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Sample records for membrane sodium transport

  1. Membrane potential and conductance during transport of sodium, potassium and rubidium in frog muscle.

    PubMed

    Adrian, R H; Slayman, C L

    1966-06-01

    explained on the basis of a fall of the potassium or rubidium concentration in a region of the extracellular space immediately external to the membrane. It is argued that certain characteristics of the hyperpolarization make it difficult to explain the hyperpolarization on this basis alone, though some part of it may be due to extracellular depletion of either potassium or rubidium.The main conclusion is that the sodium pump is capable of transferring electric charge across the membrane in which it is operating, but that, in a given time, the net charge transferred is less than the charge on the sodium ions that the pump has transported, by an amount that corresponds to the charge on the potassium or rubidium ions chemically transported by the pump.

  2. Allosteric Mechanisms of Molecular Machines at the Membrane: Transport by Sodium-Coupled Symporters.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Michael V; Cuendet, Michel A; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2016-06-08

    Solute transport across cell membranes is ubiquitous in biology as an essential physiological process. Secondary active transporters couple the unfavorable process of solute transport against its concentration gradient to the energetically favorable transport of one or several ions. The study of such transporters over several decades indicates that their function involves complex allosteric mechanisms that are progressively being revealed in atomistic detail. We focus on two well-characterized sodium-coupled symporters: the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is the prototype for the "gated pore" mechanism in the mammalian synaptic monoamine transporters, and the archaeal GltPh, which is the prototype for the "elevator" mechanism in the mammalian excitatory amino acid transporters. We present the evidence for the role of allostery in the context of a quantitative formalism that can reconcile biochemical and biophysical data and thereby connects directly to recent insights into the molecular structure and dynamics of these proteins. We demonstrate that, while the structures and mechanisms of these transporters are very different, the available data suggest a common role of specific models of allostery in their functions. We argue that such allosteric mechanisms appear essential not only for sodium-coupled symport in general but also for the function of other types of molecular machines in the membrane.

  3. Aldosterone induction of electrogenic sodium transport in the apical membrane vesicles of rat distal colon

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, V.M.; Kashgarian, M.; Binder, H.J. )

    1989-11-05

    Na-H exchange is present in apical membrane vesicles (AMV) isolated from distal colon of normal rats. Because in intact tissue aldosterone both induces amiloride-sensitive electrogenic sodium transport and inhibits electroneutral sodium absorption, these studies with AMV were designed to establish the effect of aldosterone on sodium transport. An outward-directed proton gradient stimulated 22Na uptake in AMV isolated from distal colon of normal and dietary sodium depleted (with elevated aldosterone levels) experimental rats. Unlike normal AMV, proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in experimental AMV was inhibited when uptake was measured under voltage-clamped conditions. 10 microM amiloride inhibited the initial rate of proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in AMV of normal and experimental rats by 30 and 75%, respectively. In contrast, 1 mM amiloride produced comparable inhibition (90 and 80%) of 22Na uptake in normal and experimental AMV. Intravesicular-negative potential stimulated 22Na uptake in experimental but not in normal AMV. This increase was inhibited by 90% by 10 microM amiloride. An analogue of amiloride, 5-(N-ethylisopropyl) amiloride (1 microM), a potent inhibitor of electroneutral Na-H exchange in AMV of normal rat distal colon, did not alter potassium diffusion potential-dependent 22Na uptake. Increasing sodium concentration saturated proton gradient-dependent 22Na uptake in normal AMV. However, in experimental AMV, 22Na uptake stimulated by both proton gradient and potassium diffusion potential did not saturate as a function of increasing sodium concentration. We conclude from these results that an electrically sensitive conductive channel, not electroneutral Na-H exchange, mediates 22Na uptake in AMV isolated from the distal colon of aldosterone rats.

  4. Analysis of Porphyra membrane transporters demonstrates gene transfer among photosynthetic eukaryotes and numerous sodium-coupled transport systems.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Zäuner, Simone; Wheeler, Glen; Grossman, Arthur R; Prochnik, Simon E; Blouin, Nicolas A; Zhuang, Yunyun; Benning, Christoph; Berg, Gry Mine; Yarish, Charles; Eriksen, Renée L; Klein, Anita S; Lin, Senjie; Levine, Ira; Brawley, Susan H; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Membrane transporters play a central role in many cellular processes that rely on the movement of ions and organic molecules between the environment and the cell, and between cellular compartments. Transporters have been well characterized in plants and green algae, but little is known about transporters or their evolutionary histories in the red algae. Here we examined 482 expressed sequence tag contigs that encode putative membrane transporters in the economically important red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta). These contigs are part of a comprehensive transcriptome dataset from Porphyra umbilicalis and Porphyra purpurea. Using phylogenomics, we identified 30 trees that support the expected monophyly of red and green algae/plants (i.e. the Plantae hypothesis) and 19 expressed sequence tag contigs that show evidence of endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer involving stramenopiles. The majority (77%) of analyzed contigs encode transporters with unresolved phylogenies, demonstrating the difficulty in resolving the evolutionary history of genes. We observed molecular features of many sodium-coupled transport systems in marine algae, and the potential for coregulation of Porphyra transporter genes that are associated with fatty acid biosynthesis and intracellular lipid trafficking. Although both the tissue-specific and subcellular locations of the encoded proteins require further investigation, our study provides red algal gene candidates associated with transport functions and novel insights into the biology and evolution of these transporters.

  5. Effects of cell volume changes on membrane ionic permeabilities and sodium transport in frog skin (Rana ridibunda).

    PubMed Central

    Costa, P M; Fernandes, P L; Ferreira, H G; Ferreira, K T; Giraldez, F

    1987-01-01

    dilution of the serosal bath. Cells repolarized when exposed to low-osmolality solutions after being in the absence of serosal chloride or sodium. The repolarization ran in parallel with the restoration of the short-circuit current and the potassium selectivity of the serosal membrane. 6. The results show that the effects produced by the removal of sodium or chloride ions from the serosal bathing solution are most probably mediated by a reduction in cell volume. Cell volume changes would lead to changes in the serosal membrane selectivity to potassium and thus to changes in cell membrane potential and sodium transport.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2451735

  6. Plant nutrition 1: membrane transport and energetics, potassium nutrition, and sodium toxicity.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    In this first of three lessons spanning the topic of Plant Nutrition, we examine primarily the energetics and mechanisms of nutrient uptake and transport. These processes are particularly well illustrated by an examination of the essential nutrient potassium (K), and the closely related element sodium (Na). We also examine the challenges associated with providing plants with sufficient K to support vigorous growth, and the detrimental effects of sodium accumulation in soils. Finally, we examine efforts to improve the salinity tolerance of crop plants.

  7. Reconstitution of the renal brush-border membrane sodium/phosphate co-transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Vachon, V; Delisle, M C; Laprade, R; Béliveau, R

    1991-01-01

    A simple and rapid procedure was developed for the reconstitution of Na(+)-dependent phosphate-transport activity from bovine kidney brush-border membranes. The phosphate transporter appears to be particularly sensitive to extraction conditions. To prevent its inactivation, the phosphate carrier was solubilized in a buffer containing its substrates, Na+ and phosphate, CHAPS, dithiothreitol, brush-border membrane lipids and glycerol. The uptake of phosphate by reconstituted vesicles was strongly stimulated by the presence of a transmembrane Na+ gradient. This stimulation was abolished when the Na+ gradient was dissipated by monensin. The affinity of the carrier for phosphate was similar in proteoliposomes and in brush-border membrane vesicles (apparent Kt = 40 microM). The transporter was also stimulated by the presence of a high concentration of phosphate on the trans side of the membrane. The reconstituted transport activity was inhibited by arsenate, a known inhibitor of phosphate transport. However, the bovine phosphate carrier, intact or reconstituted, was much less sensitive to inhibition by phosphonoformic and phosphonoacetic acids than were those of other species studied so far. SDS/PAGE revealed that only a small number of brush-border membrane proteins were incorporated into the proteoliposomes. This reconstitution procedure should be useful for the purification and identification of the carrier protein. Images Fig. 5. PMID:1832858

  8. Indirect coupling of urate and p-aminohippurate transport to sodium in human brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Roch-Ramel, F; Guisan, B; Schild, L

    1996-01-01

    [14C]urate and p-[14C]aminohippurate (PAH) uptake by human brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were measured in the presence of an inwardly oriented sodium gradient. No direct sodium cotransport was observed. Indirect [14C]urate coupling to sodium transport was demonstrated by cis-stimulation of [14C]urate with nicotinate or pyrazinoate (PZA) in the extravesicular medium but not by adding lactate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or beta-hydroxybutyrate. Indirect sodium coupling of [14C]PAH uptake was observed only when alpha-ketoglutarate was added to the extravesicular medium, a mechanism similar to that of basolateral membranes. The ability for PZA (and nicotinate) to cis-stimulate urate uptake was correlated with a high apparent affinity for the urate/anion exchanger. In urate-loaded vesicles, for identical medium concentrations, [14C]PZA uptake via the urateanion exchanger was 10 times higher than [14C]lactate uptake. Such high PZA affinity for the urate exchanger, working in parallel with PZA sodium cotransport can account for the stimulation of urate reabsorption by PZA in vivo.

  9. Membrane Na+-pyrophosphatases can transport protons at low sodium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Heidi H; Nordbo, Erika; Baykov, Alexander A; Lahti, Reijo; Malinen, Anssi M

    2013-12-06

    Membrane-bound Na(+)-pyrophosphatase (Na(+)-PPase), working in parallel with the corresponding ATP-energized pumps, catalyzes active Na(+) transport in bacteria and archaea. Each ~75-kDa subunit of homodimeric Na(+)-PPase forms an unusual funnel-like structure with a catalytic site in the cytoplasmic part and a hydrophilic gated channel in the membrane. Here, we show that at subphysiological Na(+) concentrations (<5 mM), the Na(+)-PPases of Chlorobium limicola, four other bacteria, and one archaeon additionally exhibit an H(+)-pumping activity in inverted membrane vesicles prepared from recombinant Escherichia coli strains. H(+) accumulation in vesicles was measured with fluorescent pH indicators. At pH 6.2-8.2, H(+) transport activity was high at 0.1 mM Na(+) but decreased progressively with increasing Na(+) concentrations until virtually disappearing at 5 mM Na(+). In contrast, (22)Na(+) transport activity changed little over a Na(+) concentration range of 0.05-10 mM. Conservative substitutions of gate Glu(242) and nearby Ser(243) and Asn(677) residues reduced the catalytic and transport functions of the enzyme but did not affect the Na(+) dependence of H(+) transport, whereas a Lys(681) substitution abolished H(+) (but not Na(+)) transport. All four substitutions markedly decreased PPase affinity for the activating Na(+) ion. These results are interpreted in terms of a model that assumes the presence of two Na(+)-binding sites in the channel: one associated with the gate and controlling all enzyme activities and the other located at a distance and controlling only H(+) transport activity. The inherent H(+) transport activity of Na(+)-PPase provides a rationale for its easy evolution toward specific H(+) transport.

  10. L-Carnitine transport in human placental brush-border membranes is mediated by the sodium-dependent organic cation transporter OCTN2.

    PubMed

    Lahjouji, Karim; Elimrani, Ihsan; Lafond, Julie; Leduc, Line; Qureshi, Ijaz A; Mitchell, Grant A

    2004-08-01

    Maternofetal transport of l-carnitine, a molecule that shuttles long-chain fatty acids to the mitochondria for oxidation, is thought to be important in preparing the fetus for its lipid-rich postnatal milk diet. Using brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from human term placentas, we showed that l-carnitine uptake was sodium and temperature dependent, showed high affinity for carnitine (apparent K(m) = 11.09 +/- 1.32 microM; V(max) = 41.75 +/- 0.94 pmol.mg protein(-1).min(-1)), and was unchanged over the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. l-Carnitine uptake was inhibited in BBM vesicles by valproate, verapamil, tetraethylammonium, and pyrilamine and by structural analogs of l-carnitine, including d-carnitine, acetyl-d,l-carnitine, and propionyl-, butyryl-, octanoyl-, isovaleryl-, and palmitoyl-l-carnitine. Western blot analysis revealed that OCTN2, a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent carnitine transporter, was present in placental BBM but not in isolated basal plasma membrane vesicles. The reported properties of OCTN2 resemble those observed for l-carnitine uptake in placental BBM vesicles, suggesting that OCTN2 may mediate most maternofetal carnitine transport in humans.

  11. Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

    2012-09-18

    An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

  12. Formaldehyde impairs transepithelial sodium transport

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yong; Li, Huiming; Wu, Sihui; Zhao, Runzhen; Du, Deyi; Ding, Yan; Nie, Hongguang; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Unsaturated oxidative formaldehyde is a noxious aldehyde in cigarette smoke that causes edematous acute lung injury. However, the mechanistic effects of formaldehyde on lung fluid transport are still poorly understood. We examined how formaldehyde regulates human epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in H441 and expressed in Xenopus oocytes and exposed mice in vivo. Our results showed that formaldehyde reduced mouse transalveolar fluid clearance in vivo. Formaldehyde caused a dose-dependent inhibition of amiloride-sensitive short-circuit Na+ currents in H441 monolayers and of αβγ-ENaC channel activity in oocytes. α-ENaC protein was reduced, whereas phosphorylation of the extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) increased significantly post exposure. Moreover, both α- and γ-ENaC transcripts were down-regulated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was elevated significantly by formaldehyde in addition to markedly augmented membrane permeability of oocytes. These data suggest that formaldehyde contributes to edematous acute lung injury by reducing transalveolar Na+ transport, through decreased ENaC activity and enhanced membrane depolarization, and by elevating ROS production over long-term exposure. PMID:27762337

  13. Co-overexpressing a plasma membrane and a vacuolar membrane sodium/proton antiporter significantly improves salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis gene AtNHX1 encodes a vacuolar membrane bound sodium/proton (Sodium/Hydrogen) antiporter that transports sodium into the vacuole and exports hydrogen into the cytoplasm. The Arabidopsis gene SOS1 encodes a plasma membrane bound sodium/hydrogen antiporter that exports sodium to the ex...

  14. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  15. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  16. Current-voltage relations of sodium-coupled sugar transport across the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J Y; Hudson, R L; Schultz, S G

    1986-01-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) relations of the rheogenic Na-sugar cotransport mechanism at the apical membrane of Necturus small intestine were determined from the relations between the electrical potential difference across the apical membrane, psi mc, and that across the entire epithelium, psi ms, when the latter was varied over the range +/- 200 mV, under steady conditions in the presence of galactose and after the current across the apical membrane carried by the cotransporter, ImSNa, is blocked by the addition of phloridzin to the mucosal solution. ImSNa was found to be strongly dependent upon psi mc over the range -50 mV less than psi mc less than EmSNa where EmSNa is the "zero current" or "reversal" potential. Over the range of values of psi mc encountered under physiological conditions the cotransporter may be modeled as a conductance in series with an electromotive force so that ImSNa = gmSNa (EmSNa - psi mc) where gmSNa is the contribution of this mechanism to the conductance of the apical membrane and is "near constant." In several instances ImSNa "saturated" at large hyperpolarizing or depolarizing values of psi mc. The values of EmSNa determined in the presence of 1, 5, and 15 mM galactose strongly suggest that if the Na-galactose cotransporters are kinetically homogeneous, the stoichiometry of this coupled process is unity. Finally, the shapes of the observed I-V relations are consistent with the predictions of a simple kinetic model which conforms with current notions regarding the mechanico-kinetic properties of this cotransport process.

  17. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2002-07-01

    In the present quarter, oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  18. Lifetime of Sodium Beta-Alumina Membranes in Molten Sodium Hydroxide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 1 April 2007 – 01 April 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lifetime of Sodium Beta-alumina Membranes in Molten Sodium ...ABSTRACT Summary: Sodium metal can be made by electrolysis of molten sodium hydroxide in sodium beta-alumina membrane electrolysis cells...However, there are some uncertainties about the lifetime of the sodium beta-alumina membranes in contact with molten sodium hydroxide. The main objective

  19. Angiotensin 2 directly increases rabbit renal brush-border membrane sodium transport: Presence of local signal transduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Morduchowicz, G.A.; Sheikh-Hamad, D.; Dwyer, B.E.; Stern, N.; Jo, O.D.; Yanagawa, N. )

    1991-05-01

    In the present study, the authors have examined the direct actions of angiotensin II (AII) in rabbit renal brush border membrane (BBM) where binding sites for AII exist. Addition of AII (10(-11)-10(-7) M) was found to stimulate 22Na+ uptake by the isolated BBM vesicles directly. All did not affect the Na(+)-dependent BBM glucose uptake, and the effect of AII on BBM 22Na+ uptake was inhibited by amiloride, suggesting the involvement of Na+/H+ exchange mechanism. BBM proton permeability as assessed by acridine orange quenching was not affected by AII, indicating the direct effect of AII on Na+/H+ antiport system. In search of the signal transduction mechanism, it was found that AII activated BBM phospholipase A2 (PLA) and that BBM contains a 42-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G-protein) that underwent pertussis toxin (PTX)-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Addition of GTP potentiated, while GDP-beta S or PTX abolished, the effects of AII on BBM PLA and 22Na+ uptake, suggesting the involvement of G-protein in AII's actions. On the other hand, inhibition of PLA by mepacrine prevented AII's effect on BBM 22Na+ uptake, and activation of PLA by mellitin or addition of arachidonic acid similarly enhanced BBM 22Na+ uptake, suggesting the role of PLA activation in mediating AII's effect on BBM 22Na+ uptake. In summary, results of the present study show a direct stimulatory effect of AII on BBM Na+/H+ antiport system, and suggest the presence of a local signal transduction system involving G-protein mediated PLA activation.

  20. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-12-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  5. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The activities during the fourth semi-annual period of the MTP project have involved the completion of the Science Concept Review (SCR) presentation and peer review, continuation of analyses for the mass transfer coefficients measured from MTA experiment data, and development of the second generation (MTP-II) instrument. The SCR panel members were generated several recommendations for the MTP project recommendations are : Table 1 Summary of Primary SCR Panel Recommendations (1) Continue and refine development of mass transfer coefficient analyses (2) Refine and upgrade analytical modeling associated with the MTP experiment. (3) Increase resolution of measurements in proximity of the membrane interface. (4) Shift emphasis to measurement of coupled transport effects (i.e., development of MTP phase II experiment concept).

  6. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C. It was found that space group of R3c yielded a better refinement than a cubic structure of Pm3m. Oxygen occupancy was nearly 3 in the region from room temperature to 700 C, above which the occupancy decreased due to oxygen loss. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. The X-Ray data and fracture mechanisms points to non-equilibrium decomposition of the LSFCO OTM membrane. The non-equilibrium conditions could probably be due to the nature of the applied stress field (stressing rates) and leads to transition in crystal structures and increased kinetics of decomposition. The formations of a Brownmillerite or Sr2Fe2O5 type structures, which are orthorhombic are attributed to the ordering of oxygen vacancies. The cubic to orthorhombic transitions leads to 2.6% increase in strains and thus residual stresses generated could influence the fracture behavior of the OTM membrane. Continued investigations on the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase-separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials were carried out. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previously characterization, stoichiometry and conductivity measurements for samples of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were reported. In this report

  7. Polarity and membrane transport in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Baron, R

    1989-01-01

    The osteoclast is a highly polarized non-epithelial cell. The apical pole of the cell is determined by the cell's attachment to the extracellular matrix. This attachment forms the sealing zone, delimiting the subosteoclastic bone resorbing compartment. The apical membrane of the cell forms the ruffled-border, which contains some specific membrane proteins and a proton pump ATPase, which acidifies the apical compartment. Newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes are vectorially transported into this apical compartment bound to mannose-6-phosphate receptors. The basolateral membrane is highly enriched in sodium pumps with beta and alpha 1 subunits. Associated with the acidification process is the carbonic anhydrase found in the cytoplasm and membrane-associated and a bicarbonate-chloride exchanger in the membrane.2 These features put the osteoclast in the same functional category as the kidney tubule intercalated cell and the gastric oxyntic cell, both of epithelial origin, which secrete acid in a polarized fashion.

  8. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-05-01

    been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  10. Influence of sodium concentration on changes of membrane capacitance associated with the electrogenic ion transport by the Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V S; Stukolov, S M; Darmostuk, A S; Apell, H J

    1998-01-01

    Electrogenic ion transport by the Na,K-ATPase was investigated in a model system of protein-containing membrane fragments adsorbed to a lipid bilayer. Transient Na+ currents were induced by photorelease of ATP from inactive caged ATP. This process was accompanied by a capacitance change of the membrane system. Two methods were applied to measure capacitances in the frequency range 1 to 6000 Hz. The frequency dependent capacitance increment, delta C, was of sigmoidal shape and decreased at high frequencies. The midpoint frequency, f0, depended on the ionic strength of the buffer. At 150 mM NaCl f0 was about 200 Hz and decreased to 12 Hz at high ionic strength (1 M). At low frequencies (f < f0) the capacitance increment became frequency independent. It was, however, dependent on Na+ concentration and on the membrane potential which was generated by the charge transferred. A simple model is presented to analyze the experimental data quantitatively as a function of two parameters, the capacitance of the adsorbed membrane fragments, Cp, and the potential of maximum capacitance increment, psi 0. Below 5 mM Na+ a negative capacitance change was detected which may be assigned to electrogenic Na+ binding to cytoplasmic sites. It could be shown that the results obtained by experiments with the presented alternating current method contain the information which is determined by current-relaxation experiments with cell membranes.

  11. [The sodium-potassium-chloride cotransport of the cell membrane].

    PubMed

    Urazaev, A Kh

    1998-01-01

    Discovery and active exploration of the furosemid-sensitive derived-active co-transport of sodium-potassium-chlorine ions took place in the end of 1970-es-1980-es. This transportation mechanism was discovered in various types of cells, both of plant and of animal origin. This review describes properties of the transportation process, which was most comprehensive explored in experiments with erythrocytes, epithelium cells and muscles. The review covers the following properties: anion and cation selectivity of the chlorine transportation, its sensitivity to the specific blocking agents (furocemid, bumetanid, etc.), stoichiometry of the transportation process, etc. For energy source, the chlorine transportation is based on transmembrane electrochemical gradient for sodium ions. The article provides the most recent results of investigation of the chemical nature of the molecule of the chlorine membrane transport. Based on various studies, the molecule of this protein weighs from 120 to 200 kD, includes about 1200 amino acid residua, and forms long cytoplasmatic NH2 and COOH-termini. The gene encoding the amino acid sequence has been cloned. The article discusses the issues of regulation of the chlorine transportation. Humoral control of intensity of the chlorine transportation has been mostly studied in experiments with plain muscles, the issues related to nervous regulation--with only skeleton muscle fibers. The article provides specific data on the mechanisms of the above types of the physiological regulation of active chlorine transportation. In general, the humoral factors, which increase the intracellular concentration of cAMF stimulate chlorine transportation. On the contrary, the hormones, which increase concentration of cGMF in cytoplasm reduce its activity in plain muscles. The discussion of the mechanisms of the nervous controls of the chlorine transportation in the skeleton muscles includes the original results of the author. These results indicate that the

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  13. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOEpatents

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  14. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1996-01-01

    The development of the seal between the membrane and the Fluid Optical Cells (FOC) has been a high priority activity. This seal occurs at an interface in the instrument where three key functions must be realized: (1) physical membrane support, (2) fluid sealing, and (3) unobscured optical transmission.

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  16. Respiration and sodium transport in rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, S U; Eaton, D C

    1982-07-28

    Respiration of rabbit urinary bladder was measured in free-floating pieces and in short-circuited pieces mounted in an Ussing chamber. Ouabain, amiloride, and potassium-free saline inhibited respiration approx. 20%; sodium-free saline depressed respiration approx. 40-50%. The coupling ratio between respiration and transport in short-circuited tissues was about two sodium ions per molecule O2. Chloride-free saline depressed mean oxygen consumption 21% in free-floating tissue pieces; 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) and furosemide had no effect. The effect of chloride-free saline in short-circuited tissues was variable; in tissues with low transport rates, respiration was stimulated about 21% while in tissue with high transport rates respiration was reduced about 24%. Nystatin and monensin, both of which markedly increase the conductance of cell membranes with a concomitant increase in sodium entry, stimulated respiration. These data indicate that 50-60% of the total oxygen consumption is not influenced by sodium, 20-25% is linked to (Na+ +K+)-ATPase transport, while the remaining 25-30% is sodium-dependent but not ouabain-inhibitable.

  17. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the current research, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature in air. Based on these measurements, the charge carrier concentration, net acceptor dopant concentration, activation energy of conduction and mobility were estimated. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature have been completed and reported previously. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affects the mechanical properties. To study the effect of temperature on the membranes when exposed to an inert environment, the membranes (LAFT and Dual phase) were heat treated at 1000 C in air and N{sub 2} atmosphere and hardness and fracture toughness of the membranes were studied after the treatment. The indentation method was used to find the fracture toughness and the effect of the heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the membranes. Further results on the investigation of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appears to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model will serve to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  18. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2006-05-01

    In this quarter a systematic analysis on the decomposition behavior of the OTM membranes at air and nitrogen were initiated to understand the structural and stoichiometric changes associated with elevated temperatures. Evaluation of the flexural strengths using 4-point bend test was also started for the dual phase membranes. Initial results on the synthesis of dual phase composite materials have been obtained. The measurements have focused on the compatibility of mixed conductors with the pure ionic conductors yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinium doped ceria (GDC). The initial results obtained for three different mixed conductors suggest that (GDC) is the better choice. A new membrane permeation system has been designed and tested and sintering studies of biphasic systems are in progress.

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  20. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2016-11-15

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  1. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2014-08-05

    A method of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. In the porous fuel oxidation layer and the optional porous surface exchange layer, A is Calcium and in the dense separation layer A is not Calcium and, preferably is Strontium. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Ca.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation and optional porous surface exchange layers and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer. The use of such materials allows the membrane to sintered in air and without the use of pore formers to reduce membrane manufacturing costs. The use of materials, as described herein, for forming the porous layers have application for forming any type of porous structure, such as a catalyst support.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  3. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit

    PubMed Central

    Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2010-01-01

    Although biochemical studies suggested a high permeability of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for small molecules, proteomics identified few specialized ER transporters. To test functionality of transporters during ER passage, we tested whether glucose transporters (GLUTs, SGLTs) destined for the plasma membrane are active during ER transit. HepG2 cells were characterized by low-affinity ER transport activity, suggesting that ER uptake is protein mediated. The much-reduced capacity of HEK293T cells to take up glucose across the plasma membrane correlated with low ER transport. Ectopic expression of GLUT1, -2, -4, or -9 induced GLUT isoform-specific ER transport activity in HEK293T cells. In contrast, the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 mediated efficient plasma membrane glucose transport but no detectable ER uptake, probably because of lack of a sufficient sodium gradient across the ER membrane. In conclusion, we demonstrate that GLUTs are sufficient for mediating ER glucose transport en route to the plasma membrane. Because of the low volume of the ER, trace amounts of these uniporters contribute to ER solute import during ER transit, while uniporters and cation-coupled transporters carry out export from the ER, together potentially explaining the low selectivity of ER transport. Expression levels and residence time of transporters in the ER, as well as their coupling mechanisms, could be key determinants of ER permeability.—Takanaga, H., Frommer, W. B. Facilitative plasma membrane transporters function during ER transit. PMID:20354141

  4. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

  6. Composite oxygen transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zigui; Plonczak, Pawel J.; Lane, Jonathan A.

    2016-11-08

    A method is described of producing a composite oxygen ion membrane and a composite oxygen ion membrane in which a porous fuel oxidation layer and a dense separation layer and optionally, a porous surface exchange layer are formed on a porous support from mixtures of (Ln.sub.1-xA.sub.x).sub.wCr.sub.1-yB.sub.yO.sub.3-.delta. and a doped zirconia. Preferred materials are (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.7Fe.sub.0.3O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous fuel oxidation layer, (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.5Fe.sub.0.5O.sub.3-.delta. for the dense separation layer, and (La.sub.0.8Sr.sub.0.2).sub.0.95Cr.sub.0.3Fe.sub.0.7O.sub.3-.delta. for the porous surface exchange layer. Firing the said fuel activation and separation layers in nitrogen atmosphere unexpectedly allows the separation layer to sinter into a fully densified mass.

  7. Membranes, mechanics, and intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2012-10-01

    Cellular membranes are remarkable materials -- self-assembled, flexible, two-dimensional fluids. Understanding how proteins manipulate membrane curvature is crucial to understanding the transport of cargo in cells, yet the mechanical activities of trafficking proteins remain poorly understood. Using an optical-trap based assay involving dynamic deformation of biomimetic membranes, we have examined the behavior of Sar1, a key component of the COPII family of transport proteins. We find that Sar1 from yeast (S. cerevisiae) lowers membrane rigidity by up to 100% as a function of its concentration, thereby lowering the energetic cost of membrane deformation. Human Sar1 proteins can also lower the mechanical rigidity of the membranes to which they bind. However, unlike the yeast proteins, the rigidity is not a monotonically decreasing function of concentration but rather shows increased rigidity and decreased mobility at high concentrations that implies interactions between proteins. In addition to describing this study of membrane mechanics, I'll also discuss some topics relevant to a range of biophysical investigations, such as the insights provided by imaging methods and open questions in the dynamics of multicellular systems.

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  10. Highly Stable Sodium Batteries Enabled by Functional Ionic Polymer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Choudhury, Snehashis; Xu, Jun; Nath, Pooja; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2017-01-23

    A sodium metal anode protected by an ion-rich polymeric membrane exhibits enhanced stability and high-Columbic efficiency cycling. Formed in situ via electropolymerization of functional imidazolium-type ionic liquid monomers, the polymer membrane protects the metal against parasitic reactions with electrolyte and, for fundamental reasons, inhibits dendrite formation and growth. The effectiveness of the membrane is demonstrated using direct visualization of sodium electrodeposition.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; W.B. Yelon; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and initial studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were loaded to fracture at varying stress rates. Studies were done at room temperature in air and at 1000 C in a specified environment to evaluate slow crack growth behavior. In addition, studies were also begun to obtain reliable estimates of fracture toughness and stable crack growth in specific environments. Newer composition of Ti doped LSF membranes were characterized by neutron diffraction analysis. Quench studies indicated an apparent correlation between the unit cell volume and oxygen occupancy. The studies however, indicated an anomaly of increasing Fe/Ti ratio with change in heat treatment. Ti doped LSF was also characterized for stoichiometry as a function of temp and pO{sub 2}. The non stoichiometry parameter {delta} was observed to increase almost linearly on lowering pO{sub 2} until a ideal stoichiometric composition of {delta} = 0.175 was approached.

  12. Modulation of glucose transporters in rat diaphragm by sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Girón, M D; Caballero, J J; Vargas, A M; Suárez, M D; Guinovart, J J; Salto, R

    2003-05-08

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. We examined the effects of 6 weeks of oral administration of tungstate on glucose transporters (GLUT) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat diaphragm. Diabetes decreased GLUT4 expression while tungstate treatment normalized not only GLUT4 protein but also GLUT4 mRNA in the diabetic rats. Furthermore, treatment increased GLUT4 protein in plasma and internal membranes, suggesting a stimulation of its translocation to the plasma membrane. Tungstate had no effect on healthy animals. There were no differences in the total amount of GLUT1 transporter in any group. We conclude that the normoglycemic effect of tungstate may be partly due to a normalization of the levels and subcellular localization of GLUT4, which should result in an increase in muscle glucose uptake.

  13. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability of luminal membrane vesicles from toad bladder. Studies using a fast-reaction apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, H.S. Jr.; Al-Awqati, Q.

    1983-05-01

    Regulation of the sodium permeability of the luminal membrane is the major mechanism by which the net rate of sodium transport across tight epithelia is varied. Previous evidence has suggested that the permeability of the luminal membrane might be regulated by changes in intracellular sodium or calcium activities. To test this directly, we isolated a fraction of the plasma membrane from the toad urinary bladder, which contains a fast, amiloride-sensitive sodium flux with characteristics similar to those of the native luminal membrane. Using a flow-quench apparatus to measure the initial rate of sodium efflux from these vesicles in the millisecond time range, we have demonstrated that the isotope exchange permeability of these vesicles is very sensitive to calcium. Calcium reduces the sodium permeability, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration is 0.5 microM, well within the range of calcium activity found in cells. Also, the permeability of the luminal membrane vesicles is little affected by the ambient sodium concentration. These results, when taken together with studies on whole tissue, suggest that cell calcium may be an important regulator of transepithelial sodium transport by its effect on luminal sodium permeability. The effect of cell sodium on permeability may be mediated by calcium rather than by sodium itself.

  14. Modulating molecular and nanoparticle transport in flexible polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kexin; Graham, Chase L.; Wolff, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The ability to fabricate flexible filtration membranes that can selectively separate particles of different sizes is of considerable interest. In this article, we describe a facile, reproducible and simple one-step method to produce pores in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes. We embedded micron-sized NaHCO3 particles in 50 micron thick PDMS films. After curing, the membranes were immersed in concentrated HCl acid. Pores were generated in the membrane by the evolution of CO2 gas from the reaction of NaHCO3 and HCl. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscope images clearly reveal the presence of openings on the surface and the cross-section of the membranes. Fluorescence and back-scattered electron imaging of porous PDMS membrane with embedded gold nanoparticles and comparison with non-porous PDMS membranes provided unambiguous evidence of pores in the membrane. Transport studies of molecular fluoresceinate ions, ions (sodium and chloride) and 240 nm polystyrene nanoparticles through these membranes demonstrate passable pores and existence of channels within the body of the membrane. Mechanically stretching the porous PDMS membrane and comparing the flow rates of fluoresceinate ions and the polystyrene beads through the stretched and unstretched membranes allowed a direct proof of the modulation of transport rate in the membranes. We show that stretching the membranes by 10% increases the flow rate of fluorescein molecules by 2.8 times and by a factor of approximately ~40% for the polystyrene nanoparticles. PMID:22942529

  15. [Sodium ion transportation system and its possible mechanisms in bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Fu; Zhao, Bai-Suo; Yang, Su-Sheng

    2007-12-01

    Sodium ion with high concentration is toxic to living cells, and microorganisms adapt to the environment containing high concentration of salt by the strategies of salt-in-cytoplasm and compatible solutes. The Na+ extrusion system plays important roles in maintaining cytoplasmic Na+ homeostasis and pH level in microbial cells. Two possible mechanisms of Na+ circulation across the cytoplasmic membrane have been proposed, namely primary Na+ pump and secondary Na+/H+ antiporter. Primary sodium pumps coupled the extrusion of Na+ to respiration, and the activity of which was insensitive to uncoupler CCCP ( carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone). There were two types of secondary Na+/H+ antiporters-encoding genes designated single gene and multiple subunits, respectively. The types of transportation systems for Na+, possible mechanisms of Na+ extrusion, and projects for further study in bacteria are reviewed.

  16. Membrane transporters in drug development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters can be major determinants of the pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy profiles of drugs. This presents several key questions for drug development, including which transporters are clinically important in drug absorption and disposition, and which in vitro methods are suitable for studying drug interactions with these transporters. In addition, what criteria should trigger follow-up clinical studies, and which clinical studies should be conducted if needed. In this article, we provide the recommendations of the International Transporter Consortium on these issues, and present decision trees that are intended to help guide clinical studies on the currently recognized most important drug transporter interactions. The recommendations are generally intended to support clinical development and filing of a new drug application. Overall, it is advised that the timing of transporter investigations should be driven by efficacy, safety and clinical trial enrolment questions (for example, exclusion and inclusion criteria), as well as a need for further understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of the drug molecule, and information required for drug labeling. PMID:20190787

  17. Electrophysiological characterization of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Grewer, Christof; Gameiro, Armanda; Mager, Thomas; Fendler, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Active transport in biological membranes has been traditionally studied using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques, including electrophysiology. This review focuses on aspects of electrophysiological methods that make them particularly suited for the investigation of transporter function. Two major approaches to electrical recording of transporter activity are discussed: (a) artificial planar lipid membranes, such as the black lipid membrane and solid supported membrane, which are useful for studies on bacterial transporters and transporters of intracellular compartments, and (b) patch clamp and voltage clamp techniques, which investigate transporters in native cellular membranes. The analytical power of these methods is highlighted by several examples of mechanistic studies of specific membrane proteins, including cytochrome c oxidase, NhaA Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, ClC-7 H(+)/Cl(-) exchanger, glutamate transporters, and neutral amino acid transporters. These examples reveal the wealth of mechanistic information that can be obtained when electrophysiological methods are used in combination with rapid perturbation approaches.

  18. Urea transport through composite polyallylamine membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Kubo, L. Y.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.; Clark, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Polyallylamine composite reverse osmosis membranes were prepared by plasma polymerization and deposition onto small-pored cellulose acetate/cellulose nitrate films. The polyallylamine coated the porous substrate with a thin uniform polymer film which exhibited water permeability and urea rejection, of interest because of the potential application of reverse osmosis to urine purification in closed environmental systems. The flux of C-14 labeled urea was studied under the influence of osmotic gradients provided by sodium chloride solutions. The urea flux was found to be enhanced by an osmotic pressure gradient in the same direction and diminished, but not prevented, by an opposing osmotic pressure gradient. Consideration is given to the mechanism of the urea transport, as well as to the influence of concentration polarization on the experimental results. The minimization of coupled flow in pores of a critical size range is apparently necessary to improve urea rejection.

  19. Ionic requirements of proximal tubular sodium transport. II. Hydrogen ion.

    PubMed

    Green, R; Giebisch, G

    1975-11-01

    Simultaneous perfusion to proximal convoluted tubules and peritubular capillaries was used to study the effects of different perfusion fluids on sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion, which was calculated as bicarbonate reabsorption and titratable acid. Results show that sodium reabsorption was not tightly coupled to hydrogen secretion. Bicarbonate stimulates both sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion, but Tris stimulates only sodium reabsorption. Imposing an adverse chloride gradient across the proximal tubule (C1- peritubular greater than C1- luminal) decreased sodium reabsorption but did not diminish hydrogen secretion. Diamox inhibited both net sodium and hydrogen transport. It is concluded that there is not firm linkage between sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion and that bicarbonate probably stimulates sodium transport by a number of mechanisms, including an effect on the sodium transport unrelated to its ability to increase hydrogen ion secretion.

  20. The plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger and its role in physiological and pathophysiological processes.

    PubMed

    Mahnensmith, R L; Aronson, P S

    1985-06-01

    The plasma membranes of most if not all vertebrate cells contain a transport system that mediates the transmembrane exchange of sodium for hydrogen. The kinetic properties of this transport system include a 1:1 stoichiometry, affinity for lithium and ammonium ion in addition to sodium and hydrogen, the ability to function in multiple 1:1 exchange modes involving these four cations, sensitivity to inhibition by amiloride and its analogues, and allosteric regulation by intracellular protons. The plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchanger plays a physiological role in the regulation of intracellular pH, the control of cell growth and proliferation, stimulus-response coupling in white cells and platelets, the metabolic response to hormones such as insulin and glucocorticoids, the regulation of cell volume, and the transepithelial absorption and secretion of sodium, hydrogen, bicarbonate and chloride ions, and organic anions. Preliminary evidence raises the possibility that the sodium-hydrogen exchanger may play a pathophysiological role in such diverse conditions as renal acid-base disorders, essential hypertension, cancer, and tissue or organ hypertrophy. Thus, future research on cellular acid-base homeostasis in general, and on plasma membrane sodium-hydrogen exchange in particular, will enhance our understanding of a great variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes.

  1. Pyrithione and 8-hydroxyquinolines transport lead across erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Stuart E; Park, Jong Sung; Drexler, John W

    2009-09-01

    Acute and chronic lead poisoning remains a significant health problem. Although chelating agents can bind to plasma lead, they cannot cross cell membranes where the total body lead burden resides, and are thus inefficient at reducing the total body lead burden. Recently, calcium and sodium ionophores have been shown to transport lead across cell membranes providing a novel method for reducing total body lead stores. We recently found that clioquinol, an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative, can act as a zinc ionophore. We postulated that zinc ionophores might also be able to transport lead across biological membranes. To study this, we loaded lead in vitro into human erythrocytes and then studied the ability of zinc ionophores to transport lead into the extracellular space, where it was trapped with a lead chelator. Using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), we found that several 8-hydroxyquinoline derivatives, as well as the zinc and sodium salts of pyrithione (N-hydroxypyridine-2-thione), reduced erythrocyte lead content. The water-soluble compound, sodium pyrithione, was able to reduce lead in citrated whole blood, without partitioning into the erythrocytes. These results indicate that two classes of zinc ionophores can transport lead across a biological membrane, and they confirm that these ionophores are not cation-specific. Lead ionophores may prove useful in mobilizing lead into the extracellular space, thereby improving the efficacy of chelation therapy, in vivo or ex vivo.

  2. Iontophoretic Transport Across a Multiple Membrane System

    PubMed Central

    MOLOKHIA, SARAH A.; ZHANG, YANHUI; HIGUCHI, WILLIAM I.; LI, S. KEVIN

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the iontophoretic transport behavior across multiple membranes of different barrier properties. Spectra/Por® (SP) and Ionac membranes were the synthetic membranes and sclera was the biomembrane in this model study. The barrier properties of SP membranes were determined individually in passive and iontophoresis transport experiments with tetraethylammonium ion (TEA), chloride ion (Cl), and mannitol as the model permeants. Passive and iontophoretic transport experiments were then conducted with an assembly of SP membranes. The contribution of electroosmosis to iontophoresis was assessed using the mannitol data. Model analysis was performed to study the contribution of diffusion and electromigration to electrotransport across the multiple membrane system. The effects of membrane barrier thickness upon ion-exchange membrane-enhanced iontophoresis were examined with Ionac, SP, and sclera. The present study shows that iontophoretic transport of TEA across the membrane system was related to the thicknesses and permeability coefficients of the membranes and the electromobilities of the permeant across the individual membranes in the assembly. Model analysis suggests significant contribution of diffusion within the membranes across the membrane system, and this mechanism is relatively independent of the current density applied across the system in iontophoresis dominant transport. PMID:17990310

  3. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Lane, Jonathan A.; Wilson, Jamie R.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Petigny, Nathalie; Sarantopoulos, Christos

    2017-02-07

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a microstructure exhibiting substantially uniform pore size distribution as a result of using PMMA pore forming materials or a bi-modal particle size distribution of the porous support layer materials. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  4. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    DOEpatents

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  5. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, Francisco; Rojas, Eduardo; Taylor, Robert E.

    1970-01-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 μsec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential. 2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential. 3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current—voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939). 4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin—Huxley equations. 5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential. PMID:5505231

  6. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential.

    PubMed

    Bezanilla, F; Rojas, E; Taylor, R E

    1970-12-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 musec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential.2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential.3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current-voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939).4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations.5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential.

  7. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  8. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  9. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  10. Coupling Substrate and Ion Binding to Extracellular Gate of a Sodium-Dependent Aspartate Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Boudker,O.; Ryan, R.; Yernool, D.; Shimamoto, K.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Secondary transporters are integral membrane proteins that catalyze the movement of substrate molecules across the lipid bilayer by coupling substrate transport to one or more ion gradients, thereby providing a mechanism for the concentrative uptake of substrates. Here we describe crystallographic and thermodynamic studies of Glt{sub Ph}, a sodium (Na{sup +})-coupled aspartate transporter, defining sites for aspartate, two sodium ions and D,L-threo-{beta}-benzyloxyaspartate, an inhibitor. We further show that helical hairpin 2 is the extracellular gate that controls access of substrate and ions to the internal binding sites. At least two sodium ions bind in close proximity to the substrate and these sodium-binding sites, together with the sodium-binding sites in another sodium-coupled transporter, LeuT, define an unwound {alpha}-helix as the central element of the ion-binding motif, a motif well suited to the binding of sodium and to participation in conformational changes that accompany ion binding and unbinding during the transport cycle.

  11. Membrane transport of several ions during peritoneal dialysis: mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Galach, Magda; Waniewski, Jacek

    2012-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis utilizes a complex mass exchange device created by natural permselective membranes of the visceral and abdominal muscle tissues. In mathematical modeling of solute transport during peritoneal dialysis, each solute is typically considered as a neutral, independent particle. However, such mathematical models cannot predict transport parameters for small ions. Therefore, the impact of the electrostatic interactions between ions on the estimated transport parameters needs to be investigated. In this study, transport of sodium, chloride, and a third ion through a permselective membrane with characteristics of the peritoneal transport barrier was described using two models: a model with the Nernst-Planck (NP) equations for a set of interacting ions and a model with combined diffusive and convective transport of each ion separately (DC). Transport parameters for the NP model were calculated using the pore theory, while the parameters for the DC model were estimated by fitting the model to the predictions from the NP model. Solute concentration profiles in the membrane obtained by computer simulations based on these two models were similar, whereas the transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters and sieving coefficients) were generally different. The presence of the third ion could substantially modify the values of diffusive mass parameter for sodium and chloride ions estimated using the DC model compared with those predicted by NP. The extent of this modification depended on the molecular mass and concentration of the third ion, and the rate of volumetric flow. Closed formulas for the transport parameters of the DC model in terms of the NP model parameters, ion concentration profiles in the membrane, and volumetric flow across the membrane were derived. Their reliable approximations, which include only boundary ion concentrations instead of spatial intramembrane concentration profiles, were formulated. The precision of this approximation

  12. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  13. Ionic transport properties of template-synthesized gold nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng

    Ionic transport in nanotubes exhibits unique properties due to the strong interactions between ions and the nanotube surface. The main objective of my research is to explore and regulate the ionic transport in gold nanotube membranes. Chapter 1 overviews a versatile method of fabricating nanostructured materials, called the template synthesis. Important parameters of the template synthesis are introduced such as templates and deposition methods. The template synthesis method is used to prepare membranes used in this dissertation. Chapter 2 describes a method to increase the ionic conductivity in membranes containing gold nanotubes with small diameter (4 nm). The gold nanotube membrane is prepared by the electroless plating of gold in a commercially available polycarbonate membrane. Voltages are applied to the gold nanotube membrane and fixed charges are injected on the gold nanotube walls. We show that ionic conductivity of the gold nanotube membrane can be enhanced in aqueous potassium chloride (KCl) solution at negative applied voltages. When the most negative voltage (-0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is applied to the membrane, the ionic conductivity of the solution inside the gold nanotube (94 mS.cm-1) is comparable to that of 1 M aqueous KCl, over two orders of magnitude higher than that of the 0.01 M KCl contacting the membrane. Chapter 3 explores another important transport property of the gold nanotube membrane -- ion permselectivity. When the permselective membrane separates two electrolyte solutions at different concentrations, a membrane potential is developed and measured by the potentiometric method. Surface charge density and the ion mobilities are estimated by fitting the experimental data with a pre-existing model. The surface charge density of the gold nanotube membrane in this research is estimated to be 2 muC/cm2. Chapter 4 describes voltage-controlled ionic transport in a gold/polypyrrole membrane doped with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Polypyrrole

  14. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Transport in the Lung and Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Shlyonsky, V.; Boom, A.; Mies, F.

    2016-01-01

    Renal and lung epithelial cells are exposed to some significant concentrations of H2O2. In urine it may reach 100 μM, while in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung it is estimated to be in micromolar to tens-micromolar range. Hydrogen peroxide has a stimulatory action on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) single-channel activity. It also increases stability of the channel at the membrane and slows down the transcription of the ENaC subunits. The expression and the activity of the channel may be inhibited in some other, likely higher, oxidative states of the cell. This review discusses the role and the origin of H2O2 in the lung and kidney. Concentration-dependent effects of hydrogen peroxide on ENaC and the mechanisms of its action have been summarized. This review also describes outlooks for future investigations linking oxidative stress, epithelial sodium transport, and lung and kidney function. PMID:27073804

  16. The coupled movements of sodium and chloride across the basolateral membrane of frog skin epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, P L; Ferreira, H G; Ferreira, K T

    1989-01-01

    1. When frog skin epithelium was exposed to a chloride-free solution bathing the basolateral side of the frog skin preparation the short-circuit current fell and there was a simultaneous loss of chloride and water from its cells. This effect was partially blocked by furosemide when this drug was added to the basolateral bathing solution. 2. Under control conditions and when added to the solution bathing the basolateral side of the preparation furosemide had no effect on the ion and water contents of the frog skin epithelium. 3. Furosemide but not SITS (4-acetamide-4'-isothiocyanate-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) or amiloride blocked the recovery of short-circuit current and the reuptake of chloride and water by preparations pre-incubated with chloride-free solution on the basolateral side. The recovery of the short-circuit current was also blocked by the replacement of basolateral potassium by sodium. 4. The effect on the short-circuit current of graded replacements by impermeant ions of sodium or chloride did not show saturation for concentrations of these ions up to their control values. 5. Replacement of basolateral potassium by sodium inhibited the short-circuit current and the recovery observed when potassium was reintroduced in the basolateral bathing solution was blocked by furosemide. 6. The replacement of basolateral sodium or chloride by impermeant ions induced an immediate fall in the intracellular concentrations of both sodium and chloride suggesting that the transport system coupling the movements of the two ions across the basolateral membrane is operative under control conditions. 7. It is proposed that the coupled movements of sodium and chloride across the basolateral membrane of the frog skin epithelium are mediated by a sodium-potassium-2 chloride co-transport system which under control conditions is very near equilibrium. PMID:2607456

  17. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-11-08

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor configured using repeating assemblies of oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalytic reforming reactors.

  18. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  19. Dopamine and angiotensin type 2 receptors cooperatively inhibit sodium transport in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells, sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D(1)-like receptors (D(1)R/D(5)R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), whereas the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and, subsequently, hypertension. We show that D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT(2)R 4-fold via a D(1)R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT(2)R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT(2)R recruitment in renal proximal tubule cells with D(1)Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D(1)Rs and AT(2)Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, protein phosphatase 2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization, and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension.

  20. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release. PMID:28059145

  1. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release.

  2. Gas transport across hyperthin membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghui; Janout, Vaclav; Regen, Steven L

    2013-12-17

    The use of organic polymeric membranes to separate gaseous mixtures provides an attractive alternative to other methods such as selective adsorption and cryogenic distillation. The primary advantages of membrane-based separations are their relative energy efficiency and lower costs. Because the flux of a gas across a membrane is inversely proportional to the membrane's thickness, this method relies on fabricating membranes that are as thin as possible. However, as researchers have tried to produce "hyperthin" membranes (less than 100 nm), these membranes often form defects and lose their permeation selectivity. In this Account, we review some of the progress in our laboratories at Lehigh University to create hyperthin membranes with high permeation selectivities. We focus special attention on gaseous permeants that are relevant for the production of clean energy (H2 and CO2 formed from CH4) and the reduction of global warming (CO2 and N2, the major components of flue gas). Our studies make extensive use of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) methods and porous surfactants derived from calix[6]arenes. We specially designed each surfactant to form cohesive monolayers and multilayers, and we introduced a "gluing" technique, where we cross-link porous surfactants containing quaternary ammonium groups ionically with polymeric counterions. Using ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, monolayer isotherm, surface viscosity, and permeation measurements, we have characterized these hyperthin films. While molecular sieving appears to make a significant contribution to the permeation selectivity of some of these membranes, solution-diffusion pathways predominate. We also describe initial studies in which we formed hyperthin films from poly(ethylene glycol)-based polyelectrolytes using layer-by-layer deposition (LbL) methods. We have found remarkably high H2/CO2 and CO2/N2 permeation selectivities with these LB- and LbL-based hyperthin membranes. These

  3. Membrane Transport in Isolated Vesicles from Sugarbeet Taproot 1

    PubMed Central

    Briskin, Donald P.; Thornley, W. Robert; Wyse, Roger E.

    1985-01-01

    Sealed membrane vesicles were isolated from homogenates of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproot by a combination of differential centrifugation, extraction with KI, and dextran gradient centrifugation. Relative to the KI-extracted microsomes, the content of plasma membranes, mitochondrial membranes, and Golgi membranes was much reduced in the final vesicle fraction. A component of ATPase activity that was inhibited by nitrate co-enriched with the capacity of the vesicles to form a steady state pH gradient during the purification procedure. This suggests that the nitrate-sensitive ATPase may be involved in driving H+-transport, and this is consistent with the observation that H+-transport, in the final vesicle fraction was inhibited by nitrate. Proton transport in the sugarbeet vesicles was substrate specific for ATP, insensitive to sodium vanadate and oligomycin but was inhibited by diethylstilbestrol and N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The formation of a pH gradient in the vesicles was enhanced by halide ions in the sequence I− > Br− > Cl− while F− was inhibitory. These stimulatory effects occur from both a direct stimulation of the ATPase by anions and a reduction in the vesicle membrane potential. In the presence of Cl−, alkali cations reduce the pH gradient relative to that observed with bis-tris-propane, possibly by H+/alkali cation exchange. Based upon the properties of the H+-transporting vesicles, it is proposed that they are most likely derived from the tonoplast so that this vesicle preparation would represent a convenient system for studying the mechanism of transport at this membrane boundary. PMID:16664342

  4. Swelling assisted photografting of itaconic acid onto sodium alginate membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşkın, Gülşen; Şanlı, Oya; Asman, Gülsen

    2011-09-01

    Grafting of itaconic acid (IA) was achieved onto sodium alginate (NaAlg) membranes by using UV-radiation. Process was performed under nitrogen atmosphere and benzophenone (BP) was used as a photoinitiator. Membranes were preswelled before the polymerization process and ethanol was determined as the best swelling agent among the studied solvents. The effect of polymerization time, initiator and monomer concentrations on the grafting efficiency were investigated. The best conditions for optimum grafting were obtained with IA concentration of 1.0 M, a BP concentration of 0.1 M and a reaction time of 4 h at 25 °C. Under these conditions grafting efficiency for NaAlg-g-IA membranes was found to be 14% (w/w). To obtain further increase in grafting efficiency membranes were also preswelled in IA and BP solutions and polymerization was carried out at different temperatures after UV polymerization. Grafted membranes were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Effect of grafting on membrane properties such as intrinsic viscosity and swelling percentage were also determined.

  5. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  6. The alternating access mechanism of transport as observed in the sodium-hydantoin transporter Mhp1

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Simone; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Iwata, So; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Cameron, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary active transporters move molecules across cell membranes by coupling this process to the energetically favourable downhill movement of ions or protons along an electrochemical gradient. They function by the alternating access model of transport in which, through conformational changes, the substrate binding site alternately faces either side of the membrane. Owing to the difficulties in obtaining the crystal structure of a single transporter in different conformational states, relatively little structural information is known to explain how this process occurs. Here, the structure of the sodium-benzylhydantoin transporter, Mhp1, from Microbacterium liquefaciens, has been determined in three conformational states; from this a mechanism is proposed for switching from the outward-facing open conformation through an occluded structure to the inward-facing open state. PMID:21169684

  7. Bidirectional diffusion of ammonium and sodium cations in forward osmosis: role of membrane active layer surface chemistry and charge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinglin; Boo, Chanhee; Ma, Jun; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-12-16

    Systematic fundamental understanding of mass transport in osmosis-driven membrane processes is important for further development of this emerging technology. In this work, we investigate the role of membrane surface chemistry and charge on bidirectional solute diffusion in forward osmosis (FO). In particular, bidirectional diffusion of ammonium (NH4(+)) and sodium (Na(+)) is examined using FO membranes with different materials and surface charge characteristics. Using an ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) draw solution, we observe dramatically enhanced cation fluxes with sodium chloride feed solution compared to that with deionized water feed solution for thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane. However, the bidirectional diffusion of cations does not change, regardless of the type of feed solution, for cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membrane. We relate this phenomenon to the membrane fixed surface charge by employing different feed solution pH to foster different protonation conditions for the carboxyl groups on the TFC membrane surface. Membrane surface modification is also carried out with the TFC membrane using ethylenediamine to alter carboxyl groups into amine groups. The modified TFC membrane, with less negatively charged groups, exhibits a significant decrease in the bidirectional diffusion of cations under the same conditions employed with the pristine TFC membrane. Based on our experimental observations, we propose Donnan dialysis as a mechanism responsible for enhanced bidirectional diffusion of cations in TFC membranes.

  8. Apical membrane sodium and chloride entry during osmotic swelling of renal (A6) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Crowe, W E; Ehrenfeld, J; Brochiero, E; Wills, N K

    1995-03-01

    To assess the role of chloride in cell volume and sodium transport regulation, we measured cell height changes (CH), transepithelial chloride and sodium fluxes, and intracellular chloride content during challenge with hyposmotic solutions under open circuit (OC) conditions. CH maximally increased following hyposmotic challenge within approximately 5 minutes. The change in CH was smaller under short circuit (SC) conditions or following replacement of chloride in the mucosal solution by gluconate or cyclamate (Cl(-)-freem). When corrected for the osmotically inactive cell volume (30 +/- 2%), delta CH for controls (OC) were greater than predicted for an ideal osmometer. In contrast, delta CH for Cl(-)-freem or SC conditions were similar to that predicted for an ideal osmometer. Na+ and Cl- mucosa-to-serosa fluxes increased following hyposmotic challenge. Chloride fluxes increased maximally within 5 min, then decreased. In contrast, the Na+ flux increased slowly and reached a steady state after approximately 25 min. Under isosmotic conditions, exposure to Cl(-)-freem solutions led to decreases in the transepithelial conductance, Na+ flux, and CH. Chloride permeabilities in the apical and basolateral membranes were detected using the fluorescent intracellular chloride indicator MQAE. The results indicate that during osmotic swelling, the entry of both sodium and chloride is increased. The time courses of these increases differ, suggesting distinct mechanisms for the osmotic regulation of these apical membrane transport processes.

