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Sample records for membrane-bound guaiacol peroxidases

  1. Phylogeny, topology, structure and functions of membrane-bound class III peroxidases in vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Lüthje, Sabine; Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Hopff, David; Möller, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are key player in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. Membrane-bound isoenzymes have been described for peroxidase superfamilies in plants and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a location of peroxidases of the secretory pathway (class III peroxidases) at the tonoplast and the plasma membrane. Proteomic approaches using highly enriched plasma membrane preparations suggest organisation of these peroxidases in microdomains, a developmentally regulation and an induction of isoenzymes by oxidative stress. Phylogenetic relations, topology, putative structures, and physiological function of membrane-bound class III peroxidases will be discussed.

  2. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  3. The role of ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polysaccharides in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots under postharvest physiological deterioration.

    PubMed

    Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Moresco, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Eder Carlos; Bouzon, Zenilda Laurita; Nunes, Eduardo da Costa; Neubert, Enilto de Oliveira; Peruch, Luiz Augusto Martins; Rocha, Miguel; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate the role of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), polysaccharides, and protein contents associated with the early events of postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) in cassava roots. Increases in APX and GPX activity, as well as total protein contents occurred from 3 to 5 days of storage and were correlated with the delay of PPD. Cassava samples stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) highlighted the presence of starch and cellulose. Degradation of starch granules during PPD was also detected. Slight metachromatic reaction with toluidine blue is indicative of increasing of acidic polysaccharides and may play an important role in PPD delay. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified samples according to their levels of enzymatic activity based on the decision tree model which showed GPX and total protein amounts to be correlated with PPD. The Oriental (ORI) cultivar was more susceptible to PPD.

  4. The rice thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase OsAPX8 functions in tolerance to bacterial blight

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guanghuai; Yin, Dedong; Zhao, Jiying; Chen, Honglin; Guo, Lequn; Zhu, Lihuang; Zhai, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) is a major H2O2-scavenging enzyme. To clarify its functions in tolerance to rice bacterial blight, we produced rice lines overexpressing and suppressing tAPX (OsAPX8). The overexpressing lines exhibited increased tolerance to bacterial pathogen. The RNA interference (RNAi) lines were considerably more sensitive than the control plant. Further analysis of the H2O2 content in these transgenic plants indicated that the H2O2 accumulation of OsAPX8-overexpressing plants was considerably less than that of wild-type and RNAi plants upon challenge with bacterial pathogen. Interestingly, H2O2 was the most important factor for the serious leaf dehydration and withering of rice without major resistance genes and was not the cause of hypersensitivity. It addition, wall tightening or loosening can occur according to the level of H2O2. In addition, OsAPX8 interacted with the susceptibility protein Os8N3/Xa13, and their binding repressed the reaction of OsAPX8 in tolerance to bacterial blight. PMID:27185545

  5. The rice thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase OsAPX8 functions in tolerance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guanghuai; Yin, Dedong; Zhao, Jiying; Chen, Honglin; Guo, Lequn; Zhu, Lihuang; Zhai, Wenxue

    2016-05-17

    Thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) is a major H2O2-scavenging enzyme. To clarify its functions in tolerance to rice bacterial blight, we produced rice lines overexpressing and suppressing tAPX (OsAPX8). The overexpressing lines exhibited increased tolerance to bacterial pathogen. The RNA interference (RNAi) lines were considerably more sensitive than the control plant. Further analysis of the H2O2 content in these transgenic plants indicated that the H2O2 accumulation of OsAPX8-overexpressing plants was considerably less than that of wild-type and RNAi plants upon challenge with bacterial pathogen. Interestingly, H2O2 was the most important factor for the serious leaf dehydration and withering of rice without major resistance genes and was not the cause of hypersensitivity. It addition, wall tightening or loosening can occur according to the level of H2O2. In addition, OsAPX8 interacted with the susceptibility protein Os8N3/Xa13, and their binding repressed the reaction of OsAPX8 in tolerance to bacterial blight.

  6. [Participation of the active oxygen forms in the induction of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase under heat hardening of wheat seedlings].

    PubMed

    Kolupaev, Iu E; Oboznyĭ, A I

    2012-01-01

    The influence of one-minute hardening heating at 42 degrees C on the dynamics of hydrogen peroxide generation and activity of antioxidant enzymes in roots of winter wheat seedlings has been investigated. It was shown that the content of hydrogen peroxide increased within the first 30 minutes after heat influence, whereupon it approached the level of control variant. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased significantly within 10 min after heating and was maintained at a high level during 24 hours of observation. The activity of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase increased after 3-6 hours after the hardening and reached its maximum after 24 hours, when there was the most significant increase in heat resistance of seedlings. The short-term increase in hydrogen peroxide content caused by hardening heating was suppressed by treatment of seedlings with H2O2 scavenger dimethylthiourea, inhibitors of NADPH-oxidase (imidazole) and SOD (sodium diethyldithiocarbamate). All these effectors levelled the increase of activity of ascorbate peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase and significantly inhibited the development of heat resistance of seedlings. The conclusion was made about the role of hydrogen peroxide produced with the participation of NADPH-oxidase and SOD in the induction of antioxidant system by heat hardening of wheat seedlings.

  7. [Effect of horse radish peroxidase immobilization on the kinetics of enzymatic oxidation of guaiacol in frozen solutions].

    PubMed

    Sergeev, G B; Gudima, A I; Sergeev, B M; Taran, A A; Batiuk, V A

    1981-06-01

    The kinetics of horse radish peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol by hydrogen peroxide has been studied within the temperature region of +20--35 degrees C. The covalent attachment of the enzyme to polyacrylamide gel had no significant influence on the activation energy of the reaction in liquid solutions. For frozen solutions it was demonstrated that the temperature dependencies of the reaction rate differ greatly for the soluble and bound forms of the enzyme. The observed phenomenon is probably due to the differences in the molecular mobility, distribution and arrangement of reactants in frozen state.

  8. ANKYRIN REPEAT-CONTAINING PROTEIN 2A is an essential molecular chaperone for peroxisomal membrane-bound ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE3 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guoxin; Kuppu, Sundaram; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Wang, Jing; Yan, Juqiang; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Hong

    2010-03-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ANKYRIN REPEAT-CONTAINING PROTEIN 2A (AKR2A) interacts with peroxisomal membrane-bound ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE3 (APX3). This interaction involves the C-terminal sequence of APX3 (i.e., a transmembrane domain plus a few basic amino acid residues). The specificity of the AKR2A-APX3 interaction suggests that AKR2A may function as a molecular chaperone for APX3 because binding of AKR2A to the transmembrane domain can prevent APX3 from forming aggregates after translation. Analysis of three akr2a mutants indicates that these mutant plants have reduced steady state levels of APX3. Reduced expression of AKR2A using RNA interference also leads to reduced steady state levels of APX3 and reduced targeting of APX3 to peroxisomes in plant cells. Since AKR2A also binds specifically to the chloroplast OUTER ENVELOPE PROTEIN7 (OEP7) and is required for the biogenesis of OEP7, AKR2A may serve as a molecular chaperone for OEP7 as well. The pleiotropic phenotype of akr2a mutants indicates that AKR2A plays many important roles in plant cellular metabolism and is essential for plant growth and development.

  9. Changes in ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-08-01

    To analyse nodular antioxidant enzyme expression in response to salt stress, Phaseolus vulgaris genotype BAT477 was inoculated with reference strain CIAT899, and treated with 50 mM NaCl. Plant growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixing activity were analysed. Results showed that: (1) all parameters, particularly in nodules, were affected by salt treatments, and (2) confirmed preferential growth allocation to roots. The ARA was significantly decreased by salt treatments. Protein dosage confirmed that nodules were more affected by salt treatment than were roots. We analysed superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase in nodules, roots and a free rhizobial strain. Our results indicated that SOD and CAT nodular isozymes had bacterial and root origins. The SOD expressed the same CuZn, Fe and Mn SOD isoforms in nodules and roots, whereas in free rhizobia we found only one Fe and Mn SOD. APX and POX nodule and root profiles had only root origins, as no rhizobial band was detected. Under salt stress, plant growth, nitrogen fixation and activities of antioxidant defense enzymes in nodules were affected. Thus, these enzymes appear to preserve symbiosis from stress turned out that NaCl salinity lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD and POX isoenzyme. So their levels in nodules appeared to be consistent with a symbiotic nitrogen fixing efficiency hypothesis, and they seem to function as the molecular mechanisms underlying the nodule response to salinity.

  10. Dependence of Guaiacol Peroxidase Activity and Lipid Peroxidation Rate in Drooping Birch (Betula pendula Roth) and Tillet (Tilia cordata Mill) Leaf on Motor Traffic Pollution Intensity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis and paradoxical effects are frequently found for different plant parameters. These phenomena were also observed for lipid peroxidation (LP) rate at environmental pollution. However, the role of antioxidant enzymes, particularly guaiacol peroxidases (GPX), in a nonmonotonic variation in the LP rate remains insufficiently explored. Therefore, dependence of GPX activity and LP rate in Betula pendula and Tilia cordata leaf on motor traffic pollution intensity was studied. Regression analysis revealed dependences of LP rate and GPX activity on traffic intensity. In B pendula, GPX activity enhanced significantly (up to 2.8 times relatively control) under increased traffic that induced biphasic paradoxical effect for LP rate. In the first phase, LP level increased in comparison with the control, and in the second phase, it was normalized by enhanced GPX activity. In T cordata, dependences of GPX activity and LP rate on traffic pollution were paradoxical effects. However, there was no connection between change of GPX activity and LP rate under middle- and high-level pollution: LP level reduced relatively the control or normalized even if GPX activity was lower than the control. This indicates that in T cordata, other regulatory mechanisms instead of GPX were activated which could control LP rate under middle- and high-level pollution. PMID:26676174

  11. Dependence of Guaiacol Peroxidase Activity and Lipid Peroxidation Rate in Drooping Birch (Betula pendula Roth) and Tillet (Tilia cordata Mill) Leaf on Motor Traffic Pollution Intensity.

    PubMed

    Erofeeva, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis and paradoxical effects are frequently found for different plant parameters. These phenomena were also observed for lipid peroxidation (LP) rate at environmental pollution. However, the role of antioxidant enzymes, particularly guaiacol peroxidases (GPX), in a nonmonotonic variation in the LP rate remains insufficiently explored. Therefore, dependence of GPX activity and LP rate in Betula pendula and Tilia cordata leaf on motor traffic pollution intensity was studied. Regression analysis revealed dependences of LP rate and GPX activity on traffic intensity. In B pendula, GPX activity enhanced significantly (up to 2.8 times relatively control) under increased traffic that induced biphasic paradoxical effect for LP rate. In the first phase, LP level increased in comparison with the control, and in the second phase, it was normalized by enhanced GPX activity. In T cordata, dependences of GPX activity and LP rate on traffic pollution were paradoxical effects. However, there was no connection between change of GPX activity and LP rate under middle- and high-level pollution: LP level reduced relatively the control or normalized even if GPX activity was lower than the control. This indicates that in T cordata, other regulatory mechanisms instead of GPX were activated which could control LP rate under middle- and high-level pollution.

  12. Structure Biology of Membrane Bound Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Dax

    2016-11-30

    The overall goal of the proposed research is to understand the membrane-associated active processes catalyzed by an alkane $\\square$-hydroxylase (AlkB) from eubacterium Pseudomonase oleovorans. AlkB performs oxygenation of unactivated hydrocarbons found in crude oils. The enzymatic reaction involves energy-demanding steps in the membrane with the uses of structurally unknown metal active sites featuring a diiron [FeFe] center. At present, a critical barrier to understanding the membrane-associated reaction mechanism is the lack of structural information. The structural biology efforts have been challenged by technical difficulties commonly encountered in crystallization and structural determination of membrane proteins. The specific aims of the current budget cycle are to crystalize AlkB and initiate X-ray analysis to set the stage for structural determination. The long-term goals of our structural biology efforts are to provide an atomic description of AlkB structure, and to uncover the mechanisms of selective modification of hydrocarbons. The structural information will help elucidating how the unactivated C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons are oxidized to initiate biodegradation and biotransformation processes. The knowledge gained will be fundamental to biotechnological applications to biofuel transformation of non-edible oil feedstock. Renewable biodiesel is a promising energy carry that can be used to reduce fossil fuel dependency. The proposed research capitalizes on prior BES-supported efforts on over-expression and purification of AlkB to explore the inner workings of a bioenergy-relevant membrane-bound enzyme.

  13. Membrane-bound mucin modular domains: from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Skrypek, Nicolas; Frénois, Frédéric; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    Mucins belong to a heterogeneous family of large O-glycoproteins composed of a long peptidic chain called apomucin on which are linked hundreds of oligosaccharidic chains. Among mucins, membrane-bound mucins are modular proteins and have a structural organization usually containing Pro/Thr/Ser-rich O-glycosylated domains (PTS), EGF-like and SEA domains. Via these modular domains, the membrane-bound mucins participate in cell signalling and cell interaction with their environment in normal and pathological conditions. Moreover, the recent knowledge of these domains and their biological activities led to the development of new therapeutic approaches involving mucins. In this review, we show 3D structures of EGF and SEA domains. We also describe the functional features of the evolutionary conserved domains of membrane-bound mucins and discuss consequences of splice events.

  14. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by fluorescamine.

    PubMed

    Jay, D; Jay, E G; Garcia, C

    1993-12-01

    Fluorescamine rapidly inactivated membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. The inhibition of the enzyme by this reagent was prevented by succinate and malonate, suggesting that the group modified by fluorescamine was located at the active site. The modification of the active site sulfhydryl group by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) did not alter the inhibitory action of fluorescamine. However, the protective effect of malonate against fluorescamine inhibition was abolished in the enzyme modified at the thiol.

  15. Microbial catabolism of vanillate: decarboxylation to guaiacol.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R L; Olson, P P

    1978-01-01

    A novel catabolic transformation of vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) by microorganisms is reported. Several strains of Bacillus megaterium and a strain of Streptomyces are shown to convert vanillate to guaiacol (o-methoxyphenol) and CO2 by nonoxidative decarboxylation. Use of a modified most-probable-number procedure shows that numerous soils contain countable numbers (10(1) to 10(2) organisms per g of dry soil) of aerobic sporeformers able to convert vanillate to guaiacol. Conversion of vanillate to guaiacol by the microfloras of most-probable-number replicates was used as the criterion for scoring replicates positive or negative. Guaiacol was detected by thin-layer chromatography. These results indicate that the classic separations of catabolic pathways leading to specific ring-fashion substrates such as protocatechuate and catechol are often interconnectable by single enzymatic transformations, usually a decarboxylation. PMID:101140

  16. Tunable Tensor Voting Improves Grouping of Membrane-Bound Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, Leandro A.; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-15

    Membrane-bound macromolecules are responsible for structural support and mediation of cell-cell adhesion in tissues. Quantitative analysis of these macromolecules provides morphological indices for damage or loss of tissue, for example as a result of exogenous stimuli. From an optical point of view, a membrane signal may have nonuniform intensity around the cell boundary, be punctate or diffused, and may even be perceptual at certain locations along the boundary. In this paper, a method for the detection and grouping of punctate, diffuse curvilinear signals is proposed. Our work builds upon the tensor voting and the iterative voting frameworks to propose an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting curvilinear structures in images. The novelty of our method lies on the idea of iteratively tuning the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. We validate the utility of our system with synthetic and annotated real data. The effectiveness of the tunable tensor voting is demonstrated on complex phenotypic signals that are representative of membrane-bound macromolecular structures.

  17. Photochemical energy conversion by membrane-bound photoredox systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tollin, G.

    1992-03-01

    Most of our effort during the past grant period has been directed towards investigating electron transfer processes involving redox proteins at lipid bilayer/aqueous interfaces. This theme, as was noted in our previous three year renewal proposal, is consistent with our goal of developing biomimetic solar energy conversion systems which utilize the unique properties of biological electron transfer molecules. Thus, small redox proteins such as cytochrome c, plastocyanin and ferredoxin function is biological photosynthesis as mediators of electron flow between the photochemical systems localized in the membrane, and more complex soluble or membrane-bound redox proteins which are designed to carry out specific biological tasks such as transbilayer proton gradient formation, dinitrogen fixation, ATP synthesis, dihydrogen synthesis, generation of strong reductants, etc. In these studies, we have utilized two principal experimental techniques, laser flash photolysis and cyclic voltammetry, both of which permit direct measurements of electron transfer processes.

  18. Reverse signaling through membrane-bound interleukin-15.

    PubMed

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Orinska, Zane; Pohl, Thomas; Borden, Ernest C; Silverman, Robert; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2004-10-01

    The results from this study implicate membrane-anchored interleukin (IL)-15 constitutively expressed on the cell surface of PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells and interferon-gamma-activated human monocytes in reverse signaling upon stimulation with soluble IL-15 receptor-alpha or anti-IL-15 antibodies, mediating the outside-to-inside signal transduction that involves the activation of members of the MAPK family (ERK and p38) and focal adhesion kinase. The presence of membrane-bound IL-15 was not dependent on the expression of the trimeric IL-15 receptor complex by these cells and resisted treatment with acidic buffer or trypsin. Reverse signaling through membrane-bound IL-15 considerably increased the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines by monocytes, such as IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, thereby indicating the relevance of this process to the complex immunomodulatory function of these cells. Furthermore, stimulation of transmembrane IL-15 also enhanced the transcription of IL-6 and IL-8 in the PC-3 cell line and promoted migration of PC-3 cells as well as LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cells stably expressing IL-15 on the cell surface. Thus, IL-15 can exist as a biologically active transmembrane molecule that possesses dual ligand-receptor qualities with a potential to induce bidirectional signaling. This fact highlights a new level of complexity in the biology of IL-15 and offers novel important insights into our understanding of the cellular responses modulated by this pleiotropic cytokine.

  19. Heterologous expression and purification of membrane-bound pyrophosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kellosalo, J; Kajander, T; Palmgren, M G; Lopéz-Marqués, R L; Goldman, A

    2011-09-01

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases) are enzymes that couple the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate to pumping of protons or sodium ions. In plants and bacteria they are important for relieving stress caused by low energy levels during anoxia, drought, nutrient deficiency, cold and low light intensity. While they are completely absent in mammalians, they are key players in the survival of disease-causing protozoans making these proteins attractive pharmacological targets. In this work, we aimed at the purification of M-PPases in amounts suitable for crystallization as a first step to obtain structural information for drug design. We have tested the expression of eight integral membrane pyrophosphatases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, six from bacterial and archaeal sources and two from protozoa. Two proteins originating from hyperthermophilic organisms were purified in dimeric and monodisperse active states. To generate M-PPases with an increased hydrophilic surface area, which potentially should facilitate formation of crystal contacts, phage T4 lysozyme was inserted into different extramembraneous loops of one of these M-PPases. Two of these fusion proteins were active and expressed at levels that would allow their purification for crystallization purposes.

  20. Membrane-bound beta-lactamase forms in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Plückthun, A; Pfitzinger, I

    1988-10-05

    Frameshift pseudo-revertants of Escherichia coli RTEM beta-lactamase were obtained by a selection procedure, starting from frameshift mutants at the signal-processing site. These pseudo-revertant proteins, which have a totally altered COOH-terminal part of the signal sequence, are attached to the outer face of the inner membrane. The mutant proteins are enzymatically active in vitro and in vivo, and the membrane localization has no deleterious effect on cell growth. We conclude that initiation of transport across the membrane does not require the COOH-terminal part of the signal, but this part of the sequence determines whether the protein is released to the periplasm either with or without cleavage of the signal, or whether the protein remains anchored to the membrane. Mutants with two signals in series were used to show that a truncated signal is not refractory to transport per se. If neither signal contains a functional cleavage site, the protein is at least partially found on the outer face of the inner membrane. If both signals contain functional cleavage sites, both are removed and the protein is released to the periplasm. If only the first signal contains a cleavage site, a longer fusion protein is transported and released. The results presented here show that a pre-beta-lactamase-like protein can fold properly even as a membrane-bound species.

  1. Meprins, membrane-bound and secreted astacin metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Sterchi, Erwin E.; Stöcker, Walter; Bond, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    The astacins are a subfamily of the metzincin superfamily of metalloproteinases. The first to be characterized was the crayfish enzyme astacin. To date more than 200 members of this family have been identified in species ranging from bacteria to humans. Astacins are involved in developmental morphogenesis, matrix assembly, tissue differentiation and digestion. Family members include the procollagen C-proteinase (BMP1, bone morphogenetic protein 1), tolloid and mammalian tolloid-like, HMP (Hydra vulgaris metalloproteinase), sea urchin BP10 (blastula protein) and SPAN (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus astacin), the ‘hatching’ subfamily comprising alveolin, ovastacin, LCE, HCE (‘low’ and ‘high’ choriolytic enzymes), nephrosin (from carp head kidney), UVS.2 from frog, and the meprins. In the human and mouse genomes, there are six astacin family genes (two meprins, three BMP1/tolloid-like, one ovastacin), but in Caenorhabditis elegans there are 40. Meprins are the only astacin proteinases that function on the membrane and extracellularly by virtue of the fact that they can be membrane-bound or secreted. They are unique in their domain structure and covalent subunit dimerization, oligomerization propensities, and expression patterns. They are normally highly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, localize to specific membranes or extracellular spaces, and can hydrolyse biologically active peptides, cytokines, extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and cell-surface proteins. The in vivo substrates of meprins are unknown, but the abundant expression of these proteinases in the epithelial cells of the intestine, kidney and skin provide clues to their functions. PMID:18783725

  2. Evidence for peroxidase activity in Caralluma umbellata.

    PubMed

    Achar, Raghu Ram; Venkatesh, B K; Sharanappa, P; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2014-08-01

    Vast applications of peroxidases create an increasing demand to characterize peroxidases from new sources with more applicability potential. The aim of the present study was to check the presence of peroxidase activity from Caralluma umbellata. This is the first report on the C. umbellata peroxidase (CUP). The presence of peroxidase was revealed by the histochemical analysis of the stem sections, zymographic studies, and in vitro peroxidase activity assay using various reducing substrates viz., 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and ferulic acid. The band pattern in zymogram confirms that CUP has a molecular weight less than that of horseradish peroxidase (44 kDa). Comparative evaluation of peroxidase activity of CUP with respect to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) indicates that CUP catalyzes ABTS and ferulic acid in a similar pattern as HRP but with guaiacol, the extent of catalysis shown by CUP over HRP is high. The standard inhibitors sodium azide and sodium meta bisulphite inhibited CUP activity in a dose dependent manner.

  3. Solvent induced conformer specific photochemistry of guaiacol.

    PubMed

    Greenough, Simon E; Horbury, Michael D; Thompson, James O F; Roberts, Gareth M; Karsili, Tolga N V; Marchetti, Barbara; Townsend, Dave; Stavros, Vasilios G

    2014-08-14

    Using a combination of ultrafast solution- and gas-phase spectroscopies, together with high-level theory calculations, we demonstrate that we are able to track conformer-specific photodissociation dynamics in solution through solvent choice. We reveal this phenomenon in guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a key subunit of the natural biopolymer lignin. In cyclohexane, the first electronically excited (1)ππ* (S1) state in guaiacol relaxes with a time-constant of τ = 4.5 ± 0.2 ns, mediated through intersystem crossing to lower lying triplet (Tn) states and internal conversion and fluorescence back to the ground state (S0). In contrast, in methanol, a further relaxation channel is also present; the S1 state relaxes with a time-constant of τ = 2.9 ± 0.1 ns, which is now additionally mediated through coupling onto a dissociative (1)πσ* (S2) state and subsequent O-H bond fission, evidenced through the appearance of a spectral signature for the guaiacoxyl radical after ∼250 ps. With the aid of complementary calculations, we attribute this to the now absent intramolecular H-bond between OH and OMe moieties, which now favours intermolecular H-bonding to methanol, lowering the barrier to O-H dissociation and facilitating H-atom loss via tunnelling.

  4. Configuration of membrane-bound proteins by x-ray reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiu-Hao; Málková, Šárka; Cho, Wonhwa; Schlossman, Mark L.

    2011-11-01

    In this presentation we review our recent work using x-ray reflectivity to determine the configuration of membrane-bound proteins. The reflectivity data is analyzed in terms of the known crystallographic structure of proteins and a slab model representing the lipid layer to yield an electron density profile of the lipid/protein system. Our recent modified analysis methodology for the lipid/protein system is concisely described in this report. In addition, some results of the configuration of the membrane-bound proteins cPLA2α-C2, p40phox-PX, and PKCα-C2 are highlighted.

  5. Oxidation of guaiacol by myeloperoxidase: a two-electron-oxidized guaiacol transient species as a mediator of NADPH oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Capeillère-Blandin, C

    1998-01-01

    The present study was first aimed at a complete steady-state kinetic analysis of the reaction between guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H2O2 system, including a description of the isolation and purification of MPO from human polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells. Secondly, the overall reaction of the oxidation of NADPH, mediated by the reactive intermediates formed from the oxidation of guaiacol in the MPO/H2O2 system, was analysed kinetically. The presence of guaiacol stimulates the oxidation of NADPH by the MPO/H2O2 system in a concentration-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the accumulation of biphenoquinone (BQ), the final steady-state product of guaiacol oxidation, is lowered, and even inhibited completely, at high concentrations of NADPH. Under these conditions, the stoichiometry of NADPH:H2O2 is 1, and the oxidation rate of NADPH approximates to that of the rate of guaiacol oxidation by MPO. The effects of the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase and of anaerobic conditions on the overall oxidation of NADPH have also been examined, and the data indicated that superoxide formation did not occur. The final product of NADPH oxidation was shown to be enzymically active NADP+, while guaiacol was generated continuously from the reaction between NADPH and oxidized guaiacol product. In contrast, similar experiments performed on the indirect, tyrosine-mediated oxidation of NADPH by MPO showed that a propagation of the free radical chain was occurring, with generation of both O2(-.) and H2O2. BQ, in itself, was able to spontaneously oxidize NADPH, but neither the rate nor the stoichiometry of the reaction could account for the NADPH-oxidation process involved in the steady-state peroxidation cycle. These results provide evidence that the oxidation of NADPH does not involve a free nucleotide radical intermediate, but that this is probably due to a direct electron-transfer reaction between NADPH and a two-electron-oxidized guaiacol intermediate

  6. Copper(II) enhances membrane-bound α-synuclein helix formation.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Heather R; Lee, Jennifer C

    2011-03-01

    Interactions of copper and membranes with α-synuclein have been implicated in pathogenic mechanisms of Parkinson's disease, yet work examining both concurrently is scarce. We have examined the effect of copper(ii) on protein/vesicle binding and found that both the copper(ii) affinity and α-helical content are enhanced for the membrane-bound protein.

  7. Steric Pressure among Membrane-Bound Polymers Opposes Lipid Phase Separation.

    PubMed

    Imam, Zachary I; Kenyon, Laura E; Carrillo, Adelita; Espinoza, Isai; Nagib, Fatema; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-04-19

    Lipid rafts are thought to be key organizers of membrane-protein complexes in cells. Many proteins that interact with rafts have bulky polymeric components such as intrinsically disordered protein domains and polysaccharide chains. Therefore, understanding the interaction between membrane domains and membrane-bound polymers provides insights into the roles rafts play in cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that high concentrations of membrane-bound polymeric domains create significant lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces. Furthermore, our recent work has shown that lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces opposes the assembly of membrane domains. Building on these findings, here we report that membrane-bound polymers are potent suppressors of membrane phase separation, which can destabilize lipid domains with substantially greater efficiency than globular domains such as membrane-bound proteins. Specifically, we created giant vesicles with a ternary lipid composition, which separated into coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases. Lipids with saturated tails and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains conjugated to their head groups were included at increasing molar concentrations. When these lipids were sparse on the membrane surface they partitioned to the liquid ordered phase. However, as they became more concentrated, the fraction of GUVs that were phase-separated decreased dramatically, ultimately yielding a population of homogeneous membrane vesicles. Experiments and physical modeling using compositions of increasing PEG molecular weight and lipid miscibility phase transition temperature demonstrate that longer polymers are the most efficient suppressors of membrane phase separation when the energetic barrier to lipid mixing is low. In contrast, as the miscibility transition temperature increases, longer polymers are more readily driven out of domains by the increased steric pressure. Therefore, the concentration of shorter polymers required

  8. [Membrane-bound proteases involved in neuropeptide degradation in the brain].

    PubMed

    Yokosawa, H

    1993-07-01

    The action of neuropeptides at the synapse is terminated through enzymatic degradation by membrane-bound proteases. We defined and purified membrane-bound proteases functioning at the initial stage of degradation of four neuropeptides. 1. Substance P-degrading endopeptidases isolated from the rat brain and pig striatum showed similar properties to those of endopeptidase-24.16 (neurolysin) except for cleavage sites of substance P. 2. LHRH fragment (1-5)-generating endopeptidases isolated from the neuroblastoma cells and rat brain showed similar properties to those of endopeptidase-24.15 (thimet oligopeptidase). 3. One of two dynorphin-degrading cysteine proteases isolated from neuroblastoma cells showed strict specificity toward the Arg-Arg residues. 4. Endopeptidase-24.11 (neprilysin) isolated from the rat brain was identified as a somatostatin-degrading enzyme.

  9. Denitrification by plant roots? New aspects of plant plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Eick, Manuela; Stöhr, Christine

    2012-10-01

    A specific form of plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase in plants is restricted to roots. Two peptides originated from plasma membrane integral proteins isolated from Hordeum vulgare have been assigned as homologues to the subunit NarH of respiratory nitrate reductase of Escherichia coli. Corresponding sequences have been detected for predicted proteins of Populus trichocarpa with high degree of identities for the subunits NarH (75%) and NarG (65%), however, with less accordance for the subunit NarI. These findings coincide with biochemical properties, particularly in regard to the electron donors menadione and succinate. Together with the root-specific and plasma membrane-bound nitrite/NO reductase, nitric oxide is produced under hypoxic conditions in the presence of nitrate. In this context, a possible function in nitrate respiration of plant roots and an involvement of plants in denitrification processes are discussed.

  10. From 'I' to 'L' and back again: the odyssey of membrane-bound M13 protein.

    PubMed

    Vos, Werner L; Nazarov, Petr V; Koehorst, Rob B M; Spruijt, Ruud B; Hemminga, Marcus A

    2009-05-01

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a surprising protein because it exists both as a membrane protein and as part of the M13 phage coat during its life cycle. Early studies showed that the phage-bound structure of the coat protein was a continuous I-shaped alpha-helix. However, throughout the years various structural models, both I-shaped and L-shaped, have been proposed for the membrane-bound state of the coat protein. Recently, site-directed labelling approaches have enabled the study of the coat protein under conditions that more closely mimic the in vivo membrane-bound state. Interestingly, the structure that has emerged from this work is I-shaped and similar to the structure in the phage-bound state.

  11. Biochemical and molecular characterization of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase in Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2016-05-01

    The two predominant forms of arginase, cytosolic Arginase-I and mitochondrial Arginase-II, catalyze hydrolysis of arginine into ornithine and urea. Based on presence of arginase activity in extracts using potassium chloride (KCl), mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been suggested. However, the activity of arginase in fractions obtained after KCl-treatment may be either due to leakage of mitochondrial arginase or release of adhered cytosolic arginase to cell organelles having altered net charge. Therefore, it has been intended to analyse impact of KCl on ultra-structural properties of mitochondria, and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins and arginase of Heteropneustes fossilis. Liver of H. fossilis was used for isolating mitochondria for analysis of ultrastructural properties, preparing cytosolic, mitochondrial, and mitochondrial-membrane bound extracts after treatment of KCl. Extracts were analysed for arginase activity assay, protein profiling through SDS-PAGE and MALDI MS/MS. The KCl-mediated modulation in polypeptides and arginase were also evaluated by PANTHER, MitoProt and IPSORT servers. The effects of KCl on ultra-structural integrity of mitochondria, activity of arginase, modulation on mitochondrial proteins and enzymes including arginase were observed. The 48 kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial fraction, that showed KCl-dependent alteration matched with Myb binding protein and 30 kDa bands resembles to arginase after MALDI MS/MS analysis. Results indicate KCl-dependent ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and release of mitochondrial arginase. The proposed membrane bound mitochondrial arginase could be mitochondrial arginase-II or altered form of cytosolic arginase-I contributing to KCl-induced arginase activity in H. fossilis.

  12. Synthetic activity enhancement of membrane-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis by pretreatment with isooctane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Xu, Yan; Teng, Yun

    2007-05-01

    The cell-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 with high catalysis ability for ester synthesis was located as a membrane-bound lipase by the treatments of Yatalase firstly. In order to improve its synthetic activity in non-aqueous phase, the pretreatments of this enzyme with various organic solvents were investigated. The pretreatment with isooctane improved evidently the lipase synthetic activity, resulting in about 139% in relative synthetic activity and 115% in activity recovery. The morphological changes of mycelia caused by organic solvent pretreatments could influence the exposure of the membrane-bound enzyme from mycelia and the exhibition of the lipase activity. The pretreatment conditions with isooctane and acetone were further investigated, and the optimum effect was obtained by the isooctane pretreatment at 4 degrees C for 1 h, resulting in 156% in relative synthetic activity and 126% in activity recovery. When the pretreated lipases were employed as catalysts for the esterification production of ethyl hexanoate in heptane, higher initial reaction rate and higher final molar conversion were obtained using the lipase pretreated with isooctane, compared with the untreated lyophilized one. This result suggested that the pretreatment of the membrane-bound lipase with isooctane could be an effective method to substitute the lyophilization for preparing biocatalysts used in non-aqueous phase reactions.

  13. Membrane bound IL-15 is increased on CD14 monocytes in early stages of MS.

    PubMed

    Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Brass, Steven D; Brass, Steven; Gandhi, Roopali; Weiner, Howard L

    2008-03-01

    IL-15 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine whose three-dimensional structure is similar to that of IL-2. IL-2 and IL-15 have similar as well as distinct biological functions. An active form of IL-15 that is membrane bound has also been described. Furthermore, IL-15 is known to play a role in autoimmune diseases. We thus investigated the expression of membrane bound IL-15 on monocytes (CD14+ cells) and studied its effect on T cell activation in MS patients. We found that unstimulated CD14+ cells from relapsing remitting MS patients had increased membrane bound IL-15. Those with high surface levels of IL-15 on monocytes were in the early stages of the disease. In addition, we found that T cells of MS patients had enhanced responsiveness to IL-15 and there was increased expression of IL-15 receptor on CD4+ T cells. Thus, IL-15 may be an important cytokine that drives Th1 responses early in the course of the disease and could serve as a target for immunotherapy and as an early marker in the immunologic staging of MS.

  14. Effects of preservatives on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris growth and guaiacol production.

    PubMed

    Cai, Rui; Yuan, Yahong; Wang, Zhouli; Guo, Chunfeng; Liu, Bin; Pan, Chunqing; Liu, Laping; Yue, Tianli

    2015-12-02

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris can survive the pasteurization process, multiply in pasteurized juices and produce guaiacol which causes medicinal or antiseptic off-flavors. Chemical preservatives have the potential to suppress outgrowth of surviving populations during subsequent storage of fruit juices. In the present study, the individual effects of potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, potassium metabisulfite, dehydroacetic acid, ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, cinnamic acid and ε-polylysine on A. acidoterrestris growth and guaiacol production were firstly evaluated in a laboratory medium. Of the seven preservatives investigated, only dehydroacetic acid, cinnamic acid and ε-polylysine were effective both in controlling growth and guaiacol formation by A. acidoterrestris. Then, these three antimicrobials were applied to apple juice. Through the addition of 270 mg/L dehydroacetic acid, 108 mg/L cinnamic acid or 100 mg/L ε-polylysine, the A. acidoterrestris counts were reduced by 3.43, 3.17 and 4.78 log colony forming unit(CFU)/mL, respectively, and no guaiacol was detected after 14 days of storage. Sensory evaluation revealed that the addition of these three preservatives did not affect the organoleptic properties of the apple juice. Results obtained in this paper could be very useful for a better control of A. acidoterrestris-related spoilage in the fruit juice/beverage industry.

  15. Membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase from ectopic mineralization and rat bone marrow cell culture.

    PubMed

    Simão, Ana Maria S; Beloti, Márcio M; Cezarino, Rodrigo M; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Pizauro, João M; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2007-04-01

    Cells from rat bone marrow exhibit the proliferation-differentiation sequence of osteoblasts, form mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro and release alkaline phosphatase into the medium. Membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase was obtained by method that is easy to reproduce, simpler and fast when compared with the method used to obtain the enzyme from rat osseous plate. The membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase from cultures of rat bone marrow cells has a MW(r) of about 120 kDa and specific PNPP activity of 1200 U/mg. The ecto-enzyme is anchored to the plasma membrane by the GPI anchor and can be released by PIPLC (selective treatment) or polidocanol (0.2 mg/mL protein and 1% (w/v) detergent). The apparent optimum pH for PNPP hydrolysis by the enzyme was pH 10. This fraction hydrolyzes ATP (240 U/mg), ADP (350 U/mg), glucose 1-phosphate (1100 U/mg), glucose 6-phosphate (340 U/mg), fructose 6-phosphate (460 U/mg), pyrophosphate (330 U/mg) and beta-glycerophosphate (600 U/mg). Cooperative effects were observed for the hydrolysis of PPi and beta-glycerophosphate. PNPPase activity was inhibited by 0.1 mM vanadate (46%), 0.1 mM ZnCl2 (68%), 1 mM levamisole (66%), 1 mM arsenate (44%), 10 mM phosphate (21%) and 1 mM theophylline (72%). We report the biochemical characterization of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase obtained from rat bone marrow cells cultures, using a method that is simple, rapid and easy to reproduce. Its properties are compared with those of rat osseous plate enzyme and revealed that the alkaline phosphatase obtained has some kinetics and structural behaviors with higher levels of enzymatic activity, facilitating the comprehension of the mineralization process and its function.

  16. A Multiscale Approach to Modelling Drug Metabolism by Membrane-Bound Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Mark S. P.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are found in all life forms. P450s play an important role in drug metabolism, and have potential uses as biocatalysts. Human P450s are membrane-bound proteins. However, the interactions between P450s and their membrane environment are not well-understood. To date, all P450 crystal structures have been obtained from engineered proteins, from which the transmembrane helix was absent. A significant number of computational studies have been performed on P450s, but the majority of these have been performed on the solubilised forms of P450s. Here we present a multiscale approach for modelling P450s, spanning from coarse-grained and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to reaction modelling using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. To our knowledge, this is the first application of such an integrated multiscale approach to modelling of a membrane-bound enzyme. We have applied this protocol to a key human P450 involved in drug metabolism: CYP3A4. A biologically realistic model of CYP3A4, complete with its transmembrane helix and a membrane, has been constructed and characterised. The dynamics of this complex have been studied, and the oxidation of the anticoagulant R-warfarin has been modelled in the active site. Calculations have also been performed on the soluble form of the enzyme in aqueous solution. Important differences are observed between the membrane and solution systems, most notably for the gating residues and channels that control access to the active site. The protocol that we describe here is applicable to other membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:25033460

  17. Coordination of copper to the membrane-bound form of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Dudzik, Christopher G; Walter, Eric D; Abrams, Benjamin S; Jurica, Melissa S; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2013-01-08

    Aggregation of the 140-amino acid protein α-synuclein (α-syn) is linked to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). α-Syn is a copper binding protein with potential function as a regulator of metal-dependent redox activity. Epidemiological studies suggest that human exposure to excess copper increases the incidence of PD. α-Syn exists in both solution and membrane-bound forms. Previous work evaluated the Cu(2+) uptake for α-syn in solution and identified Met1-Asp2 and His50 as primary contributors to the coordination shell, with a dissociation constant of approximately 0.1 nM. When bound to the membrane bilayer, α-syn takes on a predominantly helical conformation, which spatially separates His50 from the N-terminus of the protein and is therefore incompatible with the copper coordination geometry of the solution state. Here we use circular dichroism and electron paramagnetic resonance (continuous wave and pulsed) to evaluate the coordination of copper to the membrane-bound form of α-syn. In this molecular environment, Cu(2+) binds exclusively to the N-terminus of the protein (Met1-Asp2) with no participation from His50. Copper does not alter the membrane-bound α-syn conformation or enhance the release of the protein from the bilayer. The Cu(2+) affinity is similar to that identified for solution α-syn, suggesting that copper coordination is retained in the membrane. Consideration of these results demonstrates that copper exerts its greatest conformational effect on the solution form of α-syn.

  18. Ionization, partitioning, and dynamics of tryptophan octyl ester: implications for membrane-bound tryptophan residues.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, A; Mukherjee, S; Rukmini, R; Rawat, S S; Sudha, S

    1997-01-01

    The presence of tryptophan residues as intrinsic fluorophores in most proteins makes them an obvious choice for fluorescence spectroscopic analyses of such proteins. Membrane proteins have been reported to have a significantly higher tryptophan content than soluble proteins. The role of tryptophan residues in the structure and function of membrane proteins has attracted a lot of attention. Tryptophan residues in membrane proteins and peptides are believed to be distributed asymmetrically toward the interfacial region. Tryptophan octyl ester (TOE) is an important model for membrane-bound tryptophan residues. We have characterized this molecule as a fluorescent membrane probe in terms of its ionization, partitioning, and motional characteristics in unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. The ionization property of this molecule in model membranes has been studied by utilizing its pH-dependent fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of pH-dependent fluorescence intensity and emission maximum shows that deprotonation of the alpha-amino group of TOE occurs with an apparent pKa of approximately 7.5 in the membrane. The fluorescence lifetime of membrane-bound TOE also shows pH dependence. The fluorescence lifetimes of TOE have been interpreted by using the rotamer model for the fluorescence decay of tryptophan. Membrane/water partition coefficients of TOE were measured in both its protonated and deprotonated forms. No appreciable difference was found in its partitioning behavior with ionization. Analysis of fluorescence polarization of TOE as a function of pH showed that there is a decrease in polarization with increasing pH, implying more rotational freedom on deprotonation. This is further supported by pH-dependent red edge excitation shift and the apparent rotational correlation time of membrane-bound TOE. TOE should prove useful in monitoring the organization and dynamics of tryptophan residues incorporated into membranes. PMID:9251800

  19. Coordination of Copper to the Membrane-Bound Form of α-Synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, Christopher G.; Walter, Eric D.; Abrams, Benjamin S.; Jurica, Melissa S.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation of the 140 amino acid protein α-synuclein (α-syn) is linked to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). α-Syn is a copper binding protein with potential function as a regulator of metal dependent redox activity. Epidemiological studies suggest that human exposure to excess copper increases the incidence of PD. α-Syn exists in both solution and membrane bound forms. Previous work evaluated the Cu2+ uptake for α-syn in solution and identified Met1-Asp2 and His50 as primary contributors to the coordination shell, with a dissociation constant of approximately 0.1 nM. When bound to the membrane bilayer, α-syn takes on a predominantly helical conformation, which spatially separates His50 from the protein N-terminus and is therefore incompatible with the copper coordination geometry of the solution state. Here we use circular dichroism and electron paramagnetic resonance (continuous wave and pulsed) to evaluate copper coordination to the membrane bound form of α-syn. In this molecular environment, Cu2+ binds exclusively to the protein N-terminus (Met1-Asp2) with no participation from His50. Copper does not alter the membrane bound α-syn conformation, or enhance the protein's release from the bilayer. The Cu2+ affinity is similar to that identified for solution α-syn suggesting that copper coordination is retained in the membrane. Consideration of these results suggests that copper exerts its greatest conformational affect on the solution form of α-syn and this species may therefore be precursor to PD arising from environmental copper exposure.

  20. Study of the interaction of cadmium with membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Jay, D; Zamorano, R; Muñoz, E; Gleason, R; Boldu, J L

    1991-04-01

    Cadmium ions inhibit membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase with a second-order rate constant of 10.42 mM-1 s-1 at pH 7.35 and 25 degrees C. Succinate and malonate protect the enzyme against cadmium ion inhibition. The protection pattern exerted by succinate and malonate suggests that the group modified by cadmium is located at the active site. The pH curve of inactivation by Cd2+ indicates the involvement of an amino acid residue with pKa of 7.23.

  1. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  2. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu )

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  3. Purification and characterization of the membrane-bound quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL 5.

    PubMed

    Sará-Páez, Martin; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; González-Valdez, Alejandra Abigail; Gasca-Licea, Rolando; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Escamilla, José Edgardo; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria oxidize a great number of substrates, such as alcohols and sugars, using different enzymes that are anchored to the membrane. In particular, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is distinguished for its N2-fixing activity under high-aeration conditions. Ga. diazotrophicus is a true endophyte that also has membrane-bound enzymes to oxidize sugars and alcohols. Here we reported the purification and characterization of the membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase (GDHm), an oxidoreductase of Ga. diazotrophicus. GDHm was solubilized and purified by chromatographic methods. Purified GDHm was monomeric, with a molecular mass of 86 kDa. We identified the prosthetic group as pyrroloquinoline quinone, whose redox state was reduced. GDHm showed an optimum pH of 7.2, and its isoelectric point was 6.0. This enzyme preferentially oxidized D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, D-galactose and D-xylose; its affinity towards glucose was ten times greater than that of E. coli GDHm. Finally, Ga. diazotrophicus GDHm was capable of reducing quinones such as Q 1, Q 2, and decylubiquinone; this activity was entirely abolished in the presence of micromolar concentrations of the inhibitor, myxothiazol. Hence, our purification method yielded a highly purified GDHm whose molecular and kinetic parameters were determined. The possible implications of GDHm activity in the mechanism for reducing competitor microorganisms, as well as its participation in the respiratory system of Ga. diazotrophicus, are discussed.

  4. Nucleotide specificity for the bidirectional transport of membrane-bounded organelles in isolated axoplasm.

    PubMed

    Leopold, P L; Snyder, R; Bloom, G S; Brady, S T

    1990-01-01

    Video microscopy of isolated axoplasm from the squid giant axon permits correlated quantitative analyses of membrane-bounded organelle transport both in the intact axoplasm and along individual microtubules. As a result, the effects of experimental manipulations on both anterograde and retrograde movements of membrane-bounded organelles can be evaluated under nearly physiological conditions. Since anterograde and retrograde fast axonal transport are similar but distinct cellular processes, a systematic biochemical analysis is important for a further understanding of the molecular mechanisms for each. In this series of experiments, we employed isolated axoplasm of the squid to define the nucleoside triphosphate specificity for bidirectional organelle motility in the axon. Perfusion of axoplasm with 2-20 mM ATP preserved optimal vesicle velocities in both the anterograde and retrograde directions. Organelle velocities decreased to less than 50% of optimal values when the axoplasm was perfused with 10-20 mM UTP, GTP, ITP, or CTP with simultaneous depletion of endogenous ATP with hexokinase. Under the same conditions, TTP and ATP-gamma-S were unable to support significant levels of transport. None of the NTPs tested had a differential effect on anterograde vs. retrograde movement of vesicles. Surprisingly, several inconsistencies were revealed when a comparison was made between these results and nucleoside triphosphate specificities that have been reported for putative organelle motors by using in vitro assays. These data may be used in conjunction with data from well-defined in vitro assays to develop models for the molecular mechanisms of axonal transport.

  5. Membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase and inhibits enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Thai Leong; Velayati, Arash; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in GBA, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, the lysosomal enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease increase the risk for developing Parkinson disease. Recent research suggests a relationship between glucocerebrosidase and the Parkinson disease-related amyloid-forming protein, α-synuclein; however, the specific molecular mechanisms responsible for association remain elusive. Previously, we showed that α-synuclein and glucocerebrosidase interact selectively under lysosomal conditions, and proposed that this newly identified interaction might influence cellular levels of α-synuclein by either promoting protein degradation and/or preventing aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase, and that this complex formation inhibits enzyme function. Using site-specific fluorescence and Förster energy transfer probes, we mapped the protein-enzyme interacting regions on unilamellar vesicles. Our data suggest that on the membrane surface, the glucocerebrosidase-α-synuclein interaction involves a larger α-synuclein region compared to that found in solution. In addition, α-synuclein acts as a mixed inhibitor with an apparent IC50 in the submicromolar range. Importantly, the membrane-bound, α-helical form of α-synuclein is necessary for inhibition. This glucocerebrosidase interaction and inhibition likely contribute to the mechanism underlying GBA-associated parkinsonism. PMID:23266198

  6. Biochemical similarities between soluble and membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinases of barley

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczak, L.J.; Hind, G. )

    1990-04-01

    The soluble and membrane-bound forms of the calcium-dependent protein kinase from barley leaves (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Borsoy) have been partially purified and compared. Both forms showed an active polypeptide of 37 kilodaltons on activity gels with incorporated histone as substrate. They eluted from chromatofocusing columns at an identical isoelectric point of pH 4.25 {plus minus} 0.2, and also comigrated on several other chromatographic affinity media including Matrex Gel Blue A, histone-agarose, phenyl-Sepharose, and heparin-agarose. Both activities comigrated with chicken ovalbumin during gel filtration through Sephacryl S-200, indicating a native molecular mass of 45 kilodaltons. The activities share a number of enzymatic properties including salt and pH dependence, free calcium stimulation profile, substrate specificity, and Km values. The soluble activity was shown to bind to artificial lipid vesicles. These data suggest strongly that the soluble and membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinases from barley are very closely related or even identical.

  7. Membrane-Bound ATPase Contributes to Hop Resistance of Lactobacillus brevis

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kanta; van Veen, H. W.; Saito, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Konings, Wil N.

    2002-01-01

    The activity of the membrane-bound H+-ATPase of the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus brevis ABBC45 increased upon adaptation to bacteriostatic hop compounds. The ATPase activity was optimal around pH 5.6 and increased up to fourfold when L. brevis was exposed to 666 μM hop compounds. The extent of activation depended on the concentration of hop compounds and was maximal at the highest concentration tested. The ATPase activity was strongly inhibited by N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a known inhibitor of FoF1-ATPase. Western blots of membrane proteins of L. brevis with antisera raised against the α- and β-subunits of FoF1-ATPase from Enterococcus hirae showed that there was increased expression of the ATPase after hop adaptation. The expression levels, as well as the ATPase activity, decreased to the initial nonadapted levels when the hop-adapted cells were cultured further without hop compounds. These observations strongly indicate that proton pumping by the membrane-bound ATPase contributes considerably to the resistance of L. brevis to hop compounds. PMID:12406727

  8. Membrane-bound ATPase contributes to hop resistance of Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kanta; Van Veen, H W; Saito, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Konings, Wil N

    2002-11-01

    The activity of the membrane-bound H+-ATPase of the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus brevis ABBC45 increased upon adaptation to bacteriostatic hop compounds. The ATPase activity was optimal around pH 5.6 and increased up to fourfold when L. brevis was exposed to 666 microM hop compounds. The extent of activation depended on the concentration of hop compounds and was maximal at the highest concentration tested. The ATPase activity was strongly inhibited by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a known inhibitor of FoF1-ATPase. Western blots of membrane proteins of L. brevis with antisera raised against the alpha- and beta-subunits of FoF1-ATPase from Enterococcus hirae showed that there was increased expression of the ATPase after hop adaptation. The expression levels, as well as the ATPase activity, decreased to the initial nonadapted levels when the hop-adapted cells were cultured further without hop compounds. These observations strongly indicate that proton pumping by the membrane-bound ATPase contributes considerably to the resistance of L. brevis to hop compounds.

  9. SEC-MALLS ANALYSIS OF HYALURONAN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS MADE BY MEMBRANE-BOUND HYALURONAN SYNTHASE

    PubMed Central

    Baggenstoss, Bruce A.; Weigel, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    SEC-MALLS analyses of E. coli membranes expressing Streptococcus equisimilis hyaluronan synthase (seHAS) demonstrated an inherent artifact (10–100 MDa) that co-eluted with HA, and skewed the apparent weight-average mass of HA to erroneously high values. Briefly heating samples to 65–75°C eliminated this artifact and increased the yield of recovered HA, due to the release of HA chains that were attached to membrane-bound HAS. Inclusion of alkaline phosphatase, which removed UDP produced during the reaction, improved the linearity of HA synthesis - even at high substrate utilization. Surprisingly, addition of EDTA, to chelate Mg+2 ions, did not completely stop the HAS reaction at 30°C or at 4°C. The best conditions for stopping the reaction without altering SEC-MALLS profiles of the product HA were to chill samples on ice in the presence of both EDTA and UDP. Even with excess substrate, the maximum size of product HA decreased as the enzyme concentration increased. Therefore, the maximum HA size made by HAS was determined by extrapolation to zero enzyme concentration. Using the above conditions, membrane-bound seHAS synthesized a cohort of HA products that steadily increased in weight-average molar mass, reaching a final maximal steady-state size of 4–6 MDa within 2–4 hours. PMID:16476403

  10. Purification and characterization of a membrane-bound sialidase from pig liver.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Ito, M; Ikeda, K; Tanaka, K; Saito, M

    2000-04-01

    A membrane-bound sialidase in pig liver microsomes was solubilized with a nonionic detergent, IGEPAL CA630, and purified to homogeneity by sequential chromatographies on SP-Toyopearl, Butyl-Toyopearl (1st), SuperQ-Toyopearl, Hydroxyapatite, Butyl-Toyopearl (2nd), GM1-Cellulofine affinity, and sialic acid-Cellulofine affinity columns. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 57 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The pH optimum was 4.8 for the activity measured using 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4MU-Neu5Ac) as the substrate. The enzyme activity was inhibited by 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid, iodoacetamide and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid. While the enzyme could effectively hydrolyze 4MU-Neu5Ac, it failed to significantly cleave a sialic acid residue(s) from sialyllactose, glycoproteins or gangliosides at pH 4.8. These results suggest that the purified enzyme is a novel sialidase with a substrate specificity distinct from those of known membrane-bound sialidases in mammalian tissues.

  11. Interaction of the membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase with substrate and competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, A B; Vinogradov, A D

    1984-01-18

    The protective effect of dicarboxylates on the active-site-directed inhibition of the membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by N-ethylmaleimide, steady-state kinetics methods for Ki and Ks determinations, and equilibrium studies were employed to quantitate the relative affinities of succinate, fumarate, malonate and oxaloacetate to the reduced and oxidized species of the enzyme. A more than 10-fold difference in the relative affinities of the reduced and oxidized succinate dehydrogenase to succinate, fumarate and oxaloacetate is found, whereas the reactivity of the active-site sulphydryl group does not depend on the redox state of the enzyme. The redox-state-dependent changes in the affinity of the membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase to oxaloacetate can be quantitatively accounted for by a 10-fold increase in the rate of dissociation of the enzyme-inhibitor complex which occurs upon reduction of the enzyme. The data obtained give no support for either the existence of a sulphydryl group other than the active-site one important for the catalysis or for the presence of a separate dicarboxylate-specific regulatory site in the succinate dehydrogenase molecule.

  12. Membrane-bound amylopullulanase is essential for starch metabolism of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM639.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Cha, Jaeho

    2015-09-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM639 produced an acid-resistant membrane-bound amylopullulanase (Apu) during growth on starch as a sole carbon and energy source. The physiological role of Apu in starch metabolism was investigated by the growth and starch degradation pattern of apu disruption mutant as well as biochemical properties of recombinant Apu. The Δapu mutant lost the ability to grow in minimal medium in the presence of starch, and the amylolytic activity observed in the membrane fraction of the wild-type strain was not detected in the Δapu mutant when the cells were grown in YT medium. The purified membrane-bound Apu initially hydrolyzed starch, amylopectin, and pullulan into various sizes of maltooligosaccharides, and then produced glucose, maltose, and maltotriose in the end, indicating Apu is a typical endo-acting glycoside hydrolase family 57 (GH57) amylopullulanase. The maltose and maltotriose observed in the culture medium during the exponential and stationary phase growth indicates that Apu is the essential enzyme to initially hydrolyze the starch into small maltooligosaccharides to be transported into the cell.

  13. Coupled Segmentation of Nuclear and Membrane-bound Macromolecules through Voting and Multiphase Level Set.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hang; Wen, Quan; Parvin, Bahram

    2015-03-01

    Membrane-bound macromolecules play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication, and is regulated by almost one-third of the genome. At the optical scale, one group of membrane proteins expresses themselves as linear structures along the cell surface boundaries, while others are sequestered; and this paper targets the former group. Segmentation of these membrane proteins on a cell-by-cell basis enables the quantitative assessment of localization for comparative analysis. However, such membrane proteins typically lack continuity, and their intensity distributions are often very heterogeneous; moreover, nuclei can form large clump, which further impedes the quantification of membrane signals on a cell-by-cell basis. To tackle these problems, we introduce a three-step process to (i) regularize the membrane signal through iterative tangential voting, (ii) constrain the location of surface proteins by nuclear features, where clumps of nuclei are segmented through a delaunay triangulation approach, and (iii) assign membrane-bound macromolecules to individual cells through an application of multi-phase geodesic level-set. We have validated our method using both synthetic data and a dataset of 200 images, and are able to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach with superior performance.

  14. Coupled Segmentation of Nuclear and Membrane-bound Macromolecules through Voting and Multiphase Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-bound macromolecules play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication, and is regulated by almost one-third of the genome. At the optical scale, one group of membrane proteins expresses themselves as linear structures along the cell surface boundaries, while others are sequestered; and this paper targets the former group. Segmentation of these membrane proteins on a cell-by-cell basis enables the quantitative assessment of localization for comparative analysis. However, such membrane proteins typically lack continuity, and their intensity distributions are often very heterogeneous; moreover, nuclei can form large clump, which further impedes the quantification of membrane signals on a cell-by-cell basis. To tackle these problems, we introduce a three-step process to (i) regularize the membrane signal through iterative tangential voting, (ii) constrain the location of surface proteins by nuclear features, where clumps of nuclei are segmented through a delaunay triangulation approach, and (iii) assign membrane-bound macromolecules to individual cells through an application of multi-phase geodesic level-set. We have validated our method using both synthetic data and a dataset of 200 images, and are able to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach with superior performance. PMID:25530633

  15. Apoplastic Peroxidases and Lignification in Needles of Norway Spruce (Picea abies L.).

    PubMed Central

    Polle, A.; Otter, T.; Seifert, F.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the correlation of soluble apoplastic peroxidase activity with lignification in needles of field-grown Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) trees. Apoplastic peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) were obtained by vacuum infiltration of needles. The lignin content of isolated cell walls was determined by the acetyl bromide method. Accumulation of lignin and seasonal variations of apoplastic peroxidase activities were studied in the first year of needle development. The major phase of lignification started after bud break and was terminated about 4 weeks later. This phase correlated with a transient increase in apoplastic guaiacol and coniferyl alcohol peroxidase activity. NADH oxidase activity, which is thought to sustain peroxidase activity by production of H2O2, peaked sharply after bud break and decreased during the lignification period. Histochemical localization of peroxidase with guaiacol indicated that high activities were present in lignifying cell walls. In mature needles, lignin was localized in walls of most needle tissues including mesophyll cells, and corresponded to 80 to 130 [mu]mol lignin monomers/g needle dry weight. Isoelectric focusing of apoplastic washing fluids and activity staining with guaiacol showed the presence of strongly alkaline peroxidases (isoelectric point [greater than or equal to] 9) in all developmental stages investigated. New isozymes with isoelectric points of 7.1 and 8.1 appeared during the major phase of lignification. These isozymes disappeared after lignification was terminated. A strong increase in peroxidase activity in autumn was associated with the appearance of acidic peroxidases (isoelectric point [less than or equal to] 3). These results suggest that soluble alkaline apoplastic peroxidases participate in lignin formation. Soluble acidic apoplastic peroxidases were apparently unrelated to developmentally regulated lignification in spruce needles. PMID:12232302

  16. Purification and characterization of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase isoenzymes of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, M; Olivares, J; Bedmar, E J

    1996-08-19

    Two respiratory membrane-bound nitrate reductase (NR) isoenzymes, NRI and NRII, have been purified for the first time from one single microorganism. Triton X-100-solubilized NRs were purified by a three-step procedure of differential centrifugation, Q-Sepharose chromatography, and gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. Both isoenzymes were purified to homogeneity by the criteria of NR activity staining in polyacrylamide gels run under non-denaturating conditions and coincident staining of the protein band by silver nitrate. NRI is composed of three subunits of 116 kDa, 68 kDa, and 56 kDa, whereas NRII is composed of four subunits of 116 kDa, 68 kDa, 59 kDa, and 56 kDa. The 116-kDa subunit of NRI and the 59-kDa subunit of NRII exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the respiratory NR of Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZoBell.

  17. Electrochemical insights into the mechanism of NiFe membrane-bound hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lindsey A.; Parkin, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes of great biotechnological relevance because they catalyse the interconversion of H2, water (protons) and electricity using non-precious metal catalytic active sites. Electrochemical studies into the reactivity of NiFe membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH) have provided a particularly detailed insight into the reactivity and mechanism of this group of enzymes. Significantly, the control centre for enabling O2 tolerance has been revealed as the electron-transfer relay of FeS clusters, rather than the NiFe bimetallic active site. The present review paper will discuss how electrochemistry results have complemented those obtained from structural and spectroscopic studies, to present a complete picture of our current understanding of NiFe MBH. PMID:26862221

  18. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  19. The purification and subunit structure of a membrane-bound ATPase from the Archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Kristjansson, Hordur; Altekar, Wijaya

    1987-01-01

    The procedure for the isolation and 70-fold purification of membrane-bound cold-sensitive ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum is described. Upon exposure to cold, the enzyme dissociates into two major subunits, I (87 kDa) and II (60 kDa), and two minor subunits, III (29 kDa) and IV (20 kDa). The stoichiometry of the enzyme is proposed to be I2.II2.III.IV; the molecular mass of such a complex would be 343 kDa, which is in good agreement with the value of 350 kDa obtained by gel filtration. The structure of the ATPase from H. saccharovorum makes it unlike any previously described ATPase.

  20. KCl-Dependent Release of Mitochondrial Membrane-Bound Arginase Appears to Be a Novel Variant of Arginase-II

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Mishra; Rajnikant, Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Arginase regulates arginine metabolism, ornithine-urea cycle, and immunological surveillance. Arginase-I is predominant in cytosol, and arginase-II is localised in the mitochondria. A mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been proposed to be adsorbed with outer membrane of mitochondria which gets released by 150 mM potassium chloride (KCl). It is presumed that inclusion of 150 mM KCl in the homogenization medium would not only facilitate release of arginase bound with outer membrane of mitochondria but also affect functional anatomy of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzymes, and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to characterize KCl-dependent release of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase from liver of mice. Results provide advancement in the area of arginase biology and suggest that fraction of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase contains mitochondrial arginase-II and a variant of arginase-II. PMID:27293971

  1. Effect of aloe vera leaf gel extract on membrane bound phosphatases and lysosomal hydrolases in rats with streptozotocin diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, S; Sriram, N; Arulselvan, P; Subramanian, S

    2007-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to promote deterioration of membrane function and impair intra cellular metabolism in the organism. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the ethanolic extract from Aloe vera leaf gel on membrane bound phosphatases and lysosomal hydrolases in the liver and kidney of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The rats treated with STZ showed significant alterations in the activities of membrane bound phosphatases and lysosomal hydrolases in the liver and kidney. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel extract at a dose of 300 mg/kg body weight/day to STZ-induced diabetic rats for a period of 21 days significantly restored the alterations in enzymes activity to near normalcy. These results were compared with glibenclamide, a reference drug. Thus, the present study confirms that Aloe vera gel extract possesses a significant beneficial effect on membrane bound phosphatases and lysosomal hydrolases.

  2. Genome-Based Discovery of a Novel Membrane-Bound 1,6-Dihydroxyphenazine Prenyltransferase from a Marine Actinomycete

    PubMed Central

    Zeyhle, Philipp; Bauer, Judith S.; Kalinowski, Jörn; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Gross, Harald; Heide, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Recently, novel prenylated derivatives of 1,6-dihydroxyphenazine have been isolated from the marine sponge-associated Streptomyces sp. SpC080624SC-11. Genome sequencing of this strain now revealed a gene cluster containing all genes necessary for the synthesis of the phenazine and the isoprenoid moieties. Unexpectedly, however, the cluster did not contain a gene with similarity to previously investigated phenazine prenyltransferases, but instead a gene with modest similarity to the membrane-bound prenyltransferases of ubiquinone and menaquinone biosynthesis. Expression of this gene in E. coli and isolation of the membrane fraction proved that the encoded enzyme, Mpz10, catalyzes two successive prenylations of 1,6-dihydroxyphenazine. Mpz10 is the first example of a membrane-bound enzyme catalyzing the prenylation of a phenazine substrate, and one of few examples of membrane-bound enzymes involved in the prenylation of aromatic secondary metabolites in microorganisms. PMID:24892559

  3. Pirenzepine binding to membrane-bound, solubilized and purified muscarinic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgold, J.

    1986-05-01

    Muscarinic receptors were purified to near-homogeneity from bovine cortex, an area rich in the putative M1 subtype, and from bovine pons/medulla, an area rich in the putative M2 subtype. In both cases, the receptors were solubilized in digitonin and purified over an affinity column. Both the cortical and pons/medulla preparations yielded receptor proteins of 70,000 daltons. Pirenzepine binding was deduced from its competition with /sup 3/H-N-methyl scopolamine. The binding of pirenzepine to membrane-bound receptors from cortex was best described by a two site model, with approximately half the sites having a Ki of 6.4 x 10/sup -9/ M and the remaining sites having a Ki of 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M. Membrane-bound receptors from pons/medulla bound pirenzepine according to a one-site model with a Ki of 1.1 x 10/sup -7/ M. After solubilization the two-site binding of cortical receptors became a one-site binding, Ki = 1.1 x 10/sup -7/M. This value was still five-fold lower than that of soluble receptors from pons/medulla. After purification however the affinity of pirenzepine for the pons/medulla receptor increased so that the two putative subtypes bound pirenzepine with approximately the same affinity. These findings suggest that the different pirenzepine binding characteristics used to define muscarinic receptor subtypes are not inherent in the receptor protein itself but may be due to coupling factors associated with the receptor.

  4. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound l-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yingchen; Tong, Shuilong; Gao, Yongxiang; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Qi; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Zhou, Huihao

    2016-09-01

    l-amino acid oxidases/deaminases (LAAOs/LAADs) are a class of oxidoreductases catalyzing the oxidative deamination of l-amino acids to α-keto acids. They are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and exhibit diverse substrate specificity, post-translational modifications and cellular localization. While LAAOs isolated from snake venom have been extensively characterized, the structures and functions of LAAOs from other species are largely unknown. Here, we reported crystal structure of a bacterial membrane-bound LAAD from Proteus vulgaris (pvLAAD) in complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). We found that the overall fold of pvLAAD does not resemble typical LAAOs. Instead it, is similar to d-amino acid oxidases (DAAOs) with an additional hydrophobic insertion module on protein surface. Structural analysis and liposome-binding assays suggested that the hydrophobic module serves as an extra membrane-binding site for LAADs. Bacteria from genera Proteus and Providencia were found to encode two classes of membrane-bound LAADs. Based on our structure, the key roles of residues Q278 and L317 in substrate selectivity were proposed and biochemically analyzed. While LAADs on the membrane were proposed to transfer electrons to respiratory chain for FAD re-oxidization, we observed that the purified pvLAAD could generate a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide in vitro, suggesting it could use dioxygen to directly re-oxidize FADH2 as what typical LAAOs usually do. These findings provide a novel insights for a better understanding this class of enzymes and will help developing biocatalysts for industrial applications.

  5. Proinflammatory cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors are altered in the lymphocytes of schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Zhang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Abnormalities of protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines and their soluble receptors have been reported in the plasma/serum of schizophrenia (SZ) patients. To examine if SZ is also associated with the abnormal gene expression of cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors, we studied mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and their receptors in lymphocytes of SZ patients and normal control (NC) subjects. We determined the protein and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and mRNA expression of their receptors in lymphocytes from 30 SZ patients and 30 drug-free NC subjects. The subjects were diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Protein levels of cytokines were determined by ELISA, and mRNA levels in lymphocytes were determined by the qPCR method. We found that the mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1R1, TNFR1, and TNFR2, but not IL-1β, IL-1R2, IL-1RA, IL-6R, or GP130 were significantly increased in lymphocytes of SZ patients compared with NC subjects. We also found that the protein expression of IL-6 and TNF-α, but not IL-1β, was also significantly increased in SZ patients compared with NC subjects. These studies suggest that in addition to the reported abnormalities of proinflammatory cytokines and their soluble receptors in the plasma of SZ patients, an abnormal gene expression of these cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors may be involved in the pathogenesis of SZ.

  6. Soluble and Membrane-Bound β-Glucosidases Are Involved in Trimming the Xyloglucan Backbone.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Javier; Valdivia, Elene R; Fraga, Patricia; Iglesias, Natalia; Revilla, Gloria; Zarra, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    In many flowering plants, xyloglucan is a major component of primary cell walls, where it plays an important role in growth regulation. Xyloglucan can be degraded by a suite of exoglycosidases that remove specific sugars. In this work, we show that the xyloglucan backbone, formed by (1→4)-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl residues, can be attacked by two different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) β-glucosidases from glycoside hydrolase family 3. While BGLC1 (At5g20950; for β-glucosidase active against xyloglucan 1) is responsible for all or most of the soluble activity, BGLC3 (At5g04885) is usually a membrane-anchored protein. Mutations in these two genes, whether on their own or combined with mutations in other exoglycosidase genes, resulted in the accumulation of partially digested xyloglucan subunits, such as GXXG, GXLG, or GXFG. While a mutation in BGLC1 had significant effects on its own, lack of BGLC3 had only minor effects. On the other hand, double bglc1 bglc3 mutants revealed a synergistic interaction that supports a role for membrane-bound BGLC3 in xyloglucan metabolism. In addition, bglc1 bglc3 was complemented by overexpression of either BGLC1 or BGLC3 In overexpression lines, BGLC3 activity was concentrated in a microsome-enriched fraction but also was present in soluble form. Finally, both genes were generally expressed in the same cell types, although, in some cases, BGLC3 was expressed at earlier stages than BGLC1 We propose that functional specialization could explain the separate localization of both enzymes, as a membrane-bound β-glucosidase could specifically digest soluble xyloglucan without affecting the wall-bound polymer.

  7. Optimisation of the Factor VIII yield in mammalian cell cultures by reducing the membrane bound fraction.

    PubMed

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Berchtold, Martin Werner; Johnsen, Laust Bruun

    2011-02-20

    In vivo, clotting Factor VIII (FVIII) circulates in plasma bound to von Willebrand factor (vWF), and the vWF:FVIII complex prevents binding of FVIII to phosphatidylserine (PS). Activation of FVIII by thrombin releases FVIII from vWF, and subsequently FVIII binds to PS exposed on activated platelets and forms the tenase complex together with clotting Factor IX. In vitro, during serum free production of recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), production cells also expose PS, and since vWF is not present to hinder interaction of secreted rFVIII with PS, rFVIII is partly associated with the cell membrane of the production cells. Recently, we showed that as much as 90% of secreted rFVIII is bound to transiently transfected production cells during serum free conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of including vWF in the serum free medium, and demonstrate that addition of vWF results in release of active membrane bound rFVIII to the culture medium. Moreover, the attachment of rFVIII to cell membranes of un-transfected HEK293 cells was studied in the presence of compounds that competes for interactions between rFVIII and PS. Competitive assays between iodinated rFVIII (¹²⁵I-rFVIII) and annexin V or ortho-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) demonstrated that annexin V and OPLS were able to reduce the membrane bound fraction of rFVIII by 70% and 30%, respectively. Finally, adding OPLS to CHO cells stably expressing FVIII increased the yield by 50%. Using this new knowledge, the recovery of rFVIII could be increased considerably during serum free production of this therapeutic protein.

  8. Properties of soluble and membrane bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase from bovine adrenal medulla cross-linked with dimethyl suberimidate.

    PubMed

    Miras-Portugal, M T; Millaruelo, A; Vara, F

    1980-12-10

    Bovine dopamine-beta-monooxygenase from chromaffin granules in its soluble and membrane-bound forms was cross-linked with the bifunctional reagent dimethyl suberimidate, and its structural and kinetic properties were studied. 1. The cross-linking reaction does not affect the activity of soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase; it produces a ten percent inactivation in the membrane-bound enzyme, possibly because the linkage to other membrane proteins hinders its activity. 2. The soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase reaction mixture was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, showing appreciable amounts of dimer and tetramer, but only small amounts of trimer. In membrane-bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase, subjected to the same treatment, appreciable amounts of dimer and higher aggregates were found. 3. The kinetic properties of soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase after the crosslinking reaction are the same as those of the native enzyme, with a ping-pong kinetic mechanism and the same real Michaelis constants for tyramine and ascorbate: KmT = 0.36 mM and KmA = 0.32 mM. Membrane-bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase does not present a ping-pong mechanism before or after cross-linking; its real Michaelis constants are slightly modified by the cross-linking reaction: KmT = 0.4 mM and KMA = 0.4 mM.

  9. Removal of N-terminal methionine from haemoglobin nascent peptides by a membrane-bound rat liver methionine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Termignoni, C; Freitas, J O; Guimarães, J A

    1986-01-01

    A membrane-bound aminopeptidase able to remove methionine from haemoglobin nascent peptides is described. The enzyme also hydrolyses methionine from methionyl-lysyl-bradykinin but not lysine from lysyl-bradykinin. The tripeptide Met-Ala-Ser is poorly hydrolysed. This aminopeptidase also splits amino acid 2-naphthylamides, being, however, less specific with respect to these synthetic substrates. PMID:3087345

  10. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  11. Accumulation of guaiacol glycoconjugates in fruit, leaves and shoots of Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell following foliar applications of guaiacol or oak extract to grapevines.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Garcia, Ana I; Wilkinson, Kerry L; Culbert, Julie A; Lloyd, Natoiya D R; Alonso, Gonzalo L; Salinas, M Rosario

    2017-02-15

    Previous studies have shown that volatile compounds present within a vineyard during the growing season can be absorbed by grapevines, assimilated within grapes, and then released during fermentation to influence the final aroma of wine. For example, the accumulation of volatile phenols in glycoconjugate forms following grapevine exposure to bushfire smoke, and their subsequent release during winemaking. This study investigated the accumulation of guaiacol glycoconjugates in the fruit, shoots and leaves of Monastrell grapevines following foliar applications (at veraison) of either an aqueous solution of guaiacol or an aqueous oak extract. Fruit, shoot and leaf samples were then collected at 3 time points between veraison and maturity, and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, to quantify guaiacol and its glycoconjugates, respectively. Guaiacol glycoconjugates were observed in fruit and leaves in particular, demonstrating glycosylation occurred after grapevine treatment; however, different glycoconjugate profiles were apparent.

  12. A membrane-bound NAC transcription factor as an integrator of biotic and abiotic stress signals.

    PubMed

    Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2010-05-01

    Transcription factors are central components of gene regulatory networks that mediate virtually all aspects of growth and developmental processes in biological systems. The activity of transcription factors is regulated at multiple steps, such as gene transcription, posttranscriptional RNA processing, posttranslational modification, protein-protein interactions, and controlled protein turnover. Controlled activation of dormant, membrane-bound transcription factor (MTF) is an intriguing regulatory mechanism that ensures quick transcriptional responses to environmental fluctuations in plants, in which various stress hormones serve as signaling mediators. NTL6 is proteolytically activated upon exposure to cold and induces expression of the Pathogenesis-Related (PR) genes. The membrane-mediated cold signaling in inducing pathogen resistance is considered to be an adaptive strategy that protects plants against infection by hydrophilic pathogens frequently occurring during cold season. We found that NTL6 also mediates abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis. NTL6 is proteolytically activated by ABA. Transgenic plants overexpressing a nuclear NTL6 form (35S:6ΔC) exhibited a hypersensitive response to ABA and high salinity in seed germination. Taken together, these observations indicate that NTL6 plays an integrative role in plant responses to both biotic and abiotic stress conditions.

  13. Dimeric arrangement and structure of the membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor studied by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Zingsheim, H P; Neugebauer, D C; Frank, J; Hänicke, W; Barrantes, F J

    1982-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor protein (AChR) from the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata is studied in its membrane-bound form by electron microscopy and single-particle image averaging. About half the molecule protrudes from the membrane surface by approximately 5 nm. The low-resolution 3-D structure of this hydrated portion, including its handedness, can be deduced from averaged axial and lateral projections and from freeze-etched membrane surfaces. In native membrane fragments, a dimeric form of the AChR is observed and the relative orientation of the AChR monomers within the dimer is established. The dimers disappear upon disulfide reduction of the membrane preparations, whereas the average axial projections of the AChR monomer remain unaffected. Since the existence of disulfide bonds linking AChR monomers between their respective delta-subunits is well documented, the approximate position of the delta-subunit within the low-resolution structure of the AChR molecule can be deduced from the structure of the dimers. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:7188351

  14. Purification and characterization of a detergent-requiring membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase from porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Jeohn, G H; Matsuzaki, H; Takahashi, K

    1999-03-01

    A detergent-requiring metalloendopeptidase cleaving a progastrin-C-terminal peptide (progastrin-(88-101)) mainly at the Arg95-Gly96 bond was solubilized from porcine cerebral vesicular membranes and purified to homogeneity as examined by PAGE. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of approximately 76 kDa as estimated by both SDS/PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration. It hydrolyzed progastrin-(88-101) peptide, BAM-12P, and bradykinin fairly specifically, and more efficiently than various other neuropeptides and related oligopeptides examined as substrates. It was inactive in the absence of detergents, and required certain detergents such as Triton X-100 or Lubrol PX for activity. Its optimum pH was about 6.5 and was strongly inhibited by metal-chelating agents such as EDTA, EGTA, and o-phenanthroline. It was extremely sensitive to EDTA and was completely inhibited even by 0.3 microM EDTA; the activity was fully restored by addition of a 10-fold higher concentration of Zn2+, CO2+, or Mn2+ ions over EDTA. On the other hand, dynorphin A-(1-13) peptide, a strong inhibitor of neurolysin, failed to inhibit the enzyme. The various characteristics indicated that the present enzyme is a unique membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase.

  15. Biogenesis of phased siRNAs on membrane-bound polysomes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengben; Le, Brandon; Ma, Xuan; Li, Shaofang; You, Chenjiang; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Bailong; Liu, Lin; Gao, Lei; Shi, Ting; Zhao, Yonghui; Mo, Beixin; Cao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs are central players in RNA silencing, yet their cytoplasmic compartmentalization and the effects it may have on their activities have not been studied at the genomic scale. Here we report that Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are distinctly partitioned between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosol. All miRNAs are associated with membrane-bound polysomes (MBPs) as opposed to polysomes in general. The MBP association is functionally linked to a deeply conserved and tightly regulated activity of miRNAs – production of phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) from select target RNAs. The phasiRNA precursor RNAs, thought to be noncoding, are on MBPs and are occupied by ribosomes in a manner that supports miRNA-triggered phasiRNA production, suggesting that ribosomes on the rough ER impact siRNA biogenesis. This study reveals global patterns of cytoplasmic partitioning of small RNAs and expands the known functions of ribosomes and ER. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22750.001 PMID:27938667

  16. Development of a Membrane-Bound Random DNA Sequence Combinatorial Array Recognition Surface (CARS)

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A partially overlapping population of random sequence 60mer DNA molecules consisting of many concatamers of varied lengths was spatially separated in one and two dimensions by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. The spatially separated library serves as a potential sensor interface on which many different molecular recognition events or target analyte-binding patterns may emerge, thereby theoretically representing a “universal sensor” surface. The separated DNA library has been referred to as a DNA combinatorial array recognition surface or “CARS.” After UV baking and various fluorescence staining or fluorescent probe interactions, the one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D membrane-bound CARS were digitally photographed and subjected to image analysis with National Institutes of Health Image-Java software. Image analysis demonstrated relatively consistent and more similar spatial fluorescence patterns within CARS analyte treatment groups but noteworthy pattern differences before and after analyte addition and between different analyte treatments. Taken together, these data suggest a potential role for CARS as a novel, inexpensive, self-assembling universal molecular recognition surface that could be coupled to sophisticated Bayesian or other pattern recognition algorithms to classify analytes or make specific identifications, much like the senses of smell or taste. PMID:20357981

  17. Expression of BMP and Actin Membrane Bound Inhibitor Is Increased during Terminal Differentiation of MSCs

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Alexandra; Berner, Arne; Schmitz, Paul; Koch, Matthias; Nerlich, Michael; Mueller, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are mimicking embryonal endochondral ossification and become hypertrophic. BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) and Activin Membrane Bound Inhibitor (BAMBI) is a pseudoreceptor that regulates the activity of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and BMP signalling during chondrogenesis. Both TGF-β and BMP signalling are regulators of chondrogenic cell differentiation. Human bone marrow derived MSCs were chondrogenically predifferentiated in aggregate culture for 14 days. Thereafter, one group was subjected to hypertrophy enhancing media conditions while controls were kept in chondrogenic medium until day 28. Histological evaluation, gene expression by PCR, and Western blot analysis were carried out at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 17, 21, and 28. A subset of cultures was treated with the BMP inhibitor Noggin to test for BMP dependent expression of BAMBI. Hypertrophic differentiated pellets showed larger cells with increased collagen 10 and alkaline phosphatase staining. There was significantly increased expression of BAMBI on gene expression and protein level in hypertrophic cultures compared to the chondrogenic control and increased BMP4 gene expression. Immunohistochemistry showed intense staining of BAMBI in hypertrophic cells. BAMBI expression was dose-dependently downregulated by Noggin. The pseudoreceptor BAMBI is upregulated upon enhancement of hypertrophy in MSC chondrogenic differentiation by a BMP dependent mechanism. PMID:27843458

  18. Purification and structural analysis of membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase from Fuji apple.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhao, Jin-Hong; Wen, Xin; Ni, Yuan-Ying

    2015-09-15

    Membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase (mPPO) in Fuji apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Fuji) was purified and analyzed with a nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometer. The three-dimensional model and binding site of mPPO to 4-methyl catechol were also studied using molecular docking. mPPO was purified 54.41-fold using temperature-induced phase partitioning technique and ion exchange chromatography. mPPO had a molecular weight of 67.3kDa. Even though a significant level of homology was observed between mPPO and the soluble polyphenol oxidase in the copper binding sequence, there was another region, rich in histidine residues, which differed in 13 amino acids. The three-dimensional structure of mPPO consisted of six α-helices, two short β-strands, and ten random coils. The putative substrate-binding pocket contained six polar or charged amino acids, His191, His221, Trp224, Trp228, Phe227, and Val190. Trp224 and Trp228 formed hydrogen bonds with 4-methyl-catechol.

  19. EHD2 restrains dynamics of caveolae by an ATP-dependent, membrane-bound, open conformation.

    PubMed

    Hoernke, Maria; Mohan, Jagan; Larsson, Elin; Blomberg, Jeanette; Kahra, Dana; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Schwieger, Christian; Lundmark, Richard

    2017-02-21

    The EH-domain-containing protein 2 (EHD2) is a dynamin-related ATPase that confines caveolae to the cell surface by restricting the scission and subsequent endocytosis of these membrane pits. For this, EHD2 is thought to first bind to the membrane, then to oligomerize, and finally to detach, in a stringently regulated mechanistic cycle. It is still unclear how ATP is used in this process and whether membrane binding is coupled to conformational changes in the protein. Here, we show that the regulatory N-terminal residues and the EH domain keep the EHD2 dimer in an autoinhibited conformation in solution. By significantly advancing the use of infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that EHD2 adopts an open conformation by tilting the helical domains upon membrane binding. We show that ATP binding enables partial insertion of EHD2 into the membrane, where G-domain-mediated oligomerization occurs. ATP hydrolysis is related to detachment of EHD2 from the membrane. Finally, we demonstrate that the regulation of EHD2 oligomerization in a membrane-bound state is crucial to restrict caveolae dynamics in cells.