  9. Paracellular epithelial sodium transport maximizes energy efficiency in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Nguyen, Mien T.X.; Kamat, Nikhil; Magenheimer, Lynn; Zhuo, Min; Li, Jiahua; McDonough, Alicia A.; Fields, Timothy A.; Welch, William J.; Yu, Alan S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient oxygen utilization in the kidney may be supported by paracellular epithelial transport, a form of passive diffusion that is driven by preexisting transepithelial electrochemical gradients. Claudins are tight-junction transmembrane proteins that act as paracellular ion channels in epithelial cells. In the proximal tubule (PT) of the kidney, claudin-2 mediates paracellular sodium reabsorption. Here, we used murine models to investigate the role of claudin-2 in maintaining energy efficiency in the kidney. We found that claudin-2–null mice conserve sodium to the same extent as WT mice, even during profound dietary sodium depletion, as a result of the upregulation of transcellular Na-K-2Cl transport activity in the thick ascending limb of Henle. We hypothesized that shifting sodium transport to transcellular pathways would lead to increased whole-kidney oxygen consumption. Indeed, compared with control animals, oxygen consumption in the kidneys of claudin-2–null mice was markedly increased, resulting in medullary hypoxia. Furthermore, tubular injury in kidneys subjected to bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was more severe in the absence of claudin-2. Our results indicate that paracellular transport in the PT is required for efficient utilization of oxygen in the service of sodium transport. We speculate that paracellular permeability may have evolved as a general strategy in epithelial tissues to maximize energy efficiency. PMID:27214555

  10. Actinide transport across cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Bulman, R A; Griffin, R J

    1980-01-01

    Protactinium uptake into the normal liver does not exceed 3%, but when the phospholipid levels in the liver are elevated by administration of thioacetamide this uptake increases to 31%. Phosphatidic acid, which is absent from the normal liver, has been shown to extract protactinium into organic solvents. However, phosphatidylserine, a component of normal liver cell membranes, does not extract protactinium. It might be conjectured that this is why so little protactinium is taken up by the normal liver. The hypothesis is advanced that phosphatidylserine, which is known to complex plutonium, americium and curium, may regulate the uptake of these elements by liver.

  11. Biomolecular Transport through Hemofiltration Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subhra; Fissell, William H.; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for filtration of large solutes through a pore in the presence of transmembrane pressures, applied/induced electric fields, and dissimilar interactions at the pore entrance and exit is developed to characterize and predict the experimental performance of a hemofiltration membrane with nanometer scale pores designed for a proposed implantable Renal Assist Device (RAD). The model reveals that the sieving characteristics of the membrane can be improved by applying an external electric field, and ensuring a smaller ratio of the pore-feed and pore-permeate equilibrium partitioning coefficients when diffusion is present. The model is then customized to study the sieving characteristics for both charged and uncharged solutes in the slit-shaped nanopores of the hemofiltration device for the RAD. The effect of streaming potential or induced fields are found to be negligible under representative operating conditions. Experimental data on the sieving coefficient of bovine serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase and thyroglobulin are reported and compared with the theoretical predictions. Both steric and electrostatic partitioning are considered and the comparison suggests that in general electrostatic effects are present in the filtration of proteins though some data, particularly those recorded in a strongly hypertonic solution (10×PBS), show better agreement with the steric partitioning theory. PMID:19184436

  12. SLC5 Sodium-Anion Cotransporters and Renal Urate Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, David B.; Kwon, Charles Y.; Plata, Consuelo; Romero, Michael F.; Zandi-Nejad, Kambiz

    2007-04-01

    Renal urate transport plays a key role in determining the concentration of circulating uric acid. The reabsorption of filtered urate by the renal proximal tubule appears to require apical sodium-dependent anion transport and the apical URAT1 urate-anion exchanger, in that sodium-dependent transport of lactate, ketoacids, nicotinate, and pyrazinoate (PZA) increases the intracellular concentration of substrates for the subsequent exchange with luminal urate. We have identified SLC5A8 and SLC5A12 as candidates for the sodium-anion cotransporter that collaborates with URAT1. Both transporters function as sodium-dependent nicotinate/monocarboxylate/PZA transporters. Localization studies reveal serial co-expression of these transporters with URAT1, with Slc5a12 in the early proximal tubule and Slc5a8 in S2 and S3 segments. Renal urate excretion is conceivably affected by changes in the activity of SLC5A8, SLC5A12, and/or URAT1, with implications for the pathogenesis of hyperuricemia, nephrolithiasis, and related disorders.

  13. [Effect of padan on active sodium transport in the epithelium of isolated frog skin].

    PubMed

    Kontek, M; Pogorzelska, H; Knapowski, J

    1984-01-01

    The effects of " Padan " (hydrochloride of 1.3-di/ carbomylothio /-2-N-dimethylamino/propane/ upon transport capabilities of plasmatic membrane have been checked. The experiment was performed on isolated skin of Rana temporaria frogs. Assessment of transporting activity of membrane in relation to sodium ion involved a method developed by Ussing with so called "short-circuit" technique. The effects of the pesticide on the external and internal surface of the frog's skin have been examined, final concentrations of the compound being 3.4 X 10(-6) M to 3.4 X 10(-3) M. The results indicate that " Padan ", whether administered to the external or internal surface of the membrane, decreases the value of membrane potential and short-circuit current, which is indicative of membrane transport inhibition. The effect varies with pesticide concentration in the medium, though it is statistically significant only in concentration 3.4 X 10(-3) M. On the other hand, membrane resistance usually gets increased as the compound concentration in the medium increases. The results indicate that cellular membrane should be considered while explaining the mechanism of toxic effects of " Padan " upon organism.

  14. Angiotensin I conversion to angiotensin II stimulates cortical collecting duct sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Komlosi, Peter; Fuson, Amanda L; Fintha, Attila; Peti-Peterdi, János; Rosivall, Laszlo; Warnock, David G; Bell, Phillip Darwin

    2003-08-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II directly stimulates epithelial sodium channel activity in the rabbit cortical collecting duct. Because Ang I and converting enzyme analogues might be present in the distal nephron, this raises the possibility of intraluminal generation of Ang II. Conversion of Ang I to Ang II was monitored by Ang II-dependent changes in intracellular sodium concentration as a reflection of sodium transport across the apical membrane. This involved imaging-based fluorescence microscopy with sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate in isolated, perfused, cortical collecting-duct segments from rabbit kidney. Principal and intercalated cells were differentiated by rhodamine-conjugated peanut lectin. Control principal cell intracellular sodium concentration, during perfusion with 25 mmol/L NaCl and zero sodium in the bath plus monensin (10(-5) mol/L) averaged 5.8+/-0.14 mmol/L (n=156). The increase in intracellular sodium concentration, when luminal NaCl was increased from 25 to 150 mmol/L, was elevated by 3.5-fold in the presence of intraluminal Ang I (10(-6) mol/L). Also, the effects of Ang I on sodium transport were not significantly different from the effects of Ang II (10(-9) mol/L). Ang I was used in micromolar concentrations to ensure that there was sufficient substrate available for conversion to Ang II. Inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme with captopril reduced the stimulatory effect of Ang I. These results suggest that intraluminal conversion of Ang I to Ang II can occur in the cortical collecting duct, resulting in enhanced apical sodium entry.

  15. Role of intracellular membranes in transcellular calcium transport

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.R.; Young, L.B.; Wade, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Models can be tested through the use of various agents that affect different portions of the overall mechanism. The calcium ionophore A23187 can be used to increase the rate of calcium entry through the brush border, effectively removing diffusion through the brush border as a rate-limiting step. It would be expected that treatment with A23187 would thus increase the overall rate of calcium transcellular transport. In contrast, chlorpromazine has been shown to inhibit in vitro calcium uptake by Golgi membranes. Consequently if the model is correct, treatment with A23187 and chlorpromazine would tend to raise the cytoplasmic calcium concentration, since the Golgi membrane uptake mechanism would be inhibited, and calcium would accumulate in mitochondria with little or no increase in transcellular transport. Finally, Golgi membranes have been shown to release calcium in response to ATP. Sodium azide inhibits ATP generation and calcium uptake by mitochondria. Thus, treatment with A23187 and soidum azide should cause accumulation of calcium in the Golgi membranes, if the proposed model is correct. The purpose of this investigation was to use coordinated electron probe x-ray microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy to test the response of the intestinal absorptive cells to the agents mentioned.

  16. Membrane Assembly and Ion Transport Ability of a Fluorinated Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, Raphaël; Légaré, Sébastien; Auger, Maud; Carpentier, Claudia; Otis, François; Auger, Michèle; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand

    2016-01-01

    A novel 21-residue peptide incorporating six fluorinated amino acids was prepared. It was designed to fold into an amphiphilic alpha helical structure of nanoscale length with one hydrophobic face and one fluorinated face. The formation of a fluorous interface serves as the main vector for the formation of a superstructure in a bilayer membrane. Fluorescence assays showed this ion channel's ability to facilitate the translocation of alkali metal ions through a phospholipid membrane, with selectivity for sodium ions. Computational studies showed that a tetramer structure is the most probable and stable supramolecular assembly for the active ion channel structure. The results illustrate the possibility of exploiting multiple Fδ-:M+ interactions for ion transport and using fluorous interfaces to create functional nanostructures. PMID:27835700

  17. Thermodynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate partitioning into lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Anmin; Ziegler, André; Steinbauer, Bernhard; Seelig, Joachim

    2002-09-01

    The partition equilibria of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and lithium dodecyl sulfate between water and bilayer membranes were investigated with isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic methods (light scattering, (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance) in the temperature range of 28 degrees C to 56 degrees C. The partitioning of the dodecyl sulfate anion (DS(-)) into the bilayer membrane is energetically favored by an exothermic partition enthalpy of Delta H(O)(D) = -6.0 kcal/mol at 28 degrees C. This is in contrast to nonionic detergents where Delta H(O)(D) is usually positive. The partition enthalpy decreases linearly with increasing temperature and the molar heat capacity is Delta C(O)(P) = -50 +/- 3 cal mol(-1) K(-1). The partition isotherm is nonlinear if the bound detergent is plotted versus the free detergent concentration in bulk solution. This is caused by the electrostatic repulsion between the DS(-) ions inserted into the membrane and those free in solution near the membrane surface. The surface concentration of DS(-) immediately above the plane of binding was hence calculated with the Gouy-Chapman theory, and a strictly linear relationship was obtained between the surface concentration and the extent of DS(-) partitioning. The surface partition constant K describes the chemical equilibrium in the absence of electrostatic effects. For the SDS-membrane equilibrium K was found to be 1.2 x 10(4) M(-1) to 6 x 10(4) M(-1) for the various systems and conditions investigated, very similar to data available for nonionic detergents of the same chain length. The membrane-micelle phase diagram was also studied. Complete membrane solubilization requires a ratio of 2.2 mol SDS bound per mole of total lipid at 56 degrees C. The corresponding equilibrium concentration of SDS free in solution is C (sat)(D,F) approximately 1.7 mM and is slightly below the critical micelles concentration (CMC) = 2.1 mM (at 56 degrees C and 0.11 M buffer). Membrane saturation occurs at

  18. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membrane for Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Porter, Jason; Patki, Neil; Kelley, Madison; Stanislowski, Josh; Tolbert, Scott; Way, J. Douglas; Makuch, David

    2015-12-23

    A pilot-scale hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) separator was built that incorporated 98 membranes that were each 24 inches long. This separator used an advanced design to minimize the impact of concentration polarization and separated over 1000 scfh of hydrogen from a hydrogen-nitrogen feed of 5000 scfh that contained 30% hydrogen. This mixture was chosen because it was representative of the hydrogen concentration expected in coal gasification. When tested with an operating gasifier, the hydrogen concentration was lower and contaminants in the syngas adversely impacted membrane performance. All 98 membranes survived the test, but flux was lower than expected. Improved ceramic substrates were produced that have small surface pores to enable membrane production and large pores in the bulk of the substrate to allow high flux. Pd-Au was chosen as the membrane alloy because of its resistance to sulfur contamination and good flux. Processes were developed to produce a large quantity of long membranes for use in the demonstration test.

  19. Interactive effects of ethanol and silver on sodium transport across toad skin

    SciTech Connect

    Gerencser, G.A.; Loo, S.Y.; Cornette, K.M.

    1984-05-01

    Both ethanol and silver ions have been shown to affect ion transport across various epithelia. This investigation was principally undertaken to further define mechanisms of silver ions and ethanol, and their possible interactions, on sodium transport across toad skin. Isolated toad skin, mounted between identical oxygenated amphibian bicarbonate Ringer solutions, maintained stable transepithelial potential differences (serosa positive) and short-circuit currents for several hours at 25/sup 0/C. It was observed that (1) ethanol inhibited the active transcellular component of sodium absorption and this effect was reversible; (2) inhibition of sodium transport by ethanol was directly proportional to the applied concentration; (3) pretreatment with silver ions prevented any ethanol effects; and (4) pretreatment with ethanol prevented any silver ion effects. It was concluded from these results that ethanol induced its inhibitory effects on membrane phospholipids thereby perturbing the function of a sulfhydryl ligant, while silver ion or silver chloride complex binding to this ligand would maintain its function in sodium transport despite the presence of ethanol.

  20. Effect of Polyvnylpyrrolidone (PVP) in Binary Solution on the Performance of Polyethersulfone Hollow Fibre Membrane for Sodium Chloride Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolong, N.; Ismail, A. F.; Salim, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    In membrane preparation, phase inversion is a versatile technique that allow polymer to be transformed from liquid to a solid state in a controlled manner. The preparation and process involves many factors and parameters specifically in fabricating hollow fibre membrane. In this study, dope solution factor in the process of fabricating hollow fibre membrane were explored. The effects of polymer concentration and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as additive in the dope solution on the morphology and separation performance were found able to produced high porous membranes, well interconnected pores and surface properties. Employing polyethersulfone (PES) as polymer, hollow fibre membranes were fabricated using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as solvent and using water as the external coagulant. Finally the fabricated ultrafiltration membranes were characterized and evaluated based on solute transport concentration (sodium chloride) and pure water permeation properties.

  1. Cyclosporin A reduces canalicular membrane fluidity and regulates transporter function in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yasumiba, S; Tazuma, S; Ochi, H; Chayama, K; Kajiyama, G

    2001-01-01

    Changes of the biliary canalicular membrane lipid content can affect membrane fluidity and biliary lipid secretion in rats. The immunosuppressant cyclosporin A is known to cause intrahepatic cholestasis. This study investigated whether cyclosporin A influenced canalicular membrane fluidity by altering membrane phospholipids or transporter expression. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, a bile-duct cannula was inserted to collect bile, and sodium taurocholate was infused (100 nmol/min per 100 g) for 60 min. During steady-state taurocholate infusion, cyclosporin A (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was injected intravenously and then bile was collected for 80 min. After killing the rats, canalicular membrane vesicles were prepared. Expression of canalicular membrane transporters was assessed by Western blotting and canalicular membrane vesicle fluidity was estimated by fluorescence polarization. Cyclosporin A reduced biliary lipid secretion along with a disproportionate reduction of lipids relative to bile acids. Cyclosporin A significantly decreased canalicular membrane fluidity along with an increase of the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio. Only expression of the transporter P-glycoprotein was increased by cyclosporin A. Because canalicular membrane transporter expression was largely unchanged by cyclosporin A despite a marked decrease of biliary lipid secretion, transporter activity may partly depend upon canalicular membrane fluidity. PMID:11237863

  2. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Rosen, Lee J.; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-09-27

    A commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor for producing a synthesis gas that improves the thermal coupling of reactively-driven oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalyst reforming tubes required to efficiently and effectively produce synthesis gas.

  3. Solute rejection by porous glass membranes. I - Hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solutions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wydeven, T.; Leban, M. I.

    1971-01-01

    Hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea was studied with porous glass membranes in closed-end capillary form, to determine the effect of pressure, temperature, and concentration variations, and lifetime rejection and flux characteristics. Rejection data for sodium chloride were consistent with the functioning of the porous glass as a low-capacity ion-exchange membrane.

  4. 65Zn2+ transport by lobster hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Capo, J A; Mandal, P K; Eyyunni, S; Ahearn, G A

    2005-01-01

    The lobster (Homarus americanus) hepato-pancreatic epithelial baso-lateral cell membrane possesses three transport proteins that transfer calcium between the cytoplasm and hemolymph: an ATP-dependent calcium ATPase, a sodium-calcium exchanger, and a verapamil-sensitive cation channel. We used standard centrifugation methods to prepare purified hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane vesicles and a rapid filtration procedure to investigate whether (65)Zn(2+) transfer across this epithelial cell border occurs by any of these previously described transporters for calcium. Baso-lateral membrane vesicles were osmotically reactive and exhibited a time course of uptake that was linear for 10-15 s and approached equilibrium by 120 s. In the absence of sodium, (65)Zn(2+) influx was a hyperbolic function of external zinc concentration and followed the Michaelis-Menten equation for carrier transport. This carrier transport was stimulated by the addition of 150 microM ATP (increase in K(m) and J(max)) and inhibited by the simultaneous presence of 150 micromol l(-1) ATP+250 micromol l(-1) vanadate (decrease in both K(m) and J(max)). In the absence of ATP, (65)Zn(2+) influx was a sigmoidal function of preloaded vesicular sodium concentration (0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 75 mmol l(-1)) and exhibited a Hill Coefficient of 4.03+/-1.14, consistent with the exchange of 3 Na(+)/1Zn(2+). Using Dixon analysis, calcium was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of baso-lateral membrane vesicle (65)Zn(2+) influx by both the ATP-dependent (K(i)=205 nmol l(-1) Ca(2+)) and sodium-dependent (K(i)=2.47 micromol l(-1) Ca(2+)) transport processes. These results suggest that zinc transport across the lobster hepato-pancreatic baso-lateral membrane largely occurred by the ATP-dependent calcium ATPase and sodium-calcium exchanger carrier proteins.

  5. Membrane lipids and sodium pumps of cattle and crocodiles: an experimental test of the membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wu, B J; Hulbert, A J; Storlien, L H; Else, P L

    2004-09-01

    The influence of membrane lipid composition on the molecular activity of a major membrane protein (the sodium pump) was examined as a test of the membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism. Microsomal membranes from the kidneys of cattle (Bos taurus) and crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) were found to possess similar sodium pump concentrations, but cattle membranes showed a four- to fivefold higher enzyme (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase) activity when measured at 37 degrees C. The molecular activity of the sodium pumps (ATP/min) from both species was fully recoverable when delipidated pumps were reconstituted with membrane from the original source (same species). The results of experiments involving species membrane crossovers showed cattle sodium pump molecular activity to progressively decrease from 3,245 to 1,953 (P < 0.005) to 1,031 (P < 0.003) ATP/min when subjected to two cycles of delipidation and reconstitution with crocodile membrane as a lipid source. In contrast, the molecular activity of crocodile sodium pumps progressively increased from 729 to 908 (P < 0.01) to 1,476 (P = 0.01) ATP/min when subjected to two cycles of delipidation and reconstitution with cattle membrane as a lipid source. The lipid composition of the two membrane preparations showed similar levels of saturated ( approximately 31-34%) and monounsaturated ( approximately 23-25%) fatty acids. Cattle membrane had fourfold more n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (11.2 vs. 2.9%) but had a reduced n-6 polyunsaturate content (29 vs. 43%). The results support the membrane pacemaker theory of metabolism and suggest membrane lipids and their polyunsaturates play a significant role in determining the molecular activity of the sodium pump.

  6. Regulation & Development of Membrane Transport Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-15

    Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee DAVID W. PLMPLIN Department of Anatomy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland MARILYN D. RESH...Muscle 265 Douglas M. Fambrough, Barry A. Wolitzky, and David W. Pumplin Index 283 REGULATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROCESSES 77, II PART 1...243 (Cell Physiol. 12). C 124-C132. 16. Huang. C. C.. Tsai. C. M.. and Canellakis, E. S. (1973) Bochiom. Biophys. Acta. 332, 59-68. 17. Hume . S. and

  7. Phylogenetic profiles of all membrane transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, January; Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to combat the on-going malaria epidemic, discovery of new drug targets remains vital. Proteins that are essential to survival and specific to malaria parasites are key candidates. To survive within host cells, the parasites need to acquire nutrients and dispose of waste products across multiple membranes. Additionally, like all eukaryotes, they must redistribute ions and organic molecules between their various internal membrane bound compartments. Membrane transport proteins mediate all of these processes and are considered important mediators of drug resistance as well as drug targets in their own right. Recently, using advanced experimental genetic approaches and streamlined life cycle profiling, we generated a large collection of Plasmodium berghei gene deletion mutants and assigned essential gene functions, highlighting potential targets for prophylactic, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking anti-malarial drugs. Here, we present a comprehensive orthology assignment of all Plasmodium falciparum putative membrane transport proteins and provide a detailed overview of the associated essential gene functions obtained through experimental genetics studies in human and murine model parasites. Furthermore, we discuss the phylogeny of selected potential drug targets identified in our functional screen. We extensively discuss the results in the context of the functional assignments obtained using gene targeting available to date. PMID:28357319

  8. Radiation inactivation studies on the rabbit kidney sodium-dependent glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Malathi, P; Preiser, H; Jung, C Y

    1985-09-05

    Rabbit kidney cortical brush-border membrane vesicles were irradiated in the frozen state with increasing doses of high energy electrons from a Van de Graaff generator. Sodium-dependent D-glucose and L-alanine transport showed a simple exponential loss of activity with increasing radiation dosage. Target size calculation based on these data gives estimates of 1.0 X 10(6) daltons for the glucose transporter and 1.2 X 10(6) daltons for the alanine transporter. A highly purified glucose transport protein extracted from rabbit kidney cortex was similarly irradiated both before and after reconstitution into liposomes. The target size of this purified glucose transporter was 343,000 daltons, based on inactivation of transport. The intensity of the major 165,000-dalton sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis band of this preparation was decreased by radiation. The decrease in staining intensity was dose-dependent, yielding a target size of 298,000 daltons, in situ. We propose that the purified glucose transporter reconstituted into liposomes is a tetramer comprised of 85,000-dalton subunits.

  9. Coupled binding mechanism of three sodium ions and aspartate in the glutamate transporter homologue GltTk

    PubMed Central

    Guskov, Albert; Jensen, Sonja; Faustino, Ignacio; Marrink, Siewert J.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable transport of anionic amino acids across the cell membrane by coupling it to the downhill transport of cations. This coupling mechanism is still poorly understood, in part because the available crystal structures of these transporters are of relatively low resolution. Here we solve crystal structures of the archaeal transporter GltTk in the presence and absence of aspartate and use molecular dynamics simulations and binding assays to show how strict coupling between the binding of three sodium ions and aspartate takes place. PMID:27830699

  10. Synaptic uptake and beyond: the sodium- and chloride-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family SLC6.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nian-Hang; Reith, Maarten E A; Quick, Michael W

    2004-02-01

    The SLC6 family is a diverse set of transporters that mediate solute translocation across cell plasma membranes by coupling solute transport to the cotransport of sodium and chloride down their electrochemical gradients. These transporters probably have 12 transmembrane domains, with cytoplasmic N- and C-terminal tails, and at least some may function as homo-oligomers. Family members include the transporters for the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine, the aminergic transmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine, the osmolytes betaine and taurine, the amino acid proline, and the metabolic compound creatine. In addition, this family includes a system B(0+) cationic and neutral amino acid transporter, and two transporters for which the solutes are unknown. In general, SLC6 transporters act to regulate the level of extracellular solute concentrations. In the central and the peripheral nervous system, these transporters can regulate signaling among neurons, are the sites of action of various drugs of abuse, and naturally occurring mutations in several of these proteins are associated with a variety of neurological disorders. For example, transgenic animals lacking specific aminergic transporters show profoundly disturbed behavioral phenotypes and probably represent excellent systems for investigating psychiatric disease. SLC6 transporters are also found in many non-neural tissues, including kidney, intestine, and testis, consistent with their diverse physiological roles. Transporters in this family represent attractive therapeutic targets because they are subject to multiple forms of regulation by many different signaling cascades, and because a number of pharmacological agents have been identified that act specifically on these proteins.

  11. Structural Insights into the Transport Mechanism of the Human Sodium-dependent Lysophosphatidylcholine Transporter MFSD2A.

    PubMed

    Quek, Debra Q Y; Nguyen, Long N; Fan, Hao; Silver, David L

    2016-04-29

    Major facilitator superfamily domain containing 2A (MFSD2A) was recently characterized as a sodium-dependent lysophosphatidylcholine transporter expressed at the blood-brain barrier endothelium. It is the primary route for importation of docosohexaenoic acid and other long-chain fatty acids into fetal and adult brain and is essential for mouse and human brain growth and function. Remarkably, MFSD2A is the first identified major facilitator superfamily member that uniquely transports lipids, implying that MFSD2A harbors unique structural features and transport mechanism. Here, we present three three-dimensional structural models of human MFSD2A derived by homology modeling using MelB- and LacY-based crystal structures and refined by biochemical analysis. All models revealed 12 transmembrane helices and connecting loops and represented the partially outward-open, outward-partially occluded, and inward-open states of the transport cycle. In addition to a conserved sodium-binding site, three unique structural features were identified as follows: a phosphate headgroup binding site, a hydrophobic cleft to accommodate a hydrophobic hydrocarbon tail, and three sets of ionic locks that stabilize the outward-open conformation. Ligand docking studies and biochemical assays identified Lys-436 as a key residue for transport. It is seen forming a salt bridge with the negative charge on the phosphate headgroup. Importantly, MFSD2A transported structurally related acylcarnitines but not a lysolipid without a negative charge, demonstrating the necessity of a negatively charged headgroup interaction with Lys-436 for transport. These findings support a novel transport mechanism by which lysophosphatidylcholines are "flipped" within the transporter cavity by pivoting about Lys-436 leading to net transport from the outer to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

  12. Functional characterisation of human SGLT-5 as a novel kidney-specific sodium-dependent sugar transporter.

    PubMed

    Grempler, Rolf; Augustin, Robert; Froehner, Stefanie; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Simon, Eric; Mark, Michael; Eickelmann, Peter

    2012-02-03

    Sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLT) actively catalyse carbohydrate transport across cellular membranes. Six of the 12 known SGLT family members have the capacity to bind and/or transport monosaccharides (SGLT-1 to 6); of these, all but SGLT-5 have been characterised. Here we demonstrate that human SGLT-5 is exclusively expressed in the kidney. Four splice variants were detected and the most abundant SGLT-5-mRNA was functionally characterised. SGLT-5 mediates sodium-dependent [(14)C]-α-methyl-D-glucose (AMG) transport that can be inhibited by mannose, fructose, glucose, and galactose. Uptake studies using demonstrated high capacity transport for mannose and fructose and, to a lesser extent, glucose, AMG, and galactose. SGLT-5 mediated mannose, fructose and AMG transport was weakly (μM potency) inhibited by SGLT-2 inhibitors. In summary, we have characterised SGLT-5 as a kidney mannose transporter. Further studies are warranted to explore the physiological role of SGLT-5.

  13. Prenatal programming of rat cortical collecting tubule sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Lozano, German; Baum, Michel

    2012-03-15

    Prenatal insults have been shown to lead to elevated blood pressure in offspring when they are studied as adults. Prenatal administration of dexamethasone and dietary protein deprivation have demonstrated that there is an increase in transporter abundance for a number of nephron segments but not the subunits of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the cortical collecting duct. Recent studies have shown that aldosterone is elevated in offspring of protein-deprived mothers when studied as adults, but the physiological importance of the increase in serum aldosterone is unknown. As an indirect measure of ENaC activity, we compared the natriuretic response to benzamil in offspring of mothers who ate a low-protein diet (6%) with those who ate a normal diet (20%) for the last half of pregnancy. The natriuretic response to benzamil was greater in the 6% group (821.1 ± 161.0 μmol/24 h) compared with the 20% group (279.1 ± 137.0 μmol/24 h), consistent with greater ENaC activity in vivo (P < 0.05). In this study, we also directly studied cortical collecting tubule function from adult rats using in vitro microperfusion. There was no difference in basal or vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water permeability. However, while cortical collecting ducts of adult offspring whose mothers ate a 20% protein diet had no sodium transport (-1.9 ± 3.1 pmol·mm(-1)·min(-1)), the offspring of rats that ate a 6% protein diet during the last half of pregnancy had a net sodium flux of 10.7 ± 2.6 pmol·mm(-1)·min(-1) (P = 0.01) in tubules perfused in vitro. Sodium transport was measured using ion-selective electrodes, a novel technique allowing measurement of sodium in nanoliter quantities of fluid. Thus we directly demonstrate that there is prenatal programming of cortical collecting duct sodium transport.

  14. Molecular mechanisms for proton transport in membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J F; Morowitz, H J

    1978-01-01

    Likely mechanisms for proton transport through biomembranes are explored. The fundamental structural element is assumed to be continuous chains of hydrogen bonds formed from the protein side groups, and a molecular example is presented. From studies in ice, such chains are predicted to have low impedance and can function as proton wires. In addition, conformational changes in the protein may be linked to the proton conduction. If this possibility is allowed, a simple proton pump can be described that can be reversed into a molecular motor driven by an electrochemical potential across the membrane. PMID:272644

  15. Molecular and functional analysis of SDCT2, a novel rat sodium-dependent dicarboxylate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangmei; Tsukaguchi, Hiroyasu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Berger, Urs V.; Hediger, Matthias A.

    1999-01-01

    Kidney proximal tubule cells take up Krebs cycle intermediates for metabolic purposes and for secretion of organic anions through dicarboxylate/organic anion exchange. Alteration in reabsorption of citrate is closely related to renal stone formation. The presence of distinct types of sodium-coupled dicarboxylate transporters has been postulated on either side of the polarized epithelial membrane in the kidney proximal tubule. Using a PCR-based approach, we isolated a novel member of the sodium-dependent dicarboxylate/sulfate transporter called SDCT2. SDCT2 is a 600–amino acid residue protein that has 47–48% amino acid identity to SDCT1 and NaDC-1, previously identified in kidney and intestine. Northern analysis gave a single band of 3.3 kb for SDCT2 in kidney, liver, and brain. In situ hybridization revealed that SDCT2 is prominently expressed in kidney proximal tubule S3 segments and in perivenous hepatocytes, consistent with the sites of high-affinity dicarboxylate transport identified based on vesicle studies. A signal was also detected in the meningeal layers of the brain. SDCT2 expressed in Xenopus oocytes mediated sodium-dependent transport of di- and tricarboxylates with substrate preference for succinate rather than citrate, but excluding monocarboxylates. SDCT2, unlike SDCT1, displayed a unique pH dependence for succinate transport (optimal pH 7.5–8.5) and showed a high affinity for dimethylsuccinate, two features characteristic of basolateral transport. These data help to interpret the mechanisms of renal citrate transport, their alteration in pathophysiological conditions, and their role in the elimination of organic anions and therapeutic drugs. PMID:10207168

  16. Membrane ion transport in non-excitable tissues.

    PubMed

    Nehrke, Keith

    2014-12-23

    The facilitated movement of ions across cell membranes can be characterized as occurring through active (ATP-dependent), secondary active (coupled), or passive transport processes. Each of these processes is mediated by a diverse group of membrane proteins. Over the past fifteen years, studies of membrane transport in C. elegans have benefited from the fact that worms are anatomically simple, easily and economically cultured, and genetically tractable. These experimental advantages have been instrumental in defining how membrane transport processes contribute to whole organism physiology. The focus of this review is to survey the recent advances in our understanding of membrane transport that have arisen from integrative physiological approaches in the nematode C. elegans.

  17. Glycosylation of Sodium/Iodide Symporter (NIS) Regulates Its Membrane Translocation and Radioiodine Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Taemoon; Youn, Hyewon; Yeom, Chan Joo; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) protein is a membrane glycoprotein that transports iodide ions into thyroid cells. The function of this membrane protein is closely regulated by post-translational glycosylation. In this study, we measured glycosylation-mediated changes in subcellular location of hNIS and its function of iodine uptake. Methods HeLa cells were stably transfected with hNIS/tdTomato fusion gene in order to monitor the expression of hNIS. Cellular localization of hNIS was visualized by confocal microscopy of the red fluorescence of tdTomato. The expression of hNIS was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. Functional activity of hNIS was estimated by radioiodine uptake. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and tunicamycin were used to stimulate and inhibit glycosylation, respectively. In vivo images were obtained using a Maestro fluorescence imaging system. Results cAMP-mediated Glycosylation of NIS resulted in increased expression of hNIS, stimulating membrane translocation, and enhanced radioiodine uptake. In contrast, inhibition of glycosylation by treatment with tunicamycin dramatically reduced membrane translocation of intracellular hNIS, resulting in reduced radioiodine uptake. In addition, our hNIS/tdTomato fusion reporter successfully visualized cAMP-induced hNIS expression in xenografted tumors from mouse model. Conclusions These findings clearly reveal that the membrane localization of hNIS and its function of iodine uptake are glycosylation-dependent, as our results highlight enhancement of NIS expression and glycosylation with subsequent membrane localization after cAMP treatment. Therefore, enhancing functional NIS by the increasing level of glycosylation may be suggested as a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients who show refractory response to conventional radioiodine treatment. PMID:26599396

  18. Role of sodium ion in transport of folic acid in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.; Selhub, J.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of sodium on folate transport across the intestinal luminal membrane was analyzed using two techniques: the influx chamber and isoalted brush-border membrane vesicles. Preincubation of tissue in Na -free medium did not have a consistent effect on folic acid influx provided that Na was present in the test solution. Replacement of Na in the test solution by choline resulted in a significant reduction of folic acid influx. However, when intestinal sheets that had been equilibrated in Na -free solution were exposed to test solutions containing either Na , Li , K , Rb , Cs , Tris , or guanidinium as main cations, folic acid influx was not significantly decreased. Concentration-dependence studies showed that replacement of Na by Rb did not affect the saturable mechanism of folate transport. Rather, a decrease in nonsaturable folic acid uptake accounted for the slightly reduced influx observed in the presence of Rb . Experiments with brush-border membrane vesicles revealed that methotrexate uptake was significantly higher in the presence of external Na than in the presence of K , but was not different from uptake in the presence of K plus valinomycin. These data suggest that 1) the saturable component of folate transport is not Na dependent, and 2) nonsaturable transport of folic acid across the luminal membrane occurs in part through a conductive pathway that involves a negatively charged species of folate and a cation whose membrane permeability affects the rate of folate transport. The importance of Na in this process in vivo derives from the fact that Na is the most permeant cation available at the absorptive site in the small intestine.

  19. The crystal structure of a sodium galactose transporter reveals mechanistic insights into Na[superscript +]/sugar symport

    SciTech Connect

    Faham, S.; Watanabe, A.; Besserer, G.M.; Cascio, D.; Specht, A.; Hirayama, B.A.; Wright, E.M.; Abramson, J.

    2009-08-27

    Membrane transporters that use energy stored in sodium gradients to drive nutrients into cells constitute a major class of proteins. We report the crystal structure of a member of the solute sodium symporters (SSS), the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT). The -3.0 angstrom structure contains 14 transmembrane (TM) helices in an inward-facing conformation with a core structure of inverted repeats of 5 TM helices (TM2 to TM6 and TM7 to TM11). Galactose is bound in the center of the core, occluded from the outside solutions by hydrophobic residues. Surprisingly, the architecture of the core is similar to that of the leucine transporter (LeuT) from a different gene family. Modeling the outward-facing conformation based on the LeuT structure, in conjunction with biophysical data, provides insight into structural rearrangements for active transport.

  20. Assessing the effects of sodium hypochlorite exposure on the characteristics of PVDF based membranes.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syed Z; Bérubé, Pierre R

    2013-09-15

    Sodium hypochlorite is commonly used as a cleaning agent to remove adsorbed foulants from PVDF based micro/ultra filtration membranes in water and wastewater treatment applications. Although effective for fouling control, extended sodium hypochlorite exposure can affect the physical/chemical characteristics and hinder the treatment performance of these membranes. To assess these effects, PVDF based membranes were exposed to sodium hypochlorite at different concentrations for varying periods of time, and the physical/chemical characteristics of the virgin and sodium hypochlorite exposed membranes were compared. The membranes were characterized based on chemical composition (FTIR and NMR), mechanical strength (yield strength), surface hydrophilicity (contact angle), pore size and porosity (scanning electron microscopy and challenge test), and membrane resistance (clean water permeation test). The results indicated that exposure dose and concentration of the sodium hypochlorite used have significant influence on the membrane characteristics. The impact of sodium hypochlorite exposure on the parameters investigated could be most accurately and consistently correlated to an exposure dose relationship of the form C(n)t (where, C = concentration and t = exposure time) rather than the Ct relationship commonly used to define the extent of exposure to cleaning agents. For all the parameters investigated, the power coefficient n was less than 1 indicating that time had a greater impact on the changes than did the concentration of the sodium hypochlorite. The results suggest that the use of sodium hypochlorite for chemical cleaning, at concentrations that are higher than those typically used for chemical cleaning would have less of an effect on the characteristics of the membrane materials. Changes in the characteristics were attributed to the oxidation of the hydrophilic additives (HA) present in blended PVDF membranes.

  1. Salt splitting of sodium-dominated radioactive waste using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Carlson, C.D.; Virkar, A.; Joshi, A.

    1994-08-01

    The potential for salt splitting of sodium dominated radioactive wastes by use of a ceramic membrane is reviewed. The technical basis for considering this processing technology is derived from the technology developed for battery and chlor-alkali chemical industry. Specific comparisons are made with the commercial organic membranes which are the standard in nonradioactive salt splitting. Two features of ceramic membranes are expected to be especially attractive: high tolerance to gamma irradiation and high selectivity between sodium and other ions. The objective of the salt splitting process is to separate nonradioactive sodium from contaminated sodium salts prior to other pretreatment processes in order to: (1) concentrate the waste in order to reduce the volume of subsequent additives and capacity of equipment, (2) decrease the pH of the waste in preparation for further processing, and (3) provide sodium with very low radioactivity levels for caustic washing of sludge or low level and mixed waste vitrification.

  2. The Effects of Altered Membrane Cholesterol Levels on Sodium Pump Activity in Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Metabolic dysfunctions characteristic of overt hypothyroidism (OH) start at the early stage of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). Na+/K+-ATPase (the sodium pump) is a transmembrane enzyme that plays a vital role in cellular activities in combination with membrane lipids. We evaluated the effects of early changes in thyroid hormone and membrane cholesterol on sodium pump activity in SCH and OH patients. Methods In 32 SCH patients, 35 OH patients, and 34 euthyroid patients, sodium pump activity and cholesterol levels in red blood cell membranes were measured. Serum thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Differences in their mean values were analysed using post hoc analysis of variance. We assessed the dependence of the sodium pump on other metabolites by multiple regression analysis. Results Sodium pump activity and membrane cholesterol were lower in both hypothyroid groups than in control group, OH group exhibiting lower values than SCH group. In SCH group, sodium pump activity showed a significant direct dependence on membrane cholesterol with an inverse relationship with serum TSH levels. In OH group, sodium pump activity depended directly on membrane cholesterol and serum T4 levels. No dependence on serum cholesterol was observed in either case. Conclusion Despite the presence of elevated serum cholesterol in hypothyroidism, membrane cholesterol contributed significantly to maintain sodium pump activity in the cells. A critical reduction in membrane cholesterol levels heralds compromised enzyme activity, even in the early stage of hypothyroidism, and this can be predicted by elevated TSH levels alone, without any evident clinical manifestations. PMID:28256112

  3. Single molecule imaging of conformational dynamics in sodium-coupled transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Daniel S.

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) proteins remove neurotransmitters released into the synapse through a transport process driven by the physiological sodium ion (Na+) gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, as well as by antidepressants. The crystal structure of LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homologue, revealed the NSS molecular architecture and has been the basis for extensive structural, biochemical, and computational investigations of the mechanism of transporter proteins with a LeuT-like fold. In this dissertation, the conformational states sampled by LeuT are explored using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging methods, with special focus on the motions of transmembrane helix 1a that lead to inward release of substrate. We also explored how dynamics are modulated by substrate, Na+, and protons to produce efficient transport. These advances represent a first of a kind study of the dynamics of an integral membrane protein at a truly single-molecule scale. Advances in instrumentation, analysis tools, and organic fluorophores were all required to achieve these goals, and such advances are also described. While these experiments were performed with detergent-solubilized protein, preliminary work suggests that imaging of LeuT in proteoliposomes is feasible and a fluorescence sensor assay could be used to simultaneously detect conformational dynamics and transport function.

  4. Sodium/proton antiporters in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Garlid, K D

    1988-01-01

    the effects of the Na+,K+-ATPase. Nevertheless, a sound design principle would be followed if the cell, like mitochondria, were to regulate volume by governing a passive back-flow process rather than an active transport process. In conclusion, it seems premature to conclude that plasma membranes contain only one type of Na+/H+ antiporter. Nor does it seem likely that there is an unlimited variety of such transporters. I propose as a working hypothesis that antiporters from both mitochondria and plasmalemma may be separated into two classes: Na+-selective and non-Na+-selective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  5. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  6. Development of a label-free assay for sodium-dependent phosphate transporter NaPi-IIb.

    PubMed

    Wong, Soo-Hang; Gao, Alice; Ward, Sabrina; Henley, Charles; Lee, Paul H

    2012-07-01

    The most widely used assay format for characterizing plasma membrane transporter activity measures accumulation of radiolabeled substrates in tissues or cells expressing the transporters. This assay format had limitations and disadvantages; therefore, there was an unmet need for development of a homogeneous, nonradioactive assay for membrane transporter proteins. In this report, the authors describe the development of a label-free homogeneous assay for the sodium-dependent phosphate transporter NaPi-IIb using the Epic system. The addition of phosphate stimulated a dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) profile unique to cells expressing NaPi-IIb but not on parental cells. This DMR profile was phosphate specific because sulfate or buffer alone did not elicit the same response. Furthermore, the DMR response observed was phosphate and sodium dependent, with Km values in the micromolar and millimolar range, respectively. A known NaPi-IIb noncompetitive inhibitor was shown to completely inhibit the phosphate-stimulated DMR response, suggesting that this observed DMR response is an NaPi-IIb-mediated cellular event. The results demonstrate that a novel label-free assay was developed for studying transporter-mediated cellular activity, and this DMR assay platform could be applicable to other membrane transporter proteins.

  7. Carbonized-leaf Membrane with Anisotropic Surfaces for Sodium-ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbian; Shen, Fei; Luo, Wei; Dai, Jiaqi; Han, Xiaogang; Chen, Yanan; Yao, Yonggang; Zhu, Hongli; Fu, Kun; Hitz, Emily; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-01-27

    A simple one-step thermal pyrolysis route has been developed to prepare carbon membrane from a natural leaf. The carbonized leaf membrane possesses anisotropic surfaces and internal hierarchical porosity, exhibiting a high specific capacity of 360 mAh/g and a high initial Coulombic efficiency of 74.8% as a binder-free, current-collector-free anode for rechargeable sodium ion batteries. Moreover, large-area carbon membranes with low contact resistance are fabricated by simply stacking and carbonizing leaves, a promising strategy toward large-scale sodium-ion battery developments.

  8. Biomimetic polyesters and their role in ion transport across cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Jedliński, Z; Kurcok, P; Adamus, G; Juzwa, M

    2000-01-01

    Syntheses of biomimetic low-molecular weight poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutanoate mediated by three types of supramolecular catalysts are presented. The utility of these synthetic polyesters for preparation of artificial channels in phospholipid bilayers capable of sodium and calcium ion transport across cell membranes, is discussed. Further studies on possible applications of these bio-polymers for manufacturing drugs of prolonged activity are under way.

  9. Active sodium transport and the electrophysiology of rabbit colon.

    PubMed

    Schultz, S G; Frizzell, R A; Nellans, H N

    1977-05-12

    The electrophysiologic properties of rabbit colonic epithelial cells were investigated employing microelectrode techniques. Under open-circuit conditions, the transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) averaged 20 mV, serosa positive, and the intracellular electrical potential (psimc) averaged -32 mV, cell interior negative with respect to the mucosal solution; under short-circuit conditions, psimc averaged -46 mV. The addition of amiloride to the mucosal solution abolishes the transepithelial PD and active Na transport, and psimc is hyperpolarized to an average value of -53 mV. These results indicate that Na entry into the mucosal cell is a conductive process which, normally, depolarized psimc. The data obtained were interpreted using a double-membrane equivalent electrical circuit model of the "active Na transport pathway" involving two voltage-independent electromotive forces (emf's) and two voltage-independent resistances arrayed in series. Our observations are consistent with the notions that: (a) The emf's and resistances across the mucosal and baso-lateral membranes are determined predominantly by the emf (64 mV) and resistance of the Na entry process and the emf (53 mV) and resistance of the process responsible for active Na extrusion across the baso-lateral membranes: that is, the electrophysiological properties of the cell appear to be determined solely by the properties and processes responsible for transcellular active Na transport. The emf of the Na entry process is consistent with the notion that the Na activity in the intracellular transport pool is approximately one-tenth that in the mucosal solution or about 14 mM. (b) In the presence of amiloride, the transcellular conductance is essentially abolished and the total tissue conductance is the result of ionic diffusion through paracellular pathways. (c) The negative intracellular potential (with respect to the mucosal solution) is due primarily to the presence of a low resistance

  10. Transport through liquid membranes containing omeprazole and lansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Nagappa, A N; Pandi, P V; Mishra, P K; Girish, Rahul K; Shanmukh, I

    2002-12-01

    Omeprazole and lansoprazole, the therapeutically important drugs belonging to proton pump inhibitor category are extensively used in the treatment of gastric ulcers. Transport through liquid membranes generated by these drugs in lecithin-cholesterol mixture in series with a supporting membrane has been studied. The data obtained show the formation of liquid membrane in series with the supporting membrane. Transport of cations, chloride and bicarbonate ions in the presence liquid membranes generated by omeprazole and lanzoprazole indicate the modification in the permeability of various permeants.

  11. Analytical Applications of Transport Through Bulk Liquid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Ioana; Ruse, Elena; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Bunaciu, Andrei A

    2016-07-03

    This review discusses the results of research in the use of bulk liquid membranes in separation processes and preconcentration for analytical purposes. It includes some theoretical aspects, definitions, types of liquid membranes, and transport mechanism, as well as advantages of using liquid membranes in laboratory studies. These concepts are necessary to understand fundamental principles of liquid membrane transport. Due to the multiple advantages of liquid membranes several studies present analytical applications of the transport through liquid membranes in separation or preconcentration processes of metallic cations and some organic compounds, such as phenol and phenolic derivatives, organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, and drugs. This review presents coupled techniques such as separation through the liquid membrane coupled with flow injection analysis.

  12. ATP-dependent calcium transport across basal plasma membranes of human placental trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.J.; Kelley, L.K.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    As a first step in understanding the cellular basis of maternal-fetal calcium transfer, the authors examined the characteristics of calcium uptake by a highly purified preparation of the syncytiotrophoblast basal (fetal facing) plasma membrane. In the presence of nanomolar concentrations of free calcium, basal membranes demonstrated substantial ATP-dependent calcium uptake. This uptake required magnesium, was not significantly affected by Na/sup +/ or K/sup +/ (50 mM), or sodium azide (10 mM). Intravesicular calcium was rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium transport was significantly stimulated by the calcium-dependent regulatory protein calmodulin. Placental membrane fractions enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria also demonstrated ATP-dependent calcium uptake. In contrast to basal membrane, mitochondrial calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake by the ER was only 20% of that of basal membranes. They conclude that the placental basal plasma membrane possesses a high-affinity calcium transport system similar to that found in plasma membranes of a variety of cell types. This transporter is situated to permit it to function in vivo in maternal-fetal calcium transfer.

  13. Functional expression of sodium-glucose transporters in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scafoglio, Claudio; Hirayama, Bruce A.; Kepe, Vladimir; Liu, Jie; Ghezzi, Chiara; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Moatamed, Neda A.; Huang, Jiaoti; Koepsell, Hermann; Barrio, Jorge R.; Wright, Ernest M.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a major metabolic substrate required for cancer cell survival and growth. It is mainly imported into cells by facilitated glucose transporters (GLUTs). Here we demonstrate the importance of another glucose import system, the sodium-dependent glucose transporters (SGLTs), in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and investigate their role in cancer cell survival. Three experimental approaches were used: (i) immunohistochemical mapping of SGLT1 and SGLT2 distribution in tumors; (ii) measurement of glucose uptake in fresh isolated tumors using an SGLT-specific radioactive glucose analog, α-methyl-4-deoxy-4-[18F]fluoro-d-glucopyranoside (Me4FDG), which is not transported by GLUTs; and (iii) measurement of in vivo SGLT activity in mouse models of pancreatic and prostate cancer using Me4FDG-PET imaging. We found that SGLT2 is functionally expressed in pancreatic and prostate adenocarcinomas, and provide evidence that SGLT2 inhibitors block glucose uptake and reduce tumor growth and survival in a xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. We suggest that Me4FDG-PET imaging may be used to diagnose and stage pancreatic and prostate cancers, and that SGLT2 inhibitors, currently in use for treating diabetes, may be useful for cancer therapy. PMID:26170283

  14. Phenylalanine transport in guinea pig jejunum. A general mechanism for organic solute and sodium cotransport.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, F; Lherminier, M

    1982-08-01

    1. Sodium-dependent phenylalanine transport by guinea pig jejunum exhibits apparently pure K-type activation kinetics where Vmaxs is constant but KT decreases as [Na+] increases. At 0, 3 and 6 mM sodium, however, the results deviate from the expected hyperbolic kinetics and give a plateau. 2. This finding is interpreted in terms of the hypothesis that the outer face of the brush border membrane contains enough Na+ to support amino acid and Na+ cotransport at essentially maximal rates, even after preincubation of the tissues in vitro for several minutes in sodium-free buffers. 3. Sodium could move dynamically into this region from tissue stores and across the paracellular pathway. Passage of NaCl directly across the brush border also seems possible by reversal of the (neutral) Na+ and Cl- cotransport system. 4. To reconcile contradictory observations obtained in different laboratories, either with intact-epithelium preparations or with isolated brush border membrane vesicles, we include a theoretical analysis of the kinetics of organic solute and Na+ cotransport. For simplicity, this analysis is limited to cases of 1/2 stoichiometry and to neutral organic solutes such as sugars and monoamino-monocarboxylic amino acids. 5. Cotransport is explained in terms of a general, allosteric mechanism involving one site for S and another for Na+. There is no preferential order for binding, but only the ternary complex S-carrier-Na+ can translocate at quantitatively significant rates (obligatory activation kinetics). Since Na+ crosses the membrane as the free cation, under physiological conditions (inside-negative membrane potential) it will move towards its position of electrical equilibrium, hence unidirectionally. This explains why, with intact-tissue preparations, solute influx exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics. 6. By definition, cotransport kinetics are mixed type and involve effects on both KT and Vmaxs. Macroscopic deviations from this expected behaviour can be explained

  15. Sodium/proton antiport in brush-border-membrane vesicles isolated from rat small intestine and kidney.

    PubMed

    Murer, H; Hopfer, U; Kinne, R

    1976-03-15

    Studies on proton and Na+ transport by isolated intestinal and renal brush-border-membrane vesicles were carried out to test for the presence of an Na+/H+-exchange system. Proton transport was evaluated as proton transfer from the intravesicular space to the incubation medium by monitoring pH changes in the membrane suspension induced by sudden addition of cations. Na+ transport was determined as Na+ uptake into the vesicles by filtration technique. A sudden addition of sodium salts (but not choline) to the membrane suspension provokes an acidification of the incubation medium which is abolished by the addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. Pretreatment of the membranes with Triton X-100 prevents the acidification. The acidification is also not observed if the [K+] and proton conductance of the membranes have been increased by the simultaneous addition of valinomycin and carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone to the K+-rich incubation medium. Either valinomycin or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone when added alone do not alter the response of the membranes to the addition of Na+. Na+ uptake by brush-border microvilli is enhanced in the presence of a proton gradient directed from the intravesicular space to the incubation medium. Under these conditions a transient accumulation of Na+ inside the vesicles is observed. It is concluded that intestinal and renal brush-border membranes contain a NA+/H+ antiport system which catalyses an electroneutral exchange of Na+ against protons and consequently can produce a proton gradient in the presence of a concentration difference for Na+. This system might be involved in the active proton secretion of the small intestine and the proximal tubule of the kidney.

  16. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Miriam G; Nies, Anne T; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Schaeffeler, Elke; Tibboel, Dick; Schwab, Matthias; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2016-05-01

    Membrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown in drug-drug interaction and pharmacogenomic studies. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of human membrane transporters and their roles in pediatric pharmacotherapy. As they are involved in the transport of endogenous substrates, growth and development may be important determinants of their expression and activity. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge on human membrane transporters in pediatric drug disposition and effect. Existing pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic data on membrane substrate drugs frequently used in children are presented and related, where possible, to existing ex vivo data, providing a basis for developmental patterns for individual human membrane transporters. As data for individual transporters are currently still scarce, there is a striking information gap regarding the role of human membrane transporters in drug therapy in children.

  17. Sodium pump molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in two disparate ectotherms, and comparison with endotherms.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel; Hulbert, A J; Else, Paul L

    2005-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the lower sodium pump molecular activity observed in tissues of ectotherms compared to endotherms, is largely related to the lower levels of polyunsaturates and higher levels of monounsaturates found in the cell membranes of ectotherms. Marine-based ectotherms, however, have very polyunsaturated membranes, and in the current study, we measured molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in tissues of two disparate ectothermic species, the octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and the bearded dragon lizard (Pogona vitticeps), to determine whether the high level of membrane polyunsaturation generally observed in marine-based ectotherms is associated with an increased sodium pump molecular activity relative to other ectotherms. Phospholipids from all tissues of the octopus were highly polyunsaturated and contained high concentrations of the omega-3 polyunsaturate, docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 (n-3)). In contrast, phospholipids from bearded dragon tissues contained higher proportions of monounsaturates and lower proportions of polyunsaturates. Sodium pump molecular activity was only moderately elevated in tissues of the octopus compared to the bearded dragon, despite the much greater level of polyunsaturation in octopus membranes. When the current data were combined with data for the ectothermic cane toad, a significant (P = 0.003) correlation was observed between sodium pump molecular activity and the content of 22:6 (n-3) in the surrounding membrane. These results are discussed in relation to recent work which shows a similar relationship in endotherms.

  18. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes.

    PubMed

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P; Jaeger, Heinrich M; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-17

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane's electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  19. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Holt, Jason; Noy, Aleksandr; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  20. Low temperature thermal transport in partially perforated silicon nitride membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Yefremenko, V.; Wang, G.; Novosad, V.; Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Divan, R.; Chang, C. L.; Downes, T. P.; Mcmahon, J. J.; Bleem, L. E.; Crites, A. T.; Meyer, S. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-05-04

    The thermal transport in partially trenched silicon nitride membranes has been studied in the temperature range from 0.3 to 0.6 K, with the transition edge sensor (TES), the sole source of membrane heating. The test configuration consisted of Mo/Au TESs lithographically defined on silicon nitride membranes 1 {micro}m thick and 6 mm{sup 2} in size. Trenches with variable depth were incorporated between the TES and the silicon frame in order to manage the thermal transport. It was shown that sharp features in the membrane surface, such as trenches, significantly impede the modes of phonon transport. A nonlinear dependence of thermal resistance on trench depth was observed. Partial perforation of silicon nitride membranes to control thermal transport could be useful in fabricating mechanically robust detector devices.

  1. Effects of electrolytes on ion transport in Chitosan membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupiasih, N. N.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, charged polymer membranes are widely used for water purification applications involving control of water and ion transport, such as reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. In this study, we have explored the effects of electrolyte solutions on ion transport properties of chitosan synthetic membranes via concentration gradient driven transport. Also, the water uptake of those membranes, before (control) as well used membranes have studied. The membrane used was chitosan membrane 2%. The electrolyte solutions used were HCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2 and AlCl3, with various concentrations of 0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM, 100 mM and 1000 mM. Ion transport experiments were carried out in a cell membrane model which composed of two compartments and the potential difference of membrane was measured using Ag/AgCl calomel electrodes. Those measurements were conducted at ambient temperature 28.8 °C. The results showed that the current density (J) increased with increased in concentration gradient of solution. The current density was higher in electrolyte solution which has higher molar conductivity than those of a solution with a small molar conductivity. Meanwhile the current density was smaller in electrolyte solution which has larger Stokes radii than those of a solution with small Stokes radii. Except membrane which has been used in HCl solution, the water uptakes of the used membranes were greater than the control membrane. These results can develop and validate a common framework to interpret data of concentration gradient driven transport in chitosan synthetic membranes and to use it to design of membranes with improved performance.

  2. Reduction of thrombogenicity of PVC-based sodium selective membrane electrodes using heparin-modified chitosan.

    PubMed

    Badr, Ibrahim H A; Gouda, M; Abdel-Sattar, R; Sayour, Hossam E M

    2014-01-01

    Heparin-modified chitosan (H-chitosan) membrane was utilized to enhance biocompatibility of sodium selective membrane electrode based on the highly thrombogenic polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Sodium ion sensing film was prepared using PVC, sodium ionophore-X, potassium tetrakis(chlorophenyl)-borate, and o-nitrophenyloctylether. The PVC-based sensing film was sandwiched to chitosan or H-chitosan to prevent platelet adhesion on the surface of PVC. Potentiometric response characteristics of PVC-chitosan and PVC-H-chitosan membrane electrodes were found to be comparable to that of a control PVC based sodium-selective electrode. This indicates that chitosan and H-chitosan layers do not alter the response behaviour of the PVC-based sensing film. Biocompatibility of H-chitosan was confirmed by in vitro platelet adhesion study. The platelet adhesion investigations indicated that H-chitosan film is less thrombogenic compared to PVC, which could result in enhancement of biocompatibility of sodium selective membrane electrodes based on PVC, while maintaining the overall electrochemical performance of the PVC-based sensing film.

  3. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul [Allentown, PA; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  4. Electrophoretic Transport of Biomolecules through Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghua; Su, Xin; Wu, Ji; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophoretic transport of proteins across electrochemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes has been investigated. Small charged protein, lysozyme, was successfully pumped across MWCNT membranes by electric field while rejecting larger bovine serum albumin (BSA). Transport of the lysozome was reduced by a factor of about 30 in comparison to bulk mobility and consistent with prediction for hindered transport. Mobilities between 0.33-1.4×10-9 m2/V-s were observed and are approximately 10 fold faster than comparable ordered nanoporous membranes and are consistent with continuum models. For mixtures of BSA and lysozyme, complete rejection of BSA is seen with electrophoretic separations PMID:21338104

  5. Thermodynamics of Ionic Transport through Functionalized Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathee, Vikramjit; Qu, Siyi; Dilenschneider, Theodore; Phillip, William A.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    Through microphase separation of block copolymers, highly porous solid membranes may be assembled. Further functionalization with amine and sulfonic acid groups has demonstrated promise in exquisitely controlling the flux of charged species, and in particular multivalent ions. Using coarse-grained molecular simulations, we explore the essential thermodynamics underlying salt rejection in charge-functionalized membranes, and develop a model capable of linking the performance of these membranes to their molecular character through free energy calculations.

  6. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  7. Grafted functional groups on expanded tetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) support for fuel cell and water transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Fuller, Timothy J.; Jiang, Ruichun

    2017-01-24

    A method for forming a modified solid polymer includes a step of contacting a solid fluorinated polymer with a sodium sodium-naphthalenide solution to form a treated fluorinated solid polymer. The treated fluorinated solid polymer is contacted with carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, or sulfur trioxide to form a solid grafted fluorinated polymer. Characteristically, the grafted fluorinated polymer includes appended CO.sub.2H or SO.sub.2H or SO.sub.3H groups. The solid grafted fluorinated polymer is advantageously incorporated into a fuel cell as part of the ion-conducting membrane or a water transport membrane in a humidifier.

  8. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  9. Structural insights into the transport of small molecules across membranes

    PubMed Central

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    While hydrophobic small molecules often can freely permeate a lipid bilayer, ions and other polar molecules cannot and require transporters to mediate their transport. Recently, a number of important structures have been reported which have advanced our understanding of how membrane protein transporters function to transport small molecules. Structures of TbpA/B and HmuUV provided new insight into iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria while the structures of NarK, ASBT, and VcINDY revealed molecular details about the transport of nitrate, bile acids and dicarboxylates, respectively. The structure of the folate ECF transporter indicated that the S component likely undergoes a large conformational shift to mediate folate transport, while the cellulose synthase/transporter contains an elongated translocation pore for passage through the inner membrane. PMID:24681594

  10. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  11. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  12. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  13. The Role of Potassium in Active Transport of Sodium by the Toad Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Alvin; Leaf, Alexander

    1963-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the isolated urinary bladder of the toad, Bufo marinus, in order to explain the dependence of active sodium transport on the presence of potassium, in the serosal medium. Attempts to obtain evidence for coupled sodium-potassium transport by the serosal pump were unsuccessful; no relation between sodium transport and uptake of K42 from the serosal medium was demonstrable. Rather, the predominant effect of serosal potassium appeared to be operative at the mucosal permeability barrier, influencing the permeability of this surface to sodium. The mucosal effects of serosal potassium were correlated with effects on cellular cation content. When sodium Ringer's solution was used as serosal medium, removal of potassium resulted in significant decrease in tissue potassium content, commensurate increase in tissue sodium content, and marked depression of mucosal permeability and sodium transport. When choline replaced sodium in the serosal medium, removal of potassium resulted in only slight alterations of tissue electrolyte content, and effects on mucosal permeability and sodium transport were minimal. PMID:19873552

  14. Comparative Transport Activity of Intact Cells, Membrane Vesicles, and Mesosomes of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Robert A.; Thurman, Paul; Rogers, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sodium ion was shown to stimulate strongly the transport of l-glutamic acid into cells of Bacillus licheniformis 6346 His−. Lithium ion had a slight capacity to replace Na+ in this capacity, but K+ was without effect. Three of five amino acids tested. l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-alanine, were concentrated against a gradient in the cells. Intracellular pools of these amino acids were extractable with 5% trichloroacetic acid. Pools of l-histidine and l-lysine could not be detected. No evidence of active transport of lysine into cells could be detected, and histidine was taken up in the absence of chloramphenicol but not in its presence. The uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicle preparations was strongly stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and to a lesser extent by succinate. The presence of phenazine methosulfate increased uptake in the presence of succinate. Either l- or d-lactate and adenosine triphosphate were without effect. None of these compounds stimulated the uptake of glutamic acid by mesosomes, although some mesosome preparations contained separable membrane which was very active. NADH strongly stimulated the uptake of aspartic acid and alanine by membrane vesicles but had only a slight effect on the uptake of histidine and lysine. No evidence of active transport of any of the amino acids into mesosomes could be detected either in the presence or absence of NADH. NADH stimulation of the uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles was destroyed by exposure to light of 360 nm; this inactivation was reversible by vitamin K2(5) or K2(10). Sodium ion stimulated transport of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles. PMID:4347247

  15. Cortisol-sensitive urea transport across the gill basolateral membrane of the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta).

    PubMed

    Rodela, Tamara M; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Walsh, Patrick J; McDonald, M Danielle

    2009-08-01

    Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) use a unique pulsatile urea excretion mechanism that allows urea to be voided in large pulses via the periodic insertion or activation of a branchial urea transporter. The precise cellular and subcellular location of the facilitated diffusion mechanism(s) remains unclear. An in vitro basolateral membrane vesicle (BLMV) preparation was used to test the hypothesis that urea movement across the gill basolateral membrane occurs through a cortisol-sensitive carrier-mediated mechanism. Toadfish BLMVs demonstrated two components of urea uptake: a linear element at high external urea concentrations, and a phloretin-sensitive saturable constituent (K(m) = 0.24 mmol/l; V(max) = 6.95 micromol x mg protein(-1) x h(-1)) at low urea concentrations (<1 mmol/l). BLMV urea transport in toadfish was unaffected by in vitro treatment with ouabain, N-ethylmaleimide, or the absence of sodium, conditions that are known to inhibit sodium-coupled and proton-coupled urea transport in vertebrates. Transport kinetics were temperature sensitive with a Q(10) > 2, further suggestive of carrier-mediated processes. Our data provide evidence that a basolateral urea facilitated transporter accelerates the movement of urea between the plasma and gills to enable the pulsatile excretion of urea. Furthermore, in vivo infusion of cortisol caused a significant 4.3-fold reduction in BLMV urea transport capacity in lab-crowded fish, suggesting that cortisol inhibits the recruitment of urea transporters to the basolateral membrane, which may ultimately affect the size of the urea pulse event in gulf toadfish.

  16. Role of plasma membrane transporters in muscle metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, A; Fandos, C; Palacín, M

    2000-01-01

    Muscle plays a major role in metabolism. Thus it is a major glucose-utilizing tissue in the absorptive state, and changes in muscle insulin-stimulated glucose uptake alter whole-body glucose disposal. In some conditions, muscle preferentially uses lipid substrates, such as fatty acids or ketone bodies. Furthermore, muscle is the main reservoir of amino acids and protein. The activity of many different plasma membrane transporters, such as glucose carriers and transporters of carnitine, creatine and amino acids, play a crucial role in muscle metabolism by catalysing the influx or the efflux of substrates across the cell surface. In some cases, the membrane transport process is subjected to intense regulatory control and may become a potential pharmacological target, as is the case with the glucose transporter GLUT4. The goal of this review is the molecular characterization of muscle membrane transporter proteins, as well as the analysis of their possible regulatory role. PMID:10903126

  17. Transport Activity of the Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 Is Enhanced by Different Isoforms of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, Christina; Becker, Holger M.; McKenna, Robert; Deitmer, Joachim W.

    2011-01-01

    Transport metabolons have been discussed between carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and several membrane transporters. We have now studied different CA isoforms, expressed in Xenopus oocytes alone and together with the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1), to determine their catalytic activity and their ability to enhance NBCe1 transport activity. pH measurements in intact oocytes indicated similar activity of CAI, CAII and CAIII, while in vitro CAIII had no measurable activity and CAI only 30% of the activity of CAII. All three CA isoforms increased transport activity of NBCe1, as measured by the transport current and the rate of intracellular sodium rise in oocytes. Two CAII mutants, altered in their intramolecular proton pathway, CAII-H64A and CAII-Y7F, showed significant catalytic activity and also enhanced NBCe1 transport activity. The effect of CAI, CAII, and CAII mutants on NBCe1 activity could be reversed by blocking CA activity with ethoxyzolamide (EZA, 10 µM), while the effect of the less EZA-sensitive CAIII was not reversed. Our results indicate that different CA isoforms and mutants, even if they show little enzymatic activity in vitro, may display significant catalytic activity in intact cells, and that the ability of CA to enhance NBCe1 transport appears to depend primarily on its catalytic activity. PMID:22076132

  18. Purification and identification of the functional sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transport glycoprotein from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Radian, R; Bendahan, A; Kanner, B I

    1986-11-25

    Using the reconstitution conditions developed recently (Radian, R., and Kanner, B. I. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 11859-11865) we have now purified the sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter from rat brain to apparent homogeneity. A partially purified transporter preparation was passed over wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose 6MB and non-bound proteins were washed away. The transport activity, as expressed upon reconstitution of the protein into liposomes, was eluted by a solution containing Triton X-100 and N-acetylglucosamine. The specific transport activity was increased almost 400-fold over that of the crude extract. Taking into account an approximately 2.5-fold inactivation during the lectin column chromatography, the actual purification is about 1000-fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis of the active fractions revealed one band of 80 kDa and small amounts of a band which ran at an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa. The ratio between the two could be experimentally changed such as, for instance, by lyophilization. Polyclonal antibodies were prepared against the 80-kDa band which also cross-reacted with the 160-kDa band, indicating that the latter apparently represents a dimer form of the first. Using Protein A-Sepharose Cl-4B and the antibody against the 80-kDa band, we were able to quantitatively immunoprecipitate the potential gamma-aminobutyric acid transport activity from a crude transporter preparation. The pure transporter preparation exhibited the same features of the transporter in synaptic plasma membrane vesicles, namely dependence on sodium and chloride, electrogeneity, affinity, and efflux and exchange properties. We conclude that the 80-kDa band represents the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter.

  19. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  20. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  1. Change of ruminal sodium transport in sheep during dietary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Etschmann, Benjamin; Suplie, Annabelle; Martens, Holger

    2009-02-01

    Rumen adaptation plays an important role in the productive cycle of dairy cattle. In this study, the time course of functional rumen epithelium adaptation after a change from hay feeding (ad libitum) to a mixed hay/concentrate diet was monitored by measuring Na+ transport rates in Ussing chamber experiments. A total of 18 sheep were subjected to different periods of mixed hay/concentrate feeding ranging from 0 weeks (control; hay ad libitum) to 12 weeks (800 g hay plus 800 g concentrate per day in two equal portions). For each animal, the net absorption of sodium was measured following the mixed hay/concentrate feeding period. Net Na transport, Jnet, significantly rose from 2.15 +/- 0.43 (control) to 3.73 +/- 1.02 microeq x cm(-2) x h(-1) after one week of mixed hay/ concentrate diet, reached peak levels of 4.55 +/- 0.50 microEq x cm(-2) x h(-1) after four weeks and levelled out at 3.92 +/- 0.36 microeq x cm(-2) x h(-1) after 12 weeks of mixed feeding. Thus, 73% of functional adaptation occurred during the first week after diet change. This is in apparent contrast to findings that morphological adaptation takes approximately six weeks to reach peak levels. Hence, early functional adaptation to a mixed hay/concentrate diet is characterised by enhanced Na absorption rates per epithelial cell. Absorption rates are likely to be further enhanced by proliferative effects on the rumen epithelium (number and size of papillae) when concentrate diets are fed over longer periods of time. Early functional adaptation without surface area enlargement of the rumen epithelium appears to be the first step in coping with altered fermentation rates following diet change.

  2. Electrolyte transport in distal colon of sodium-depleted rats: Effect of sodium repletion

    SciTech Connect

    Turnamian, S.G.; Binder, H.J. )

    1988-09-01

    Dietary sodium depletion increases plasma aldosterone level and, as a result, induces amiloride-sensitive electrogenic sodium absorption and electrogenic potassium secretion and stimulates Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in rat distal colon, while inhibiting electroneutral sodium chloride absorption. To assess the events that occur as the aldosterone-stimulated colon reverts to normal, unidirectional {sup 22}Na and {sup 36}Cl fluxes were measured under voltage-clamp conditions across isolated distal colonic mucosa of rats that were initially dietary sodium depleted for 7 days and then sodium repleted for varying periods of time before the study. Within 8 h of dietary sodium repletion, plasma aldosterone level and Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity declined to normal, amiloride-sensitive electrogenic sodium absorption decreased by >90%, and active electrogenic potassium secretion also decreased markedly. In contrast, electroneutral sodium chloride absorption did not completely return to levels seen in normal animals until {approximately}64-68 h. These results demonstrate that maintenance of electrogenic sodium absorption and potassium secretion are directly dependent on elevated plasma aldosterone levels. The inhibition of electroneutral sodium absorption, although initiated by excess aldosterone, persists after normalization of the plasma aldosterone level, thereby implying that the inhibition is dependent on additional factor(s).

  3. Changes in erythrocyte sodium, sodium transport and /sup 3/H ouabain binding capacity during digoxin administration in the pig

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, J.; Hawkins, M.; Swaminathan, R.

    1983-02-14

    Time course of the changes in erthrocyte sodium content, sodium transport, /sup 3/H ouabain binding capacity and Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase activity were measured for 14 weeks, in 6 young pigs treated with digoxin and in 6 control pigs. After one week of treatment the erythrocyte sodium content increased from 5.4 mmol/kg cells and the efflux rate constant of sodium decreased. With prolonged treatment the erythrocyte sodium content returned to normal and the /sup 3/H ouabain binding capacity increased by week 5. The plasma digoxin concentration decreased from 1.1 ng/ml at week 5 to 0.6 ng/ml at week 8 probably due to the decline in dose (..mu..g/kg) of digoxin with age. The efflux rate constant of sodium and Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase activity were higher towards the end of treatment. It is concluded that with prolonged administration of digoxin there is an increase in erythrocyte sodium pump units.

  4. Mitochondrial ascorbic acid transport is mediated by a low-affinity form of the sodium-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Montesino, Carola; Roa, Francisco J; Peña, Eduardo; González, Mauricio; Sotomayor, Kirsty; Inostroza, Eveling; Muñoz, Carolina A; González, Iván; Maldonado, Mafalda; Soliz, Carlos; Reyes, Alejandro M; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I

    2014-05-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of the redox metabolism of mitochondria under normal and pathological conditions, our knowledge regarding the transport of vitamin C across mitochondrial membranes remains far from complete. We report here that human HEK-293 cells express a mitochondrial low-affinity ascorbic acid transporter that molecularly corresponds to SVCT2, a member of the sodium-coupled ascorbic acid transporter family 2. The transporter SVCT1 is absent from HEK-293 cells. Confocal colocalization experiments with anti-SVCT2 and anti-organelle protein markers revealed that most of the SVCT2 immunoreactivity was associated with mitochondria, with minor colocalization at the endoplasmic reticulum and very low immunoreactivity at the plasma membrane. Immunoblotting of proteins extracted from highly purified mitochondrial fractions confirmed that SVCT2 protein was associated with mitochondria, and transport analysis revealed a sigmoidal ascorbic acid concentration curve with an apparent ascorbic acid transport Km of 0.6mM. Use of SVCT2 siRNA for silencing SVCT2 expression produced a major decrease in mitochondrial SVCT2 immunoreactivity, and immunoblotting revealed decreased SVCT2 protein expression by approximately 75%. Most importantly, the decreased protein expression was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the mitochondrial ascorbic acid transport rate. Further studies using HEK-293 cells overexpressing SVCT2 at the plasma membrane revealed that the altered kinetic properties of mitochondrial SVCT2 are due to the ionic intracellular microenvironment (low in sodium and high in potassium), with potassium acting as a concentration-dependent inhibitor of SVCT2. We discarded the participation of two glucose transporters previously described as mitochondrial dehydroascorbic acid transporters; GLUT1 is absent from mitochondria and GLUT10 is not expressed in HEK-293 cells. Overall, our data indicate that intracellular SVCT2 is localized in mitochondria, is

  5. Effects of sodium hypochlorite exposure mode on PES/PVP ultrafiltration membrane degradation.

    PubMed

    Causserand, Christel; Pellegrin, Bastien; Rouch, Jean-Christophe

    2015-11-15

    Drinking water production plants using membrane filtration processes report membrane failure issues. According to the literature, membrane degradation is often induced by exposure to sodium hypochlorite, an oxidant widely used during in-place cleanings. The present study focused on quantifying the effect of membrane exposure mode to hypochlorite on properties modifications of a PES/PVP ultrafiltration membrane widely used for drinking water production. For this purpose effects of sodium hypochlorite concentration, contact duration and exposure mode (static or dynamic) were investigated. The pH of the hypochlorite solution was set to 8 as it was demonstrated in numerous previous works that the pH range 7-8 leads to the most severe modification in the membrane characteristics. Membrane degradation was monitored at molecular scale by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and at macroscopic scale by pure water permeability and elongation at break measurements. The results obtained in static (soaking) and dynamic (filtration and filtration/backwashing cycles) hypochlorite exposure modes indicated that PES/PVP membrane degradation progress was predominantly governed by hypochlorite oxidation rate. In the tested conditions, mechanical stress (pressure differentials) did not significantly contribute to membrane ageing. The correlation between molecular and macroscopic characterizations demonstrated that PVP degradation is responsible for the membrane integrity loss. A linear relationship between the loss of ductility of the membrane and the progress of the PVP degradation was obtained whatever the exposure mode. Thanks to experiments conducted at various hypochlorite concentrations and exposure durations, the hypochlorite dose parameter (hypochlorite concentration times contact time), widely used in the literature, was demonstrated to be inappropriate to describe the degradation rate: the hypochlorite concentration impact was shown to be dominating the

  6. Transport of heptafluorostearate across model membranes. Membrane transport of long-chain fatty acid anions I.

    PubMed

    Schmider, W; Fahr, A; Blum, H E; Kurz, G

    2000-05-01

    Heptafluorostearic acid, an isogeometric derivative of stearic acid, has a pK(a) value of about 0.5. To evaluate the suitability of heptafluorostearate as model compound for anions of long-chain fatty acids in membrane transport, monolayer and liposome studies were performed with lipid mixtures containing phospholipids;-cholesterol-heptafluorostearate or stearate (100:40:20 molar ratios). Transfer of heptafluorostearate and stearate from liposomes to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was followed by measuring the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. The percentage of heptafluorostearate, equivalent to the amount placed in their outer monolayer, transferred from liposomes (120;-130 nm diameter) to BSA was 55.7 +/- 3.7% within 10 min at 25 degrees C and 55 +/- 2% within 5 min at 37 degrees C. Slow transfer of 22.7 +/- 2.5% of heptafluorostearate at 25 degrees C followed with a half-life of 2.3 +/- 0.4 h and of 20 +/- 4% at 37 degrees C with a half-life of 0.9 +/- 0.1 h until the final equilibrium distributions between BSA and liposomes were reached, 79 +/- 6% to 21 +/- 5% at 25 degrees C and 75 +/- 5% to 25 +/- 4% at 37 degrees C. The pseudounimolecular rate constants for flip-flop of heptafluorostearate equal k(FF,25) = 0.24 +/- 0.05 h(-) and k(FF,37) = 0.6 +/- 0.1 h(-), respectively. By comparison, transfer of stearate required only 3 min to reach equilibrium distribution. The difference between heptafluorostearate and stearate may be explained by a rapid flip-flop movement of the un-ionized fatty acids which exist in different concentrations in accordance with their pK(a) values. Half-life of flip-flop of heptafluorostearate makes it suitable to study mediated membrane transport of long-chain fatty acid anions.

  7. Hydroxide Solvation and Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-01-27

    Understanding hydroxide solvation and transport in anion exchange membranes (AEMs) can provide important insight into the design principles of these new membranes. To accurately model hydroxide solvation and transport, we developed a new multiscale reactive molecular dynamics model for hydroxide in aqueous solution, which was then subsequently modified for an AEM material. With this model, we investigated the hydroxide solvation structure and transport mechanism in the membrane. We found that a relatively even separation of the rigid side chains produces a continuous overlapping region for hydroxide transport that is made up of the first hydration shell of the tethered cationic groups. Our results show that hydroxide has a significant preference for this overlapping region, transporting through it and between the AEM side chains with substantial contributions from both vehicular (standard diffusion) and Grotthuss (proton hopping) mechanisms. Comparison of the AEM with common proton exchange membranes (PEMs) showed that the excess charge is less delocalized in the AEM than the PEMs, which is correlated with a higher free energy barrier for proton transfer reactions. The vehicular mechanism also contributes considerably more than the Grotthuss mechanism for hydroxide transport in the AEM, while our previous studies of PEM systems showed a larger contribution from the Grotthuss mechanism than the vehicular mechanism for proton transport. The activation energy barrier for hydroxide diffusion in the AEM is greater than that for proton diffusion in PEMs, implying a more significant enhancement of ion transport in the AEM at elevated temperatures.

  8. Hydroxide Solvation and Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chen; Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-01-27

    Understanding hydroxide solvation and transport in anion exchange membranes (AEMs) can provide important insight into the design principles of these new membranes. To accurately model hydroxide solvation and transport, we developed a new multiscale reactive molecular dynamics model for hydroxide in aqueous solution, which was then subsequently modified for an AEM material. With this model, we investigated the hydroxide solvation structure and transport mechanism in the membrane. We found that a relatively even separation of the rigid side chains produces a continuous overlapping region for hydroxide transport that is made up of the first hydration shell of the tethered cationic groups. Our results show that hydroxide has a significant preference for this overlapping region, transporting through it and between the AEM side chains with substantial contributions from both vehicular (standard diffusion) and Grotthuss (proton hopping) mechanisms. Comparison of the AEM with common proton exchange membranes (PEMs) showed that the excess charge is less delocalized in the AEM than the PEMs, which is correlated with a higher free energy barrier for proton transfer reactions. The vehicular mechanism also contributes considerably more than the Grotthuss mechanism for hydroxide transport in the AEM, while our previous studies of PEM systems showed a larger contribution from the Grotthuss mechanism than the vehicular mechanism for proton transport. The activation energy barrier for hydroxide diffusion in the AEM is greater than that for proton diffusion in PEMs, implying a more significant enhancement of ion transport in the AEM at elevated temperatures.

  9. Simulating and Modeling Transport Through Atomically Thin Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Joseph; Eaves, Joel

    2014-03-01

    The world is running out of clean portable water. The efficacy of water desalination technologies using porous materials is a balance between membrane selectivity and solute throughput. These properties are just starting to be understood on the nanoscale, but in the limit of atomically thin membranes it is unclear whether one can apply typical continuous time random walk models. Depending on the size of the pore and thickness of the membrane, mass transport can range from single stochastic passage events to continuous flow describable by the usual hydrodynamic equations. We present a study of mass transport through membranes of various pore geometries using reverse nonequilibrium simulations, and analyze transport rates using stochastic master equations.

  10. Water and Molecular Transport across Nanopores in Monolayer Graphene Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Doojoon; O'Hern, Sean; Kidambi, Piran; Boutilier, Michael; Song, Yi; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Kong, Jing; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2015-11-01

    Graphene's atomic thickness and high tensile strength allow it to outstand as backbone material for next-generation high flux separation membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations predicted that a single-layer graphene membrane could exhibit high permeability and selectivity for water over ions/molecules, qualifying as novel water desalination membranes. However, experimental investigation of water and molecular transport across graphene nanopores had remained barely explored due to the presence of intrinsic defects and tears in graphene. We introduce two-step methods to seal leakage across centimeter scale single-layer graphene membranes create sub-nanometer pores using ion irradiation and oxidative etching. Pore creation parameters were varied to explore the effects of created pore structures on water and molecular transport driven by forward osmosis. The results demonstrate the potential of nanoporous graphene as a reliable platform for high flux nanofiltration membranes.

  11. Phosphate transport by rat intestinal basolateral-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, F K; Kikuchi, K; Arab, N

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of phosphate transport across intestinal basolateral membranes of the rat were determined by using enriched preparations in which uphill Na+-dependent D-glucose transport could not be demonstrated, but ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport was present. Phosphate transport was saturable, Na+-dependent and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Vmax. was 51.1 +/- 4.2 pmol/10 s per mg of protein and Km was 14 +/- 3.9 microM. The transport process was electroneutral. Tracer-exchange experiments and counter-transport studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-Pi carrier at the basolateral membrane. The presence of inside-positive membrane potential did not enhance phosphate uptake, indicating that the Na+ effect is secondary to the presence of the Na+-Pi carrier rather than an induction of positive membrane potential. The stoichiometry of this carrier at pH 7.4 was 2 Na+:1 phosphate, as shown by direct studies utilizing the static-head method. These studies are the first to determine the presence of a phosphate carrier at the basolateral membrane. PMID:3663094

  12. Hijacking membrane transporters for arsenic phytoextraction

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Melissa S.; McKinney, Elizabeth C.; Meagher, Richard B.; Smith, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid and recognized carcinogen. Arsenate and arsenite are the most common arsenic species available for uptake by plants. As an inorganic phosphate (Pi) analog, arsenate is acquired by plant roots through endogenous Pi transport systems. Inside the cell, arsenate is reduced to the thiol-reactive form arsenite. Glutathione (GSH)-conjugates of arsenite may be extruded from the cell or sequestered in vacuoles by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters. In the present study we sought to enhance both plant arsenic uptake through Pi transporter overexpression, and plant arsenic tolerance through ABC transporter overexpression. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing the high-affinity Pi transporter family members, AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7, are hypersensitive to arsenate due to increased arsenate uptake. These plants do not exhibit increased sensitivity to arsenite. Co-overexpression of the yeast ABC transporter YCF1 in combination with AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7 suppresses the arsenate-sensitive phenotype while further enhancing arsenic uptake. Taken together, our results support an arsenic transport mechanism in which arsenate uptake is increased through Pi transporter overexpression, and arsenic tolerance is enhanced through YCF1-mediated vacuolar sequestration. This work substantiates the viability of coupling enhanced uptake and vacuolar sequestration as a means for developing a prototypical engineered arsenic hyperaccumulator. PMID:23108027

  13. Sodium channels in membrane vesicles from cultured toad bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Moran, A.; Rossier, B.C.; Garty, H. Ben Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva Institut de Pharmacologie de l'Universite de Lausanne )

    1988-04-01

    Electrical potential-driven {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes were measured in membrane vesicles prepared from TBM-18(cl23) cells (a clone of the established cell line TB-M). Fifty to seventy percent of the tracer uptake in vesicles derived from cells that were cultivated on a porous support were blocked by the diuretic amiloride. The amiloride inhibition constant was <0.1 {mu}M, indicating that this flux is mediated by the apical Na{sup +}-specific channels. Vesicles prepared from cells that were not grown on a porous support exhibited much smaller amiloride-sensitive fluxes. Two Ca{sup 2+}-dependent processes that down-regulated the channel conductance and were previously identified in native epithelia were found in the cultured cells as well. Vesicles isolated from cells that were preincubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M aldosterone for 16-20 h exhibited higher amiloride-sensitive conductance than vesicles derived from control, steroid-depleted cells. Thus membrane derived from TBM-18(cl23) cells can be used to characterize the epithelial Na{sup +} channel and its hormonal regulation.

  14. Surface expression of sodium channels and transporters in rat kidney: effects of dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2009-11-01

    The abundance of Na transport proteins in the luminal membrane of the rat kidney was assessed using in situ biotinylation and immunoblotting. When animals were fed an Na-deficient diet for 1 wk, the amounts of epithelial Na channel (ENaC) beta-subunit (beta-ENaC) and gamma-subunit (gamma-ENaC) and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) protein in the surface fraction increased relative to controls by 1.9-, 3.5-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. The amounts of the luminal Na/H exchanger (NHE3) and the luminal Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) did not change significantly. The increases in ENaC subunits were mimicked by administration of aldosterone for 1 wk, but the increase in NCC was not. When the animals were fed a high-Na (5% NaCl) diet for 1 wk, the surface expression of beta-ENaC increased by 50%, whereas that of the other membrane proteins did not change, relative to controls. The biochemical parameter most strongly affected by dietary Na was the abundance of the 65-kDa cleaved form of gamma-ENaC at the surface. This increased by 8.5-fold with Na depletion and decreased by 40% with Na loading. The overall 14-fold change reflected regulation of the total abundance of the subunit as well as the fraction of the subunit protein in the cleaved form. We conclude that cleavage of gamma-ENaC and its expression at the apical surface play a major role in the regulation of renal Na reabsorption.

  15. Roles and Transport of Sodium and Potassium in Plants.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Al Shiblawi, Fouad Razzaq; Sentenac, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    The two alkali cations Na(+) and K(+) have similar relative abundances in the earth crust but display very different distributions in the biosphere. In all living organisms, K(+) is the major inorganic cation in the cytoplasm, where its concentration (ca. 0.1 M) is usually several times higher than that of Na(+). Accumulation of Na(+) at high concentrations in the cytoplasm results in deleterious effects on cell metabolism, e.g., on photosynthetic activity in plants. Thus, Na(+) is compartmentalized outside the cytoplasm. In plants, it can be accumulated at high concentrations in vacuoles, where it is used as osmoticum. Na(+) is not an essential element in most plants, except in some halophytes. On the other hand, it can be a beneficial element, by replacing K(+) as vacuolar osmoticum for instance. In contrast, K(+) is an essential element. It is involved in electrical neutralization of inorganic and organic anions and macromolecules, pH homeostasis, control of membrane electrical potential, and the regulation of cell osmotic pressure. Through the latter function in plants, it plays a role in turgor-driven cell and organ movements. It is also involved in the activation of enzymes, protein synthesis, cell metabolism, and photosynthesis. Thus, plant growth requires large quantities of K(+) ions that are taken up by roots from the soil solution, and then distributed throughout the plant. The availability of K(+) ions in the soil solution, slowly released by soil particles and clays, is often limiting for optimal growth in most natural ecosystems. In contrast, due to natural salinity or irrigation with poor quality water, detrimental Na(+) concentrations, toxic for all crop species, are present in many soils, representing 6 % to 10 % of the earth's land area. Three families of ion channels (Shaker, TPK/KCO, and TPC) and 3 families of transporters (HAK, HKT, and CPA) have been identified so far as contributing to K(+) and Na(+) transport across the plasmalemma and

  16. Selective transport of monoamine neurotransmitters by human plasma membrane monoamine transporter and organic cation transporter 3.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haichuan; Wang, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) and organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) are the two most prominent low-affinity, high-capacity (i.e., uptake(2)) transporters for endogenous biogenic amines. Using the Flp-in system, we expressed human PMAT (hPMAT) and human OCT3 (hOCT3) at similar levels in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Parallel and detailed kinetics analysis revealed distinct and seemingly complementary patterns for the two transporters in transporting monoamine neurotransmitters. hPMAT is highly selective toward serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine, with the rank order of transport efficiency (V(max)/K(m)) being: dopamine, 5-HT ≫ histamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine. The substrate preference of hPMAT toward these amines is substantially driven by large (up to 15-fold) distinctions in its apparent binding affinities (K(m)). In contrast, hOCT3 is less selective than hPMAT toward the monoamines, and the V(max)/K(m) rank order for hOCT3 is: histamine > norepinephrine, epinephrine > dopamine >5-HT. It is noteworthy that hOCT3 demonstrated comparable (≤2-fold difference) K(m) toward all amines, and distinctions in V(max) played an important role in determining its differential transport efficiency toward the monoamines. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that hPMAT is expressed at much higher levels than hOCT3 in most human brain areas, whereas hOCT3 is selectively and highly expressed in adrenal gland and skeletal muscle. Our results suggest that hOCT3 represents a major uptake(2) transporter for histamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. hPMAT, on the other hand, is a major uptake(2) transporter for 5-HT and dopamine and may play a more important role in transporting these two neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.

  17. Current topics in membranes and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinzeller, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Expression of the Oxytocin and Vasopressin Genes; Steroid Effects on Excitable Membranes: The Secretory Vesicle in Processing and Secretion of Neuropeptides: and Steroid Hormone Influences on Cyclic AMP-Generating Systems.

  18. Effect of chaotropic anions on the sodium transport by the Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Ayuyan, Artem G; Sokolov, Valerij S; Lenz, Alexander A; Apell, Hans-Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    The effect of choline iodide, bromide and chloride on the kinetics of the electrogenic sodium transport by the Na,K-ATPase was investigated in a model system of ATPase-containing membrane fragments adsorbed on the lipid bilayer membrane. The kinetic parameters of Na(+) transport were determined from short circuit currents after fast release of ATP from its caged precursor. The falling phase of the current transients could be fitted by a single exponential with the time constant, tau (2). Its temperature dependence allowed an estimation of the activation energy of the rate-limiting reaction step, the conformation transition E(1)/E(2). Choline iodide and bromide caused a decrease of the activation energy as well as the overall rate of the process expressed as the pre-exponential factor A of the Arrhenius equation. If choline iodide or bromide were present on the cytoplasmic and extracellular sides of the protein, the temperature dependent changes were more pronounced than when present on the cytoplasmic side only. These results can be explained by an effect of the anions on water structure on the extracellular surface of the protein, where a deep access channel connects the ion-binding sites with the solution. Chloride ions also caused a deceleration of the electrogenic transport, however, in contrast to iodide or bromide, they did not affect the activation energy, and were more effective when added on the cytoplasmic side. This effect can be explained by asymmetric screening of the negative surface charges which leads to a transmembrane electric potential that modifies the ion transfer.

  19. Gating effects in Halobacterium halobium membrane transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    The transport of Na(+) via an H(+)/Na(+) antiporter and of aspartate and serine via Na(+)/amino acid symport systems was studied in Halobacterium halobium cell envelope vesicles. Gradients for H(+) were produced by illuminating the bacteriorhodopsin-containing vesicles at different light intensities, and the rate and extent of Na(+) transport were followed as functions of the electrochemical potential difference for protons. The coupling of Na(+) and H(+) gradients suggested a translocation stoichiometry of 2H(+)/Na(+) for the antiporter. The rate of Na(+) transport increases steeply above a critical transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient, and since the electrical and the chemical potentials of H(+) at this threshold point vary with the experimental conditions, while the sum of these potentials is constant, it was concluded that the gating of the Na(+) transport is caused by the total electrochemical gradient.

  20. Chloroplast membrane transport: interplay of prokaryotic and eukaryotic traits.

    PubMed

    Vothknecht, Ute C; Soll, Jürgen

    2005-07-18

    Chloroplasts are specific plant organelles of prokaryotic origin. They are separated from the surrounding cell by a double membrane, which represents an effective barrier for the transport of metabolites and proteins. Specific transporters in the inner envelope membrane have been described, which facilitate the exchange of metabolites. In contrast, the outer envelope has been viewed for a long time as a molecular sieve that offers a mere size constriction to the passage of molecules. This view has been challenged lately, and a number of specific and regulated pore proteins of the outer envelope (OEPs) have been identified. These pores seem to have originated by adaptation of outer membrane proteins of the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast. In a similar fashion, the transport of proteins across the two envelope membranes is achieved by two hetero-oligomeric protein complexes called Toc (translocon in the outer envelope of chloroplasts) and Tic (translocon in the inner envelope of chloroplasts). The phylogenetic provenance of the translocon components is less clear, but at least the channel protein of the Toc translocon is of cyanobacterial origin. Characteristic of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts is furthermore a specialized internal membrane system, the thylakoids, on which the components of the photosynthetic machinery are located. Despite the importance of this membrane, very little is known about its phylogenetic origin or the manner of its synthesis. Vipp1 appears to be a ubiquitous component of thylakoid formation, while in chloroplasts of land plants, additionally a vesicle transport system of eukaryotic origin might be involved in this process.

  1. Dehydration of dioxane by pervaporation using filled blend membranes of polyvinyl alcohol and sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Kuila, Sunil Baran; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2014-01-30

    Pervaporation membranes were made by solution blending of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate (SA). Accordingly, five different blends with PVA:SA weight ratio of 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, 20:80 and 10:90 designated as PS1, PS2, PS3, PS4 and PS5, respectively, were prepared. Each of these blends was crosslinked with 2, 4 and 6 wt% glutaraldehyde and the resulting fifteen (5 × 3) membranes were used for pervaporative separation of 90 wt% dioxane in water. The membranes made from PS4 and PS5 were not stable during pervaporation experiments. Among the stable membranes PS3 membrane crosslinked with 2 wt% glutaraldehyde showed the best results for flux and selectivity. Thus, it was filled with nano size sodium montmorillonite filler and used for separation of dioxane-water mixtures over the entire concentration range of 80-99.5 wt% dioxane in water. The membranes were also characterized by mechanical properties, FTIR, SEM, DTA-TGA and XRD.

  2. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  3. Natural polyphenols: Influence on membrane transporters

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Saad Abdulrahman; Sulaiman, Amal Ajaweed; Alhaddad, Hasan; Alhadidi, Qasim

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has focused on the use of natural polyphenolic compounds as nutraceuticals since they showed a wide range of bioactivities and exhibited protection against variety of age-related disorders. Polyphenols have variable potencies to interact, and hence alter the activities of various transporter proteins, many of them classified as anion transporting polypeptide-binding cassette transporters like multidrug resistance protein and p-glycoprotein. Some of the efflux transporters are, generally, linked with anticancer and antiviral drug resistance; in this context, polyphenols may be beneficial in modulating drug resistance by increasing the efficacy of anticancer and antiviral drugs. In addition, these effects were implicated to explain the influence of dietary polyphenols on drug efficacy as result of food-drug interactions. However, limited data are available about the influence of these components on uptake transporters. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review the potential efficacies of polyphenols in modulating the functional integrity of uptake transporter proteins, including those terminated the effect of neurotransmitters, and their possible influence in neuropharmacology. PMID:27069731

  4. Chloride ion transport into pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, G W; Gabriel, S E

    1988-01-01

    1. This study was carried out to determine the types and activities of carrier proteins which transport the chloride ion in pig jejunal brush-border membranes, with an emphasis on studying the properties of chloride conductance activity in vesicles prepared from these membranes. 2. Sodium-chloride co-transport activity was not detected in this tissue. A sodium-proton antiport with typical amiloride sensitivity was present. An anion exchanger linking chloride to hydroxyl or bicarbonate ions was also found in the pig jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles. 3. Chloride conductance activity in this system was specifically dependent on the buffering agents used for vesicle preparation. Conductance activity could not be demonstrated in vesicles prepared in imidazolium acetate or in HEPES-Tris buffers. HEPES-tetramethylammonium buffering of vesicles in the chloride uptake system produced a significant conductance response to a potassium gradient plus valinomycin. 4. Chloride conductance showed saturable kinetics with respect to substrate concentration, with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of approximately 116 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 132 nmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. 5. Preliminary screening of potential inhibitors of chloride conductance showed only minimal inhibitor effects of SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-sulphonic acid), anthracene-9-carboxylate, N-phenylanthranilate and piretanide. 6. The conductance activity in pig jejunal vesicles appears to have stringent buffer requirements, and to be relatively insensitive to the effects of reported conductance inhibitors. PMID:2466986

  5. Single Molecule Imaging of Conformational Dynamics in Sodium-Coupled Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) proteins remove neurotransmitters released into the synapse through a transport process driven by the physiological sodium ion (Na[superscript +]) gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, as well as by antidepressants. The…

  6. Free energy landscapes of sodium ions bound to DMPC-cholesterol membrane surfaces at infinite dilution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Calero, Carles; Martí, Jordi

    2016-04-07

    Exploring the free energy landscapes of metal cations on phospholipid membrane surfaces is important for the understanding of chemical and biological processes in cellular environments. Using metadynamics simulations we have performed systematic free energy calculations of sodium cations bound to DMPC phospholipid membranes with cholesterol concentration varying between 0% (cholesterol-free) and 50% (cholesterol-rich) at infinite dilution. The resulting free energy landscapes reveal the competition between binding of sodium to water and to lipid head groups. Moreover, the binding competitiveness of lipid head groups is diminished by cholesterol contents. As cholesterol concentration increases, the ionic affinity to membranes decreases. When cholesterol concentration is greater than 30%, the ionic binding is significantly reduced, which coincides with the phase transition point of DMPC-cholesterol membranes from a liquid-disordered phase to a liquid-ordered phase. We have also evaluated the contributions of different lipid head groups to the binding free energy separately. The DMPC's carbonyl group is the most favorable binding site for sodium, followed by DMPC's phosphate group and then the hydroxyl group of cholesterol.

  7. A dileucine motif is involved in plasma membrane expression and endocytosis of rat sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp).

    PubMed

    Stross, Claudia; Kluge, Stefanie; Weissenberger, Katrin; Winands, Elisabeth; Häussinger, Dieter; Kubitz, Ralf

    2013-11-15

    The sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) is the major uptake transporter for bile salts into liver parenchymal cells, and PKC-mediated endocytosis was shown to regulate the number of Ntcp molecules at the plasma membrane. In this study, mechanisms of Ntcp internalization were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analyses in HepG2 cells. PKC activation induced endocytosis of Ntcp from the plasma membrane by ~30%. Endocytosis of Ntcp was clathrin dependent and was followed by lysosomal degradation. A dileucine motif located in the third intracellular loop of Ntcp was essential for endocytosis but also for processing and plasma membrane targeting, suggesting a dual function of this motif for intracellular trafficking of Ntcp. Mutation of two of five potential phosphorylation sites surrounding the dileucine motif (Thr225 and Ser226) inhibited PKC-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, we could identify a motif, which is critical for Ntcp plasma membrane localization. Endocytic retrieval protects hepatocytes from elevated bile salt concentrations and is of special interest, because NTCP has been identified as a receptor for the hepatitis B and D virus.

  8. MECHANISM OF GLUCOSE TRANSPORT ACROSS THE YEAST CELL MEMBRANE

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Vincent P.

    1962-01-01

    Cirillo, Vincent P. (Seton Hall College of Medicine and Dentistry, Jersey City, N.J.). Mechanism of glucose transport across the yeast cell membrane. J. Bacteriol. 84:485–491. 1962.—The kinetics of d-glucose and l-sorbose transport was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited with iodoacetic acid under nitrogen to prevent glucose metabolism. d-Glucose was found to compete with l-sorbose for a common membrane transport system with an apparent affinity greater than 25 times that of sorbose. A comparison of the net rate of glucose and sorbose transport at 50 and 500 mm external concentration showed that glucose transport is greater than that of sorbose from the lower concentration, but sorbose transport is greater than glucose at the higher concentration. This reversal of transport rate of two sugars with markedly different affinities is predicted by the membrane carrier theory. A further prediction of carrier theory was confirmed by the demonstration that the rate of glucose transport into fructose-loaded cells is greater than into unloaded cells. PMID:14021412

  9. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  10. Mass Transport through Nanostructured Membranes: Towards a Predictive Tool

    PubMed Central

    Darvishmanesh, Siavash; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a new mechanism to understand the transport of solvents through nanostructured membranes from a fundamental point of view. The findings are used to develop readily applicable mathematical models to predict solvent fluxes and solute rejections through solvent resistant membranes used for nanofiltration. The new model was developed based on a pore-flow type of transport. New parameters found to be of fundamental importance were introduced to the equation, i.e., the affinity of the solute and the solvent for the membrane expressed as the hydrogen-bonding contribution of the solubility parameter for the solute, solvent and membrane. A graphical map was constructed to predict the solute rejection based on the hydrogen-bonding contribution of the solubility parameter. The model was evaluated with performance data from the literature. Both the solvent flux and the solute rejection calculated with the new approach were similar to values reported in the literature. PMID:27918434

  11. Selective Fusion of Heterogeneous Classifiers for Predicting Substrates of Membrane Transporters.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Naeem; Sharma, Mahesh; Garg, Prabha

    2017-03-27

    Membrane transporters play a crucial role in determining fate of administered drugs in a biological system. Early identification of plausible transporters for a drug molecule can provide insights into its therapeutic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicological profiles. In the present study, predictive models for classifying small molecules into substrates and nonsubstrates of various pharmaceutically important membrane transporters were developed using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and proteochemometric (PCM) approaches. For this purpose, 4575 substrate interactions for these transporters were collected from the Metabolism and Transport Database (Metrabase) and the literature. The transporters selected for this study include (i) six efflux transporters, viz., breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), P-glycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1), and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4), and (ii) seven influx transporters, viz., organic cation transporter (OCT1/SO22A1), peptide transporter (PEPT1/SO15A1), apical sodium-bile acid transporter (ASBT/NTCP2), and organic anion transporting peptides (OATP1A2/SO1A2, OATP1B/SO1B1, OATP1B3/SO1B3, and OATP2B1/SO2B1). Various types of descriptors and machine learning methods (classifiers) were evaluated for the development of robust predictive models. Additionally, ensemble models were developed by bagging of homogeneous classifiers and selective fusion of heterogeneous classifiers. It was observed that the latter approach improves the accuracy of substrate/nonsubstrate prediction for transporters (average correct classification rate of more than 0.80 for external validation). Moreover, structural fragments important in determining the substrate specificity across the various transporters were identified. To demonstrate these fragments on the query molecule, contour maps were generated. The prediction efficacy of the developed models was illustrated by a good correlation between the reported logBB value

  12. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    DOEpatents

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  13. Calixarene-Mediated Liquid-Membrane Transport of Choline Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Birendra Babu; Fujii, Ayu; Schramm, Michael P

    2014-05-01

    A series of supramolecular calixarenes efficiently transport distinct molecular species through a liquid membrane when attached to a receptor-complementary choline handle. Calix-[6]arene hexacarboxylic acid was highly effective at transporting different target molecules against a pH gradient. Both carboxylic- and phosphonic-acid-functionalized calix[4]arenes effect transport without requiring a pH or ion gradient. NMR binding studies, two-phase solvent extraction, and three-phase transport experiments reveal the necessary and subtle parameters to effect the transport of molecules attached to a choline "handle". On the other hand, rescorin[4]arene cavitands, which have similar guest recognition profiles, did not transport guest molecules. These developments reveal new approaches towards attempting synthetic-receptor-mediated selective small-molecule transport in vesicular and cellular systems.

  14. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Nung Jan, Yuh; Sherwood, David R

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth.

  15. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  16. Stability properties of elementary dynamic models of membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Julio A

    2003-01-01

    Living cells are characterized by their capacity to maintain a stable steady state. For instance, cells are able to conserve their volume, internal ionic composition and electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane within values compatible with the overall cell functions. The dynamics of these cellular variables is described by complex integrated models of membrane transport. Some clues for the understanding of the processes involved in global cellular homeostasis may be obtained by the study of the local stability properties of some partial cellular processes. As an example of this approach, I perform, in this study, the neighborhood stability analysis of some elementary integrated models of membrane transport. In essence, the models describe the rate of change of the intracellular concentration of a ligand subject to active and passive transport across the plasma membrane of an ideal cell. The ligand can be ionic or nonionic, and it can affect the cell volume or the plasma membrane potential. The fundamental finding of this study is that, within the physiological range, the steady states are asymptotically stable. This basic property is a necessary consequence of the general forms of the expressions employed to describe the active and passive fluxes of the transported ligand.

  17. Requirement for Coenzyme Q in Plasma Membrane Electron Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, I. L.; Sun, E. E.; Crane, F. L.; Morre, D. J.; Lindgren, A.; Low, H.

    1992-12-01

    Coenzyme Q is required in the electron transport system of rat hepatocyte and human erythrocyte plasma membranes. Extraction of coenzyme Q from the membrane decreases NADH dehydrogenase and NADH:oxygen oxidoreductase activity. Addition of coenzyme Q to the extracted membrane restores the activity. Partial restoration of activity is also found with α-tocopherylquinone, but not with vitamin K_1. Analogs of coenzyme Q inhibit NADH dehydrogenase and oxidase activity and the inhibition is reversed by added coenzyme Q. Ferricyanide reduction by transmembrane electron transport from HeLa cells is inhibited by coenzyme Q analogs and restored with added coenzyme Q10. Reduction of external ferricyanide and diferric transferrin by HeLa cells is accompanied by proton release from the cells. Inhibition of the reduction by coenzyme Q analogs also inhibits the proton release, and coenzyme Q10 restores the proton release activity. Trans-plasma membrane electron transport stimulates growth of serum-deficient cells, and added coenzyme Q10 increases growth of HeLa (human adenocarcinoma) and BALB/3T3 (mouse fibroblast) cells. The evidence is consistent with a function for coenzyme Q in a trans-plasma membrane electron transport system which influences cell growth.

  18. Does hindered transport theory apply to desalination membranes?

    PubMed

    Dražević, Emil; Košutić, Krešimir; Kolev, Vesselin; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2014-10-07

    As reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration polyamide membranes become increasingly used for water purification, prediction of pollutant transport is required for membrane development and process engineering. Many popular models use hindered transport theory (HTT), which considers a spherical solute moving through an array of fluid-filled rigid cylindrical pores. Experiments and molecular dynamic simulations, however, reveal that polyamide membranes have a distinctly different structure of a "molecular sponge", a network of randomly connected voids widely distributed in size. In view of this disagreement, this study critically examined the validity of HTT by directly measuring diffusivities of several alcohols within a polyamide film of commercial RO membrane using attenuated total reflection-FTIR. It is found that measured diffusivities deviate from HTT predictions by as much as 2-3 orders of magnitude. This result indicates that HTT does not adequately describe solute transport in desalination membranes. As a more adequate alternative, the concept of random resistor networks is suggested, with resistances described by models of activated transport in "soft" polymers without a sharp size cutoff and with a proper address of solute partitioning.

  19. Transport in nanoporous carbon membranes: Experiments and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, M.; Foley, H.C.

    2000-05-01

    Single-component permeances of six gases were measured on three different supported nanoporous carbon membranes prepared by spray coating and pyrolysis of poly(furfuryl alcohol) on porous stainless-steel disks. Global activation energies were regressed from data collected as a function of temperature. Permeances and global activation energies were correlated to molecular size, assuming that entropic affects dominated the transport. The permeance was best correlated to the minimum projected area of the molecule computed from first principles. The free-energy barriers to transport within the membranes were derived from the temperature dependence of the permeance data, after accounting for porosity differences between the membranes and differences in molecular adsorption. Using transition-state theory and an entropic model derived, the free energy, enthalpy, and entropic barriers to transport within the membrane were examined as a function of molecular size. Computed on the basis of size, the entropic component of this barrier did not account for the large differences in the transition-state free energies. However, when these entropic barrier values were used to compute the enthalpic portion of the barrier free energies, the minimum projected area of each molecule correlated strongly. Furthermore, these enthalpic components of the barriers were fitted nicely by the Everett-Powl mean field potential, using only the pore size as the adjustable parameter. These results shed light on the underlying mechanism by which shape-selective transport takes place in the NPC membranes and small molecules are separated.

  20. Chloride transport and the actions of nedocromil sodium and cromolyn sodium in asthma.

    PubMed

    Alton, E W; Norris, A A

    1996-11-01

    Nedocromil sodium has been shown to be capable of inhibiting chloride ion flux in mast cells, epithelial cells, and neurons. This feature may explain how it can prevent responses such as mast-cell degranulation, the effects of osmolarity changes in the airways, and neuronal activation. This mechanism may also provide a unifying hypothesis to explain the effects of nedocromil sodium on a range of cell types involved in asthma, such as sensory and efferent neurons and cells involved in inflammation.

  1. Increased sodium plus potassium adenosine triphosphatase activity in erythrocyte membranes in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D A; Oeswein, J Q; Prunty, M E; Hisle, K C; Markesbery, W R

    1978-07-01

    Dopa-decarboxylase, acetylcholinesterase, sodium plus potassium stimulated adenosine triphosphatase (Na+ + K+-ATPase), and membrane-bound protein kinase were compared in the erythrocytes of patients with Huntington's disease and normal controls. All these enzymes also exist in the basal ganglia. The Na+ +K+-ATPase level was elevated (p less than 0.05) in Huntington's disease, while no significant changes were observed in the other enzymes. This finding is consistent with the concept that Huntington's disease is associated with a general membrane abnormality.

  2. The maltose ABC transporter: action of membrane lipids on the transporter stability, coupling and ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Wang, Victor; Rouiller, Isabelle; Duong, Franck

    2013-08-01

    The coupling between ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport remains a key question in the understanding of ABC-mediated transport. We show using the MalFGK2 complex reconstituted into nanodiscs, that membrane lipids participate directly to the coupling reaction by stabilizing the transporter in a low energy conformation. When surrounded by short acyl chain phospholipids, the transporter is unstable and hydrolyzes large amounts of ATP without inducing maltose. The presence of long acyl chain phospholipids stabilizes the conformational dynamics of the transporter, reduces its ATPase activity and restores dependence on maltose. Membrane lipids therefore play an essential allosteric function, they restrict the transporter ATPase activity to increase coupling to the substrate. In support to the notion, we show that increasing the conformational dynamics of MalFGK2 with mutations in MalF increases the transporter ATPase activity but decreases the maltose transport efficiency.

  3. Survey of the transport properties of sodium superionic conductor materials for use in sodium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, M.; Tietz, F.

    2015-01-01

    One important issue in future scenarios predominantly using renewable energy sources is the electrochemical storage of electricity in batteries. Among all rechargeable battery technologies, Li-ion cells have the largest energy density and output voltage today, but they have yet to be optimized in terms of capacity, safety and cost for use as stationary systems. Recently, sodium batteries have been attracting attention again because of the abundant availability of Na. However, much work is still required in the field of sodium batteries in order to mature this technology. Sodium superionic conductor (NASICON) materials are a thoroughly studied class of solid electrolytes. In this study, their crystal structure, compositional diversity and ionic conductivity are surveyed and analysed in order to correlate the lattice parameters and specific crystal structure data with sodium conductivity and activation energy using as much data sets as possible. Approximately 110 compositions with the general formula Na 1 + 2 w + x - y + zMw(II) Mx(III) My(V) M2- w - x - y (IV) (SiO4)z(PO4) 3 - z were included in the data collection to determine an optimal size for the M cations. In addition, the impact of the amount of Na per formula unit on the conductivity and the substitution of P with Si are discussed. An extensive study of the size of the structural bottleneck for sodium conduction (formed by triangles of oxygen ions) was carried out to validate the influence of this geometrical parameter on sodium conductivity.

  4. Method of making a hydrogen transport membrane, and article

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Joseph M.; Corpus, Joseph M.; Lim, Hankwon

    2015-07-21

    The present invention relates to a method of manufacturing a hydrogen transport membrane and the composite article itself. More specifically, the invention relates to producing a membrane substrate, wherein the ceramic substrate is coated with a metal oxide slurry, thereby eliminating the need for an activation step prior to plating the ceramic membrane through an electroless plating process. The invention also relates to modifying the pore size and porosity of the substrate by oxidation or reduction of the particles deposited by the metal oxide slurry.