  20. Sex steroids regulate skin pigmentation through nonclassical membrane-bound receptors

    PubMed Central

    Natale, Christopher A; Duperret, Elizabeth K; Zhang, Junqian; Sadeghi, Rochelle; Dahal, Ankit; O'Brien, Kevin Tyler; Cookson, Rosa; Winkler, Jeffrey D; Ridky, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    The association between pregnancy and altered cutaneous pigmentation has been documented for over two millennia, suggesting that sex hormones play a role in regulating epidermal melanocyte (MC) homeostasis. Here we show that physiologic estrogen (17β-estradiol) and progesterone reciprocally regulate melanin synthesis. This is intriguing given that we also show that normal primary human MCs lack classical estrogen or progesterone receptors (ER or PR). Utilizing both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we establish that sex steroid effects on human pigment synthesis are mediated by the membrane-bound, steroid hormone receptors G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), and progestin and adipoQ receptor 7 (PAQR7). Activity of these receptors was activated or inhibited by synthetic estrogen or progesterone analogs that do not bind to ER or PR. As safe and effective treatment options for skin pigmentation disorders are limited, these specific GPER and PAQR7 ligands may represent a novel class of therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15104.001 PMID:27115344

  1. Cloning of SEZ-12 encoding seizure-related and membrane-bound adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Nagasawa, H; Shimizu-Nishikawa, K; Ookura, T; Kimura, M; Sugaya, E

    1996-05-06

    SEZ-12 is one of the seizure-related cDNAs which was isolated by differential hybridization from primary cultured neurons from the mouse cerebral cortex with or without pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). SEZ-12 expression is transiently down-regulated in the mouse brain by injection of PTZ. To characterize SEZ-12, isolation of full-length cDNA and nucleotide sequence analysis were performed. The deduced amino acid sequence of SEZ-12 revealed that it encodes membrane-bound C-type lectin and has a significant homology to that of human cDNA, DGCR2 and IDD, which were cloned from a balanced translocation breakpoint associated with the DiGeorge syndrome. The isolated cDNA was about 4 kb in length and the message was expressed ubiquitously in various organs with low-abundance. Previously, we also cloned a transmembrane protein which is probably involved in cell-cell interaction by the differential hybridization technique. These findings suggest that transmembrane signaling in neuronal cells may have an important role in PTZ-induced seizure.

  2. The putative roles of nuclear and membrane-bound progesterone receptors in the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Magdalena K; Rekawiecki, Robert; Kotwica, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Progesterone produced by the corpus luteum (CL) is a key regulator of normal cyclical reproductive functions in the females of mammalian species. The physiological effects of progesterone are mediated by the canonical genomic pathway after binding of progesterone to its specific nuclear progesterone receptor (PGR), which acts as a ligand-activated transcription factor and has two main isoforms, PGRA and PGRB. These PGR isoforms play different roles in the cell; PGRB acts as an activator of progesterone-responsive genes, while PGRA can inhibit the activity of PGRB. The ratio of these isoforms changes during the estrous cycle and pregnancy, and it corresponds to the different levels of progesterone signaling occurring in the reproductive tract. Progesterone exerts its effects on cells also by a non-genomic mechanism by the interaction with the progesterone-binding membrane proteins including the progesterone membrane component (PGRMC) 1 and 2, and the membrane progestin receptors (mPRs). These receptors rapidly activate the appropriate intracellular signal transduction pathways, and subsequently they can initiate specific cell responses or modulate genomic cell responses. The diversity of progesterone receptors and their cellular actions enhances the role of progesterone as a factor regulating the function of the reproductive system and other organs. This paper deals with the possible involvement of nuclear and membrane-bound progesterone receptors in the function of target cells within the female reproductive tract.

  3. A gene complex coding for the membrane-bound hydrogenase of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Kortlüke, C; Horstmann, K; Schwartz, E; Rohde, M; Binsack, R; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    One of the key enzymes in the chemolithoautotrophic metabolism of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 is a dimeric, membrane-associated hydrogenase. The genetic determinants of this enzyme are located on the endogenous megaplasmid pHG1 (G. Eberz, C. Hogrefe, C. Kortlüke, A. Kamienski, and B. Friedrich, J. Bacteriol. 168:636-641, 1986). Complementation studies showed that the information required for the formation of active membrane-bound hydrogenase occupies more than 7.5 kb of megaplasmid DNA. We cloned and sequenced this region and identified the genes encoding the two hydrogenase subunits (hoxK and hoxG). The nucleotide sequence contains nine additional closely spaced open reading frames. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the gene product of one of these open reading frames (hoxM) is involved in the process leading to the attachment of hydrogenase to the membrane. Other open reading frames may encode additional processing functions and components of a hydrogenase-linked electron transport chain. Analysis of Tn5-B21-mediated transcriptional fusions provided evidence that the structural genes and accessory functions belong to at least three coordinately regulated transcriptional units. Images PMID:1383192

  4. Identification of a Membrane-bound Prepore Species Clarifies the Lytic Mechanism of Actinoporins * ♦

    PubMed Central

    Bellomio, Augusto; Gil-Cartón, David; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Sot, Jesús; Scheuring, Simon; Valle, Mikel; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2016-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are cytolytic proteins belonging to the molecular warfare apparatus of living organisms. The assembly of the functional transmembrane pore requires several intermediate steps ranging from a water-soluble monomeric species to the multimeric ensemble inserted in the cell membrane. The non-lytic oligomeric intermediate known as prepore plays an essential role in the mechanism of insertion of the class of β-PFTs. However, in the class of α-PFTs, like the actinoporins produced by sea anemones, evidence of membrane-bound prepores is still lacking. We have employed single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and atomic force microscopy to identify, for the first time, a prepore species of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C bound to lipid vesicles. The size of the prepore coincides with that of the functional pore, except for the transmembrane region, which is absent in the prepore. Biochemical assays indicated that, in the prepore species, the N terminus is not inserted in the bilayer but is exposed to the aqueous solution. Our study reveals the structure of the prepore in actinoporins and highlights the role of structural intermediates for the formation of cytolytic pores by an α-PFT. PMID:27445331

  5. Membrane-Bound PenA β-Lactamase of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Linnell B.; Dobos, Karen; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a difficult-to-treat disease with diverse clinical manifestations. β-Lactam antibiotics such as ceftazidime are crucial to the success of melioidosis therapy. Ceftazidime-resistant clinical isolates have been described, and the most common mechanism is point mutations affecting expression or critical amino acid residues of the chromosomally encoded class A PenA β-lactamase. We previously showed that PenA was exported via the twin arginine translocase system and associated with the spheroplast fraction. We now show that PenA is a membrane-bound lipoprotein. The protein and accompanying β-lactamase activity are found in the membrane fraction and can be extracted with Triton X-114. Treatment with globomycin of B. pseudomallei cells expressing PenA results in accumulation of the prolipoprotein. Mass spectrometric analysis of extracted membrane proteins reveals a protein peak whose mass is consistent with a triacylated PenA protein. Mutation of a crucial lipobox cysteine at position 23 to a serine residue results in loss of β-lactamase activity and absence of detectable PenAC23S protein. A concomitant isoleucine-to-alanine change at position 20 in the signal peptide processing site in the PenAC23S mutant results in a nonlipidated protein (PenAI20A C23S) that is processed by signal peptidase I and exhibits β-lactamase activity. The resistance profile of a B. pseudomallei strain expressing this protein is indistinguishable from the profile of the isogenic strain expressing wild-type PenA. The data show that PenA membrane association is not required for resistance and must serve another purpose. PMID:26711764

  6. Detection of oocyte perivitelline membrane-bound sperm: a tool for avian collection management.

    PubMed

    Croyle, Kaitlin E; Durrant, Barbara S; Jensen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The success and sustainability of an avian breeding programme depend on managing productive and unproductive pairs. Given that each breeding season can be of immeasurable importance, it is critical to resolve pair fertility issues quickly. Such problems are traditionally diagnosed through behavioural observations, egg lay history and hatch rates, with a decision to re-pair generally taking one or more breeding seasons. In pairs producing incubated eggs that show little or no signs of embryonic development, determining fertility is difficult. Incorporating a technique to assess sperm presence on the oocyte could, in conjunction with behaviour and other data, facilitate a more timely re-pair decision. Detection of perivitelline membrane-bound (PVM-bound) sperm verifies successful copulation, sperm production and sperm functionality. Alternatively, a lack of detectable sperm, at least in freshly laid eggs, suggests no mating, lack of sperm production/function or sperm-oviduct incompatibility. This study demonstrated PVM-bound sperm detection by Hoechst staining in fresh to 24-day-incubated exotic eggs from 39 species representing 13 orders. However, a rapid and significant time-dependent loss of detectable PVM-bound sperm was observed following incubation of chicken eggs. The PCR detection of sperm in seven species, including two bacterially infected eggs, demonstrated that this method was not as reliable as visual detection using Hoechst staining. The absence of amplicons in visually positive PVMs was presumably due to large PVM size and low sperm count, resulting in DNA concentrations too low for standard PCR detection. In summary, this study demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of using PVM-bound sperm detection as a management tool for exotic avian species. We verified that sperm presence or absence on fluorescence microscopy can aid in the differentiation of fertile from infertile eggs to assist breeding managers in making prompt decisions for pair

  7. Molecular characterization of soluble and membrane-bound trehalases of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; He, Wen-Bo; Su, Yun-Lin; Bing, Xiao-Li; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Trehalases (Tres) have been demonstrated to be the key enzymes that are involved in various trehalose-associated physiological processes in insects. However, little attention has been devoted to the Tres in the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. In this study, a soluble Tre (BtTre-1) and a membrane-bound Tre (BtTre-2) were cloned in the invasive cryptic species Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) of the whitefly B. tabaci complex. Alignment of deduced amino acids sequences of both BtTres revealed that they share common consensus regions and residues with Tres of other insect species. Levels of BtTres expression in various stages and tissues of the whitefly suggested that BtTre-2 may play a key role in trehalose catabolism during development of the whitefly, especially for oocyte development, while BtTre-1 may prevent trehalose in salivary gland from leaking and entering into plants along with saliva. Potential roles of trehalose catabolism in response to direct and/or plant-mediated indirect effects of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl China Virus (TYLCCNV) were also detected. Whiteflies feeding on virus-infected tobacco plants showed higher BtTres expressions and accordingly higher BtTres activity but lower trehalose content than those feeding on uninfected plants. The enhanced trehalose catabolism may be beneficial to oocyte development in ovary and attenuate plant defensive responses induced by trehalose in saliva. Viruliferous and nonviruliferous whiteflies feeding on cotton, a nonhost plant for TYLCCNV, differed significantly only in trehalose content. The higher trehalose content in viruliferous whiteflies may be conducive to resisting the stress inflicted by TYLCCNV.

  8. Detection of oocyte perivitelline membrane-bound sperm: a tool for avian collection management

    PubMed Central

    Croyle, Kaitlin E.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Jensen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The success and sustainability of an avian breeding programme depend on managing productive and unproductive pairs. Given that each breeding season can be of immeasurable importance, it is critical to resolve pair fertility issues quickly. Such problems are traditionally diagnosed through behavioural observations, egg lay history and hatch rates, with a decision to re-pair generally taking one or more breeding seasons. In pairs producing incubated eggs that show little or no signs of embryonic development, determining fertility is difficult. Incorporating a technique to assess sperm presence on the oocyte could, in conjunction with behaviour and other data, facilitate a more timely re-pair decision. Detection of perivitelline membrane-bound (PVM-bound) sperm verifies successful copulation, sperm production and sperm functionality. Alternatively, a lack of detectable sperm, at least in freshly laid eggs, suggests no mating, lack of sperm production/function or sperm–oviduct incompatibility. This study demonstrated PVM-bound sperm detection by Hoechst staining in fresh to 24-day-incubated exotic eggs from 39 species representing 13 orders. However, a rapid and significant time-dependent loss of detectable PVM-bound sperm was observed following incubation of chicken eggs. The PCR detection of sperm in seven species, including two bacterially infected eggs, demonstrated that this method was not as reliable as visual detection using Hoechst staining. The absence of amplicons in visually positive PVMs was presumably due to large PVM size and low sperm count, resulting in DNA concentrations too low for standard PCR detection. In summary, this study demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of using PVM-bound sperm detection as a management tool for exotic avian species. We verified that sperm presence or absence on fluorescence microscopy can aid in the differentiation of fertile from infertile eggs to assist breeding managers in making prompt decisions for pair

  9. Effects of membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase overproduction on the respiratory chain of Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Maria; Schweiger, Paul; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    The acetic acid bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans incompletely oxidizes carbon sources as a natural part of its metabolism, and this feature has been exploited for many biotechnological applications. The most important enzymes used to harness the biocatalytic oxidative capacity of G. oxydans are the pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent dehydrogenases. The membrane-bound PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), encoded by gox0265, was used as model protein for homologous membrane protein production using the previously described Gluconobacter expression vector pBBR1p452. The mgdh gene had ninefold higher expression in the overproduction strain compared to the parental strain. Furthermore, membranes from the overexpression strain had a five- and threefold increase of mGDH activity and oxygen consumption rates, respectively. Oxygen consumption rate of the membrane fraction could not be increased by the addition of a substrate combination of glucose and ethanol in the overproduction strain, indicating that the terminal quinol oxidases of the respiratory chain were rate limiting. In contrast, addition of glucose and ethanol to membranes of the control strain increased oxygen consumption rates approaching the observed rates with G. oxydans overproducing mGDH. The higher glucose oxidation rates of the mGDH overproduction strain corresponded to a 70 % increase of the gluconate production rate compared to the control strain. The high rate of glucose oxidation may be useful in the industrial production of gluconates and ketogluconates, or as whole-cell biosensors. Furthermore, mGDH was purified to homogeneity by one-step strep-tactin affinity chromatography and characterized. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a membrane integral quinoprotein being purified by affinity chromatography and serves as a proof-of-principle for using G. oxydans as a host for membrane protein expression and purification.

  10. Determination of 15N chemical shift anisotropy from a membrane-bound protein by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Ahuja, Shivani; Pichumani, Kumar; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-06-21

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors are essential in the structural and dynamic studies of proteins using NMR spectroscopy. Results from relaxation studies in biomolecular solution and solid-state NMR experiments on aligned samples are routinely interpreted using well-characterized CSA tensors determined from model compounds. Since CSA tensors, particularly the (15)N CSA, highly depend on a number of parameters including secondary structure, electrostatic interaction, and the amino acid sequence, there is a need for accurately determined CSA tensors from proteins. In this study, we report the backbone amide-(15)N CSA tensors for a 16.7-kDa membrane-bound and paramagnetic-heme containing protein, rabbit Cytochrome b(5) (cytb(5)), determined using the (15)N CSA/(15)N-(1)H dipolar transverse cross-correlation rates. The mean values of (15)N CSA determined for residues in helical, sheet, and turn regions are -187.9, -166.0, and -161.1 ppm, respectively, with an overall average value of -171.7 ppm. While the average CSA value determined from this study is in good agreement with previous solution NMR experiments on small globular proteins, the CSA value determined for residues in helical conformation is slightly larger, which may be attributed to the paramagnetic effect from Fe(III) of the heme unit in cytb(5). However, like in previous solution NMR studies, the CSA values reported in this study are larger than the values measured from solid-state NMR experiments. We believe that the CSA parameters reported in this study will be useful in determining the structure, dynamics, and orientation of proteins, including membrane proteins, using NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Diisopropylfluorophosphate Impairs the Transport of Membrane-Bound Organelles in Rat Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Naughton, Sean X.; Wulff, Heike; Singh, Vikrant; Beck, Wayne D.; Magrane, Jordi; Thomas, Bobby; Kaidery, Navneet Ammal; Hernandez, Caterina M.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive use of organophosphates (OPs) is an ongoing environmental health concern due to multiple reports of OP-related neurologic abnormalities. The mechanism of the acute toxicity of OPs has been attributed to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but there is growing evidence that this may not account for all the long-term neurotoxic effects of OPs. In previous experiments (using ex vivo and in vitro model systems) we observed that the insecticide OP chlorpyrifos impaired the movements of vesicles and mitochondria in axons. Here, using a time-lapse imaging technique, we evaluated the OP-nerve agent diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) across a wide range of concentrations (subnanomolar to micromolar) for effects on fast axonal transport of membrane-bound organelles (MBOs) that contain the amyloid precursor protein (APP) tagged with the fluorescent marker Dendra2 (APPDendra2). Both 1 and 24 hours of exposure to DFP and a positive control compound, colchicine, resulted in a decrease in the velocity of anterograde and retrograde movements of MBOs and an increase in the number of stationary MBOs. These effects occurred at picomolar (100 pM) to low nanomolar (0.1 nM) concentrations that were not associated with compromised cell viability or cytoskeletal damage. Moreover, the effects of DFP on axonal transport occurred at concentrations that did not inhibit AChE activity, and they were not blocked by cholinergic receptor antagonists. Given the fundamental importance of axonal transport to neuronal function, these observations may explain some of the long-term neurologic deficits that have been observed in humans who have been exposed to OPs. PMID:26718240

  12. Disruption of the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase-encoding gene improved glycerol use and dihydroxyacetone productivity in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Habe, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Kitamoto, Dai; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Sakaki, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) production from glycerol by Gluconobacter oxydans is an industrial form of fermentation, but some problems exist related to microbial DHA production. For example, glycerol inhibits DHA production and affects its biological activity. G. oxydans produces both DHA and glyceric acid (GA) from glycerol simultaneously, and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase and membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenases are involved in the two reactions, respectively. We discovered that the G. oxydans mutant DeltaadhA, in which the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase-encoding gene (adhA) was disrupted, significantly improved its ability to grow in a higher concentration of glycerol and to produce DHA compared to a wild-type strain. DeltaadhA grew on 220 g/l of initial glycerol and produced 125 g/l of DHA during a 3-d incubation, whereas the wild-type did not. Resting DeltaadhA cells converted 230 g/l of glycerol aqueous solution to 139.7 g/l of DHA during a 3-d incubation. The inhibitory effect of glycerate sodium salt on DeltaadhA was investigated. An increase in the glycerate concentration at the beginning of growth resulted in decreases in both growth and DHA production.

  13. Membrane-bound heat shock proteins facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Weicheng; Shao, Miaomiao; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were originally identified as stress-responsive proteins and serve as molecular chaperones in different intracellular compartments. Translocation of HSPs to the cell surface and release of HSPs into the extracellular space have been observed during the apoptotic process and in response to a variety of cellular stress. Here, we report that UV irradiation and cisplatin treatment rapidly induce the expression of membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 upstream the phosphatidylserine exposure. Membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the release of IL-6 and IL-1β as well as DC maturation by the evaluation of CD80 and CD86 expression. On the other hand, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 on cells could facilitate the uptake of dying cells by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), as a common receptor for Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90, is response for their recognition and mediates the uptake of dying cells. Furthermore, membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the cross-presentation of OVA antigen from E.G7 cells and inhibition of the uptake of dying cells by LOX-1 decreases the cross-presentation of cellular antigen. Therefore, the rapid exposure of HSPs on dying cells at the early stage allows for the recognition by and confers an activation signal to the immune system.

  14. Presence of membrane-bound proteinases that preferentially degrade oxidatively damaged erythrocyte membrane proteins as secondary antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Beppu, M; Inoue, M; Ishikawa, T; Kikugawa, K

    1994-11-23

    Human erythrocytes were oxidized with xanthine/xanthine oxidase/ferric ion or ADP/ferric ion at 37 degrees C for several hours. Band 3 protein and spectrin of the oxidized cells were found to be significantly modified as analyzed by radiolabeling with tritiated borohydride. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the xanthine/xanthine oxidase/ferric iron-oxidized cells and subsequent immunoblotting with anti band 3 protein showed that band 3 protein was fragmented into smaller molecular-weight fragments. When the cell membrane obtained from the oxidized cells were incubated at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C for several hours in the presence of alpha-tocopherol, extensive degradation of band 3 protein and spectrin was observed. Band 3 protein was found to be most susceptible to the degradation. Degradation of band 3 protein was also observed after similar incubation of the membrane from the ADP/ferric ion-oxidized cells. Membrane-bound serine- and metalloproteinases were responsible for the degradation of band 3 protein, because the degradation was remarkably inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and partially by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Hence, the membrane proteins became susceptible to membrane-bound proteinases by oxidative stress. This observation suggests that these membrane-bound proteinases exist to remove oxidatively damaged proteins from the cell membrane.

  15. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  16. Phylogenetic analysis, molecular modeling, substrate-inhibitor specificity, and active site comparison of bacterial, fungal, and plant heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Pandey, Veda P; Naaz, Huma; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of 40 heme peroxidases, belonging to both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, revealed their clustering into three major classes. Class I represented sequences from plants, bacteria, fungi, and algae, whereas classes II and III exclusively represented plant and fungal peroxidases, respectively. Modeling of three representative classes of peroxidases, belonging to each of bacterial, plant, and fungal categories, revealed a similar kind of folding; however, superimposition analysis revealed relatively more closeness between plant and fungal peroxidases than that of the bacterial peroxidase. The docking analysis of three representative modeled peroxidases with three common substrates, namely, H₂O₂, guaiacol, and ascorbate, and three arginine-specific inhibitors, namely, phenylglyoxal, 1,2-cyclohexanedione, and 2,3-butanedione, revealed that all three inhibitors competed for guaiacol- and ascorbate-binding sites of peroxidases, except for phenylglyoxal binding in the case of plant peroxidase. Phenylglyoxal, 1,2-cyclohexanedione, and 2,3-butanedione were found to be most potent inhibitors of bacterial, fungal, and plant peroxidases, respectively.

  17. Structure and promoter analysis of the mouse membrane-bound transferrin-like protein (MTf) gene.

    PubMed

    Nakamasu, K; Kawamoto, T; Yoshida, E; Noshiro, M; Matsuda, Y; Kato, Y

    2001-03-01

    Recently, we purified membrane-bound transferrin-like protein (MTf) from the plasma membrane of rabbit chondrocytes and showed that the expression levels of MTf protein and mRNA were much higher in cartilage than in other tissues [Kawamoto T, Pan, H., Yan, W., Ishida, H., Usui, E., Oda, R., Nakamasu, K., Noshiro, M., Kawashima-Ohya, Y., Fujii, M., Shintani, H., Okada, Y. & Kato, Y. (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 256, 503--509]. In this study, we isolated the MTf gene from a constructed mouse genomic library. The mouse MTf gene was encoded by a single-copy gene spanning approximately 26 kb and consisting of 16 exons. The transcription-initiation site was located 157 bp upstream from the translation-start codon, and a TATA box was not found in the 5' flanking region. The mouse MTf gene was mapped on the B3 band of chromosome 16 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Using primary chondrocytes, SK-MEL-28 (melanoma cell line), ATDC5 (chondrogenic cell line) and NIH3T3 (fibroblast cell line) cells, we carried out transient expression studies on various lengths of the 5' flanking region of the MTf gene fused to the luciferase reporter gene. Luciferase activity in SK-MEL-28 cells was higher than in primary chondrocytes. Although no luciferase activity was detectable in NIH3T3 cells, it was higher in chondrocytes than in ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. These findings were consistent with the levels of expression of MTf mRNA in these cells cultured under similar conditions. The patterns of increase and decrease in the luciferase activity in chondrocytes transfected with various 5' deleted constructs of the MTf promoter were similar to that in ATDC5 cells, but differed from that in SK-MEL-28 cells. The findings obtained with primary chondrocytes suggest that the regions between -693 and -444 and between -1635 and -1213 contain positive and negative cis-acting elements, respectively. The chondrocyte-specific expression of the MTf gene could be regulated via these regulatory elements in

  18. Structural and Dynamical Insights into the Membrane-Bound α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2013-01-01

    Membrane-induced disorder-to-helix transition of α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, has been implicated in a number of important neuronal functions as well as in the etiology of Parkinson’s disease. In order to obtain structural insights of membrane-bound α-synuclein at the residue-specific resolution, we took advantage of the fact that the protein is devoid of tryptophan and incorporated single tryptophan at various residue positions along the sequence. These tryptophans were used as site-specific markers to characterize the structural and dynamical aspects of α-synuclein on the negatively charged small unilamellar lipid vesicles. An array of site-specific fluorescence readouts, such as the spectral-shift, quenching efficiency and anisotropy, allowed us to discern various features of the conformational rearrangements occurring at different locations of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane. In order to define the spatial localization of various regions of the protein near the membrane surface, we utilized a unique and sensitive indicator, namely, red-edge excitation shift (REES), which originates when a fluorophore is located in a highly ordered micro-environment. The extent of REES observed at different residue positions allowed us to directly identify the residues that are localized at the membrane-water interface comprising a thin (∼ 15 Å) layer of motionally restrained water molecules and enabled us to construct a dynamic hydration map of the protein. The combination of site-specific fluorescence readouts allowed us to unravel the intriguing molecular details of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane in a direct model-free fashion. Additionally, the combination of methodologies described here are capable of distinguishing subtle but important structural alterations of α-synuclein bound to different negatively charged lipids with varied head-group chemistry. We believe that the structural modulations of α-synuclein on the membrane could potentially be

  19. The Microwave Studies of Guaiacol (2-METHOXYPHENOL) Isotopologues and Van Der Waals Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurusinghe, Ranil M.; Fox, Ashley; Tubergen, Michael J.

    2013-06-01

    The microwave spectrum of one conformer of guaiacol, 2-methoxyphenol, was recorded in the 12-21 GHz range. Fifty two rotational transitions were fitted to the lowest energy ab initio structure computed with Hatree-Fock method using the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The fitted rotational constants are: A= 2607.0664(6) MHz, B= 1560.7967(2) MHz, C= 982.8721(1) MHz. Microwave spectra were recorded for each of seven unique ^{13}C isotopomers and the deuterated hydroxyl isotopomer. Quantum chemical calculations and the spectral analysis indicate that the observed conformer is the anti-syn form of guaiacol. Progress on the assignment of the Argon-guaiacol complex and water-guaiacol complex will also be presented.

  20. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    PubMed Central

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25258549

  1. Structural Features of Membrane-bound Glucocerebrosidase and α-Synuclein Probed by Neutron Reflectometry and Fluorescence Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Thai Leong; Jiang, Zhiping; Heinrich, Frank; Gruschus, James M.; Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Barros, Marilia; Curtis, Joseph E.; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, are a common genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson disease and related disorders, implicating the role of this lysosomal hydrolase in the disease etiology. A specific physical interaction exists between the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (α-syn) and GCase both in solution and on the lipid membrane, resulting in efficient enzyme inhibition. Here, neutron reflectometry was employed as a first direct structural characterization of GCase and α-syn·GCase complex on a sparsely-tethered lipid bilayer, revealing the orientation of the membrane-bound GCase. GCase binds to and partially inserts into the bilayer with its active site most likely lying just above the membrane-water interface. The interaction was further characterized by intrinsic Trp fluorescence, circular dichroism, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Both Trp fluorescence and neutron reflectometry results suggest a rearrangement of loops surrounding the catalytic site, where they extend into the hydrocarbon chain region of the outer leaflet. Taking advantage of contrasting neutron scattering length densities, the use of deuterated α-syn versus protiated GCase showed a large change in the membrane-bound structure of α-syn in the complex. We propose a model of α-syn·GCase on the membrane, providing structural insights into inhibition of GCase by α-syn. The interaction displaces GCase away from the membrane, possibly impeding substrate access and perturbing the active site. GCase greatly alters membrane-bound α-syn, moving helical residues away from the bilayer, which could impact the degradation of α-syn in the lysosome where these two proteins interact. PMID:25429104

  2. pH-induced conformational changes of membrane-bound influenza hemagglutinin and its effect on target lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, C.; Tamm, L. K.

    1998-01-01

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) has served as a paradigm for both pH-dependent and -independent viral membrane fusion. Although large conformational changes were observed by X-ray crystallography when soluble fragments of HA were subjected to fusion-pH conditions, it is not clear whether the same changes occur in membrane-bound HA, what the spatial relationship is between the conformationally changed HA and the target and viral membranes, and in what way HA perturbs the target membrane at low pH. We have taken a spectroscopic approach using an array of recently developed FTIR techniques to address these questions. Difference attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy was employed to reveal reversible and irreversible components of the pH-induced conformational change of the membrane-bound bromelain fragment of HA, BHA. Additional proteolytic fragments of BHA were produced which permitted a tentative assignment of the observed changes to the HA1 and HA2 subunits, respectively. The membrane-bound HA1 subunit undergoes a reversible conformational change, which most likely involves the loss of a small proportion of beta-sheet at low pH. BHA was found to undergo a partially reversible tilting motion relative to the target membrane upon exposure to pH 5, indicating a previously undescribed hinge near the anchoring point to the target membrane. Time-resolved amide H/D exchange experiments revealed a more dynamic (tertiary) structure of membrane-bound BHA and its HA2, but not its HA1, subunit. Finally BHA and, to a lesser degree, HA1 perturbed the lipid bilayer of the target membrane at the interface, as assessed by spectral changes of the lipid ester carbonyl groups. These results are discussed in the context of a complementary study of HA that was bound to viral membranes through its transmembrane peptide (Gray C, Tamm LK, 1997, Protein Sci 6:1993-2006). A distinctive role for the HA1 subunit in the conformational change of HA becomes apparent from these combined

  3. Role of peroxidases in the compensation of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase knockdown in rice plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Aurenivia; Martins, Marcio O; Ribeiro, Carolina W; Fontenele, Adilton V; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2011-10-01

    Current studies, particularly in Arabidopsis, have demonstrated that mutants deficient in cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases (APXs) are susceptible to the oxidative damage induced by abiotic stress. In contrast, we demonstrate here that rice mutants double silenced for cytosolic APXs (APx1/2s) up-regulated other peroxidases, making the mutants able to cope with abiotic stress, such as salt, heat, high light and methyl viologen, similar to non-transformed (NT) plants. The APx1/2s mutants exhibited an altered redox homeostasis, as indicated by increased levels of H₂O₂ and ascorbate and glutathione redox states. Both mutant and NT plants exhibited similar photosynthesis (CO₂) assimilation and photochemical efficiency) under both normal and stress conditions. Overall, the antioxidative compensatory mechanism displayed by the mutants was associated with increased expression of OsGpx genes, which resulted in higher glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the cytosolic and chloroplastic fractions. The transcript levels of OsCatA and OsCatB and the activities of catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOD; type III peroxidases) were also up-regulated. None of the six studied isoforms of OsApx were up-regulated under normal growth conditions. Therefore, the deficiency in cytosolic APXs was effectively compensated for by up-regulation of other peroxidases. We propose that signalling mechanisms triggered in rice mutants could be distinct from those proposed for Arabidopsis.

  4. Palm tree peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Sakharov, I Yu

    2004-08-01

    Over the years novel plant peroxidases have been isolated from palm trees leaves. Some molecular and catalytic properties of palm peroxidases have been studied. The substrate specificity of palm peroxidases is distinct from the specificity of other plant peroxidases. Palm peroxidases show extremely high stability under acidic and alkaline conditions and high thermal stability. Moreover, these enzymes are more stable with respect to hydrogen peroxide treatment than other peroxidases. Due to their extremely high stability, palm peroxidases have been used successfully in the development of new bioanalytical tests, the construction of improved biosensors, and in polymer synthesis.

  5. Alterations in Soluble Class III Peroxidases of Maize Shoots by Flooding Stress

    PubMed Central

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Buck, Friedrich; Lüthje, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Due to changing climate, flooding (waterlogged soils and submergence) becomes a major problem in agriculture and crop production. In the present study, the effect of waterlogging was investigated on peroxidases of maize (Zea mays L.) leaves. The plants showed typical adaptations to flooding stress, i.e., alterations in chlorophyll a/b ratios and increased basal shoot diameter. Seven peroxidase bands could be detected by first dimension modified SDS-PAGE and 10 bands by first dimension high resolution Clear Native Electrophoresis that altered in dependence on plant development and time of waterlogging. Native isoelectric focusing revealed three acidic to neutral and four alkaline guaiacol peroxidases that could be further separated by high resolution Clear Native Electrophorese in the second dimension. One neutral peroxidase (pI 7.0) appeared to be down-regulated within four hours after flooding, whereas alkaline peroxidases (pI 9.2, 8.0 and 7.8) were up-regulated after 28 or 52 h. Second dimensions revealed molecular masses of 133 kDa and 85 kDa for peroxidases at pI 8.0 and 7.8, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography revealed native molecular masses of 30–58 kDa for peroxidases identified as class III peroxidases and ascorbate peroxidases by mass spectrometry. Possible functions of these peroxidases in flooding stress will be discussed. PMID:28250383

  6. Copper-induced oxidative stress in maize shoots (Zea mays L.): H2O2 accumulation and peroxidases modulation.

    PubMed

    Bouazizi, Houda; Jouili, H; El Ferjani, E

    2007-06-01

    The effect of copper excess on growth, H2O2 level and peroxidase activities were studied in maize shoots. Ten-day-old seedlings were cultured in nutrient solution that contained Cu2+ ions at various concentrations (50 and 100 microM) for seven days. High concentrations of Cu2+ ions caused significant decrease both in matter production and elongation of maize shoots. In addition, treatment with CuSO4 increased levels of H2O2 and induced changes in several peroxidase activities. Moreover, the disturbance of the physiological parameters was accompanied by the modulation of the peroxidase activities: GPX (Guaiacol peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.7), CAPX (Coniferyl alcohol peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.4) and APX (Ascorbate peroxidase, EC. 1.11.1.11). Furthermore, this modulation becomes highly significant, especially, in the presence of 100 microM of CuSO4.

  7. Are hormones from the neuropeptide Y family recognized by their receptors from the membrane-bound state?

    PubMed

    Bader, Reto; Zerbe, Oliver

    2005-09-01

    Hormones and many other neurotransmitters, growth factors, odorant molecules, and light all present stimuli for a class of membrane-anchored receptors called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The GPCRs are the largest family of cell-surface receptors involved in signal transduction. About 1% of all known genes of Drosophila and more than 5% of the genes of Caenorhabditis elegans encode GPCRs. In addition, more than 50% of current therapeutic agents on the market target these receptors. When the enormous biological and pharmaceutical importance of these receptors is considered, it is surprising how little is known about the mechanism with which these receptors recognize their natural ligands. In this review we present a structural approach, utilizing techniques of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, to address the question of whether peptides from the neuropeptide Y family of neurohormones are recognized directly from solution or from the membrane-bound state. In our studies we discovered that the structures of the membrane-bound species are better correlated to the pharmacological properties of these peptides than the solution structures are. These findings are supported by the observation that many biophysical properties of these peptides seem to be optimized for membrane binding. We finally present a scenario of possible events during receptor recognition.

  8. Size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering analysis of hyaluronan size distributions made by membrane-bound hyaluronan synthase.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Bruce A; Weigel, Paul H

    2006-05-15

    Size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) analyses of Escherichia coli membranes expressing Streptococcus equisimilis hyaluronan synthase (seHAS) demonstrated an inherent artifact (10-100 MDa) that coeluted with hyaluronan (HA) and skewed the apparent weight-average mass of HA to erroneously high values. Briefly heating samples to 65-75 degrees C eliminated this artifact and increased the yield of recovered HA due to the release of HA chains that were attached to membrane-bound HAS. Inclusion of alkaline phosphatase, which removed uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP) produced during the reaction, improved the linearity of HA synthesis-even at high substrate use. Surprisingly, the addition of EDTA, to chelate Mg(2+) ions, did not completely stop the HAS reaction at 30 degrees C or at 4 degrees C. The best conditions for stopping the reaction without altering SEC-MALLS profiles of the product HA were to chill samples on ice in the presence of both EDTA and UDP. Even with excess substrate, the maximum size of product HA decreased as the enzyme concentration increased. Therefore, the maximum HA size made by HAS was determined by extrapolation to zero enzyme concentration. Using the above conditions, membrane-bound seHAS synthesized a cohort of HA products that steadily increased in weight-average molar mass, reaching a final maximal steady-state size of 4 to 6 MDa within 2-4 h.

  9. Mg2+ is an essential activator of hydrolytic activity of membrane-bound pyrophosphatase of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, A; Ordaz, H; Romero, I; Celis, H

    1992-01-01

    The substrate for the hydrolytic activity of membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is the PP(i)-Mg2+ complex. The enzyme has no activity when the free Mg2+ concentration is lower than 10 microM (at 0.5 mM-PP(i)-Mg2+), and therefore free Mg2+ is an essential activator of the hydrolytic activity. The Km for the substrate changes in response to variation in free Mg2+ concentration, from 10.25 to 0.6 mM when free Mg2+ is increased from 0.03 to 1.0 mM respectively. The Km for Mg2+ depends on the substrate concentration: the Km decreases from 0.52 to 0.14 mM from 0.25 to 0.75 mM-PP(i)-Mg2+ respectively. The extrapolated Km for Mg2+ in the absence of the substrate is 0.73 mM. Imidodiphosphate-Mg2+ and free Ca2+ were used as competitive inhibitors of substrate and activator respectively. The equilibrium binding kinetics suggest an ordered mechanism for the activator and the substrate: Mg2+ ions bind the enzyme before PP(i)-Mg2+ in the formation of the catalytic complex, membrane-bound pyrophosphatase-(Mg2+)-(PP(i)-Mg2+). PMID:1315519

  10. Protective Effect of Prosopis cineraria Against N-Nitrosodiethylamine Induced Liver Tumor by Modulating Membrane Bound Enzymes and Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Pakkir Maideen, Naina Mohamed; Velayutham, Ravichandiran; Manavalan, Gobinath

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of methanol extract of Prosopis cineraria (MPC) against N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN, 200mg/kg) induced Phenobarbital promoted experimental liver tumors in male Wistar rats. Methods: The rats were divided into four groups, each group consisting of six animals. Group 1 served as control animals. Liver tumor was induced in group 2, 3, and 4 and Group 3 animals received MPC 200mg/kg and Group 4 animals received MPC 400mg/kg. Results: Administration of DEN has brought down the levels of membrane bound enzymes like Na+/ K+ ATPase, Mg2+ ATPase and Ca2+ATPase which were later found to be increased by the administration of Prosopis cineraria (200 and 400mg/kg) in dose dependent manner. The MPC extract also suppressed the levels of glycoproteins like Hexose, Hexosamine and Sialic acid when compared to liver tumor bearing animals. Conclusion: Our study suggests that MPC may extend its protective role by modulating the levels of membrane bound enzymes and suppressing glycoprotein levels. PMID:24312790

  11. Structural Ensembles of Membrane-bound α-Synuclein Reveal the Molecular Determinants of Synaptic Vesicle Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Giuliana; De Simone, Alfonso; Arosio, Paolo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Veglia, Gianluigi; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed characterisation of the molecular determinants of membrane binding by α-synuclein (αS), a 140-residue protein whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease, is of fundamental significance to clarify the manner in which the balance between functional and dysfunctional processes are regulated for this protein. Despite its biological relevance, the structural nature of the membrane-bound state αS remains elusive, in part because of the intrinsically dynamic nature of the protein and also because of the difficulties in studying this state in a physiologically relevant environment. In the present study we have used solid-state NMR and restrained MD simulations to refine structure and topology of the N-terminal region of αS bound to the surface of synaptic-like membranes. This region has fundamental importance in the binding mechanism of αS as it acts as to anchor the protein to lipid bilayers. The results enabled the identification of the key elements for the biological properties of αS in its membrane-bound state. PMID:27273030

  12. Identification and characterization of novel membrane-bound PRL protein tyrosine phosphatases from Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Yadav, Smita; Rathaur, Sushma

    2015-11-01

    A significant amount of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity was detected in the detergent-soluble membrane-bound fraction of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite. The membrane-bound PTP activity was significantly inhibited when the adult parasites were exposed to compounds having antifilarial activity like aspirin and SK7 as well as phenylarsine oxide, a specific PTP inhibitor suggesting that this activity is stress regulated. Further, this enzyme was purified as a single protein of apparently 21 kDa using two different chromatographic techniques. The MALDI-MS/MS analysis of its peptides showed closest match with protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (Aedes aegypti). This purified enzyme (named as PRL) showed maximum activity at pH 5.5/37 °C and hydrolysed para nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP) at the highest rate followed by O-P-L-tyrosine and O-P-L-threonine. It showed significant inhibition by specific inhibitors of PTP such as sodium orthovanadate, phenylarsine oxide and ammonium molybdate and was activated by dithiothreitol (DTT). The active site modification studies suggested involvement of cysteine, arginine, histidine and aspartic acid in the catalytic activity of PRL. The activity of S. cervi PRL was also found to be resistant towards the external oxidative stress. Thus, S. cervi PRL could be taken as a potential target for the management of human lymphatic filariasis.

  13. Pantetheinase activity of membrane-bound Vanin-1: lack of free cysteamine in tissues of Vanin-1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pitari, G; Malergue, F; Martin, F; Philippe, J M; Massucci, M T; Chabret, C; Maras, B; Duprè, S; Naquet, P; Galland, F

    2000-10-20

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.-) is an ubiquitous enzyme which in vitro has been shown to recycle pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) and to produce cysteamine, a potent anti-oxidant. We show that the Vanin-1 gene encodes pantetheinase widely expressed in mouse tissues: (1) a pantetheinase activity is specifically expressed by Vanin-1 transfectants and is immunodepleted by specific antibodies; (2) Vanin-1 is a GPI-anchored pantetheinase, and consequently an ectoenzyme; (3) Vanin-1 null mice are deficient in membrane-bound pantetheinase activity in kidney and liver; (4) in these organs, a major metabolic consequence is the absence of detectable free cysteamine; this demonstrates that membrane-bound pantetheinase is the main source of cysteamine in tissues under physiological conditions. Since the Vanin-1 molecule was previously shown to be involved in the control of thymus reconstitution following sublethal irradiation in vivo, this raises the possibility that Vanin/pantetheinase might be involved in the regulation of some immune functions maybe in the context of the response to oxidative stress.