  5. Features of ion transport in perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Timashev, S.F.

    1986-02-01

    The conditions for functioning for various systems and devices electrolyzers for ''chlorate'' electrolysis, current sources, etc.) with perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes and septums are determined to a considerable degree by the physicochemical properties of the perfluorinated materials. In this work, on the basis of concepts developed in streaming theory as to the topology of the ''infinite clusters'' (ICs), the author defines more precisely the form of the preexponential dependence of ion transport coefficients and draws conclusions on the character of heat evolution in a perfluorinated membrane when an electric current is passed through the membrane.

  6. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  7. Vasopressin regulation of sodium transport in the distal nephron and collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Kortenoeven, M L A; Pedersen, N B; Rosenbaek, L L; Fenton, R A

    2015-08-15

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is released from the posterior pituitary gland during states of hyperosmolality or hypovolemia. AVP is a peptide hormone, with antidiuretic and antinatriuretic properties. It allows the kidneys to increase body water retention predominantly by increasing the cell surface expression of aquaporin water channels in the collecting duct alongside increasing the osmotic driving forces for water reabsorption. The antinatriuretic effects of AVP are mediated by the regulation of sodium transport throughout the distal nephron, from the thick ascending limb through to the collecting duct, which in turn partially facilitates osmotic movement of water. In this review, we will discuss the regulatory role of AVP in sodium transport and summarize the effects of AVP on various molecular targets, including the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2, the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter NCC, and the epithelial sodium channel ENaC.

  8. Capacitance-Voltage Measurement of Transporting Function at Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Toshiya; Miyahara, Yuji

    In this paper, we report the detection of transporting function at cell membrane using capacitance-voltage (CV) measurement. The detection principle of our devices is based on the field-effect of electrostatic interaction between charged species at cell membrane in solution and surface electrons in silicon crystal through the gate insulator of Si3N4/SiO2 thin double-layer. We designed an oocyte-based field-effect capacitor, on which a Xenopus laevis oocyte was fixed. The transporter of human organic anion transporting peptide C (hOATP-C) was expressed at oocyte membrane by induction of cRNA. The electrical phenomena such as ion or molecular charge flux at the interface between cell membrane and gate surface could be detected as the change of flat band voltage in CV characteristics. The flat band voltage shift decreased with incubation time after introduction of substrate into the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor. The electrical signal is due to the change of charge flux from the oocyte at the gate surface inspired by transporter-substrate binding. The platform based on the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor is suitable for a simple and non-invasive detection system in order to analyze function of transporters related to drug efficacy.

  9. Effect of N-bromoacetamide on single sodium channel currents in excised membrane patches

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the effect of N-bromoacetamide (NBA) on the behavior of single sodium channel currents in excised patches of rat myotube membrane at 10 degree C. Inward sodium currents were activated by voltage steps from holding potentials of about -100 mV to test potentials of -40 mV. The cytoplasmic-face solution was isotonic CsF. Application of NBA or pronase to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane irreversibly removed sodium channel inactivation, as determined by averaged single-channel records. Teh lifetime of the open channel at - 40 mV was increased about 10-fold by NBA treatment without affecting the amplitude of single-channel currents. A binomial analysis was used both before and after treatment to determine the number of channels within the excised patch. NBA was shown to have little effect on activation kinetics, as determined by an examination of both the rising phase of averaged currents and measurements f the delay between the start of the pulse and the first channel opening. Our data support a kinetic model of sodium channel activation in which the rate constant leading back from the open state to the last closed state is slower than expected from a strict Hodgkin-Huxley model. The data also suggest that the normal open-channel lifetime is primarily determined by the inactivation process in the voltage range we have examined. PMID:6281357

  10. Does Membrane Thickness Affect the Transport of Selective Ions Mediated by Ionophores in Synthetic Membranes?

    PubMed

    Lomora, Mihai; Dinu, Ionel Adrian; Itel, Fabian; Rigo, Serena; Spulber, Mariana; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2015-08-31

    Biomimetic polymer nanocompartments (polymersomes) with preserved architecture and ion-selective membrane permeability represent cutting-edge mimics of cellular compartmentalization. Here it is studied whether the membrane thickness affects the functionality of ionophores in respect to the transport of Ca(2+) ions in synthetic membranes of polymersomes, which are up to 2.6 times thicker than lipid membranes (5 nm). Selective permeability toward calcium ions is achieved by proper insertion of ionomycin, and demonstrated by using specific fluorescence markers encapsulated in their inner cavities. Preservation of polymersome architecture is shown by a combination of light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. By using a combination of stopped-flow and fluorescence spectroscopy, it is shown that ionomycin can function and transport calcium ions across polymer membranes with thicknesses in the range 10.7-13.4 nm (7.1-8.9 times larger than the size of the ionophore). Thicker membranes induce a decrease in transport, but do not block it due to the intrinsic flexibility of these synthetic membranes. The design of ion selective biomimetic nanocompartments represents a new path toward the development of cellular ion nanosensors and nano-reactors, in which calcium sensitive biomacromolecules can be triggered for specific biological functions.

  11. SPAK isoforms and OSR1 regulate sodium-chloride co-transporters in a nephron-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Grimm, P Richard; Taneja, Tarvinder K; Liu, Jie; Coleman, Richard; Chen, Yang-Yi; Delpire, Eric; Wade, James B; Welling, Paul A

    2012-11-02

    STE20/SPS-1-related proline-alanine-rich protein kinase (SPAK) and oxidative stress-related kinase (OSR1) activate the potassium-dependent sodium-chloride co-transporter, NKCC2, and thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, in vitro, and both co-localize with a kinase regulatory molecule, Cab39/MO25α, at the apical membrane of the thick ascending limb (TAL) and distal convoluted tubule (DCT). Yet genetic ablation of SPAK in mice causes a selective loss of NCC function, whereas NKCC2 becomes hyperphosphorylated. Here, we explore the underlying mechanisms in wild-type and SPAK-null mice. Unlike in the DCT, OSR1 remains at the TAL apical membrane of KO mice where it is accompanied by an increase in the active, phosphorylated form of AMP-activated kinase. We found an alterative SPAK isoform (putative SPAK2 form), which modestly inhibits co-transporter activity in vitro, is more abundant in the medulla than the cortex. Thus, enhanced NKCC2 phosphorylation in the SPAK knock-out may be explained by removal of inhibitory SPAK2, sustained activity of OSR1, and activation of other kinases. By contrast, the OSR1/SPAK/M025α signaling apparatus is disrupted in the DCT. OSR1 becomes largely inactive and displaced from M025α and NCC at the apical membrane, and redistributes to dense punctate structures, containing WNK1, within the cytoplasm. These changes are paralleled by a decrease in NCC phosphorylation and a decrease in the mass of the distal convoluted tubule, exclusive to DCT1. As a result of the dependent nature of OSR1 on SPAK in the DCT, NCC is unable to be activated. Consequently, SPAK(-/-) mice are highly sensitive to dietary salt restriction, displaying prolonged negative sodium balance and hypotension.

  12. Evidence for Bidirectional Endocannabinoid Transport across Cell Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Chicca, Andrea; Marazzi, Janine; Nicolussi, Simon; Gertsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research on the trafficking of anandamide (AEA) across cell membranes, little is known about the membrane transport of other endocannabinoids, such as 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Previous studies have provided data both in favor and against a cell membrane carrier-mediated transport of endocannabinoids, using different methodological approaches. Because AEA and 2-AG undergo rapid and almost complete intracellular hydrolysis, we employed a combination of radioligand assays and absolute quantification of cellular and extracellular endocannabinoid levels. In human U937 leukemia cells, 100 nm AEA and 1 μm 2-AG were taken up through a fast and saturable process, reaching a plateau after 5 min. Employing differential pharmacological blockage of endocannabinoid uptake, breakdown, and interaction with intracellular binding proteins, we show that eicosanoid endocannabinoids harboring an arachidonoyl chain compete for a common membrane target that regulates their transport, whereas other N-acylethanolamines did not interfere with AEA and 2-AG uptake. By combining fatty acid amide hydrolase or monoacyl glycerol lipase inhibitors with hydrolase-inactive concentrations of the AEA transport inhibitors UCM707 (1 μm) and OMDM-2 (5 μm), a functional synergism on cellular AEA and 2-AG uptake was observed. Intriguingly, structurally unrelated AEA uptake inhibitors also blocked the cellular release of AEA and 2-AG. We show, for the first time, that UCM707 and OMDM-2 inhibit the bidirectional movement of AEA and 2-AG across cell membranes. Our findings suggest that a putative endocannabinoid cell membrane transporter controls the cellular AEA and 2-AG trafficking and metabolism. PMID:22879589

  13. Electrochemical control of ion transport through a mesoporous carbon membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Chai, Songhai; Choi, Jai-Pil; Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Jeseung; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The transport of fluids through nanometer scale channels typically on the order of 1 -100 nm often exhibit unique properties compared to the bulk fluid. These phenomena occur because the channel dimensions and molecular size become comparable to the range of several important forces including electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Small changes in properties such as the electric double layer or surface charge can significantly affect molecular transport through the channels. Based on these emerging properties, a variety of nanofluidic devices such as nanofluidic transistors, nanofluidic diodes or lab-on-a-chip devices have been developed3-7 with a diverse range of applications including water purification, biomolecular sensing, DNA separation, and rectified ion transport. Nanofluidic devices are typically fabricated using expensive lithography techniques or sacrificial templates. Here we report a carbon-based, three-dimensional nanofluidic transport membrane that enables gated, or on/off, control of the transport of organic molecular species and metal ions using an applied electrical potential. In the absence of an applied potential, both cationic and anionic molecules freely diffuse across the membrane via a concentration gradient. However, when an electrochemical potential is applied, the transport of ions through the membrane is inhibited.

  14. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  15. Membrane transporter engineering in industrial biotechnology and whole cell biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas B; Swainston, Neil; Pir, Pınar; Oliver, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Because they mainly do not involve chemical changes, membrane transporters have been a Cinderella subject in the biotechnology of small molecule production, but this is a serious oversight. Influx transporters contribute significantly to the flux towards product, and efflux transporters ensure the accumulation of product in the much greater extracellular space of fermentors. Programmes for improving biotechnological processes might therefore give greater consideration to transporters than may have been commonplace. Strategies for identifying important transporters include expression profiling, genome-wide knockout studies, stress-based selection, and the use of inhibitors. In addition, modern methods of directed evolution and synthetic biology, especially those effecting changes in energy coupling, offer huge opportunities for increasing the flux towards extracellular product formation by transporter engineering.

  16. Prism-patterned Nafion membrane for enhanced water transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Kang, Yun Sik; Ahn, Chiyeong; Jang, Segeun; Kim, Minhyoung; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoo, Sung Jong; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a simple and effective strategy to enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by imprinting prism-patterned arrays onto the Nafion membrane, which provides three combined effects directly related to the device performance. First, a locally thinned membrane via imprinted micro prism-structures lead to reduced membrane resistance, which is confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Second, increments of the geometrical surface area of the prism-patterned Nafion membrane compared to a flat membrane result in the increase in the electrochemical active surface area. Third, the vertically asymmetric geometry of prism structures in the cathode catalyst layer lead to enhanced water transport, which is confirmed by oxygen gain calculation. To explain the enhanced water transport, we propose a simple theoretical model on removal of water droplets existing in the asymmetric catalyst layer. These three combined effects achieved via incorporating prism patterned arrays into the Nafion membrane effectively enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  17. Host-microbe interactions via membrane transport systems.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Hiroaki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Living organisms take in essential molecules and get rid of wastes effectively through the selective transport of materials. Especially in the digestive tract, advanced transport systems are indispensable for the absorption of nutrients and elimination of waste products. These transport pathways control physiological functions by modulating the ionic environment inside and outside the cells. Moreover, recent studies have shown the importance of the expression of trafficking-related molecules and the population of gut microbiota. We found that the molecules secreted from microorganisms are imported into the cells via transporters or endocytosis and that they activate cell survival pathways of intestinal epithelial cells. These findings indicate that the interactions between the gut microbiota and host cells are mediated, at least partly, by the membrane transport systems. In addition, it is well known that the breakdown of transport systems induces various diseases. This review highlights the significance of the transport systems as the pathogenic molecules and therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal disorders. For example, abnormal expression of the genes encoding membrane transport-related molecules is frequently involved in digestive diseases, such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. We herein review the significance of these molecules as pathogenic and therapeutic targets for digestive diseases.

  18. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane.

  19. Effect of barium ion on p-aminohippurate transport in basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Gemba, M

    1985-06-01

    To clarify the cause of the stimulation of p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat kidney cortical slices by barium, an experiment was carried out with basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex. The effect of barium on PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles was compared with that of verapamil which also stimulated PAH accumulation in the slices. The enzyme marker for basolateral membrane, (Na+ + K+)- ATPase, was enriched 15-fold and the brushborder enzyme marker, alkaline phosphatase, was 1.3-fold in our membrane preparation. Contamination in this preparation by lysosomes, mitochondria and cytosol was also low but that by endoplasmic reticulum was slightly high as judged by the enzyme markers. PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles possessed the usual characteristics, i.e., sodium-dependence and probenecid-sensitivity. PAH uptake by the membrane vesicles was enhanced by barium, but not by verapamil. On the other hand, barium did not affect tetraethylammonium (TEA) uptake by the vesicles, and verapamil strongly inhibited it. Manganese also stimulated PAH uptake to the same extent as did barium, but calcium and strontium did not affect the uptake. Barium did not act on sodium transport in the membrane vesicles. An 'anion-sensitively transported lipophilic cation', triphenylmethylphosphonium iodide (TPMP), uptake was depressed by barium. These results suggest that barium stimulates selectively PAH uptake in basolateral membrane vesicles. Its stimulatory action may contribute at least partly to an increase in PAH accumulation in rat kidney cortical slices by this ion and may prove useful in an analysis of the mechanism of PAH transport system in renal basolateral membranes.

  20. Understanding the transport processes in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheah, May Jean

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are energy conversion devices suitable for automotive, stationary and portable applications. An engineering challenge that is hindering the widespread use of PEM fuel cells is the water management issue, where either a lack of water (resulting in membrane dehydration) or an excess accumulation of liquid water (resulting in fuel cell flooding) critically reduces the PEM fuel cell performance. The water management issue is addressed by this dissertation through the study of three transport processes occurring in PEM fuel cells. Water transport within the membrane is a combination of water diffusion down the water activity gradient and the dragging of water molecules by protons when there is a proton current, in a phenomenon termed electro-osmotic drag, EOD. The impact of water diffusion and EOD on the water flux across the membrane is reduced due to water transport resistance at the vapor/membrane interface. The redistribution of water inside the membrane by EOD causes an overall increase in the membrane resistance that regulates the current and thus EOD, thereby preventing membrane dehydration. Liquid water transport in the PEM fuel cell flow channel was examined at different gas flow regimes. At low gas Reynolds numbers, drops transitioned into slugs that are subsequently pushed out of the flow channel by the gas flow. The slug volume is dependent on the geometric shape, the surface wettability and the orientation (with respect to gravity) of the flow channel. The differential pressure required for slug motion primarily depends on the interfacial forces acting along the contact lines at the front and the back of the slug. At high gas Reynolds number, water is removed as a film or as drops depending on the flow channel surface wettability. The shape of growing drops at low and high Reynolds number can be described by a simple interfacial energy minimization model. Under flooding conditions, the fuel cell local current

  1. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  2. Multicomponent Transport through Realistic Zeolite Membranes: Characterization & Transport in Nanoporous Networks

    SciTech Connect

    William C. Conner

    2007-08-02

    These research studies focused on the characterization and transport for porous solids which comprise both microporosity and mesoporosity. Such materials represent membranes made from zeolites as well as for many new nanoporous solids. Several analytical sorption techniques were developed and evaluated by which these multi-dimensional porous solids could be quantitatively characterized. Notably an approach by which intact membranes could be studied was developed and applied to plate-like and tubular supported zeolitic membranes. Transport processes were studied experimentally and theoretically based on the characterization studies.

  3. Mechanistic equations for membrane transport of multicomponent solutions.

    PubMed

    Suchanek, G

    2006-03-01

    In the present article, mechanistic equations for membrane transport of N + 1-component solutions have been derived. The major specific investigation result is the introduction - for ternary solutions - of two diffusion coefficients omega(d1) and omega(d2) for solutes, as well as two cross coefficients omega(d12) and omega(d21) for these solutes. The latter parameters may be treated as coefficients of interdiffusion. The expansion of the description of substance transport to include the N + 1-component solutions does not formulate any additional physical phenomena other than those which are formulated by the transport equations for three-component solutions.

  4. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  5. Relationship between sodium-dependent phosphate transporter (NaPi-IIc) function and cellular vacuole formation in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Yuji; Segawa, Hiroko; Ohnishi, Saori; Ohi, Akiko; Ito, Mikiko; Kaneko, Ichiro; Kido, Shinsuke; Tatsumi, Sawako; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    NaPi-IIc/SLC34A3 is a sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter in the renal proximal tubules and its mutations cause hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH). In the present study, we created a specific antibody for opossum SLC34A3, NaPi-IIc (oNaPi-IIc), and analyzed its localization and regulation in opossum kidney cells (a tissue culture model of proximal tubular cells). Immunoreactive oNaPi-IIc protein levels increased during the proliferative phase and decreased during differentiation. Moreover, stimulating cell growth upregulated oNaPi-IIc protein levels, whereas suppressing cell proliferation downregulated oNaPi-IIc protein levels. Immunocytochemistry revealed that endogenous and exogenous oNaPi-IIc proteins localized at the protrusion of the plasma membrane, which is a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) rich-membrane, and at the intracellular vacuolar membrane. Exogenous NaPi-IIc also induced cellular vacuoles and localized in the plasma membrane. The ability to form vacuoles is specific to electroneutral NaPi-IIc, and not electrogenic NaPi-IIa or NaPi-IIb. In addition, mutations of NaPi-IIc (S138F and R468W) in HHRH did not cause cellular PIP2-rich vacuoles. In conclusion, our data anticipate that NaPi-IIc may regulate PIP2 production at the plasma membrane and cellular vesicle formation.

  6. Structure and Function of Thyroid Hormone Plasma Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Johannes, Jörg; Bayer, Dorothea; Braun, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) cross the plasma membrane with the help of transporter proteins. As charged amino acid derivatives, TH cannot simply diffuse across a lipid bilayer membrane, despite their notorious hydrophobicity. The identification of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, SLC16A2) as a specific and very active TH transporter paved the way to the finding that mutations in the MCT8 gene cause a syndrome of psychomotor retardation in humans. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current model of transmembrane transport and highlight the diversity of TH transmembrane transporters. The interactions of TH with plasma transfer proteins, T3 receptors, and deiodinase are summarized. It is shown that proteins may bind TH owing to their hydrophobic character in hydrophobic cavities and/or by specific polar interaction with the phenolic hydroxyl, the aminopropionic acid moiety, and by weak polar interactions with the iodine atoms. These findings are compared with our understanding of how TH transporters interact with substrate. The presumed effects of mutations in MCT8 on protein folding and transport function are explained in light of the available homology model. PMID:25538896

  7. Pervaporation dehydration of ethanol by hyaluronic acid/sodium alginate two-active-layer composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chengyun; Zhang, Minhua; Ding, Jianwu; Pan, Fusheng; Jiang, Zhongyi; Li, Yifan; Zhao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The composite membranes with two-active-layer (a capping layer and an inner layer) were prepared by sequential spin-coatings of hyaluronic acid (HA) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) support layer. The SEM showed a mutilayer structure and a distinct interface between the HA layer and the NaAlg layer. The coating sequence of two-active-layer had an obvious influence on the pervaporation dehydration performance of membranes. When the operation temperature was 80 °C and water concentration in feed was 10 wt.%, the permeate fluxes of HA/Alg/PAN membrane and Alg/HA/PAN membrane were similar, whereas the separation factor were 1130 and 527, respectively. It was found that the capping layer with higher hydrophilicity and water retention capacity, and the inner layer with higher permselectivity could increase the separation performance of the composite membranes. Meanwhile, effects of operation temperature and water concentration in feed on pervaporation performance as well as membrane properties were studied.

  8. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  9. Barriers to superfast water transport in carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Jens H; Ritos, Konstantinos; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R; Megaridis, Constantine M; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2013-05-08

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes hold the promise of extraordinary fast water transport for applications such as energy efficient filtration and molecular level drug delivery. However, experiments and computations have reported flow rate enhancements over continuum hydrodynamics that contradict each other by orders of magnitude. We perform large scale molecular dynamics simulations emulating for the first time the micrometer thick CNTs membranes used in experiments. We find transport enhancement rates that are length dependent due to entrance and exit losses but asymptote to 2 orders of magnitude over the continuum predictions. These rates are far below those reported experimentally. The results suggest that the reported superfast water transport rates cannot be attributed to interactions of water with pristine CNTs alone.

  10. Centrifuge-induced hypergravity and glutamate efflux by reversal of high-affinity, sodium-dependent transporters from rat brain synaptosomes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate uptake by high affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters is essential for termination of the synaptic transmission. Glutamate transporters may also contribute to an increase in extracellular glutamate. Glutamate efflux can occur by reversal of the sodium-dependent glutamate transporters during ATP depletion and dissipation of the sodium gradient across the cell membrane. Depolarization-induced calcium independent release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomal cytosolic pool is Na+-dependent and due to reverse of the neurotransmitter transporters also. We used monovalent organic cations N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) to replace extracellular sodium, suggesting that the reducing of Na+ elucidate further the mechanism underlying Ca2+-independent glutamate release. A reduction in extracellular sodium would facilitate reversal of sodium-dependent transporters with extrusion of glutamate. We have compared the basal release of glutamate in Ca2+-free Na+-supplemented and NMDG-supplemented medium in control and after exposure of animals to long-arm centrifuge-induced hypergravity (ten G, during one hour). Replacement of sodium by NMDG enhanced basal level of neurotransmitter. The value of basal level increased to 110± 4% and 140± 2% in the medium with NMDG in comparison with Na+ under the control and hypergravity conditions, respectively. It is likely to reflect the enhancement of the neurotransmitter level in cytosolic pool. Thermodynamic considerations show that the extracellular level of a amino acid neurotransmitter, such as glutamate, that can be generated by transporter reversal are directly proportional to the intracellular concentration of the intracellular concentration of amino acid. KCl-stimulated glutamate release from cytosolic pool increased not statistically after hypergravity loading. We examined the effects of transporter inhibitors DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate ( DL-TBOA) on the release to elucidate whether reverse transport via the

  11. Millimeter microwave effect on ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M C

    1995-01-01

    The effects of millimeter microwaves in the frequency range of 54-76 GHz on capacitance and conductance of lipid bilayer membranes (BLM) were studied. Some of the membranes were modified by gramicidin A and amphotericin B or by tetraphenylboron anions (TPhB-). The millimeter microwaves were pulse-modulated (PW) at repetition rates ranging from 1 to 100 pps, PW at 1000 pps, or unmodulated continuous waves (CW). The maximum output power at the waveguide outlet was 20 mW. It was found that CW irradiation decreased the unmodified BLM capacitance by 1.2% +/- 0.5%. At the same time, membrane current induced by TPhB- transport increased by 5% +/- 1%. The changes in conductance of ionic channels formed by gramicidin A and amphotericin B were small (0.6% +/- 0.4%). No "resonance-like" effects of mm-wave irradiation on membrane capacitance, ionic channel currents, or TPhB- transport were detected. All changes in membrane capacitance and currents were independent of the modulation employed and were equivalent to heating by approximately 1.1 degrees C.

  12. Mechanism of electrodialytic ion transport through solvent extraction membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Moskvin, L.N.; Shmatko, A.G.; Krasnoperov, V.M.

    1987-02-01

    The authors construct a mathematical model for electrodialysis and solvent extraction via an ion-selective ion exchange membrane and accounts for the electrochemical, ion exchange, and diffusional behavior of the processes including their dependence on component concentration and current and voltage. The model is tested against experimental data for the electrodialytic transport of anionic platinum complexes of chlorides from hydrochloric acid solution through tributylphosphate membranes. The platinum concentration in the aqueous solution was determined by gamma spectroscopy obtained via platinum 191 as a radiotracer.

  13. Selective separation of sodium ions from a mixture with phenylalanine by Donnan dialysis with a profiled sulfogroup cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Goleva, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of separating ions of metal from a mixture with ampholyte (an amino acid) by Donnan dialysis with an MK-40 sulfogroup cation exchange membrane is demonstrated. Conditions ensuring the selectivity and intensity of the mass transfer of sodium ions from a mixture with bipolar phenylalanine ions into a diffusate containing hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange membrane are found.

  14. TonB-dependent outer membrane transport: going for Baroque?

    PubMed

    Wiener, Michael C

    2005-08-01

    The import of essential organometallic micronutrients (such as iron-siderophores and vitamin B(12)) across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria proceeds via TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs). The TBDT couples to the TonB protein, which is part of a multiprotein complex in the plasma (inner) membrane. Five crystal structures of TBDTs illustrate clearly the architecture of the protein in energy-independent substrate-free and substrate-bound states. In each of the TBDT structures, an N-terminal hatch (or plug or cork) domain occludes the lumen of a 22-stranded beta barrel. The manner by which substrate passes through the transporter (the "hatch-barrel problem") is currently unknown. Solution NMR and X-ray crystallographic structures of various TonB domains indicate a striking structural plasticity of this protein. Thermodynamic, biochemical and bacteriological studies of TonB and TBDTs indicate further that existing structures do not yet capture critical energy-dependent and in vivo conformations of the transport cycle. The reconciliation of structural and non-structural experimental data, and the unambiguous experimental elucidation of a detailed molecular mechanism of transport are current challenges for this field.

  15. Calcium transport by rat duodenal villus and crypt basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, J.R.F.; Weiser, M.M.

    1987-02-01

    Rat duodenal cells were isolated sequentially to give fractions enriched for villus and crypt cells. From each of these fractions, basolateral-enriched membrane vesicles were prepared and ATP-dependent calcium uptake was studied. Calcium uptake was sensitive to temperature, was inhibited by vanadate and by A23187, and was lower in vitamin D-deficient animals. In normal animals, (UVCa)-transport was approximately twofold greater in villus-tip than in crypt cell-fraction basolateral membranes though the affinity of the uptake for calcium was similar (K/sub m/ = 0.3 M). In vitamin D-deficient animals, the crypt-to-villus gradient was reduced, and in all fractions, calcium transport was similar to or lower than that in the crypts of normal animals. Six hours after vitamin D-deficient animals were repleted with 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, a significant increase in calcium transport by everted gut sacs was present; however, basolateral calcium transport was significantly increased in only the mid-villus fractions, and no change was seen in the villus-tip fractions. Thus vitamin D appears necessary for the development of increased basolateral membrane calcium pump activity in duodenal villus cells, but not all cells in vitamin D-deficient rats are able to respond to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

  16. Microbial responses to membrane cleaning using sodium hypochlorite in membrane bioreactors: Cell integrity, key enzymes and intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaomeng; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xueye; Zheng, Xiang; Ma, Jinxing; Wu, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is a commonly used reagent for membrane cleaning in membrane bioreactors (MBRs), while it, being a kind of disinfectant (oxidant), may impair viability of microbes or even totally inactivate them upon its diffusion into mixed liquor during membrane cleaning. In this study, we systematically examine the effects of NaClO on microorganisms in terms of microbial cell integrity, metabolism behaviours (key enzymes), and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) under various NaClO concentrations. Different proportions of microbial cells in activated sludge were damaged within several minutes dependent on NaClO dosages (5-50 mg/g-SS), and correspondingly organic matters were released to bulk solution. Inhibition of key enzymes involved in organic matter biodegradation, nitrification and denitrification was observed in the presence of NaClO above 1 mg/g-SS, and thus organic matter and nitrogen removal efficiencies were decreased. It was also demonstrated that intracellular ROS production was increased with the NaClO dosage higher than 1 mg/g-SS, which likely induced further damage to microbial cells.

  17. Co-overexpressing a Plasma Membrane and a Vacuolar Membrane Sodium/Proton Antiporter Significantly Improves Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivan, Necla; Sun, Li; Jarrett, Philip; Yang, Xiaojie; Mishra, Neelam; Chen, Lin; Kadioglu, Asim; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis gene AtNHX1 encodes a vacuolar membrane-bound sodium/proton (Na+/H+) antiporter that transports Na+ into the vacuole and exports H+ into the cytoplasm. The Arabidopsis gene SOS1 encodes a plasma membrane-bound Na+/H+ antiporter that exports Na+ to the extracellular space and imports H+ into the plant cell. Plants rely on these enzymes either to keep Na+ out of the cell or to sequester Na+ into vacuoles to avoid the toxic level of Na+ in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of AtNHX1 or SOS1 could improve salt tolerance in transgenic plants, but the improved salt tolerance is limited. NaCl at concentration >200 mM would kill AtNHX1-overexpressing or SOS1-overexpressing plants. Here it is shown that co-overexpressing AtNHX1 and SOS1 could further improve salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, making transgenic Arabidopsis able to tolerate up to 250 mM NaCl treatment. Furthermore, co-overexpression of AtNHX1 and SOS1 could significantly reduce yield loss caused by the combined stresses of heat and salt, confirming the hypothesis that stacked overexpression of two genes could substantially improve tolerance against multiple stresses. This research serves as a proof of concept for improving salt tolerance in other plants including crops. PMID:26985021

  18. Co-overexpressing a Plasma Membrane and a Vacuolar Membrane Sodium/Proton Antiporter Significantly Improves Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Necla; Sun, Li; Jarrett, Philip; Yang, Xiaojie; Mishra, Neelam; Chen, Lin; Kadioglu, Asim; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The Arabidopsis gene AtNHX1 encodes a vacuolar membrane-bound sodium/proton (Na(+)/H(+)) antiporter that transports Na(+) into the vacuole and exports H(+) into the cytoplasm. The Arabidopsis gene SOS1 encodes a plasma membrane-bound Na(+)/H(+) antiporter that exports Na(+) to the extracellular space and imports H(+) into the plant cell. Plants rely on these enzymes either to keep Na(+) out of the cell or to sequester Na(+) into vacuoles to avoid the toxic level of Na(+) in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of AtNHX1 or SOS1 could improve salt tolerance in transgenic plants, but the improved salt tolerance is limited. NaCl at concentration >200 mM would kill AtNHX1-overexpressing or SOS1-overexpressing plants. Here it is shown that co-overexpressing AtNHX1 and SOS1 could further improve salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, making transgenic Arabidopsis able to tolerate up to 250 mM NaCl treatment. Furthermore, co-overexpression of AtNHX1 and SOS1 could significantly reduce yield loss caused by the combined stresses of heat and salt, confirming the hypothesis that stacked overexpression of two genes could substantially improve tolerance against multiple stresses. This research serves as a proof of concept for improving salt tolerance in other plants including crops.

  19. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  20. Effects of spatial variation in membrane diffusibility and solubility on the lateral transport of membrane components.

    PubMed Central

    Eisinger, J; Halperin, B I

    1986-01-01

    There exist many examples of membrane components (e.g. receptors) accumulating in special domains of cell membranes. We analyze how certain variations in lateral diffusibility and solubility of the membrane would increase the efficiency of transport to these regions. A theorem is derived to show that the mean-time-of capture, tc, for particles diffusing to a trap from an annular region surrounding it, is intermediate to the tc values that correspond to the minimum and maximum diffusion coefficients that obtain in this region. An analytical solution for tc as a function of the gradient of diffusivity surrounding a trap is derived for circular geometry. Since local diffusion coefficients can be increased dramatically by reducing the concentration of intra-membrane particles and/or allowing them to form aggregates, such mechanisms could greatly enhance the diffusion-limited transport of particular membrane components to a trap (e.g. coated pit). If the trap is surrounded by an annular region in which the probe particles' partition function is increased, say, by the local segregation of certain phospholipids, tc is shown to vary inversely with the logarithm of the relative partition function. We provide some conjectural examples to illustrate the magnitude of the effects which heterogeneities in diffusibility and solubility may have in biological membranes. PMID:3756302

  1. Method and system for producing hydrogen using sodium ion separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Frost, Lyman

    2013-05-21

    A method of producing hydrogen from sodium hydroxide and water is disclosed. The method comprises separating sodium from a first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream in a sodium ion separator, feeding the sodium produced in the sodium ion separator to a sodium reactor, reacting the sodium in the sodium reactor with water, and producing a second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream and hydrogen. The method may also comprise reusing the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream by combining the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream with the first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream. A system of producing hydrogen is also disclosed.

  2. Membrane permeability as a cause of transport defects in experimental Fanconi syndrome. A new hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M; Dubord, L; Hausser, C; Schwab, C

    1976-01-01

    The injection of sodium maleate (200-400 mg/kg) into rats produces aminoaciduria along with glycosuria and phosphaturia, resembling the Fanconi syndrome. This experimental model was studied by means of microinjections into proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney, stop-flow diuresis, and microperfusion of single nephrons. Our results show that, in maleate-treated rats, competition between amino acids or related structures (L-proline, L-OH-proline, and glycine) possesses the same characteristics, and net influx of amino acids appear normal at the proximal nephron. Data obtained by classical stop-flow techniques and single nephron microperfusions also indicate a normal entry of labeled amino acids (L-lysine, glycine, L-valine, L-proline, L-cystine), and 3-0-methyl-D-[3H]glucose and [32P]phosphate from the luminal side of the proximal tubule cell. However, the efflux of molecules from the cell appears enhanced throughout the proximal and distal tubule; molecules that exit at this site are excreted directly into the urine. Our results suggest that the phosphaturia, aminoaciduria, and glycosuria of the experimental Fanconi syndrome can be explained by a modification of the cell membrane permeability (increased efflux) at distal sites of the nephron rather than by a modification of the membrane transport (decreased influx) at the proximal sites, as is currently accepted. Our data also stress the importance of efflux phenomena in membrane transport. PMID:1262464

  3. Barium, TEA and sodium sensitive potassium channels are present in the human placental syncytiotrophoblast apical membrane.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Vallejos, C; Guerrero, I; Riquelme, G

    2008-10-01

    The human placental syncytiotrophoblast (hSTB) is a polarized epithelial structure, without paracellular routes, forming the main barrier for materno-fetal exchange. There is ample evidence suggesting the presence of potassium (K(+)) channels in the placental apical membrane; which could contribute to membrane potential and volume regulation. We have therefore examined the K(+) currents of isolated apical membranes from human term placenta using electrophysiological methods: reconstitution of ion channels from apical membranes into giant liposomes (single channel recordings, patch clamp method) or their functional transplantation into Xenopus laevis oocytes (total currents recording, voltage clamp method). Single channel recording experiments show the presence of K(+) channels in the hSTB microvillous membrane sensitive to Tetraethylammonium (TEA) and Barium (Ba(+2)). Patch current activity was diminished 50% and 70% by 20 mmol/L TEA and 5 mmol/L Ba(+2) respectively. The more frequent conductance was approximately 73pS, however several levels of current were detected suggesting the presence of more than one type of K(+) channel. In addition, sodium (Na(+)) sensitivity was detected in the patch current thus, over 10 mmol/L Na(+) reduced the seal current to 38%. These results were corroborated by the total current experiments where the K(+) current elicited in injected oocytes with apical purified membrane was blocked by Ba(+2) and TEA. The total current was also affected by Na(+), becoming larger when a Na(+)-free solution was used. Our results show the existence of at least two types of Ba(+2)-sensitive K(+) channels including a TEA sensitive sub-population, and some of them Na(+) sensitive K(+) channels. These channels could be the conductive pathways proposed previously for this cation in placental hSTB. Our novel contribution has been to successfully obtain K(+) channel recordings in systems suitable for electrophysiological studies of isolated apical membranes.

  4. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions.

  5. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    PubMed Central

    Jarzyniak, Karolina M.; Jasiński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular, and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted. PMID:25538721

  6. Isothermal titration calorimetry of ion-coupled membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Boudker, Olga; Oh, SeCheol

    2015-04-01

    Binding of ligands, ranging from proteins to ions, to membrane proteins is associated with absorption or release of heat that can be detected by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Such measurements not only provide binding affinities but also afford direct access to thermodynamic parameters of binding--enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity. These parameters can be interpreted in a structural context, allow discrimination between different binding mechanisms and guide drug design. In this review, we introduce advantages and limitations of ITC as a methodology to study molecular interactions of membrane proteins. We further describe case studies where ITC was used to analyze thermodynamic linkage between ions and substrates in ion-coupled transporters. Similar type of linkage analysis will likely be applicable to a wide range of transporters, channels, and receptors.

  7. Arsenate transport by sodium/phosphate cotransporter type IIb

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Sorribas, Victor

    2010-08-15

    Arsenic is a metalloid that causes the dysfunction of critical enzymes, oxidative stress, and malignancies. In recent years several transporters of As{sup III} have been identified, including aquaglyceroporins (AQP) and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP). As{sup V} transport, however, has not been sufficiently studied because it has been assumed that arsenate is taken up by mammalian cells through inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. In this paper we have analyzed the role of Pi transporters in the uptake of arsenate by directly using {sup 73}As{sup V} as a radiotracer in phosphate transporter-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. The affinities of Pi transporters for H{sub 3}AsO{sub 4} were lower than the affinities for Pi. NaPiIIa, NaPiIIc, Pit1, and Pit2 showed a K{sub m} for arsenate that was > 1 mM (i.e., at least ten times lower than the affinities for Pi). The NaPiIIb isoform showed the highest affinity for As{sup V} in mouse (57 {mu}M), rat (51 {mu}M), and human (9.7 {mu}M), which are very similar to the affinities for Pi. Therefore, NaPiIIb can have a prominent role in the toxicokinetics of arsenic following oral exposure to freshwater or food contaminated with As{sup V}.

  8. OCTN3 is a mammalian peroxisomal membrane carnitine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Tilups, Aina; Edwards, Vernon D.; Wanders, Ronald J.; Tein, Ingrid . E-mail: ingrid.tein@sickkids.ca

    2005-12-30

    Carnitine is a zwitterion essential for the {beta}-oxidation of fatty acids. The role of the carnitine system is to maintain homeostasis in the acyl-CoA pools of the cell, keeping the acyl-CoA/CoA pool constant even under conditions of very high acyl-CoA turnover, thereby providing cells with a critical source of free CoA. Carnitine derivatives can be moved across intracellular barriers providing a shuttle mechanism between mitochondria, peroxisomes, and microsomes. We now demonstrate expression and colocalization of mOctn3, the intermediate-affinity carnitine transporter (K {sub m} 20 {mu}M), and catalase in murine liver peroxisomes by TEM using immunogold labelled anti-mOctn3 and anti-catalase antibodies. We further demonstrate expression of hOCTN3 in control human cultured skin fibroblasts both by Western blotting and immunostaining analysis using our specific anti-mOctn3 antibody. In contrast with two peroxisomal biogenesis disorders, we show reduced expression of hOCTN3 in human PEX 1 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes is impaired but the biosynthesis of peroxisomal membrane proteins is normal, versus a complete absence of hOCTN3 in human PEX 19 deficient Zellweger fibroblasts in which both the uptake of peroxisomal matrix enzymes as well as peroxisomal membranes are deficient. This supports the localization of hOCTN3 to the peroxisomal membrane. Given the impermeability of the peroxisomal membrane and the key role of carnitine in the transport of different chain-shortened products out of peroxisomes, there appears to be a critical need for the intermediate-affinity carnitine/organic cation transporter, OCTN3, on peroxisomal membranes now shown to be expressed in both human and murine peroxisomes. This Octn3 localization is in keeping with the essential role of carnitine in peroxisomal lipid metabolism.

  9. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V.; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-01-01

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land. PMID:23636397

  10. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Julian I; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-05-02

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land.

  11. Protective effect of silymarin on viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm treated with sodium arsenite

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Farzaneh; Momeni, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sodium arsenite can impair male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress. Silymarin is known as a potent antioxidant. Objective: This study was performed to investigate if silymarin can prevent the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on ram sperm viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential. Materials and Methods: Epidydimal spermatozoa obtained from ram were divided into five groups: 1) Spermatozoa at 0 hr, 2) spermatozoa at 180 min (control), 3) spermatozoa treated with sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min, 4) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) + sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min and 5) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) for 180 min. MTT assay and Rhodamine 123 staining were used to assess sperm viability and mitochondrial membrane potential respectively. Sperm motility was performed according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Results: Viability (p<0.01), nonprogressive motility (p<0.001) and intact mitochondrial membrane potential (p<0.001) of the spermatozoa were significantly decreased in sodium arsenite treated group compared to control group. In silymarin + sodium arsenite group, silymarin could significantly reverse the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on these sperm parameters compared to sodium arsenite group (p<0.001). In addition, the application of silymarin alone for 180 minutes could significantly increase progressively motile sperm (p<0.001) and decrease non motile sperm (p<0.01) compared to the control. Conclusion: Silymarin could compensate the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on viability, nonprogressive motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm. PMID:27525323

  12. Temperature effect on transport performance by inorganic nanofiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuru, Toshinori; Izumi, Shuhei; Yoshioka, Tomohisa; Asaeda, Masashi

    2000-03-01

    The effect of temperature on nanofiltration performance was examined using three inorganic membranes with a molecular-weight cutoff of approximately 200, 600, and 2,000, respectively. The inorganic porous membranes were prepared from silica-zirconia colloidal sols and used in nanofiltration experiments for neutral solutes over a temperature range of 20 to 60 C. The rejection of solutes decreased with an increase in temperature for the membranes, while the permeate volume flux increased. Three transport coefficients--reflection coefficient, solute permeability, and water permeability--were obtained using the Spiegler-Kedem equation, which accounts for the contribution of convection and diffusion to solute flux. As a result, the reflection coefficient corresponding to the fraction of solutes reflected by the membrane in convective flow was almost constant, irrespective of experimental temperature. The dependency was larger for larger solutes and membranes with smaller pore diameters. Therefore, the hindered diffusion of solutes through micropores was indicative of an activated process. Moreover, pure water permeability, after correction for the temperature effect on viscosity, also increased with experimental temperature.

  13. Use of inside-out chloroplast thylakoid membrane vesicles for studying electron transport and membrane structure

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Asafo-Adjei, E.

    1987-01-01

    Inside-out and right-side-out thylakoid vesicles were isolated from spinach chloroplasts by aqueous-polymer two-phase partitioning following mechanical fragmentation of thylakoid membranes by Yeda press treatment. Externally added plastocyanin stimulated the whole-chain and PSI electron transport rates in the inside-out thylakoid vesicles by about 500 and 350%, respectively, compared to about 50% stimulation for both assays in the fraction enriched in right-side-out vesicles. The electron transport between PSII and PSI in inside-out thylakoid vesicles appears to be interrupted due to plastocyanin release from the thylakoids by the Yeda press treatment, but it was restored by externally added plastocyanin. Acetic anhydride chemical modification and uncoupler-induced proton release from dark-adapted membranes are probes for detecting the sequested proton domains in thylakoid membranes. Both assays were used to find out if inside-out membranes retain metastable, localized proton binding domains. Treatment of dark-maintained inside-out thylakoid membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H)acetic anhydride showed no uncoupler-induced increase in acetylation of the 33, 24, and 18 kDa polypeptides of the oxygen-evolving-complex, indicating complete loss of the implicated proton domains in these polypeptides. The various steps in the inside-out preparation were studied to discern which steps(s) leads to the loss of the metastable domain proton pool.

  14. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  15. Multicomponent transport in membranes for redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) incorporate separator membranes, which ideally prevent mixing of electrochemically active species while permitting crossover of inactive supporting ions. Understanding crossover and membrane selectivity may require multicomponent transport models that account for solute/solute interactions within the membrane, as well as solute/membrane interactions. Application of the Onsager-Stefan-Maxwell formalism allows one to account for all the dissipative phenomena that may accompany component fluxes through RFB membranes. The magnitudes of dissipative interactions (diffusional drag forces) are quantified by matching experimentally established concentration transients with theory. Such transients can be measured non-invasively using DC conductometry, but the accuracy of this method requires precise characterization of the bulk RFB electrolytes. Aqueous solutions containing both vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) are relevant to RFB technology. One of the first precise characterizations of aqueous vanadyl sulfate has been implemented and will be reported. To assess the viability of a separator for vanadium RFB applications with cell-level simulations, it is critical to understand the tendencies of various classes of membranes to absorb (uptake) active species, and to know the relative rates of active-species and supporting-electrolyte diffusion. It is also of practical interest to investigate the simultaneous diffusion of active species and supports, because interactions between solutes may ultimately affect the charge efficiency and power efficiency of the RFB system as a whole. A novel implementation of Barnes's classical model of dialysis-cell diffusion [Physics 5:1 (1934) 4-8] is developed to measure the binary diffusion coefficients and sorption equilibria for single solutes (VOSO4 or H2SO4) in porous membranes and cation-exchange membranes. With the binary diffusion and uptake measurement in hand, a computer simulation that

  16. YTPdb: a wiki database of yeast membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Barriot, Roland; Moreau, Yves; André, Bruno

    2010-10-01

    Membrane transporters constitute one of the largest functional categories of proteins in all organisms. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this represents about 300 proteins ( approximately 5% of the proteome). We here present the Yeast Transport Protein database (YTPdb), a user-friendly collaborative resource dedicated to the precise classification and annotation of yeast transporters. YTPdb exploits an evolution of the MediaWiki web engine used for popular collaborative databases like Wikipedia, allowing every registered user to edit the data in a user-friendly manner. Proteins in YTPdb are classified on the basis of functional criteria such as subcellular location or their substrate compounds. These classifications are hierarchical, allowing queries to be performed at various levels, from highly specific (e.g. ammonium as a substrate or the vacuole as a location) to broader (e.g. cation as a substrate or inner membranes as location). Other resources accessible for each transporter via YTPdb include post-translational modifications, K(m) values, a permanently updated bibliography, and a hierarchical classification into families. The YTPdb concept can be extrapolated to other organisms and could even be applied for other functional categories of proteins. YTPdb is accessible at http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/ytpdb/.

  17. Plasma membrane-localized transporter for aluminum in rice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jixing; Yamaji, Naoki; Kasai, Tomonari; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-10-26

    Aluminum (Al) is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust, but its trivalent ionic form is highly toxic to all organisms at low concentrations. How Al enters cells has not been elucidated in any organisms. Herein, we report a transporter, Nrat1 (Nramp aluminum transporter 1), specific for trivalent Al ion in rice. Nrat1 belongs to the Nramp (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein) family, but shares a low similarity with other Nramp members. When expressed in yeast, Nrat1 transports trivalent Al ion, but not other divalent ions, such as manganese, iron, and cadmium, or the Al-citrate complex. Nrat1 is localized at the plasma membranes of all cells of root tips except epidermal cells. Knockout of Nrat1 resulted in decreased Al uptake, increased Al binding to cell wall, and enhanced Al sensitivity, but did not affect the tolerance to other metals. Expression of Nrat1 is up-regulated by Al in the roots and regulated by a C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor (ART1). We therefore concluded that Nrat1 is a plasma membrane-localized transporter for trivalent Al, which is required for a prior step of final Al detoxification through sequestration of Al into vacuoles.

  18. Investigation of ionic transport in sodium scandium phosphate (NSP) and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Kaustubh; Blügel, Stefan; Lustfeld, Hans

    Sodium ionic conductors offer significant advantages for application in large scale energy storage systems. In this study, we investigate the different pathways available for sodium ion conduction in NSP and calculate energy barriers for ionic transport using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nudged Elastic Band Method. We identify the structural parameters that reduce the energy barrier, by calculating the influence of positive and negative external pressure on the energy barrier. Lattice strain can be introduced by cation or anion substitution within the NASICON structure. We substitute the scandium atom with other trivalent atoms such as aluminium and yttrium, and calculate the resulting energy barriers. Sodium thiophosphate (Na3PS4) has previously shown about two orders of magnitude higher ionic conductivity than sodium phosphate (Na3PO4). We investigate the effect of substituting oxygen with sulphur in NSP. We acknowledge discussions with our experimental colleagues F. Tietz and M. Guin toward this work

  19. Mechanism of exaggerated natriuresis in hypertensive man: impaired sodium transport in the loop of henle

    PubMed Central

    Buckalew, Vardaman M.; Puschett, Jules B.; Kintzel, James E.; Goldberg, Martin

    1969-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of saline loading on distal sodium reabsorption in hypertensive man, studies were performed during both water deprivation and water diuresis in eight hypertensive subjects, and the results were compared to data obtained from similar studies in normal subjects. All hypertensive patients exhibited an enhanced excretion of filtered sodium (CNa/CIn) at any level of distal delivery of sodium compared to normal controls. Free water reabsorption (TcH2O) during hypertonic saline loading was quantitatively abnormal in the hypertensives at high levels of osmolar clearance (COsm), and also the curve of TcH2O vs. COsm leveled off above a COsm of 18 ml/min per 1.73 m2 in the hypertensive group in contrast to the normal controls in whom TcH2O showed no evidence of achieving an upper limit. Sodium depletion exaggerated the abnormality in TcH2O in hypertensives, and resulted in a positive free water clearance (CH2O) during hydropenia. During hypotonic saline loading in water diuresis, changes in free water clearance per 100 ml of glomerular filtrate (CH2O/CIn) were less at any given increment in urine flow per 100 ml of glomerular filtrate (V/CIn) in the hypertensives compared to normal controls (P < 0.001). This abnormality in CH2O/CIn in the hypertensives in conjunction with the defect in TcH2O observed during hydropenia indicates that sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle was abnormal at any given rate of distal delivery of sodium in hypertension. Furthermore, these abnormalities in TcH2O and CH2O coincided temporally with the development of the exaggerated natriuresis. Although the distal defect in sodium transport, in large part, accounted for the augmented natriuresis in hypertension, evidence was present also for enhanced rejection of sodium in the proximal tubule during saline loading in the hypertensives. Additional studies utilizing acetazolamide which increases distal delivery of sodium without extracellular fluid volume expansion showed only

  20. Degradation of poly(ether sulfone)/polyvinylpyrrolidone membranes by sodium hypochlorite: insight from advanced electrokinetic characterizations.

    PubMed

    Hanafi, Yamina; Szymczyk, Anthony; Rabiller-Baudry, Murielle; Baddari, Kamel

    2014-11-18

    Poly(ether sulfone) (PES)/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) membranes are widely used in various industrial fields such as drinking water production and in the dairy industry. However, the use of oxidants to sanitize the processing equipment is known to impair the integrity and lifespan of polymer membranes. In this work we showed how thorough electrokinetic measurements can provide essential information regarding the mechanism of degradation of PES/PVP membranes by sodium hypochlorite. Tangential streaming current measurements were performed with ultrafiltration and nanofiltration PES/PVP membranes for various aging times. The electrokinetic characterization of membranes was complemented by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. Results confirmed that sodium hypochlorite induces the degradation of both PES and PVP. This latter is easily oxidized by sodium hypochlorite, which leads to an increase in the negative charge density of the membrane due to the formation of carboxylic acid groups. The PVP was also found to be partly released from the membrane with aging time. Thanks to the advanced electrokinetic characterization implemented in this work it was possible for the first time to demonstrate that two different mechanisms are involved in the degradation of PES. Phenol groups were first formed as a result of the oxidation of PES aromatic rings by substitution of hydrogen by hydroxyl radicals. For more severe aging conditions, this membrane degradation mechanism was followed by the formation of sulfonic acid functions, thus indicating a second degradation process through scission of PES chains.

  1. Core Transmembrane Domain 6 Plays a Pivotal Role in the Transport Cycle of the Sodium/Proline Symporter PutP.

    PubMed

    Bracher, Susanne; Schmidt, Claudia C; Dittmer, Sophie I; Jung, Heinrich

    2016-12-09

    Crystal structures of transporters with a LeuT-type structural fold assign core transmembrane domain 6 (TM6') a central role in substrate binding and translocation. Here, the function of TM6' in the sodium/proline symporter PutP, a member of the solute/sodium symporter family, was investigated. A complete scan of TM6' identified eight amino acids as particularly important for PutP function. Of these residues, Tyr-248, His-253, and Arg-257 impact sodium binding, whereas Arg-257 and Ala-260 may participate in interactions leading to closure of the inner gate. Furthermore, the previous suggestion of an involvement of Trp-244, Tyr-248, and Pro-252 in proline binding is further supported. In addition, substitution of Gly-245, Gly-247, and Gly-250 affects the amount of PutP in the membrane. A Cys accessibility analysis suggests an involvement of the inner half of TM6' in the formation of a hydrophilic pathway that is open to the inside in the absence of ligands and closed in the presence of sodium and proline. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that TM6' plays a central role in substrate binding and release on the inner side of the membrane also in PutP and extend the knowledge on functionally relevant amino acids in transporters with a LeuT-type structural fold.

  2. Regulation of membrane excitability: a convergence on voltage-gated sodium conductance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Baines, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) plays a key role in regulation of neuronal excitability. Aberrant regulation of Nav expression and/or function can result in an imbalance in neuronal activity which can progress to epilepsy. Regulation of Nav activity is achieved by coordination of a multitude of mechanisms including RNA alternative splicing and translational repression. Understanding of these regulatory mechanisms is complicated by extensive genetic redundancy: the mammalian genome encodes ten Navs. By contrast, the genome of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, contains just one Nav homologue, encoded by paralytic (DmNa v ). Analysis of splicing in DmNa v shows variants exhibit distinct gating properties including varying magnitudes of persistent sodium current (INaP). Splicing by Pasilla, an identified RNA splicing factor, alters INaP magnitude as part of an activity-dependent mechanism. Enhanced INaP promotes membrane hyperexcitability that is associated with seizure-like behaviour in Drosophila. Nova-2, a mammalian Pasilla homologue, has also been linked to splicing of Navs and, moreover, mouse gene knockouts display seizure-like behaviour.Expression level of Navs is also regulated through a mechanism of translational repression in both flies and mammals. The translational repressor Pumilio (Pum) can bind to Na v transcripts and repress the normal process of translation, thus regulating sodium current (INa) density in neurons. Pum2-deficient mice exhibit spontaneous EEG abnormalities. Taken together, aberrant regulation of Nav function and/or expression is often epileptogenic. As such, a better understanding of regulation of membrane excitability through RNA alternative splicing and translational repression of Navs should provide new leads to treat epilepsy.

  3. Flexible oligocholate foldamers as membrane transporters and their guest-dependent transport mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyong; Zhao, Yan

    2012-01-14

    Dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric oligocholates with flexible 4-aminobutyroyl spacers caused the efflux of hydrophilic molecules such as carboxyfluorescein (CF) and glucose from POPC/POPG liposomes. Transport was greatly suppressed across higher-melting DPPC membranes. Lipid-mixing assays and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that the liposomes were intact during the transport. Kinetic analysis supported the involvement of monomeric species in the rate-limiting step of CF transport, consistent with a carrier-based mechanism. Glucose transport, on the other hand, displayed a highly unusual zero-order dependence on the oligocholate concentration at low loading of the transporter. Different selectivity was observed in the oligocholate transporters depending on the guest involved.

  4. The plasma membrane transport systems and adaptation to salinity.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Magdy F

    2014-11-15

    Salt stress represents one of the environmental challenges that drastically affect plant growth and yield. Evidence suggests that glycophytes and halophytes have a salt tolerance mechanisms working at the cellular level, and the plasma membrane (PM) is believed to be one facet of the cellular mechanisms. The responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in contrasting species/cultivars were discussed. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances describing the crucial roles that the PM transport systems have in plant adaptation to salt. Several lines of evidence were presented to demonstrate the correlation between the PM transport proteins and adaptation of plants to high salinity. How alterations in these transport systems of the PM allow plants to cope with the salt stress was also addressed. Although inconsistencies exist in some of the information related to the responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in different species/cultivars, their key roles in adaptation of plants to high salinity is obvious and evident, and cannot be precluded. Despite the promising results, detailed investigations at the cellular/molecular level are needed in some issues of the PM transport systems in response to salinity to further evaluate their implication in salt tolerance.

  5. Proton transport and the water environment in nafion fuel cell membranes and AOT reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Spry, D B; Goun, A; Glusac, K; Moilanen, David E; Fayer, M D

    2007-07-04

    The properties of confined water and diffusive proton-transfer kinetics in the nanoscopic water channels of Nafion fuel cell membranes at various hydration levels are compared to water in a series of well-characterized AOT reverse micelles with known water nanopool sizes using the photoacid pyranine as a molecular probe. The side chains of Nafion are terminated by sulfonate groups with sodium counterions that are arrayed along the water channels. AOT has sulfonate head groups with sodium counterions that form the interface with the reverse micelle's water nanopool. The extent of excited-state deprotonation is observed by steady-state fluorescence measurements. Proton-transfer kinetics and orientational relaxation are measured by time-dependent fluorescence using time-correlated single photon counting. The time dependence of deprotonation is related to diffusive proton transport away from the photoacid. The fluorescence reflecting the long time scale proton transport has an approximately t-0.8 power law decay in contrast to bulk water, which has a t-3/2 power law. For a given hydration level of Nafion, the excited-state proton transfer and the orientational relaxation are similar to those observed for a related size AOT water nanopool. The effective size of the Nafion water channels at various hydration levels are estimated by the known size of the AOT reverse micelles that display the corresponding proton-transfer kinetics and orientational relaxation.

  6. Modular structure of sodium-coupled bicarbonate transporters.

    PubMed

    Boron, Walter F; Chen, Liming; Parker, Mark D

    2009-06-01

    Mammalian genomes contain 10 SLC4 genes that, between them, encode three Cl-HCO(3) exchangers, five Na(+)-coupled HCO(3) transporters (NCBTs), one reported borate transporter, and what is reported to be a fourth Cl-HCO(3) exchanger. The NCBTs are expressed throughout the body and play important roles in maintaining intracellular and whole-body pH, as well as contributing to transepithelial transport processes. The importance of NCBTs is underscored by the genetic association of dysfunctional NCBT genes with blindness, deafness, epilepsy, hypertension and metal retardation. Key to understanding the action and regulation of NCBTs is an appreciation of the diversity of NCBT gene products. The transmembrane domains of human NCBT paralogs are 50-84% identical to each other at the amino acid level, and are capable of a diverse range of actions, including electrogenic Na/HCO(3) cotransport (i.e. NBCe1 and NBCe2) and electroneutral Na/HCO(3) cotransport (i.e. NBCn1 and NBCn2), as well as Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO(3) exchange (i.e. NDCBE). Furthermore, by the use of alternative promoters and alternative-splicing events, individual SLC4 genes have the potential to generate multiple splice variants (as many as 16 in the case of NBCn1), each of which could have unique temporal and spatial patterns of distribution, unitary transporter activity (i.e. flux mediated by one molecule), array of protein-binding partners, and complement of regulatory stimuli. In the first section of this review, we summarize our present knowledge of the function and distribution of mammalian NCBTs and their multiple variants. In the second section of this review we consider the molecular consequences of NCBT variation.

  7. Clay and pillard clay membranes: Synthesis, characterization and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercauteren, Sven

    In this work, the preparation and characterization of ceramic multilayer membranes with an Alsb2Osb3-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) and a Laponite separating layer have been studied. Al-PILC is a pillared clay prepared by intercalation of polyoxo cations of aluminium between the montmorillonite clay sheets, followed by a thermal treatment (400sp°C) to obtain rigid oxide pillars. The free spacing between the clay plates is about 0.8 nm. Laponite is a synthetic clay with a pore structure formed by the stacking of very small clay plates. To deposit an Al-PILC top layer on a macro- or mesoporous aluminiumoxide support membrane, two preparation routes were considered. According to the standard preparation route of a pillared clay, the easiest way is to use a suspension of clay mixed with the pillaring solution in which the support membrane is dipped. However, it is not possible to deposit uniform and crack-free top layers in this way because of the formation of unstable suspensions. A second preparation route is based on an indirect pillaring procedure. By dipping a support membrane in a stable clay suspension, a thin clay film is deposited in a first step. Pillaring is achieved via immersion of the supported clay film in the pillaring solution in a second step. After a washing procedure, the membrane is dried and calcined at 400sp°C. Laponite membranes were simply prepared by dipping a support membrane in a suspension of this synthetic clay in water. Afterwards a drying at room temperature and a calcination at 400 ar 500sp°C is performed. Both membrane types were tested for gas separation and pervaporation purposes. Transport of permanent gases (He, N2) occurs by means of Knudsen diffusion. Diffusion is kinetically controlled and for a binary mixture, the maximum separation factor is determined by the difference in molecular weight of both components. From pervaporation experiments with water/alcohol mixtures it was found that Al-PILC membranes can be used for

  8. Cellular Transport and Membrane Dynamics of the Glycine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dumoulin, Andrea; Triller, Antoine; Kneussel, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic transmission is essential to tune individual-to-network neuronal activity. One way to modulate synaptic strength is to regulate neurotransmitter receptor numbers at postsynaptic sites. This can be achieved either through plasma membrane insertion of receptors derived from intracellular vesicle pools, a process depending on active cytoskeleton transport, or through surface membrane removal via endocytosis. In parallel, lateral diffusion events along the plasma membrane allow the exchange of receptor molecules between synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments, contributing to synaptic strength regulation. In recent years, results obtained from several groups studying glycine receptor (GlyR) trafficking and dynamics shed light on the regulation of synaptic GlyR density. Here, we review (i) proteins and mechanisms involved in GlyR cytoskeletal transport, (ii) the diffusion dynamics of GlyR and of its scaffolding protein gephyrin that control receptor numbers, and its relationship with synaptic plasticity, and (iii) adaptative changes in GlyR diffusion in response to global activity modifications, as a homeostatic mechanism. PMID:20161805

  9. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes.

  10. Electrogenicity of phosphate transport by renal brush-border membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Ibnoul-Khatib, H

    1988-01-01

    Phosphate uptake by rat renal brush-border membrane vesicles was studied under experimental conditions where transmembrane electrical potential (delta psi) could be manipulated. Experiments were performed under initial rate conditions to avoid complications associated with the dissipation of ion gradients. First, phosphate uptake was shown to be strongly affected by the nature of Na+ co-anions, the highest rates of uptake being observed with 100 mM-NaSCN (1.010 +/- 0.086 pmol/5 s per micrograms of protein) and the lowest with 50 mM-Na2SO4 (0.331 +/- 0.046 pmol/5 s per micrograms of protein). Anion substitution studies showed that potency of the effect of the co-anions was in the order thiocyanate greater than nitrate greater than chloride greater than isethionate greater than gluconate greater than sulphate, which correlates with the known permeability of the membrane to these anions and thus to the generation of transmembrane electrical potentials of decreasing magnitude (inside negative). The stimulation by ion-diffusion-induced potential was observed from pH 6.5 to 8.5, indicating that the transport of both monovalent and divalent phosphate was affected. In addition, inside-negative membrane potentials were generated by valinomycin-induced diffusion of K+ from K+-loaded vesicles and showed a 57% stimulation of phosphate uptake, at pH 7.5. Similar experiments with H+-loaded vesicles, in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone gave a 50% stimulation compared with controls. Inside-positive membrane potentials were also induced by reversal of the K+ gradient (outside greater than inside) in the presence of valinomycin and gave 58% inhibition of phosphate uptake. The membrane-potential dependency of phosphate uptake was finally analysed under thermodynamic equilibrium, and a stimulation by inside-negative potential was observed. The transport of phosphate was thus driven against a concentration gradient by a membrane potential, implicating the net

  11. A novel strategy for the treatment of diabetes mellitus - sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Asfandyar Khan; Niazi, Saad Hameed

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases, affecting almost 3 million in Canada alone and is characterized by increased blood glucose levels. Treatment varies from lifestyle changes to oral anti-diabetics and/or insulin. Sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors may offer promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetes. The inhibitors act by increasing the loss of glucose in urine by decreasing the reabsorption of glucose from the proximal tubules of nephrons. Aims: The aim of this review was to assess the efficacy of sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors in the treatment of diabetes as well as any adverse effects. Materials and Methods: Databases such as MEDLINE, COCHRANE and EMBASE were systematically searched for literature on the efficacy of sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors in improving the glycemic control of patients with diabetes. Results: Research showed that sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors significantly decreased blood glucose levels by increasing glucosuria. Due to the diuretic effects of these inhibitors, diabetic patients who were suffering from hypertension showed a decrease in blood pressure. The caloric loss associated with these inhibitors resulted in weight loss as well. The most common adverse effect seen in patients on these medications was mycotic infection of the urinary or genital tract. Conclusion: Sodium glucose co-transport inhibitors may be an effective line of treatment for diabetes. Although short-term research has shown these drugs to be safe and well-tolerated, studies should be conducted to assess the long-term effects of these drugs. PMID:22558567

  12. Apical membrane permeability and kinetic properties of the sodium pump in rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S A; Wills, N K

    1983-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that aldosterone stimulates the rate of Na+ transport across the rabbit urinary bladder epithelium by increasing the apical membrane permeability to Na+. Paradoxically, ion-sensitive and conventional micro-electrode measurements demonstrated that intracellular Na+ activity aiNa+ was essentially unchanged by aldosterone, i.e. aiNa+ was constant regardless of the rate of Na+ transport. The present study was designed to resolve this apparent contradiction. The effects of elevated, endogenous aldosterone levels produced by low-Na+ diet (Lewis & Diamond, 1976) on urinary bladder Na+ transport were investigated in vitro using Ussing-type chambers and intracellular conventional and ion-sensitive microelectrodes. Apical membrane selectivity and kinetics of the Na+ pump were assessed as a function of hormone stimulation. The aldosterone-stimulated increase in Na+ transport was accounted for by increases in both the relative selective permeability of the apical membrane to Na+ and an increase in its absolute Na+ permeability. The kinetics of the Na+ pump were evaluated electrically by loading the cells with Na+ (monitored with Na+-sensitive micro-electrodes) or alternatively by manipulating serosal solution K+ concentration and measuring changes in the basolateral membrane electromotive forces and resistance. From these measurements the current generated by the pump was calculated as a function of intracellular Na+ or extracellular K+. The kinetics of the pump were not altered by aldosterone. A model of highly co-operative binding estimated Km for Na+ as 14.2 mM and 2.3 mM for K+. Hill coefficients for these ions were 2.8 and 1.8, respectively, consistent with a pump stoichiometry of 3 Na+ to 2 K+. The kinetic properties of the Na-K pump indicate that physiological levels of aiNa+ are poised at the foot of a step kinetic curve which energetically favours Na+ extrusion. PMID:6312027

  13. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors: from apple tree to 'Sweet Pee'.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Timothy C; Rutherford, Peter; Dubrey, Simon W; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2010-01-01

    The sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2), located in the plasma membrane of cells lining the proximal tubule, facilitates the reabsorbtion of glucose in the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 has the potential to reduce blood glucose and represents an opportune target for managing blood glucose. By promoting the excretion of glucose, SGLT2 inhibitors are the first anti-diabetic treatment to target the removal rather than the metabolic redirection of glucose. Their mechanism of action is independent of that of endogenous insulin status and thus provides a means of managing plasma glucose irrespective of a patient's glycaemic status or treatments being used in combination. Several candidate SGLT2 inhibitors based on the core glucoside structure of phlorizin are currently being developed, of which, the metabolically more stable aromatic and heteroaromatic C-glucosides have demonstrated the most promising preclinical and clinical data. The inhibition of SGLT2 by messenger antisense technology is also being investigated. Current indications suggest that short-term benefits, in terms of HbA1(c) reductions, are modest and it remains to be seen whether encouraging exogenous glucose disposal will result in long term patient benefits in terms of returning metabolic balance or even weight loss. Indications are that clinical efficacy will be greater with molecules based on an O-glucoside structure. Concerns have been raised over the safety of these agents, particularly a possible predisposition to urinary tract infections, but these concerns have yet to be confirmed in clinical studies. Clinical development programs will need to establish those patients most likely to benefit from inhibition of SGLT2.

  14. Free Energy Wells and Barriers to Ion Transport Across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Susan

    2014-03-01

    The flow of ions across cellular membranes is essential to many biological processes. Ion transport is also important in synthetic materials used as battery electrolytes. Transport often involves specific ions and fast conduction. To achieve those properties, ion conduction pathways must solvate specific ions by just the ``right amount.'' The right amount of solvation avoids ion traps due to deep free energy wells, and avoids ion block due to high free energy barriers. Ion channel proteins in cellular membranes demonstrate this subtle balance in solvation of specific ions. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between binding site structure and ion solvation free energies in biological ion binding sites. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites for fast transport of specific ions. We acknowledge support from Sandia's LDRD program. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Immobilization of sodium alginate sulfates on polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes for selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Cao, Jian-Da; Lan, Ping; Wu, Wen

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for the immobilization of sodium alginate sulfates (SAS) on polysulfone (PSu) ultrafiltration membranes to achieve selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was developed, which involved the photoinduced graft polymerization of acrylamide on the membrane and the Hofmann rearrangement reaction of grafted acrylamide followed by chemical binding of SAS with glutaraldehyde. The surface modification processes were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization. Zeta potential and water contact angle measurements were performed to investigate the surface charge and wettability of the membranes. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the binding of LDL on plain and modified PSu membranes. It was found that the PSu membrane immobilized with sodium alginate sulfates (PSu-SAS) greatly enhanced the selective adsorption of LDL from protein solutions and the absorbed LDL could be easily eluted with sodium chloride solution, indicating a specific and reversible binding of LDL to SAS, mainly driven by electrostatic forces. Furthermore, the PSu-SAS membrane showed good blood compatibility as examined by platelet adhesion. The results suggest that the PSu-SAS membranes are promising for application in simultaneous hemodialysis and LDL apheresis therapy.

  16. Quantized Water Transport: Ideal Desalination through Graphyne-4 Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E. G.; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations on pore-size effects suggest that γ-graphyne-4, with 4 acetylene bonds between two adjacent phenyl rings, has the best performance with 100% salt rejection and an unprecedented water permeability, to our knowledge, of ~13 L/cm2/day/MPa, 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore size. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membranes. PMID:24196437

  17. Study of transport through an electro responsive polymer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Datta, A.; Contractor, A. Q.

    2015-02-01

    Conducting polymers have been used widely for development of several electronic, sensing devices because of its electro active nature. In the present work porous polycarbonate (PC) support was coated with a thin gold layer. An electrochemically synthesized polyaniline (PANI) film was deposited on gold coated PC and characterisation was done by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For measuring the concentration of potassium ion (K+) inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used. Potassium ion transport across PANI membrane at various potential showed the gradual opening of the coiled PANI. In this work an effort has been given to picture the situation in the membrane electrolyte junction on application of potential.

  18. Membrane fouling by sodium alginate in high salinity conditions to simulate biofouling during seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Charfi, Amine; Jang, Hoseok; Kim, Jeonghwan

    2017-02-21

    This study aims to better understand biofouling by algal organic matters (AOM) during seawater pretreatment by microfiltration (MF). To simulate AOM biofouling, sodium alginate (SA) solutions with three different concentrations (2, 20 and 50ppm) were filtered in dead-end mode with MF membrane. A modelling approach with blocking laws was used to identify the fouling mechanisms behind flux decline with time. The effect of SA concentration and cations such as Na(+) (0.6M) and Ca(2+) (0.015M) addition to SA solution on fouling mechanisms was studied. While for low SA concentration (2ppm), fouling occurs within two phases: a pore constriction phase followed by cake formation phase, for high SA concentration (50ppm), fouling occurs within only one phase controlled by cake formation. The addition of Na(+) (0.6M) or Ca(2+) (0.015M) to SA solution mitigates membrane fouling, however, the addition of both cations enhances fouling by formation of dense cake layer on membrane.

  19. Mechanisms of calcium transport in human colonic basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Saksena, Seema; Ammar, Mohammad S; Tyagi, Sangeeta; Elsharydah, Ahmed; Gill, Ravinder K; Ramaswamy, Krishnamurthy; Dudeja, Pradeep K

    2002-10-01

    Human colon has been suggested to play an important role in calcium absorption especially after extensive disease or resection of the small intestine. We have previously demonstrated the presence of a carrier-mediated calcium uptake mechanism in the human colonic luminal membrane vesicles. Current studies were, therefore, undertaken to investigate the mechanism(s) of calcium exit across the basolateral membrane domain of the human colon. Human colonic basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMVs) were isolated and purified from mucosal scrapings of organ donor colons, utilizing a technique developed in our laboratory. 45Ca uptake was measured by a rapid filtration technique. 45Ca uptake represented transport into the intravesicular space as evidenced by an osmolarity study and by the demonstration of Ca2' efflux from calcium preloaded vesicles by Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Calcium uptake was stimulated by Mg2+ ATP. The kinetic parameters for ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake revealed saturation kinetics with Michaelis constant (Km) of 0.22 +/- 0.04 microM and a maximum rate of uptake (Vmax) of 0.38 +/- 0.12 nmol/mg protein/min. The Km of ATP concentration required for half maximal Ca2+ uptake was 0.39 +/- 0.04 mM. ATP-stimulated calcium uptake into these vesicles was further stimulated in the presence of calmodulin and was inhibited by calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine. Uptake of 45Ca into BLMVs was markedly inhibited by cis-Na+ but was significantly stimulated by trans-Na+ (40-50% stimulation). Our results demonstrate the presence of a Mg2+/ATP-dependent calmodulin-regulated Ca2+ transport system and a Na+-Ca2+ exchange process in the human colonic basolateral membranes.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes with controlled ion transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kui

    2011-12-01

    conductivity at the same order of magnitude as Nafion. This unique transport feature gave rise to exceedingly higher electrochemical selectivity in relation to Nafion. The selectivity characteristics have been rationalized based on the formation of restrained ionic domains and the state of the absorbed water within the membranes. A series of new Nafion-based composite membranes were prepared via an in situ sol-gel reaction of 3-(trihydroxylsilyl) propane-1-sulfonic acid and solution casting method. The morphological structure, ion-exchange capacity, water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability of the resulting composite membranes were extensively investigated as functions of the content of sulfopropylated polysilsesquioxane filler, temperature, and relative humidity. Unlike the conventional Nafion/silica composites, the prepared membranes exhibit an increased water uptake and associated enhancement in proton conductivity compared to unmodified Nafion. In particular, considerably high proton conductivities at 80 and 120 °C under 30% relative humidity were demonstrated in the composite membranes, which are over 2 times greater than that of Nafion. In addition to a remarkable improvement in proton conductivity, the composite membranes displayed lower methanol permeability and superior electrochemical selectivity in comparison to the pure Nafion membrane. A versatile and facile synthetic approach was developed for the preparation of a family of new ionomers with rigid aromatic backbones and pendant perfluorinated sulfonic acid groups. Variation in the chemical composition and structure of the new aromatic ionomers were performed to optimize PEM properties and fuel cell performance. The ionomers prepared from condensation polymerization of Sodium 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoro-2-(2',3',5',6'-tetrafluoro-phenoxy)- ethane sulfonate and bisphenol monomers, e.g. hydroquinone, 4,4'-biphenol, or their mixture with appropriate ratio, exhibited comparable or greater proton

  1. Sodium and chloride transport in the large intestine of potassium-loaded rats

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, M.E.; Foster, E.S.; Hayslett, J.P.; Binder, H.J.

    1986-08-01

    Increased dietary potassium (potassium loading) induces several adaptive changes in colonic function, including increased potential dependent potassium secretion, active potassium secretion, and Na-K-ATPase activity, but does not alter net sodium absorption in vivo. To establish whether potassium loading stimulates active sodium transport, unidirectional, net sodium, and chloride fluxes were determined under voltage-clamp conditions across isolated rat distal colonic mucosa. In normal animals net sodium flux (J/sub net/sup Na/), net chloride flux (J/sub net/sub Cl/) and short-circuit current (I/sub sc/) were 6.1 +/- 1.1, 8.4 +/-1.0, and 0.7 +/- 0.1 eq h cm S, respectively; potassium loading significantly increased J/sub net/sup Na/ and I/sup sc/ by 4.9 +/- 1.4 and 3.5 +/- 0.7 eq h cm S, respectively, without changing J/sub net/sup Na/ and I/sub sc/ produced by potassium loading. In Cl-free Ringer solution in normal animals J/sub net/sup Na was reduced to 0.6 +/- 0.3 eq h cm S. Potassium loading produced identical increases in J/sub net/sup Na/ and I/sub sc/, which were also completely inhibited by 0.1 mM amiloride. These studies establish that potassium loading induces amiloride-sensitive electrogenic sodium absorption without affecting electroneutral sodium-chloride absorption.

  2. Ammonium across a Selective Polymer Inclusion Membrane: Characterization, Transport, and Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Casadellà, Anna; Schaetzle, Olivier; Loos, Katja

    2016-05-01

    The recovery of ammonium from urine requires distinguishing and excluding sodium and potassium. A polymer inclusion membrane selective for ammonium is developed using an ionophore based on pyrazole substituted benzene. The interactions of the components are studied, as well as their effect on transport and selectivity. Spectroscopic and thermogravimetric measurements show no extensive physical interactions of the components, and that the plasticizer reduces the intermolecular forces (rigidity) of the membrane. The ionophore turns the membrane more rigid, although it increases its swelling degree and therefore the affinity of cations. A ratio of plasticizer (DEHP) and polymer (PVC) of 1:3 in mass gives the highest ammonium flux. Tested contents of ionophore (2 and 5 wt%) show that the higher the content of the ionophore, the fastest the flux is (7.5 × 10(-3) mmol cm(-2) h(-1) ). Selectivity of NH4 (+) over Na(+) and over K(+) is reduced from 13.07 to 9.33 and from 14.15 to 9.57 correspondingly.

  3. Characterization of transport of calcium by microsomal membranes from roots maize

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates calcium transport by membranes of roots of maize isolated by differential centrifugation. The preparation was determined to be enriched in plasma membrane using market enzyme and electron microscopy. Using the /sup 45/Ca filtration technique and liquid scintillation counting, vesicular calcium uptake was shown to be stimulated by added calmodulin and specific for and dependent on ATP. Conditions for maximal calcium accumulation were found to be 30 min incubation in the presence of 5 mM ATP, 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..M CaCl/sub 2/, at 23/sup 0/C, and at pH 6.5. Calcium uptake was inhibited by the ionophores A23187, X-537A, and ionomycin. Sodium fluoride, ruthenium red, and p-chloromercuribenzoate completely inhibited transport: diamide and vanadate produced slight inhibition; caffeine, caffeic acid, oligomycin, and ouabain produced little or no inhibition. Chlorpromazine, W7, trifluoperazine, and R 24 571 inhibit calcium uptake irrespective of added calmodulin, while W5 showed little effect on uptake. Verapamil, nifedipine, cinnarizine, flunarizine, lidoflazine, and diltiazem decreased calcium uptake by 17%-50%. Electron microscopic localization of calcium by pyroantimonate showed vesicles incubated with calmodulin and ATP showed the greatest amount of precipitate. These results suggest that these vesicles accumulate calcium in an ATP-dependent, calmodulin-stimulated manner.

  4. Surfactant and temperature effects on paraben transport through silicone membranes.

    PubMed

    Waters, Laura J; Dennis, Laura; Bibi, Aisha; Mitchell, John C

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of two surfactants (one anionic and one non-ionic) and controlled modifications in temperature (298-323K) on the permeation of two structurally similar compounds through a silicone membrane using a Franz diffusion cell system. In all cases the presence of an anionic surfactant, namely sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), reduced the permeation of both compounds (methylparaben and ethylparaben) over a period of 24h. The degree of permeation reduction was proportional to the concentration of surfactant with a maximum effect observed, with an average reduction of approximately 50%, at the highest surfactant concentration of 20mM. Differences were seen around the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS implying the effect was partially connected with the favoured formation of micelles. In contrast, the presence of non-ionic surfactant (Brij 35) had no effect on the permeation of methylparaben or ethylparaben at any of the concentrations investigated, both above and below the CMC of the surfactant. From these findings the authors conclude that the specific effects of SDS are a consequence of ionic surfactant-silicone interactions retarding the movement of paraben through the membrane through indirect modifications to the surface of the membrane. As expected, an increase in experimental temperature appeared to enhance the permeation of both model compounds, a finding that is in agreement with previously reported data. Interestingly, in the majority of cases this effect was optimum at the second highest temperature studied (45°C) which suggests that permeation is a temperature-dependent phenomenon.

  5. Resolution of parameters in the equivalent electrical circuit of the sodium transport mechanism across toad skin.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, L C

    1977-01-28

    In amphibian epithelia, amiloride reduces net sodium transport by hindering the entry of sodium to the active transport mechanism, that is, by increasing the series resistance (Rser). Theoretically, therefore, analysis of amiloride-induced changes in potential differences and short-circuit current should yield numerical estimates of all the parameters in the equivalent electrical circuit of the sodium transport mechanism. The concept has been explored by analysis of such changes in toad skins (Xenopus laevis) bathed in hypotonic sulphate Ringer's, after exposure to varying doses of amiloride, or to amphotericin, dinitrophenol or Pitressin. The estimated values of Rser, of the electromotive force of the sodium pump (ENa), and of the shunt resistance (Rsh) were independent of the dose of amiloride employed. Skins bathed in hypotonic sulphate Ringer's exhibited a progressive rise in ENa. Amphotericin produced a fall in Rser, while dinitrophenol caused a fall in ENa; washout of the drugs reversed these effects. Pitressin produced a fall in both Rser and Rsh, with a rise in ENa. These results are in accord with earlier suggestions regarding the site(s) of action of these agents.

  6. Slow DNA Transport through Nanopores in Hafnium Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2–7 nm thick) free-standing hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with <2 nm diameter pores that last several hours, in which we observe >50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore. PMID:24083444

  7. Intracellular sodium ion activity and sodium transport in rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, D C

    1981-01-01

    1. Intracellular potentials and the intracellular activities of Na+ and K+ were examined using conventional and ion-selective micro-electrodes. 2. In animals on a normal diet, the intracellular Na+ activity was 8.6 +/- 2.9 mM (mean +/- S.D.) with a mean short-circuit current of 2.8 +/- 0.9 microA/cm2. 3. In animals on a low-Na+ diet, the intracellular Na+ activity was 18.5 +/- 9.9 mM with a short-circuit current of 4.5 +/- 1.3 microA/cm2 (mean +/- S.D.). 4. There was a correlation between short-circuit current and intracellular Na+ activity which could be fitted by a saturating hyperbolic relationship. 5. Treatment of the issue with ouabain and amiloride produced an increase and a decrease, respectively, in the intracellular Na+ activity. 6. Treatment with aldosterone produced a large increase in short-circuit current with a substantial increase in intracellular Na+ activity. 7. Intracellular Na+ activity does not seem to affect apical membrane permeability directly. PMID:7320880

  8. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  9. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  10. Osteoblast protects osteoclast devoid of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters from oxidative cytotoxicity of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Kambe, Yuki; Sahara, Koichi; Kurokawa, Shintaro; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2007-12-01

    The view that ascorbic acid indirectly benefits osteoclastogenesis through expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL) by osteoblasts is prevailing. In this study, we have examined the direct effect of ascorbic acid on osteoclastogenesis in cultured mouse osteoclasts differentiated from bone marrow precursors. The absence of alkaline phosphatase and osteoblastic marker genes validated the usefulness of isolation procedures. Sustained exposure to ascorbic acid, but not to dehydroascorbic acid, significantly reduced the number of multinucleated cells positive to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. In cultured osteoclasts, mRNA expression was seen for glucose transporter-1 involved in membrane transport of dehydroascorbic acid, but not for sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters-1 and -2 that are both responsible for the transport of ascorbic acid. The inhibition by ascorbic acid was completely prevented by catalase, while ascorbic acid or hydrogen peroxide drastically increased the number of cells stained with propidium iodide and the generation of reactive oxygen species, in addition to inducing mitochondrial membrane depolarization in cultured osteoclasts. In pre-osteoclastic cell line RAW264.7 cells, ascorbic acid similarly inhibited the formation of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells, with a significant decrease in RANKL-induced NF-kappaB transactivation. Moreover, co-culture with osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells significantly prevented the ascorbic acid-induced decrease in the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that ascorbic acid may play a dual repulsive role in osteoclastogenesis toward bone remodeling through the direct cytotoxicity mediated by oxidative stress to osteoclasts, in addition to the indirect trophism mediated by RANKL from osteoblasts.

  11. Primary sodium plasma membrane ATPases in salt-tolerant algae: facts and fictions.

    PubMed

    Gimmler, H

    2000-07-01

    For thermodynamic reasons algae growing in media of both high salinity and high alkalinity require active export of sodium. However, experimental evidence for an active Na+-dependent cycle was scarce until recently, in contrast to the situation in marine bacteria (including cyanobacteria), fungi and animals. However, a review of literature reveals that some progress has been made in this respect, recently: data demonstrate that at least in two marine algae, Tetraselmis (Platymonas) viridis and Heterosigma akashiwo (syn. Olisthodiscus luteus), active Na+-export is carried out by means of a plasma membrane localized Na+-pump (apparent molecular mass 100-140 kDa). Biochemical characteristics of this vanadate-sensitive, but ouabain-resistant primary P-type Na+-ATPase are described and compared with the corresponding properties of Na+-ATPase from prokaryotes and animals. Alternative mechanisms for Na+-pumping are discussed.

  12. FACTORS WHICH MODIFY THE EFFECT OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM ON BACTERIAL CELL MEMBRANES.

    PubMed

    HENNEMAN, D H; UMBREIT, W W

    1964-06-01

    Henneman, Dorothy H. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), and W. W. Umbreit. Factors which modify the effect of sodium and potassium on bacterial cell membranes. J. Bacteriol. 87:1266-1273. 1964.-Suspensions of Escherichia coli B, when placed in 0.2 to 0.5 m solutions of NaCl, KCl, or LiCl, show an increased turbidity. With NaCl, this increased turbidity is stable with time; with KCl and LiCl, it is gradually lost. The stability to NaCl with time is due to substances removable from the cell by incubation in phosphate buffer; these materials exist in water washings from such phosphate-incubated cells.

  13. Components of the plasma membrane of growing axons. III. Saxitoxin binding to sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The density of sodium channels was measured in growing and mature axons of the olfactory nerve of the bullfrog, using as a probe the drug saxitoxin (STX). The toxin binds to control nerves from adult animals in a saturable manner with a dissociation constant of approximately 23 nM at 4 degrees C and a capacity of 72 fmol/mg wet weight, equivalent to about five sites per square micrometer of axolemma. In growing nerves, obtained from adult frogs 4-5 wk following removal of the original nerve, the STX-binding capacity per wet weight of tissue is markedly reduced, to approximately 25% of control values, and appears to decrease in the proximodistal direction. STX-binding data, expressed as STX/mg wet weight, was converted to STX/micron 2 of axolemma using stereologically derived values of membrane area per milligram wet weight of nerve. The axolemmal content (area/mg wet weight) of all regions of growing nerve is substantially decreased compared to controls, but increases in the proximodistal direction by 60%. These changes in axolemmal area result in calculated STX receptor densities (per unit axolemmal area) which, in distal regions, are approximately at the level of the mature nerve and, in proximal regions, are actually increased above controls by 50 to 70%. Upon comparing the axolemmal density of intramembrane particles, reported in the companion paper, with the calculated density of STX receptors in both mature and growing nerves, we find a correlation between STX receptors and intramembrane particles with diameters of 11.5-14.0 nm. The growing axon's gradient of sodium channels and the shift from this gradient to a uniform distribution in the mature axon suggest (a) that sodium channels are inserted into the perikaryal plasmalemma and diffuse from there into the growing axolemma, and (b) that the axolemma undergoes functional maturation during growth. PMID:6325471

  14. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  15. The sodium pump. Its molecular properties and mechanics of ion transport.

    PubMed

    Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2002-05-01

    The sodium pump (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase; sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase; EC 3.6.1.37) has been under investigation for more than four decades. During this time, the knowledge about the structure and properties of the enzyme has increased to such an extent that specialized groups have formed within this field that focus on specific aspects of the active ion transport catalyzed by this enzyme. Taking this into account, this review, while somewhat speculative, is an attempt to summarize the information regarding the enzymology of the sodium pump with the hope of providing to interested readers from outside the field a concentrated overview and to readers from related fields a guide in their search for gathering specific information concerning the structure, function, and enzymology of this enzyme.

  16. Molecular structure and transport dynamics in perfluoro sulfonyl imide membranes.

    PubMed

    Idupulapati, Nagesh; Devanathan, Ram; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-06-15

    We report a detailed and comprehensive analysis from classical molecular dynamics simulations of the nanostructure of a model of hydrated perfluoro sulfonyl imide (PFSI) membrane, a polymeric system of interest as a proton conductor in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. We also report on the transport dynamics of water and hydronium ions, and water network percolation in this system. We find that the water network percolation threshold for PFSI, i.e. the threshold at which a consistent spanning water network starts to develop in the membrane, is found to occur between hydration levels (λ) 6 and 7. The higher acidity of the sulfonyl imide acid group of PFSI compared to the sulfonic acid group in Nafion, as computationally characterized in our earlier ab initio study (Idupulapati et al 2010 J. Phys. Chem. A 114 6904-12), results in a larger fraction of 'free' hydronium ions at low hydration levels in PFSI compared to Nafion. However, the calculated diffusion coefficients of the H(3)O(+) ions and H(2)O molecules as a function the hydration level are observed to be almost the same as that of Nafion, indicating similar conductivity and consistent with experimental data.

  17. Molecular Structure and Transport Dynamics in Perfluoro Sulfonyl Imide Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-05-25

    We report a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the nanostructure, transport dynamics of water and hydronium and water percolation in hydrated perfluoro sulfonyl imides (PFSI), a polymer considered for proton transport in PEM fuel cells, using classical molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamical changes are related to the changes in the membrane nanostructure. Water network percolation threshold, the level at which a consistent spanning water network starts to develop in the membrane, lies between hydration level (λ) 6 and 7. The higher acidity of the sulfonyl imide acid group of PFSI compared to Nafion reported in our earlier ab initio study, translates into more free hydronium ions at low hydration levels. Nevertheless, the calculated diffusion coefficients of the H3O+ ions and H2O molecules as a function the hydration level were observed to be almost the same as that of Nafion, indicating similar conductivity and consistent with the experimental observations. This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  18. Polymer electrolyte membranes from fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene: Membrane structure and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sodeye, Akinbode; Huang, Tianzi; Gido, Samuel; Mays, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    With a view to optimizing morphology and ultimately properties, membranes have been cast from relatively inexpensive block copolymer ionomers of fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene (FISS) with various sulfonation levels, in both the acid form and the cesium neutralized form. The morphology of these membranes was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, as well as water uptake, proton conductivity and methanol permeability within the temperature range from 20 to 60 C. Random phase separated morphologies were obtained for all samples except the cesium sample with 50 mol% sulfonation. The transport properties increased with increasing degree of sulfonation and temperature for all samples. The acid form samples absorbed more water than the cesium samples with a maximum swelling of 595% recorded at 60 C for the acid sample having 50 mol% sulfonation. Methanol permeability for the latter sample was more than an order of magnitude less than for Nafion 112 but so was the proton conductivity within the plane of the membrane at 20 C. Across the plane of the membrane this sample had half the conductivity of Nafion 112 at 60 C.

  19. Towards Co-evolution of Membrane Transport and Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Protocellular boundaries were inextricably connected to the metabolism they encapsulated: to be inheritable, early metabolism must have led to an increased rate of growth and division of vesicles and, similarly, transport through vesicle boundaries must have supported the evolution of metabolism. Even though explaining how this coupling emerged and evolved in the absence of the complex machinery of modern cells is one of the key issues in studies on the origin of life, little is known about the biochemical and biophysical processes that might have been involved. This gap in our knowledge is a major impediment in efforts to construct scenarios for the origin of life and laboratory models of protocells. A combination of experimental and computational studies carried out by us and our collaborators is aimed at helping to close this gap. Properties of membranes might have contributed to the selection of RNA as an early biopolymer. A kinetic mechanism was proposed (Sacerdote & Szostak, 2005) in which ribose was supplied more quickly than other aldopentoses to primordial cells for preferential incorporation of ribonucleotides into nucleic acids. This proposal is based on a finding that ribose permeates membranes an order of magnitude faster than its diastereomers, arabinose and xylose. Our computer simulations, which yield permeation rates in excellent agreement with experiment, and kinetic modeling explain this phenomenon in terms of inter- and intramolecular interactions involving exocyclic hydroxyl groups attached to carbon atoms of the pyranose ring (Wei and Pohorille, 2009). They also constrain scenarios for the formation of the earliest nucleic acids (Wei and Pohorille, 2013). In one scenario, sugars permeate protocellular walls and subsequently are used to synthesize nucleic acids inside protocells. As long as this process proceeds at the rate faster than 6x10(exp -3)/s, ribose derivatives will be available for synthesis easier than their diastereomers. If

  20. K⁺-dependent ³H-D-glucose transport by hepatopancreatic brush border membrane vesicles of a marine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Obi, Ijeoma E; Sterling, Kenneth M; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of sodium, potassium, sugar inhibitors, and membrane potential on ³H-D-glucose uptake by hepatopancreatic epithelial brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of the Atlantic marine shrimp, Litopenaeus setiferus, were investigated. Brush border membrane vesicles were prepared using a MgCl₂/EGTA precipitation method and uptake experiments were conducted using a high speed filtration technique. ³H-D-Glucose uptake was stimulated by both sodium and potassium and these transport rates were almost doubled in the presence of an inside-negative-induced membrane potential. Kinetics of ³H-D-glucose influx were hyperbolic functions of both external Na⁺ or K⁺, and an induced membrane potential increased influx J(max) and lowered K(m) in both salts. ³H-D-Glucose influx versus [glucose] in both Na⁺ or K⁺ media also displayed Michaelis-Menten properties that were only slightly affected by induced membrane potential. Phloridzin was a poor inhibitor of 0.5 mM ³H-D-glucose influx, requiring at least 5 mM in NaCl and 10 mM in KCl to significantly reduce hexose transport. Several sugars (D-galactose, α-methyl-D-gluco-pyranoside, unlabeled D-glucose, D-fructose, and D-mannose) were used at 75 mM as potential inhibitors of 0.1 mM ³H-D-glucose influx. Only unlabeled D-glucose, D-fructose, and D-mannose significantly (p < 0.05) reduced labeled glucose transport. An additional experiment using increasing concentrations of D-mannose (0, 10, 25, 75, and 100 mM) showed this hexose to be an effective inhibitor of 0.1 mM ³H-D-glucose uptake at concentrations of 75 mM and higher. As a whole these results suggest that ³H-D-glucose transport by hepatopancreatic BBMV occurs by a carrier system that is able to use both Na⁺ and K⁺ as drivers, is enhanced by membrane potential, is relatively refractory to phloridzin, and is only inhibited by itself, D-fructose, and D-mannose. These properties are similar to those exhibited by the mammalian SLC5A9/SGLT4 transporter

  1. ATP-dependent transport of bile acid intermediates across rat liver peroxisomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Une, Mizuho; Iguchi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Tomoko; Tomita, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Morita, Masashi; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2003-08-01

    The bile acid intermediate 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholestanoic acid (THCA) is converted to cholic acid exclusively in peroxisomes by the oxidative cleavage of the side chain. To investigate the mechanism by which the biosynthetic intermediates of bile acids are transported into peroxisomes, we incubated THCA or its CoA ester (THC-CoA) with isolated intact rat liver peroxisomes and analyzed their oxidation products, cholic acid and 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholest-24-enoic acid. The oxidation of both THCA and THC-CoA was dependent on incubation time and peroxisomal proteins, and was stimulated by ATP. THC-CoA was efficiently oxidized to cholic acid and 3alpha,7alpha,12alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholest-24-enoic acid as compared with THCA, suggesting that THC-CoA is the preferred substrate for transport into peroxisomes. The oxidation of THC-CoA was significantly inhibited by sodium azide, verapamile, and N-ethylmaleimide. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect of ATP on the oxidation was not replaced by GTP or AMP. In addition, the ATP-dependent oxidation of THC-CoA was markedly inhibited by pretreatment of peroxisomes with proteinase K when peroxisomal matrix proteins were not degraded. These results suggest that an ATP-dependent transport system for THC-CoA exists on peroxisomal membranes.

  2. Brownian dynamics study of ion transport in the vestibule of membrane channels.

    PubMed

    Li, S C; Hoyles, M; Kuyucak, S; Chung, S H

    1998-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the transport of ions in a vestibular geometry, which offers a more realistic shape for membrane channels than cylindrical tubes. Specifically, we consider a torus-shaped channel, for which the analytical solution of Poisson's equation is possible. The system is composed of the toroidal channel, with length and radius of the constricted region of 80 A and 4 A, respectively, and two reservoirs containing 50 sodium ions and 50 chloride ions. The positions of each of these ions executing Brownian motion under the influence of a stochastic force and a systematic electric force are determined at discrete time steps of 50 fs for up to 2.5 ns. All of the systematic forces acting on an ion due to the other ions, an external electric field, fixed charges in the channel protein, and the image charges induced at the water-protein boundary are explicitly included in the calculations. We find that the repulsive dielectric force arising from the induced surface charges plays a dominant role in channel dynamics. It expels an ion from the vestibule when it is deliberately put in it. Even in the presence of an applied electric potential of 100 mV, an ion cannot overcome this repulsive force and permeate the channel. Only when dipoles of a favorable orientation are placed along the sides of the transmembrane segment can an ion traverse the channel under the influence of a membrane potential. When the strength of the dipoles is further increased, an ion becomes detained in a potential well, and the driving force provided by the applied field is not sufficient to drive the ion out of the well. The trajectory of an ion navigating across the channel mostly remains close to the central axis of the pore lumen. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for the transport of ions across the membrane.

  3. Gd3+ and Calcium Sensitive, Sodium Leak Currents Are Features of Weak Membrane-Glass Seals in Patch Clamp Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Chemin, Jean; Monteil, Arnaud; Spafford, J. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of leaky patch currents in whole cell recording of HEK-293T cells were examined as a means to separate these control currents from expressed sodium and calcium leak channel currents from snail NALCN leak channels possessing both sodium (EKEE) and calcium (EEEE) selectivity filters. Leak currents were generated by the weakening of gigaohm patch seals by artificial membrane rupture using the ZAP function on the patch clamp amplifier. Surprisingly, we found that leak currents generated from the weakened membrane/glass seal can be surprisingly stable and exhibit behavior that is consistent with a sodium leak current derived from an expressible channel. Leaky patch currents differing by 10 fold in size were similarly reduced in size when external sodium ions were replaced with the large monovalent ion NMDG+. Leaky patch currents increased when external Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was lowered to 0.1 mM and were inhibited (>40% to >90%) with 10 µM Gd3+, 100 µM La3+, 1 mM Co2+ or 1 mM Cd2+. Leaky patch currents were relatively insensitive (<30%) to 1 mM Ni2+ and exhibited a variable amount of block with 1 mM verapamil and were insensitive to 100 µM mibefradil or 100 µM nifedipine. We hypothesize that the rapid changes in leak current size in response to changing external cations or drugs relates to their influences on the membrane seal adherence and the electro-osmotic flow of mobile cations channeling in crevices of a particular pore size in the interface between the negatively charged patch electrode and the lipid membrane. Observed sodium leak conductance currents in weak patch seals are reproducible between the electrode glass interface with cell membranes, artificial lipid or Sylgard rubber. PMID:24945283

  4. Molecular characterization of the first aromatic nutrient transporter from the sodium neurotransmitter symporter family.

    PubMed

    Meleshkevitch, Ella A; Assis-Nascimento, Poincyane; Popova, Lyudmila B; Miller, Melissa M; Kohn, Andrea B; Phung, Elizabeth N; Mandal, Anita; Harvey, William R; Boudko, Dmitri Y

    2006-08-01

    Nutrient amino acid transporters (NATs, subfamily of sodium neurotransmitter symporter family SNF, a.k.a. SLC6) represent a set of phylogenetically and functionally related transport proteins, which perform intracellular absorption of neutral, predominantly essential amino acids. Functions of NATs appear to be critical for the development and survival in organisms. However, mechanisms of specific and synergetic action of various NAT members in the amino acid transport network are virtually unexplored. A new transporter, agNAT8, was cloned from the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae (SS). Upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes it performs high-capacity, sodium-coupled (2:1) uptake of nutrients with a strong preference for aromatic catechol-branched substrates, especially phenylalanine and its derivatives tyrosine and L-DOPA, but not catecholamines. It represents a previously unknown SNF phenotype, and also appears to be the first sodium-dependent B(0) type transporter with a narrow selectivity for essential precursors of catecholamine synthesis pathways. It is strongly and specifically transcribed in absorptive and secretory parts of the larval alimentary canal and specific populations of central and peripheral neurons of visual-, chemo- and mechano-sensory afferents. We have identified a new SNF transporter with previously unknown phenotype and showed its important role in the accumulation and redistribution of aromatic substrates. Our results strongly suggest that agNAT8 is an important, if not the major, provider of an essential catechol group in the synthesis of catecholamines for neurochemical signaling as well as ecdysozoan melanization and sclerotization pathways, which may include cuticle hardening/coloring, wound curing, oogenesis, immune responses and melanization of pathogens.

  5. Functional genomics of membrane transporters in human populations.

    PubMed

    Urban, Thomas J; Sebro, Ronnie; Hurowitz, Evan H; Leabman, Maya K; Badagnani, Ilaria; Lagpacan, Leah L; Risch, Neil; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2006-02-01

    Although considerable progress has been made toward characterizing human DNA sequence variation, there remains a deficiency in information on human phenotypic variation at the single-gene level. We systematically analyzed the function of all protein-altering variants of eleven membrane transporters in heterologous expression systems. Coding-region variants were identified by screening DNA from a large sample (n = 247-276) of ethnically diverse subjects. In total, we functionally analyzed 88 protein-altering variants. Fourteen percent of the polymorphic variants (defined as variants with allele frequencies > or =1% in at least one major ethnic group) had no activity or significantly reduced function. Decreased function variants had significantly lower allele frequencies and were more likely to alter evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues. However, variants at evolutionarily conserved positions with approximately normal activity in cellular assays were also at significantly lower allele frequencies, suggesting that some variants with apparently normal activity in biochemical assays may influence occult functions or quantitative degrees of function that are important in human fitness but not measured in these assays. For example, eight (14%) of the 58 variants for which we had measured the transport of at least two substrates showed substrate-specific defects in transport. These variants and the reduced function variants provide plausible candidates for disease susceptibility or variation in clinical drug response.

  6. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  7. System and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.

    2017-02-21

    A system and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  8. Investigation of low ionic strength effect on passive monovalent cation transport through erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, I; Ihrig, I; Erdmann, A

    1993-01-01

    Effect of low ionic force on the passive transport of univalent cations through the erythrocyte membranes is considered. It is postulated that this effect is complex and cannot be explained on the basis of electrodiffusion. Data are presented on the already known transport pathways in the erythrocyte membranes for univalent cations. Characteristics of residual cation transport (the "leak" flux) through the erythrocyte membranes also affected by the low ionic force are presented.

  9. Distance Measurement on an Endogenous Membrane Transporter in E. coli Cells and Native Membranes Using EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Benesh; Sikora, Arthur; Bordignon, Enrica; Jeschke, Gunnar; Cafiso, David S; Prisner, Thomas F

    2015-05-18

    Membrane proteins may be influenced by the environment, and they may be unstable in detergents or fail to crystallize. As a result, approaches to characterize structures in a native environment are highly desirable. Here, we report a novel general strategy for precise distance measurements on outer membrane proteins in whole Escherichia coli cells and isolated outer membranes. The cobalamin transporter BtuB was overexpressed and spin-labeled in whole cells and outer membranes and interspin distances were measured to a spin-labeled cobalamin using pulse EPR spectroscopy. A comparative analysis of the data reveals a similar interspin distance between whole cells, outer membranes, and synthetic vesicles. This approach provides an elegant way to study conformational changes or protein-protein/ligand interactions at surface-exposed sites of membrane protein complexes in whole cells and native membranes, and provides a method to validate outer membrane protein structures in their native environment.

  10. Effects of Hypotonic Saline Loading in Hydrated Dog: Evidence for a Saline-induced Limit on Distal Tubular Sodium Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Richard M.; Abramson, Ruth G.; Kahn, Thomas; Levitt, Marvin F.

    1967-01-01

    We performed studies on dogs under hydrated conditions, utilizing the rate of free water formation (CH2O) as an index of the rate of distal tubular sodium transport. Since CH2O could be progressively increased with no evidence of a maximal rate during loading with hypotonic (2.5%) mannitol, it was concluded that there is no limit on distal tubular sodium transport during mannitol loading. In contrast, during hypotonic (0.45%) saline loading CH2O rose initially, but as urine flow (V) exceeded 25% of the filtered load CH2O attained maximal levels (up to 20% of the filtered load) and remained stable as V increased to 50% of the filtered load. It was concluded that saline loading progressively inhibits proximal sodium reabsorption. Initially, the distal tubule absorbes a large fraction of the proximal rejectate and sodium excretion rises slightly. Eventually, an alteration in distal sodium transport appears which culminates in a maximal rate or transport limit. This distal transport limit provoked by saline loading could not be characterized by a classical Tm as seen with glucose and does not seem to be consequent to high rates of flow through the distal tubule. Regardless of the precise nature of this limit, the major increment in sodium excretion develops during saline loading only after saline alters the capacity of the distal tubule to transport sodium. PMID:6027084

  11. SNAT3-mediated glutamine transport in perisynaptic astrocytes in situ is regulated by intracellular sodium.

    PubMed

    Todd, Alison C; Marx, Mari-Carmen; Hulme, Sarah R; Bröer, Stefan; Billups, Brian

    2017-03-08

    The release of glutamine from astrocytes adjacent to synapses in the central nervous system is thought to play a vital role in the mechanism of glutamate recycling and is therefore important for maintaining excitatory neurotransmission. Here we investigate the nature of astrocytic membrane transport of glutamine in rat brainstem slices, using electrophysiological recording and fluorescent imaging of pHi and Nai+. Glutamine application to perisynaptic astrocytes induced a membrane current, caused by activation of system A (SA) family transporters. A significant electroneutral component was also observed, which was mediated by the system N (SN) family transporters. This response was stimulated by glutamine (KM of 1.57 mM), histidine, and asparagine, but not by leucine or serine, indicating activation of the SNAT3 isoform of SN. We hypothesized that increasing the [Na(+) ]i would alter the SNAT3 transporter equilibrium, thereby stimulating glutamine release. In support of this hypothesis, we show that SNAT3 transport can be driven by changing cation concentration and that manipulations to raise [Na(+) ]i (activation of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), SA transporters or AMPA receptors) all directly influence SNAT3 transport rate. A kinetic model of glutamine fluxes is presented, which shows that EAAT activation causes the release of glutamine, driven mainly by the increased [Na(+) ]i . These data demonstrate that SNAT3 is functionally active in perisynaptic astrocytes in situ. As a result, astrocytic Nai+ signaling, as would be stimulated by neighboring synaptic activity, has the capacity to stimulate astrocytic glutamine release to support glutamate recycling.

  12. Transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport in free-standing nanometer-sized polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Susanne; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2015-11-01

    The transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport of ions through thin polymer membranes has been investigated by recording single transport events via time-correlated single-particle detection. At the highest kinetic energies investigated, ballistic transport of potassium ions is observed with no discernible energy loss to the membrane. At the lowest kinetic energies investigated (several 100 eV) ions are demonstrated to lose the entire kinetic energy to the membrane. Transport there occurs by electrodiffusion. A transition regime is observed. The transition energy is shown to depend on the thickness of the membrane.

  13. Transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport in free-standing nanometer-sized polymer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Susanne; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2015-11-01

    The transition from ballistic to electrodiffusive transport of ions through thin polymer membranes has been investigated by recording single transport events via time-correlated single-particle detection. At the highest kinetic energies investigated, ballistic transport of potassium ions is observed with no discernible energy loss to the membrane. At the lowest kinetic energies investigated (several 100 eV) ions are demonstrated to lose the entire kinetic energy to the membrane. Transport there occurs by electrodiffusion. A transition regime is observed. The transition energy is shown to depend on the thickness of the membrane.

  14. The production of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wafiroh, Siti; Pudjiastuti, Pratiwi; Sari, Ilma Indana

    2016-03-01

    The majority of energy was used in this period is from fossil fuel, which getting decreased in the future. The objective of this research is production and characterization of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) for alternative energy. PEMFC was produced with 4 variations (w/w) ratio between chitosan and sodium alginate, 8 : 0, 8 : 1, 8 : 2, 8 : 4 (w/w). The production of membrane was mixed sodium alginate solution into chitosan solution and sulfonated with H2SO4 0.72 N. The characterization of the PEM was uses Modulus Young analysis, water swelling, ion exchange capacity, FTIR, SEM, DTA, methanol permeability and proton conductivity. The result of the research, showed that the optimum membrane was with ratio 8 : 2 (w/w) that the Modulus Young 8564 kN/m2, water swelling 31.86%, ion exchange capacity 1.020 meq/g, proton conductivity 8,8 × 10-6 S/cm, methanol permeability 1.90 × 10-8 g/cm2s and glass transition temperature (Tg) 100.9 °C, crystalline temperature (Tc) 227.6 °C, and the melting temperature (Tm) 267.9 °C.

  15. Ginsenosides, ingredients of the root of Panax ginseng, are not substrates but inhibitors of sodium-glucose transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shengli; Kushida, Hirotaka; Makino, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Recent pharmacokinetic studies have revealed that ginsenosides, the major ingredients of ginseng (the roots of Panax ginseng), are present in the plasma collected from subjects receiving ginseng, and speculated that ginsenosides might be actively transported via glucose transporters. We evaluated whether ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1, and their metabolites from enteric bacteria act as substrates of sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 1, the major glucose transporter expressed on the apical side of intestinal epithelial cells. First, we evaluated the competing effects of ginseng extract and ginsenosides on the uptake of [(14)C]methyl-glucose, a substrate of SGLT1, by SGLT1-overexpressing HEK293 cells. A boiling water extract of ginseng inhibited SGLT1 in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 0.85 mg/ml. By activity-guided fractionation, we determined that the fraction containing ginsenosides displayed an inhibitory effect on SGLT1. Of the ginsenosides evaluated, protopanaxatriol-type ginsenosides were not found to inhibit SGLT1, whereas protopanaxadiol-type ginsenosides, including ginsenosides Rd, Rg3, Rh2, F2 and compound K, exhibited significant inhibitory effects on SGLT1, with ginsenoside F2 having the highest activity with an IC50 value of 23.0 µM. Next, we measured the uptake of ginsenoside F2 and compound K into Caco-2 cells, a cell line frequently used to evaluate the intestinal absorption of drugs. The uptake of ginsenoside F2 and compound K into Caco-2 cells was not competitively inhibited by glucose. Furthermore, the uptake of ginsenoside F2 and compound K into SGLT1-overexpressing HEK293 cells was not significantly higher than into mock cells. Ginsenoside F2 and compound K did not appear to be substrates of SGLT1, although these compounds could inhibit SGLT1. Ginsenosides might be absorbed by passive diffusion through the intestinal membrane or actively transported via unknown transporters other than SGLT1.

  16. Albumen Transport to Bruch's Membrane and RPE by Choriocapillaris Caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Masataka; Grebe, Rhonda; Bhutto, Imran A.; Edwards, Malia; McLeod, D. Scott; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The choriocapillaris (CC), the capillary network of the choroid, is positioned adjacent to Bruch's membrane (BM) and the RPE. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism(s) for transport of serum albumen from CC lumen to RPE. Methods Alexa647 conjugated to BSA (BSA-A647) or PBS was administrated via the femoral vein to young and aged wild-type (WT; C57BL/6J) mice and Caveolin-1 knockout mice (Cav1−/−). Mice were perfused with PBS and killed at 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours after injection. Eyecups were cryopreserved, and cryosections were analyzed on a Zeiss 710 confocal microscope. Bovine serum albumin conjugated to gold nanoparticles (BSA-GNP) was administrated through the left common carotid artery. Mice were perfused with PBS and killed at 30 minutes after injection. Eyecups were embedded after fixation, and 70-nm-thick sections were analyzed on a Hitachi H7600 transmission electron microscope. Results In eyes of WT young mice, BSA-A647 was transported to the RPE at 30 minutes and diffused to the photoreceptor layer by 1 hour. In contrast, most BSA-A647 was found in the CC in Cav1−/− eyes. The majority of BSA-GNP found in the CC of young WT mice was on the luminal side in caveolae at 30 minutes after injection. In aged WT mice, BSA-GNPs were found in defective tight junctions between endothelial cells and appeared trapped at the diaphragm of fenestrations. Conclusions Normally, CC carefully regulates transport system of BSA from lumen to BM by caveolae-mediated transcytosis; however, endothelium cells of aged control WT mice have leaky tight junctions and lacked regulated BSA transport. PMID:27116549

  17. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Swathirajan, S.

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  18. Quantized Water Transport: Ideal Desalination through Graphyne-4 Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, E. G.; Meng, Sheng

    2014-03-01

    The shortage of clean and fresh water is one of most pervasive problems afflicting human being's life in the world. Desalination is one viable solution to produce clean water, since 98% of the available water in the form of salty water. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that graphyne sheet exhibits promising potential for nanoscale desalination to achieve both high water permeability and salt rejection rate. In addition, Graphyne sheets also are mechanically robust with high tolerance to deformation. Especially, γ-graphyne-4 has the best performance with 100% slat rejection and an unprecedented water permeability of ~ 13L/cm2/day/MPa. 3 orders of magnitude higher than prevailing commercial membranes based on reverse osmosis, and ~ 10 times higher than the state-of-the-art nanoporous graphene. Strikingly, water permeability across graphyne exhibits unexpected nonlinear dependence on the pore area. This counter-intuitive behavior is attributed to the quantized nature of water flow at the nanoscale, which has wide implications in controlling nanoscale water transport and designing highly effective membrane.