  14. Equilibration kinetics in isolated and membrane-bound photosynthetic reaction centers upon illumination: a method to determine the photoexcitation rate.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Anthony J; Goushcha, Alexander O; Barabash, Yuri M; Kharkyanen, Valery N; Scott, Gary W

    2009-07-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer, following variation of actinic light intensity, for photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) of purple bacteria (isolated and membrane-bound) were analyzed by measuring absorbance changes in the primary photoelectron donor absorption band at 865 nm. The bleaching of the primary photoelectron donor absorption band in RCs, following a sudden increase of illumination from the dark to an actinic light intensity of I(exp), obeys a simple exponential law with the rate constant alphaI(exp) + k(rec), in which alpha is a parameter relating the light intensity, measured in mW/cm(2), to a corresponding theoretical rate in units of reciprocal seconds, and k(rec) is the effective rate constant of the charge recombination in the photosynthetic RCs. In this work, a method for determining the alpha parameter value is developed and experimentally verified for isolated and membrane-bound RCs, allowing for rigorous modeling of RC macromolecule dynamics under varied photoexcitation conditions. Such modeling is necessary for RCs due to alterations of the forward photoexcitation rates and relaxation rates caused by illumination history and intramolecular structural dynamics effects. It is demonstrated that the classical Bouguer-Lambert-Beer formalism can be applied for the samples with relatively low scattering, which is not necessarily the case with strongly scattering media or high light intensity excitation.

  15. Suspension cell culture as a tool for the characterization of class III peroxidases in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Creste, Silvana; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Secreted class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) are implicated in a broad range of physiological processes throughout the plant life cycle. However, the unambiguous determination of the precise biological role of an individual class III peroxidase isoenzyme is still a difficult task due to genetic redundancy and broad substrate specificity in vitro. In addition, many difficulties are encountered during extraction and analysis of cell wall proteins. Since class III peroxidases are also secreted into the apoplast, the use of suspension cell cultures can facilitate isolation and functional characterization of individual isoforms. Here, we report on the characterization of class III peroxidases secreted in the spent medium of sugarcane suspension cell cultures. After treatment with specific inducers of cell wall lignification, peroxidases were isolated and activities assayed with guaiacol, syringaldazine and coniferyl alcohol. Enzymatic activity was not significantly different after treatments, regardless of the substrate, with the exception of methyl-jasmonate treatment, which led to a decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Remarkably, peroxidases isolated from the medium were capable of oxidizing syringaldazine, an analog to sinapyl alcohol, suggesting that sugarcane cultures can produce peroxidases putatively correlated to lignification. A proteomic approach using activity staining of 2-DE gels revealed a complex isoperoxidase profile, composed predominantly of cationic isoforms. Individual spots were excised and analyzed by LC-ESI-Q-TOF and homology-based search against the Sugarcane EST Database resulted in the identification of several proteins. Spatio-temporal expression pattern of selected genes was determined for validation of identified class III peroxidases that were preferentially expressed during sugarcane stem development.

  16. Caralluma umbellata Peroxidase: Biochemical Characterization and Its Detoxification Potentials in Comparison with Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Achar, Raghu Ram; Venkatesh, B K; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2017-02-01

    Caralluma umbellata peroxidase (CUP) is an acidic heme-containing protein having a molecular weight of ~42 kDa and is specific to guaiacol. It is not a glycoprotein. It was purified to 12.5-fold purity with 6.16 % yield. Its activity is dependent on hydrogen peroxide and has an optimum pH and temperature of 6.2 and 45 °C respectively. It can decolorize dyes, viz., Aniline Blue, Reactive Black 5, and Reactive Blue 19 but not Congo Red, while HRP can decolorize Congo Red also. It has lignin-degrading potentiality as it can decompose veratryl alcohol. Detoxification of phenol was more by CUP compared to HRP while with p-nitrophenol HRP has a greater detoxification rate. Based on our results, CUP was identified to be capable of oxidizing a variety of hazardous substances and also a lignin-degrading plant biocatalyst.

  17. Degradation of vanillic acid and production of guaiacol by microorganisms isolated from cork samples.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Belloch, Carmela; Villa, Mercedes; Uruburu, Federico; Larriba, Germán; Coque, Juan José R

    2003-03-14

    The presence of guaiacol in cork stoppers is responsible for some cases of cork taint causing unpleasant alterations to wine. We have performed a characterization of the cork-associated microbiota by isolating 55 different microorganisms: eight yeast, 14 filamentous fungi or molds, 13 actinomycetes and 20 non-filamentous bacteria. A screening for degradation of vanillic acid and guaiacol production showed that none of the filamentous fungi could achieve any of these processes. By contrast, five of the eight yeast strains isolated were able to degrade vanillic acid, although it was not converted to guaiacol. Guaiacol production was only detected in four bacterial strains: one isolate of Bacillus subtilis and three actinomycetes, Streptomyces sp. A3, Streptomyces sp. A5 and Streptomyces sp. A13, were able to accumulate this compound in both liquid media and cultures over cork. These results suggest that guaiacol-mediated cork taint should be attributed to the degradative action of vanillic acid by bacterial strains growing on cork.

  18. Cantaloupe melon peroxidase: characterization and effects of additives on activity.

    PubMed

    Lamikanra, O; Watson, M A

    2000-06-01

    Peroxidase in cantaloupe melon (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud.), a fruit commonly fresh cut processed, was characterized to determine reaction pathway, optimal conditions for activity and effect of some additives on enzymatic action. Mn2+, CaCl2, NaNO2 and kinetin had partial inhibitory effects on enzyme activity. Activity was effectively inhibited by compounds capable of chelating peroxidase heme iron such as diethyldithiocarbamate and tiron, but unaffected by EDTA. Free radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase, also had no effect on reaction velocity. Enzymatic action was consistent with that of ascorbate peroxidase based on the relatively higher affinity for ascorbate over guaiacol. Optimum activity temperature was 50-55 degrees C. The enzyme was stable at temperatures below 40 degrees C and at 50 degrees C for up to 10 min. Over 90% of total activity was lost at 80 degrees C within 5 min. Broad pH optima, 5.5-7.5 at 50 degrees C and 6-7 at 30 degrees C, were obtained. Peroxidase activity in cantaloupe was higher than those in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), suggesting a relatively high oxidative stress in fresh cut cantaloupe. The potential use of ascorbate as an additive in fresh cut cantaloupe melon was demonstrated by its ability to preserve color in minimally processed fruits for 25 days at 4 degrees C, possibly as a result of an enhanced antioxidative action of the ascorbate-peroxidase complex and trace metal ion cofactors.

  19. Chemical characterization of the main products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-08-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e., burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed atmospherically in the gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the main products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by solid-phase extraction and then purified with semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state proton, carbon-13 and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of ultraviolet and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  20. Effect of Butanedioic Acid Mono (2,2-Dimethylhydrazide) on the Activity of Membrane-Bound Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    See, Raymond M.; Foy, Chester L.

    1982-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from hypocotyls of five-day-old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. `Black Valentine') seedlings rapidly oxidized succinate, malate, and NADH. Oxidation rates, respiratory control, and ADP:O ratios obtained with saturating concentrations of all three substrates indicated that the mitochondria were tightly coupled. The mitochondrial preparation was then employed to investigate the respiration-inhibiting effects of butanedioic acid mono (2,2-dimethyl-hydrazide) (daminozide) a plant growth retardant having structural similarity to an endogenous respiratory substrate (succinate). Daminozide markedly inhibited the activity of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. Inhibition was of the competitive type (apparent Ki, 20.2 millimolar) with respect to succinate. Although not excluding other hypotheses, the results support an active role for daminozide in the suppression of respiration as an important metabolic site of its action as a plant growth regulator. PMID:16662493

  1. Penconazole alters redox status, cholinergic function, and membrane-bound ATPases in the cerebrum and cerebellum of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Chaâbane, M; Ghorbel, I; Elwej, A; Mnif, H; Boudawara, T; Chaâbouni, S Ellouze; Zeghal, N; Soudani, N

    2016-10-12

    Pesticides exposure causes usually harmful effects to the environment and human health. The present study aimed to investigate the potential toxic effects of penconazole, a triazole fungicide, on the cerebrum and cerebellum of adult rats. Penconazole was administered intraperitoneally to male Wistar rats at a dose of 67 mg kg(-1) body weight every 2 days during 9 days. Results showed that penconazole induced oxidative stress in rat cerebrum and cerebellum tissues. In fact, we have found a significant increase in malondialdehyde, hydrogen peroxide, and advanced oxidation protein product levels, as well as an alteration of the antioxidant status, enzymatic (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and nonenzymatic (glutathione), the cholinergic function, and membrane-bound ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase). Penconazole also provoked histological alterations marked by pyknotic and vacuolated neurons in the cerebrum and apoptosis and edema in the cerebellum Purkinje cells' layer. Therefore, the use of this neurotoxicant fungicide must be regularly monitored in the environment.

  2. Preliminary safety assessment of a membrane-bound delta 9 desaturase candidate protein for transgenic oilseed crops.

    PubMed

    Madduri, Krishna M; Schafer, Barry W; Hasler, James M; Lin, Gaofeng; Foster, Mendy L; Embrey, Shawna K; Sastry-Dent, Lakshmi; Song, Ping; Larrinua, Ignacio M; Gachotte, Daniel J; Herman, Rod A

    2012-10-01

    A gene encoding delta 9 desaturase (D9DS), an integral membrane protein, is being considered for incorporation into oilseed crops to reduce saturated fatty acids and thus improve human nutritional value. Typically, a safety assessment for transgenic crops involves purifying heterologously produced transgenic proteins in an active form for use in safety studies. Membrane-bound proteins have been very difficult to isolate in an active form due to their inherent physicochemical properties. Described here are methods used to derive enriched preparations of the active D9DS protein for use in early stage safety studies. Results of these studies, in combination with bioinformatic results and knowledge of the mode of action of the protein, along with a history of safe consumption of related proteins, provides a weight of evidence supporting the safety of the D9DS protein in food and feed.

  3. Photochemical energy conversion by membrane-bound photoredox systems. Progress report, July 1, 1989--March 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tollin, G.

    1992-03-01

    Most of our effort during the past grant period has been directed towards investigating electron transfer processes involving redox proteins at lipid bilayer/aqueous interfaces. This theme, as was noted in our previous three year renewal proposal, is consistent with our goal of developing biomimetic solar energy conversion systems which utilize the unique properties of biological electron transfer molecules. Thus, small redox proteins such as cytochrome c, plastocyanin and ferredoxin function is biological photosynthesis as mediators of electron flow between the photochemical systems localized in the membrane, and more complex soluble or membrane-bound redox proteins which are designed to carry out specific biological tasks such as transbilayer proton gradient formation, dinitrogen fixation, ATP synthesis, dihydrogen synthesis, generation of strong reductants, etc. In these studies, we have utilized two principal experimental techniques, laser flash photolysis and cyclic voltammetry, both of which permit direct measurements of electron transfer processes.

  4. Release of Membrane-Bound Vesicles and Inhibition of Tumor Cell Adhesion by the Peptide Neopetrosiamide A

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Pamela; Heller, Markus; Williams, David E.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Vogl, A. Wayne; Foster, Leonard J.; Andersen, Raymond J.; Roberge, Michel; Roskelley, Calvin D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neopetrosiamide A (NeoA) is a 28-amino acid tricyclic peptide originally isolated from a marine sponge as a tumor cell invasion inhibitor whose mechanism of action is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that NeoA reversibly inhibits tumor cell adhesion, disassembles focal adhesions in pre-attached cells, and decreases the level of β1 integrin subunits on the cell surface. NeoA also induces the formation of dynamic, membrane-bound protrusions on the surface of treated cells and the release of membrane-bound vesicles into the culture medium. Proteomic analysis indicates that the vesicles contain EGF and transferrin receptors as well as a number of proteins involved in adhesion and migration including: β1 integrin and numerous α integrin subunits; actin and actin-binding proteins such as cofilin, moesin and myosin 1C; and membrane modulating eps15 homology domain (EHD) proteins. Surface labeling, trafficking inhibition, and real-time imaging experiments all suggest that β1 integrin-containing vesicles are released directly from NeoA-induced cell surface protrusions rather than from vesicles generated intracellularly. The biological activity of NeoA is dependent on its disulfide bond pattern and NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide is globular with a continuous ridge of hydrophobic groups flanked by charged amino acid residues that could facilitate a simultaneous interaction with lipids and proteins in the membrane. Conclusions/Significance NeoA is an anti-adhesive peptide that decreases cell surface integrin levels through a novel, yet to be elucidated, mechanism that involves the release of adhesion molecule-containing vesicles from the cell surface. PMID:20520768

  5. Human Renal Normal, Tumoral, and Cancer Stem Cells Express Membrane-Bound Interleukin-15 Isoforms Displaying Different Functions1

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Gallerne, Cindy; Romei, Cristina; Le Coz, Vincent; Gangemi, Rosaria; Khawam, Krystel; Devocelle, Aurore; Gu, Yanhong; Bruno, Stefania; Ferrini, Silvano; Chouaib, Salem; Eid, Pierre; Azzarone, Bruno; Giron-Michel, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal interleukin-15 (IL-15) participates to renal pathophysiology, but the role of its different membrane-bound isoforms remains to be elucidated. In this study, we reassess the biology of membrane-bound IL-15 (mb-IL-15) isoforms by comparing primary cultures of human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) to peritumoral (ptumTEC), tumoral (RCC), and cancer stem cells (CSC/CD105+). RPTEC express a 14 to 16 kDa mb-IL-15, whose existence has been assumed but never formally demonstrated and likely represents the isoform anchored at the cell membrane through the IL-15 receptor α (IL-15Rα) chain, because it is sensitive to acidic treatment and is not competent to deliver a reverse signal. By contrast, ptumTEC, RCC, and CSC express a novel N-hyperglycosylated, short-lived transmembrane mb-IL-15 (tmb-IL-15) isoform around 27 kDa, resistant to acidic shock, delivering a reverse signal in response to its soluble receptor (sIL-15Rα). This reverse signal triggers the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin in ptumTEC and RCC but not in CSC/CD105+, where it promotes survival. Indeed, through the AKT pathway, tmb-IL-15 protects CSC/CD105+ from non-programmed cell death induced by serum starvation. Finally, both mb-IL-15 and tmb-IL-15 are sensitive to metalloproteases, and the cleaved tmb-IL-15 (25 kDa) displays a powerful anti-apoptotic effect on human hematopoietic cells. Overall, our data indicate that both mb-IL-15 and tmb-IL-15 isoforms play a complex role in renal pathophysiology downregulating E-cadherin and favoring cell survival. Moreover, “apparently normal” ptumTEC cells, sharing different properties with RCC, could contribute to organize an enlarged peritumoral “preneoplastic” environment committed to favor tumor progression. PMID:26152359

  6. Soluble and Membrane-Bound β-Glucosidases Are Involved in Trimming the Xyloglucan Backbone1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    In many flowering plants, xyloglucan is a major component of primary cell walls, where it plays an important role in growth regulation. Xyloglucan can be degraded by a suite of exoglycosidases that remove specific sugars. In this work, we show that the xyloglucan backbone, formed by (1→4)-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl residues, can be attacked by two different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) β-glucosidases from glycoside hydrolase family 3. While BGLC1 (At5g20950; for β-glucosidase active against xyloglucan 1) is responsible for all or most of the soluble activity, BGLC3 (At5g04885) is usually a membrane-anchored protein. Mutations in these two genes, whether on their own or combined with mutations in other exoglycosidase genes, resulted in the accumulation of partially digested xyloglucan subunits, such as GXXG, GXLG, or GXFG. While a mutation in BGLC1 had significant effects on its own, lack of BGLC3 had only minor effects. On the other hand, double bglc1 bglc3 mutants revealed a synergistic interaction that supports a role for membrane-bound BGLC3 in xyloglucan metabolism. In addition, bglc1 bglc3 was complemented by overexpression of either BGLC1 or BGLC3. In overexpression lines, BGLC3 activity was concentrated in a microsome-enriched fraction but also was present in soluble form. Finally, both genes were generally expressed in the same cell types, although, in some cases, BGLC3 was expressed at earlier stages than BGLC1. We propose that functional specialization could explain the separate localization of both enzymes, as a membrane-bound β-glucosidase could specifically digest soluble xyloglucan without affecting the wall-bound polymer. PMID:27956490

  7. Targeting membrane-bound viral RNA synthesis reveals potent inhibition of diverse coronaviruses including the middle East respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Anna; Dijkman, Ronald; Bergström, Tomas; Kann, Nina; Adamiak, Beata; Hannoun, Charles; Kindler, Eveline; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R; Muth, Doreen; Kint, Joeri; Forlenza, Maria; Müller, Marcel A; Drosten, Christian; Thiel, Volker; Trybala, Edward

    2014-05-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6), a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections.

  8. Guaiacol hydrodeoxygenation mechanism on Pt(111): Insights from density functional theory and linear free energy relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study density functional theory (DFT) was used to study the adsorption of guaiacol and its initial hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions on Pt(111). Previously reported Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi (BEP) correlations for small open chain molecules are found to be inadequate in estimating the reaction...

  9. Adsorption of guaiacol on Fe (110) and Pd (111) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Alyssa J. R.; Wang, Yong; McEwen, Jean-Sabin

    2016-06-01

    The catalytic properties of surfaces are highly dependent upon the effect said surfaces have on the geometric and electronic structure of adsorbed reactants, products, and intermediates. It is therefore crucial to have a surface-level understanding of the adsorption of the key species in a reaction in order to design active and selective catalysts. Here, we study the adsorption of guaiacol on Fe (110) and Pd (111) using dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations as both of these metals are of interest as hydrodeoxygenation catalysts for the conversion of bio-oils to useable biofuels. Both vertical (via the oxygen functional groups) and horizontal (via the aromatic ring) adsorption configurations were examined and the resulting adsorption and molecular distortion energies showed that the vertical sites were only physisorbed while the horizontal sites were chemisorbed on both metal surfaces. A comparison of guaiacol's horizontal adsorption on Fe (110) and Pd (111) showed that guaiacol had a stronger adsorption on Pd (111) while the Fe (110) surface distorted the Csbnd O bonds to a greater degree. Electronic analyses on the horizontal systems showed that the greater adsorption strength for guaiacol on Pd (111) was likely due to the greater charge transfer between the aromatic ring and the surface Pd atoms. Additionally, the greater distortion of the Csbnd O bonds in adsorbed guaiacol on Fe (110) is likely due to the greater degree of interaction between the oxygen and surface Fe atoms. Overall, our results show that the Fe (110) surface has a greater degree of interaction with the functional groups and the Pd (111) surface has a greater degree of interaction with the aromatic ring.

  10. A 4-alkyl-substituted analogue of guaiacol shows greater repellency to savannah tsetse (Glossina spp.).

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajindar K; Hassanali, Ahmed

    2007-05-01

    The responses of Glossina morsitans morsitans Westwood to guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a mild repellent constituent of bovid odors, and seven analogues comprising 2-methoxyfuran, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol (4-methylguaiacol), 4-ethyl-2-methoxyphenol (4-ethylguaiacol), 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol (4-allylguaiacol; eugenol), 3,4-methylenedioxytoluene, and 3,4-dimethoxystyrene were compared in a two-choice wind tunnel. The 4-methyl-substituted derivative (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) was found to elicit stronger repellent responses from the flies compared with guaiacol. None of the other analogues showed significant repellent effects on flies. 4-Methylguaiacol, guaiacol, and eugenol (which was included because of previous reports of its repellency against a number of arthropods) were further evaluated in the field with wild populations of predominantly Glossina pallidipes Austen. The presence of guaiacol or eugenol near odor-baited traps caused some nonsignificant reduction in the number of tsetse catches at relatively high release rates (approximately 50 mg/hr). In contrast, the 4-methyl derivative at three different release rates (2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 mg/hr) reduced trap catches of baited traps in a dose-response manner. At 10 mg/hr release rate, it reduced the catches of baited and unbaited traps by approximately 80 and approximately 70%, respectively. In addition, the compound not only reduced the number of tsetse attracted to natural ox odor (approximately 80%), but also had an effect on their feeding responses, reducing the proportion that fed on an ox by more than 80%. Our study shows that the presence of a methyl substituent at the 4-position of guaiacol enhances the repellency of the molecule to savannah tsetse and suggests that 4-methylguaiacol may represent a promising additional tool in the arsenal of techniques in trypanosomiasis control.

  11. Characterization of 19 Genes Encoding Membrane-Bound Fatty Acid Desaturases and their Expression Profiles in Gossypium raimondii Under Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Wei; He, Qiuling; Daud, Muhammad Khan; Chen, Jinhong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2015-01-01

    To produce unsaturated fatty acids, membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases (FADs) can be exploited to introduce double bonds into the acyl chains of fatty acids. In this study, 19 membrane-bound FAD genes were identified in Gossypium raimondii through database searches and were classified into four different subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis. All 19 membrane-bound FAD proteins shared three highly conserved histidine boxes, except for GrFAD2.1, which lost the third histidine box in the C-terminal region. In the G. raimondii genome, tandem duplication might have led to the increasing size of the FAD2 cluster in the Omega Desaturase subfamily, whereas segmental duplication appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the expansion of the Sphingolipid and Front-end Desaturase subfamilies. Gene expression analysis showed that seven membrane-bound FAD genes were significantly up-regulated and that five genes were greatly suppressed in G. raimondii leaves exposed to low temperature conditions.

  12. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  13. The Novel Membrane-Bound Proteins MFSD1 and MFSD3 are Putative SLC Transporters Affected by Altered Nutrient Intake.

    PubMed

    Perland, Emelie; Hellsten, Sofie V; Lekholm, Emilia; Eriksson, Mikaela M; Arapi, Vasiliki; Fredriksson, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Membrane-bound solute carriers (SLCs) are essential as they maintain several physiological functions, such as nutrient uptake, ion transport and waste removal. The SLC family comprise about 400 transporters, and we have identified two new putative family members, major facilitator superfamily domain containing 1 (MFSD1) and 3 (MFSD3). They cluster phylogenetically with SLCs of MFS type, and both proteins are conserved in chordates, while MFSD1 is also found in fruit fly. Based on homology modelling, we predict 12 transmembrane regions, a common feature for MFS transporters. The genes are expressed in abundance in mice, with specific protein staining along the plasma membrane in neurons. Depriving mouse embryonic primary cortex cells of amino acids resulted in upregulation of Mfsd1, whereas Mfsd3 is unaltered. Furthermore, in vivo, Mfsd1 and Mfsd3 are downregulated in anterior brain sections in mice subjected to starvation, while upregulated specifically in brainstem. Mfsd3 is also attenuated in cerebellum after starvation. In mice raised on high-fat diet, Mfsd1 was specifically downregulated in brainstem and hypothalamus, while Mfsd3 was reduced consistently throughout the brain.

  14. A novel prokaryotic expression system for biosynthesis of recombinant human membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Pedro, A Q; Bonifácio, M J; Queiroz, J A; Maia, C J; Passarinha, L A

    2011-11-10

    Membrane proteins constitute 20-30% of all proteins encoded by the genome of various organisms. While large amounts of purified proteins are required for pharmaceutical and crystallization attempts, there is an unmet need for the development of novel heterologous membrane protein overexpression systems. Specifically, we tested the application of Brevibacillus choshinensis cells for the biosynthesis of human membrane bound catechol-O-methyltransferase (hMBCOMT). In terms of the upstream stage moderate to high expression was obtained for complex media formulation with a value near 45 nmol/h/mg for hMBCOMT specific activity achieved at 20 h culture with 37°C and 250 rpm. Subsequently, the efficiency for reconstitution of hMBCOMT is markedly null in the presence of ionic detergents, such as sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). In general, for non-ionic and zwiterionic detergents, until a detergent critic micellar concentration (CMC) of 1.0 mM, hMBCOMT shows more biological activity at lower detergent concentrations while for detergent CMC higher than 1 mM, higher detergent concentrations seem to be ideal for hMBCOMT solubilization. Indeed, from the detergents tested, the non-ionic digitonin at 0.5% (w/v) appears to be the most suitable for hMBCOMT solubilization.

  15. A rice membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinase is activated in response to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Martín, M L; Busconi, L

    2001-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are found in various subcellular localizations, which suggests that this family of serine/threonine kinases may be involved in multiple signal transduction pathways. CDPKs are believed to be involved in the response of plants to low temperatures, but the precise role in the signal transduction pathway is largely unknown. Previous reports described changes in CDPKs' mRNA levels in response to cold treatment, but whether these changes are accompanied by increases in protein level and/or kinase activities is unknown. In the present study, we identify in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Don Juan) plants a 56-kD membrane-bound CDPK that is activated in response to cold treatment. Immunoblot analysis of the enzyme preparations from control and cold-treated plants showed that the kinase level was similar in both preparations. However, both kinase and autophosphorylating activities of the enzyme prepared from cold-treated plants were significantly higher than that obtained from control plants. The activation of the CDPK is detected after 12 to 18 h of cold treatment, which indicates that the kinase does not participate in the initial response to low temperature but in the adaptative process to adverse conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a CDPK that is posttranscriptionally activated in response to low temperature.

  16. Engineering Hydrogen Gas Production from Formate in a Hyperthermophile by Heterologous Production of an 18-Subunit Membrane-bound Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Gina L.; Schut, Gerrit J.; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Nixon, William J.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Biohydrogen gas has enormous potential as a source of reductant for the microbial production of biofuels, but its low solubility and poor gas mass transfer rates are limiting factors. These limitations could be circumvented by engineering biofuel production in microorganisms that are also capable of generating H2 from highly soluble chemicals such as formate, which can function as an electron donor. Herein, the model hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 °C by fermenting sugars to produce H2, has been engineered to also efficiently convert formate to H2. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome vector, the 16.9-kb 18-gene cluster encoding the membrane-bound, respiratory formate hydrogen lyase complex of Thermococcus onnurineus was inserted into the P. furiosus chromosome and expressed as a functional unit. This enabled P. furiosus to utilize formate as well as sugars as an H2 source and to do so at both 80° and 95 °C, near the optimum growth temperature of the donor (T. onnurineus) and engineered host (P. furiosus), respectively. This accomplishment also demonstrates the versatility of P. furiosus for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24318960

  17. The effect of progesterone and 17-β estradiol on membrane-bound HLA-G in adipose derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Akram; Hashemi-beni, Batool; Moslehi, Azam; Akbari, Maryam Ali

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-bound HLA-G (mHLA-G) discovery on adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) as a tolerogenic and immunosuppressive molecule was very important. Many documents have shown that HLA-G expression can be controlled via some hormones such as progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2). Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate progesterone and estradiol effects on mHLA-G in ADSCs at restricted and combination concentrations. Three independent cell lines were cultured in complete free phenol red DMEM and subcultured to achieve suffi cient cells. These cells were treated with P4, E2 and P4 plus E2 at physiologic and pregnancy concentrations for 3 days in cell culture conditions. The HLA-G positive ADSCs was measured via monoclonal anti HLA-G-FITC/MEMG-09 by means of flow cytometry in nine groups. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. There were no signifi cant values of the mean percentage of HLA-G positive cells in E2-treated and the combination of P4 plus E2-treated ADSCs compared to control cells (p value>0.05) but P4 had a signifi cant increase on mHLA-G in ADSCs (p value<0.05). High P4 concentration increased mHLA-G but E2 and the combination of P4 plus E2 could not change mHLA-G on ADSCs. PMID:27382350

  18. The effect of progesterone and 17-β estradiol on membrane-bound HLA-G in adipose derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, Akram; Hashemi-Beni, Batool; Moslehi, Azam; Akbari, Maryam Ali; Adib, Minoo

    2016-07-01

    Membrane-bound HLA-G (mHLA-G) discovery on adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) as a tolerogenic and immunosuppressive molecule was very important. Many documents have shown that HLA-G expression can be controlled via some hormones such as progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2). Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate progesterone and estradiol effects on mHLA-G in ADSCs at restricted and combination concentrations. Three independent cell lines were cultured in complete free phenol red DMEM and subcultured to achieve suffi cient cells. These cells were treated with P4, E2 and P4 plus E2 at physiologic and pregnancy concentrations for 3 days in cell culture conditions. The HLA-G positive ADSCs was measured via monoclonal anti HLA-G-FITC/MEMG-09 by means of flow cytometry in nine groups. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. There were no signifi cant values of the mean percentage of HLA-G positive cells in E2-treated and the combination of P4 plus E2-treated ADSCs compared to control cells (p value>0.05) but P4 had a signifi cant increase on mHLA-G in ADSCs (p value<0.05). High P4 concentration increased mHLA-G but E2 and the combination of P4 plus E2 could not change mHLA-G on ADSCs.

  19. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J. Q.; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D.; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg2+ or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  20. Comparison of membrane-bound and soluble polyphenol oxidase in Fuji apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Fuji).

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhao, Jin-Hong; Gan, Zhi-Lin; Ni, Yuan-Ying

    2015-04-15

    This study compared membrane-bound with soluble polyphenol oxidase (mPPO and sPPO, respectively) from Fuji apple. Purified mPPO and partially purified sPPO were used. mPPO was purified by temperature-induced phase partitioning and ion exchange chromatography. The specific activity of mPPO was 34.12× higher than that of sPPO. mPPO was more stable than sPPO at pH 5.0-8.5. Although mPPO was more easily inactivated at 25-55 °C, it is still more active than sPPO in this temperature range. The optimum substrate of mPPO was 4-methyl catechol, followed by catechol. L-cysteine had the highest inhibitory effects on mPPO followed by ascorbic acid and glutathione. Surprisingly, EDTA increased mPPO activity. The results revealed that purified mPPO is a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 67 kDa.

  1. Putative Membrane-Bound Transporters MFSD14A and MFSD14B Are Neuronal and Affected by Nutrient Availability

    PubMed Central

    Lekholm, Emilia; Perland, Emelie; Eriksson, Mikaela M.; Hellsten, Sofie V.; Lindberg, Frida A.; Rostami, Jinar; Fredriksson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of orphan transporters is of importance due to their involvement in cellular homeostasis but also in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The tissue and cellular localization, as well as function, is still unknown for many of the solute carriers belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) Pfam clan. Here, we have characterized two putative novel transporters MFSD14A (HIAT1) and MFSD14B (HIATL1) in the mouse central nervous system and found protein staining throughout the adult mouse brain. Both transporters localized to neurons and MFSD14A co-localized with the Golgi marker Giantin in primary embryonic cortex cultures, while MFSD14B staining co-localized with an endoplasmic retention marker, KDEL. Based on phylogenetic clustering analyses, we predict both to have organic substrate profiles, and possible involvement in energy homeostasis. Therefore, we monitored gene regulation changes in mouse embryonic primary cultures after amino acid starvations and found both transporters to be upregulated after 3 h of starvation. Interestingly, in mice subjected to 24 h of food starvation, both transporters were downregulated in the hypothalamus, while Mfsd14a was also downregulated in the brainstem. In addition, in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD), upregulation of both transporters was seen in the striatum. Both MFSD14A and MFSD14B were intracellular neuronal membrane-bound proteins, expressed in the Golgi and Endoplasmic reticulum, affected by both starvation and HFD to varying degree in the mouse brain. PMID:28179877

  2. Aluminium and Acrylamide Disrupt Cerebellum Redox States, Cholinergic Function and Membrane-Bound ATPase in Adult Rats and Their Offspring.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Imen; Amara, Ibtissem Ben; Ktari, Naourez; Elwej, Awatef; Boudawara, Ons; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-12-01

    Accumulation of aluminium and acrylamide in food is a major source of human exposure. Their adverse effects are well documented, but there is no information about the health problems arising from their combined exposure. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neurotoxic effects after co-exposure of pregnant and lactating rats to aluminium and acrylamide in order to evaluate redox state, cholinergic function and membrane-bound ATPases in the cerebellum of adult rats and their progeny. Pregnant female rats have received aluminium (50 mg/kg body weight) via drinking water and acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight) by gavage, either individually or in combination from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. Exposure to these toxicants provoked an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels and a decrease in SOD, CAT, GPx, Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase and AChE activities in the cerebellum of mothers and their suckling pups. A reduction in GSH, NPSH and vitamin C levels was also observed. These changes were confirmed by histological results. Interestingly, co-exposure to these toxicants exhibited synergism based on physical and biochemical variables in the cerebellum of mothers and their progeny.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary structure determination of the membrane-bound complex cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M. L.; Oliveira, T.; Matias, P. M.; Martins, I. C.; Valente, F. M. A.; Pereira, I. A. C.; Archer, M.

    2006-06-01

    The cytochrome c nitrite reductase complex from D. vulgaris Hildenborough has been crystallized. The preliminary crystallographic structure reveals a 2:1 NrfA:NrfH complex stoichiometry. The cytochrome c nitrite reductase (cNiR) isolated from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a membrane-bound complex formed of NrfA and NrfH subunits. The catalytic subunit NrfA is a soluble pentahaem cytochrome c that forms a physiological dimer of about 120 kDa. The electron-donor subunit NrfH is a membrane-anchored tetrahaem cytochrome c of about 18 kDa molecular weight and belongs to the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases, for which no structures are known. Crystals of the native cNiR membrane complex, solubilized with dodecylmaltoside detergent (DDM), were obtained using PEG 4K as precipitant. Anomalous diffraction data were measured at the Swiss Light Source to 2.3 Å resolution. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.5, b = 256.7, c = 578.2 Å. Molecular-replacement and MAD methods were combined to solve the structure. The data presented reveal that D. vulgaris cNiR contains one NrfH subunit per NrfA dimer.

  4. Protective effect of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol) against membrane-bound enzyme alterations in isoproterenol-induced cardiac damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, M; Selvi, V; Krishnakumari, S

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the preventive role of the ethanolic extract of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol) fruit on membrane-bound enzymes, such as sodium potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase), calcium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Ca(2+) ATPase) and magnesium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Mg(2+) ATPase) on isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with the ethanolic extract of L. siceraria (Mol) fruit (125, 250 and 500 mg kg(-1) body weight) for a period of 30 days. After the treatment period, ISO (85mg kg(-1) body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats at 24-h intervals for 2 days. ISO-induced rats showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the activity of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and an increase in the activities of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ATPases in the heart tissues. Pre-treatment with the ethanolic extract of L. siceraria (Mol) fruit for a period of 30 days exhibited a significant (p < 0.05) effect in ISO-induced rats. Thus, our study shows that the ethanolic extract of L. siceraria (Mol) fruit has membrane-stabilising role in ISO-induced MI in rats.

  5. Quinone-reactive proteins devoid of haem b form widespread membrane-bound electron transport modules in bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Kern, Melanie

    2008-10-01

    Many quinone-reactive enzyme complexes that are part of membrane-integral eukaryotic or prokaryotic respiratory electron transport chains contain one or more haem b molecules embedded in the membrane. In recent years, various novel proteins have emerged that are devoid of haem b but are thought to fulfil a similar function in bacterial anaerobic respiratory systems. These proteins are encoded by genes organized in various genomic arrangements and are thought to form widespread membrane-bound quinone-reactive electron transport modules that exchange electrons with redox partner proteins located at the outer side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Prototypic representatives are the multihaem c-type cytochromes NapC, NrfH and TorC (NapC/NrfH family), the putative iron-sulfur protein NapH and representatives of the NrfD/PsrC family. Members of these protein families vary in the number of their predicted transmembrane segments and, consequently, diverse quinone-binding sites are expected. Only a few of these enzymes have been isolated and characterized biochemically and high-resolution structures are limited. This mini-review briefly summarizes predicted and experimentally demonstrated properties of the proteins in question and discusses their role in electron transport and bioenergetics of anaerobic respiration.

  6. An investigation into membrane bound redox carriers involved in energy transduction mechanism in Brevibacterium linens DSM 20158 with unsequenced genome.

    PubMed

    Shabbiri, Khadija; Botting, Catherine H; Adnan, Ahmad; Fuszard, Matthew; Naseem, Shahid; Ahmed, Safeer; Shujaat, Shahida; Syed, Quratulain; Ahmad, Waqar

    2014-04-01

    Brevibacterium linens (B. linens) DSM 20158 with an unsequenced genome can be used as a non-pathogenic model to study features it has in common with other unsequenced pathogens of the same genus on the basis of comparative proteome analysis. The most efficient way to kill a pathogen is to target its energy transduction mechanism. In the present study, we have identified the redox protein complexes involved in the electron transport chain of B. linens DSM 20158 from their clear homology with the shot-gun genome sequenced strain BL2 of B. linens by using the SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with nano LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry. B. linens is found to have a branched electron transport chain (Respiratory chain), in which electrons can enter the respiratory chain either at NADH (Complex I) or at Complex II level or at the cytochrome level. Moreover, we are able to isolate, purify, and characterize the membrane bound Complex II (succinate dehydrogenase), Complex III (menaquinone cytochrome c reductase cytochrome c subunit, Complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and Complex V (ATP synthase) of B. linens strain DSM 20158.

  7. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities.

  8. Identification of a novel type III secretion-associated outer membrane-bound protein from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Li, Rui-Fang; Ming, Zhen-Hua; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells to overcome host defenses. To date, most of our knowledge about the T3SS molecular architecture comes from the studies on animal pathogens. In plant pathogens, nine Hrc proteins are believed to be structural components of the T3SS, of which HrcC and HrcJ form the outer and inner rings of the T3SS, respectively. Here, we demonstrated that a novel outer membrane-bound protein (HpaM) of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is critical for the type III secretion and is structurally and functionally conserved in phytopathogenic Xanthomonas spp. We showed that the C-terminus of HpaM extends into the periplasm to interact physically with HrcJ and the middle part of HpaM interacts physically with HrcC. It is clear that the outer and inner rings compose the main basal body of the T3SS apparatus in animal pathogens. Therefore, we presume that HpaM may act as a T3SS structural component, or play a role in assisting assembling or affecting the stability of the T3SS apparatus. HpaM is a highly prevalent and specific protein in Xanthomonas spp., suggesting that the T3SS of Xanthomonas is distinctive in some aspects from other pathogens. PMID:28198457

  9. Sensing Size through Clustering in Non-Equilibrium Membranes and the Control of Membrane-Bound Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Vagne, Quentin; Turner, Matthew S; Sens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The formation of dynamical clusters of proteins is ubiquitous in cellular membranes and is in part regulated by the recycling of membrane components. We show, using stochastic simulations and analytic modeling, that the out-of-equilibrium cluster size distribution of membrane components undergoing continuous recycling is strongly influenced by lateral confinement. This result has significant implications for the clustering of plasma membrane proteins whose mobility is hindered by cytoskeletal "corrals" and for protein clustering in cellular organelles of limited size that generically support material fluxes. We show how the confinement size can be sensed through its effect on the size distribution of clusters of membrane heterogeneities and propose that this could be regulated to control the efficiency of membrane-bound reactions. To illustrate this, we study a chain of enzymatic reactions sensitive to membrane protein clustering. The reaction efficiency is found to be a non-monotonic function of the system size, and can be optimal for sizes comparable to those of cellular organelles.

  10. Identification of a novel type III secretion-associated outer membrane-bound protein from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Li, Rui-Fang; Ming, Zhen-Hua; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2017-02-15

    Many bacterial pathogens employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic cells to overcome host defenses. To date, most of our knowledge about the T3SS molecular architecture comes from the studies on animal pathogens. In plant pathogens, nine Hrc proteins are believed to be structural components of the T3SS, of which HrcC and HrcJ form the outer and inner rings of the T3SS, respectively. Here, we demonstrated that a novel outer membrane-bound protein (HpaM) of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is critical for the type III secretion and is structurally and functionally conserved in phytopathogenic Xanthomonas spp. We showed that the C-terminus of HpaM extends into the periplasm to interact physically with HrcJ and the middle part of HpaM interacts physically with HrcC. It is clear that the outer and inner rings compose the main basal body of the T3SS apparatus in animal pathogens. Therefore, we presume that HpaM may act as a T3SS structural component, or play a role in assisting assembling or affecting the stability of the T3SS apparatus. HpaM is a highly prevalent and specific protein in Xanthomonas spp., suggesting that the T3SS of Xanthomonas is distinctive in some aspects from other pathogens.

  11. The Mössbauer Parameters of the Proximal Cluster of Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase Revisited: A Density Functional Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An unprecedented [4Fe-3S] cluster proximal to the regular [NiFe] active site has recently been found to be responsible for the ability of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBHs) to oxidize dihydrogen in the presence of ambient levels of oxygen. Starting from proximal cluster models of a recent DFT study on the redox-dependent structural transformation of the [4Fe-3S] cluster, 57Fe Mössbauer parameters (electric field gradients, isomer shifts, and nuclear hyperfine couplings) were calculated using DFT. Our results revise the previously reported correspondence of Mössbauer signals and iron centers in the [4Fe-3S]3+ reduced-state proximal cluster. Similar conflicting assignments are also resolved for the [4Fe-3S]5+ superoxidized state with particular regard to spin-coupling in the broken-symmetry DFT calculations. Calculated 57Fe hyperfine coupling (HFC) tensors expose discrepancies in the experimental set of HFC tensors and substantiate the need for additional experimental work on the magnetic properties of the MBH proximal cluster in its reduced and superoxidized redox states. PMID:26598030

  12. Peroxidase(s) in environment protection.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment.

  13. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  14. Musa paradisiaca stem juice as a source of peroxidase and ligninperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Vernwal, S K; Yadav, R S; Yadav, K D

    2000-10-01

    Musa paradisiaca stem juice has been shown to contain peroxidase activity of the order of 0.1 enzyme unit/ml. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide are 2.4 and 0.28 mM respectively. The pH and temperature optima are 4.5 and 62.5 degrees C respectively. Like other peroxidases, it follows double displacement type mechanism. At low pH, Musa paradisiaca stem juice exhibits ligninperoxidase type activity. The pH optimum for ligninperoxidase type activity is 2.0 and the temperature optimum is 24 degrees C. The Km values for veratryl alcohol and n-propanol are 66 and 78 microM respectively.