  19. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  20. Effect of chemical interactions in pentachlorophenol mixtures on skin and membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Ronald E; Brooks, James D; Mumtaz, Moiz; Riviere, Jim E

    2002-10-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been widely used as a pesticide, and topical exposure to a chemical mixture can alter its dermal absorption. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of single and binary solvent systems (ethanol, EtOH, and water), a surfactant (6% sodium lauryl sulfate, SLS), and a rubifacient/vasodilator (1.28% methyl nicotinate, MNA) on PCP membrane transport, and to correlate these effects with physiochemical characteristics of the PCP mixtures. Partitioning, diffusion, and absorption parameters of (14)C-PCP at low (4 microg/cm(2)) and high (40 microg/cm(2)) doses were assessed in porcine skin and silastic membranes in vitro. In these 8-h, flow-through diffusion studies, PCP was dosed with the following vehicles: 100% EtOH, 100% water, 40% EtOH + 60% water, 40% EtOH + 60% water + SLS, 40% EtOH + 60% water + MNA, and 40% EtOH + 60% water + SLS + MNA. PCP absorption ranged from 1.55-15.62% for the high dose and 0.43-7.20% for the low dose. PCP absorption, flux, and apparent permeability were influenced by PCP solubility, and PCP apparent permeability was correlated with log PC (r2 = 0.66). Although PCP was very soluble in pure ethanol (100%), this vehicle evaporated very rapidly, and PCP absorption in ethanol was the lowest with this vehicle when compared to pure water (100%) or aqueous ethanol mixtures in general. MNA had no significant effect on membrane absorption or relative permeability R(P) in aqueous ethanol solutions, but the presence of the surfactant, SLS, significantly reduced PCP absorption and R(P) in both membrane systems. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated that modification in mixture composition with either a solvent and/or a surfactant can influence PCP diffusion in skin. Physicochemical interactions between these mixture components on the skin surface and stratum corneum contributed significantly to PCP transport, and these interactions were identified by simultaneously assessing chemical diffusion in biological

  1. Relations among transepithelial sodium transport, potassium exchange, and cell volume in rabbit ileum.

    PubMed

    Nellans, H N; Schultz, S G

    1976-10-01

    The relation between active transepithelial Na transport across rabbit ileum and 42K exchange from the serosal solution across the basolateral membranes has been explored. Although 42K influx across the basolateral membranes is inhibited by ouabain and by complete depletion of cell Na, it is not affected when transepithelial Na transport is abolished (i.e. in the presence of an Na-free mucosal solution) or stimulated (i.e. when glucose or alanine is added to the mucosal solution). We are unable to detect any relation between the ouabain-sensitive Na-K exchange mechanism responsible for the maintenance of intracellular Na and K concentrations and active transcellular Na transport. In addition, the maintenance of cell volume (water content) does not appear to be dependent upon transepithelial Na transport or the ouabain-sensitive Na-K exchange pump. Although the results of these studies cannot be considered conclusive, they raise serious questions regarding the role of the Na-K exchange pump, located at the basolateral membranes, in active transepithelial Na transport and the maintenance of cell volume.

  2. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  3. CtBP3/BARS drives membrane fission in dynamin-independent transport pathways.

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, Matteo; Spanò, Stefania; Turacchio, Gabriele; Cericola, Claudia; Valente, Carmen; Colanzi, Antonino; Kweon, Hee Seok; Hsu, Victor W; Polishchuck, Elena V; Polishchuck, Roman S; Sallese, Michele; Pulvirenti, Teodoro; Corda, Daniela; Luini, Alberto

    2005-06-01

    Membrane fission is a fundamental step in membrane transport. So far, the only fission protein machinery that has been implicated in in vivo transport involves dynamin, and functions in several, but not all, transport pathways. Thus, other fission machineries may exist. Here, we report that carboxy-terminal binding protein 3/brefeldin A-ribosylated substrate (CtBP3/BARS) controls fission in basolateral transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane and in fluid-phase endocytosis, whereas dynamin is not involved in these steps. Conversely, CtBP3/BARS protein is inactive in apical transport to the plasma membrane and in receptor-mediated endocytosis, both steps being controlled by dynamin. This indicates that CtBP3/BARS controls membrane fission in endocytic and exocytic transport pathways, distinct from those that require dynamin.

  4. Simultaneous determination of ampicillin and sulbactam by liquid chromatography: post-column reaction with sodium hydroxide and sodium hypochlorite using an active hollow-fibre membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Haginaka, J; Nishimura, Y

    1990-10-26

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of ampicillin (ABPC) and sulbactam (SBT) in serum and urine. The method involves separation of ABPC and SBT from the background components of serum and urine on a C18 column, post-column reaction with sodium hydroxide and sodium hypochlorite using an active hollow-fibre membrane reactor, and detection at 270 nm. At ABPC and SBT concentrations of 10 and 5 micrograms/ml in urine and serum samples, the precisions (relative standard deviations) were 0.9-2.5% (n = 8). The detection limits were 20 and 5 ng for ABPC and SBT, respectively, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  5. Cloning and functional analysis of TipE, a novel membrane protein that enhances Drosophila para sodium channel function.

    PubMed

    Feng, G; Deák, P; Chopra, M; Hall, L M

    1995-09-22

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels are involved in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in many excitable cells. Here we report that tipE, a gene defined by a temperature-sensitive paralytic mutation in Drosophila, encodes a novel integral membrane protein that dramatically stimulates functional expression in Xenopus oocytes of the Drosophila sodium channel alpha subunit encoded by the paralytic (para) locus. Using a heat shock promoter to control tipE+ gene expression in transgenic flies, we demonstrate that tipE+ gene expression is required during pupal development to rescue adult paralysis. In addition, we demonstrate a role for the tipE gene product in adults.

  6. Morphology and Proton Transport in Sulfonated Block Copolymer and Mesoporous Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Wong, David; Beers, Keith; Balsara, Nitash

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to understand the fundamentals of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs), we have developed a series of poly(styrene-b-ethylene-b-styrene) (SES) membranes. The SES membranes were subsequently sulfonated to yield proton conducting S-SES membranes. We examine the effects of sulfonation level, temperature and thermal history on the morphology of S-SES membranes in both dry and hydrated states. The effects of these parameters on water uptake and proton transport characteristics of the membranes are also examined. Furthermore, building upon the strategy we deployed in sulfonating the SES membranes, we fabricated mesoporous S-SES membranes, with pores lined up with the proton conducting channels. These membranes have three distinct phases: structural block, proton-conducting block, and void. We examine the effects of pore size, domain structure and sulfonation level on water uptake and proton conductivity of the mesoporous PEMs at different temperatures. This work is funded by Department of Energy.

  7. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    is incredible freedom in designing the block copolymer architecture in order to optimize the mechanical and other properties of the membrane without sacrificing conductivity. The derived scaling relationships are shown to be general for many block copolymer and ionic liquid chemistries. In certain cases, the mechanism of ion conduction in the ionic liquid is affected by block copolymer nanoconfinement. The introduction of excess neutral imidazole to [Im][TFSI] leads to enhanced proton conductivity as well as a high H+ transference number due to facilitated proton hopping between imidazole molecules. We show that there is increased proton hopping when the nonstoichiometric ionic liquid is confined to lamellar block copolymer nanodomains, which we hypothesize is due to changes in the hydrogen bond structure of the ionic liquid under confinement. This, in combination with unique ion aggregation behavior, leads to a lower activation energy for macroscopic ion transport compared to that in a corresponding homopolymer/ionic liquid mixture. Through this work, we further the understanding of the relationship between membrane composition, structure, and ion transport. The findings presented herein portend the rational design of nanostructured membranes having improved mechanical properties and conductivity.

  8. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  9. Sodium channels as gateable non-photonic sensors for membrane-delimited reactive species

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Navin K.; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Neugebauer, Sophie; Borowski, Benjamin; El-Hussein, Ahmed; Hoshi, Toshinori; Leipold, Enrico; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) play crucial roles in physiological processes. While excessive ROS damages cells, small fluctuations in ROS levels represent physiological signals important for vital functions. Despite the physiological importance of ROS, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, such as which types of ROS occur in cells, how they distribute inside cells, and how long they remain in an active form. The current study presents a ratiometric sensor of intracellular ROS levels based on genetically engineered voltage-gated sodium channels (roNaV). roNaV can be used for detecting oxidative modification that occurs near the plasma membrane with a sensitivity similar to existing fluorescence-based ROS sensors. Moreover, roNaV has several advantages over traditional sensors because it does not need excitation light for sensing, and thus, can be used to detect phototoxic cellular modifications. In addition, the ROS dynamic range of roNaV is easily manipulated in real time by means of the endogenous channel inactivation mechanism. Measurements on ROS liberated from intracellular Lucifer Yellow and genetically encoded KillerRed has revealed an assessment of ROS lifetime in individual mammalian cells. Flashlight-induced ROS concentration decayed with two major time constants of about 10 and 1000 ms. PMID:24513256

  10. Effect of nanoscale morphology on selective ethanol transport through block copolymer membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the effect of block copolymer domain size on transport of liquid mixtures through the membranes by presenting pervaporation data of an 8 wt% ethanol/water mixture through A-B-A and B-A-B triblock copolymer membranes. The A-block was chosen to facilitate ethanol transport while the B-blo...

  11. Targeting and biogenesis of transporters and channels in chloroplast envelope membranes: Unsolved questions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Jun; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-07-01

    Chloroplasts produce carbohydrates, hormones, vitamins, amino acids, pigments, nucleotides, ATP, and secondary metabolites. Channels and transporters are required for the movement of molecules across the two chloroplast envelope membranes. These transporters and channel proteins are grouped into two different types, including β-barrel proteins and transmembrane-domain (TMD) containing proteins. Most β-barrel proteins are localized at the outer chloroplast membrane, and TMD-containing proteins are localized at the inner chloroplast membrane. Many of these transporters and channels are encoded by nuclear genes; therefore, they have to be imported into chloroplasts after translation on cytosolic ribosomes. These proteins should have specific targeting signals for their final destination in the chloroplast membrane and for assembly into specific complexes. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the identification, functional characterization, and biogenesis of transporters and channels at the chloroplast envelope membranes, and discuss outstanding questions regarding transporter and channel protein biogenesis.

  12. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S; Dickson, James M

    2013-03-28

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  13. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of pressure-driven water transport through modified CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented to investigate the effect of water-membrane interactions on the transport properties of pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT membrane is modified with different physical properties to alter the van der Waals interactions or the electrostatic interactions between water molecules and the CNT membranes. The unmodified and modified CNT membranes are models of simplified nanofiltration (NF) membranes at operating conditions consistent with real NF systems. All NEMD simulations are run with constant pressure difference (8.0 MPa) temperature (300 K), constant pore size (0.643 nm radius for CNT (12, 12)), and membrane thickness (6.0 nm). The water flow rate, density, and velocity (in flow direction) distributions are obtained by analyzing the NEMD simulation results to compare transport through the modified and unmodified CNT membranes. The pressure-driven water flow through CNT membranes is from 11 to 21 times faster than predicted by the Navier-Stokes equations. For water passing through the modified membrane with stronger van der Waals or electrostatic interactions, the fast flow is reduced giving lower flow rates and velocities. These investigations show the effect of water-CNT membrane interactions on water transport under NF operating conditions. This work can help provide and improve the understanding of how these membrane characteristics affect membrane performance for real NF processes.

  14. Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT): a potential target for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-06-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems.

  15. [The effect of N-bromoacetamide on the components of sodium channel inactivation in the membrane of Ranvier's node].

    PubMed

    Lonskiĭ, A V; Krutetskaia, Z I; Roshchina, N G; P'iankova, S V

    1991-05-01

    In voltage clamp experiments on the frog Ranvier node, the specific protein reagent, N-bromacetamide, significantly decelerates the sodium inactivation kinetics and makes it incomplete. After treatment with N-bromacetamide, both fast and slow inactivation time constants are increased and the proportion of inactivation components is changed favouring the slowly inactivating one in the wide range of membrane potentials. The results are consistent with a single channel population following the 3-state model of inactivation.

  16. Clopidogrel attenuates lithium-induced alterations in renal water and sodium channels/transporters in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, János; Heiney, Kristina M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Carlson, Noel G; Müller, Christa E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    Lithium (Li) administration causes deranged expression and function of renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters resulting in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Extracellular nucleotides (ATP/ADP/UTP), via P2 receptors, regulate these transport functions. We tested whether clopidogrel bisulfate (CLPD), an antagonist of ADP-activated P2Y(12) receptor, would affect Li-induced alterations in renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters. Adult mice were treated for 14 days with CLPD and/or Li and euthanized. Urine and kidneys were collected for analysis. When administered with Li, CLPD ameliorated polyuria, attenuated the rise in urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and resulted in significantly higher urinary arginine vasopressin (AVP) and aldosterone levels as compared to Li treatment alone. However, urine sodium excretion remained elevated. Semi-quantitative immunoblotting revealed that CLPD alone increased renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and the subunits of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) in medulla by 25-130 %. When combined with Li, CLPD prevented downregulation of AQP2, Na-K-ATPase, and NKCC2 but was less effective against downregulation of cortical α- or γ-ENaC (70 kDa band). Thus, CLPD primarily attenuated Li-induced downregulation of proteins involved in water conservation (AVP-sensitive), with modest effects on aldosterone-sensitive proteins potentially explaining sustained natriuresis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong labeling for P2Y(12)-R in proximal tubule brush border and blood vessels in the cortex and less intense labeling in medullary thick ascending limb and the collecting ducts. Therefore, there is the potential for CLPD to be directly acting at the tubule sites to mediate these effects. In conclusion, P2Y(12)-R may represent a novel therapeutic target for Li-induced NDI.

  17. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R; Allen, Frances I; Shnyrova, Anna V; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M; Frolov, Vadim A; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-30

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these 'CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  18. Second-messenger regulation of sodium transport in mammalian airway epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, A; Steel, D M; Alton, E W; Geddes, D M

    1992-01-01

    1. Sodium absorption is the dominant ion transport process in conducting airways and is a major factor regulating the composition of airway surface liquid. However, little is known about the control of airway sodium transport by intracellular regulatory pathways. 2. In sheep tracheae and human bronchi mounted in Ussing chambers under short circuit conditions, the sodium current can be isolated by pretreating tissues with acetazolamide (100 microM) to inhibit bicarbonate secretion, bumetanide (100 microM) to inhibit chloride secretion and phloridzin (200 microM) to inhibit sodium-glucose cotransport. This sodium current consists of amiloride-sensitive (57%) and amiloride-insensitive (43%) components. 3. The regulation of the isolated sodium current by three second messenger pathways was studied using the calcium ionophore A23187 to elevate intracellular calcium, a combination of forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor zardaverine to elevate intracellular cyclic AMP, and the phorbol ester 12,13-phorbol dibutyrate (PDB) to stimulate protein kinase C. 4. In sheep trachea, A23187 produces a dose-related inhibition of the sodium current with maximal effect (38% of ISC) at 10 microM and IC50 1 microM. This response affects both the amiloride-sensitive and insensitive components of the sodium current and is not altered by prior stimulation of protein kinase C or elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP. In human bronchi, A23187 (10 microM) produced a significantly greater inhibition of ISC (68%), a response which was unaffected by prior treatment with PDB or forskolin-zardaverine. 5. In sheep trachea, stimulation of protein kinase C with PDB produced a dose-related inhibition of ISC maximal (56% of ISC) at 50 nM (IC50 7 nM). This response was abolished by amiloride (100 microM) pretreatment suggesting a selective effect on the amiloride-sensitive component of the sodium current. The response was not altered by prior elevation of intracellular calcium or cyclic AMP. PDB

  19. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    SciTech Connect

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-10-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels.

  20. Organic Anion Transporter 4-Mediated Transport of Olmesartan at Basal Plasma Membrane of Human Placental Barrier.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Saki; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Fujibayashi, Ayasa; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Tomi, Masatoshi; Nakashima, Emi

    2015-09-01

    Mechanisms regulating fetal transfer of olmesartan, an angiotensin-II receptor type 1 antagonist, are important as potential determinants of life-threatening adverse fetal effects. The purpose of this study was to examine the olmesartan transport mechanism through the basal plasma membrane (BM) of human syncytiotrophoblasts forming the placental barrier. Uptake of olmesartan by human placental BM vesicles was potently inhibited by dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), estrone 3-sulfate, and bromosulfophthalein, which are all typical substrates of organic anion transporter (OAT) 4 localized at the BM of syncytiotrophoblasts, and was increased in the absence of chloride. In tetracycline-inducible OAT4-expressing cells, [(3) H]olmesartan uptake was increased by tetracycline treatment. Olmesartan uptake via OAT4 was concentration dependent with a Km of 20 μM, and was increased in the absence of chloride. [(3) H]Olmesartan efflux via OAT4 was also observed and was trans-stimulated by extracellular chloride and DHEAS. Thus, OAT4 mediates bidirectional transport of olmesartan and appears to regulate fetal transfer of olmesartan at the BM of syncytiotrophoblasts. Efflux transport of olmesartan via OAT4 from syncytiotrophoblasts to the fetal circulation might be facilitated in the presence of an inwardly directed physiological chloride gradient and extracellular DHEAS.

  1. Transportation behavior of alkali ions through a cell membrane ion channel. A quantum chemical description of a simplified isolated model.

    PubMed

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Quantum chemical model calculations were carried out for modeling the ion transport through an isolated ion channel of a cell membrane. An isolated part of a natural ion channel was modeled. The model channel was a calixarene derivative, hydrated sodium and potassium ions were the models of the transported ion. The electrostatic potential of the channel and the energy of the channel-ion system were calculated as a function of the alkali ion position. Both attractive and repulsive ion-channel interactions were found. The calculations - namely the dependence of the system energy and the atomic charges of the water molecules with respect to the position of the alkali ion in the channel - revealed the molecular-structural background of the potassium selectivity of this artificial ion channel. It was concluded that the studied ion channel mimics real biological ion channel quite well.

  2. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  3. Metformin Transport by a Newly Cloned Proton-Stimulated Organic Cation Transporter (Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter) Expressed in Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mingyan; Xia, Li; Wang, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used oral antihyperglycemic drug for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. The intestinal absorption of metformin is dose-dependent and involves an active, saturable uptake process. Metformin has been shown to be transported by the human organic cation transporters 1 and 2 (hOCT1–2). We recently cloned and characterized a novel proton-activated organic cation transporter, plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT). We previously showed that PMAT transports many classic organic cations (e.g., monoamine neurotransmitters, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) in a pH-dependent manner and its mRNA is expressed in multiple human tissues. The goal of this study is to investigate whether metformin is a substrate of PMAT and whether PMAT plays a role in the intestinal uptake of metformin. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells stably expressing human PMAT, we showed that metformin is avidly transported by PMAT, with an apparent affinity (Km = 1.32 mM) comparable to those reported for hOCT1–2. Interestingly, the concentration-velocity profile of PMAT-mediated metformin uptake is sigmoidal, with a Hill coefficient of 2.64. PMAT-mediated metformin transport is greatly stimulated by acidic pH, with the uptake rate being ~4-fold higher at pH 6.6 than at pH 7.4. Using a polyclonal antibody against PMAT, we showed that the PMAT protein (58 kDa) was expressed in human small intestine and concentrated on the tips of the mucosal epithelial layer. Taken together, our results suggest that PMAT transports metformin, is expressed in human intestine, and may play a role in the intestinal absorption of metformin and possibly other cationic drugs. PMID:17600084

  4. Electrochemical instability of solvent membranes during electrodialytic cation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, V.N.; Kontush, A.S.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental data are reported concerning the uptake of water by solvent membranes during dialysis and electrodialysis when the solvent is nonaqueous and a macrocyclic carrier is present. Aspects of the electrochemical instability of solvent membranes are discussed, and particularly the discontinuous conductivity fluctuations and the three stages of development of electric breakdown. The cationic selectivity of the macrocyclic carrier, the amount of water present in the solvent membrane, and the character of electrochemical instability of the membrane are shown to be interrelated.

  5. Multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Eric D.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) enable efficient conversion of fuels to electricity. They have enormous potential due to the high energy density of the fuels they utilize (hydrogen or alcohols). Power density is a major limitation to wide-scale introduction of PEMFCs. Power density in hydrogen fuel cells is limited by accumulation of water in what is termed fuel cell `flooding.' Flooding may occur in either the gas diffusion layer (GDL) or within the flow channels of the bipolar plate. These components comprise the electrodes of the fuel cell and balance transport of reactants/products with electrical conductivity. This thesis explores the role of electrode materials in the fuel cell and examines the fundamental connection between material properties and multiphase transport processes. Water is generated at the cathode catalyst layer. As liquid water accumulates it will utilize the largest pores in the GDL to go from the catalyst layer to the flow channels. Water collects to large pores via lateral transport at the interface between the GDL and catalyst layer. We have shown that water may be collected in these large pores from several centimeters away, suggesting that we could engineer the GDL to control flooding with careful placement and distribution of large flow-directing pores. Once liquid water is in the flow channels it forms slugs that block gas flow. The slugs are pushed along the channel by a pressure gradient that is dependent on the material wettability. The permeable nature of the GDL also plays a major role in slug growth and allowing bypass of gas between adjacent channels. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have analogous multiphase flow issues where carbon dioxide bubbles accumulate, `blinding' regions of the fuel cell. This problem is fundamentally similar to water management in hydrogen fuel cells but with a gas/liquid phase inversion. Gas bubbles move laterally through the porous GDL and emerge to form large bubbles within the

  6. On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

    2010-05-01

    This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

  7. Na+-dependent and Na+-independent betaine transport across the apical membrane of rat renal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Cano, Mercedes; Calonge, María L; Ilundáin, Anunciación A

    2015-10-01

    The low renal excretion of betaine indicates that the kidney efficiently reabsorbs the betaine filtered by the glomeruli but the mechanisms involved in such a process have been scarcely investigated. We have detected concentrative and non-concentrative betaine transport activity in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from rat renal cortex and medulla. The concentrative system is the Sodium/Imino-acid Transporter 1 (SIT1) because it is Na+- and Cl--dependent, electrogenic and is inhibited by an anti-SIT1 antibody. Its apparent affinity constant for betaine, Kt, is 1.1±0.5 mM and its maximal transport velocity, Vmax, 0.5±0.1 nmol betaine/mg protein/s. Inhibitors of the Na+/Cl-/betaine uptake are L-proline (75%) and cold betaine, L-carnitine and choline (40-60%). Neither creatine, TEA, taurine, β-alanine, GABA nor glycine significantly inhibited Na+/Cl-/betaine uptake. The non-concentrative betaine transport system is Na+- and H+-independent, electroneutral, with a Kt for betaine of 47±7 μM and a Vmax of 7.8±1 pmol betaine/mg protein/s. Its transport activity is nearly abolished by betaine, followed by L-carnitine (70-80%) and proline (40-50%), but a difference from the Na+/Cl-/betaine transport is that it is inhibited by TEA (approx. 50%) and unaffected by choline. The underlying carrier functions as an antiporter linking betaine entry into the BBMV with the efflux of either L-carnitine or betaine, an exchange unaffected by the anti-SIT1 antibody. As far as we know this is the first work reporting that betaine crosses the apical membrane of rat renal epithelium by SIT1 and by a Na+- and H+-independent transport system.

  8. Electro- and Magneto-Modulated Ion Transport through Graphene Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    The control of ion trans-membrane transport through graphene oxide (GO) membranes is achieved by electric and magnetic fields. Electric field can either increase or decrease the ion transport through GO membranes depending on its direction, and magnetic field can enhance the ion penetration monotonically. When electric field is applied across GO membrane, excellent control of ion fluidic flows can be done. With the magnetic field, the effective anchoring of ions is demonstrated but the modulation of the ion flowing directions does not occur. The mechanism of the electro- and magneto-modulated ion trans-membrane transport is investigated, indicating that the electric fields dominate the ion migration process while the magnetic fields tune the structure of nanocapillaries within GO membranes. Results also show that the ion selectivity of GO membranes can be tuned with the electric fields while the transport of ions can be enhanced synchronously with the magnetic fields. These excellent properties make GO membranes promising in areas such as field-induced mass transport control and membrane separation. PMID:25347969

  9. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  10. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  11. Morphology and Proton Transport in Porous Block Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chelsea; Kortright, Jeffrey; Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Block copolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of a proton-conducting block and an uncharged structural block are attractive due to their potential in clean energy applications. Herein we demonstrate a novel approach of fabricating block copolymer electrolyte membranes, by inducing pores in the proton-conducting phase. We examine morphology of these membranes with contrast-matched resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSoXS) and electron tomography. Proton conductivity as a function of porosity and water activity is also investigated. By tuning the porosity of the membranes, we are able to adjust the water uptake of the membranes for improved proton conductivities, in both humid air and liquid water.

  12. Effect of cyclic aromatics on sodium active transport in frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Blankemeyer, J.T.; Bowerman, M.C. )

    1993-01-01

    A modified glass Ussing-chamber was used to mount the skin. The electrical potential difference (PD) was measured by two 3% agar-frog Ringer's bridges. Current (i.e. short-circuit current, or ISC) was passed by Ag-AgCl electrodes placed so that current density was uniform across the skin. Ringer's solution, bathing each side of the frog skin, was stirred and aerated by gas-lift pumps. The effect of toxicants on the ISC was determined by using the 15 min prior to toxicant administration as a control period, then calculating the change in ISC during the toxicant period as a percent of the control ISC. Phenol and benzene are components of crude oil and crude oil waste. These hydrocarbons and phenanthrene were tested for their effect on frog skin. The results show that the effect of organics on sodium active transport of an epithelium is to alter the active transport of sodium ions. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Refinement of the Central Steps of Substrate Transport by the Aspartate Transporter GltPh: Elucidating the Role of the Na2 Sodium Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, SanthoshKannan; Saha, Kusumika; Sohail, Azmat; Sandtner, Walter; Freissmuth, Michael; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Sitte, Harald H.; Stockner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate homeostasis in the brain is maintained by glutamate transporter mediated accumulation. Impaired transport is associated with several neurological disorders, including stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Crystal structures of the homolog transporter GltPh from Pyrococcus horikoshii revealed large structural changes. Substrate uptake at the atomic level and the mechanism of ion gradient conversion into directional transport remained enigmatic. We observed in repeated simulations that two local structural changes regulated transport. The first change led to formation of the transient Na2 sodium binding site, triggered by side chain rotation of T308. The second change destabilized cytoplasmic ionic interactions. We found that sodium binding to the transiently formed Na2 site energized substrate uptake through reshaping of the energy hypersurface. Uptake experiments in reconstituted proteoliposomes confirmed the proposed mechanism. We reproduced the results in the human glutamate transporter EAAT3 indicating a conserved mechanics from archaea to humans. PMID:26485255

  14. Role of STARD4 in sterol transport between the endocytic recycling compartment and the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Iaea, David B; Mao, Shu; Lund, Frederik W; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-02-16

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of membranes in mammalian cells. The plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) are both highly enriched in cholesterol. The abundance and distribution of cholesterol among organelles are tightly controlled by a combination of mechanisms involving vesicular and non-vesicular sterol transport processes. Using the fluorescent cholesterol analog, dehydroergosterol, we examined sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and a novel sterol efflux assay. We found that sterol transport between these organelles in a U2OS cell line has a t1/2 of 12-15 minutes. Approximately 70% of sterol transport is ATP-independent and, therefore, non-vesicular. Increasing cellular cholesterol levels dramatically increases bidirectional transport rate constants, but decreases in cholesterol levels have only a modest effect. We found that a soluble sterol transport protein, STARD4, accounts for ∼25% of total sterol transport and ∼33% of non-vesicular sterol transport between the plasma membrane and ERC. This study shows that non-vesicular sterol transport mechanisms, and STARD4 in particular, account for a large fraction of sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC.

  15. Study of skin and mucous membrane disorders among workers engaged in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Vijay Kumar; Deswal, Balbir Singh; Singh, Bachu Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inhalation of dusts and fumes arising during the manufacture of sodium dichromate from chrome ore, chromic acid mist emitted during electroplating, and skin contact with chromate produce hazards to workers. Objectives: (1) To elucidate the prevalence of skin and mucous membrane disorders among the workers engaged in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry. (2) To know the relationship of prevalence with the duration of exposure to chrome mist, dust, and fumes. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among all the workers engaged in sodium dichromate manufacturing and chrome plating from several industries situated near the Delhi-Haryana border in the districts of Faridabad and Sonepat of Haryana, India from January 01, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Materials and Methods: All the workers available from the concerned industries for the study were interviewed and medically examined after obtaining their informed consent. A total of 130 workers comprising 66 workers from the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and 64 workers from the chrome plating industry were examined on a pretested schedule. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistical methods (proportions, relative risk, and Chi-square test of significance with P value analyzed using Epi Info version 7). Results: All the workers were found to be males and of the adult age group. Out of the total examined, 69.69% and 56.22% of the workers had disorders of the nasal mucous membrane in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and the chrome plating industry, respectively. 42.42% and 28.22% of the workers had perforation of the nasal septum in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry, respectively. 6.06% and 3.12% workers had skin ulcers in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry, respectively. Nasal irritation and rhinorrhea were the most commonly found symptoms in both the processes

  16. Tailored Transport through Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibre Membranes; Controlled Synthesis, Modelling, and Passive Diffusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Fletcher, Benjamin L; Hullander, Eric D; Klein, Kate L; Hensley, Dale K; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Simpson, Michael L; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-01-01

    The ability to control the permeability of a synthetic membrane structure formed by a spatially stochastic forest of vertically aligned carbon nanofibres is demonstrated. Control of membrane pore size and morphology was achieved by varying the thickness of a uniform, conformal coating of SiO2 on the nanofibre surfaces. Characterization of passive diffusion using fluorescence microscopy and labelled latex beads confirms the ability to alter membrane permeability. Further, statistically reproducible transport regimes are predicted for the spatially stochastic membrane as a function of the nanofibre diameter by a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Realizing predictable nanoscale behaviour in a microscopically random, statistical structure is essential for applications requiring controlled, species specific transport.

  17. Highly parallel transport recordings on a membrane-on-nanopore chip at single molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael; Kleefen, Alexander; Mukherjee, Nobina; Seelheim, Patrick; Windschiegl, Barbara; Vor der Brüggen, Marc; Koçer, Armagan; Tampé, Robert

    2014-03-12

    Membrane proteins are prime drug targets as they control the transit of information, ions, and solutes across membranes. Here, we present a membrane-on-nanopore platform to analyze nonelectrogenic channels and transporters that are typically not accessible by electrophysiological methods in a multiplexed manner. The silicon chip contains 250,000 femtoliter cavities, closed by a silicon dioxide top layer with defined nanopores. Lipid vesicles containing membrane proteins of interest are spread onto the nanopore-chip surface. Transport events of ligand-gated channels were recorded at single-molecule resolution by high-parallel fluorescence decoding.

  18. Prenatal Exposure to Sodium Arsenite Alters Placental Glucose 1, 3, and 4 Transporters in Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Torres, Daniela Sarahí; González-Horta, Carmen; Del Razo, Luz María; Infante-Ramírez, Rocío; Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto; Levario-Carrillo, Margarita; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure induces a decrease in glucose type 4 transporter (GLUT4) expression on the adipocyte membrane, which may be related to premature births and low birth weight infants in women exposed to iAs at reproductive age. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) exposure on GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 protein expression and on placental morphology. Female Balb/c mice (n = 15) were exposed to 0, 12, and 20 ppm of NaAsO2 in drinking water from 8th to 18th day of gestation. Morphological changes and GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 expression were evaluated in placentas by immunohistochemical and image analysis and correlated with iAs and arsenical species concentration, which were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. NaAsO2 exposure induced a significant decrease in fetal and placental weight (P < 0.01) and increases in infarctions and vascular congestion. Whereas GLUT1 expression was unchanged in placentas from exposed group, GLUT3 expression was found increased. In contrast, GLUT4 expression was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in placentas from females exposed to 12 ppm. The decrease in placental GLUT4 expression might affect the provision of adequate fetal nutrition and explain the low fetal weight observed in the exposed groups. PMID:26339590

  19. Membrane Transport of Singlet Oxygen Monitored by Dipole Potential Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Valerij S.; Pohl, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The efficiency of photodynamic reactions depends on 1), the penetration depth of the photosensitizer into the membrane and 2), the sidedness of the target. Molecules which are susceptible to singlet oxygen (1O2) experience less damage when separated from the photosensitizer by the membrane. Since 1O2 lifetime in the membrane environment is orders of magnitude longer than the time required for nonexcited oxygen (O2) to cross the membrane, this observation suggests that differences between the permeabilities or membrane partition of 1O2 and O2 exist. We investigated this hypothesis by releasing 1O2 at one side of a planar membrane while monitoring the kinetics of target damage at the opposite side of the same membrane. Damage to the target, represented by dipole-modifying molecules (phloretin or phlorizin), was indicated by changes in the interleaflet dipole potential difference Δϕb. A simple analytical model allowed estimation of the 1O2 interleaflet concentration difference from the rate at which Δϕb changed. It confirmed that the lower limit of 1O2 permeability is ∼2 cm/s; i.e., it roughly matches O2 permeability as predicted by Overton's rule. Consequently, the membrane cannot act as a barrier to 1O2 diffusion. Differences in the reaction rates at the cytoplasmic and extracellular membrane leaflets may be attributed only to 1O2 quenchers inside the membrane. PMID:18931253

  20. Quantitative description of ion transport in Donnan ion exchange membrane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, W.E.; Baker, B.L.

    1980-05-01

    Presented are simplified mass transfer techniques describing the transfer of ions in continuous ion selective membrane systems in which the resistance to ion transport through the membrane is small in relation to the resistance to ion transport in the solution phase. Methods are developed through the application of the transfer unit concept to the Donnan equilibrium. This equilibrium describes the equilibrium ion concentration on either side of an ion selective membrane. Data from one cation selection system is presented as evidence of the validity of these methods. Further techniques are shown that will allow the determination of ion transport given only equipment parameters and solution diffusivities. Supporting data are shown.

  1. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Widdows, Kate L; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P; Please, Colin P; Hanson, Mark A; Sibley, Colin P; Johnstone, Edward D; Sengers, Bram G; Lewis, Rohan M; Glazier, Jocelyn D

    2015-06-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [(14)C]L-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [(14)C]L-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with L-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.

  2. Involvement of disulphide bonds in the renal sodium/phosphate co-transporter NaPi-2.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Boyer, C J; Vincent, E; Dugré, A; Vachon, V; Potier, M; Béliveau, R

    1997-01-01

    The rat renal brush border membrane sodium/phosphate co-transporter NaPi-2 was analysed in Western blots with polyclonal antibodies raised against its N-terminal and C-terminal segments. Under reducing conditions, proteins of 45-49 and 70-90 kDa (p45 and p70) were detected with N-terminal antibodies, and proteins of 40 and 70-90 kDa (p40 and p70) were detected with C-terminal antibodies. p40 and p45 apparently result from a post-translational cleavage of NaPi-2 but remain linked through one or more disulphide bonds. Glycosidase digestion showed that both polypeptides are glycosylated; the cleavage site could thus be located between Asn-298 and Asn-328, which have been shown to constitute the only two N-glycosylated residues in NaPi-2. In the absence of reducing agents, both N-terminal and C-terminal antibodies detected p70 and a protein of 180 kDa (p180), suggesting the presence of p70 dimers. Much higher concentrations of beta-mercaptoethanol were required to produce a given effect in intact membrane vesicles than in solubilized proteins, indicating that the affected disulphide bonds are not exposed at the surface of the co-transporter. Phosphate transport activity decreased with increasing concentrations of reducing agents [beta-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol and tris-(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine] and was linearly correlated with the amount of p180 detected. The target sizes estimated from the radiation-induced loss of intensity of p40, p70 and p180 were all approx. 190 kDa, suggesting that NaPi-2 exists as an oligomeric protein in which the subunits are sufficiently close to one another to allow substantial energy transfer between the monomers. When protein samples were pretreated with beta-mercaptoethanol [2.5% and 5% (v/v) to optimize the detection of p40 and p70] before irradiation, target sizes estimated from the radiation-induced loss of intensity of p40 and p70 were 74 and 92 kDa respectively, showing the presence of disulphide bridges in the molecular

  3. Classical and channel-like urate transporters in rabbit renal brush border membranes.

    PubMed

    Knorr, B A; Beck, J C; Abramson, R G

    1994-03-01

    The precise mechanism by which urate is transported across rabbit renal proximal tubule luminal membranes has not been defined. To determine whether urate flux across this membrane represents simple diffusion or transport on specific carriers, urate uptake was examined in brush border membrane vesicles that were prepared by a Mg+(+)-aggregation technique and then exposed to CuCl2. Na(+)-independent, voltage sensitive urate transport was demonstrated in these Cu+(+)-exposed vesicles. Transport was trans-stimulated by urate and cis inhibited by pyrazinoic acid and oxonate. A small fraction of transported urate and urate in the extravesicular fluid was oxidized to allantoin. Kinetic analysis revealed the presence of two kinetically distinct transporters; a channel-like carrier that was inhibited by pyrazinoic acid and oxonate, and a high-affinity, classical, saturable carrier that was inhibited by higher concentrations of oxonate. These studies provide the first direct evidence for carrier-mediated urate transport in rabbit renal brush-border membranes and demonstrate that the rabbit transporter(s) share a number of properties with the urate uniporter in rat proximal tubule cell membranes.

  4. Morphological alteration, lysosomal membrane fragility and apoptosis of the cells of Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Dutta, Manab Kumar; Acharya, Avanti; Mukhopadhyay, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Sajal

    2015-12-01

    Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is a component of laundry detergent. Domestic effluent, drain water and various anthropogenic activities have been identified as major routes of sodium carbonate contamination of the freshwater ecosystem. The freshwater sponge, Eunapius carteri, bears ecological and evolutionary significance and is considered as a bioresource in aquatic ecosystems. The present study involves estimation of morphological damage, lysosomal membrane integrity, activity of phosphatases and apoptosis in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Exposure to washing soda resulted in severe morphological alterations and damages in cells of E. carteri. Fragility and destabilization of lysosomal membranes of E. carteri under the sublethal exposure was indicative to toxin induced physiological stress in sponge. Prolonged exposure to sodium carbonate resulted a reduction in the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in the cells of E. carteri. Experimental concentration of 8 mg/l of washing soda for 192 h yielded an increase in the physiological level of cellular apoptosis among the semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, which was suggestive to possible shift in apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. The results were indicative of an undesirable shift in the immune status of sponge. Contamination of the freshwater aquifers by washing soda thus poses an alarming ecotoxicological threat to sponges.

  5. Receptors and ionic transporters in nuclear membranes: new targets for therapeutical pharmacological interventions.

    PubMed

    Bkaily, Ghassan; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Ahmarani, Lena; Perreault, Claudine; Jacques, Danielle

    2012-08-01

    Work from our group and other laboratories showed that the nucleus could be considered as a cell within a cell. This is based on growing evidence of the presence and role of nuclear membrane G-protein coupled receptors and ionic transporters in the nuclear membranes of many cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, endocardial endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and hepatocytes. The nuclear membrane receptors were found to modulate the functioning of ionic transporters at the nuclear level, and thus contribute to regulation of nuclear ionic homeostasis. Nuclear membranes of the mentioned types of cells possess the same ionic transporters; however, the type of receptors is cell-type dependent. Regulation of cytosolic and nuclear ionic homeostasis was found to be dependent upon a tight crosstalk between receptors and ionic transporters of the plasma membranes and those of the nuclear membrane. This crosstalk seems to be the basis for excitation-contraction coupling, excitation-secretion coupling, and excitation - gene expression coupling. Further advancement in this field will certainly shed light on the role of nuclear membrane receptors and transporters in health and disease. This will in turn enable the successful design of a new class of drugs that specifically target such highly vital nuclear receptors and ionic transporters.

  6. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  7. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I

    2013-10-07

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  8. Mode of action of pyrazinamide: disruption of Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane transport and energetics by pyrazinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wade, Mary Margaret; Scorpio, Angelo; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Zhonghe

    2003-11-01

    Pyrazinamide is an important sterilizing drug that shortens tuberculosis (TB) therapy. However, the mechanism of action of pyrazinamide is poorly understood because of its unusual properties. Here we show that pyrazinoic acid, the active moiety of pyrazinamide, disrupted membrane energetics and inhibited membrane transport function in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The preferential activity of pyrazinamide against old non-replicating bacilli correlated with their low membrane potential and the disruption of membrane potential by pyrazinoic acid and acid pH. Inhibitors of membrane energetics increased the antituberculous activity of pyrazinamide. These findings shed new light on the mode of action of pyrazinamide and may help in the design of new drugs that shorten therapy.

  9. Studies on gas transport through dry cellulose acetate membranes prepared by solvent exchange technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.; Talbot, F.D.F.; Sourirajan, S.; Fouda, A.; Matsuura, T.

    1988-10-01

    The mechanism of gas transport through pores on the surface of dry cellulose acetate membranes under pressure was identified for membranes prepared by the solvent exchange technique using pure gas permeation rate data. The pure gases were helium, methane and carbon dioxide. The variables involved in the membrane preparation variables involved in the membrane preparation are the shrinkage temperature, the first solvent, the second solvent and the combinations thereof. Different conditions of membrane preparation produce different pore sizes. Depending on this pore size, one of the following mechanisms becomes dominant: Knudsen, surface and size exclusion.

  10. [Transport of large organic ions through syringomycin channels in the membranes containing dipole modifiers].

    PubMed

    Efimova, S S; Ostroumova, O S; Malev, V V; Shchagina, L V

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the membrane dipole potential (Phid) on a conductance and a steady-state number of functioning channels formed by cyclic lipodepsipeptide syringomycin E (SRE) in bilayer lipid membranes made from phosphocholine and bathed in 0.4 M solution of sodium salts of aspartate, gluconate and chloride was shown. The magnitude of Phid was varied with the introduction to membrane bathing solutions of phloretin, which reduces the Phid, and RH 421, increasing the Phid. It was established that in all studied systems the increase in the membrane dipole potential cause a decrease in the steady-state number of open channels. In the systems containing sodium salts of aspartate (Asp) or gluconate (Glc), changes in the number of functioning channels are in an order of magnitude smaller than in systems containing sodium chloride. At the same time, the conductance (g) of single SRE-channels on the membranes bathed in NaCI solution increases with the increase in Phid, and in the systems containing NaAsp or NaGlc the conductance of single channels does not depend on the Phid. The latter is due to the lack of cation/anion selectivity of the SRE-channels in these systems. The different channel-forming activity of SRE in the experimental systems is defined by the gating charge of the channel and the partition coefficient of the dipole modifiers between the lipid and aqueous phases.

  11. Evolutionary primacy of sodium bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y; Galperin, Michael Y; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2008-01-01

    Background The F- and V-type ATPases are rotary molecular machines that couple translocation of protons or sodium ions across the membrane to the synthesis or hydrolysis of ATP. Both the F-type (found in most bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria and chloroplasts) and V-type (found in archaea, some bacteria, and eukaryotic vacuoles) ATPases can translocate either protons or sodium ions. The prevalent proton-dependent ATPases are generally viewed as the primary form of the enzyme whereas the sodium-translocating ATPases of some prokaryotes are usually construed as an exotic adaptation to survival in extreme environments. Results We combine structural and phylogenetic analyses to clarify the evolutionary relation between the proton- and sodium-translocating ATPases. A comparison of the structures of the membrane-embedded oligomeric proteolipid rings of sodium-dependent F- and V-ATPases reveals nearly identical sets of amino acids involved in sodium binding. We show that the sodium-dependent ATPases are scattered among proton-dependent ATPases in both the F- and the V-branches of the phylogenetic tree. Conclusion Barring convergent emergence of the same set of ligands in several lineages, these findings indicate that the use of sodium gradient for ATP synthesis is the ancestral modality of membrane bioenergetics. Thus, a primitive, sodium-impermeable but proton-permeable cell membrane that harboured a set of sodium-transporting enzymes appears to have been the evolutionary predecessor of the more structurally demanding proton-tight membranes. The use of proton as the coupling ion appears to be a later innovation that emerged on several independent occasions. Reviewers This article was reviewed by J. Peter Gogarten, Martijn A. Huynen, and Igor B. Zhulin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:18380897

  12. Charge transport in the electrospun nanofiber composite membrane's three-dimensional fibrous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGostin, Matthew B.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Myles, Timothy D.; Cassenti, Brice N.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a Fiber Network (FN) ion transport model is developed to simulate the three-dimensional fibrous microstructural morphology that results from the electrospinning membrane fabrication process. This model is able to approximate fiber layering within a membrane as well as membrane swelling due to water uptake. The discrete random fiber networks representing membranes are converted to resistor networks and solved for current flow and ionic conductivity. Model predictions are validated by comparison with experimental conductivity data from electrospun anion exchange membranes (AEM) and proton exchange membranes (PEM) for fuel cells as well as existing theories. The model is capable of predicting in-plane and thru-plane conductivity and takes into account detailed membrane characteristics, such as volume fraction, fiber diameter, fiber conductivity, and membrane layering, and as such may be used as a tool for advanced electrode design.

  13. Fabrication of self-supporting porous silicon membranes and tuning transport properties by surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Velleman, Leonora; Shearer, Cameron James; Ellis, Amanda Vera; Losic, Dusan; Voelcker, Nicolas Hans; Shapter, Joseph George

    2010-09-01

    This study presents a simple approach to perform selective mass transport through freestanding porous silicon (pSi) membranes. pSi membranes were fabricated by the electrochemical etching of silicon to produce membranes with controlled structure and pore sizes close to molecular dimensions (approximately 12 nm in diameter). While these membranes are capable of size-exclusion based separations, chemically specific filtration remains a great challenge especially in the biomedical field. Herein, we investigate the transport properties of chemically functionalized pSi membranes. The membranes were functionalized using silanes (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDS) and N-(triethoxysilylpropyl)-o-polyethylene oxide urethane (PEGS) to give membranes hydrophobic (PFDS) and hydrophilic (PEGS) properties. The transport of probe dyes tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(ii) hexahydrate (Rubpy) and Rose Bengal (RB) through these functionalized membranes was examined to determine the effect surface functionalization has on the selectivity and separation ability of pSi membranes. This study provides the basis for further investigation into more sophisticated surface functionalization and coupled with the biocompatibility of pSi will lead to new advances in membrane based bio-separations.

  14. Hydrocarbon-Based Polymer Electrolyte Membranes: Importance of Morphology on Ion Transport and Membrane Stability.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Won; Guiver, Michael D; Lee, Young Moo

    2017-03-03

    A fundamental understanding of polymer microstructure is important in order to design novel polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) with excellent electrochemical performance and stabilities. Hydrocarbon-based polymers have distinct microstructure according to their chemical structure. The ionic clusters and/or channels play a critical role in PEMs, affecting ion conductivity and water transport, especially at medium temperature and low relative humidity (RH). In addition, physical properties such as water uptake and dimensional swelling behavior depend strongly on polymer morphology. Over the past few decades, much research has focused on the synthetic development and microstructural characterization of hydrocarbon-based PEM materials. Furthermore, blends, composites, pressing, shear field, electrical field, surface modification, and cross-linking have also been shown to be effective approaches to obtain/maintain well-defined PEM microstructure. This review summarizes recent work on developments in advanced PEMs with various chemical structures and architecture and the resulting polymer microstructures and morphologies that arise for potential application in fuel cell, lithium ion battery, redox flow battery, actuators, and electrodialysis.

  15. Ultralong Sb2Se3 Nanowire-Based Free-Standing Membrane Anode for Lithium/Sodium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Calas, Armand; Tang, Chunjuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Liang; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-12-28

    Metal chalcogenides have emerged as promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium ion batteries (SIBs). Herein, a free-standing membrane based on ultralong Sb2Se3 nanowires has been successfully fabricated via a facile hydrothermal synthesis combined with a subsequent vacuum filtration treatment. The as-achieved free-standing membrane constructed by pure Sb2Se3 nanowires exhibits good flexibility and integrity. Meanwhile, we investigate the lithium and sodium storage behavior of the Sb2Se3 nanowire-based free-standing membrane. When applied as the anode for LIBs, it delivers a reversible capacity of 614 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1), maintaining 584 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles. When applied as the anode for SIBs, it delivers a reversible capacity of 360 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1), retaining 289 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles. Such difference in electrochemical performance can be attributed to the more complex sodiation process relative to the corresponding lithiation process. This work may provide insight on developing Sb2Se3-based anode materials for high-performance LIBs or SIBs.

  16. Identification of membrane topography of the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter pNBC1 by in vitro transcription/translation.

    PubMed

    Tatishchev, Sergei; Abuladze, Natalia; Pushkin, Alexander; Newman, Debra; Liu, Weixin; Weeks, David; Sachs, George; Kurtz, Ira

    2003-01-28

    The transmembrane topography of the human pancreatic electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter pNBC1 was investigated using in vitro transcription/translation of HK-M0 and HK-M1 fusion vectors designed to test membrane insertion properties of pNBC1 hydrophobic sequences (H). These vectors encode N-terminal 101 (HK-M0) or 139 (HK-M1) amino acids of the H,K-ATPase alpha-subunit, a linker region and the C-terminal 177 amino acids of the H,K-ATPase beta-subunit that contain five N-linked glycosylation consensus sites (Bamberg, K., and Sachs, G. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 16909-16919). The glycosylation status of the beta-region was used as a reporter to determine whether a given hydrophobic sequence possesses signal anchor and/or stop transfer properties in the HK-M0 and HK-M1 vectors. The linker region of each vector was replaced either with individual hydrophobic sequences or combinations thereof. The transcription/translation products of these fusion vectors in reticulocyte lysate system +/- microsomal membranes were identified by [(35)S]-autoradiography following separation using SDS-PAGE. The results of the in vitro transcription/translation analysis indicated that 10 (H1, H2N, H3, H5, H6, H7, H8, H9, H11, and H12) out of 12 hydrophobic sequences were able to insert into the plasma membrane. Two hydrophobic sequences, H4 and H10, had no membrane insertion activity even when upstream and downstream sequences were present. These data and immunocytochemical studies indicate that pNBC1 contains 10 transmembrane domains with N- and C-termini oriented intracellularly. This is the first characterization of the membrane topography of a sodium bicarbonate cotransporter.

  17. Final technical report. A sodium-cycle based organism with improved membrane resistance aimed at increasing the efficiency of energy biotransformations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Kim

    2001-06-01

    The aim of the project was to express in E. coli components that would allow a formation of oxidative phosphorylation based on a sodium cycle. This would improve the resistance of cells to organic solvents, detergents and other toxins. The author cloned and expressed the nqr operon from H. influenzae in E. coli. Experiments with membrane vesicles indicated the presence of the functional recombinant sodium pumping NADH dehydrogenase. A gene for a hybrid E. coli/P.modestum ATPase was constructed which will enable one to co-express a sodium ATPsynthase together with a sodium NADH dehydrogenase.

  18. Transport numbers in the surface layers of asymmetric membranes from initial time measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Compan, V.; Lopez, M.L. ); Sorensen, T.S. ); Garrido, J. )

    1994-09-08

    The initial time asymmetry potentials of two ultra filtration membranes (cellulose acetate and polysulfone membranes) were measured in electrochemical cells using Ag/AgCl electrodes and NaCl solutions. The concentration in the two electrode chambers differed slightly by a fixed concentration difference. Either the membranes were brought to equilibrium with the left-hand solution and subsequently exposed to the right-hand solution at the right-hand face, or the procedure was reversed. From such measurements it is possible to evaluate the transport numbers corresponding to each of the two surface layers of the membrane under conditions such that the effects of autoprotolysis of water and of foreign ions may be neglected. These measurements permit a description of each of the surface layers of the membranes and make possible an electrochemical characterization of the asymmetry of ultrafiltration membranes. The asymmetry is given by the difference between surface layer transport numbers. 31 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Oxygen transport membrane based advanced power cycle with low pressure synthesis gas slip stream

    DOEpatents

    Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2016-09-27

    A method and system for generating electrical power in which a high pressure synthesis gas stream generated in a gasifier is partially oxidized in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor, expanded and thereafter, is combusted in an oxygen transport membrane based boiler. A low pressure synthesis gas slip stream is split off downstream of the expanders and used as the source of fuel in the oxygen transport membrane based partial oxidation reactors to allow the oxygen transport membrane to operate at low fuel pressures with high fuel utilization. The combustion within the boiler generates heat to raise steam to in turn generate electricity by a generator coupled to a steam turbine. The resultant flue gas can be purified to produce a carbon dioxide product.

  20. The movement of membranous organelles in axons. Electron microscopic identification of anterogradely and retrogradely transported organelles

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    To identify the structures to be rapidly transported through the axons, we developed a new method to permit local cooling of mouse saphenous nerves in situ without exposing them. By this method, both anterograde and retrograde transport were successfully interrupted, while the structural integrity of the nerves was well preserved. Using radioactive tracers, anterogradely transported proteins were shown to accumulate just proximal to the cooled site, and retrogradely transported proteins just distal to the cooled site. Where the anterogradely transported proteins accumulated, the vesiculotubular membranous structures increased in amount inside both myelinated and unmyelinated axons. Such accumulated membranous structures showed a relatively uniform diameter of 50--80 nm, and some of them seemed to be continuous with the axonal smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER). Thick sections of nerves selectively stained for the axonal membranous structures revealed that the network of the axonal SER was also packed inside axons proximal to the cooled site. In contrast, large membranous bodies of varying sizes accumulated inside axons just distal to the cooled site, where the retrogradely transported proteins accumulated. These bodies were composed mainly of multivesicular bodies and lamellated membranous structures. When horseradish peroxidase was administered in the distal end of the nerve, membranous bodies showing this activity accumulated, together with unstained membranous bodies. Hence, we are led to propose that, besides mitochondria, the membranous components in the axon can be classified into two systems from the viewpoint of axonal transport: "axonal SER and vesiculotubular structures" in the anterograde direction and "large membranous bodies" in the retrograde direction. PMID:6153657

  1. Cooperative Effects in Models of Steady-State Transport across Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Terrell L.; Chen, Yi-Der

    1971-01-01

    Several different one-site, two-site, and multisite models of steady-state ion transport across a membrane are investigated. The basic features, including cooperative interactions between channels, are the same as in earlier papers in this series. In particular, the present paper represents a considerable elaboration of part III. The models might apply to artificial or possibly to biological membranes, but particular applications must await further elucidation of the molecular structure and operation of these membranes. PMID:5132496

  2. Proteins involved in vesicular transport and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Waters, M G; Griff, I C; Rothman, J E

    1991-08-01

    In the past year, new information about proteins involved in vesicular transport has been plentiful. Particularly noteworthy are the complementary findings that Sec17p is required for vesicle consumption in endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport in yeast and that an analogous activity in mammalian cells, termed SNAP, is required for transport from the cis to the medial cisternae of the Golgi apparatus.

  3. Decoupling Mechanical and Ion Transport Properties in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Lucas D.

    Polymer electrolytes are mixtures of a polar polymer and salt, in which the polymer replaces small molecule solvents and provides a dielectric medium so that ions can dissociate and migrate under the influence of an external electric field. Beginning in the 1970s, research in polymer electrolytes has been primarily motivated by their promise to advance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices, such as lithium ion batteries, flexible organic solar cells, and anhydrous fuel cells. In particular, polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) can improve both safety and energy density by eliminating small molecule, volatile solvents and enabling an all-solid-state design of electrochemical cells. The outstanding challenge in the field of polymer electrolytes is to maximize ionic conductivity while simultaneously addressing orthogonal mechanical properties, such as modulus, fracture toughness, or high temperature creep resistance. The crux of the challenge is that flexible, polar polymers best-suited for polymer electrolytes (e.g., poly(ethylene oxide)) offer little in the way of mechanical robustness. Similarly, polymers typically associated with superior mechanical performance (e.g., poly(methyl methacrylate)) slow ion transport due to their glassy polymer matrix. The design strategy is therefore to employ structured electrolytes that exhibit distinct conducting and mechanically robust phases on length scales of tens of nanometers. This thesis reports a remarkably simple, yet versatile synthetic strategy---termed polymerization-induced phase separation, or PIPS---to prepare PEMs exhibiting an unprecedented combination of both high conductivity and high modulus. This performance is enabled by co-continuous, isotropic networks of poly(ethylene oxide)/ionic liquid and highly crosslinked polystyrene. A suite of in situ, time-resolved experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism by which this network morphology forms, and it appears to be tied to the

  4. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  5. Membrane-on-a-chip: microstructured silicon/silicon-dioxide chips for high-throughput screening of membrane transport and viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Ilja; van Oijen, Antoine M; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-04-22

    Screening of transport processes across biological membranes is hindered by the challenge to establish fragile supported lipid bilayers and the difficulty to determine at which side of the membrane reactants reside. Here, we present a method for the generation of suspended lipid bilayers with physiological relevant lipid compositions on microstructured Si/SiO2 chips that allow for high-throughput screening of both membrane transport and viral membrane fusion. Simultaneous observation of hundreds of single-membrane channels yields statistical information revealing population heterogeneities of the pore assembly and conductance of the bacterial toxin α-hemolysin (αHL). The influence of lipid composition and ionic strength on αHL pore formation was investigated at the single-channel level, resolving features of the pore-assembly pathway. Pore formation is inhibited by a specific antibody, demonstrating the applicability of the platform for drug screening of bacterial toxins and cell-penetrating agents. Furthermore, fusion of H3N2 influenza viruses with suspended lipid bilayers can be observed directly using a specialized chip architecture. The presented micropore arrays are compatible with fluorescence readout from below using an air objective, thus allowing high-throughput screening of membrane transport in multiwell formats in analogy to plate readers.