  15. Class III peroxidases are activated in proanthocyanidin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liguo; Xu, Weifeng; Li, Wenrao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Bin Rahman, A. N. M. Rubaiyath; Fan, Mingshou; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It has previously been shown that proanthocyanidins (PAs) in the seed coat of Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to scavenge superoxide radicals (O2−). However, the physiological processess in PA-deficit seeds are not clear. It is hypothesized that there exist alternative ways in PA-deficient seeds to cope with oxidative stress. Methods The content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and its relevance to the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases was investigated in both wild-type and PA-deficit mutant seeds. A biochemical staining approach was used to detect tissue localizations of peroxidase activities in PA-deficit mutant seeds. Key Results PA-deficient mutants possess significantly lower levels of H2O2 than the wild-type, despite their higher accumulation of superoxide radicals. Screening of the key antioxidant enzymes revealed that peroxidase activity was significantly over-activated in mutant seeds. This high peroxidase activity was mainly confined to the seed coat zone. Interestingly, neither ascorbate peroxidase nor glutathione peroxidase, just the guaiacol peroxidases (class III peroxidases), was specifically activated in the seed coat. However, no significant difference in peroxidase activity was observed in embryos of either mutants or the wild-type, although gene expressions of several candidate peroxidases were down-regulated in the embryos of PA-deficient seeds. Conclusions The results suggest that enhanced class III peroxidase activity in the seed coat of PA-deficient mutants is an adaptive strategy for seed development and survival. PMID:23448691

  16. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  17. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  18. A ripening associated peroxidase from papaya having a role in defense and lignification: heterologous expression and in-silico and in-vitro experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Veda P; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2015-01-25

    Fruit ripening associated full length cDNA of a peroxidase from papaya was cloned and heterologously expressed. The expressed peroxidase was activated by in-vitro re-folding in the presence of hemin and calcium. The purified recombinant peroxidase exhibited broad substrate affinity in the order of o-dianisidine>pyrogallol>guaiacol and was found to be a homotetramer of 155kDa with each subunit having a size of 38kDa. The basis of the distinctive preferences for various substrates was investigated through in-silico molecular modeling approaches. Thus, when the modeled papaya peroxidase-heme complex was docked with these substrates, the in-silico binding efficiency was found to be in agreement with those of wet lab results with the involvement of Arg37, Phe40, His41, Pro137, Asn138, His139, His167, and Phe239 as the common interacting residues in all the cases. However, the binding of the different substrates were found to be associated with conformational changes in the peroxidase. Thus, in the case of o-dianisidine (the most efficient substrate), the protein was folded in the most compact fashion when compared to guaiacol (the least efficient substrate). Protein function annotation analyses revealed that the papaya peroxidase may have biological roles in oxidation-reduction processes, stresses, defense responses etc. In order to further validate its role in lignifications, the papaya peroxidase was compared with a lignin biosynthetic peroxidase from Leucaena leucocephala, a tree legume. Thus, based on 3D structure superimposition and docking, both peroxidases exhibited a great extent of similarity suggesting the papaya peroxidase having a role in lignification (defense response) too. The predicted functions of papaya peroxidase in defense response and lignification were further validated experimentally using qRT-PCR analyses and measurement of oxidation of coniferyl alcohol.

  19. IR/UV and UV/UV double-resonance study of guaiacol and eugenol dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longarte, Asier; Redondo, Carolina; Fernández, José A.; Castaño, Fernando

    2005-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) molecules are biologically active phenol derivatives with an intramolecular -OH⋯OCH3 hydrogen bond (H bond). Pulsed supersonic expansions of mixtures of either of the two molecules with He yield weakly bound homodimers as well as other higher-order complexes. A number of complementary and powerful laser spectroscopic techniques, including UV-UV and IR-UV double resonances, have been employed to interrogate the species formed in the expansion in order to get information on their structures and spectroscopic properties. The interpretation of the spectra of eugenol dimer is complex and required a previous investigation on a similar but simpler molecule both to gain insight into the possible structures and support the conclusions. Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) has been used for that purpose. The combination of the broad laser study combined with ab initio calculations at the Becke 3 Lee-Yang-Parr/6-31+G(d) level has provided the isomer structures, the potential-energy wells, and shed light on the inter- and intramolecular interactions involved. Guaiacol homodimer has been shown to have a single isomer whereas eugenol dimer has at least two. The comparison between the computed geometries of the dimers, their respective energies, and the vibrational normal modes permits the identification of the spectra.

  20. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of guaiacol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-07-01

    In this study we investigated the formation of the oxidation products of guaiacol in brines and heated meat matrix: 6-nitrosoguaiacol, 4-nitroguaiacol and 6-nitroguaiacol. For this purpose we applied a newly developed HPLC-UV and LC-MS method. For the first time, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined in brine and meat (containing guaiacol and sodium nitrite), which had been heated to 80°C and subsequently subjected to simulated digestion. Application of 500mg/L ascorbic acid to the brines reduced guaiacol degradation at pH3 and simultaneously inhibited the formation of 6-nitrosoguaiacol compared to brines containing only 100mg/L of ASC. The oxidation products were isolated with a new extraction method from meat samples containing 400mg/kg sodium nitrite at pH3.6 following simulated digestion. When oxygen was added, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined even at legally allowed levels (150mg/kg) of the curing agent. Finally, we developed a new LC-MS method for the separation and qualitative determination of the four main smoke methoxyphenols.

  1. Kinetic degradation of the pollutant guaiacol by dark Fenton and solar photo-Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Samet, Youssef; Wali, Ines; Abdelhédi, Ridha

    2011-11-01

    This work is first intended to optimize the experimental conditions for the maximum degradation of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) by Fenton's reagent, and second, to improve the process efficiency through the use of solar radiation. Guaiacol is considered as a model compound of pulp and paper mill effluent. The experiments were carried out in a laboratory-scale reactor subjected or not to solar radiation. Hydrogen peroxide solution was continuously introduced into the reactor at a constant flow rate. The kinetics of organic matter decay was evaluated by means of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the absorbance measurements. The experimental results showed that the Fenton and solar photo-Fenton systems lead successfully to 90% elimination of COD and absorbance at 604 nm from a guaiacol solution under particular experimental conditions. The COD removal always obeyed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The effect of pH, temperature, H(2)O(2) dosing rate, initial concentration of Fe(2+), and initial COD was investigated using the Fenton process. The solar photo-Fenton system needed less time and consequently less quantity of H(2)O(2). Under the optimum experimental conditions, the solar photo-Fenton process needs a dose of H(2)O(2) 40% lower than that used in the Fenton process to remove 90% of COD.

  2. Effects of herbal drugs prescribed in wood creosote pills on the dissolution profile of guaiacol.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tatsuya; Nishino, Takao; Tani, Tadato

    2003-02-01

    Wood creosote pills (P4) containing wood creosote and four herbal drugs, Gambir, Phellodendri Cortex, Glycyrrhizae Radix, and Citri Unshiu Pericarpium (CUP), have been used to treat food poisoning and diarrhea through self-medication in Japan. The mean dissolution time (MDT) of guaiacol, one of the active constituents of wood creosote, from P4 (138.3+/-3.3 min) was significantly longer than that (42.6+/-4.3 min) from pills (P0) containing only wood creosote. The MDT of the variant pills prepared from P4 without CUP (54.3+/-12.5 min) was found to be significantly shorter than that of P4. These findings suggest that CUP plays an important role in sustaining the dissolution of guaiacol from P4. The long MDT of guaiacol is considered one of the most important factors affecting the duration of efficacy after oral administration of wood creosote pills. The present findings are considered proof that CUP has been prescribed in traditional as well as new formulations of wood creosote pills.

  3. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) buds.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Ekrem; Gülçin, Ilhami

    2008-01-01

    Peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; donor: hydrogen peroxide oxidoreductase) are part of a large group of enzymes. In this study, peroxidase, a primer antioxidant enzyme, was purified with 19.3 fold and 0.2% efficiency from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, CM-Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-25 purification steps. The substrate specificity of peroxidase was investigated using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol), 1,2,3-trihyidroxybenzene (pyrogallol) and 4-methylcatechol. Also, optimum pH, optimum temperature, optimum ionic strength, stable pH, stable temperature, thermal inactivation conditions were determined for guaiacol/H(2)O(2), pyrogallol/H(2)O(2), ABTS/H(2)O(2), catechol/H(2)O(2) and 4-methyl catechol/H(2)O(2) substrate patterns. The molecular weight (M(w)) of this enzyme was found to be 44 kDa by gel filtration chromatography method. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was performed for isoenzyme determination and a single band was observed. K(m) and V(max) values were calculated from Lineweaver-Burk graph for each substrate patterns.

  4. In vitro selection of RNA molecules that displace cocaine from the membrane-bound nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, H; Ippolito, J E; Pagán, O R; Eterović, V A; Hann, R M; Shi, H; Lis, J T; Eldefrawi, M E; Hess, G P

    1998-11-24

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) controls signal transmission between cells in the nervous system. Abused drugs such as cocaine inhibit this receptor. Transient kinetic investigations indicate that inhibitors decrease the channel-opening equilibrium constant [Hess, G. P. & Grewer, C. (1998) Methods Enzymol. 291, 443-473]. Can compounds be found that compete with inhibitors for their binding site but do not change the channel-opening equilibrium? The systematic evolution of RNA ligands by exponential enrichment methodology and the AChR in Torpedo californica electroplax membranes were used to find RNAs that can displace inhibitors from the receptor. The selection of RNA ligands was carried out in two consecutive steps: (i) a gel-shift selection of high-affinity ligands bound to the AChR in the electroplax membrane, and (ii) subsequent use of nitrocellulose filters to which both the membrane-bound receptor and RNAs bind strongly, but from which the desired RNA can be displaced from the receptor by a high-affinity AChR inhibitor, phencyclidine. After nine selection rounds, two classes of RNA molecules that bind to the AChR with nanomolar affinities were isolated and sequenced. Both classes of RNA molecules are displaced by phencyclidine and cocaine from their binding site on the AChR. Class I molecules are potent inhibitors of AChR activity in BC3H1 muscle cells, as determined by using the whole-cell current-recording technique. Class II molecules, although competing with AChR inhibitors, do not affect receptor activity in this assay; such compounds or derivatives may be useful for alleviating the toxicity experienced by millions of addicts.

  5. Oxygen reduction in the strict anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: characterization of two membrane-bound oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, O; Pieulle, L; Aubert, C; Mouhamar, F; Stocker, P; Dolla, A; Brasseur, G

    2011-09-01

    Although Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) is a strictly anaerobic bacterium, it is able to consume oxygen in different cellular compartments, including extensive periplasmic O₂ reduction with hydrogen as electron donor. The genome of DvH revealed the presence of cydAB and cox genes, encoding a quinol oxidase bd and a cytochrome c oxidase, respectively. In the membranes of DvH, we detected both quinol oxygen reductase [inhibited by heptyl-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO)] and cytochrome c oxidase activities. Spectral and HPLC data for the membrane fraction revealed the presence of o-, b- and d-type haems, in addition to a majority of c-type haems, but no a-type haem, in agreement with carbon monoxide-binding analysis. The cytochrome c oxidase is thus of the cc(o/b)o₃ type, a type not previously described. The monohaem cytochrome c₅₅₃ is an electron donor to the cytochrome c oxidase; its encoding gene is located upstream of the cox operon and is 50-fold more transcribed than coxI encoding the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I. Even when DvH is grown under anaerobic conditions in lactate/sulfate medium, the two terminal oxidase-encoding genes are expressed. Furthermore, the quinol oxidase bd-encoding genes are more highly expressed than the cox genes. The cox operon exhibits an atypical genomic organization, with the gene coxII located downstream of coxIV. The occurrence of these membrane-bound oxygen reductases in other strictly anaerobic Deltaproteobacteria is discussed.

  6. Complete replication in vitro of tobacco mosaic virus RNA by a template-dependent, membrane-bound RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Osman, T A; Buck, K W

    1996-01-01

    A crude membrane-bound RNA polymerase, obtained by differential centrifugation of extracts of tomato leaves infected with tobacco mosaic tobamovirus (tomato strain L) TMV-L), was purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Removal of the endogenous RNA template with micrococcal nuclease rendered the polymerase template dependent and template specific. The polymerase was primer independent and able to initiate RNA synthesis on templates containing the 3'-terminal sequences of the TMV-L positive or negative strands. TMV-vulgare RNA was a less efficient template, while RNAs of cucumber mosaic cucumovirus and red clover necrotic mosaic dianthovirus, or 5'-terminal sequences of TMV-L positive or negative strands, did not act as templates for the polymerase. A main product of the reaction with TMV-L genomic RNA as a template, carried out in the presence of [alpha-32P]UTP, was genomic-length single-stranded RNA. This was shown to be the positive strand and uniformly labelled along its length, demonstrating complete replication of TMV-L RNA. Genomic-length double-stranded RNA, labelled in both strands, and small amounts of RNAs corresponding to the single- and double-stranded forms of the coat protein subgenomic mRNA were also formed. Antibodies to N-terminal and C-terminal portions of the 126-kDa protein detected the 126-kDa protein and the 183-kDa readthrough protein in purified RNA polymerase preparations, whereas antibodies to the readthrough portion of the 183-kDa protein detected only the 183-kDa protein. All three antibodies inhibited the template-dependent RNA polymerase, but none of them had any effect on the template-bound enzyme. PMID:8709249

  7. Rapid effects of aldosterone in primary cultures of cardiomyocytes - do they suggest the existence of a membrane-bound receptor?

    PubMed

    Araujo, Carolina Morais; Hermidorff, Milla Marques; Amancio, Gabriela de Cassia Sousa; Lemos, Denise da Silveira; Silva, Marcelo Estáquio; de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Isoldi, Mauro César

    2016-10-01

    Aldosterone acts on its target tissue through a classical mechanism or through the rapid pathway through a putative membrane-bound receptor. Our goal here was to better understand the molecular and biochemical rapid mechanisms responsible for aldosterone-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We have evaluated the hypertrophic process through the levels of ANP, which was confirmed by the analysis of the superficial area of cardiomyocytes. Aldosterone increased the levels of ANP and the cellular area of the cardiomyocytes; spironolactone reduced the aldosterone-increased ANP level and cellular area of cardiomyocytes. Aldosterone or spironolactone alone did not increase the level of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), but aldosterone plus spironolactone led to increased cAMP level; the treatment with aldosterone + spironolactone + BAPTA-AM reduced the levels of cAMP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced cAMP increase is independent of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and dependent on Ca(2+). Next, we have evaluated the role of A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAP) in the aldosterone-induced hypertrophic response. We have found that St-Ht31 (AKAP inhibitor) reduced the increased level of ANP which was induced by aldosterone; in addition, we have found an increase on protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) activity when cells were treated with aldosterone alone, spironolactone alone and with a combination of both. Our data suggest that PKC could be responsible for ERK5 aldosterone-induced phosphorylation. Our study suggests that the aldosterone through its rapid effects promotes a hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes that is controlled by an AKAP, being dependent on ERK5 and PKC, but not on cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase signaling pathways. Lastly, we provide evidence that the targeting of AKAPs could be relevant in patients with aldosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  8. Survival, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities of freshwater planarian, Dugesia japonica, exposed to synthetic and natural surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Surfactants are a major class of emerging pollutants widely used in large quantities in everyday life and commonly found in surface waters worldwide. Freshwater planarian was selected to examine the effects of different surfactants by measuring mortality, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities. Among the 10 surfactants tested, the acute toxicities of betaine and polyethylene glycol (PEG-200) to planarians were relatively low, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) greater than 10,000 mg/L. The toxicity to planarians of the other eight surfactants based on 48-h LC50 could be arranged in the descending order of cetylpyridinum chloride (CPC) > 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) > ammonium lauryl sulfate > benzalkonium chloride > saponin > sodium lauroylsarcosinate > dioctyl sulfosuccinate > dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). Both CPC and 4-tert-OP were very toxic to planarians, with 48-h LC50 values <1 mg/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of planarian mobility were in the 0.1 to 50 mg/L range and were in the same range as the 24-h LC50 of planarians exposed to different surfactants, except for DTAB. In addition, significant inhibition of cholinesterase activity activities was found in planarians exposed to 4-tert-OP at 2.5 and 5 mg/L and to saponin at 10 mg/L after 2-h treatments. This result suggests that planarian mobility responses can be used as an alternative indicator for acute toxicity of surfactants after a very short exposure period.

  9. Overproduction of the membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Thermococcus kodakarensis and its effect on hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Simons, Jan-Robert; Tsukamoto, Ryohei; Nakajima, Akihito; Omori, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Ryoji; Beppu, Haruki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis can utilize sugars or pyruvate for growth. In the absence of elemental sulfur, the electrons via oxidation of these substrates are accepted by protons, generating molecular hydrogen (H2). The hydrogenase responsible for this reaction is a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Mbh). In this study, we have examined several possibilities to increase the protein levels of Mbh in T. kodakarensis by genetic engineering. Highest levels of intracellular Mbh levels were achieved when the promoter of the entire mbh operon (TK2080-TK2093) was exchanged to a strong constitutive promoter from the glutamate dehydrogenase gene (TK1431) (strain MHG1). When MHG1 was cultivated under continuous culture conditions using pyruvate-based medium, a nearly 25% higher specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) of 35.3 mmol H2 g-dcw(-1) h(-1) was observed at a dilution rate of 0.31 h(-1). We also combined mbh overexpression using an even stronger constitutive promoter from the cell surface glycoprotein gene (TK0895) with disruption of the genes encoding the cytosolic hydrogenase (Hyh) and an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), both of which are involved in hydrogen consumption (strain MAH1). At a dilution rate of 0.30 h(-1), the SHPR was 36.2 mmol H2 g-dcw(-1) h(-1), corresponding to a 28% increase compared to that of the host T. kodakarensis strain. Increasing the dilution rate to 0.83 h(-1) or 1.07 h(-1) resulted in a SHPR of 120 mmol H2 g-dcw(-1) h(-1), which is one of the highest production rates observed in microbial fermentation.

  10. Senescent cells expose and secrete an oxidized form of membrane-bound vimentin as revealed by a natural polyreactive antibody

    PubMed Central

    Frescas, David; Roux, Christelle M.; Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Krasnov, Peter; Kurnasov, Oleg V.; Strom, Evguenia; Virtuoso, Lauren P.; Wrobel, Michelle; Osterman, Andrei L.; Antoch, Marina P.; Mett, Vadim; Chernova, Olga B.; Gudkov, Andrei V.

    2017-01-01

    Studying the phenomenon of cellular senescence has been hindered by the lack of senescence-specific markers. As such, detection of proteins informally associated with senescence accompanies the use of senescence-associated β-galactosidase as a collection of semiselective markers to monitor the presence of senescent cells. To identify novel biomarkers of senescence, we immunized BALB/c mice with senescent mouse lung fibroblasts and screened for antibodies that recognized senescence-associated cell-surface antigens by FACS analysis and a newly developed cell-based ELISA. The majority of antibodies that we isolated, cloned, and sequenced belonged to the IgM isotype of the innate immune system. In-depth characterization of one of these monoclonal, polyreactive natural antibodies, the IgM clone 9H4, revealed its ability to recognize the intermediate filament vimentin. By using 9H4, we observed that senescent primary human fibroblasts express vimentin on their cell surface, and MS analysis revealed a posttranslational modification on cysteine 328 (C328) by the oxidative adduct malondialdehyde (MDA). Moreover, elevated levels of secreted MDA-modified vimentin were detected in the plasma of aged senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 mice, which are known to have deregulated reactive oxygen species metabolism and accelerated aging. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that humoral innate immunity may recognize senescent cells by the presence of membrane-bound MDA-vimentin, presumably as part of a senescence eradication mechanism that may become impaired with age and result in senescent cell accumulation. PMID:28193858

  11. Defining the extreme substrate specificity of Euonymus alatus diacylglycerol acetyltransferase, an unusual membrane-bound O-acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sunil; Durrett, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Euonymus alatus diacylglycerol acetyltransferase (EaDAcT) synthesizes the unusually structured 3-acetyl-1,2-diacylglycerols (acetyl-TAG) found in the seeds of a few plant species. A member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, EaDAcT transfers the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to produce acetyl-TAG. In vitro assays demonstrated that the enzyme is also able to utilize butyryl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as acyl donors, though with much less efficiency compared with acetyl-CoA. Acyl-CoAs longer than eight carbons were not used by EaDAcT. This extreme substrate specificity of EaDAcT distinguishes it from all other MBOATs which typically catalyze the transfer of much longer acyl groups. In vitro selectivity experiments revealed that EaDAcT preferentially acetylated DAG molecules containing more double bonds over those with less. However, the enzyme was also able to acetylate saturated DAG containing medium chain fatty acids, albeit with less efficiency. Interestingly, EaDAcT could only acetylate the free hydroxyl group of sn-1,2-DAG but not the available hydroxyl groups in sn-1,3-DAG or in monoacylglycerols (MAG). Consistent with its similarity to the jojoba wax synthase, EaDAcT could acetylate fatty alcohols in vitro to produce alkyl acetates. Likewise, when coexpressed in yeast with a fatty acyl-CoA reductase capable of producing fatty alcohols, EaDAcT synthesized alkyl acetates although the efficiency of production was low. This improved understanding of EaDAcT specificity confirms that the enzyme preferentially utilizes acetyl-CoA to acetylate sn-1,2-DAGs and will be helpful in engineering the production of acetyl-TAG with improved functionality in transgenic plants. PMID:27688773

  12. Depression of membrane-bound Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase activity induced by free radicals and by ischemia of kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Kako, K.; Kato, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Mustapha, A. )

    1988-02-01

    A partially purified, membrane-bound Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase fraction, prepared from the outer medulla of porcine kidney, was incubated in the presence of 0.1-100 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for either 15 or 30 min at 37{degree}C. The activity of ouabain-sensitive Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase was reduced proportionally to the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the duration of incubation. There were decreases in SH contents and turnover rates of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase preparation, while malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were generated from the membrane lipids in the course of the incubation. The concentrations of ethanolamine (E) plasmalogen and of arachidonic acid in the E glycerophospholipid molecules were reduced by the free radical reaction. Similarly, a reduction in Na{sup +}K{sup +}-ATPase activity and the formation of MDA and conjugated dienes, together with a decrease in E glycerophospholipids, were observed when the membrane fraction was exposed to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) for 30 min at 4{degree}C. Microsomal fractions, prepared from the outer medulla of canine kidney after 1 h of unilateral ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion, showed a decreased Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity, a reduced amount of SH groups, and an increased MDA. These changes were normalized by the infusion of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. These results support the view (1) that free radical generation affects the enzyme protein as well as membrane lipids, and (2) that free radicals may be formed in the ischemic reperfused kidney.

  13. Overproduction of the membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Thermococcus kodakarensis and its effect on hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Simons, Jan-Robert; Tsukamoto, Ryohei; Nakajima, Akihito; Omori, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Ryoji; Beppu, Haruki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis can utilize sugars or pyruvate for growth. In the absence of elemental sulfur, the electrons via oxidation of these substrates are accepted by protons, generating molecular hydrogen (H2). The hydrogenase responsible for this reaction is a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Mbh). In this study, we have examined several possibilities to increase the protein levels of Mbh in T. kodakarensis by genetic engineering. Highest levels of intracellular Mbh levels were achieved when the promoter of the entire mbh operon (TK2080-TK2093) was exchanged to a strong constitutive promoter from the glutamate dehydrogenase gene (TK1431) (strain MHG1). When MHG1 was cultivated under continuous culture conditions using pyruvate-based medium, a nearly 25% higher specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) of 35.3 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1 was observed at a dilution rate of 0.31 h−1. We also combined mbh overexpression using an even stronger constitutive promoter from the cell surface glycoprotein gene (TK0895) with disruption of the genes encoding the cytosolic hydrogenase (Hyh) and an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), both of which are involved in hydrogen consumption (strain MAH1). At a dilution rate of 0.30 h−1, the SHPR was 36.2 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, corresponding to a 28% increase compared to that of the host T. kodakarensis strain. Increasing the dilution rate to 0.83 h−1 or 1.07 h−1 resulted in a SHPR of 120 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, which is one of the highest production rates observed in microbial fermentation. PMID:26379632

  14. Direct evidence from in situ FTIR spectroscopy that o-quinonemethide is a key intermediate during the pyrolysis of guaiacol.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Wu, Shubin; Huang, Jinbao; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2017-02-10

    Although o-quinonemethide (6-methylene-2,4-cyclohexadien-1-one) has been proposed as a key intermediate in char formation during the pyrolysis of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), direct evidence of this (e.g., spectroscopic data) has not yet been provided. Using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, the pyrolysis of guaiacol was investigated from 30 °C to 630 °C at 40 °C/min. The IR profiles showed direct evidence of o-quinonemethide production at about 350 °C, which vanished rapidly at around 420 °C in the vapor phase, indicating char formation. In addition, at 400 °C, salicyl aldehyde was observed, which decomposed slowly at about 500 °C. In combination with the known products of guaiacol pyrolysis, these results allowed the major reaction pathways of guaiacol pyrolysis to be discerned. Density functional theory calculations were performed, and the results were found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained IR profiles. These findings provide guidance on how to suppress secondary reactions of guaiacol during lignin pyrolysis. Graphical abstract On-line analysis of pyrolysis process of guaiacol using in situ FTIR.

  15. Formation of Guaiacol by Spoilage Bacteria from Vanillic Acid, a Product of Rice Koji Cultivation, in Japanese Sake Brewing.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshihiko; Konno, Mahito; Shimura, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Seiei; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Hashizume, Katsumi

    2016-06-08

    The formation of guaiacol, a potent phenolic off-odor compound in the Japanese sake brewing process, was investigated. Eight rice koji samples were analyzed, and one contained guaiacol and 4-vinylguaiacol (4-VG) at extraordinarily high levels: 374 and 2433 μg/kg dry mass koji, respectively. All samples contained ferulic and vanillic acids at concentrations of mg/kg dry mass koji. Guaiacol forming microorganisms were isolated from four rice koji samples. They were identified as Bacillus subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens/subtilis, and Staphylococcus gallinarum using 16S rRNA gene sequence. These spoilage bacteria convert vanillic acid to guaiacol and ferulic acid to 4-VG. However, they convert very little ferulic acid or 4-VG to guaiacol. Nine strains of koji fungi tested produced vanillic acid at the mg/kg dry mass koji level after cultivation. These results indicated that spoilage bacteria form guaiacol from vanillic acid, which is a product of koji cultivation in the sake brewing process.

  16. Homogeneous purification and characterization of LePGT1--a membrane-bound aromatic substrate prenyltransferase involved in secondary metabolism of Lithospermum erythrorhizon.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Mito, Koji; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2013-06-01

    Membrane-bound type prenyltransferases for aromatic substrates play crucial roles in the biosynthesis of various natural compounds. Lithospermum erythrorhizon p-hydroxybenzoate: geranyltransferase (LePGT1), which contains multiple transmembrane α-helices, is involved in the biosynthesis of a red naphthoquinone pigment, shikonin. Taking LePGT1 as a model membrane-bound aromatic substrate prenyltransferase, we utilized a baculovirus-Sf9 expression system to generate a high yield LePGT1 polypeptide, reaching ~ 1000-fold higher expression level compared with a yeast expression system. Efficient solubilization procedures and biochemical purification methods were developed to extract LePGT1 from the membrane fraction of Sf9 cells. As a result, 80 μg of LePGT1 was purified from 150 mL culture to almost homogeneity as judged by SDS/PAGE. Using purified LePGT1, enzymatic characterization, e.g. substrate specificity, divalent cation requirement and kinetic analysis, was done. In addition, inhibition experiments revealed that aromatic compounds having two phenolic hydroxyl groups effectively inhibited LePGT1 enzyme activity, suggesting a novel recognition mechanism for aromatic substrates. As the first example of solubilization and purification of this membrane-bound protein family, the methods established in this study will provide valuable information for the precise biochemical characterization of aromatic prenyltransferases as well as for crystallographic analysis of this novel enzyme family.

  17. Enhancement of cell growth and glycolic acid production by overexpression of membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase in Gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Shi, Lulu; Mao, Xinlei; Lin, Jinping; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-11-10

    Membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (mADH) was overexpressed in Gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003, and the effects on cell growth and glycolic acid production were investigated. The transcription levels of two terminal ubiquinol oxidases (bo3 and bd) in the respiratory chain of the engineered strain G. oxydans-adhABS were up-regulated by 13.4- and 3.8-fold, respectively, which effectively enhanced the oxygen uptake rate, resulting in higher resistance to acid. The cell biomass of G. oxydans-adhABS could increase by 26%-33% when cultivated in a 7L bioreactor. The activities of other major membrane-bound dehydrogenases were also increased to some extent, particularly membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase (mALDH), which is involved in the catalytic oxidation of aldehydes to the corresponding acids and was 1.26-fold higher. Relying on the advantages of the above, G. oxydans-adhABS could produce 73.3gl(-1) glycolic acid after 45h of bioconversion with resting cells, with a molar yield 93.5% and a space-time yield of 1.63gl(-1)h(-1). Glycolic acid production could be further improved by fed-batch fermentation. After 45h of culture, 113.8gl(-1) glycolic acid was accumulated, with a molar yield of 92.9% and a space-time yield of 2.53gl(-1)h(-1), which is the highest reported glycolic acid yield to date.

  18. Protective effect of fish oil on changes in the activities of membrane-bound ATPases and mineral status in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu Shyamala; Kalaiselvi, Palaniswamy

    2010-12-01

    The present study evaluated the protective effect of fish oil in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats. The results of the present study indicate that the IPH administration decreases the activities of membrane-bound ATPases compared to control animals. Fish oil pretreatment brought about significant increase in the activity of these membrane-bound ATPases in IPH (isoproterenol hydrochloride)-treated animals. Significant increase in serum potassium level with concomitant decrease in the values of sodium, magnesium, and calcium were observed in IPH-treated rats compared to control rats, fish oil pretreatment reversed these changes to near normal. Significant elevation of sodium and calcium levels with concomitant decrease in the levels of potassium and magnesium were observed in the myocardial tissue of IPH-administered rats compared to control rats, fish oil pretreatment followed by IPH administration brought these levels to near normal. The levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in both serum and tissue were increased in IPH-treated rats compared with control rats, whereas pretreatment with fish oil in IPH-treated rats maintained near-normal LPO levels. The results of the present study reveals that the pretreatment of fish maintains the activities of membrane-bound ATPases and the mineral levels at near normal by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  19. Analysis of peroxidase activity of rice (Oryza sativa) recombinant hemoglobin 1: implications for in vivo function of hexacoordinate non-symbiotic hemoglobins in plants.

    PubMed

    Violante-Mota, Fernando; Tellechea, Edurne; Moran, Jose F; Sarath, Gautam; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2010-01-01

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH 6.0 and compared it to that from horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Results showed that the affinity of rice Hb1 for H2O2 was 86-times lower than that of HRP (K(m)=23.3 and 0.27 mM, respectively) and that the catalytic efficiency of rice Hb1 for the oxidation of guaiacol using H2O2 as electron donor was 2838-times lower than that of HRP (k(cat)/K(m)=15.8 and 44,833 mM(-1) min(-1), respectively). Also, results from this work showed that rice Hb1 is not chemically modified and binds CO after incubation with high H2O2 concentration, and that it poorly protects recombinant Escherichia coli from H2O2 stress. These observations indicate that rice Hb1 inefficiently scavenges H2O2 as compared to a typical plant peroxidase, thus indicating that non-symbiotic Hbs are unlikely to function as peroxidases in planta.

  20. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III) Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hernández Anzaldo, Samuel; Arroyo Abad, Uriel; León García, Armando; Ramírez Rosales, Daniel; Zamorano Ulloa, Rafael; Reyes Ortega, Yasmi

    2016-06-27

    The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H₂O₂ oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto), (meso), (deuteroporphyrinato) (picdien)]Fe(III) complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively) pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III) quantum mixed spin (qms) ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1-3 + guaiacol + H₂O₂ → oxidation guaiacol products). The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III) and H₂O₂, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0-4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III) family with the ligand picdien [N,N'-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, ¹H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  1. Effect of anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies on TPO activity measured by chemiluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Kaczur, V; Vereb, G; Molnár, I; Krajczár, G; Kiss, E; Farid, N R; Balázs, C

    1997-08-01

    A chemiluminescence method was developed to measure thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity and the inhibitory effect of anti-TPO antibodies in purified porcine TPO. The TPO preparation was characterized kinetically and controlled by Western-blotting technique. The chemiluminescence method proved to be reproducible and much more sensitive than the widely used guaiacol method, being able to detect TPO concentrations of 2.21 x 10(-5) g/L vs 6.63 x 10(-2) g/L with the latter. Otherwise, the determinations with the two methods correlated well (r = 0.76). Investigating the effect of IgGs from 23 hypothyroid patients on measured TPO activity, we detected inhibition in 19 cases with the chemiluminescence technique (15 with the guaiacol method). Anti-TPO antibodies showed competitive inhibition of TPO activity with respect to the substrate guaiacol. In both systems, the inhibition is present in the IgG F(ab')2 fragment. We conclude that the high sensitivity of chemiluminescence detection allows routine determination of the inhibition of TPO activity by anti-TPO antibodies.

  2. Generation of membrane-bound catechol-O-methyl transferase deficient mice with disctinct sex dependent behavioral phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tammimaki, A; Aonurm-Helm, A; Zhang, F P; Poutanen, M; Duran-Torres, G; Garcia-Horsman, A; Mannisto, P T

    2016-12-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) has two isoforms: soluble (S-COMT), which resides in the cytoplasm, and membrane-bound (MB-MT), anchored to intracellular membranes. COMT is involved in the O-methylation of L-DOPA, dopamine and other catechols. The exact role of MB-COMT is still mostly unclear. We wanted to create a novel genetically modified mouse model that specifically lacks MB-COMT activity and to study their behavioral phenotype. MB-COMT knock-in mutant mice were generated by introducing two point mutations in exon 2 of the Comt gene (ATGCTG->GAGCTC disabling the function of the P2 promoter and allowing only the P1-regulated S-COMT transcription. The first mutation changes methionine to glutamic acid whereas the second one does not affect coding. The expression of the two COMT isoforms, total COMT activity in several areas of the brain and peripheral tissues and extracellular dopamine concentrations after L-DOPA (10 mg/kg) and carbidopa (30 mg/kg) subcutaneous administration were assessed. A battery of behavioral tests was performed to compare MB-COMT deficient mice and their wild type littermates of both sexes. MB-COMT deficient mice were seemingly normal, bred usually and had unaltered COMT activity in the brain and periphery despite a complete lack of the MB-COMT protein. MB-COMT deficient male mice showed higher extracellular dopamine levels than their wild-type littermates in the striatum, but not in the mPFC. In addition, the MB-COMT deficient male mice exhibited a distinct endophenotype characterized by schizophrenia-related behaviors like aggressive behavior and reduced prepulse inhibition. They also had prolonged immobility in the tail suspension test. Both sexes were sensitized to acute pain and had normal motor activity but disturbed short-term memory. Hence the behavioral phenotype was not limited to schizophrenia-related endophenotype and some behavioural findings were not sex-dependent. Our findings indicate that MB-COMT is critical for

  3. Identification of membrane-bound CR1 (CD35) in human urine: evidence for its release by glomerular podocytes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is present on erythrocytes (E-CR1), various leucocytes, and renal glomerular epithelial cells (podocytes). In addition, plasma contains a soluble form of CR1 (sCR1). By using a specific ELISA, CR1 was detected in the urine (uCR1) of normal individuals (excretion rate in 12 subjects, 3.12 +/- 1.15 micrograms/24 h). Contrary to sCR1, uCR1 was pelleted by centrifugation at 200,000 g for 60 min. Analysis by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation showed that uCR1 was sedimenting in fractions larger than 19 S, whereas sCR1 was found as expected in fractions smaller than 19 S. The addition of detergents reduced the apparent size of uCR1 to that of sCR1. After gel filtration on Sephacryl-300 of normal urine, the fractions containing uCR1 were found to be enriched in cholesterol and phospholipids. The membrane-association of uCR1 was demonstrated by analyzing immunoaffinity purified uCR1 by electron microscopy which revealed membrane-bound vesicles. The apparent molecular mass of uCR1 was 15 kD larger than E-CR1 and sCR1 when assessed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. This difference in size could not be explained on the basis of glycosylation only, since pretreatment with N-glycosidase F reduced the size of all forms of CR1; however, the difference in regular molecular mass was not abrogated. The structural alleles described for E-CR1 were also found for uCR1. The urine of patients who had undergone renal transplantation contained alleles of uCR1 which were discordant with E-CR1 in 7 of 11 individuals, indicating that uCR1 originated from the kidney. uCR1 was shown to bind C3b-coated immune complexes, suggesting that the function of CR1 was not destroyed in urine. A decrease in uCR1 excretion was observed in 3 of 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, corresponding to the three who had severe proliferative nephritis, and in three of three patients with focal sclerosis, but not in six other patients with proteinuria. Taken together

  4. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Kroflič, Ana; Čusak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4

  5. Quantification and evaluation of kinetic bio-catalytic pathway of horseradish peroxidase in an electron mediated reaction system and its applications in plant extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Honnur; Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Chamaraja, Nelligere A.; Aradhana, Narayan

    2013-02-01

    The intermolecular coupling of 2,5-dimethoxyaniline (DMA) as mediated electron transfer reaction in presence of H2O2 and peroxidase in acetate buffer of pH 4.2 resulting green colored product having maximum absorption at λmax = 740 nm was investigated by spectrophotometer. Under optimum conditions, linearity range for the quantification of H2O2 was 2.0-288.0 μM and for peroxidase were 0.59-9.46 and 0.443-9.46 nM by kinetic and fixed-time method, respectively. The catalytic efficiency and catalytic power were KeffD = 2.354 × 105 M-1 min-1 and KpowD = 4.59 × 10-4 min-1, respectively. From the plot of d(1/Do) vs d(1/Vo) and d(1/Ho) vs d(1/Vo), Michaelis-Menten constants for DMA and H2O2were found that KmD = 1458 μM and KmHO = 301 μM. Applicability of the method was tested for peroxidase activity in some plant extracts and compared with guaiacol/peroxidase system. Regarding superiority of the method, it is suggested that DMA/peroxidase system can be a better hydrogen donor for HRP assay than guaiacol system as evident from kinetic data.

  6. Arabidopsis Type II Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase PI4Kγ5 Regulates Auxin Biosynthesis and Leaf Margin Development through Interacting with Membrane-Bound Transcription Factor ANAC078

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shu-Tang; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Normal leaf margin development is important for leaf morphogenesis and contributes to diverse leaf shapes in higher plants. We here show the crucial roles of an atypical type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, PI4Kγ5, in Arabidopsis leaf margin development. PI4Kγ5 presents a dynamics expression pattern along with leaf development and a T-DNA mutant lacking PI4Kγ5, pi4kγ5–1, presents serrated leaves, which is resulted from the accelerated cell division and increased auxin concentration at serration tips. Studies revealed that PI4Kγ5 interacts with and phosphorylates a membrane-bound NAC transcription factor, ANAC078. Previous studies demonstrated that membrane-bound transcription factors regulate gene transcription by undergoing proteolytic process to translocate into nucleus, and ANAC078 undergoes proteolysis by cleaving off the transmembrane region and carboxyl terminal. Western blot analysis indeed showed that ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal is significantly reduced in pi4kγ5–1, indicating that PI4Kγ5 is important for the cleavage of ANAC078. This is consistent with the subcellular localization observation showing that fluorescence by GFP-ANAC078 is detected at plasma membrane but not nucleus in pi4kγ5–1 mutant and that expression of ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal, driven by PI4Kγ5 promoter, could rescue the leaf serration defects of pi4kγ5–1. Further analysis showed that ANAC078 suppresses the auxin synthesis by directly binding and regulating the expression of auxin synthesis-related genes. These results indicate that PI4Kγ5 interacts with ANAC078 to negatively regulate auxin synthesis and hence influences cell proliferation and leaf development, providing informative clues for the regulation of in situ auxin synthesis and cell division, as well as the cleavage and functional mechanism of membrane-bound transcription factors. PMID:27529511

  7. Salicylic acid changes the properties of extracellular peroxidase activity secreted from wounded wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Minibayeva, F; Mika, A; Lüthje, S

    2003-05-01

    Wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) roots released proteins showing peroxidase activity in the apoplastic solution in response to wound stress. Preincubation of excised roots with 1 mM salicylic acid at pH 7.0 enhanced the guaiacol peroxidase activity of the extracellular solution (so-called extracellular peroxidase). The soluble enzymes were partially purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate followed by size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. Despite an increase in the total activity of secreted peroxidase induced by pretreatment of excised roots with salicylic acid, the specific activity of the partially purified protein was significantly lower compared to that of the control. Purification of the corresponding proteins by ion exchange chromatography indicates that several isoforms of peroxidase occurred in both control and salicylic acid-treated samples. The activities of the extracellular peroxidases secreted by the salicylic acid-treated roots responded differently to calcium and lectins compared with those from untreated roots. Taken together, our data suggest that salicylic acid changes the isoforms of peroxidase secreted by wounded wheat roots.