  6. Getting pumped: membrane efflux transporters for enhanced biomolecule production.

    PubMed

    Boyarskiy, Sergey; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-10-01

    Small molecule production in microbial hosts is limited by the accumulation of the product inside the cell. Efflux transporters show promise as a solution to removal of the often-toxic products. Recent advances in transporter identification through expression profiling, heterologous expression, and knockout studies have identified transporters capable of secreting compounds of biotechnological interest. In addition, engineering of well-studied transporters has shown that substrate specificity in these transporters is malleable. Future work in identification, engineering, and expression of small molecule exporters can be instrumental in expanding the biocatalysis portfolio.

  7. Transport of sodium and urea in outer medullary descending vasa recta.

    PubMed Central

    Pallone, T L; Work, J; Myers, R L; Jamison, R L

    1994-01-01

    We dissected and perfused outer medullary vasa recta (OMVR) from vascular bundles in the rat. Permeabilities of sodium (PNa) and urea (Pu) were simultaneously determined from the lumen-to-bath efflux of 22Na and [14C]urea. PNa and Pu were also measured by in vivo microperfusion of descending (DVR) and ascending vasa recta (AVR) at the papillary tip of Munich-Wistar rats. In some OMVR PNa was indistinguishable from zero. The mean +/- SE of PNa (x 10(-5), cm/s) in OMVR was 76 +/- 9. Pu in OMVR was always very high (x 10(-5), cm/s), 360 +/- 14. There was no correlation between OMVR PNa and Pu. Inner medullary AVR and DVR had PNa of 115 +/- 10 and 75 +/- 10, respectively, and Pu of 121 +/- 10 and 76 +/- 11, respectively. PNa and Pu in papillary vasa recta were always nearly identical and highly correlated. Transport of [14C] urea in OMVR was reversibly inhibited by addition of unlabeled urea or phloretin to the bath and lumen, providing evidence for carrier-mediated transport. These data suggest that sodium and urea might traverse the wall of inner medullary vasa recta by a paracellular pathway while urea also crosses by a transcellular route in OMVR. Electron microscopic examination of seven in vitro perfused OMVR revealed no fenestrations and exposure of these vessels to 10 microM calcium ionophore A23187 or 1 nM angiotensin II resulted in reversible contraction, suggesting that in vitro perfused OMVR are DVR only. Images PMID:8282790

  8. Transungual iontophoresis of lithium and sodium: effect of pH and co-ion competition on cationic transport numbers.

    PubMed

    Dutet, Julie; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Iontophoresis has been proposed as an alternative method to deliver drugs into and across the nail plate. However, the knowledge about the rules governing transungual iontophoretic transport numbers is still uncomplete. This work investigated the iontophoretic and passive transungual fluxes of sodium and lithium and the effect of pH and co-ion competition on the cations' transport numbers. The objective was to further investigate whether nails show cation permselectivity at physiological pH and to improve our understanding of transport numbers during transungual iontophoresis. The donor solutions comprised the single ion and binary mixtures of the two cations at different pH. Sodium and lithium iontophoretic fluxes showed low inter-nail variability and were significantly greater than passive fluxes. Cationic transport numbers clearly increased as the pH was sequentially raised from 4.0 to 5.0 and then to 7.0, in agreement with a net negative charge of the human nails at physiological pH. Sodium transport number was maximal when the ion was formulated as a single ion (absence of competing co-ions) and decreased as the molar fraction of lithium was increased in the vehicle. The magnitude of the transport numbers measured and their response to changes in the cations' molar fraction and pH in the donor solution were remarkably similar to those observed during the transdermal iontophoresis. The ratio of lithium and sodium transport numbers was directly proportional to their relative concentration ratios; the proportionality constant being remarkably similar in the 4.0-7.0 pH range as well as to the ratio of the cations' aqueous mobilities. Another interesting similarity with transdermal iontophoresis was the existence of a cationic transport number threshold. On the whole, this work provided some key information about nail permselectivity and transungual transport numbers which will assist to formulate efficiently therapeutic compounds to be delivered iontophoretically

  9. Increased ubiquitination and reduced plasma membrane trafficking of placental amino acid transporter SNAT-2 in human IUGR

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Fredrick J.; Shehab, Majida Abu; Powell, Theresa L.; Gupta, Madhulika B.; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Placental amino acid transport is decreased in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR); however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We have shown that mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling regulates system A amino acid transport by modulating the ubiquitination and plasma membrane trafficking of sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT-2) in cultured primary human trophoblast cells. We hypothesize that IUGR is associated with (1) inhibition of placental mTORC1 and mTORC2 signalling pathways, (2) increased amino acid transporter ubiquitination in placental homogenates and (3) decreased protein expression of SNAT-2 in the syncytiotrophoblast microvillous plasma membrane (MVM). To test this hypothesis, we collected placental tissue and isolated MVM from women with pregnancies complicated by IUGR (n=25) and gestational age-matched women with appropriately grown control infants (n=19, birth weights between the twenty-fifth to seventy-fifth percentiles). The activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2 was decreased whereas the protein expression of the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4-2; +72%, P<0.0001) and the ubiquitination of SNAT-2 (+180%, P<0.05) were increased in homogenates of IUGR placentas. Furthermore, IUGR was associated with decreased system A amino acid transport activity (–72%, P<0.0001) and SNAT-1 (–42%, P<0.05) and SNAT-2 (–31%, P<0.05) protein expression in MVM. In summary, these findings are consistent with the possibility that decreased placental mTOR activity causes down-regulation of placental system A activity by shifting SNAT-2 trafficking towards proteasomal degradation, thereby contributing to decreased fetal amino acid availability and restricted fetal growth in IUGR. PMID:26374858

  10. Increased ubiquitination and reduced plasma membrane trafficking of placental amino acid transporter SNAT-2 in human IUGR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Yung; Rosario, Fredrick J; Shehab, Majida Abu; Powell, Theresa L; Gupta, Madhulika B; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Placental amino acid transport is decreased in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR); however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We have shown that mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling regulates system A amino acid transport by modulating the ubiquitination and plasma membrane trafficking of sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT-2) in cultured primary human trophoblast cells. We hypothesize that IUGR is associated with (1) inhibition of placental mTORC1 and mTORC2 signalling pathways, (2) increased amino acid transporter ubiquitination in placental homogenates and (3) decreased protein expression of SNAT-2 in the syncytiotrophoblast microvillous plasma membrane (MVM). To test this hypothesis, we collected placental tissue and isolated MVM from women with pregnancies complicated by IUGR (n=25) and gestational age-matched women with appropriately grown control infants (n=19, birth weights between the twenty-fifth to seventy-fifth percentiles). The activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2 was decreased whereas the protein expression of the ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4-2; +72%, P<0.0001) and the ubiquitination of SNAT-2 (+180%, P<0.05) were increased in homogenates of IUGR placentas. Furthermore, IUGR was associated with decreased system A amino acid transport activity (-72%, P<0.0001) and SNAT-1 (-42%, P<0.05) and SNAT-2 (-31%, P<0.05) protein expression in MVM. In summary, these findings are consistent with the possibility that decreased placental mTOR activity causes down-regulation of placental system A activity by shifting SNAT-2 trafficking towards proteasomal degradation, thereby contributing to decreased fetal amino acid availability and restricted fetal growth in IUGR.

  11. Effect of Chemicals on the Cell Membrane Transport of Nucleosides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    lipid synthesis , a direct inhibition of the purine carrier by PFDA would not be expected. When efflux of AP from L5178Y cells was estimated with PFDA in...turnover of the carrier protein. PFDA may be an inhibitor -of carrier protein synthesis in the cell membrane. Another hypothesis suggests that the...inactive form. The activity level *may be controlled through inhibition of protein synthesis or the interaction 4between the carrier and the membrane

  12. A carrier-mediated transport for folate in basolateral membrane vesicles of rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Said, H M; Redha, R

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of exit of folate from the enterocyte, i.e. transport across the basolateral membrane, is not known. In this study we examined, using basolateral membrane vesicles, the transport of folic acid across the basolateral membrane of rat intestine. Uptake of folic acid by these vesicles represents transport of the substrate into the intravesicular compartment and not binding to the membrane surface. The rate of folic acid transport was linear for the first 1 min of incubation but decreased thereafter, reaching equilibrium after 5 min of incubation. The transport of folic acid was: (1) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 0.6 +/- 0.17 microM and Vmax. of 1.01 +/- 0.11 pmol/30 s per mg of protein; (2) inhibited in a competitive manner by the structural analogues 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and methotrexate (Ki = 2 and 1.4 microM, respectively); (4) electroneutral; (5) Na+-independent; (6) sensitive to the effect of the anion exchange inhibitor 4,4'-di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). These data indicate the existence of a carrier-mediated transport system for folic acid in rat intestinal basolateral membrane and demonstrate that the transport process is electroneutral, Na+-independent and sensitive to the effect of anion exchange inhibition. PMID:3689340

  13. Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues Lining the Extracellular Loop I of Sodium-coupled Bile Acid Transporter ASBT Interact with Na+ and 7α-OH Moieties on the Ligand Cholestane Skeleton*

    PubMed Central

    Hussainzada, Naissan; Da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Zhang, Eric Y.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Functional contributions of residues Val-99—Ser-126 lining extracellular loop (EL) 1 of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter were determined via cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol modification, and in silico interpretation. Despite membrane expression for all but three constructs (S112C, Y117C, S126C), most EL1 mutants (64%) were inactivated by cysteine mutation, suggesting a functional role during sodium/bile acid co-transport. A negative charge at conserved residues Asp-120 and Asp-122 is required for transport function, whereas neutralization of charge at Asp-124 yields a functionally active transporter. D124A exerts low affinity for common bile acids except deoxycholic acid, which uniquely lacks a 7α-hydroxyl (OH) group. Overall, we conclude that (i) Asp-122 functions as a Na+ sensor, binding one of two co-transported Na+ ions, (ii) Asp-124 interacts with 7α-OH groups of bile acids, and (iii) apolar EL1 residues map to hydrophobic ligand pharmacophore features. Based on these data, we propose a comprehensive mechanistic model involving dynamic salt bridge pairs and hydrogen bonding involving multiple residues to describe sodium-dependent bile acid transporter-mediated bile acid and cation translocation. PMID:18508772

  14. Numerical Investigations of Vadose Zone Transport of Saturated Sodium Thiosulfate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. D.; Ward, A. L.

    2001-12-01

    Compared with water, hypersaline liquid wastes ([NaNO3] > 10 N) from the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) process at the Hanford site have elevated viscosity (μ > 1.2 cP), density (ρ > 1.4 gm/cm3), and surface tension (σ > 100 dyn/cm). Such liquids have infiltrated into the vadose zone at Hanford from leaking underground storage tanks. The migration behavior of saturated or hypersaline salt solutions through unsaturated soils is largely unknown. Laboratory tests with tank-waste simulants suggest that the elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension properties of these liquids can influence the wetting front behavior, altering its shape and migration rate. Conditions under which these mechanisms are active in the field and the extent to which they contribute to transport through the vadose zone are largely unknown, making it impossible to accurately predict the post-leak distribution of these fluids in the field. To investigate the effects of fluid properties on subsurface migration of hypersaline saline solutions, numerical simulations were conducted of a field-scale, tank-leak experiment. The field experiments consisted of five 4000-L injections, at a depth of 5 m, of saturated sodium thiosulfate brine (used as a surrogate for REDOX type wastes) over a 5-week period, followed by three 4000-L injections of Columbia River water. Pre-test modeling of river water injections at this Hanford field site predicted significant lateral spreading of the moisture plume and were confirmed by geophysical logging. A series of three-dimensional, multifluid (i.e., aqueous and gas phases) numerical simulations were conducted that systematically considered the effects of elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension, and reduced vapor pressure on vadose-zone transport. Hydrologic properties were determined from cores collected at the field site and calibrated using river-water injection experiments. Isothermal conditions were assumed for the simulations, however, the effects of

  15. Prominent expression of xenobiotic efflux transporters in mouse extraembryonic fetal membranes compared with placenta.

    PubMed

    Aleksunes, Lauren M; Cui, Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2008-09-01

    Fetal exposure to xenobiotics can be restricted by transporters at the interface between maternal and fetal circulation. Previous work identified transporters in the placenta; however, less is known about the presence of these transporters in the fetal membranes (i.e., yolk sac and amniotic membranes). The purpose of this study was to quantify mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic transporters in mouse placenta and fetal membranes during mid to late gestation. Concepti (placenta and fetal membranes, gestation day 11) or placenta and fetal membranes (gestation days 14 and 17) were collected from pregnant mice and analyzed for expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps), multidrug resistance proteins (Mdrs), multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (Mates), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), and organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps). Maternal liver and kidneys were also collected at day 14 for mRNA and immunohistochemical analysis. mRNA expression of Mrp, Mdr, Bcrp, Mate-1, and Oatp isoforms was detected at day 11. The uptake carriers Oatp2a1, 3a1, 4a1, and 5a1 showed placenta-predominant expression. At days 14 and 17, fetal membranes expressed higher mRNA levels of the efflux transporters Mrp2 (7-fold), Mrp4 (5-fold), Mrp5 (3-fold), Mrp6 (12-fold), Bcrp (2-fold), and Mate-1 (7-fold) than placenta. Western blot analysis of Mrp2, Mrp4, Mrp6, and Bcrp confirmed higher expression in fetal membranes. Immunostaining revealed apical (Mrp2 and Bcrp) and basolateral (Mrp4, 5, and 6) cellular localization in epithelial cells of the yolk sac. In conclusion, xenobiotic transporters in the fetal membranes may provide an additional route to protect the fetus against endogenous chemicals and xenobiotics.

  16. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  17. Effect of acid stress on sodium transport by isolated skins and on osmotic permeability of intact frogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, P.O.

    1981-08-01

    The experiments reported here were designed to determine the effects of increased external hydrogen ion concentrations on the ion transport capability of isolated frog skins measured as short-circuit current and to determine the nature of the interaction of hydrogen ions to sodium transport. Results from a study of the effects of acid exposure on the osmotic permeability of intact frogs are also reported.

  18. Targeting Type 2 Diabetes with C-Glucosyl Dihydrochalcones as Selective Sodium Glucose Co-Transporter 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Ana R; Vila-Viçosa, Diogo; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Marques, Ana P; Dore, Timothy M; Rauter, Amélia P

    2017-01-26

    Inhibiting glucose reabsorption by sodium glucose co-transporter proteins (SGLTs) in the kidneys is a relatively new strategy for treating type 2 diabetes. Selective inhibition of SGLT2 over SGLT1 is critical for minimizing adverse side effects associated with SGLT1 inhibition. A library of C-glucosyl dihydrochalcones and their dihydrochalcone and chalcone precursors was synthesized and tested as SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors using a cell-based fluorescence assay of glucose uptake. The most potent inhibitors of SGLT2 (IC50 = 9-23 nM) were considerably weaker inhibitors of SGLT1 (IC50 = 10-19 μM). They showed no effect on the sodium independent GLUT family of glucose transporters, and the most potent ones were not acutely toxic to cultured cells. The interaction of a C-glucosyl dihydrochalcone with a POPC membrane was modeled computationally, providing evidence that it is not a pan-assay interference compound. These results point toward the discovery of structures that are potent and highly selective inhibitors of SGLT2.

  19. Report membrane transport of lactic acid in the filamentous fungus Rhizopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid, but little is known about the mechanisms or proteins for transporting this carboxylic acid. Since transport of the lactate anion across the plasma membrane is critical to prevent acidification of the cytoplasm, we ev...

  20. The activity of anandamide at vanilloid VR1 receptors requires facilitated transport across the cell membrane and is limited by intracellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, L; Bisogno, T; Maccarrone, M; Davis, J B; Finazzi-Agro, A; Di Marzo, V

    2001-04-20

    The endogenous ligand of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors, anandamide, is also a full agonist at vanilloid VR1 receptors for capsaicin and resiniferatoxin, thereby causing an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in human VR1-overexpressing (hVR1-HEK) cells. Two selective inhibitors of anandamide facilitated transport into cells, VDM11 and VDM13, and two inhibitors of anandamide enzymatic hydrolysis, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and methylarachidonoyl fluorophosphonate, inhibited and enhanced, respectively, the VR1-mediated effect of anandamide, but not of resiniferatoxin or capsaicin. The nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside, known to stimulate anandamide transport, enhanced anandamide effect on the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Accordingly, hVR1-HEK cells contain an anandamide membrane transporter inhibited by VDM11 and VDM13 and activated by sodium nitroprusside, and an anandamide hydrolase activity sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and methylarachidonoyl fluorophosphonate, and a fatty acid amide hydrolase transcript. These findings suggest the following. (i) Anandamide activates VR1 receptors by acting at an intracellular site. (ii) Degradation by fatty acid amide hydrolase limits anandamide activity on VR1; and (iii) the anandamide membrane transporter inhibitors can be used to distinguish between CB(1) or VR1 receptor-mediated actions of anandamide. By contrast, the CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A inhibited also the VR1-mediated effect of anandamide and capsaicin on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, although at concentrations higher than those required for CB(1) antagonism.

  1. Soil bacteria confer plant salt tolerance by tissue-specific regulation of the sodium transporter HKT1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated sodium (Na+) decreases plant growth and thereby agricultural productivity. The ion transporter HKT1 controls Na+ import in roots, yet dysfunction or over-expression of HKT1 fails to increase salt tolerance, raising questions as to HKT1’s role in regulating Na+ homeostasis. Here, we report t...

  2. Morphological, Chemical Surface, and Diffusive Transport Characterizations of a Nanoporous Alumina Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, María I.; Romero, Virgina; Vega, Victor; García, Javier; Prida, Victor M.; Hernando, Blanca; Benavente, Juana

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of a nanoporous alumina membrane (NPAM) by the two-step anodization method and its morphological and chemical surface characterization by analyzing Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) micrographs and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) spectra is reported. Influence of electrical and diffusive effects on the NaCl transport across the membrane nanopores is determined from salt diffusion measurements performed with a wide range of NaCl concentrations, which allows the estimation of characteristic electrochemical membrane parameters such as the NaCl diffusion coefficient and the concentration of fixed charges in the membrane, by using an appropriated model and the membrane geometrical parameters (porosity and pore length). These results indicate a reduction of ~70% in the value of the NaCl diffusion coefficient through the membrane pores with respect to solution. The transport number of ions in the membrane pores (Na+ and Cl−, respectively) were determined from concentration potential measurements, and the effect of concentration-polarization at the membrane surfaces was also considered by comparing concentration potential values obtained with stirred solutions (550 rpm) and without stirring. From both kinds of results, a value higher than 0.05 M NaCl for the feed solution seems to be necessary to neglect the contribution of electrical interactions in the diffusive transport. PMID:28347115

  3. Identification of a meningococcal L-glutamate ABC transporter operon essential for growth in low-sodium environments.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Caterina; Talà, Adelfia; Spinosa, Maria Rita; Progida, Cinzia; De Nitto, Eleanna; Gaballo, Antonio; Bruni, Carmelo B; Bucci, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro

    2006-03-01

    GdhR is a meningococcal transcriptional regulator that was previously shown to positively control the expression of gdhA, encoding the NADP-specific L-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH), in response to the growth phase and/or to the carbon source. In this study we used reverse transcriptase-PCR-differential display (to identify additional GdhR-regulated genes. The results indicated that GdhR, in addition to NADP-GDH, controls the expression of a number of genes involved in glucose catabolism by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and in l-glutamate import by an unknown ABC transport system. The genes encoding the putative periplasmic substrate-binding protein (NMB1963) and the permease (NMB1965) of the ABC transporter were genetically inactivated. Uptake experiments demonstrated an impairment of L-glutamate import in the NMB1965-defective mutant in the absence or in the presence of a low sodium ion concentration. In contrast, at a sodium ion concentration above 60 mM, the uptake defect disappeared, possibly because the activity of a sodium-driven secondary transporter became predominant. Indeed, the NMB1965-defective mutant was unable to grow at a low sodium ion concentration (<20 mM) in a chemically defined medium containing L-glutamate and four other amino acids that supported meningococcal growth, but it grew when the sodium ion concentration was raised to higher values (>60 mM). The same growth phenotype was observed in the NMB1963-defective mutant. Cell invasion and intracellular persistence assays and expression data during cell invasion provided evidence that the l-glutamate ABC transporter, tentatively named GltT, was critical for meningococcal adaptation in the low-sodium intracellular environment.

  4. Grafted biomembranes containing membrane proteins--the case of the leucine transporter.

    PubMed

    Jagalski, Vivien; Barker, Robert D; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Gotfryd, Kamil; Krüger, Mie B; Shi, Lei; Maric, Selma; Bovet, Nicolas; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Pomorski, Thomas Günther; Loland, Claus J; Cárdenas, Marité

    2015-10-21

    Here, we bind the sodium dependent amino acid transporter on nitrilotriacetic acid/polyethylene glycol functionalized gold sensors in detergents and perform a detergent-lipid exchange with phosphatidylcholine. We characterize the LeuT structure in the adsorbed film by magnetic contrast neutron reflection using the predicted model from molecular dynamic simulations.

  5. Male Sex is Associated with a Reduced Alveolar Epithelial Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kaltofen, Till; Haase, Melanie; Thome, Ulrich H.; Laube, Mandy

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most frequent pulmonary complication in preterm infants. RDS incidence differs between genders, which has been called the male disadvantage. Besides maturation of the surfactant system, Na+ transport driven alveolar fluid clearance is crucial for the prevention of RDS. Na+ transport is mediated by the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and the Na,K-ATPase, therefore potential differences in their expression or activity possibly contribute to the gender imbalance observed in RDS. Fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells of rat fetuses were separated by sex and analyzed regarding expression and activity of the Na+ transporters. Ussing chamber experiments showed a higher baseline short-circuit current (ISC) and amiloride-sensitive ΔISC in FDLE cells of female origin. In addition, maximal amiloride-sensitive ΔISC and maximal ouabain-sensitive ΔISC of female cells were higher when measured in the presence of a permeabilized basolateral or apical membrane, respectively. The number of FDLE cells per fetus recoverable during cell isolation was also significantly higher in females. In addition, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio was lower in fetal and newborn female pups. Female derived FDLE cells had higher mRNA levels of the ENaC- and Na,K-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA levels were higher in female cells, which might render female cells more responsive, while concentrations of placenta-derived sex steroids do not differ between both genders during fetal life. Inhibition of ER-β abolished the sex differences in Na+ transport and female cells were more responsive to estradiol stimulation. In conclusion, a higher alveolar Na+ transport, possibly attributable to a higher expression of hormone receptors in female FDLE cells, provides an explanation for the well known sex-related difference in RDS occurrence and outcome. PMID:26291531

  6. Surface modification of PTMSP membranes by plasma treatment: Asymmetry of transport in organic solvent nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Tsarkov, S E; Gilman, A B; Khotimsky, V S; Roldughin, V I; Volkov, V V

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the effect of asymmetry of the membrane transport was studied for organic solvents and solutes upon their nanofiltration through the plasma-modified membranes based on poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP). Plasma treatment is shown to provide a marked hydrophilization of the hydrophobic PTMSP surface (the contact angle of water decreases from 88 down to 20°) and leads to the development of a negative charge of -5.2 nC/cm(2). The XPS measurements prove the formation of the oxygen-containing groups (Si-O and C-O) due to the surface modification. The AFM images show that the small-scale surface roughness of the plasma-treated PTMSP sample is reduced but the large-scale surface heterogeneities become more pronounced. The modified membranes retain their hydrophilic surface properties even after the nanofiltration tests and 30-day storage under ambient conditions. The results of the filtration tests show that when the membrane is oriented so that its modified layer contacts the feed solution, the membrane permeability for linear alcohols (methanol-propanol) and acetone decreases nearly two times. When the modified membrane surface faces the permeate, the membrane is seen to regain its transport characteristics: the flux becomes equal to that of the unmodified PTMSP. The well-pronounced effect of the transport asymmetry is observed for the solution of the neutral dye Solvent Blue 35 in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. For example, the initial membrane shows the negative retention for the Solvent Blue 35 dye (-16%) upon its filtration from the ethanol solution whereas, for the modified PTMSP membrane, the retention increases up to 17%. Various effects contributing to the asymmetry of the membrane transport characteristics are discussed.

  7. Vectorial transport of nucleoside analogs from the apical to the basolateral membrane in double-transfected cells expressing the human concentrative nucleoside transporter hCNT3 and the export pump ABCC4.

    PubMed

    Rius, Maria; Keller, Daniela; Brom, Manuela; Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Lyko, Frank; Keppler, Dietrich

    2010-07-01

    The identification of the transport proteins responsible for the uptake and the efflux of nucleosides and their metabolites enables the characterization of their vectorial transport and a better understanding of their absorption, distribution, and elimination. Human concentrative nucleoside transporters (hCNTs/SLC28A) are known to mediate the transport of natural nucleosides and some nucleoside analogs into cells in a sodium-dependent and unidirectional manner. On the other hand, several human multidrug resistance proteins [human ATP-binding cassette transporter, subfamily C (ABCC)] cause resistance against nucleoside analogs and mediate transport of phosphorylated nucleoside derivatives out of the cells in an ATP-dependent manner. For the integrated analysis of uptake and efflux of these compounds, we established a double-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cell line stably expressing the human uptake transporter hCNT3 in the apical membrane and the human efflux pump ABCC4 in the basolateral membrane. The direction of transport was from the apical to the basolateral compartment, which is in line with the unidirectional transport and the localization of both recombinant proteins in the MDCKII cells. Recombinant hCNT3 mediated the transport of several known nucleoside substrates, and we identified 5-azacytidine as a new substrate for hCNT3. It is of interest that coexpression of both transporters was confirmed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, which represent an important clinical indication for the therapeutic use of nucleoside analogs. Thus, our results establish a novel cell system for studies on the vectorial transport of nucleosides and their analogs from the apical to the basolateral compartment. The results contribute to a better understanding of the cellular transport characteristics of nucleoside drugs.

  8. Development of a Desalination Membrane Bioinspired by Mangrove Roots for Spontaneous Filtration of Sodium Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiwoong; Kim, Hyejeong; Lim, Jae Hong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-12-27

    The shortage of available fresh water is one of the global issues presently faced by humanity. To determine a solution to this problem, the survival strategies of plants have been examined. In this study, a nature-inspired membrane with a highly charged surface is proposed as an effective membrane for the filtration of saline water. To mimic the desalination characteristics of mangrove roots, a macroporous membrane based on polyethylene terephthalate is treated with polyelectrolytes using a layer-by-layer deposition method. The fabricated membrane surface has a highly negative charged ζ-potential value of -97.5 ± 4.3 mV, similar to that of the first layer of mangrove roots. Desalination of saline water using this membrane shows a high salt retention rate of 96.5%. The highly charged surface of the membrane may induce a relatively thick and stable ion depletion zone in front of the membrane. As a result, most co-ions are repelled from the membrane surface, and counterions are also rejected by virtue of their electroneutrality. The water permeability is found to be 7.60-7.69 L/m(2)·h, which is 10 times higher than that of the reverse osmosis desalination method. This nature-inspired filtration membrane exhibits steady desalination performance over 72 h of operation, successfully demonstrating the stable filtration of saline water. This nature-inspired membrane is applicable to the design of a small-scale, portable, and energy-free desalination device for use in third-world countries or small villages.

  9. The Divergence, Actions, Roles, and Relatives of Sodium-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Boron, Walter F.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian Slc4 (Solute carrier 4) family of transporters is a functionally diverse group of 10 multi-spanning membrane proteins that includes three Cl-HCO3 exchangers (AE1–3), five Na+-coupled HCO3− transporters (NCBTs), and two other unusual members (AE4, BTR1). In this review, we mainly focus on the five mammalian NCBTs-NBCe1, NBCe2, NBCn1, NDCBE, and NBCn2. Each plays a specialized role in maintaining intracellular pH and, by contributing to the movement of HCO3− across epithelia, in maintaining whole-body pH and otherwise contributing to epithelial transport. Disruptions involving NCBT genes are linked to blindness, deafness, proximal renal tubular acidosis, mental retardation, and epilepsy. We also review AE1–3, AE4, and BTR1, addressing their relevance to the study of NCBTs. This review draws together recent advances in our understanding of the phylogenetic origins and physiological relevance of NCBTs and their progenitors. Underlying these advances is progress in such diverse disciplines as physiology, molecular biology, genetics, immunocytochemistry, proteomics, and structural biology. This review highlights the key similarities and differences between individual NCBTs and the genes that encode them and also clarifies the sometimes confusing NCBT nomenclature. PMID:23589833

  10. Biodegradation, Biosorption of Phenanthrene and Its Trans-Membrane Transport by Massilia sp. WF1 and Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haiping; Lou, Jun; Wang, Haizhen; Yang, Yu; Wu, Laosheng; Wu, Jianjun; Xu, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Reducing phenanthrene (PHE) in the environment is critical to ecosystem and human health. Biodegradation, biosorption, and the trans-membrane transport mechanism of PHE by a novel strain, Massilia sp. WF1, and an extensively researched model fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated in aqueous solutions. Results showed that the PHE residual concentration decreased with incubation time and the data fitted well to a first-order kinetic equation, and the t1/2 of PHE degradation by WF1, spores, and mycelial pellets of P. chrysosporium were about 2 h, 87 days, and 87 days, respectively. The biosorbed PHE was higher in P. Chrysosporium than that in WF1, and it increased after microorganisms were inactivated and inhibited, especially in mycelial pellets. The detected intracellular auto-fluorescence of PHE by two-photon excitation microscopy also proved that PHE indeed entered into the cells. Based on regression, the intracellular (Kdin) and extracellular (Kdout) dissipation rate constants of PHE by WF1 were higher than those by spores and mycelial pellets. In addition, the transport rate constant of PHE from outside solution into cells (KinS/Vout) for WF1 were higher than the efflux rate constant of PHE from cells to outside solution (KoutS/Vin), while the opposite phenomena were observed for spores and mycelial pellets. The amount of PHE that transported from outside solution into cells was attributed to the rapid degradation and active PHE efflux in the cells of WF1 and P. Chrysosporium, respectively. Besides, the results under the inhibition treatments of 4°C, and the presence of sodium azide, colchicine, and cytochalasin B demonstrated that a passive trans-membrane transport mechanism was involved in PHE entering into the cells of WF1 and P. Chrysosporium. PMID:26858710

  11. Expanding Spectrum of Sodium Potassium Chloride Co-transporters in the Pathophysiology of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Kaur, Aalamjeet; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Sodium potassium chloride co-transporter (NKCC) belongs to cation-dependent chloride co-transporter family, whose activation allows the entry of Na+, K+ and 2Cl- inside the cell. It acts in concert with K+ Cl- co-transporter (KCC), which extrudes K+ and Cl- ions from cell. NKCC1 is widely distributed throughout the body, while NKCC2 is exclusively present in kidney. Protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase, oxidative stress responsive kinases, With No K=lysine kinase and protein phosphatase type 1 control the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of key threonine residues of in regulatory domain of NKCC1. The selective inhibitors of NKCC1 including bumetanide and furosemide are conventionally employed as diuretics. However, recent studies have indicated that NKCC1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, fragile X syndrome, autism and schizophrenia. The inhibitors of NKCC1 are shown to produce anxiolytic effects; attenuate cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal injury; produce antiepileptic effects and attenuate neuropathic pain. In the early developing brain, GABAA activation primarily produces excitatory actions due to high NKCC1/KCC2 ratio. However, as the development progresses, the ratio of NKCC1/KCC2 ratio reverses and there is switch in the polarity of GABAA actions and latter acquires the inhibitory actions. The recapitulation of developmental-like state during pathological state may be associated with increase in the expression and functioning of NKCC1, which decreases the strength of inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. The present review describes the expanding role and mechanism of NKCC1 in the pathophysiology of different diseases. PMID:26411965

  12. Simulated diabetic ketoacidosis therapy in vitro elicits brain cell swelling via sodium-hydrogen exchange and anion transport.

    PubMed

    Rose, Keeley L; Watson, Andrew J; Drysdale, Thomas A; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Chan, Melissa; Rupar, C Anthony; Fraser, Douglas D

    2015-08-15

    A common complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a state of severe insulin deficiency. A potentially harmful consequence of DKA therapy in children is cerebral edema (DKA-CE); however, the mechanisms of therapy-induced DKA-CE are unknown. Our aims were to identify the DKA treatment factors and membrane mechanisms that might contribute specifically to brain cell swelling. To this end, DKA was induced in juvenile mice with the administration of the pancreatic toxins streptozocin and alloxan. Brain slices were prepared and exposed to DKA-like conditions in vitro. Cell volume changes were imaged in response to simulated DKA therapy. Our experiments showed that cell swelling was elicited with isolated DKA treatment components, including alkalinization, insulin/alkalinization, and rapid reductions in osmolality. Methyl-isobutyl-amiloride, a nonselective inhibitor of sodium-hydrogen exchangers (NHEs), reduced cell swelling in brain slices elicited with simulated DKA therapy (in vitro) and decreased brain water content in juvenile DKA mice administered insulin and rehydration therapy (in vivo). Specific pharmacological inhibition of the NHE1 isoform with cariporide also inhibited cell swelling, but only in the presence of the anion transport (AT) inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid. DKA did not alter brain NHE1 isoform expression, suggesting that the cell swelling attributed to the NHE1 was activity dependent. In conclusion, our data raise the possibility that brain cell swelling can be elicited by DKA treatment factors and that it is mediated by NHEs and/or coactivation of NHE1 and AT.

  13. Transport of Water in Semicrystalline Block Copolymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel; Oparaji, Onyekachi

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS- b-PEO) is a semicrystalline block copolymer (BCP) with interesting properties. It is mechanically tough, amphiphilic, and has a polar phase. The mechanical toughness is due to the crystallinity of PEO and the high glass transition temperature of PS, as well as the morphological structure of the BCP. The polymer has high CO2, water, and salt solubility that derive from the polar PEO component. Potential applications include CO2 separation, water purification, and lithium air batteries. In all of the aforementioned applications, water transport is an important parameter. The presence of water can also affect thermal and mechanical properties. Water transport and thermal and mechanical properties of a lamellar PS- b-PEO copolymer have been measured as a function of water activity. Water transport can be affected by the heterogeneous nature of a semicrystalline BCP. Therefore, Fourier transform infrared - attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy has been employed, because water transport and polymer swelling can be measured simultaneously. The effect of BCP structure on transport has been investigated by comparing water transport in PS- b-PEO to a PEO homopolymer. The crystalline content of the PEO and the presence of glassy PS lamellae will be used to explain the transport results.

  14. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson

    2006-01-31

    During this quarter of the no cost extension a cermet composition referred to as EC101 containing a high permeability metal and a ceramic phase was prepared for sealing and permeability testing. Several different types of seals were developed and tested. In addition membrane surface stability was characterized.

  15. Hollow-fiber membranes for photosensitized electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wamser, C.C.; Otvos, J.W.; Calvin, M.

    1981-01-01

    Commercially available cellulose acetate hollow fiber membranes have been investigated for possible use in artificial photosynthesis solar energy schemes. The function of the membrane is to contain the photosensitizer and to separate the oxidized and reduced species which result from photosensitized electron transfer reactions on each side of the membrane wall. Membranes were successfully modified by a process of soaking in a THF solution saturated with porphyrin, followed by a water rinse. This procedure gives dark purple fibers which contain up to 30 mM zinc tetraphenylporphyrin in the fiber walls. A plumbing system has been developed to allow flow of a solution through the inner channels of a 24-fiber bundle while it is immersed in a separate outer solution. Preliminary studies indicate that the fibers are somewhat permeable to both EDTA and dimethyl viologen, the electron donor and acceptor molecules, respectively. Preliminary photochemical studies on cut-up pieces of the treated fiber indicate that it does photosensitize a reaction between EDTA and dimethyl viologen in aqueous solution.

  16. Kinetics of K-Cl cotransport in frog erythrocyte membrane: effect of external sodium.

    PubMed

    Gusev, G P; Agalakova, N I; Lapin, A V

    1999-12-01

    In frog red blood cells, K-Cl cotransport (i.e., the difference between ouabain-resistant K fluxes in Cl and NO(3)) has been shown to mediate a large fraction of the total K(+) transport. In the present study, Cl(-)-dependent and Cl(-)-independent K(+) fluxes via frog erythrocyte membranes were investigated as a function of external and internal K(+) ([K(+)](e) and [K(+)](i)) concentration. The dependence of ouabain-resistant Cl(-)-dependent K(+) ((86)Rb) influx on [K(+)](e) over the range 0-20 mm fitted the Michaelis-Menten equation, with an apparent affinity (K(m)) of 8.2 +/- 1.3 mm and maximal velocity (V(max)) of 10.4 +/- 1.6 mmol/l cells/hr under isotonic conditions. Hypotonic stimulation of the Cl(-)-dependent K(+) influx increased both K(m) (12.8 +/- 1.7 mm, P < 0.05) and V(max) (20.2 +/- 2.9 mmol/l/hr, P < 0.001). Raising [K(+)](e) above 20 mm in isotonic media significantly reduced the Cl(-)-dependent K(+) influx due to a reciprocal decrease of the external Na(+) ([Na(+)](e)) concentration below 50 mm. Replacing [Na(+)](e) by NMDG(+) markedly decreased V(max) (3.2 +/- 0.7 mmol/l/hr, P < 0.001) and increased K(m) (15.7 +/- 2.1 mm, P < 0.03) of Cl(-)-dependent K(+) influx. Moreover, NMDG(+) Cl substitution for NaCl in isotonic and hypotonic media containing 10 mm RbCl significantly reduced both Rb(+) uptake and K(+) loss from red cells. Cell swelling did not affect the Na(+)-dependent changes in Rb(+) uptake and K(+) loss. In a nominally K(+)(Rb(+))-free medium, net K(+) loss was reduced after lowering [Na(+)](e) below 50 mm. These results indicate that over 50 mm [Na(+)](e) is required for complete activation of the K-Cl cotransporter. In nystatin-pretreated cells with various intracellular K(+), Cl(-)-dependent K(+) loss in K(+)-free media was a linear function of [K(+)](i), with a rate constant of 0.11 +/- 0.01 and 0.18 +/- 0.008 hr(-1) (P < 0.001) in isotonic and hypotonic media, respectively. Thus K-Cl cotransport in frog erythrocytes exhibits a strong

  17. Cortisol regulates sodium homeostasis by stimulating the transcription of sodium-chloride transporter (NCC) in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Hu, Huei-Jyun; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2016-02-15

    In mammals, sodium/hydrogen exchanger (NHE) and sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) are expressed in renal tubules, and exhibit functional redundancy and mutual compensation in Na(+) uptake. In teleosts, the gills of the adult and skin of the embryonic stage function as external kidneys, and ionocytes are responsible for ionoregulation in these tissues. NHE- and NCC-expressing ionocytes mutually cooperate to adjust Na(+) uptake, which is analogous to the activity of the mammalian kidney. Cortisol is a hormone that controls Na(+) uptake through regulating NCC expression and activity in mammals; however, cortisol-mediated control of NCC expression is little understood in non-mammalian vertebrates, such as teleosts. It is essential for our understanding of the evolution of such regulation to determine whether cortisol has a conserved effect on NCC in vertebrates. In the present study, we treated zebrafish embryos with low Na(+) medium (LNa, 0.04 mM Na(+)) for 3 d to stimulate the mRNA expression of nhe3b, ncc, and cyp11b1 (a cortisol-synthesis enzyme) and whole body cortisol level. Exogenous cortisol treatment (20 mg/l, 3 d) resulted in an elevation of whole-body Na(+) content, ncc expression, and the density of ncc-expressing cells in zebrafish larvae. In loss-of-function experiments, microinjection of glucocorticoid receptor (gr) morpholino (MO) suppressed sodium content, ncc expression, and the density of ncc-expressing cells, but injection of mr MO had no such effects. In addition, exogenous cortisol treatment and gr MO injection also altered ncc expression and the density of ncc-expressing cells in gcm2 morphant larvae. Taken together, cortisol and GR appear to regulate Na(+) absorption through stimulating ncc expression and the differentiation of ncc-expressing ionocytes, providing new insights into the actions of cortisol on Na(+) uptake.

  18. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K+ transporter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K+ required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporters (...

  19. AtCHX13 is a plasma membrane K(+) transporter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potassium (K+) homeostasis is essential for diverse cellular processes, although how various cation transporters collaborate to maintain a suitable K(+) required for growth and development is poorly understood. The Arabidopsis ("Arabidopsis thaliana") genome contains numerous cation:proton antiporte...

  20. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  1. Transport Modeling of Membrane Extraction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon from Water for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Yongzhai; Feng, Zhili; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ME-IMS) is a feasible technique for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. This work studies theoretically the time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of trichloroethylene (TCE). The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a transport gas flowing through the membrane tube into IMS analyzer. The theoretical study is based on a two-dimensional transient fluid flow and mass transport model. The model describes the TCE mixing in the water, permeation through the membrane layer, and convective diffusion in the air flow inside membrane tube. The effect of various transport gas flow rates on temporal profiles of IMS signal intensity is investigated. The results show that fast time response and high transport yield can be achieved for ME-IMS by controlling the flow rate in the extraction membrane tube. These modeled time-response profiles are important for determining duty cycles of field-deployable sensors for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  2. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma.

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of membrane transport in the reverse imaging mode.

    PubMed

    Uitto, O D; White, H S

    2001-02-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), operated in reverse imaging mode (RIM), has been used to visualize the steady-state transport of molecules entering into porous membranes. RIM imaging is advantageous for investigating transport across biological membranes in situations where the SECM tip can access only the exterior membrane surface. Examples of RIM images of a synthetic membrane (mica with pores filled with the ion-selective polymer Nafion) and a biological membrane (hairless mouse skin) recorded during diffusive and iontophoretic transport, are reported. RIM imaging during diffusive transport allows visualization of the depletion of solute molecules in the solution adjacent to the pore openings. However, an accumulation of solute molecules above the pore opening is observed during iontophoresis, which is a consequence of the separation of the solute from the solvent (i.e., ultrafiltration). The separation results from differences in the rates of molecule transfer across the pore/solution interface when electroosmotic flow is operative. The results suggest that RIM imaging may be useful for measuring the kinetics of interfacial molecule transfer at biological membranes.

  4. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water transport through carbon nanotube membranes at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S; Dickson, James M

    2012-07-28

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at low pressures (5.0 MPa) typical of real nanofiltration (NF) systems. The CNT membrane is modeled as a simplified NF membrane with smooth surfaces, and uniform straight pores of typical NF pore sizes. A NEMD simulation system is constructed to study the effects of the membrane structure (pores size and membrane thickness) on the pure water transport properties. All simulations are run under operating conditions (temperature and pressure difference) similar to a real NF processes. Simulation results are analyzed to obtain water flux, density, and velocity distributions along both the flow and radial directions. Results show that water flow through a CNT membrane under a pressure difference has the unique transport properties of very fast flow and a non-parabolic radial distribution of velocities which cannot be represented by the Hagen-Poiseuille or Navier-Stokes equations. Density distributions along radial and flow directions show that water molecules in the CNT form layers with an oscillatory density profile, and have a lower average density than in the bulk flow. The NEMD simulations provide direct access to dynamic aspects of water flow through a CNT membrane and give a view of the pressure-driven transport phenomena on a molecular scale.

  5. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water transport through carbon nanotube membranes at low pressurea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S.; Dickson, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at low pressures (5.0 MPa) typical of real nanofiltration (NF) systems. The CNT membrane is modeled as a simplified NF membrane with smooth surfaces, and uniform straight pores of typical NF pore sizes. A NEMD simulation system is constructed to study the effects of the membrane structure (pores size and membrane thickness) on the pure water transport properties. All simulations are run under operating conditions (temperature and pressure difference) similar to a real NF processes. Simulation results are analyzed to obtain water flux, density, and velocity distributions along both the flow and radial directions. Results show that water flow through a CNT membrane under a pressure difference has the unique transport properties of very fast flow and a non-parabolic radial distribution of velocities which cannot be represented by the Hagen-Poiseuille or Navier-Stokes equations. Density distributions along radial and flow directions show that water molecules in the CNT form layers with an oscillatory density profile, and have a lower average density than in the bulk flow. The NEMD simulations provide direct access to dynamic aspects of water flow through a CNT membrane and give a view of the pressure-driven transport phenomena on a molecular scale.

  6. Transport of 3-bromopyruvate across the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Soszyński, Mirosław; Ułaszewski, Stanisław; Ko, Young; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    3-Bromopyruvic acid (3-BP) is a promising anticancer compound because it is a strong inhibitor of glycolytic enzymes, especially glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The Warburg effect means that malignant cells are much more dependent on glycolysis than normal cells. Potential complications of anticancer therapy with 3-BP are side effects due to its interaction with normal cells, especially erythrocytes. Transport into cells is critical for 3-BP to have intracellular effects. The aim of our study was the kinetic characterization of 3-BP transport into human erythrocytes. 3-BP uptake by erythrocytes was linear within the first 3 min and pH-dependent. The transport rate decreased with increasing pH in the range of 6.0-8.0. The Km and Vm values for 3-BP transport were 0.89 mM and 0.94 mmol/(l cells x min), respectively. The transport was inhibited competitively by pyruvate and significantly inhibited by DIDS, SITS, and 1-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Flavonoids also inhibited 3-BP transport: the most potent inhibition was found for luteolin and quercetin.

  7. A Minireview: Usefulness of Transporter-Targeted Prodrugs in Enhancing Membrane Permeability.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo

    2016-09-01

    Orally administered drugs are categorized into 4 classes depending on the solubility and permeability in a Biopharmaceutics Classification System. Prodrug derivatization is one of feasible approaches in modifying the physicochemical properties such as low solubility and low permeability without changing the in vivo pharmacological action of the parent drug. In this article, prodrug-targeted solute carrier (SLC) transporters were searched randomly by PubMed. Collected SLC transporters are amino acid transporter 1, bile acid transporter, carnitine transporter 2, glucose transporter 1, peptide transporter 1, vitamin C transporter 1, and multivitamin transporter. The usefulness of transporter-targeted prodrugs was evaluated in terms of membrane permeability, stability under acidic condition, and conversion to the parent drug. Among prodrugs collected, peptide transporter-targeted prodrugs exhibited the highest number, and some prodrugs such as valaciclovir and valganciclovir are clinically available. ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), reduces the intestinal absorption of lipophilic P-gp substrate drugs, and SLC transporter-targeted prodrugs of P-gp substrate drugs circumvented the P-gp-mediated efflux transport. Thus, SLC transporter-targeted prodrug derivatization seems to be feasible approach to increase the oral bioavailability by overcoming various unwanted physicochemical properties of orally administered drugs, although the effect of food on prodrug absorption should be taken into consideration.

  8. Novel Swelling-Resistant Sodium Alginate Membrane Branching Modified by Glycogen for Highly Aqueous Ethanol Solution Pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chen-Hao; Xue, Shuang-Mei; Xu, Zhen-Liang

    2016-10-12

    A novel carbohydrate chain cross-linking method of sodium alginate (SA) is proposed in which glycogen with the branched-chain structure is utilized to cross-link with SA matrix by the bridging of glutaraldehyde (GA). The active layer of SA composite ceramic membrane modified by glycogen and GA for pervaporation (PV) demonstrates great advantages. The branched structure increases the chain density of the active layer, which compresses the free volume between the carbohydrate chains of SA. Large amounts of hydroxyl groups are consumed during the reaction with GA, which reduces the hydrogen bond formation between water molecules and the polysaccharide matrix. The two factors benefit the active layer with great improvement in swelling resistance, promoting the potential of the active layer for the dehydration of an ethanol-water solution containing high water content. Meanwhile, the modified active layer is loaded on the rigid α-Al2O3 ceramic membrane by dip-coating method with the enhancement of anti-deformation and controllable thickness of the active layer. Characterization techniques such as SEM, AFM, XRD, FTIR, XPS, and water contact angle are utilized to observe the composite structure and surface morphology of the composite membrane, to probe the free volume variation, and to determine the chemical composition and hydrophilicity difference of the active layer caused by the different glycogen additive amounts. The membrane containing 3% glycogen in the selective layer demonstrates the flux at 1250 g m(-2) h(-1) coupled with the separation factor of 187 in the 25 wt % water content feed solution at the operating temperature of 75 °C, reflecting superior pervaporation processing capacity compared with the general organic PV membranes in the same condition.

  9. Aboral changes in D-glucose transport by human intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Bluett, M K; Abumrad, N N; Arab, N; Ghishan, F K

    1986-01-01

    D-Glucose transport was investigated in isolated brush-border membrane vesicles from human small intestine. Characteristics of D-glucose transport from the jejunum were compared with that in the mid and terminal ileum. Jejunal and mid-ileal D-glucose transport was Na+-dependent and electrogenic. The transient overshoot of jejunal D-glucose transport was significantly greater than corresponding values in mid-ileum. The terminal ileum did not exhibit Na+-dependent D-glucose transport, but did exhibit Na+-dependent taurocholate transport. Na+-glucose co-transport activity as measured by tracer-exchange experiments was greatest in the jejunum, and diminished aborally. We conclude that D-glucose transport in man is Na+-dependent and electrogenic in the proximal intestine and directly related to the activity of D-glucose-Na+ transporters present in the brush-border membranes. D-Glucose transport in the terminal ileum resembles colonic transport of D-glucose. PMID:3800877

  10. Transport efficiency of membrane-anchored kinesin-1 motors depends on motor density and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Grover, Rahul; Fischer, Janine; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Walter, Wilhelm J; Schwille, Petra; Diez, Stefan

    2016-11-15

    In eukaryotic cells, membranous vesicles and organelles are transported by ensembles of motor proteins. These motors, such as kinesin-1, have been well characterized in vitro as single molecules or as ensembles rigidly attached to nonbiological substrates. However, the collective transport by membrane-anchored motors, that is, motors attached to a fluid lipid bilayer, is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the influence of motors' anchorage to a lipid bilayer on the collective transport characteristics. We reconstituted "membrane-anchored" gliding motility assays using truncated kinesin-1 motors with a streptavidin-binding peptide tag that can attach to streptavidin-loaded, supported lipid bilayers. We found that the diffusing kinesin-1 motors propelled the microtubules in the presence of ATP. Notably, we found the gliding velocity of the microtubules to be strongly dependent on the number of motors and their diffusivity in the lipid bilayer. The microtubule gliding velocity increased with increasing motor density and membrane viscosity, reaching up to the stepping velocity of single motors. This finding is in contrast to conventional gliding motility assays where the density of surface-immobilized kinesin-1 motors does not influence the microtubule velocity over a wide range. We reason that the transport efficiency of membrane-anchored motors is reduced because of their slippage in the lipid bilayer, an effect that we directly observed using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Our results illustrate the importance of motor-cargo coupling, which potentially provides cells with an additional means of regulating the efficiency of cargo transport.

  11. RND transporters protect Corynebacterium glutamicum from antibiotics by assembling the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Lu, Shuo; Belardinelli, Juan; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Jones, Victoria; Jackson, Mary; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2014-08-01

    Corynebacterium-Mycobacterium-Nocardia (CMN) group are the causative agents of a broad spectrum of diseases in humans. A distinctive feature of these Gram-positive bacteria is the presence of an outer membrane of unique structure and composition. Recently, resistance-nodulation-division (RND) transporters (nicknamed MmpLs, Mycobacterial membrane protein Large) have emerged as major contributors to the biogenesis of the outer membranes in mycobacteria and as promising drug targets. In this study, we investigated the role of RND transporters in the physiology of Corynebacterium glutamicum and analyzed properties of these proteins. Our results show that in contrast to Gram-negative species, in which RND transporters actively extrude antibiotics from cells, in C. glutamicum and relatives these transporters protect cells from antibiotics by playing essential roles in the biogenesis of the low-permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Conditional C. glutamicum mutants lacking RND proteins and with the controlled expression of either NCgl2769 (CmpL1) or NCgl0228 (CmpL4) are hypersusceptible to multiple antibiotics, have growth deficiencies in minimal medium and accumulate intracellularly trehalose monocorynomycolates, free corynomycolates, and the previously uncharacterized corynomycolate-containing lipid. Our results also suggest that similar to other RND transporters, Corynebacterial membrane proteins Large (CmpLs) functions are dependent on a proton-motive force.

  12. Linear coupling of alignment with transport in a polymer electrolyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Park, Jong Keun; Moore, Robert B.; Madsen, Louis A.

    2011-07-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) selectively transport ions and polar molecules in a robust yet formable solid support. Tailored PEMs allow for devices such as solid-state batteries,‘artificial muscle’ actuators and reverse-osmosis water purifiers. Understanding how PEM structure and morphology relate to mobile species transport presents a challenge for designing next-generation materials. Material length scales from subnanometre to 1 μm (refs , ) influence bulk properties such as ion conductivity and water transport. Here we employ multi-axis pulsed-field-gradient NMR (ref. ) to measure diffusion anisotropy, and 2H NMR spectroscopy and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering to probe orientational order as a function of water content and of membrane stretching. Strikingly, transport anisotropy linearly depends on the degree of alignment, signifying that membrane stretching affects neither the nanometre-scale channel dimensions nor the defect structure,causing only domain reorientation. The observed reorientation of anisotropic domains without perturbation of the inherent nematic-like domain character parallels the behaviour of nematic elastomers, promises tailored membrane conduction and potentially allows understanding of tunable shape-memory effects in PEM materials. This quantitative understanding will drive PEM design efforts towardsoptimal membrane transport, thus enabling more efficient polymeric batteries, fuel cells, mechanical actuators and water purification.

  13. Solute transport model for trace organic neutral and charged compounds through nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Uk; Drewes, Jörg E; Scott Summers, R; Amy, Gary L

    2007-09-01

    Rejection of trace organic compounds, including disinfection by-products (DBPs) and pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs), by high-pressure membranes has become a focus of public interest internationally in both drinking water treatment and wastewater reclamation/reuse. The ability to simulate, or even predict, the rejection of these compounds by high-pressure membranes, encompassing nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO), will improve process economics and expand membrane applications. The objective of this research is to develop a membrane transport model to account for diffusive and convective contributions to solute transport and rejection. After completion of cross-flow tests and diffusion cell tests with target compounds, modeling efforts were performed in accordance with a non-equilibrium thermodynamic transport equation. Comparing the percentages of convection and diffusion contributions to transport, convection is dominant for most compounds, but diffusion is important for more hydrophobic non-polar compounds. Convection is also more dominant for looser membranes (i.e., NF). In addition, higher initial compound concentrations and greater J(0)/k ratios contribute to solute fluxes more dominated by convection. Given the treatment objective of compound rejection, compound transport and rejection trends are inversely related.

  14. Thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes measured by laser-induced transient gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Flick, A.; Duncan, R. A.; Eliason, J. K.; Cuffe, J.; Johnson, J. A.; Peraud, J.-P. M.; Zeng, L.; Lu, Z.; Maznev, A. A.; Wang, E. N.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Sledzinska, M.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.; Chen, G.; Nelson, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG) technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both "solid" and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes (135nm) indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membrane-based silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.

  15. Fluid and electrolyte transport across the peritoneal membrane during CAPD according to the three-pore model.

    PubMed

    Rippe, Bengt; Venturoli, Daniele; Simonsen, Ole; de Arteaga, Javier

    2004-01-01

    In the present review, we summarize the principles governing the transport of fluid and electrolytes across the peritoneum during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in "average" patients and during ultrafiltration failure (UFF), according to the three-pore model of peritoneal transport. The UF volume curves as a function of dwell time [V(t)] are determined in their early phase by the glucose osmotic conductance [product of the UF coefficient (LpS) and the glucose reflection coefficient (sigmag)] of the peritoneum; in their middle portion by intraperitoneal volume and glucose diffusivity; and in their late portion by the LpS, Starling forces, and lymph flow. The most common cause of UFF is increased transport of small solutes (glucose) across the peritoneum, whereas the LpS is only moderately affected. Concerning peritoneal ion transport, ions that are already more or less fully equilibrated across the membrane at the start of the dwell, such as Na+ (Cl-), Ca2+, and Mg2+, have a convection-dominated transport. The removal of these ions is proportional to UF volume (approximately 10 mmol/L Na+ and 0.12 mmol/L Ca2+ removed per deciliter UF in 4 hours). The present article examines the impact on fluid and solute transport of varying concentrations of Ca2+ and Na+ in peritoneal dialysis solutions. Particularly, the effect of "ultralow" sodium solutions on transport and UF is simulated and discussed. Ions with high initial concentration gradients across the peritoneum, such as K+, phosphate, and bicarbonate, display a diffusion-dominated transport. The transport of these ions can be adequately described by non-electrolyte equations. However, for ions that are in (or near) their diffusion equilibrium over the peritoneum (Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+), more complex ion transport equations need to be used. Due to the complexity of these equations, however, non-electrolyte transport formalism is commonly employed, which leads to a marked underestimation of mass transfer

  16. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  17. Nanopore-spanning lipid bilayers on silicon nitride membranes that seal and selectively transport ions.