  8. Catalytic conversion of lignin pyrolysis model compound- guaiacol and its kinetic model including coke formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyan; Wang, Yun; Shao, Shanshan; Xiao, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is the most difficult to be converted and most easy coking component in biomass catalytic pyrolysis to high-value liquid fuels and chemicals. Catalytic conversion of guaiacol as a lignin model compound was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor over ZSM-5 to investigate its conversion and coking behaviors. The effects of temperature, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) and partial pressure on product distribution were studied. The results show the maximum aromatic carbon yield of 28.55% was obtained at temperature of 650 °C, WHSV of 8 h−1 and partial pressure of 2.38 kPa, while the coke carbon yield was 19.55%. The reaction pathway was speculated to be removing methoxy group to form phenols with further aromatization to form aromatics. The amount of coke increased with increasing reaction time. The surface area and acidity of catalysts declined as coke formed on the acid sites and blocked the pore channels, which led to the decrease of aromatic yields. Finally, a kinetic model of guaiacol catalytic conversion considering coke deposition was built based on the above reaction pathway to properly predict product distribution. The experimental and model predicting data agreed well. The correlation coefficient of all equations were all higher than 0.90. PMID:27869228

  9. Catalytic conversion of lignin pyrolysis model compound- guaiacol and its kinetic model including coke formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Wang, Yun; Shao, Shanshan; Xiao, Rui

    2016-11-01

    Lignin is the most difficult to be converted and most easy coking component in biomass catalytic pyrolysis to high-value liquid fuels and chemicals. Catalytic conversion of guaiacol as a lignin model compound was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor over ZSM-5 to investigate its conversion and coking behaviors. The effects of temperature, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) and partial pressure on product distribution were studied. The results show the maximum aromatic carbon yield of 28.55% was obtained at temperature of 650 °C, WHSV of 8 h‑1 and partial pressure of 2.38 kPa, while the coke carbon yield was 19.55%. The reaction pathway was speculated to be removing methoxy group to form phenols with further aromatization to form aromatics. The amount of coke increased with increasing reaction time. The surface area and acidity of catalysts declined as coke formed on the acid sites and blocked the pore channels, which led to the decrease of aromatic yields. Finally, a kinetic model of guaiacol catalytic conversion considering coke deposition was built based on the above reaction pathway to properly predict product distribution. The experimental and model predicting data agreed well. The correlation coefficient of all equations were all higher than 0.90.

  10. Characteristics of estrogen-induced peroxidase in mouse uterine luminal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinck, P.H.; Newbold, R.R.; McLachlan, J.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Peroxidase activity in the uterine luminal fluid of mice treated with diethylstilbestrol was measured by the guaiacol assay and also by the formation of 3H2O from (2-3H)estradiol. In the radiometric assay, the generation of 3H2O and 3H-labeled water-soluble products was dependent on H2O2 (25 to 100 microM), with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Tyrosine or 2,4-dichlorophenol strongly enhanced the reaction catalyzed either by the luminal fluid peroxidase or the enzyme in the CaCl2 extract of the uterus, but decreased the formation of 3H2O from (2-3H)estradiol by lactoperoxidase in the presence of H2O2 (80 microM). NADPH, ascorbate, and cytochrome c inhibited both luminal fluid and uterine tissue peroxidase activity to the same extent, while superoxide dismutase showed a marginal activating effect. Lactoferrin, a major protein component of uterine luminal fluid, was shown not to contribute to its peroxidative activity, and such an effect by prostaglandin synthase was also ruled out. However, it was not possible to exclude eosinophil peroxidase, brought to the uterus after estrogen stimulation, as being the source of peroxidase activity in uterine luminal fluid.

  11. Mechanism-based suicide inactivation of white Spanish broom (Cytisus multiflorus) peroxidase by excess hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Galende, Patricia Pérez; Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Roig, Manuel G; Kennedy, John F; Shnyrov, Valery L

    2015-11-01

    Suicide inactivation is a common mechanism observed for haem peroxidases, in which the enzyme is inactivated as a result of self-oxidation mediated by intermediate highly oxidizing enzyme forms during the catalytic cycle. The time-dependence and the inactivation mechanism of Cytisus multiflorus peroxidase (CMP) by hydrogen peroxide were studied kinetically with four co-substrates (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), ferulic acid, guaiacol and o-dianisidine). Catalytic activity decreased following the sequence ABTS>guaiacol>ferulic acid>o-dianisidine. Once the intermediate complex (compound III-H2O2) had been formed, competition was established between the catalytic pathway and the suicide inactivation pathway. One mole of CMP afforded around 3790 turnovers of H2O2 for ABTS before its complete inactivation. These results suggest that CMP follows a suicide mechanism, the enzyme not being protected in this case. The mechanism of suicide inactivation is discussed with a view to establishing a broad knowledge base for future rational protein engineering.

  12. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  13. Novel Applications of Peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Abdul; Ball, Andrew S.; Tuncer, Munir; Wilson, Michael T.

    1997-02-01

    The article entitled "Novel Biocatalysts Will Work Even Better for Industry" published recently in this Journal (1) was informative and interesting. However it touched only briefly on the application of peroxidase as catalyst. Here, we would like to mention in more detail the novel applications of peroxidase in agricultural, paper pulp, water treatment, pharmaceutical, and medical situations. Firstly, the peroxidase isolated from Phanerochaete chyrosporium has been shown to detoxify herbicides such as atrazine to less toxic compounds and would certainly find potential application in agriculture (2). Secondly, the peroxidase produced by Streptomyces thermoviolaceus may find application in the paper pulp industry as a delignifying agent (3). Thirdly, it has been shown that extracellular peroxidase produced by Streptomyces avermitilis can remove the intense color from paper-mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw (4), and thus this enzyme might find application as a catalyst in water treatment plants. Fourthly, the heme-containing horseradish peroxidase enzyme has been exploited in several diagnostic applications in pharmaceutics and medicine, such as the detection of human immunodeficiency virus and cystic fibrosis (5-10). Finally, recent work from our laboratory has suggested that thermophilic nonheme peroxidase produced by Thermomonospora fusca BD25 may find medical use in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (11, 12). Literature Cited 1. Wiseman, A. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 55-58. 2. Mougin, C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 705-708. 3. McCarthy A. J.; Peace, W.; Broda, P. Appl. Microbiol. Technol. 1985, 23, 238-244. 4. Hernandez, M; Rodriguez J; Soliveri, J; Copa, J. L; Perez, M. I; Arias, M. E. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 3909-3913. 5. Hopfer, S. M.; Aslanzadeh, J. Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 1995, 25, 475-480. 6. Suzuki, K; Iman, M. J. Virol. Methods 1995, 55, 347-356. 7. Nielsen, K. J. Immunoassay 1995, 16, 183-197. 8

  14. First evidence of a membrane-bound, tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine producing, tyrosine decarboxylase in Enterococcus faecalis: a two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Pessione, Alessandro; Lamberti, Cristina; Coïsson, Daniel Jean; Riedel, Kathrin; Mazzoli, Roberto; Bonetta, Silvia; Eberl, Leo; Giunta, Carlo

    2009-05-01

    The soluble and membrane proteome of a tyramine producing Enterococcus faecalis, isolated from an Italian goat cheese, was investigated. A detailed analysis revealed that this strain also produces small amounts of beta-phenylethylamine. Kinetics of tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine accumulation, evaluated in tyrosine plus phenylalanine-enriched cultures (stimulated condition), suggest that the same enzyme, the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC), catalyzes both tyrosine and phenylalanine decarboxylation: tyrosine was recognized as the first substrate and completely converted into tyramine (100% yield) while phenylalanine was decarboxylated to beta-phenylethylamine (10% yield) only when tyrosine was completely depleted. The presence of an aspecific aromatic amino acid decarboxylase is a common feature in eukaryotes, but in bacteria only indirect evidences of a phenylalanine decarboxylating TDC have been presented so far. Comparative proteomic investigations, performed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, on bacteria grown in conditions stimulating tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine biosynthesis and in control conditions revealed 49 differentially expressed proteins. Except for aromatic amino acid biosynthetic enzymes, no significant down-regulation of the central metabolic pathways was observed in stimulated conditions, suggesting that tyrosine decarboxylation does not compete with the other energy-supplying routes. The most interesting finding is a membrane-bound TDC highly over-expressed during amine production. This is the first evidence of a true membrane-bound TDC, longly suspected in bacteria on the basis of the gene sequence.

  15. An organelle-free assay for pea chloroplast Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Mg-chelatase, which catalyzes the insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin, lies at the branchpoint of heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis in chloroplasts. Since magnesium chelation is the first step unique to chlorophyll synthesis, one would expect this step to be highly regulated. However, to date little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase due mostly to an inability to assay it's activity outside of the intact plastid. Here the authors report the first truly in vitro i.e. organelle-free, assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts which is 3 to 4 fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts, survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated, by centrifugation, into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity and both were inactivated by boiling; indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane bound protein(s). The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol Mg-Deuteroporphyrin/h/mg protein and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity. The soluble component could be fractionated with ammonium sulfate. The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. Crude separation of chloroplast membranes into thylakoids and envelopes, suggested that the membrane-bound component of Mg-chelatase is probably located in the envelope.

  16. Identification of a membrane-bound, glycol-stimulated phospholipase A sub 2 located in the secretory granules of the adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, E.; Albanesi, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Chromaffin granule membranes prepared from bovine adrenal medullae showed Ca{sup 2+}-stimulated phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) activity when assayed at pH 9.0 with phosphatidylcholine containing an ({sup 14}C)-arachidonyl group in the 2-position. However, the activity occurred in both soluble and particulate subcellular fractions, and did not codistribute with markers for the secretory granule. PLA{sub 2} activity in the granule membrane preparation was stimulated dramatically by addition of glycerol, ethylene glycole, or poly(ethylene glycol). This glycol-stimulated PLA{sub 2} activity codistributed with membrane-bound dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase, a marker for the granule membranes, through the sequence of differential centrifugation steps employed to prepare the granule membrane fraction, as well as on a sucrose density gradient which resolved the granules from mitochondria, lysosomes, and plasma membrane. The glycol-stimulated PLA{sub 2} of the chromaffin granule was membrane-bound, exhibited a pH optimum of 7.8, retained activity in the presence of EDTA, and was inactivated by p-bromophenacyl bromide. When different {sup 14}C-labeled phospholipids were incorporated into diarachidonylphosphatidylcholine liposomes, 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonylphosphatidylcholine was a better substrate for this enzyme than 1-palmitoyl-2-oleylphosphatidylcholine or 1-acyl-2-arachidonyl-phosphatidylethhanolamine, and distearoylphosphatidylcholine was not hydrolyzed.

  17. Fourier transform infrared evidence for a predominantly alpha-helical structure of the membrane bound channel forming COOH-terminal peptide of colicin E1.

    PubMed Central

    Rath, P; Bousché, O; Merrill, A R; Cramer, W A; Rothschild, K J

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the membrane bound state of the 178-residue thermolytic COOH-terminal channel forming peptide of colicin E1 was studied by polarized Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. This fragment was reconstituted into DMPC liposomes at varying peptide/lipid ratios ranging from 1/25-1/500. The amide I band frequency of the protein indicated a dominant alpha-helical secondary structure with limited beta- and random structures. The amide I and II frequencies are at 1,656 and 1,546 cm-1, close to the frequency of the amide I and II bands of rhodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin and other alpha-helical proteins. Polarized FTIR of oriented membranes revealed that the alpha-helices have an average orientation less than the magic angle, 54.6 degrees, relative to the membrane normal. Almost all of the peptide groups in the membrane-bound channel protein undergo rapid hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange. These results are contrasted to the alpha-helical membrane proteins, bacteriorhodopsin, and rhodopsin. PMID:1710937

  18. Screening of postharvest agricultural wastes as alternative sources of peroxidases: characterization and kinetics of a novel peroxidase from lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) stubble.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Cuadrado, Nazaret; Pérez-Galende, Patricia; Manzano, Teresa; De Maria, Cándido Garcia; Shnyrov, Valery L; Roig, Manuel G

    2012-05-16

    Aqueous crude extracts of a series of plant wastes (agricultural, wild plants, residues from sports activities (grass), ornamental residues (gardens)) from 17 different plant species representative of the typical biodiversity of the Iberian peninsula were investigated as new sources of peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7). Of these, lentil (Lens culinaris L.) stubble crude extract was seen to provide one of the highest specific peroxidase activities, catalyzing the oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to tetraguaiacol, and was used for further studies. For the optimum extraction conditions found, the peroxidase activity in this crude extract (110 U mL(-1)) did not vary for at least 15 months when stored at 4 °C (k(inact) = 0.146 year(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 4.75 year), whereas, for comparative purposes, the peroxidase activity (60 U mL(-1)) of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana L.) root crude extract, obtained and stored under the same conditions, showed much faster inactivation kinetics (k(inact) = 2.2 × 10(-3) day(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 315 days). Using guaiacol as an H donor and a universal buffer (see above), all crude extract samples exhibited the highest peroxidase activity in the pH range between 4 and 7. Once semipurified by passing the crude extract through hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, the novel peroxidase (LSP) was characterized as having a purity number (RZ) of 2.5 and three SDS-PAGE electrophoretic bands corresponding to molecular masses of 52, 35, and 18 kDa. The steady-state kinetic study carried out on the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of guaiacol by the catalytic action of this partially purified peroxidase pointed to apparent Michaelian kinetic behavior (K(m)(appH(2)O(2)) = 1.87 mM; V(max)(appH(2)O(2)) = 6.4 mM min(-1); K(m)(app guaicol) = 32 mM; V(max)(app guaicol) = 9.1 mM min(-1)), compatible with the two-substrate ping-pong mechanism generally accepted for peroxidases. Finally, after the effectiveness of the crude

  19. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: a kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroflič, Ana; Grgić, Irena

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the Earth's climate and public health (Pöschl 2005). Despite a great effort invested in the studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget, composition, and its formation mechanisms, there is still a gap between field observations and atmospheric model predictions (Heald et al. 2005, Hallquist et al. 2009, and Lim et al. 2010). The insisting uncertainties surrounding SOA formation and aging thus gained an increasing interest in atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry; they call for more complex and time consuming studies at the environmentally relevant conditions allowing confident extrapolation to desired ambient conditions. In addition to the adverse health effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) as such, toxicity is also attributed to nitro-aromatic and other organic compounds which have already been detected in real aerosol samples (Traversi et al. 2009). Moreover, low-volatility aromatic derivatives are believed to form at least partly in the aerosol aqueous phase and not only in the gas phase from where they partition into water droplets (Ervens et al. 2011). Two nitro derivatives of biomass burning tracer guaiacol have recently been found in winter PM10 samples from the city of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and aqueous photonitration reaction was proposed as their possible production pathway (Kitanovski et al. 2012). In this study the kinetics of guaiacol nitration in aqueous solution was investigated in the presence of H2O2 and NO2¯ upon simulated solar irradiation (Xenon lamp, 300 W). During the experiment the DURAN® flask with the reaction mixture was held in the thermostated bath and thoroughly mixed. The reaction was monitored for 44 hours at different temperatures. Guaiacol and its main nitro-products (4-nitroguaiacol, 4-NG; 6-nitroguaiacol, 6-NG; and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol, 4,6-DNG) were quantified in every aliquot, taken from the reaction mixture, by use of high pressure liquid

  20. Catalytic Profile of Arabidopsis Peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, Contributing to Stem Lignification

    PubMed Central

    Shigeto, Jun; Nagano, Mariko; Fujita, Koki; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols), oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C) and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs) were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine), which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors. PMID:25137070

  1. Catalytic profile of Arabidopsis peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, contributing to stem lignification.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Nagano, Mariko; Fujita, Koki; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols), oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C) and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs) were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine), which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors.

  2. Structural characterization of lignin: a potential source of antioxidants guaiacol and 4-vinylguaiacol.

    PubMed

    Azadfar, Mohammadali; Gao, Allan Haiming; Bule, Mahesh V; Chen, Shulin

    2015-04-01

    The structure of lignin obtained from the ozone and soaking aqueous ammonia pretreatment of wheat straw has been characterized utilizing chemical analytical methods in order to reveal its antioxidant characteristics, including attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), pyrolysis/tetramethylammonium hydroxide-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py/TMAH-GC/MS), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), ultra violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) antioxidant evaluation assay. The results demonstrated that the isolated lignin is a ρ-hydroxyphenyl- guaiacyl-syringyl (H-G-S) lignin, with S/G ratio of 0.35 and significant amounts of phenol 2-methoxy (guaiacol) and phenol 2-methoxy-4-vinyl (4-vinylguaiacol). The Py-GC/MS and Py/TMAH-GC/MS pyrograms indicated that the major units in this lignin are derived from hydroxycinnamic acids. The GPC results revealed the molecular weight of the lignin was considerably low and also the FTIR analysis showed that the lignin possessed hydroxyl and methoxy functional groups; the factors led to the extracted lignin having a comparable antioxidant activity to that of currently used commercial antioxidants. The UV-vis and DPPH antioxidant assay results suggested a percentage of inhibition of the DPPH radicals in the following order: guaiacol (103.6 ± 1.36)>butylated hydroxytoluene (103.3 ± 1)>ferulic acid (102.6 ± 0.79)>pretreated lignin (86.9 ± 0.34).

  3. A pyrroloquinoline quinine-dependent membrane-bound d-sorbitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans exhibits an ordered Bi Bi reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Peng; Wei, Liu-Jing; Ye, Jian-Bin; Yin, Bo; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2008-09-15

    A membrane-bound pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ)-dependent D-sorbitol dehydrogenase (mSLDH) in Gluconobacter oxydans participates in the oxidation of D-sorbitol to L-sorbose by transferring electrons to ubiquinone which links to the respiratory chain. To elucidate the kinetic mechanism, the enzyme purified was subjected to two-substrate steady-state kinetic analysis, product and substrate inhibition studies. These kinetic data indicate that the catalytic reaction follows an ordered Bi Bi mechanism, where the substrates bind to the enzyme in a defined order (first ubiquinone followed by D-sorbitol), while products are released in sequence (first L-sorbose followed by ubiquinol). From these findings, we proposed that the native mSLDH bears two different substrate-binding sites, one for ubiquinone and the other for D-sorbitol, in addition to PQQ-binding and Mg(2+)-binding sites in the catalytic center.

  4. Membrane-bound ICAM-1 contributes to the onset of proinvasive tumor stroma by controlling acto-myosin contractility in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bonan, Stephanie; Albrengues, Jean; Grasset, Eloise; Kuzet, Sanya-Eduarda; Nottet, Nicolas; Bourget, Isabelle; Bertero, Thomas; Mari, Bernard; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Gaggioli, Cedric

    2017-01-01

    Acto-myosin contractility in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts leads to assembly of the tumor extracellular matrix. The pro-inflammatory cytokine LIF governs fibroblast activation in cancer by regulating the myosin light chain 2 activity. So far, however, how LIF mediates cytoskeleton contractility remains unknown. Using phenotypic screening assays based on knock-down of LIF-dependent genes in fibroblasts, we identified the glycoprotein ICAM-1 as a crucial regulator of stroma fibroblast proinvasive matrix remodeling. We demonstrate that the membrane-bound ICAM-1 isoform is necessary and sufficient to promote inflammation-dependent extracellular matrix contraction, which favors cancer cell invasion. Indeed, ICAM-1 mediates generation of acto-myosin contractility downstream of the Src kinases in stromal fibroblasts. Moreover, acto-myosin contractility regulates ICAM-1 expression by establishing a positive feedback signaling. Thus, targeting stromal ICAM-1 might constitute a possible therapeutic mean to counteract tumor cell invasion and dissemination. PMID:27901489

  5. Membrane-bound oxygen reductases of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: roles in oxygen defence and electron link with periplasmic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ramel, F; Amrani, A; Pieulle, L; Lamrabet, O; Voordouw, G; Seddiki, N; Brèthes, D; Company, M; Dolla, A; Brasseur, G

    2013-12-01

    Cytoplasmic membranes of the strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough contain two terminal oxygen reductases, a bd quinol oxidase and a cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase (Cox). Viability assays pointed out that single Δbd, Δcox and double ΔbdΔcox deletion mutant strains were more sensitive to oxygen exposure than the WT strain, showing the involvement of these oxygen reductases in the detoxification of oxygen. The Δcox strain was slightly more sensitive than the Δbd strain, pointing to the importance of the cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase in oxygen protection. Decreased O2 reduction rates were measured in mutant cells and membranes using lactate, NADH, ubiquinol and menadiol as substrates. The affinity for oxygen measured with the bd quinol oxidase (Km, 300 nM) was higher than that of the cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase (Km, 620 nM). The total membrane activity of the bd quinol oxidase was higher than that of the cytochrome oxidase activity in line with the higher expression of the bd oxidase genes. In addition, analysis of the ΔbdΔcox mutant strain indicated the presence of at least one O2-scavenging membrane-bound system able to reduce O2 with menaquinol as electron donor with an O2 affinity that was two orders of magnitude lower than that of the bd quinol oxidase. The lower O2 reductase activity in mutant cells with hydrogen as electron donor and the use of specific inhibitors indicated an electron transfer link between periplasmic H2 oxidation and membrane-bound oxygen reduction via the menaquinol pool. This linkage is crucial in defence of the strictly anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio against oxygen stress.

  6. Trapping of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin in the membrane-bound monomeric state blocks membrane insertion and functional pore formation by the toxin.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2014-06-13

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a potent membrane-damaging cytolytic toxin that belongs to the family of β barrel pore-forming protein toxins. VCC induces lysis of its target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pores. The mechanism of membrane pore formation by VCC follows the overall scheme of the archetypical β barrel pore-forming protein toxin mode of action, in which the water-soluble monomeric form of the toxin first binds to the target cell membrane, then assembles into a prepore oligomeric intermediate, and finally converts into the functional transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pore. However, there exists a vast knowledge gap in our understanding regarding the intricate details of the membrane pore formation process employed by VCC. In particular, the membrane oligomerization and membrane insertion steps of the process have only been described to a limited extent. In this study, we determined the key residues in VCC that are critical to trigger membrane oligomerization of the toxin. Alteration of such key residues traps the toxin in its membrane-bound monomeric state and abrogates subsequent oligomerization, membrane insertion, and functional transmembrane pore-formation events. The results obtained from our study also suggest that the membrane insertion of VCC depends critically on the oligomerization process and that it cannot be initiated in the membrane-bound monomeric form of the toxin. In sum, our study, for the first time, dissects membrane binding from the subsequent oligomerization and membrane insertion steps and, thus, defines the exact sequence of events in the membrane pore formation process by VCC.

  7. Synergistic salubrious effect of ferulic acid and ascorbic acid on membrane-bound phosphatases and lysosomal hydrolases during experimental myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Yogeeta, Surinder Kumar; Gnanapragasam, Arunachalam; Senthilkumar, Subramanian; Subhashini, Rajakannu; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2006-12-23

    Altered membrane integrity has been suggested as a major factor in the development of cellular injury during myocardial necrosis. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of the combination of ferulic acid (FA) and ascorbic acid (AA) on lysosomal hydrolases and membrane-bound phosphatases during isoproterenol (ISO) induced myocardial necrosis in rats. Induction of rats with 1SO (150 mg/kg b.wt, i.p.) for 2 days resulted in a significant increase in the activities of lysosomal hydrolases (beta-D-glucuronidase, beta-D-galactosidase, beta-D-N-acetylglucosaminidase, acid phosphatase and cathepsin-D) in the heart and serum. A significant increase in plasma lactate level, cardiac levels of sodium, calcium and a decrease in cardiac level of potassium was also observed, which was paralleled by abnormal activities of membrane-bound phosphatases (Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase and Mg(2+) ATPase) in the heart of ISO-administered rats. Pre-co-treatment with the combination of FA (20 mg/kg b.wt) and AA (80 mg/kg b.wt) orally for 6 days significantly attenuated these abnormalities and restored the levels to near normalcy when compared to individual drug treated groups. The combination of FA and AA preserved the membrane integrity by mitigating the oxidative stress and associated cellular damage more effectively when compared to individual treatment groups. In our study, the protection conferred by FA and AA might be through the nitric oxide pathway and by their ability of quenching free radicals. In conclusion, these findings indicate the synergistic modulation of lysosomal hydrolases and membrane phosphatases by the combination of FA and AA.

  8. Role of Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC1325 in membrane-bound transport ATPases system in Alzheimer’s disease-induced rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Mallikarjuna, Nimgampalle; Praveen, Kukkarasapalli; Yellamma, Kuna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, clinically characterized by memory dysfunction and progressive loss of cognition. No curative therapeutic or drug is available for the complete cure of this disease. The present study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC1325 in ATPases activity in the selected brain regions of rats induced with Alzheimer’s. Methods: For the study, 48 healthy Wistar rats were divided into four groups: group I as control group, group II as AD model (AD induced by intraperitoneal injection of D-Galactose, 120 mg/kg body weight for 6 weeks), group III as normal control rats which were orally administered only with L. plantarum MTCC1325 for 60 days, and group IV where the AD-induced rats simultaneously received oral treatment of L. plantarum MTCC1325 (10ml/kg body weight, 12×108 CFU/mL) for 60 days. The well known membrane bound transport enzymes including Na+, K+-ATPases, Ca2+-ATPases, and Mg2+-ATPases were assayed in the selected brain regions of hippocampus and cerebral cortex in all four groups of rats at selected time intervals. Results: Chronic injection of D-Galactose caused lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction leading to the damage of neurons in the brain, finally bringing a significant decrease (-20%) in the brain total membrane bound ATPases over the controls. Contrary to this, treatment of AD-induced rats with L. plantarum MTCC1325 reverted all the constituents of ATPase enzymes to near normal levels within 30 days. Conclusion: Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC1325 exerted a beneficial action on the entire ATPases system in AD-induced rat brain by delaying neurodegeneration. PMID:28265536

  9. Membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases are inserted co-translationally into the ER and contain different ER retrieval motifs at their carboxy termini.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Andrew W; Dyer, John M; Dhanoa, Preetinder K; Kim, Peter K; Andrews, David W; McNew, James A; Mullen, Robert T

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) play a prominent role in plant lipid metabolism and are located in various subcellular compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To investigate the biogenesis of ER-localized membrane-bound FADs, we characterized the mechanisms responsible for insertion of Arabidopsis FAD2 and Brassica FAD3 into ER membranes and determined the molecular signals that maintain their ER residency. Using in vitro transcription/translation reactions with ER-derived microsomes, we show that both FAD2 and FAD3 are efficiently integrated into membranes by a co-translational, translocon-mediated pathway. We also demonstrate that while the C-terminus of FAD3 (-KSKIN) contains a functional prototypic dilysine ER retrieval motif, FAD2 contains a novel C-terminal aromatic amino acid-containing sequence (-YNNKL) that is both necessary and sufficient for maintaining localization in the ER. Co-expression of a membrane-bound reporter protein containing the FAD2 C-terminus with a dominant-negative mutant of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf)1 abolished transient localization of the reporter protein in the Golgi, indicating that the FAD2 peptide signal acts as an ER retrieval motif. Mutational analysis of the FAD2 ER retrieval signal revealed a sequence-specific motif consisting of Phi-X-X-K/R/D/E-Phi-COOH, where -Phi- are large hydrophobic amino acid residues. Interestingly, this aromatic motif was present in a variety of other known and putative ER membrane proteins, including cytochrome P450 and the peroxisomal biogenesis factor Pex10p. Taken together, these data describe the insertion and retrieval mechanisms of FADs and define a new ER localization signal in plants that is responsible for the retrieval of escaped membrane proteins back to the ER.

  10. Biosynthesis of UDP-xylose. Cloning and characterization of a novel Arabidopsis gene family, UXS, encoding soluble and putative membrane-bound UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harper, April D; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2002-12-01

    UDP-xylose (Xyl) is an important sugar donor for the synthesis of glycoproteins, polysaccharides, various metabolites, and oligosaccharides in animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. UDP-Xyl also feedback inhibits upstream enzymes (UDP-glucose [Glc] dehydrogenase, UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, and UDP-GlcA decarboxylase) and is involved in its own synthesis and the synthesis of UDP-arabinose. In plants, biosynthesis of UDP-Xyl is catalyzed by different membrane-bound and soluble UDP-GlcA decarboxylase (UDP-GlcA-DC) isozymes, all of which convert UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Because synthesis of UDP-Xyl occurs both in the cytosol and in membranes, it is not known which source of UDP-Xyl the different Golgi-localized xylosyltransferases are utilizing. Here, we describe the identification of several distinct Arabidopsis genes (named AtUXS for UDP-Xyl synthase) that encode functional UDP-GlcA-DC isoforms. The Arabidopsis genome contains five UXS genes and their protein products can be subdivided into three isozyme classes (A-C), one soluble and two distinct putative membrane bound. AtUxs from each class, when expressed in Escherichia coli, generate active UDP-GlcA-DC that converts UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Members of this gene family have a large conserved C-terminal catalytic domain (approximately 300 amino acids long) and an N-terminal variable domain differing in sequence and size (30-120 amino acids long). Isoforms of class A and B appear to encode putative type II membrane proteins with their catalytic domains facing the lumen (like Golgi-glycosyltransferases) and their N-terminal variable domain facing the cytosol. Uxs class C is likely a cytosolic isoform. The characteristics of the plant Uxs support the hypothesis that unique UDP-GlcA-DCs with distinct subcellular localizations are required for specific xylosylation events.

  11. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew S; Heffron, Lynn; Sundick, Roy; Roberts, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1), demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC). Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4) fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective. PMID:19393093

  12. Degradation of horseradish peroxidase after microinjection into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, S.E.; Hopgood, M.F.; Ballard, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been microinjected into mammalian cells in tissue culture by the erythrocyte ghost-mediated technique. This protein was selected because it can be localized and quantified after injection by cytochemical and spectrophotometric methods. HRP labeled by reductive methylation retained full catalytic activity, was efficiently loaded into erythrocyte ghosts, and did not associate to a significant degree with ghost membranes. A combination of cytochemical staining and autoradiography established that HRP injected into rat L6 myoblasts, HE(39)L human diploid fibroblasts, or HeLa cells was intracellular and uniformly distributed throughout the cell, while cell lysis techniques showed that the catalytically active HRP was not membrane bound. Inactivation of labeled HRP after injection paralleled the disappearance of the 40-kDa polypeptide, and was always more rapid than its overall degradation. This difference was associated with a pool of water-insoluble radioactivity in the injected cells. This material was of smaller molecular size than the native protein: many labeled peptides were detected in the range of 10 to 38 kDa. By the use of inhibitors of autophagic proteolysis or lysosomal function it was established that HRP degradation was not subjected quantitatively to the same regulatory processes as the average endogenous protein labeled in the same cultures.

  13. Molecular Phylogeny of Heme Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Obinger, Christian

    All currently available gene sequences of heme peroxidases can be phylogenetically divided in two superfamilies and three families. In this chapter, the phylogenetics and genomic distribution of each group are presented. Within the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, the main evolutionary direction developed peroxidatic heme proteins involved in the innate immune defense system and in biosynthesis of (iodinated) hormones. The peroxidase-catalase superfamily is widely spread mainly among bacteria, fungi, and plants, and particularly in Class I led to the evolution of bifunctional catalase-peroxidases. Its numerous fungal representatives of Class II are involved in carbon recycling via lignin degradation, whereas Class III secretory peroxidases from algae and plants are included in various forms of secondary metabolism. The family of di-heme peroxidases are predominantly bacteria-inducible enzymes; however, a few corresponding genes were also detected in archaeal genomes. Four subfamilies of dyp-type peroxidases capable of degradation of various xenobiotics are abundant mainly among bacteria and fungi. Heme-haloperoxidase genes are widely spread among sac and club fungi, but corresponding genes were recently found also among oomycetes. All described families herein represent heme peroxidases of broad diversity in structure and function. Our accumulating knowledge about the evolution of various enzymatic functions and physiological roles can be exploited in future directed evolution approaches for engineering peroxidase genes de novo for various demands.

  14. Purification and characterization of a new cationic peroxidase from fresh flowers of Cynara scolymus L.

    PubMed

    López-Molina, Dorotea; Heering, Hendrik A; Smulevich, Giulietta; Tudela, José; Thorneley, Roger N F; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2003-03-01

    A basic heme peroxidase isoenzyme (AKPC) has been purified to homogeneity from artichoke flowers (Cynara scolymus L.). The enzyme was shown to be a monomeric glycoprotein, M(r)=42300+/-1000, (mean+/-S.D.) with an isoelectric point >9. The native enzyme exhibits a typical peroxidase ultraviolet-visible spectrum with a Soret peak at 404 nm (epsilon=137,000+/-3000 M(-1) cm(-1)) and a Reinheitzahl (Rz) value (A(404nm)/A(280nm)) of 3.8+/-0.2. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra of compounds I, II and III were typical of class III plant peroxidases but unlike horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C, compound I was unstable. Resonance Raman and UV-Vis spectra of the ferric form show that between pH 5.0 and 7.0 the protein is mainly 6 coordinate high spin with a water molecule as the sixth ligand. The substrate-specificity of AKPC is characteristic of class III (guaiacol-type) peroxidases with chlorogenic and caffeic acids, that are abundant in artichoke flowers, as particularly good substrates at pH 4.5. Ferric AKPC reacts with hydrogen peroxide to yield compound I with a second-order rate constant (k(+1)) of 7.4 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) which is significantly slower than that reported for most other class III peroxidases. The reaction of ferric and ferrous AKPC with nitric oxide showed a potential use of this enzyme for quantitative spectrophotometric determination of NO and as a component of novel NO sensitive electrodes.

  15. Carbon-supported bimetallic Pd–Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Karim, Ayman M.; Zhang, He; Kovarik, Libor; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Hensley, Alyssa J.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Carbon supported metal catalysts (Cu/C, Fe/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, PdFe/C and Ru/C) have been prepared, characterized and tested for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol (GUA) at atmospheric pressure. Phenol was the major intermediate on all catalysts. Over the noble metal catalysts saturation of the aromatic ring was the major pathway observed at low temperature (250 °C), forming predominantly cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Substantial ring opening reaction was observed on Pt/C and Ru/C at higher reaction temperatures (e.g., 350 °C). Base metal catalysts, especially Fe/C, were found to exhibit high HDO activity without ring-saturation or ring-opening with the main products being benzene, phenol along with small amounts of cresol, toluene and trimethylbenzene (TMB). A substantial enhancement in HDO activity was observed on the PdFe/C catalysts. Compared with Fe/C, the yield to oxygen-free aromatic products (i.e., benzene/toluene/TMB) on PdFe/C increased by a factor of four at 350 °C, and by approximately a factor of two (83.2% versus 43.3%) at 450 °C. The enhanced activity of PdFe/C is attributed to the formation of PdFe alloy as evidenced by STEM, EDS and TPR.

  16. High-throughput continuous flow synthesis of nickel nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Emily J.; Habas, Susan E.; Wang, Lu; Ruddy, Daniel A.; White, Erick A.; Baddour, Frederick G.; Griffin, Michael B.; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Malmstadt, Noah; Brutchey, Richard L.

    2016-11-07

    The translation of batch chemistries to high-throughput continuous flow methods dresses scaling, automation, and reproducibility concerns associated with the implementation of colloidally prepared nanoparticle (NP) catalysts for industrial catalytic processes. Nickel NPs were synthesized by the high-temperature amine reduction of a Ni2+ precursor using a continuous millifluidic (mF) flow method, achieving yields greater than 60%. The resulting Ni NP catalysts were compared against catalysts prepared in a batch reaction under conditions analogous to the continuous flow conditions with respect to total reaction volume, time, and temperature and by traditional incipient wetness (IW) impregnation for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol under ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis conditions. Compared to the IW method, the colloidally prepared NPs displayed increased morphological control and narrowed size distributions, and the NPs prepared by both methods showed similar size, shape, and crystallinity. The Ni NP catalyst synthesized by the continuous flow method exhibited similar H-adsorption site densities, site-time yields, and selectivities towards deoxygenated products as compared to the analogous batch reaction, and outperformed the IW catalyst with respect to higher selectivity to lower oxygen content products and a 6.9-fold slower deactivation rate. These results demonstrate the utility of synthesizing colloidal Ni NP catalysts using continuous flow methods while maintaining the catalytic properties displayed by the batch equivalent. Finally, this methodology can be extended to other catalytically relevant base metals for the high-throughput synthesis of metal NPs for the catalytic production of biofuels.

  17. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  18. Increased soluble and membrane-bound PD-L1 contributes to immune regulation and disease progression in patients with tuberculous pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xue; Zhong, Anyuan; Xing, Yufei; Shi, Minhua; Qian, Bin; Zhou, Tong; Chen, Yongjing; Zhang, Xueguang

    2016-01-01

    Soluble and membrane-bound programmed death ligand-1 (sPD-L1 and mPD-L1, respectively) have been demonstrated to participate in the immune suppression of non-small cell lung cancer. However, the contribution of sPD-L1 and mPD-L1 to immune regulation and disease progression in patients with pleural effusions remains unknown. The present study evaluated the levels of sPD-L1 and membrane-bound PD-1/PD-L1 in the peripheral blood and pleural effusions of patients with tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE), malignant pleural effusion (MPE) and non-tuberculous non-malignant pleural effusion (n-TB n-M). Furthermore, selected T lymphocytes and cluster of differentiation (CD)14+ monocytes were co-cultured to investigate the potential effect of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in TPE. Levels of sPD-L1 and PD-L1 on CD14+ monocytes were increased in the TPE group, as compared with the MPE and n-TB n-M groups. Furthermore, sPD-L1 levels and the expression levels of PD-L1 on CD14+ monocytes were demonstrated to be positively correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ concentration in pleural effusions. Therefore, IFN-γ may increase the expression of PD-L1 on CD14+ monocytes in vitro. Cell counting kit-8 analysis demonstrated that anti-PD-L1 antibody was able to partially reverse the proliferation of T lymphocytes in the co-culture system. The results of the present study indicated that sPD-L1 or mPD-L1 are associated with the immune regulation and disease progression of TPE, and may serve as possible biomarkers of TPE. Furthermore, sPD-L1 and the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway of TPE may be associated with the Th1 immune response; therefore, an anti-PD-1/PD-L1 pathway suggests a potential immune therapy strategy for the treatment of TPE. PMID:27698705

  19. Membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase in acetic acid bacteria catalyzes L-ribulose formation and NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase is independent of the oxidative fermentation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, O; Fujii, Y; Ano, Y; Moonmangmee, D; Toyama, H; Shinagawa, E; Theeragool, G; Lotong, N; Matsushita, K

    2001-01-01

    To identify the enzyme responsible for pentitol oxidation by acetic acid bacteria, two different ribitol oxidizing enzymes, one in the cytosolic fraction of NAD(P)-dependent and the other in the membrane fraction of NAD(P)-independent enzymes, were examined with respect to oxidative fermentation. The cytoplasmic NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.56) was crystallized from Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 12528 and found to be an enzyme having 100 kDa of molecular mass and 5 s as the sedimentation constant, composed of four identical subunits of 25 kDa. The enzyme catalyzed a shuttle reversible oxidoreduction between ribitol and D-ribulose in the presence of NAD and NADH, respectively. Xylitol and L-arabitol were well oxidized by the enzyme with reaction rates comparable to ribitol oxidation. D-Ribulose, L-ribulose, and L-xylulose were well reduced by the enzyme in the presence of NADH as cosubstrates. The optimum pH of pentitol oxidation was found at alkaline pH such as 9.5-10.5 and ketopentose reduction was found at pH 6.0. NAD-Dependent ribitol dehydrogenase seemed to be specific to oxidoreduction between pentitols and ketopentoses and D-sorbitol and D-mannitol were not oxidized by this enzyme. However, no D-ribulose accumulation was observed outside the cells during the growth of the organism on ribitol. L-Ribulose was accumulated in the culture medium instead, as the direct oxidation product catalyzed by a membrane-bound NAD(P)-independent ribitol dehydrogenase. Thus, the physiological role of NAD-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase was accounted to catalyze ribitol oxidation to D-ribulose in cytoplasm, taking D-ribulose to the pentose phosphate pathway after being phosphorylated. L-Ribulose outside the cells would be incorporated into the cytoplasm in several ways when need for carbon and energy sources made it necessary to use L-ribulose for their survival. From a series of simple experiments, membrane-bound sugar alcohol dehydrogenase was concluded to be

  20. Diverse in vivo effects of soluble and membrane-bound M-CSF on tumor-associated macrophages in lymphoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinfeng; Feng, Wenli; Wang, Rong; Ma, Shihui; Wang, Lina; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Feifei; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2016-01-12

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is an important cytokine for monocyte/macrophage lineage. Secretory M-CSF (sM-CSF) and membrane-bound M-CSF (mM-CSF) are two major alternative splicing isoforms. The functional diversity of these isoforms in the activation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), especially in lymphoma microenvironment, has not been documented. Here, we studied the effects of M-CSF isoforms on TAMs in xenograft mouse model. More infiltrating TAMs were detected in microenvironment with mM-CSF and sM-CSF. TAMs could be divided into three subpopulations based on their expression of CD206 and Ly6C. While sM-CSF had greater potential to recruit and induce differentiation of TAMs and TAM subpopulations, mM-CSF had greater potential to induce proliferation of TAMs and TAM subpopulations. Though both isoforms educated TAMs and TAM subpopulations to M2-like macrophages, mM-CSF and sM-CSF induced different spectrums of phenotype-associated genes in TAMs and TAM subpopulations. These results suggested the diverse effects of M-CSF isoforms on the activation of TAMs and TAM subpopulations in lymphoma microenvironments.

  1. Electroosmotic perfusion of tissue: sampling the extracellular space and quantitative assessment of membrane-bound enzyme activity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yangguang; Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats

    2014-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in sampling fluid from the extracellular space of brain tissue by electroosmosis (EO). Two techniques, EO sampling with a single fused-silica capillary and EO push–pull perfusion, have been developed. These tools were used to investigate the function of membrane-bound enzymes with outward-facing active sites, or ectoenzymes, in modulating the activity of the neuropeptides leu-enkephalin and galanin in organotypic-hippocampal-slice cultures (OHSCs). In addition, the approach was used to determine the endogenous concentration of a thiol, cysteamine, in OHSCs. We have also investigated the degradation of coenzyme A in the extracellular space. The approach provides information on ectoenzyme activity, including Michaelis constants, in tissue, which, as far as we are aware, has not been done before. On the basis of computational evidence, EO push–pull perfusion can distinguish ectoenzyme activity with a ~100 µm spatial resolution, which is important for studies of enzyme kinetics in adjacent regions of the rat hippocampus. PMID:25168111

  2. Engraftment of human HSCs in nonirradiated newborn NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice is enhanced by transgenic expression of membrane-bound human SCF

    PubMed Central

    Racki, Waldemar J.; Leif, Jean; Burzenski, Lisa; Hosur, Vishnu; Wetmore, Amber; Gott, Bruce; Herlihy, Mary; Ignotz, Ronald; Dunn, Raymond; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human HSCs support multidisciplinary translational experimentation, including the study of human hematopoiesis. Heightened levels of human HSC engraftment are observed in immunodeficient mice expressing mutations in the IL2-receptor common γ chain (IL2rg) gene, including NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice. Engraftment of human HSC requires preconditioning of immunodeficient recipients, usually with irradiation. Such preconditioning increases the expression of stem cell factor (SCF), which is critical for HSC engraftment, proliferation, and survival. We hypothesized that transgenic expression of human membrane-bound stem cell factor Tg(hu-mSCF)] would increase levels of human HSC engraftment in nonirradiated NSG mice and eliminate complications associated with irradiation. Surprisingly, detectable levels of human CD45+ cell chimerism were observed after transplantation of cord blood–derived human HSCs into nonirradiated adult as well as newborn NSG mice. However, transgenic expression of human mSCF enabled heightened levels of human hematopoietic cell chimerism in the absence of irradiation. Moreover, nonirradiated NSG-Tg(hu-mSCF) mice engrafted as newborns with human HSCs rejected human skin grafts from a histoincompatible donor, indicating the development of a functional human immune system. These data provide a new immunodeficient mouse model that does not require irradiation preconditioning for human HSC engraftment and immune system development. PMID:22246028

  3. Hydrogen evolution of Enterobacter aerogenes depending on culture pH: mechanism of hydrogen evolution from NADH by means of membrane-bound hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tanisho, S; Kamiya, N; Wakao, N

    1989-01-26

    The pH dependency of cell mass productivity, the hydrogen evolution rate and the yield of hydrogen from glucose was measured by controlling the pH of the culture automatically. The cell mass productivity of Enterobacter aerogenes increased in a linear fashion up to a pH value of approx. 7.0. In contrast, both the evolution rate and the yield of hydrogen showed convex relationships up to a pH value of 7.0, both having maximum values at a pH of approx. 5.8. The maximum evolution rate was approx. 11.3 mmol H2 per g dry cell per h at 38 degrees C. A hypothetical mechanism for hydrogen evolution was proposed by taking our results and other research work into consideration. The proposed mechanism of hydrogen evolution was that NADH was oxidized on the inside surface of the cell membrane and protons were reduced on the outside surface by means of membrane-bound hydrogenase. This mechanism explains in a thermodynamic context the relation between the activity of the hydrogen evolution and the pH of the culture.

  4. Construction of a plasmid for co-expression of mouse membrane-bound form of IL-15 and RAE-1ε and its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Qian, Li; Ji, Ming-Chun; Pan, Xin-Yuan; Gong, Wei-Juan; Tian, Fang; Duan, Qiu-Fang

    2011-05-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) is a pivotal cytokine for the proliferation and activation of a specific group of immune cells such as natural killer (NK), IFN-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDC) and CD8 T cells. RAE-1ε, the ligand for the activating NKG2D receptor, which also play an important role in the proliferation and activation of NK cells and IKDCs. In this study, a membrane-bound form of IL-15 (termed mb15) encoding sequence and RAE-1ε gene were obtained by SOE-PCR or PCR amplification. The amplified mb15 and RAE-1ε gene were then digested and inserted into the multiple cloning site1 (MCS1) and MCS2 of pVITRO2-mcs vector, respectively. A recombinant eukaryotic expression vector for co-expression of mb15 and RAE-1ε was successfully constructed. After it was transfected to BaF3 cells, the expression of IL-15 and RAE-1ε in recombinant BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were verified by RT-PCR, western blot and FCM analysis. Furthermore, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells had the ability of promoting NK cells proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. In conclusion, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were successfully constructed, which is very useful for further studies, especially for the expansion and activation of certain subsets of immune cells such as NK cells and IKDCs.

  5. Differences in the effect of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate on the hydrolytic and transphosphatidylation activities of membrane-bound phospholipase D from poppy seedlings.

    PubMed

    Oblozinsky, Marek; Bezakova, Lydia; Mansfeld, Johanna; Heilmann, Ingo; Ulbrich-Hofmann, Renate

    2013-08-01

    The hydrolytic activity of phospholipase D (PLD) yielding phosphatidic acid from phosphatidylcholine and other glycerophospholipids is known to be involved in many cellular processes. In contrast, it is not clear whether the competitive transphosphatidylation activity of PLD catalyzing the head group exchange of phospholipids has a natural function. In poppy seedlings (Papaver somniferum L.) where lipid metabolism and alkaloid synthesis are closely linked, five isoenzymes with different substrate and hydrolysis/transphosphatidylation selectivities have been detected hitherto. A membrane-bound PLD, found in microsomal fractions of poppy seedlings, is active at micromolar concentrations of Ca(2+) ions and needs phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) as effector in the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). The optimum PIP2 concentration at 1.2 mol% of the concentration of the substrate PC indicates a specific activation effect. Transphosphatidylation with glycerol, ethanolamine, l-serine, or myo-inositol as acceptor alcohols is also activated by PIP2, however, with an optimum concentration at 0.6-0.9 mol%. In contrast to hydrolysis, a basic transphosphatidylation activity occurs even in the absence of PIP2, suggesting a different fine-tuning of the two competing reactions.

  6. Purification of a Membrane-Bound UDP-Glucose:Sterol [beta]-D-Glucosyltransferase Based on Its Solubility in Diethyl Ether.

    PubMed Central

    Warnecke, D. C.; Heinz, E.

    1994-01-01

    Membrane-bound UDP-glucose:sterol [beta]-D-glucosyltransferase (UDPG-SGTase) catalyzes the formation of steryl glucosides from UDP-glucose and free sterols. This enzyme was purified from etiolated oat shoots (Avena sativa L. cv Alfred) in five steps. UDPG-SGTase was solubilized from a microsomal fraction with the detergent n-octyl-[beta]-D-thioglucopyranoside and then extracted into diethyl ether. Subsequent removal of the organic solvent, resolubilization with an aqueous buffer, and two column chromatographic steps on Q-Sepharose and Blue Sepharose resulted in a 12,500-fold overall purification. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the final preparation revealed a 56-kD protein band, the intensity of which correlated with enzyme activity in the respective fractions. Polyclonal antibodies raised against this 56-kD protein did not inhibit enzyme activity but specifically bound to the native UDPG-SGTase. These results suggest that the 56-kD protein represents the UDPG-SGTase. The purified enzyme was specific for UDP-glucose (Km = 34 [mu]M), for which UDP was a competitive inhibitor (inhibitor constant = 47 [mu]M). In contrast to the specificity with regard to the glycosyl donor, UDPG-SGTase utilized all tested sterol acceptors, such as [beta]-sitosterol, cholesterol, stigmasterol, and ergosterol. PMID:12232266

  7. Genome-wide identification of membrane-bound fatty acid desaturase genes in Gossypium hirsutum and their expressions during abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiyu; Dong, Yating; Liu, Wei; He, Qiuling; Daud, M. K.; Chen, Jinhong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases (FADs) are of great importance and play multiple roles in plant growth and development. In the present study, 39 full-length FAD genes, based on database searches, were identified in tetraploid upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and were phylogenetically clustered into four subfamilies. Genomic localization revealed that 34 genes were mapped on 22 chromosomes, and five genes were positioned on the scaffold sequences. The FAD genes of G. hirsutum in the same subfamily had similar gene structures. The structures of paralogous genes were considerably conserved in exons number and introns length. It was suggested that the FAD gene families in G. hirsutum might be duplicated mainly by segmental duplication. Moreover, the FAD genes were differentially expressed in different G. hirsutum tissues in response to different levels of salt and cold stresses, as determined by qRT-PCR analysis. The identification and functional analysis of FAD genes in G. hirsutum may provide more candidate genes for genetic modification. PMID:28374822

  8. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase (Nar) in pure cultures and microbial communities from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Bohnert, Kenneth A; Cuebas, Mariola; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Vetriani, Costantino

    2013-11-01

    Over the past few years the relevance of nitrate respiration in microorganisms from deep-sea hydrothermal vents has become evident. In this study, we surveyed the membrane-bound nitrate reductase (Nar) encoding gene in three different deep-sea vent microbial communities from the East Pacific Rise and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Additionally, we tested pure cultures of vent strains for their ability to reduce nitrate and for the presence of the NarG-encoding gene in their genomes. By using the narG gene as a diagnostic marker for nitrate-reducing bacteria, we showed that nitrate reductases related to Gammaproteobacteria of the genus Marinobacter were numerically prevalent in the clone libraries derived from a black smoker and a diffuse flow vent. In contrast, NarG sequences retrieved from a community of filamentous bacteria located about 50 cm above a diffuse flow vent revealed the presence of a yet to be identified group of enzymes. 16S rRNA gene-inferred community compositions, in accordance with previous studies, showed a shift from Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria to Epsilonproteobacteria as the vent fluids become warmer and more reducing. Based on these findings, we argue that Nar-catalyzed nitrate reduction is likely relevant in temperate and less reducing environments where Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria are more abundant and where nitrate concentrations reflect that of background deep seawater.

  9. Molybdenum-containing membrane-bound formate dehydrogenase isolated from Citrobacter sp. S-77 having high stability against oxygen, pH, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nga T; Yatabe, Takeshi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-10-01

    Membrane-bound formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was purified to homogeneity from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77. The FDH from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (FDHS77) was a monomer with molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. On SDS-PAGE, the purified FDHS77 showed as three different protein bands with molecular mass of approximately 95, 87, and 32 kDa, respectively. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, the sequence alignments observed for the 87 kDa protein band were identical to that of the large subunit of 95 kDa, indicating that the purified FDHS77 consisted of two subunits; a 95 kDa large subunit and a 32 kDa small subunit. The purified FDHS77 in this purification did not contain a heme b subunit, but the FDHS77 showed significant activity for formate oxidation, determined by the Vmax of 30.4 U/mg using benzyl viologen as an electron acceptor. The EPR and ICP-MS spectra indicate that the FDHS77 is a molybdenum-containing enzyme, displaying a remarkable O2-stability along with thermostability and pH resistance. This is the first report of the purification and characterization of a FDH from Citrobacter species.

  10. Polyphenol Oxidation by Vicia faba Chloroplast Membranes: STUDIES ON THE LATENT MEMBRANE-BOUND POLYPHENOL OXIDASE AND ON THE MECHANISM OF PHOTOCHEMICAL POLYPHENOL OXIDATION.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, S W; Buchanan, B B

    1980-12-01

    The mechanism whereby light effects polyphenol oxidation was examined with Vicia faba chloroplast membranes known to contain a bound latent polyphenol oxidase. Results obtained with the inhibitors 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-idopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB) indicated an involvement of the non-cyclic electron transport pathway in the light-dependent oxidation of polyphenols, such as dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). Further evidence was provided by experiments in which (a) DOPA replaced H(2)O as electron donor for the photoreduction of NADP, (b) NADP replaced O(2) as electron acceptor in the photochemical oxidation of DOPA, and (c) the variable fluorescence associated with photosystem II was increased by DOPA. The photochemical oxidation of DOPA by V. faba chloroplast membranes was insensitive to KCN and to antibodies against purified latent polyphenol oxidase. The results are consistent with the conclusion that the light-dependent oxidation of polyphenols by V. faba chloroplast membranes is achieved independently of the latent membrane-bound polyphenol oxidase. Electrons derived from polyphenols seem to enter the noncyclic electron transport chain on the oxidizing side of photosystem II and to react with O(2) at an unidentified site on the photosystem I side of the DCMU/DBMIB blocks.The physiological mechanism for the activation of latent polyphenol oxidase remains an unanswered question. Present results suggest that activation could occur through either acidification or the release of free fatty acids.

  11. Purification and characterization of a membrane bound neutral pH optimum magnesium-dependent and phosphatidylserine-stimulated sphingomyelinase from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Hassler, D F; Smith, G K; Weaver, K; Hannun, Y A

    1998-12-18

    Sphingomyelin hydrolysis and ceramide generation catalyzed by sphingomyelinases (SMase) are key components of the signaling pathways in cytokine- and stress-induced cellular responses. In this study, we report the partial purification and characterization of the membrane bound, neutral pH optimal, and magnesium-dependent SMase (N-SMase) from rat brain. Proteins from Triton X-100 extract of brain membrane were purified sequentially with DEAE-Sephacel, heparin-Sepharose, ceramic hydroxyapatite, Mono Q, phenyl-Superose, and Superose 12 column chromatography. After eight purification steps, the specific activity of the enzyme increased by 3030-fold over the brain homogenate. The enzyme hydrolyzed sphingomyelin but not phosphatidylcholine and its activity was dependent upon magnesium with an optimal pH of 7.5 and a native pI of 5.2. Delipidation of the enzyme through chromatographic purification or by extraction with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonic acid followed by gel filtration revealed that the enzyme became increasingly dependent on phosphatidylserine (PS). Up to 20-fold stimulation was observed with PS whereas other lipids examined were either ineffective or only mildly stimulatory. The Km of the enzyme for substrate sphingomyelin (3.4 mol %) was not affected by PS. The highly purified enzyme was inhibited by glutathione with a >95% inhibition observed with 3 mM glutathione and with a Hill number calculated at approximately 8. The significance of these results to the regulation of N-SMase is discussed.

  12. Krypton Derivatization of an O2 -Tolerant Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reveals a Hydrophobic Tunnel Network for Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Kalms, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Andrea; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; van der Linden, Peter; von Stetten, David; Lenz, Oliver; Carpentier, Philippe; Scheerer, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen into protons and electrons. Gas tunnels make the deeply buried active site accessible to substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the architecture and function of the tunnels is pivotal to modulating the feature of O2 tolerance in a subgroup of these [NiFe] hydrogenases, as they are interesting for developments in renewable energy technologies. Here we describe the crystal structure of the O2 -tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha (ReMBH), using krypton-pressurized crystals. The positions of the krypton atoms allow a comprehensive description of the tunnel network within the enzyme. A detailed overview of tunnel sizes, lengths, and routes is presented from tunnel calculations. A comparison of the ReMBH tunnel characteristics with crystal structures of other O2 -tolerant and O2 -sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases revealed considerable differences in tunnel size and quantity between the two groups, which might be related to the striking feature of O2 tolerance.

  13. Kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response in relation to the H+-permeability of the membrane bound ATPase in spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.L.; van Kooten, O.; Vredenberg, W.J.

    1985-08-01

    The effect of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) on the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response and on the activity of the ATPase was investigated in isolated spinach chloroplasts. It was found that after the addition of 5 X 10(-8)mol DCCD the rate of ATP hydrolysis induced by a period of 60 sec illumination was decreased to less than 5% of its original value. At this concentration, hardly any effect, if at all, could be detected on the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response, neither in dark-adapted nor in light-activated chloroplasts. It was concluded that the presence of concentrations of DCCD, sufficiently high to affect the ATPase activity, does not affect the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response. Since DCCD decreases the H+ permeability of the membrane-bound ATPase, it was concluded that this permeability coefficient for protons is not an important factor in the regulation of the flash-induced membrane potential and, therefore, does not affect the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response.

  14. Difference in NaCl tolerance of membrane-bound 5'-nucleotidases purified from deep-sea and brackish water Shewanella species.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Taka-Aki; Fujii, Sotaro; Masanari, Misa; Yamanaka, Masaru; Wakai, Satoshi; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-03

    Shewanella species are widely distributed in sea, brackish, and fresh water areas, growing psychrophilically or mesophilically, and piezophilically or piezo-sensitively. Here, membrane-bound 5'-nucleotidases (NTases) from deep-sea Shewanella violacea and brackish water Shewanella amazonensis were examined from the aspect of NaCl tolerance to gain an insight into protein stability against salt. Both NTases were single polypeptides with molecular masses of ~59 kDa, as determined on mass spectroscopy. They similarly required 10 mM MgCl2 for their activities, and they exhibited the same pH dependency and substrate specificity for 5'-nucleotides. However, S. violacea 5'-nucleotidase (SVNTase) was active enough in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl, whereas S. amazonensis 5'-nucleotidase (SANTase) exhibited significantly reduced activity with the same concentration of the salt. Although SVNTase and SANTase exhibited high sequence identity (69.7%), differences in the ratio of acidic to basic amino acid residues and the number of potential salt bridges maybe being responsible for the difference in the protein stability against salt. 5'-Nucleotidases from these Shewanella species will provide useful information regarding NaCl tolerance, which may be fundamental for understanding bacterial adaptation to growth environments.

  15. High-throughput continuous flow synthesis of nickel nanoparticles for the catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol

    DOE PAGES

    Roberts, Emily J.; Habas, Susan E.; Wang, Lu; ...

    2016-11-07

    The translation of batch chemistries to high-throughput continuous flow methods dresses scaling, automation, and reproducibility concerns associated with the implementation of colloidally prepared nanoparticle (NP) catalysts for industrial catalytic processes. Nickel NPs were synthesized by the high-temperature amine reduction of a Ni2+ precursor using a continuous millifluidic (mF) flow method, achieving yields greater than 60%. The resulting Ni NP catalysts were compared against catalysts prepared in a batch reaction under conditions analogous to the continuous flow conditions with respect to total reaction volume, time, and temperature and by traditional incipient wetness (IW) impregnation for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol undermore » ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis conditions. Compared to the IW method, the colloidally prepared NPs displayed increased morphological control and narrowed size distributions, and the NPs prepared by both methods showed similar size, shape, and crystallinity. The Ni NP catalyst synthesized by the continuous flow method exhibited similar H-adsorption site densities, site-time yields, and selectivities towards deoxygenated products as compared to the analogous batch reaction, and outperformed the IW catalyst with respect to higher selectivity to lower oxygen content products and a 6.9-fold slower deactivation rate. These results demonstrate the utility of synthesizing colloidal Ni NP catalysts using continuous flow methods while maintaining the catalytic properties displayed by the batch equivalent. Finally, this methodology can be extended to other catalytically relevant base metals for the high-throughput synthesis of metal NPs for the catalytic production of biofuels.« less

  16. Substrate oxidation sites in versatile peroxidase and other basidiomycete peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Morales, María; García, Eva; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2009-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is defined by its capabilities to oxidize the typical substrates of other basidiomycete peroxidases: (i) Mn(2+), the manganese peroxidase (MnP) substrate (Mn(3+) being able to oxidize phenols and initiate lipid peroxidation reactions); (ii) veratryl alcohol (VA), the typical lignin peroxidase (LiP) substrate; and (iii) simple phenols, which are the substrates of Coprinopsis cinerea peroxidase (CIP). Crystallographic, spectroscopic, directed mutagenesis, and kinetic studies showed that these 'hybrid' properties are due to the coexistence in a single protein of different catalytic sites reminiscent of those present in the other basidiomycete peroxidase families. Crystal structures of wild and recombinant VP, and kinetics of mutated variants, revealed certain differences in its Mn-oxidation site compared with MnP. These result in efficient Mn(2+) oxidation in the presence of only two of the three acidic residues forming its binding site. On the other hand, a solvent-exposed tryptophan is the catalytically-active residue in VA oxidation, initiating an electron transfer pathway to haem (two other putative pathways were discarded by mutagenesis). Formation of a tryptophanyl radical after VP activation by peroxide was detected using electron paramagnetic resonance. This was the first time that a protein radical was directly demonstrated in a ligninolytic peroxidase. In contrast with LiP, the VP catalytic tryptophan is not beta-hydroxylated under hydrogen peroxide excess. It was also shown that the tryptophan environment affected catalysis, its modification introducing some LiP properties in VP. Moreover, some phenols and dyes are oxidized by VP at the edge of the main haem access channel, as found in CIP. Finally, the biotechnological interest of VP is discussed.

  17. Effects of copper excess on growth, H2O2, production and peroxidase activities in maize seedlings (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Bouazizi, Houda; Jouili, Hager; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine

    2007-03-01

    Ten day old mays seedlings (Zea mays L., var. Aligreen) cultured in hydroponic medium were treated by toxic amounts of copper (50 and 100 microM of CuSO4) during seven days. Cupric stress induced changes in growth parameters: The matter productions were more reduced in roots than in shoots. Also, a significant decrease in shoot and root elongation was observed. On the other hand, excess of copper increased significantly endogenous H2O2 in the two investigated organs and induced changes in peroxidase activities. Our results showed that in shoots, inducibility of GPX (Guaiacol peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.7), CAPX (Coniferyl alcohol peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.4) and APX (Ascorbate peroxidase, EC.1.11.1.11) was highly significant after application of 100 microM of CuSO4. While, this effect was not observed in 50 microM Cu-stressed shoots, in roots, data showed that 50 microM of CuSO4 induced stimulation in GPX and APX activities but ACPX activity remains unchanged. In roots, by contrast, exposure to 100 microM Cu induced significant increase only in ACPX activity.

  18. A novel Lentinula edodes laccase and its comparative enzymology suggest guaiacol-based laccase engineering for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Sing; Cheung, Man-Kit; Au, Chun-Hang; Kwan, Hoi-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are versatile biocatalysts for the bioremediation of various xenobiotics, including dyes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. However, current sources of new enzymes, simple heterologous expression hosts and enzymatic information (such as the appropriateness of common screening substrates on laccase engineering) remain scarce to support efficient engineering of laccase for better "green" applications. To address the issue, this study began with cloning the laccase family of Lentinula edodes. Three laccases perfectio sensu stricto (Lcc4A, Lcc5, and Lcc7) were then expressed from Pichia pastoris, characterized and compared with the previously reported Lcc1A and Lcc1B in terms of kinetics, stability, and degradation of dyes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Lcc7 represented a novel laccase, and it exhibited both the highest catalytic efficiency (assayed with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) [ABTS]) and thermostability. However, its performance on "green" applications surprisingly did not match the activity on the common screening substrates, namely, ABTS and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. On the other hand, correlation analyses revealed that guaiacol is much better associated with the decolorization of multiple structurally different dyes than are the two common screening substrates. Comparison of the oxidation chemistry of guaiacol and phenolic dyes, such as azo dyes, further showed that they both involve generation of phenoxyl radicals in laccase-catalyzed oxidation. In summary, this study concluded a robust expression platform of L. edodes laccases, novel laccases, and an indicative screening substrate, guaiacol, which are all essential fundamentals for appropriately driving the engineering of laccases towards more efficient "green" applications.

  19. Dimethoate induces kidney dysfunction, disrupts membrane-bound ATPases and confers cytotoxicity through DNA damage. Protective effects of vitamin E and selenium.

    PubMed

    Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Karray, Aida; Hakim, Ahmed; Ben Ali, Yassine; Troudi, Afef; Soudani, Nejla; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir; Zeghal, Najiba

    2013-12-01

    Dimethoate (DM) is an organophosphate insecticide widely used in agriculture and industry and has toxic effects on non-target organisms especially mammalian. However, we still know little about DM-induced kidney injury and its alleviation by natural antioxidants. In the present study, selenium (Se), vitamin E, DM, Se+DM, vitamin E+DM, Se+vitamin E+DM were given to adult rats for 4 weeks. Plasma creatinine and uric acid, kidney MDA, PC, H2O2 and AOPP levels were higher, while Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and LDH values were lower in the DM group than those of controls. A smear without ladder formation on agarose gel was shown in the DM group, indicating random DNA degradation and DM-induced genotoxicity. A decrease in kidney GSH, NPSH and plasma urea levels and an increase in GPx, SOD and catalase activities were observed in the DM group when compared to those of controls. Plasma cystatin C levels increased, indicating a decrease in glomerular filtration rate. When Se or vitamin E was added through diet, the biochemical parameters cited above were partially restored in Se+DM and vitamin E+DM than DM group. The joint effect of Se and vitamin E was more powerful against DM-induced oxidative stress and kidney dysfunction. The changes in biochemical parameters were substantiated by histological data. In conclusion, our results indicated a possible mechanism of DM-induced nephrotoxicity, where renal genotoxicity was noted, membrane-bound ATPases and plasma biomarkers were disturbed. Se and vitamin E ameliorated the toxic effects of this pesticide in renal tissue suggesting their role as potential antioxidants.

  20. LPT1 encodes a membrane-bound O-acyltransferase involved in the acylation of lysophospholipids in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hisanori; Shimada, Atsushi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ohya, Mihoko; Takase, Juri; Miyashita, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Hisashi; Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Reiko; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2007-11-23

    Phospholipids are major components of cellular membranes that participate in a range of cellular processes. Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key molecule in the phospholipid biosynthetic pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SLC1 has been identified as the gene encoding lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase, which catalyzes PA synthesis. However, despite the importance of PA, disruption of SLC1 does not affect cell viability (Nagiec, M. M., Wells, G. B., Lester, R. L., and Dickson, R. C. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 22156-22163). We originally aimed to identify the acetyl-CoA:lyso platelet-activating factor acetyltransferase (lysoPAF AT) gene in yeast. Screening of a complete set of yeast deletion clones (4741 homozygous diploid clones) revealed a single mutant strain, YOR175c, with a defect in lysoPAF AT activity. YOR175c has been predicted to be a member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase superfamily, and we designated the gene LPT1. An Lpt1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Other than lysoPAF AT activity, Lpt1 catalyzed acyltransferase activity with a wide variety of lysophospholipids as acceptors, including lysophosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylglycerol, lysophosphatidylinositol, and lysophosphatidylserine. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine accumulated in the Deltalpt1 mutant strain. Although the Deltalpt1 mutant strain did not show other detectable defects, the Deltalpt1 Deltaslc1 double mutant strain had a synthetic lethal phenotype. These results indicate that, in concert with Slc1, Lpt1 plays a central role in PA biosynthesis, which is essential for cell viability.

  1. Widespread occurrence of N-terminal acylation in animal globins and possible origin of respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor.

    PubMed

    Blank, Miriam; Burmester, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    Proteins of the (hemo-)globin superfamily have been identified in many different animals but also occur in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Globins are renowned for their ability to store and to transport oxygen, but additional globin functions such as sensing, signaling, and detoxification have been proposed. Recently, we found that the zebrafish globin X protein is myristoylated and palmitoylated at its N-terminus. The addition of fatty acids results in an association with the cellular membranes, suggesting a previously unrecognized globin function. In this study, we show that N-terminal acylation likely occurs in globin proteins from a broad range of phyla. An N-terminal myristoylation site was identified in 90 nonredundant globins from Chlorophyta, Heterokontophyta, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, and Chordata (including Cephalochordata), of which 66 proteins carry an additional palmitoylation site. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified five major globin families, which may mirror the ancient globin diversity of the Metazoa. Globin X-like proteins form two related clades, which diverged before the radiation of the Eumetazoa. Vertebrate hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin, cytoglobin, globin E, and globin Y form a strongly supported common clade, which is the sister group of a clade consisting of invertebrate Hbs and relatives. The N-terminally acylated globins do not form a single monophyletic group but are distributed to four distinct clades. This pattern may be either explained by multiple introduction of an N-terminal acylation site into distinct globin lineages or by the origin of animal respiratory globins from a membrane-bound ancestor. Similarly, respiratory globins were not monophyletic. This suggests that respiratory globins might have emerged independently several times and that the early metazoan globins might have been associated with a membrane and carried out a function that was related to lipid protection or

  2. A Heteromeric Membrane-Bound Prenyltransferase Complex from Hop Catalyzes Three Sequential Aromatic Prenylations in the Bitter Acid Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoxun; Ban, Zhaonan; Qin, Hao; Ma, Liya; King, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Bitter acids (α and β types) account for more than 30% of the fresh weight of hop (Humulus lupulus) glandular trichomes and are well known for their contribution to the bitter taste of beer. These multiprenylated chemicals also show diverse biological activities, some of which have potential benefits to human health. The bitter acid biosynthetic pathway has been investigated extensively, and the genes for the early steps of bitter acid synthesis have been cloned and functionally characterized. However, little is known about the enzyme(s) that catalyze three sequential prenylation steps in the β-bitter acid pathway. Here, we employed a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) system for the functional identification of aromatic prenyltransferase (PT) genes. Two PT genes (HlPT1L and HlPT2) obtained from a hop trichome-specific complementary DNA library were functionally characterized using this yeast system. Coexpression of codon-optimized PT1L and PT2 in yeast, together with upstream genes, led to the production of bitter acids, but no bitter acids were detected when either of the PT genes was expressed by itself. Stepwise mutation of the aspartate-rich motifs in PT1L and PT2 further revealed the prenylation sequence of these two enzymes in β-bitter acid biosynthesis: PT1L catalyzed only the first prenylation step, and PT2 catalyzed the two subsequent prenylation steps. A metabolon formed through interactions between PT1L and PT2 was demonstrated using a yeast two-hybrid system, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation, and in vitro biochemical assays. These results provide direct evidence of the involvement of a functional metabolon of membrane-bound prenyltransferases in bitter acid biosynthesis in hop. PMID:25564559

  3. The Membrane Bound LRR Lipoprotein Slr, and the Cell Wall-Anchored M1 Protein from Streptococcus pyogenes Both Interact with Type I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Bober, Marta; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Collin, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen and surface structures allow it to adhere to, colonize and invade the human host. Proteins containing leucine rich repeats (LRR) have been indentified in mammals, viruses, archaea and several bacterial species. The LRRs are often involved in protein-protein interaction, are typically 20–30 amino acids long and the defining feature of the LRR motif is an 11-residue sequence LxxLxLxxNxL (x being any amino acid). The streptococcal leucine rich (Slr) protein is a hypothetical lipoprotein that has been shown to be involved in virulence, but at present no ligands for Slr have been identified. We could establish that Slr is a membrane attached horseshoe shaped lipoprotein by homology modeling, signal peptidase II inhibition, electron microscopy (of bacteria and purified protein) and immunoblotting. Based on our previous knowledge of LRR proteins we hypothesized that Slr could mediate binding to collagen. We could show by surface plasmon resonance that recombinant Slr and purified M1 protein bind with high affinity to collagen I. Isogenic slr mutant strain (MB1) and emm1 mutant strain (MC25) had reduced binding to collagen type I as shown by slot blot and surface plasmon resonance. Electron microscopy using gold labeled Slr showed multiple binding sites to collagen I, both to the monomeric and the fibrillar structure, and most binding occurred in the overlap region of the collagen I fibril. In conclusion, we show that Slr is an abundant membrane bound lipoprotein that is co-expressed on the surface with M1, and that both these proteins are involved in recruiting collagen type I to the bacterial surface. This underlines the importance of S. pyogenes interaction with extracellular matrix molecules, especially since both Slr and M1 have been shown to be virulence factors. PMID:21655249

  4. Structure and function of rat liver polysome populations. I. Complexity, frequency distribution, and degree of uniqueness of free and membrane-bound polysomal polyadenylate-containing RNA populations

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Free and membrane-bound polysomes were isolated from rat liver in high yields with minimal degradation, cross-contamination, or contamination by nuclear or nonpolysomal cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein. Poly(A)+ RNA fractions isolated from free and bound polysomal RNA (poly(A)+ RNAfree and poly(A)+ RNAbound) by oligo(dT) cellulose chromatography exhibited number-average lengths of 1,600 and 1,200 nucleotides, respectively, on formamide sucrose gradients. Poly(A)+ RNAfree and poly(A)+ RNAbound contain 9.1 +/- 0.55 and 10.7 +/- 0.50% poly(A) as measured by hybridization to [3H]poly(U) and comprise 2.37 and 1.22% of their respective polysomal RNA populations. Homologous poly(A)+ RNA-cDNA hybridizations revealed that greater than 95% of the mass of poly(A)+ RNAfree and poly(A)+ RNAbound contain nucleotide complexities of about 3.4 x 10(7) and 6.0 x 10(6), respectively. This represents about 20,000 and 5,000 poly(A)+ RNA species of average sizes. Heterologous hybridizations suggested that considerable overlap exists between poly(A)+ RNAfree and poly(A)+ RNAbound sequences that cannot be attributed to cross-contamination. This was confirmed by conducting heterologous reactions using kinetically enriched cDNA populations. Heterologous hybridizations involving poly(A)+ RNA derived from tightly bound polysomes and cDNAfree indicated tha most of the overlapping sequences are not contributed by loosely bound (high-salt releasable) polysomes. The ramifications of these findings are discussed. PMID:6116718

  5. In vitro assay of the chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane-bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-07-01

    The first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis is the Mg-chelatase-catalyzed insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. Since iron insertion into protoporphyrin leads to heme formation, Mg-chelatase lies at the branch point of heme and chlorophyll synthesis in chloroplasts. Little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase, as it has been assayed only in intact cucumber chloroplasts. In this report we describe an in vitro assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts was 3- to 4-fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts. This activity survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated by centrifugation into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity, and both were inactivated by boiling indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane-bound protein(s). The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol of Mg-deuteroporphyrin per h per mg of protein, and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity and the enzymen was sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 20 {mu}M). Broken and reconstituted cucumber chloroplasts were unable to maintain Mg-chelatase activity. However, the cucumber supernatant fraction was active when combined with the pellet fraction of peas; the converse was not true, which suggested that the cucumber pellet was the component that lost activity during lysis.

  6. Identification of amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of mammalian membrane-bound front-end fatty acid desaturases[S

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenshi; Ohno, Makoto; Taguchi, Masahiro; Kawamoto, Seiji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Aki, Tsunehiro

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-bound desaturases are physiologically and industrially important enzymes that are involved in the production of diverse fatty acids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives. Here, we identified amino acid residues that determine the substrate specificity of rat Δ6 desaturase (D6d) acting on linoleoyl-CoA by comparing its amino acid sequence with that of Δ5 desaturase (D5d), which converts dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. The N-terminal cytochrome b5-like domain was excluded as a determinant by domain swapping analysis. Substitution of eight amino acid residues (Ser209, Asn211, Arg216, Ser235, Leu236, Trp244, Gln245, and Val344) of D6d with the corresponding residues of D5d by site-directed mutagenesis switched the substrate specificity from linoleoyl-CoA to dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-CoA. In addition, replacement of Leu323 of D6d with Phe323 on the basis of the amino acid sequence of zebra fish Δ5/6 bifunctional desaturase was found to render D6d bifunctional. Homology modeling of D6d using recent crystal structure data of human stearoyl-CoA (Δ9) desaturase revealed that Arg216, Trp244, Gln245, and Leu323 are located near the substrate-binding pocket. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the structural basis of the substrate specificity of a mammalian front-end fatty acid desaturase, which will aid in efficient production of value-added fatty acids. PMID:26590171

  7. Intramolecular structure and dynamics of mequinol and guaiacol in the gas phase: Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of their S{sub 1} states

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Rodríguez-Matus, Marcela; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo E-mail: gmerino@mda.cinvestav.mx; Cabellos, José Luis; Merino, Gabriel E-mail: gmerino@mda.cinvestav.mx; Yi, John T.; Pratt, David W.; Schmitt, Michael

    2015-09-07

    The molecular structures of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and mequinol (4-methoxyphenol) have been studied using high resolution electronic spectroscopy in a molecular beam and contrasted with ab initio computations. Mequinol exhibits two low frequency bands that have been assigned to electronic origins of two possible conformers of the molecule, trans and cis. Guaiacol also shows low frequency bands, but in this case, the bands have been assigned to the electronic origin and vibrational modes of a single conformer of the isolated molecule. A detailed study of these bands indicates that guaiacol has a vibrationally averaged planar structure in the ground state, but it is distorted along both in-plane and out-of-plane coordinates in the first electronically excited state. An intramolecular hydrogen bond involving the adjacent   –OH and   –OCH{sub 3} groups plays a major role in these dynamics.

  8. Intramolecular structure and dynamics of mequinol and guaiacol in the gas phase: Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of their S1 states.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Rodríguez-Matus, Marcela; Cabellos, José Luis; Yi, John T; Pratt, David W; Schmitt, Michael; Merino, Gabriel; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo

    2015-09-07

    The molecular structures of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and mequinol (4-methoxyphenol) have been studied using high resolution electronic spectroscopy in a molecular beam and contrasted with ab initio computations. Mequinol exhibits two low frequency bands that have been assigned to electronic origins of two possible conformers of the molecule, trans and cis. Guaiacol also shows low frequency bands, but in this case, the bands have been assigned to the electronic origin and vibrational modes of a single conformer of the isolated molecule. A detailed study of these bands indicates that guaiacol has a vibrationally averaged planar structure in the ground state, but it is distorted along both in-plane and out-of-plane coordinates in the first electronically excited state. An intramolecular hydrogen bond involving the adjacent   -OH and   -OCH3 groups plays a major role in these dynamics.

  9. Growth of the Obligate Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough under Continuous Low Oxygen Concentration Sparging: Impact of the Membrane-Bound Oxygen Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, Fanny; Brasseur, Gael; Pieulle, Laetitia; Valette, Odile; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Fardeau, Marie Laure; Dolla, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Although obligate anaerobe, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) exhibits high aerotolerance that involves several enzymatic systems, including two membrane-bound oxygen reductases, a bd-quinol oxidase and a cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase. Effect of constant low oxygen concentration on growth and morphology of the wild-type, single (Δbd, Δcox) and double deletion (Δcoxbd) mutant strains of the genes encoding these oxygen reductases was studied. When both wild-type and deletion mutant strains were cultured in lactate/sulfate medium under constant 0.02% O2 sparging, they were able to grow but the final biomasses and the growth yield were lower than that obtained under anaerobic conditions. At the end of the growth, lactate was not completely consumed and when conditions were then switched to anaerobic, growth resumed. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that a large majority of the cells were then able to divide (over 97%) but the time to recover a complete division event was longer for single deletion mutant Δbd than for the three other strains. Determination of the molar growth yields on lactate suggested that a part of the energy gained from lactate oxidation was derived toward cells protection/repairing against oxidative conditions rather than biosynthesis, and that this part was higher in the single deletion mutant Δbd and, to a lesser extent, Δcox strains. Our data show that when DvH encounters oxidative conditions, it is able to stop growing and to rapidly resume growing when conditions are switched to anaerobic, suggesting that it enters active dormancy sate under oxidative conditions. We propose that the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) plays a central role in this phenomenon by reversibly switching from an oxidative-sensitive fully active state to an oxidative-insensitive inactive state. The oxygen reductases, and especially the bd-quinol oxidase, would have a crucial function by maintaining reducing conditions

  10. Degradation of membrane-bound ganglioside GM1. Stimulation by bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and the activator proteins SAP-B and GM2-AP.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, G; Linke, T; Uhlhorn-Dierks, G; Sandhoff, K

    2000-11-17

    According to our hypothesis (Fürst, W., and Sandhoff, K. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1126, 1-16) glycosphingolipids of the plasma membrane are digested after endocytosis as components of intraendosomal and intralysosomal vesicles and membrane structures. The lysosomal degradation of glycosphingolipids with short oligosaccharide chains by acid exohydrolases requires small, non-enzymatic cofactors, called sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). A total of five activator proteins have been identified as follows: namely the saposins SAP-A, -B, -C, and -D, which are derived from the single chain SAP-precursor protein (prosaposin), and the GM2 activator protein. A deficiency of prosaposin results in the storage of ceramide and sphingolipids with short oligosaccharide head groups. The loss of the GM2 activator protein blocks the degradation of the ganglioside GM2. The enzymatic hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1 is catalyzed by beta-galactosidase, a water-soluble acid exohydrolase. The lack of ganglioside GM1 accumulation in patients suffering from either prosaposin or GM2 activator protein deficiency has led to the hypothesis that SAPs are not needed for the hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1 in vivo. In this study we demonstrate that an activator protein is required for the enzymatic degradation of membrane-bound ganglioside GM1 and that both SAP-B and the GM2 activator protein significantly enhance the degradation of the ganglioside GM1 by acid beta-galactosidase in a liposomal, detergent-free assay system. These findings offer a possible explanation for the observation that no storage of the ganglioside GM1 has been observed in patients with either isolated prosaposin or isolated GM2 activator deficiency. We also demonstrate that anionic phospholipids such as bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and phosphatidylinositol, which specifically occur in inner membranes of endosomes and in lysosomes, are essential for the activator-stimulated hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1

  11. Growth of the obligate anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough under continuous low oxygen concentration sparging: impact of the membrane-bound oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Fanny; Brasseur, Gael; Pieulle, Laetitia; Valette, Odile; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Fardeau, Marie Laure; Dolla, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Although obligate anaerobe, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) exhibits high aerotolerance that involves several enzymatic systems, including two membrane-bound oxygen reductases, a bd-quinol oxidase and a cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase. Effect of constant low oxygen concentration on growth and morphology of the wild-type, single (Δbd, Δcox) and double deletion (Δcoxbd) mutant strains of the genes encoding these oxygen reductases was studied. When both wild-type and deletion mutant strains were cultured in lactate/sulfate medium under constant 0.02% O2 sparging, they were able to grow but the final biomasses and the growth yield were lower than that obtained under anaerobic conditions. At the end of the growth, lactate was not completely consumed and when conditions were then switched to anaerobic, growth resumed. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that a large majority of the cells were then able to divide (over 97%) but the time to recover a complete division event was longer for single deletion mutant Δbd than for the three other strains. Determination of the molar growth yields on lactate suggested that a part of the energy gained from lactate oxidation was derived toward cells protection/repairing against oxidative conditions rather than biosynthesis, and that this part was higher in the single deletion mutant Δbd and, to a lesser extent, Δcox strains. Our data show that when DvH encounters oxidative conditions, it is able to stop growing and to rapidly resume growing when conditions are switched to anaerobic, suggesting that it enters active dormancy sate under oxidative conditions. We propose that the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) plays a central role in this phenomenon by reversibly switching from an oxidative-sensitive fully active state to an oxidative-insensitive inactive state. The oxygen reductases, and especially the bd-quinol oxidase, would have a crucial function by maintaining reducing conditions

  12. Membrane-Bound CYB5R3 Is a Common Effector of Nutritional and Oxidative Stress Response Through FOXO3a and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Siendones, Emilio; SantaCruz-Calvo, Sara; Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; Cascajo, María V.; Ariza, Julia; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Villalba, José M.; Acquaviva-Bourdain, Cécile; Roze, Emmanuel; Bernier, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Membrane-bound CYB5R3 deficiency in humans causes recessive hereditary methaemoglobinaemia (RHM), an incurable disease that is characterized by severe neurological disorders. CYB5R3 encodes for NADH-dependent redox enzyme that contributes to metabolic homeostasis and stress protection; however, how it is involved in the neurological pathology of RHM remains unknown. Here, the role and transcriptional regulation of CYB5R3 was studied under nutritional and oxidative stress. Results: CYB5R3-deficient cells exhibited a decrease of the NAD+/NADH ratio, mitochondrial respiration rate, ATP production, and mitochondrial electron transport chain activities, which were associated with higher sensitivity to oxidative stress, and an increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Overexpression of either forkhead box class O 3a (FOXO3a) or nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like2 (Nrf2) was associated with increased CYB5R3 levels, and genetic ablation of Nrf2 resulted in lower CYB5R3 expression. The presence of two antioxidant response element sequences in the CYB5R3 promoter led to chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, which showed that cellular stressors enhanced the binding of Nrf2 and FOXO3a to the CYB5R3 promoter. Innovation: Our findings demonstrate that CYB5R3 contributes to regulate redox homeostasis, aerobic metabolism, and cellular senescence, suggesting that CYB5R3 might be a key effector of oxidative and nutritional stress pathways. The expression of CYB5R3 is regulated by the cooperation of Nrf2 and FOXO3a. Conclusion: CYB5R3 is an essential gene that appears as a final effector for both nutritional and oxidative stress responses through FOXO3a and Nrf2, respectively, and their interaction promotes CYB5R3 expression. These results unveil a potential mechanism of action by which CYB5R3 deficiency contributes to the pathophysiological underpinnings of neurological disorders in RHM patients. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1708–1725. PMID

  13. Kinetic properties of manganese peroxidase from the mushroom Stereum ostrea and its ability to decolorize dyes.

    PubMed

    Praveen, K; Usha, K Y; Viswanath, Buddolla; Reddy, B Rajasekhar

    2012-11-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was isolated from the culture filtrate of the wood log mushroom Stereum ostrea (S. ostrea), grown on Koroljova medium, and then purified by ammonium sulfate [70% (w/v)] fractionation, DEAE-cellulose anion exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography, with an attainment of 88.6-fold purification and the recovery of 22.8% of initial activity. According to SDS-PAGE the molecular mass of the MnP was 40 kDa. The optimal pH and temperature were found to be 4.5 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable even after exposure to a pH range of 4.5 to 6.0, and at temperatures of up to 35 degrees C at a pH of 4.5 for 1h. The K(m) and V(max) values for the substrate phenol red were found to be 8 micronm and 111.14 U/mg of protein, respectively. The MnP also oxidized other substrates such as guaiacol, DMP, and veratryl alcohol. Sodium azide, EDTA, SDS, Cu(2+), and Fe(2+), at 1-5 mM, strongly inhibited enzyme activity, whereas Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) increased enzyme activity. The participation of the purified enzyme in the decolorization of dyes suggests that S. ostrea manganese peroxidase could be effectively employed in textile industries.