    PubMed

    Korman, Christopher E; Megens, Mischa; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M; Horsley, David A

    2013-04-09

    We report the formation of POPC lipid bilayers that span 130 nm pores in a freestanding silicon nitride film supported on a silicon substrate. These solvent-free lipid membranes self-assemble on organosilane-treated Si3N4 via the fusion of 200 nm unilamellar vesicles. Membrane fluidity is verified by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and membrane resistance in excess of 1 GΩ is demonstrated using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). An array of 40,000 membranes maintained high impedance over 72 h, followed by rupture of most of the membranes by 82 h. Membrane incorporation of gramicidin, a model ion channel, resulted in increased membrane conductance. This membrane conductance was diminished when the gramicidin channels were blocked with CaCl2, indicating that the change in membrane conductance results from gramicidin-mediated ion transport. These very stable, biologically functional pore-spanning membranes open many possibilities for silicon-based ion-channel devices for applications such as biosensors and high-throughput drug screening.

  18. TransportDB 2.0: a database for exploring membrane transporters in sequenced genomes from all domains of life.

    PubMed

    Elbourne, Liam D H; Tetu, Sasha G; Hassan, Karl A; Paulsen, Ian T

    2017-01-04

    All cellular life contains an extensive array of membrane transport proteins. The vast majority of these transporters have not been experimentally characterized. We have developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and annotate complete sets of transporters in any sequenced genome. This pipeline is now fully automated enabling it to better keep pace with the accelerating rate of genome sequencing. This manuscript describes TransportDB 2.0 (http://www.membranetransport.org/transportDB2/), a completely updated version of TransportDB, which provides access to the large volumes of data generated by our automated transporter annotation pipeline. The TransportDB 2.0 web portal has been rebuilt to utilize contemporary JavaScript libraries, providing a highly interactive interface to the annotation information, and incorporates analysis tools that enable users to query the database on a number of levels. For example, TransportDB 2.0 includes tools that allow users to select annotated genomes of interest from the thousands of species held in the database and compare their complete transporter complements.

  19. TransportDB 2.0: a database for exploring membrane transporters in sequenced genomes from all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Hassan, Karl A.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2017-01-01

    All cellular life contains an extensive array of membrane transport proteins. The vast majority of these transporters have not been experimentally characterized. We have developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and annotate complete sets of transporters in any sequenced genome. This pipeline is now fully automated enabling it to better keep pace with the accelerating rate of genome sequencing. This manuscript describes TransportDB 2.0 (http://www.membranetransport.org/transportDB2/), a completely updated version of TransportDB, which provides access to the large volumes of data generated by our automated transporter annotation pipeline. The TransportDB 2.0 web portal has been rebuilt to utilize contemporary JavaScript libraries, providing a highly interactive interface to the annotation information, and incorporates analysis tools that enable users to query the database on a number of levels. For example, TransportDB 2.0 includes tools that allow users to select annotated genomes of interest from the thousands of species held in the database and compare their complete transporter complements. PMID:27899676

  20. Membrane Transport Processes Analyzed by a Highly Parallel Nanopore Chip System at Single Protein Resolution.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael; Vor der Brüggen, Marc; Tampé, Robert

    2016-08-16

    Membrane protein transport on the single protein level still evades detailed analysis, if the substrate translocated is non-electrogenic. Considerable efforts have been made in this field, but techniques enabling automated high-throughput transport analysis in combination with solvent-free lipid bilayer techniques required for the analysis of membrane transporters are rare. This class of transporters however is crucial in cell homeostasis and therefore a key target in drug development and methodologies to gain new insights desperately needed. The here presented manuscript describes the establishment and handling of a novel biochip for the analysis of membrane protein mediated transport processes at single transporter resolution. The biochip is composed of microcavities enclosed by nanopores that is highly parallel in its design and can be produced in industrial grade and quantity. Protein-harboring liposomes can directly be applied to the chip surface forming self-assembled pore-spanning lipid bilayers using SSM-techniques (solid supported lipid membranes). Pore-spanning parts of the membrane are freestanding, providing the interface for substrate translocation into or out of the cavity space, which can be followed by multi-spectral fluorescent readout in real-time. The establishment of standard operating procedures (SOPs) allows the straightforward establishment of protein-harboring lipid bilayers on the chip surface of virtually every membrane protein that can be reconstituted functionally. The sole prerequisite is the establishment of a fluorescent read-out system for non-electrogenic transport substrates. High-content screening applications are accomplishable by the use of automated inverted fluorescent microscopes recording multiple chips in parallel. Large data sets can be analyzed using the freely available custom-designed analysis software. Three-color multi spectral fluorescent read-out furthermore allows for unbiased data discrimination into different

  1. Transport of cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the transport of newly synthesized cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in Chinese hamster ovary cells using a cell fractionation assay. We found that transport is dependent on metabolic energy, but that the maintenance of the high differential concentration of cholesterol in the plasma membrane is not an energy-requiring process. We have tested a variety of inhibitors for their effect on cholesterol transport and found that cytochalasin B, colchicine, monensin, cycloheximide, and NH4Cl did not have any effect. The cholesterol transport process shows a sharp temperature dependence; it ceases at 15 degrees C, whereas cholesterol synthesis continues. When synthesis occurs at 15 degrees C, the newly synthesized cholesterol accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and in a low density, lipid-rich vesicle fraction. These results suggest that cholesterol is transported via a vesicular system. PMID:4040520

  2. Low Temperature Hydrogen Transport Using Palladium/Copper Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Lessing, Paul Alan; Wood, Henry Carwin; Zuck, Larry Douglas

    2003-06-01

    Results are presented from low temperature hydrogen permeation experiments using a palladium/copper membrane. Inlet pressure was varied from 5 psig to 180 psig, while temperature was varied from 25°C to 275°C. The palladium/copper membranes exhibited flow stability problems at low temperatures and pressures when using ultra high purity hydrogen. A preconditioning step of high temperatures and inlet pressures of pure hydrogen was necessary to stimulate any substantial permeate flows. After pre-conditioning, results showed zero hydrogen flow when using 3–4% hydrogen mixed with helium or argon. It is thought that the inert gas atoms were adsorbed into the membrane surface and thus blocked the hydrogen atom dissolution. When using pure hydrogen at low to moderate temperatures and low pressures, no measurable permeate flow was observed. Also, zero permeate flow was observed at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 150°C) and a low inlet pressure (5 psig). The cause of the zero permeate flow, when using pure hydrogen, was attributed to interface control of the permeation process. Interface control could be due to: (a) insufficient energy to split the hydrogen molecule into hydrogen atoms, or (b) a reversible phase change from beta to alpha of crystals at the near surface.

  3. Bi-modal water transport behavior across a simple Nafion membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziheng; Promislow, Keith; Martin, Jonathan; Wang, Haijiang; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2011-10-01

    The development of predictive mathematical models for water management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells requires detailed understanding of water distribution and water transport across the Nafion layer. The anisotropic microstructure of Nafion suggests the measurement of water content and mass transport should be along the fuel cell functional direction, i.e. across the membrane. Non-invasive, high resolution, microscopy measurements of this type are very challenging. We report here the calibration of a minimal mathematical model for diffusive water transport in Nafion against data from high-resolution water content maps determined with a new magnetic resonance imaging methodology developed for this purpose. A mock fuel cell was designed to permit well-controlled wetting and drying boundary conditions. With no chemical potential driving force involved, we assume the water transport behavior will be dominated by diffusion. Moreover we show that, in this context, our model is mathematically equivalent to the traditional permeation models based upon saturation dependent pressure gradients via a capillary pressure ansatz. The non-linear equilibrium water distribution across the Nafion membrane measured in this work suggests a bi-modal diffusivity. The model constructed associates distinct transport behaviors to water contents above and below a critical threshold, consistent with a rearrangement of a micro-structural pore network. The experimental observation and the model prediction agree with the primary features of Weber's model of Nafion, which predicts distinct modes of transport for hydration fronts traversing the through-plane direction of the membrane.

  4. Calcium uptake by intestinal brush border membrane vesicles. Comparison with in vivo calcium transport.

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, H P; Wilson, H D

    1985-01-01

    In prior studies, we examined kinetics of steady state in vivo transepithelial calcium transport in rat and hamster. The present studies related calcium uptake by the brush border to in vivo transport. We measured calcium uptake by brush border membrane vesicles from the two species. In the rat, our prior in vivo studies had shown that (a) calcium transport was mediated, (b) no nonmediated component was detectable, and (c) Vmax was 2.5 times greater in proximal than distal small intestine. In brush border membrane vesicles from the rat, Vmax for the saturable component of calcium uptake was again 2.5 times greater in proximal than distal intestine. Contrasting with in vivo studies, a major nonsaturable component was present in vesicles from proximal and distal small intestine. In the hamster, our previous in vivo studies had shown (1) both mediated and nonmediated components of calcium transport, (2) greater nonmediated transport in proximal than distal small intestines, and (3) Vmax for calcium transport twice as great in distal as in proximal small intestine. In the present study with brush border membrane vesicles from hamster, Vmax for saturable calcium transport was again twice as great in distal as in proximal small intestine. However, nonsaturable calcium transport rates relative to saturable rates were much greater with vesicles than in in vivo studies, and were greater in vesicles from distal than proximal small intestine. Since rates of saturable calcium uptake by brush border membrane vesicles parallel corresponding in vivo mediated transport rates, we conclude that the segmental rates of calcium transport in rat and hamster could be determined by brush border function. PMID:2997294

  5. Specific binding of toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus to the sodium channel in electroplaque membranes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, K P; Barhanin, J; Lazdunski, M

    1982-10-26

    The binding of toxin II from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssII) to electroplaque membranes from Electrophorus electricus was studied with the use of a radiolabeled derivative of the toxin ([125I]CssII). Specific binding of the latter to the membranes required the protonation of a group, either in the membrane or in the toxin itself, with an apparent pKa value of 7.5 and also the presence of a certain minimum concentration of ions, though there was no requirement for a specific ion. At 20 degrees C and pH 6 the second-order rate constant for formation of the [125I]CssII-membrane complex was about 5 X 10(6) M-1 s-1, while the first-order constant for its dissociation was about 2 X 10(-3) s-1. Under equilibrium conditions specific binding of [125I]CssII was a simple saturable function of [125I]CssII concentration, characterized by a dissociation constant of 0.4-0.7 nM and a maximum capacity of 0.9-2.4 pmol of toxin/mg of membrane protein. The latter value was the same as the number of membrane sites that could specifically bind a radiolabeled derivative of tetrodotoxin. Unlabeled CssII displaced bound [125I]CssII with an apparent dissociation constant of about 1 nM. None of 19 other neurotoxins or local anaesthetics known to interact with Na+ channels in excitable cells affected [125I]CssII binding, but it was completely inhibited by toxin gamma from the scorpion Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. These findings suggest that the Na+ channel possesses a distinct class of binding sites to which these two scorpion toxins bind with high affinities. On the other hand, no CssII receptor was detected in crab axonal membranes, indicating that it is not a characteristic feature of all Na+ channels.

  6. Transcellular transport and membrane insertion of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement by glomerular epithelial cells in experimental membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kerjaschki, D; Schulze, M; Binder, S; Kain, R; Ojha, P P; Susani, M; Horvat, R; Baker, P J; Couser, W G

    1989-07-15

    Deposition of the C5b-9 complex of C in glomeruli of rats with experimental membranous nephropathy (MN) is essential for the development of proteinuria. In this investigation C5b-9 was localized in the passive Heymann nephritis (PHN) by immunoelectron microscopy with a mAb specific for C5b-9(m) neoantigen. Its distribution was compared with that in another model of MN induced by successive injections of cationic human IgG and rabbit anti-human IgG into rats. In PHN C5b-9 was found: 1) in the immune deposits (ID), and on the cell membranes of foot processes close to the ID; 2) in clathrin-coated pits of the glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) close to the ID and in membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm, separated from sheep IgG and the gp330 Ag; 3) in high concentration in multivesicular bodies of GEC; and 4) in association with membrane vesicles in the urinary space which presumably are the exocytosed content of membrane vesicular bodies. By contrast, in the cationic IgG-MN model C5b-9 was found mostly in ID, but rarely within the GEC. By freeze-fracture electron microscopy we have further identified 200- to 250-A intramembrane particles in PHN in the cell membranes of the "soles" of the foot processes which resemble membrane inserted human C5b-9(m). Degradation products of C5b-9 were further detected by immunoblotting of a 100,000 x g pellet of PHN rat urine. These results indicate that, in PHN, C5b-9 is inserted into the cell membranes of GEC, and that it is selectively endocytosed and transported across GEC by a cellular mechanism which apparently protects the cell from accumulation of membrane-inserted C5b-9.

  7. Electrolyte Gradient-Based Modulation of Molecular Transport through Nanoporous Gold Membranes.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Daniel A; Bailey, Ryan C

    2017-02-14

    Nanopores, and nanoporous materials in general, are interesting for applications in chemical and biomolecular transport as pore sizes are on the same scale as the dimension of many (bio)chemical species. Many studies have focused on either single pores or small arrays of cylindrical pores, which are convenient in terms of their amenability toward computational modeling of transport phenomenon. However, the limited overall porosity may inhibit transport flux as well as the eventual implementation of these materials as active separation elements. Inspired by its relatively high porosity, we have explored nanoporous gold (NPG) as a membrane across which small molecular species can be transported. NPG offers a random, bicontinuous pore geometry, while also being inherently conductive and readily amenable to surface modification-attributes that may be enabling in the pursuit of size- and charge-based approaches to molecular separations. NPG was fabricated via a free-corrosion process whereby immersion of Au-containing alloys in concentrated nitric acid preferentially dissolves the less noble metals (e.g., Ni, Cu). Average pore diameters of 50 ± 20 nm were obtained as verified under scanning electron microscopy. NPG membranes were sandwiched between two reservoirs, and the selective transport of chemical species across the membrane in the presence of an ionic strength gradient was investigated. The flux of small molecules were monitored by UV-vis absorption spectrometry and found to be dependent upon the direction and magnitude of the ionic strength gradient. Moreover, transport trends underscored the effects of surface charge in a confined environment, considering that the pore diameters were on the same scale as the electrical double layer experienced by molecules transiting the membrane. Under such conditions, the transport of anions and cations through NPG was found to depend on an induced electric field as well as ion advection. Further electrical and surface

  8. Reverse osmosis transport of alkali halides and nickel salts through cellulose triacetate membranes. Performance prediction from NaCl experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmal, J.D.; Pandya, V.P.; Desai, N.V.; Rangarajan, R. )

    1992-10-01

    The separation of alkali metal halides, nickel chloride, and nickel sulfate was determined for cellulose triacetate reverse osmosis (CTA RO) membranes. From transport analysis, the relative free energy parameters for transport of these salts through CTA membranes were determined. From these relative free energy parameters of salts, the solute separation by CTA membranes could be predicted from RO experiment with NaCl solution. The transport analysis and an illustration of how the concept is useful are presented in this paper.

  9. Evaluations of the Absolute and Relative Free Energies for Antidepressant Binding to the Amino Acid Membrane Transporter LeuT with Free Energy Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Caplan, David A; Noskov, Sergei Yu

    2010-06-08

    The binding of ligands to protein receptors with high affinity and specificity is central to many cellular processes. The quest for the development of computational models capable of accurately evaluating binding affinity remains one of the main goals of modern computational biophysics. In this work, free energy perturbation/molecular dynamics simulations were used to evaluate absolute and relative binding affinity for three different antidepressants to a sodium-dependent membrane transporter, LeuT, a bacterial homologue of human serotonin and dopamine transporters. Dysfunction of these membrane transporters in mammals has been implicated in multiple diseases of the nervous system, including bipolar disorder and depression. Furthermore, these proteins are key targets for antidepressants including fluoxetine (aka Prozac) and tricyclic antidepressants known to block transport activity. In addition to being clinically relevant, this system, where multiple crystal structures are readily available, represents an ideal testing ground for methods used to study the molecular mechanisms of ligand binding to membrane proteins. We discuss possible pitfalls and different levels of approximation required to evaluate binding affinity, such as the dependence of the computed affinities on the strength of constraints and the sensitivity of the computed affinities to the particular partial charges derived from restrained electrostatic potential fitting of quantum mechanics electrostatic potential. Finally, we compare the effects of different constraint schemes on the absolute and relative binding affinities obtained from free energy simulations.

  10. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane-II. Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanshaw, B.B.; Coplen, T.B.

    1973-01-01

    Several recent laboratory studies and field investigations have indicated that shales and compacted clay minerals behave as semipermeable membranes. One of the properties of semipermeable membranes is to retard or prevent the passage of charged ionic species through the membrane pores while allowing relatively free movement of uncharged species. This phenomenon is termed salt filtering, reverse osmosis, or ultrafiltration. This paper shows how one can proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane. Reasonable agreement between theory and laboratory results were found. The concentration of the ultrafiltrate was always greater than predicted because of uncertainty in values of some parameters in the equations. Ultrafiltration phenomena may be responsible for the formation of some subsurface brines and mineral deposits. The effect should also be taken into consideration in any proposal for subsurface waste emplacement in an environment containing large quantities of clay minerals. ?? 1973.

  11. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors and euglycemic ketoacidosis: Wisdom of hindsight

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2i) are newly approved class of oral anti-diabetic drugs, in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, which reduces blood glucose through glucouresis via the kidney, independent, and irrespective of available pancreatic beta-cells. Studies conducted across their clinical development program found, a modest reduction in glycated hemoglobin ranging from −0.5 to −0.8%, without any significant hypoglycemia. Moreover, head-to-head studies versus active comparators yielded comparable efficacy. Interestingly, weight and blood pressure reduction were additionally observed, which was not only consistent but significantly superior to active comparators, including metformin, sulfonylureas, and dipeptydylpeptide-4 inhibitors. Indeed, these additional properties makes this class a promising oral anti-diabetic drug. Surprisingly, a potentially fatal unwanted side effect of diabetic ketoacidosis has been noted with its widespread use, albeit rarely. Nevertheless, this has created a passé among the clinicians. This review is an attempt to pool those ketosis data emerging with SGLT-2i, and put a perspective on its implicated mechanism. PMID:26693421

  12. A specific pharmacophore model of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunlei; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Dandan; Zan, Xin; Yang, Baowei; Li, Ying; Du, Xiaoyong; Qian, Hai; Huang, Wenlong

    2012-06-01

    Sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) plays a pivotal role in maintaining glucose equilibrium in the human body, emerging as one of the most promising targets for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. Pharmacophore models of SGLT2 inhibitors have been generated with a training set of 25 SGLT2 inhibitors using Discovery Studio V2.1. The best hypothesis (Hypo1(SGLT2)) contains one hydrogen bond donor, five excluded volumes, one ring aromatic and three hydrophobic features, and has a correlation coefficient of 0.955, cost difference of 68.76, RMSD of 0.85. This model was validated by test set, Fischer randomization test and decoy set methods. The specificity of Hypo1(SGLT2) was evaluated. The pharmacophore features of Hypo1(SGLT2) were different from the best pharmacophore model (Hypo1(SGLT1)) of SGLT1 inhibitors we developed. Moreover, Hypo1(SGLT2) could effectively distinguish selective inhibitors of SGLT2 from those of SGLT1. These results indicate that a highly predictive and specific pharmacophore model of SGLT2 inhibitors has been successfully obtained. Then Hypo1(SGLT2) was used as a 3D query to screen databases including NCI and Maybridge for identifying new inhibitors of SGLT2. The hit compounds were subsequently subjected to filtering by Lipinski's rule of five. And several compounds selected from the top ranked hits have been suggested for further experimental assay studies.

  13. Pharmacodynamic model of sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition: implications for quantitative translational pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Tristan S; Ghosh, Avijit; Haddish-Berhane, Nahor; Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Boustany-Kari, Carine M; She, Li; Leininger, Michael T; Zhu, Tong; Tugnait, Meera; Yang, Xin; Kimoto, Emi; Mascitti, Vincent; Robinson, Ralph P

    2011-12-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are an emerging class of agents for use in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Inhibition of SGLT2 leads to improved glycemic control through increased urinary glucose excretion (UGE). In this study, a biologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model of SGLT2 inhibitor-mediated UGE was developed. The derived model was used to characterize the acute PK/PD relationship of the SGLT2 inhibitor, dapagliflozin, in rats. The quantitative translational pharmacology of dapagliflozin was examined through both prospective simulation and direct modeling of mean literature data obtained for dapagliflozin in healthy subjects. Prospective simulations provided time courses of UGE that were of consistent shape to clinical observations, but were modestly biased toward under prediction. Direct modeling provided an improved characterization of the data and precise parameter estimates which were reasonably consistent with those predicted from preclinical data. Overall, these results indicate that the acute clinical pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors in healthy subjects can be reasonably well predicted from preclinical data through rational accounting of species differences in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and SGLT2 pharmacology. Because these data can be generated at the earliest stages of drug discovery, the proposed model is useful in the design and development of novel SGLT2 inhibitors. In addition, this model is expected to serve as a useful foundation for future efforts to understand and predict the effects of SGLT2 inhibition under chronic administration and in other patient populations.

  14. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors: a growing class of antidiabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Vivian, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Although several treatment options are available to reduce hyperglycemia, only about half of individuals with diagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) achieve recommended glycemic targets. New agents that reduce blood glucose concentrations by novel mechanisms and have acceptable safety profiles are needed to improve glycemic control and reduce the complications associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The renal sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) is responsible for reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibitors of SGLT2 lower blood glucose independent of the secretion and action of insulin by inhibiting renal reabsorption of glucose, thereby promoting the increased urinary excretion of excess glucose. Canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin are SGLT2 inhibitors approved as treatments for T2DM in the United States, Europe, and other countries. Canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin increase renal excretion of glucose and improve glycemic parameters in patients with T2DM when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents. Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is associated with weight reduction, lowered blood pressure, and a low intrinsic propensity to cause hypoglycemia. Overall, canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin are well tolerated. Cases of genital infections and, in some studies, urinary tract infections have been more frequent in canagliflozin-, dapagliflozin-, and empagliflozin-treated patients compared with those receiving placebo. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new treatment option for T2DM.

  15. Sodium glucose CoTransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors: Current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Madaan, Tushar; Akhtar, Mohd; Najmi, Abul Kalam

    2016-10-10

    Diabetes mellitus is a disease that affects millions of people worldwide and its prevalence is estimated to rise in the future. Billions of dollars are spent each year around the world in health expenditure related to diabetes. There are several anti-diabetic drugs in the market for the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. In this article, we will be talking about a relatively new class of anti-diabetic drugs called sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. This class of drugs has a unique mechanism of action focusing on inhibition of glucose reabsorption that separates it from other classes. This article covers the mechanism of glucose reabsorption in the kidneys, the mechanism of action of SGLT2 inhibitors, several SGLT2 inhibitors currently available in the market as well as those in various phases of development, their individual pharmacokinetics as well as the discussion about the future role of SGLT2 inhibitors, not only for the treatment of diabetes, but also for various other diseases like obesity, hepatic steatosis, and cardiovascular disorders.

  16. Sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibition has no renoprotective effects on non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuyue; Steiger, Stefanie; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Sodium glucose transporter (SGLT)-2 inhibition has renoprotective effects in diabetic kidney disease. Whether similar effects can be achieved also in non-diabetic kidney disease is speculative. Chronic kidney disease was induced in C57BL/6N mice by feeding an oxalate-rich diet for 14 days, known to induce nephrocalcinosis-related tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis without directly affecting the glomerular compartment. Empagliflozin treatment started from day 0 of oxalate feeding had no effect on the decline of glomerular filtration rate, crystal deposition, blood urea nitrogen or serum creatinine levels on day 7 and 14. Tissue morphometry of tubular injury and kidney mRNA levels of kidney injury molecule-1 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 were comparable between empagliflozin- and vehicle-treated mice with oxalate nephropathy on day 7 and 14. Similarly, empagliflozin did not affect markers of interstitial fibrosis, including silver, alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and collagen 1 staining, and mRNA levels of fibronectin-1, collagen 1α1, fibroblast-specific protein-1, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 on day 7 and 14. Thus, the specific renoprotective mechanisms-of-action of SGLT2 inhibition in diabetic kidney disease do not apply to chronic oxalosis, a non-diabetic form of chronic kidney disease.

  17. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors: a growing class of antidiabetic agents

    PubMed Central

    Vivian, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Although several treatment options are available to reduce hyperglycemia, only about half of individuals with diagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) achieve recommended glycemic targets. New agents that reduce blood glucose concentrations by novel mechanisms and have acceptable safety profiles are needed to improve glycemic control and reduce the complications associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The renal sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) is responsible for reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibitors of SGLT2 lower blood glucose independent of the secretion and action of insulin by inhibiting renal reabsorption of glucose, thereby promoting the increased urinary excretion of excess glucose. Canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin are SGLT2 inhibitors approved as treatments for T2DM in the United States, Europe, and other countries. Canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin increase renal excretion of glucose and improve glycemic parameters in patients with T2DM when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents. Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is associated with weight reduction, lowered blood pressure, and a low intrinsic propensity to cause hypoglycemia. Overall, canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin are well tolerated. Cases of genital infections and, in some studies, urinary tract infections have been more frequent in canagliflozin-, dapagliflozin-, and empagliflozin-treated patients compared with those receiving placebo. Evidence from clinical trials suggests that SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new treatment option for T2DM. PMID:25598831

  18. Ion transport membrane reactor systems and methods for producing synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Repasky, John Michael

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the present invention provide cost-effective systems and methods for producing a synthesis gas product using a steam reformer system and an ion transport membrane (ITM) reactor having multiple stages, without requiring inter-stage reactant injections. Embodiments of the present invention also provide techniques for compensating for membrane performance degradation and other changes in system operating conditions that negatively affect synthesis gas production.

  19. Transport Properties of Aqueous Glycerol and Aqueous Mannitol through the Zirconium Oxide Membrane

    PubMed

    Blokhra; Sharma; Blokhra

    1997-08-15

    The transport properties of aqueous glycerol and aqueous mannitol across a zirconium oxide membrane are, investigated from the point of view of irreversible thermodynamics. The data on hydrodynamic permeability are analyzed in terms of frictional coefficients and entropy of activation. The phenomenological coefficient characterizing the electroosmotic flow and the membrane characteristics are also estimated for the various solutions with the object of determining the efficiencies of electrokinetic energy conversion and zeta potential. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  20. Characterization of butyrate transport across the luminal membranes of equine large intestine.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Taoufik; Moran, Andrew W; Al-Rammahi, Miran A; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2014-10-01

    The diet of the horse, pasture forage (grass), is fermented by the equine colonic microbiota to short-chain fatty acids, notably acetate, propionate and butyrate. Short-chain fatty acids provide a major source of energy for the horse and contribute to many vital physiological processes. We aimed to determine both the mechanism of butyrate uptake across the luminal membrane of equine colon and the nature of the protein involved. To this end, we isolated equine colonic luminal membrane vesicles. The abundance and activity of cysteine-sensitive alkaline phosphatase and villin, intestinal luminal membrane markers, were significantly enriched in membrane vesicles compared with the original homogenates. In contrast, the abundance of GLUT2 protein and the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, known markers of the intestinal basolateral membrane, were hardly detectable. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, that monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) protein is expressed on the luminal membrane of equine colonocytes. We showed that butyrate transport into luminal membrane vesicles is energized by a pH gradient (out < in) and is not Na(+) dependent. Moreover, butyrate uptake is time and concentration dependent, with a Michaelis-Menten constant of 5.6 ± 0.45 mm and maximal velocity of 614 ± 55 pmol s(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Butyrate transport is significantly inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, phloretin and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, all potent inhibitors of MCT1. Moreover, acetate and propionate, as well as the monocarboxylates pyruvate and lactate, also inhibit butyrate uptake. Data presented here support the conclusion that transport of butyrate across the equine colonic luminal membrane is predominantly accomplished by MCT1.

  1. Transport Properties of Multivalent Cations in Nafion-117 Membrane with Mixed Ionic Composition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sanhita; Agarwal, Chhavi; Goswami, A

    2015-08-20

    The transport characteristics of multivalent cations like Ba(2+) and Eu(3+) have been studied in bi-ionic form of the Nafion-117 membrane. The membranes have been prepared by loading different proportions of H(+)-Ba(2+)/Mg(2+)-Ba(2+)/Ba(2+)-Eu(3+)/H(+)-Eu(3+)/Na(+)-Eu(3+). The cationic compositions of the membranes have been determined from the measured ion exchange isotherms. Results show that the self-diffusion coefficient of Ba(2+) (D(Ba)) in H-Ba/Mg-Ba systems as well as the self-diffusion coefficient of Eu(3+) (D(Eu)) in H-Eu/Na-Eu systems are strongly dependent on the membrane ionic compositions and decreased continuously with increasing concentration of the highly hydrated ions (H(+)/Na(+)/Mg(2+)) in the membrane. Increase in the proportion of H(+)/Na(+)/Mg(2+) ions in the membrane increases the effective charge on the membrane matrix. This causes stronger electrostatic interaction of the less hydrated multivalent ions (Ba(2+)/Eu(3+)) with the membrane matrix charges, which ultimately results in their slower self-diffusion coefficients. The higher the valence, the stronger the electrostatic interaction is with the fixed ionic charges; hence, in general, D(Eu) is affected more as compared to D(Ba). On the basis of the free-volume theory for polymers, the effective interaction potential (Φ) of the Ba(2+) with the fixed ionic sites in the membrane has been calculated and found to be on the order of approximately millivolts. The higher the proportion of hydrated ion in the membrane, the higher the Φ is and the stronger the ion pair formation is with the fixed ionic sites in the membrane. However, in the Ba-Eu system, as the electrostatic interactions of the two ions with the membrane matrix are close, D(Ba) and D(Eu) are independent of the membrane ionic composition. The ionic composition dependence of D(Ba) in the H-Ba system is reflected in the transport rate of Ba(2+), showing the importance of such measurements in understanding the transport

  2. Electrophysiology of glutamate and sodium co-transport in a glial cell of the salamander retina.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E A; Tachibana, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Müller cells were isolated from salamander retinas and their membrane voltage was controlled with a whole-cell voltage clamp. External D-aspartate, L-aspartate and L-glutamate each induced a membrane current. D-Glutamate, kainate, quisqualate and N-methyl-D-aspartate were more than 100x less effective than L-aspartate. Kynurenic acid had no effect on the current produced by L-glutamate, L-aspartate or D-aspartate. 2. The current induced by an acidic amino acid (AAA) was completely dependent on the presence of external Na+. Neither Li+, Cs+, choline nor TEA+ were able to substitute for Na+. The relationship between external Na+ concentration and current amplitude can be explained if the binding of three Na+ ions enabled transport. The apparent affinity constant for Na+ binding was 41 mM. Altering K+, H+ and Cl- concentrations demonstrated that these ions are not required for transport. 3. The shape of the current-voltage relation did not depend on the external amino acid concentration. The relationship between D-aspartate concentration and current amplitude can be described by the binding of D-aspartate to a single site with an apparent affinity constant of 20 microM. 4. Influx and efflux of AAA were not symmetric. Although influx was electrogenic, efflux did not produce a current. Moreover, influx stimulated efflux; but efflux inhibited influx. 5. Removing external Na+ demonstrated that Na+ carried a current in the absence of an AAA. Li+ was a very poor substitute for Na+. This current may be due to the uncoupled movement of Na+ through the transporter. The relationship between the external Na+ concentration and the amplitude of the uncoupled current can be explained if the binding of two or three Na+ ions enabled the translocation of Na+ in the absence of an AAA. The apparent affinity constant for Na+ binding was approximately 90 mM. 6. The temperature dependence of the AAA-induced current had a Q10 between 8 and 18 degrees C of 1.95. The Q10 is consistent

  3. Highly selective transport of a uranyl ion through a liquid membrane containing a lipophilic ion-associate of methyltrioctylammonium and hydroxycalix[n]arene-p-sulfonates (n = 6, 8) as metal carriers.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirotomo; Nishida, Masashi; Yoshida, Isao

    2002-02-01

    Uranyl ion, UO2(2+), in an aqueous sodium hydrogen carbonate solution of pH 4-8 (source phase) was simultaneously and selectively transported into a dilute sulfuric acid solution (receiving phase) through a membrane (chloroform, bulk) containing a lipophilic ion-associate of methyltrioctylammonium ion and hydroxycalix[n]arene-p-sulfonate ion, 2n (n = 6, 8), MTA+-2n, as a metal carrier. The rate of transport increased in proportion to the concentrations of UO2(2+) in the source phase and carrier in the membrane and along with an increase in the temperature of the system. The rate was also increased along with an increase in the pH of the source phase. None of the other metal ions were transported, or obstructed the transport of UO2(2+), while the presence of large amounts of sodium hydrogencarbonate and sodium chloride in the source phase interfered with the transport by causing a delay in the start of transport.

  4. Hypertension, dietary salt intake, and the role of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride transporter NCCT.

    PubMed

    Glover, Mark; Zuber, Annie Mercier; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2011-02-01

    A high salt intake in industrialized countries is an important cardiovascular risk factor. It remains at typically twice the maximum recommended levels of 5-6 g/day, and halving this would have enormous public health benefit in preventing stroke and cardiovascular disease. Salt homeostasis can also be affected pharmacologically by diuretic drugs that target mechanisms within the distal kidney nephron to cause salt wasting. Indeed, thiazide-type diuretics are among the most widely used agents in the management of hypertension and work by blocking NCCT, the NaCl-transporter in the distal nephron. The biology of this membrane transporter was not previously well understood until the discovery of the molecular basis of a rare familial form of hypertension called Gordon syndrome (pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2, PHAII). This has established that the NCCT transporter is dynamically regulated in the kidney by WNK kinases and a signaling cascade using a second kinase called SPAK. Common polymorphisms in the SPAK gene have recently been shown to affect blood pressure in human cohorts and removing its function lowers blood pressure in mice. The SPAK-deficient mouse actually has a phenotype reminiscent of Gitelman syndrome. This suggests that specific inhibitors of SPAK kinase may provide a novel class of diuretic drugs to lower blood pressure through salt wasting. The expectation is that SPAK inhibitors would mimic the on-target effects of thiazides but not their adverse off-target effects. An antihypertensive drug that could lower blood pressure with the efficacy of a thiazide without producing metabolic side effects such as hyperuricaemia or impaired glucose tolerance is therapeutically very attractive. It also exemplifies how data coming from the rare monogenic hypertension syndromes can together with genome-wide association studies in hypertension deliver novel druggable targets.

  5. Transport parameters in the human red cell membrane: solute-membrane interactions of amides and ureas.

    PubMed

    Toon, M R; Solomon, A K

    1991-04-02

    We have studied the permeability of a series of hydrophilic amides and ureas through the red cell membrane by determining the three phenomenological coefficients which describe solute-membrane interaction: the hydraulic permeability (Lp), the phenomenological permeability coefficient (omega i) and the reflection coefficient (sigma i). In 55 experiments on nine solutes, we have determined that the reflection coefficient (after a small correction for solute permeation by membrane dissolution) is significantly less than 1.0 (P less than 0.003, t-test), which provides very strong evidence that solute and water fluxes are coupled as they cross the red cell membrane. It is proposed that the aqueous channel is a tripartite assembly, comprising H-bond exchange regions at both faces of the membrane, joined by a narrower sieve-specific region which crosses the lipid. The solutes bind to the H-bond exchange regions to exchange their solvation shell with the H-bonds of the channel; the existence of these regions is confirmed by the finding that the permeation of all the amides and ureas requires binding to well-characterized sites with Km values of 0.1-0.5 M. The sieve-specific regions provide the steric restraints which govern the passage of the solutes according to their size; their existence is shown by the findings that: (1) the reflection coefficient (actually the function [1-corrected sigma i]) is linearly dependent upon the solute molecular diameter; and (2) the permeability coefficient is linearly dependent upon solute molar volume. These several observations, taken together, provide strong arguments which lead to the conclusion that the amides and urea cross the red cell membrane in an aqueous pore.

  6. Novel fluorescent core-shell nanocontainers for cell membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Yin, Meizhen; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W; Sorokina, Ksenia; Li, Chen; Mihov, George; Pietrowski, Eweline; Koynov, Kaloian; Klapper, Markus; Luhmann, Heiko J; Müllen, Klaus; Weil, Tanja

    2008-05-01

    The synthesis and characterization of novel core-shell macromolecules consisting of a fluorescent perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxdiimide chromophore in the center surrounded by a hydrophobic polyphenylene shell as a first and a flexible hydrophilic polymer shell as a second layer was presented. Following this strategy, several macromolecules bearing varying polymer chain lengths, different polymer shell densities, and increasing numbers of positive and negative charges were achieved. Because all of these macromolecules reveal a good water solubility, their ability to cross cellular membranes was investigated. In this way, a qualitative relationship between the molecular architecture of these macromolecules and the biological response was established.

  7. Carbonate and Bicarbonate Ion Transport in Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-25

    bicarbonate, membrane A. M. Kiss, T. D . Myles, K. N. Grew, A. A. Peracchio, G. J. Nelson, W. K. S. Chiu University of Connecticut - Storrs Office for...Timothy D . Myles,a Kyle N. Grew,b,∗∗ Aldo A. Peracchio,a George J. Nelson,a,∗∗ and Wilson K. S. Chiua,∗∗,z aDepartment of Mechanical Engineering...Phys., 9(12), 1479 (2007). 8. J. R. Varcoe and R. C. T. Slade, Electrochem. Comm., 8(5), 839 (2006). 9. J. R. Varcoe, R. C. T. Slade, H. Y. Lam, S. D

  8. Structure, function and binding selectivity and stereoselectivity of siderophore-iron outer membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Brillet, Karl

    2012-01-01

    To get access to iron, microorganisms produce and release into their environment small organic metal chelators called siderophores. In parallel, they produce siderophore-iron outer membrane transporters (also called TonB-Dependent Transporters or TBDT) embedded in the outer membrane; these proteins actively reabsorb the siderophore loaded with iron from the extracellular medium. This active uptake requires energy in the form of the proton motive force transferred from the inner membrane to the outer membrane transporter via the inner membrane TonB complex. Siderophores produced by microorganisms are structurally very diverse with molecular weights of 150 up to 2000Da. Siderophore-iron uptake from the extracellular medium by TBDTs is a highly selective and sometimes even stereoselective process, with each siderophore having a specific TBDT. Unlike the siderophores, all TBDTs have similar structures and belong to the outer membrane β-barrel protein superfamily. The way in which the siderophore-iron complex passes through the TBDT is still unclear. In some bacteria, TBDTs are also partners of signaling cascades regulating the expression of proteins involved in siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore-iron acquisition.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  10. Myosin 1b Regulates Amino Acid Transport by Associating Transporters with the Apical Plasma Membrane of Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Komaba, Shigeru; Coluccio, Lynne M

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATers) in the brush border of the apical plasma membrane (APM) of renal proximal tubule (PT) cells mediate amino acid transport (AAT). We found that the membrane-associated class I myosin myosin 1b (Myo1b) localized at the apical brush border membrane of PTs. In opossum kidney (OK) 3B/2 epithelial cells, which are derived from PTs, expressed rat Myo1b-GFP colocalized in patched microvilli with expressed mouse V5-tagged SIT1 (SIT1-V5), which mediates neutral amino acid transport in OK cells. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of opossum Myo1b-specific shRNA resulted in knockdown (kd) of Myo1b expression, less SIT1-V5 at the APM as determined by localization studies, and a decrease in neutral AAT as determined by radioactive uptake assays. Myo1b kd had no effect on Pi transport or noticeable change in microvilli structure as determined by rhodamine phalloidin staining. The studies are the first to define a physiological role for Myo1b, that of regulating renal AAT by modulating the association of AATers with the APM.

  11. Understanding ion and solvent transport in anion exchange membranes under humidified conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarode, Himanshu

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) have been studied for more than a decade for potential applications in low temperature fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. They offer the advantage of faster reaction kinetics under alkaline conditions and ability to perform without costly platinum catalyst. Inherently slow diffusion of hydroxide ions compared to protons is a primary reason for synthesizing and studying the ion transport properties in AEMs. The aim of this thesis is to understand ion transport in novel AEMs using Pulse Gradient stimulated Spin Echo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance technique (PGSE NMR), water uptake, ionic conductivity, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) etc. All experiments were performed under humidified conditions (80--95% relative humidity) and fuel cell operating temperatures of 30--90°C. In this work, the NMR tube design was modified for humidifying the entire NMR tube evenly from our previous design. We have developed a new protocol for replacing caustic hydroxide with harmless fluoride or bicarbonate ions for 19F and 13 C NMR diffusion experiments. After performing these NMR experiments, we have obtained in-depth understanding of the morphology linked ion transport in AEMs. We have obtained the highest fluoride self-diffusion coefficient of > 1 x 10-5 cm2/sec ( 55°C) for ETFE-g-PVBTMA membrane which is a result of low tortuosity of 1 obtained for the membrane. This faster fluoride transport combined with low tortuosity of the membrane resulted in > 100mS/cm hydroxide conductivity for the membrane. Polycyclooctene (PCOE) based triblock copolymers are also studied for in-depth understanding of molecular weight, IEC, mechanical and transport properties. Effect of melting temperature of PCOE has favorable effect on increasing ion conductivity and lowering activation energy. Mechanical properties of these types of membranes were studied showing detrimental effect of water plasticization which results in unsuitable mechanical properties

  12. Conserved tyrosine in the first transmembrane segment of solute:sodium symporters is involved in Na+-coupled substrate co-transport.

    PubMed

    Mazier, Sonia; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2011-08-19

    Solute:sodium symporters (SSSs) transport vital molecules across the plasma membrane of all living organisms. vSGLT, the Na(+)/galactose transporter of Vibrio parahemeolyticus, is the only SSS for which high resolution structural information is available, revealing a LeuT-like fold and a Na(+)-binding site analogous to the Na2 site of LeuT. Whereas the core transmembrane segments (TMs) of SSSs share high structural similarity with other transporters of LeuT-like fold, TM1 does not correspond to any TM in those structural homologs and was only resolved for the backbone atoms in the initial vSGLT structure (Protein Data Bank code 3DH4). To assess the role of TM1 in Na(+)-coupled substrate symport by the SSSs, here we have studied the role of a conserved residue in TM1 by computational modeling in conjunction with radiotracer transport and binding studies. Based on our sequence alignment and much topological data for homologous PutP, the Na(+)/proline transporter, we have simulated a series of vSGLT models with shifted TM1 residue assignments. We show that in two converged vSGLT models that retained the original TM1 backbone conformation, a conserved residue, Tyr-19, is associated with the Na(+) binding interaction network. In silico and in vitro mutagenesis of homologous Tyr-14 in PutP revealed the involvement of this conserved residue in Na(+)-dependent substrate binding and transport. Thus, our combined computational and experimental data provide the first clues about the importance of a conserved residue in TM1, a unique TM in the proteins with LeuT-like fold, in the Na(+)-coupled symport mechanism of SSSs.

  13. Solute transport on the sub 100 ms scale across the lipid bilayer membrane of individual proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Gabriel; Tabaei, Seyed R; Beech, Jason; Kvassman, Jan; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-11-21

    Screening assays designed to probe ligand and drug-candidate regulation of membrane proteins responsible for ion-translocation across the cell membrane are wide spread, while efficient means to screen membrane-protein facilitated transport of uncharged solutes are sparse. We report on a microfluidic-based system to monitor transport of uncharged solutes across the membrane of multiple (>100) individually resolved surface-immobilized liposomes. This was accomplished by rapidly switching (<10 ms) the solution above dye-containing liposomes immobilized on the floor of a microfluidic channel. With liposomes encapsulating the pH-sensitive dye carboxyfluorescein (CF), internal changes in pH induced by transport of a weak acid (acetic acid) could be measured at time scales down to 25 ms. The applicability of the set up to study biological transport reactions was demonstrated by examining the osmotic water permeability of human aquaporin (AQP5) reconstituted in proteoliposomes. In this case, the rate of osmotic-induced volume changes of individual proteoliposomes was time resolved by imaging the self quenching of encapsulated calcein in response to an osmotic gradient. Single-liposome analysis of both pure and AQP5-containing liposomes revealed a relatively large heterogeneity in osmotic permeability. Still, in the case of AQP5-containing liposomes, the single liposome data suggest that the membrane-protein incorporation efficiency depends on liposome size, with higher incorporation efficiency for larger liposomes. The benefit of low sample consumption and automated liquid handling is discussed in terms of pharmaceutical screening applications.

  14. Ion transport in complex layered graphene-based membranes with tuneable interlayer spacing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi; Jiang, Gengping; Garvey, Christopher J.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simon, George P.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Li, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the transport properties of ions confined in nanoporous carbon is generally difficult because of the stochastic nature and distribution of multiscale complex and imperfect pore structures within the bulk material. We demonstrate a combined approach of experiment and simulation to describe the structure of complex layered graphene-based membranes, which allows their use as a unique porous platform to gain unprecedented insights into nanoconfined transport phenomena across the entire sub–10-nm scales. By correlation of experimental results with simulation of concentration-driven ion diffusion through the cascading layered graphene structure with sub–10-nm tuneable interlayer spacing, we are able to construct a robust, representative structural model that allows the establishment of a quantitative relationship among the nanoconfined ion transport properties in relation to the complex nanoporous structure of the layered membrane. This correlation reveals the remarkable effect of the structural imperfections of the membranes on ion transport and particularly the scaling behaviors of both diffusive and electrokinetic ion transport in graphene-based cascading nanochannels as a function of channel size from 10 nm down to subnanometer. Our analysis shows that the range of ion transport effects previously observed in simple one-dimensional nanofluidic systems will translate themselves into bulk, complex nanoslit porous systems in a very different manner, and the complex cascading porous circuities can enable new transport phenomena that are unattainable in simple fluidic systems. PMID:26933689

  15. Ion transport in complex layered graphene-based membranes with tuneable interlayer spacing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi; Jiang, Gengping; Garvey, Christopher J; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simon, George P; Liu, Jefferson Z; Li, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Investigation of the transport properties of ions confined in nanoporous carbon is generally difficult because of the stochastic nature and distribution of multiscale complex and imperfect pore structures within the bulk material. We demonstrate a combined approach of experiment and simulation to describe the structure of complex layered graphene-based membranes, which allows their use as a unique porous platform to gain unprecedented insights into nanoconfined transport phenomena across the entire sub-10-nm scales. By correlation of experimental results with simulation of concentration-driven ion diffusion through the cascading layered graphene structure with sub-10-nm tuneable interlayer spacing, we are able to construct a robust, representative structural model that allows the establishment of a quantitative relationship among the nanoconfined ion transport properties in relation to the complex nanoporous structure of the layered membrane. This correlation reveals the remarkable effect of the structural imperfections of the membranes on ion transport and particularly the scaling behaviors of both diffusive and electrokinetic ion transport in graphene-based cascading nanochannels as a function of channel size from 10 nm down to subnanometer. Our analysis shows that the range of ion transport effects previously observed in simple one-dimensional nanofluidic systems will translate themselves into bulk, complex nanoslit porous systems in a very different manner, and the complex cascading porous circuities can enable new transport phenomena that are unattainable in simple fluidic systems.

  16. Enhanced vapor transport in membrane distillation via functionalized carbon nanotubes anchored into electrospun nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Kyoungjin An, Alicia; Lee, Eui-Jong; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Jung-Gil; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2017-01-01

    To ascertain membrane distillation (MD) as an emerging desalination technology to meet the global water challenge, development of membranes with ideal material properties is crucial. Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were anchored to nanofibres of electrospun membranes. Covalent modification and fluorination of CNTs improved their dispersibility and interfacial interaction with the polymer membrane, resulting in well-aligned CNTs inside crystalline fibres with superhydrophobicity. Consideration for the chemical/physical properties of the CNT composite membranes and calculation of their theoretical fluxes revealed the mechanism of MD: CNTs facilitated the repulsive force for Knudsen and molecular diffusions, reduced the boundary-layer effect in viscous flow, and assisted surface diffusion, allowing for fast vapor transport with anti-wetting. This study shows that the role of CNTs and an optimal composite ratio can be used to reduce the gap between theoretical and experimental approaches to desalination. PMID:28134288

  17. Enhanced vapor transport in membrane distillation via functionalized carbon nanotubes anchored into electrospun nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyoungjin An, Alicia; Lee, Eui-Jong; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Jung-Gil; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2017-01-01

    To ascertain membrane distillation (MD) as an emerging desalination technology to meet the global water challenge, development of membranes with ideal material properties is crucial. Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were anchored to nanofibres of electrospun membranes. Covalent modification and fluorination of CNTs improved their dispersibility and interfacial interaction with the polymer membrane, resulting in well-aligned CNTs inside crystalline fibres with superhydrophobicity. Consideration for the chemical/physical properties of the CNT composite membranes and calculation of their theoretical fluxes revealed the mechanism of MD: CNTs facilitated the repulsive force for Knudsen and molecular diffusions, reduced the boundary-layer effect in viscous flow, and assisted surface diffusion, allowing for fast vapor transport with anti-wetting. This study shows that the role of CNTs and an optimal composite ratio can be used to reduce the gap between theoretical and experimental approaches to desalination.

  18. Enhanced vapor transport in membrane distillation via functionalized carbon nanotubes anchored into electrospun nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Kyoungjin An, Alicia; Lee, Eui-Jong; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Jung-Gil; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2017-01-30

    To ascertain membrane distillation (MD) as an emerging desalination technology to meet the global water challenge, development of membranes with ideal material properties is crucial. Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were anchored to nanofibres of electrospun membranes. Covalent modification and fluorination of CNTs improved their dispersibility and interfacial interaction with the polymer membrane, resulting in well-aligned CNTs inside crystalline fibres with superhydrophobicity. Consideration for the chemical/physical properties of the CNT composite membranes and calculation of their theoretical fluxes revealed the mechanism of MD: CNTs facilitated the repulsive force for Knudsen and molecular diffusions, reduced the boundary-layer effect in viscous flow, and assisted surface diffusion, allowing for fast vapor transport with anti-wetting. This study shows that the role of CNTs and an optimal composite ratio can be used to reduce the gap between theoretical and experimental approaches to desalination.

  19. Membrane transporters as machines: degenerate singularities as a requirement for function.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R W; Boyd, C A R

    2005-01-21

    It is suggested that Membrane Transporter functionality is based on low energy paths between proteins of different conformations. A simple extension of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to reduce the protein structure problem to one of the kinematics of engineering mechanisms. Such low energy paths between conformations with the same handedness imply the existence of degenerate singularities in the engineering mechanism. The requirement for degeneracy leads to a number of conjectures. These include the structure and function of chaperones for constructing such proteins and the thermodynamic properties of membrane transporters.

  20. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson

    2006-04-30

    Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and NORAM are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this final quarter of the no cost extension several planar membranes of a cermet composition referred to as EC101 containing a high permeability metal and a ceramic phase were prepared and permeability testing was performed.

  1. The effects of tert-butyl hydroperoxide on human erythrocyte membrane ion transport and the protective actions of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Dwight, J F; Hendry, B M

    1996-05-30

    The oxidising actions of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) (0-3 mmol/l) on human erythrocyte membrane ion transport have been studied using measurements of 86Rb+ influx. Ouabain and bumetanide were used to distinguish Rb+ flux via the sodium pump (Na,K-ATPase), Na,K,2Cl cotransporter and through residual membrane permeability. The protective actions of antioxidants and related molecules (vitamin E, vitamin E acetate, Trolox, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and dithioerythritol (DTE) were studied. The effects of tBH were concentration dependent and the mean residual (ouabain and bumetanide insensitive) Rb+ permeability was increased by a factor of 8.5 (S.E.M. 2.2, n = 15) by a 5-min exposure to 2 mmol/l tBH. This action was almost completely prevented by co-incubation with Trolox or BHT, and partially prevented by the presence of vitamin E or DTE. Incubation with 2 mmol/l tBH for 5 min increased intracellular Na+ by a factor of 1.8 (S.E.M. 0.1, n = 8) and reduced intracellular K+ by a factor of 0.93 (S.E.M. 0.03, n = 8). These effects were prevented by Trolox and partially prevented by vitamin E, whereas DTE and vitamin E acetate were ineffective. Incubation with 2 mmol/l tBH for 5 min reduced the mean apparent sodium pump Vmax by 43% (S.E.M. 4, n = 8). This effect was completely prevented by Trolox and partially prevented by vitamin E. Vitamin E acetate had no effect. The mean bumetanide-sensitive Rb+ influx via the Na,K,2Cl cotransporter was reduced by 30% (S.E.M. 8.7, n = 25) by a 5-min exposure to 2 mmol/l tBH. This action was variable and no significant actions of the antioxidants studied could be demonstrated. This study suggests that tBH-mediated oxidative damage occurs from a hydrophilic site and involves increased non-selective membrane cation permeability and inhibition of specific transport systems.

  2. Electrochemical performance and transport properties of a Nafion membrane in a hydrogen-bromine cell environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    The overall energy conversion efficiency of a hydrogen-bromine energy storage system is highly dependent upon the characteristics and performance of the ion-exchange membrane utilized as a half-cell separator. The electrochemical performance and transport properties of a duPont Nafion membrane in an aqueous HBr-Br2 environment were investigated. Membrane conductivity data are presented as a function of HBr concentration and temperature for the determination of ohmic voltage losses across the membrane in an operational cell. Diffusion-controlled bromine permeation rates and permeabilities are presented as functions of solution composition and temperature. Relationships between the degree of membrane hydration and the membrane transport characteristics are discussed. The solution chemistry of an operational hydrogen-bromine cell undergoing charge from 45% HBr to 5% HBr is discussed, and, based upon the experimentally observed bromine permeation behavior, predicted cell coulombic losses due to bromine diffusion through the membrane are presented as a function of the cell state-of-charge.

  3. Tuning transport selectivity of ionic species by phosphoric acid gradient in positively charged nanochannel membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Fan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xizhen; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jin

    2015-02-03

    The transport of ionic species through a nanochannel plays important roles in fundamental research and practical applications of the nanofluidic device. Here, we demonstrated that ionic transport selectivity of a positively charged nanochannel membrane can be tuned under a phosphoric acid gradient. When phosphoric acid solution and analyte solution were connected by the positively charged nanochannel membrane, the faster-moving analyte through the positively charged nanochannel membrane was the positively charged dye (methylviologen, MV(2+)) instead of the negatively charged dye (1,5-naphthalene disulfonate, NDS(2-)). In other words, a reversed ion selectivity of the nanochannel membranes can be found. It can be explained as a result of the combination of diffusion, induced electroosmosis, and induced electrophoresis. In addition, the influencing factors of transport selectivity, including concentration of phosphoric acid, penetration time, and volume of feed solution, were also investigated. The results showed that the transport selectivity can further be tuned by adjusting these factors. As a method of tuning ionic transport selectivity by establishing phosphoric acid gradient, it will be conducive to improving the separation of ionic species.

  4. Sodium modulates opioid receptors through a membrane component different from G-proteins. Demonstration by target size analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, S.; Costa, T.; Herz, A.

    1988-07-25

    The target size for opioid receptor binding was studied after manipulations known to affect the interactions between receptor and GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins). Addition of GTP or its analogs to the binding reaction, exposure of intact cells to pertussis toxin prior to irradiation, or treatment of irradiated membranes with N-ethylmaleimide did not change the target size (approximately equal to 100 kDa) for opioid receptors in NG 108-15 cells and rat brain. These data suggest that the 100-kDa species does not include an active subunit of a G-protein or alternatively that GTP does not promote the dissociation of the receptor-G-protein complex. The presence of Na+ (100 mM) in the radioligand binding assay induced a biphasic decay curve for agonist binding and a flattening of the monoexponential decay curve for a partial agonist. In both cases the effect was explained by an irradiation-induced loss of the low affinity state of the opioid receptor produced by the addition of Na+. This suggests that an allosteric inhibitor that mediates the effect of sodium on the receptor is destroyed at low doses of irradiation, leaving receptors which are no longer regulated by sodium. The effect of Na+ on target size was slightly increased by the simultaneous addition of GTP but was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. Thus, the sodium unit is distinct from G-proteins and may represent a new component of the opioid receptor complex. Assuming a simple bimolecular model of one Na+ unit/receptor, the size of this inhibitor can be measured as 168 kDa.

  5. Ischemic preconditioning stimulates sodium and proton transport in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed Central