  14. Metabolism of sulphonated anthraquinones in rhubarb, maize and celery: the role of cytochromes P450 and peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Page, Valérie; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul

    2009-11-01

    Sulphonated anthraquinones are precursors of many synthetic dyes and pigments, recalcitrant to biodegradation, and thus contaminating many industrial effluents and rivers. In the development of a phytotreatment to remove sulphonated aromatic compounds, rhubarb (Rheum rhaponticum), a plant producing natural anthraquinones, as well as maize (Zea mays) and celery (Apium graveolens), plants not producing anthraquinones, were tested for their ability to metabolise these xenobiotics. Plants were cultivated under hydroponic conditions, with or without sulphonated anthraquinones, and were harvested at different times. Either microsomal or cytosolic fractions were prepared. The monooxygenase activity of cytochromes P450 towards several sulphonated anthraquinones was tested using a new method based on the fluorimetric detection of oxygen consumed during cytochromes P450-catalysed reactions. The activity of cytosolic peroxidases was measured by spectrophotometry, using guaiacol as a substrate. Results indicated that the activity of cytochromes P450 and peroxidases significantly increased in rhubarb plants cultivated in the presence of sulphonated anthraquinones. A higher activity of cytochromes P450 was also detected in maize and celery exposed to the pollutants. In these two plants, a peroxidase activity was also detected, but without a clear difference between the control plants and the plants exposed to the organic contaminants. This research demonstrated the existence in rhubarb, maize and celery of biochemical mechanisms involved in the metabolism and detoxification of sulphonated anthraquinones. Taken together, results confirmed that rhubarb might be the most appropriate plant for the phytotreatment of these organic pollutants.

  15. Zonal Changes in Ascorbate and Hydrogen Peroxide Contents, Peroxidase, and Ascorbate-Related Enzyme Activities in Onion Roots1

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Córdoba-Pedregosa, María; Córdoba, Francisco; Villalba, José Manuel; González-Reyes, José Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) roots growing hydroponically show differential zonal values for intra- (symplastic) and extra- (apoplastic) cellular ascorbate (ASC) and dehydroascorbate (DHA) contents and for related enzyme activities. In whole roots, ASC and DHA concentrations were higher in root apex and meristem and gradually decreased toward the root base. Guaiacol peroxidase, ASC peroxidase, monodehydroascorbate oxidoreductase, DHA reductase, catalase, and glutathione reductase activities showed differential activity patterns depending on the zone of the root and their apoplastic or symplastic origin. An in vivo staining of peroxidase activity also revealed a specific distribution pattern along the root axis. Using electron microscopy, hydrogen peroxide was found at different locations depending on the root zone but was mainly located in cell walls from epidermal and meristematic cells and in cells undergoing lignification. A balanced control of all of these molecules seems to exist along the root axis and may be directly related to the mechanisms in which the ASC system is involved, as cell division and elongation. The role of ASC on growth and development in relation to its presence at the different zones of the root is discussed. PMID:12586893

  16. Plant peroxidases. Their primary, secondary and tertiary structures, and relation to cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Welinder, K G

    1985-09-16

    The amino acid sequences of the 51% different horseradish peroxidase HRP C and turnip peroxidase TP 7 have previously been completed by us, but the three-dimensional structures are unknown. Recently the amino acid sequence and the crystal structure of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase have appeared. The three known apoperoxidases consist of 300 +/- 8 amino acid residues. The sequences have now been aligned and show 18% and 16% identity only, between the yeast peroxidase and plant peroxidase HRP C and TP 7, respectively. We show that different structural tests all support similar protein folds in plant peroxidases and yeast peroxidase and, therefore, a common evolutionary origin. The following tests support this thesis: (a) predicted helices in the plant peroxidases follow the complex pattern observed in the crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase; (b) their hydropathic profiles are similar and agree with observed buried and exposed peptide chain in cytochrome c peroxidase; (c) half-cystines which are distant in the amino acid sequence of plant peroxidases become spatial neighbours when fitted into the cytochrome c peroxidase model; (d) the two-domain structure proposed from limited proteolysis of apoperoxidase HRP C is observed in the crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase. The similarities and differences of the plant and yeast peroxidases and the reactive side chains of a plant peroxidase active site are described. The characteristics of Ca2+-binding sequences, derived from several superfamilies, are applied to predict the Ca2+-binding sequences in plant peroxidases.

  17. Purification, properties, and distribution of ascorbate peroxidase in legume root nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, D.A.; Hanus, F.J.; Russell, S.A.; Evans, H.J. )

    1987-01-01

    All aerobic biological system, including N{sub 2}-fixing root nodules, are subject to O{sub 2} toxicity that results from the formation of reactive intermediates such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and free radicals of O{sub 2}. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may be removed from root nodules in a series of enzymic reactions involving ascorbate peroxidase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and glutathione reductase. The authors confirm here the presence of these enzymes in root nodules from nine species of legumes and from Alnus rubra. Ascorbate peroxidase from soybean nodules was purified to near homogeneity. This enzyme was found to be a hemeprotein with a molecular weight of 30,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. KCN, NaN{sub 3}, CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were potent inhibitors of activity. Nonphysiological reductants such as guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and pyrogallol functioned as substrates for the enzyme. No activity was detected with NAD(P)H, reduced glutathione, or urate. Ascorbate peroxidation did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The substrate concentration which resulted in a reaction rate of 1/2 V{sub max} was 70 micromolar for ascorbate and 3 micromolar for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The high affinity of ascorbate peroxidase for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} indicates that this enzyme, rather than catalase, is responsible for most H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal outside of peroxisomes in root nodules.

  18. Evolutionary Divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana Classical Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Mamoshina, P O; Ezhova, T A

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms of 62 peroxidase genes derived from Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated to evaluate evolutionary dynamics and divergence of peroxidase proteins. By comparing divergence of duplicated genes AtPrx53-AtPrx54 and AtPrx36-AtPrx72 and their products, nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were identified that were apparently targets of positive selection. These substitutions were detected among paralogs of 461 ecotypes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these substitutions are conservative and matched paralogous peroxidases in other Brassicaceae species. These results suggest that after duplication, peroxidase genes evolved under the pressure of positive selection, and amino acid substitutions identified during our study provided divergence of properties and physiological functions in peroxidases. Our predictions regarding functional significance for amino acid residues identified in variable sites of peroxidases may allow further experimental assessment of evolution of peroxidases after gene duplication.

  19. Modulatory Effect of Taurine on 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)Anthracene-Induced Alterations in Detoxification Enzyme System, Membrane Bound Enzymes, Glycoprotein Profile and Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen in Rat Breast Tissue.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Selvaraj, Sundaramoorthy; Ilakkia, Aruldoss; Saravanan, Dhiravidamani; Venkateswari, Ramachandran; Revathi Mani, Balasundaram; Anandakumar, Pandi; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-08-01

    The modulatory effect of taurine on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats was studied. DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) was administered to induce breast cancer in rats. Protein carbonyl levels, activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase), phase I drug metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH cytochrome c reductase), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase), glycoprotein levels, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied. DMBA-induced breast tumor bearing rats showed abnormal alterations in the levels of protein carbonyls, activities of membrane bound enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, glycoprotein levels, and PCNA protein expression levels. Taurine treatment (100 mg/kg body weight) appreciably counteracted all the above changes induced by DMBA. Histological examination of breast tissue further supported our biochemical findings. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated the chemotherapeutic effect of taurine in DMBA-induced breast cancer.

  20. [The Role of Membrane-Bound Heat Shock Proteins Hsp90 in Migration of Tumor Cells in vitro and Involvement of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Protein Binding to Plasma Membrane].

    PubMed

    Snigireva, A V; Vrublevskaya, V V; Skarga, Y Y; Morenkov, O S

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein Hsp90, detected in the extracellular space and on the membrane of cells, plays an important role in cell motility, migration, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. At present, the functional role and molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 binding to plasma membrane are not elucidated. Using isoform-specific antibodies against Hsp90, Hsp9α and Hsp90β, we showed that membrane-bound Hsp90α and Hsp90β play a significant role in migration of human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and glioblastoma (A-172) cells in vitro. Disorders of sulfonation of cell heparan sulfates, cleavage of cell heparan. sulfates by heparinase I/III as well as treatment of cells with heparin lead to an abrupt reduction in the expression level of Hsp90 isoforms. Furthermore, heparin significantly inhibits tumor cell migration. The results obtained demonstrate that two isoforms of membrane-bound Hsp90 are involved in migration of tumor cells in vitro and that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a pivotal role in the "anchoring" of Hsp90α and Hsp90β to the plasma membrane.

  1. Engineering Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity Into Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Meharenna, Y.T.; Oertel, P.; Bhaskar, B.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) have very similar structures, and yet neither CCP nor APX exhibits each others activities with respect to reducing substrates. APX has a unique substrate binding site near the heme propionates where ascorbate H-bonds with a surface Arg and one heme propionate (Sharp et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 303--307). The corresponding region in CCP has a much longer surface loop, and the critical Arg residue that is required for ascorbate binding in APX is Asn in CCP. In order to convert CCP into an APX, the ascorbate-binding loop and critical arginine were engineered into CCP to give the CCP2APX mutant. The mutant crystal structure shows that the engineered site is nearly identical to that found in APX. While wild-type CCP shows no APX activity, CCP2APX catalyzes the peroxidation of ascorbate at a rate of {approx}12 min{sup -1}, indicating that the engineered ascorbate-binding loop can bind ascorbate.

  2. DyP-type peroxidases comprise a novel heme peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Y

    2009-04-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) is produced by a basidiomycete (Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1) and is a member of a novel heme peroxidase family (DyP-type peroxidase family) that appears to be distinct from general peroxidases. Thus far, 80 putative members of this family have been registered in the PeroxiBase database (http://peroxibase.isbsib.ch/) and more than 400 homologous proteins have been detected via PSI-BLAST search. Although few studies have characterized the function and structure of these proteins, they appear to be bifunctional enzymes with hydrolase or oxygenase, as well as typical peroxidase activities. DyP-type peroxidase family suggests an ancient root compared with other general peroxidases because of their widespread distribution in the living world. In this review, firstly, an outline of the characteristics of DyP from T. cucumeris is presented and then interesting characteristics of the DyP-type peroxidase family are discussed.

  3. Atmospheric reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a biomass burning emitted compound: Secondary organic aerosol formation and gas-phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Deboudt, Karine; Fourmentin, Marc; Choël, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Methoxyphenols are low molecular weight semi-volatile polar aromatic compounds produced from the pyrolysis of wood lignin. The reaction of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the LPCA simulation chamber at (294 ± 2) K, atmospheric pressure, low relative humidity (RH < 1%) and under high-NOx conditions using CH3ONO as OH source. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer); the SOA yields were in the range from 0.003 to 0.87 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM) Electron Microscopy observations were performed to characterize the physical state of SOA produced from the OH reaction with guaiacol; they display both liquid and solid particles (in an amorphous state). GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detection) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) analysis show the formation of nitroguaiacol isomers as main oxidation products in the gas- and aerosol-phases. In the gas-phase, the formation yields were (10 ± 2) % for 4-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-4-nitrobenzene; 4-NG) and (6 ± 2) % for 3- or 6-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene or 1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene; 3/6-NG; the standards are not commercially available so both isomers cannot be distinguished) whereas in SOA their yield were much lower (≤0.1%). To our knowledge, this work represents the first identification of nitroguaiacols as gaseous oxidation products of the OH reaction with guaiacol. As the reactivity of nitroguaiacols with atmospheric oxidants is probably low, we suggest using them as biomass burning emission gas tracers. The atmospheric implications of the guaiacol + OH reaction are also discussed.

  4. Evaluation of Silica-Supported Metal and Metal Phosphide Nanoparticle Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol Under Ex Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Michael B.; Baddour, Frederick G.; Habas, Susan E.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Schaidle, Joshua A.

    2015-09-30

    A series of metal and metal phosphide catalysts were investigated for the hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol under ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) conditions (350 °C, 0.5 MPa, 12 H2:1 guaiacol, weight hourly space velocity 5 h$-$1). Ligand-capped Ni, Pt, Rh, Ni2P, and Rh2P nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared using solution-phase synthesis techniques and dispersed on a silica support. For the metal phosphide NP-catalysts, a synthetic route that relies on the decomposition of a single molecular precursor was employed. The reactivity of the NP-catalysts was compared to a series of reference materials including Ni/SiO2 and Pt/SiO2 prepared using incipient wetness (IW) impregnation and a commercial (com) Pt/SiO2 catalyst. The NP-Ni/SiO2 catalyst exhibited the largest reduction in the oxygen mol% of the organic phase and outperformed the IW-Ni/SiO2 material. Although it was less active for guaiacol conversion than NP-Ni/SiO2, NP-Rh2P/SiO2 demonstrated the largest production of completely deoxygenated products and the highest selectivity to anisole, benzene, and cyclohexane, suggesting that it is a promising catalyst for deoxygenation of aryl-OH bonds. Finally, the com-Pt/SiO2 and IW-Pt/SiO2 catalyst exhibited the highest normalized rate of guaiacol conversion per m2 and per gram of active phase, respectively, but did not produce any completely deoxygenated products.

  5. Evaluation of Silica-Supported Metal and Metal Phosphide Nanoparticle Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol Under Ex Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Griffin, Michael B.; Baddour, Frederick G.; Habas, Susan E.; ...

    2015-09-30

    A series of metal and metal phosphide catalysts were investigated for the hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol under ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) conditions (350 °C, 0.5 MPa, 12 H2:1 guaiacol, weight hourly space velocity 5 h$-$1). Ligand-capped Ni, Pt, Rh, Ni2P, and Rh2P nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared using solution-phase synthesis techniques and dispersed on a silica support. For the metal phosphide NP-catalysts, a synthetic route that relies on the decomposition of a single molecular precursor was employed. The reactivity of the NP-catalysts was compared to a series of reference materials including Ni/SiO2 and Pt/SiO2 prepared using incipient wetness (IW) impregnationmore » and a commercial (com) Pt/SiO2 catalyst. The NP-Ni/SiO2 catalyst exhibited the largest reduction in the oxygen mol% of the organic phase and outperformed the IW-Ni/SiO2 material. Although it was less active for guaiacol conversion than NP-Ni/SiO2, NP-Rh2P/SiO2 demonstrated the largest production of completely deoxygenated products and the highest selectivity to anisole, benzene, and cyclohexane, suggesting that it is a promising catalyst for deoxygenation of aryl-OH bonds. Finally, the com-Pt/SiO2 and IW-Pt/SiO2 catalyst exhibited the highest normalized rate of guaiacol conversion per m2 and per gram of active phase, respectively, but did not produce any completely deoxygenated products.« less

  6. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  7. Formation of Light Absorbing Soluble Secondary Organics and Insoluble Polymeric Particles from the Dark Reaction of Catechol and Guaiacol with Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Slikboer, Samantha; Grandy, Lindsay; Blair, Sandra L; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Smith, Richard W; Al-Abadleh, Hind A

    2015-07-07

    Transition metals such as iron are reactive components of environmentally relevant surfaces. Here, dark reaction of Fe(III) with catechol and guaiacol was investigated in an aqueous solution at pH 3 under experimental conditions that mimic reactions in the adsorbed phase of water. Using UV-vis spectroscopy, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering, and electron microscopy techniques, we characterized the reactants, intermediates, and products as a function of reaction time. The reactions of Fe(III) with catechol and guaiacol produced significant changes in the optical spectra of the solutions due to the formation of light absorbing secondary organics and colloidal organic particles. The primary steps in the reaction mechanism were shown to include oxidation of catechol and guaiacol to hydroxy- and methoxy-quinones. The particles formed within a few minutes of reaction and grew to micron-size aggregates after half an hour reaction. The mass-normalized absorption coefficients of the particles were comparable to those of strongly absorbing brown carbon compounds produced by biomass burning. These results could account for new pathways that lead to atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation and abiotic polymer formation on environmental surfaces mediated by transition metals.

  8. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Actinobacterial peroxidases: an unexplored resource for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Khan, Nuraan; Burton, Stephanie Gail

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are redox enzymes that can be found in all forms of life where they play diverse roles. It is therefore not surprising that they can also be applied in a wide range of industrial applications. Peroxidases have been extensively studied with particular emphasis on those isolated from fungi and plants. In general, peroxidases can be grouped into haem-containing and non-haem-containing peroxidases, each containing protein families that share sequence similarity. The order Actinomycetales comprises a large group of bacteria that are often exploited for their diverse metabolic capabilities, and with recent increases in the number of sequenced genomes, it has become clear that this metabolically diverse group of organisms also represents a large resource for redox enzymes. It is therefore surprising that, to date, no review article has been written on the wide range of peroxidases found within the actinobacteria. In this review article, we focus on the different types of peroxidases found in actinobacteria, their natural role in these organisms and how they compare with the more well-described peroxidases. Finally, we also focus on work remaining to be done in this research field in order for peroxidases from actinobacteria to be applied in industrial processes.

  10. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  11. The effect of dissolved organic matter on soybean peroxidase-mediated removal of triclosan in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Ya; Peng, Jianbiao; Wu, Xinan; Gao, Shixiang; Mao, Liang

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in water and involved in numerous important chemical processes in aqueous systems, enabling it a unique challenge for a variety of water treatment processes. Soybean peroxidase (SBP)-based enzymatic process, as a promising treatment technique, has been successfully applied to remove pollutants in wastewaters such as coal-tar and refinery wastewater. In this study, the effect of DOM on the removal of polychlorinated aromatic antimicrobials triclosan (TCS) by SBP was investigated. Our results suggested that DOM significantly suppressed the catalytic performance of SBP to TCS, presumably resulting from the competition of the phenolic moiety in DOM structure as the active substrate of SBP via the analysis of excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectra of DOM. Although the product species of TCS in SBP-mediated system with DOM has no change compared with the system without DOM, the yields of self-coupling products relative to total transformed TCS were remarkably reduced in the presence of DOM, suggesting that DOM participated in the oxidative coupling reactions. Cross-coupling between TCS and DOM was also verified using guaiacol as a model DOM constituent. Moreover, the products including self-coupling products and co-polymers in SBP-mediated TCS reaction system with DOM were innocuous through growth inhibition assay of S. obliquus.

  12. Purification and characterization of a thermostable soluble peroxidase from Citrus medica leaf.

    PubMed

    Mall, Ruckminee; Naik, Gaurav; Mina, Usha; Mishra, Sarad Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A soluble and thermostable peroxidase enzyme (POD) was extracted from the leaf of Citrus medica. The enzyme was purified 15.10-fold with a total yield of 28.6% by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme came as a single band on native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) as well as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) PAGE. The molecular mass of the enzyme was about 32 kD as determined by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 6.0 and 50°C temperature. The enzyme was active in wide range of pH (5.0-8.0) and temperature (30-80°C). From the thermal inactivation studies in the range of 60-75°C, the half-life (t(1/2)) values of the enzyme ranged from 8 to 173 min. The inactivation energy (Ea) value of POD was estimated to be 21.7 kcal mol(-1). The Km values for guaiacol and H(2)O(2) were 8 mM and 1.8 mM, respectively. This enzyme was activated by some metals and reagents such as Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+), ferulic acid, and indole acetic acid (IAA), while it was inhibited by Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and Mn(2+), L-cysteine, L-proline, and protocatechuic acid.

  13. Purification of peroxidase from red cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata f. rubra) by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Somtürk, Burcu; Kalın, Ramazan; Özdemir, Nalan

    2014-08-01

    Peroxidase was purified in a single step using 4-amino benzohydrazide affinity chromatography from red cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata f. rubra), and some important biochemical characteristics of the purified enzyme were determined. The enzyme, with a specific activity of 3,550 EU/mg protein, was purified 120.6-fold with a yield of 2.9% from the synthesized affinity matrix. The molecular weight of the enzyme was found to be 69.3 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.0 and 30 °C. For guaiacol substrate, the K m and V max values were found as 0.048 mM and 1.46 EU/mL/min, respectively. Additionally, the IC50 and K i values for 4-amino benzohydrazide were calculated to be 1.047 and 0.702±0.05 mM, respectively, and 4-amino benzohydrazide showed noncompetitive inhibition.

  14. Investigation on binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase by absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li; Zhu, Shuhua; Ma, Hongmei; Zhou, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated by absorption spectrometry in 0.2 M anaerobic phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Based on this binding equilibrium, a model equation for evaluating the binding constant of nitric oxide to HRP is developed and the binding constant is calculated to be (1.55 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1, indicating that HRP can form a stable complex with nitric oxide. The type of inhibition by nitric oxide is validated on the basis of studying initial reaction rates of HRP-catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. The inhibition mechanism is found to follow an apparent non-competitive inhibition by Lineweaver-Burk method. Based on this kinetic mechanism, the binding constant is also calculated to be (5.22 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1. The values of the binding constant determined by the two methods are almost identical. The non-competitive inhibition model is also applicable to studying the effect of nitric oxide on other metalloenzymes, which catalyze the two-substrate reaction with the "ping-pong" mechanism.

  15. Identification of membrane-bound variant of metalloendopeptidase neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16) as the non-angiotensin type 1 (non-AT1), non-AT2 angiotensin binding site.

    PubMed

    Wangler, Naomi J; Santos, Kira L; Schadock, Ines; Hagen, Fred K; Escher, Emanuel; Bader, Michael; Speth, Robert C; Karamyan, Vardan T

    2012-01-02

    Recently, we discovered a novel non-angiotensin type 1 (non-AT1), non-AT2 angiotensin binding site in rodent and human brain membranes, which is distinctly different from angiotensin receptors and key proteases processing angiotensins. It is hypothesized to be a new member of the renin-angiotensin system. This study was designed to isolate and identify this novel angiotensin binding site. An angiotensin analog, photoaffinity probe 125I-SBpa-Ang II, was used to specifically label the non-AT1, non-AT2 angiotensin binding site in mouse forebrain membranes, followed by a two-step purification procedure based on the molecular size and isoelectric point of the photoradiolabeled binding protein. Purified samples were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry identification of proteins in the two-dimensional gel sections containing radioactivity. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed eight protein candidates, of which the four most abundant were immunoprecipitated after photoradiolabeling. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated that the angiotensin binding site might be the membrane-bound variant of metalloendopeptidase neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16). To verify these observations, radioligand binding and photoradiolabeling experiments were conducted in membrane preparations of HEK293 cells overexpressing mouse neurolysin or thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15), a closely related metalloendopeptidase of the same family. These experiments also identified neurolysin as the non-AT1, non-AT2 angiotensin binding site. Finally, brain membranes of mice lacking neurolysin were nearly devoid of the non-AT1, non-AT2 angiotensin binding site, further establishing membrane-bound neurolysin as the binding site. Future studies will focus on the functional significance of this highly specific, high affinity interaction between neurolysin and angiotensins.

  16. Identification of Membrane-bound Variant of Metalloendopeptidase Neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16) as the Non-angiotensin Type 1 (Non-AT1), Non-AT2 Angiotensin Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Wangler, Naomi J.; Santos, Kira L.; Schadock, Ines; Hagen, Fred K.; Escher, Emanuel; Bader, Michael; Speth, Robert C.; Karamyan, Vardan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we discovered a novel non-angiotensin type 1 (non-AT1), non-AT2 angiotensin binding site in rodent and human brain membranes, which is distinctly different from angiotensin receptors and key proteases processing angiotensins. It is hypothesized to be a new member of the renin-angiotensin system. This study was designed to isolate and identify this novel angiotensin binding site. An angiotensin analog, photoaffinity probe 125I-SBpa-Ang II, was used to specifically label the non-AT1, non-AT2 angiotensin binding site in mouse forebrain membranes, followed by a two-step purification procedure based on the molecular size and isoelectric point of the photoradiolabeled binding protein. Purified samples were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry identification of proteins in the two-dimensional gel sections containing radioactivity. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed eight protein candidates, of which the four most abundant were immunoprecipitated after photoradiolabeling. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated that the angiotensin binding site might be the membrane-bound variant of metalloendopeptidase neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16). To verify these observations, radioligand binding and photoradiolabeling experiments were conducted in membrane preparations of HEK293 cells overexpressing mouse neurolysin or thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15), a closely related metalloendopeptidase of the same family. These experiments also identified neurolysin as the non-AT1, non-AT2 angiotensin binding site. Finally, brain membranes of mice lacking neurolysin were nearly devoid of the non-AT1, non-AT2 angiotensin binding site, further establishing membrane-bound neurolysin as the binding site. Future studies will focus on the functional significance of this highly specific, high affinity interaction between neurolysin and angiotensins. PMID:22039052

  17. The energy-conserving electron transfer system used by Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 during pyruvate fermentation involves reduction of endogenously formed fumarate and cytoplasmic and membrane-bound complexes, Hdr-Flox and Rnf.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Price, Morgan N; Ray, Jayashree; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2014-11-01

    The adaptation capability of Desulfovibrio to natural fluctuations in electron acceptor availability was evaluated by studying Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 under varying respiratory, fermentative and methanogenic coculture conditions in chemostats. Transition from lactate to pyruvate in coculture resulted in a dramatic shift in the population structure and closer interspecies cell-to-cell interactions. Lower methane production rates in coculture than predicted from pyruvate input was attributed to redirection of electron flow to fumarate reduction. Without a methanogenic partner, accumulation of H₂and formate resulted in greater succinate production. Comparative transcript and gene fitness analysis in concert with physiological data of G20 wildtype and mutants demonstrated that pyruvate fermentation involves respiration of cytoplasmically formed fumarate using cytoplasmic and membrane-bound energy-conserving complexes, Rnf, Hdr-Flox-1 and Hmc. At the low H₂/formate levels maintained in coculture, Rnf likely functions as proton-pumping ferredoxin (Fd): type-I cytochrome c oxidoreductase, which transitions to a proton-pumping Fd(red):  nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD⁺) oxidoreductase at high H₂/formate levels during fermentation in monoculture. Hdr-Flox-1 is postulated to recycle Fd(red) via a flavin-based electron bifurcation involving NADH, Fdox and the thiol/disulphide-containing DsrC. In a menaquinone (MQ)-based electron confurcation reaction, the high-molecular-weight cytochrome-c₃complex, Hmc, is proposed to then couple DsrC(red) and periplasmic H₂/formate oxidation using the MQ pool to fuel a membrane-bound fumarate reductase.

  18. Mode of action and active site of an extracellular peroxidase from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y H; Shin, K S; Youn, H D; Hah, Y C; Kang, S O

    1996-01-01

    The properties of the haem environment of an extracellular peroxidase from Pleurotus ostreatus were studied by electronic absorption spectroscopy. A high-spin ferric form was predominant in the native enzyme and a high-spin ferrous form in the reduced enzyme. Cyanide was readily bound to the haem iron in the native form, thereby changing the enzyme to a low-spin cyano adduct. The electronic absorption spectra of the enzyme were similar to those of lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Compound III of the enzyme was formed after the addition of an excess of H2O2 to the native enzyme, and thereafter spontaneously reverted to the native form. The enzyme oxidized 1-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxyp ropane in the presence of H2O2 to produce 1-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-oxo-3-hydroxypr opane , 2,6-dimethoxyhydroquinone, 2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-3-hydroxypropanal, 2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-3-hydroxypropanoic acid, 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone and guaiacol. A similar oxidation pattern was demonstrated with a one-electron oxidant, ammonium cerium(IV)nitrate. Free radicals were detected as intermediates of the enzyme-mediated oxidation of 1-(3,5-dimethoxy-5-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxyp ropane and acetosyringone. These results can be explained by the mechanisms involving an initial one-electron oxidation of the lignin substructure. This radical may undergo C alpha-C beta cleavage, C alpha-oxidation and alkyl-phenyl cleavage. PMID:8670051

  19. Haem propionates control oxidative and reductive activities of horseradish peroxidase by maintaining the correct orientation of the haem.

    PubMed Central

    Adak, S; Banerjee, R K

    1998-01-01

    The role of haem propionates in oxidative and reductive reactions catalysed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied after successful reconstitution of ferric protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (PPDME) into the apoperoxidase. The reconstituted enzyme oxidizes neither guaiacol (aromatic electron donor) nor iodide or thiocyanate (inorganic donor). Although the reconstituted enzyme binds guaiacol with a similar Kd (13 mM) to that of the native enzyme (10 mM), the Kd for SCN- binding (5 mM) is decreased 20-fold compared with that of the native enzyme (100 mM). This indicates that haem propionates hinder the entry or binding of inorganic anion to the active site of the native HRP. However, the reconstituted enzyme is catalytically inactive as it does not form spectroscopically detectable compound II with H2O2. CD measurements indicate a significant loss of haem CD spectrum of the reconstituted enzyme at 409 nm, suggesting a loss of asymmetry of the haem-protein interaction. Thus the inability of the reconstituted enzyme to form catalytic intermediates results from the change in orientation of the haem due to loss of interactions via the haem propionates. HRP also catalyses reductive reactions such as reduction of iodine (I+) in the presence of EDTA and H2O2. The reconstituted enzyme cannot catalyse I+ reduction because of the loss of I+ binding to the haem propionate. Since I+ reduction requires formation of the catalytically active enzyme-I+-EDTA ternary complex, the loss of reductive activity is primarily due to the loss of active enzyme formation. Haem propionates thus play a vital role in the oxidative and reductive reactions of HRP by favouring the formation of catalytic intermediates with H2O2 by maintaining the correct orientation of the haem with respect to the surrounding residues. PMID:9693101

  20. Application of fly ash adsorbed peroxidase for the removal of bisphenol A in batch process and continuous reactor: assessment of genotoxicity of its product.

    PubMed

    Karim, Zoheb; Husain, Qayyum

    2010-12-01

    In the present study peroxidase has been immobilized simply by adsorption on fly ash. On fly ash adsorbed nearly 1113 U of peroxidase activity per g. Comparative degradation of endocrine disrupter, bisphenol A has been performed by soluble and immobilized enzyme. Soluble and immobilized enzyme removed maximum bisphenol A in the presence of 0.3mM guaiacol, a redox mediator, 0.75 mM H(2)O(2) in sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0 at 40 °C. Degradation of bisphenol A in batch process was 61%, 100% and 100% at 20, 40 and 60 °C, respectively. Fly ash adsorbed peroxidase was more effective in the degradation of bisphenol A as compared to its free form. Immobilized enzyme catalyzed complete degradation of bisphenol A at 40 °C within 3.5h. The oxidative degradation and polymerization of bisphenol A was also evaluated in the continuous bed-reactors at different flow rates. The removal of this compound was maximum at a flow rate of 20 mL h(-1). HPLC analysis showed two clear peaks, one related to bisphenol A and other related to its degradation product, 4-isopropenylphenol. Plasmid nicking and comet assays demonstrated that the product, 4-isopropenylphenol was significantly nontoxic.

  1. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  2. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  3. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast.

  4. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast. PMID:26810073

  5. Recents patents in the use of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Berenize; Torres, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidases are hemoenzymes with a wide range of applications, from fine chemical synthesis to environmental biocatalysis. These outstanding biocatalysts are able to catalyze reactions such as heteroatom oxidation (N- and S-oxidation), epoxidation, hydroxylation, and the oxidation of alcohols and indole, often giving high yields and enantiomeric excess values. This makes these biocatalysts very useful for application to several biotechnological processes. In this paper, recent advances and patents surrounding the use of peroxidases are reviewed, covering different aspects related to the applications of peroxidases and the modifications carried out to improve their functionality as biocatalysts.

  6. Substrates and products of eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    van Dalen, C J; Kettle, A J

    2001-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase has been implicated in promoting oxidative tissue damage in a variety of inflammatory conditions, including asthma. It uses H(2)O(2) to oxidize chloride, bromide and thiocyanate to their respective hypohalous acids. The aim of this study was to establish which oxidants eosinophil peroxidase produces under physiological conditions. By measuring rates of H(2)O(2) utilization by the enzyme at neutral pH, we determined the catalytic rate constants for bromide and thiocyanate as 248 and 223 s(-1) and the Michaelis constants as 0.5 and 0.15 mM respectively. On the basis of these values thiocyanate is preferred 2.8-fold over bromide as a substrate for eosinophil peroxidase. Eosinophil peroxidase catalysed substantive oxidation of chloride only below pH 6.5. We found that when eosinophil peroxidase or myeloperoxidase oxidized thiocyanate, another product besides hypothiocyanite was formed; it also converted methionine into methionine sulphoxide. During the oxidation of thiocyanate, the peroxidases were present as their compound II forms. Compound II did not form when GSH was included to scavenge hypothiocyanite. We propose that the unidentified oxidant was derived from a radical species produced by the one-electron oxidation of hypothiocyanite. We conclude that at plasma concentrations of bromide (20-120 microM) and thiocyanate (20-100 microM), hypobromous acid and oxidation products of thiocyanate are produced by eosinophil peroxidase. Hypochlorous acid is likely to be produced only when substrates preferred over chloride are depleted. Thiocyanate should be considered to augment peroxidase-mediated toxicity because these enzymes can convert relatively benign hypothiocyanite into a stronger oxidant. PMID:11485572

  7. Engineering the active site of ascorbate peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Raven, E; Celik, A; Cullis, P M; Sangar, R; Sutcliffe, M J

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the catalytic versatility of haem enzymes, and in particular the relationships that exist between different classes of haem-containing proteins and the mechanisms by which the apo-protein structure controls chemical reactivity, presents a major experimental and theoretical challenge. These issues are discussed in the general context of peroxidase and cytochrome P450 chemistry, and specific issues relating to the catalytic chemistry of ascorbate peroxidase are highlighted.

  8. Identification of white campion (Silene latifolia) guaiacol O-methyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of veratrole, a key volatile for pollinator attraction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Silene latifolia and its pollinator, the noctuid moth Hadena bicruris, represent an open nursery pollination system wherein floral volatiles, especially veratrole (1, 2-dimethoxybenzene), lilac aldehydes, and phenylacetaldehyde are of key importance for floral signaling. Despite the important role of floral scent in ensuring reproductive success in S. latifolia, the molecular basis of scent biosynthesis in this species has not yet been investigated. Results We isolated two full-length cDNAs from S. latifolia that show similarity to rose orcinol O-methyltransferase. Biochemical analysis showed that both S. latifolia guaiacol O-methyltransferase1 (SlGOMT1) &S. latifolia guaiacol O-methyltransferase2 (SlGOMT2) encode proteins that catalyze the methylation of guaiacol to form veratrole. A large Km value difference between SlGOMT1 (~10 μM) and SlGOMT2 (~501 μM) resulted that SlGOMT1 is 31-fold more catalytically efficient than SlGOMT2. qRT-PCR expression analysis showed that the SlGOMT genes are specifically expressed in flowers and male S. latifolia flowers had 3- to 4-folds higher level of GOMT gene transcripts than female flower tissues. Two related cDNAs, S. dioica O-methyltransferase1 (SdOMT1) and S. dioica O-methyltransferase2 (SdOMT2), were also obtained from the sister species Silene dioica, but the proteins they encode did not methylate guaiacol, consistent with the lack of veratrole emission in the flowers of this species. Our evolutionary analysis uncovered that SlGOMT1 and SlGOMT2 genes evolved under positive selection, whereas SdOMT1 and SdOMT2 genes show no evidence for selection. Conclusions Altogether, we report the identification and functional characterization of the gene, SlGOMT1 that efficiently catalyzes veratrole formation, whereas another copy of this gene with only one amino acid difference, SlGOMT2 was found to be less efficient for veratrole synthesis in S. latifolia. PMID:22937972

  9. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  10. Overexpression of a Plasma Membrane Bound Na+/H+ Antiporter-Like Protein (SbNHXLP) Confers Salt Tolerance and Improves Fruit Yield in Tomato by Maintaining Ion Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, P. Hima; Kumar, S. Anil; Sivan, Pramod; Katam, Ramesh; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Rao, K. S.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Kishor, Polavarapu B. Kavi

    2017-01-01

    A Na+/H+ antiporter-like protein (NHXLP) was isolated from Sorghum bicolor L. (SbNHXLP) and validated by overexpressing in tomato for salt tolerance. Homozygous T2 transgenic lines when evaluated for salt tolerance, accumulated low Na+ and displayed enhanced salt tolerance compared to wild-type plants (WT). This is consistent with the amiloride binding assay of the protein. Transgenics exhibited higher accumulation of proline, K+, Ca2+, improved cambial conductivity, higher PSII, and antioxidative enzyme activities than WT. Fluorescence imaging results revealed lower Na+ and higher Ca2+ levels in transgenic roots. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that SbNHXLP interacts with a Solanum lycopersicum cation proton antiporter protein2 (SlCHX2). qRT-PCR results showed upregulation of SbNHXLP and SlCHX2 upon treatment with 200 mM NaCl and 100 mM potassium nitrate. SlCHX2 is known to be involved in K+ acquisition, and the interaction between these two proteins might help to accumulate more K+ ions, and thus maintain ion homeostasis. These results strongly suggest that plasma membrane bound SbNHXLP involves in Na+ exclusion, maintains ion homeostasis in transgenics in comparison with WT and alleviates NaCl stress. PMID:28111589

  11. Physicochemical constraints of elevated pH affect efficient membrane interaction and arrest an abortive membrane-bound oligomeric intermediate of the beta-barrel pore-forming toxin Vibrio cholerae cytolysin.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Kundu, Nidhi; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a potent membrane-damaging cytotoxic protein. VCC causes permeabilization of the target cell membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores. Membrane pore formation by VCC involves following key steps: (i) membrane binding, (ii) formation of a pre-pore oligomeric intermediate, (iii) membrane insertion of the pore-forming motifs, and (iv) formation of the functional transmembrane pore. Membrane binding, oligomerization, and subsequent pore-formation process of VCC appear to be facilitated by multiple regulatory mechanisms that are only partly understood. Here, we have explored the role(s) of the physicochemical constraints, specifically imposed by the elevated pH conditions, on the membrane pore-formation mechanism of VCC. Elevated pH abrogates efficient interaction of VCC with the target membranes, and blocks its pore-forming activity. Under the elevated pH conditions, membrane-bound fractions of VCC remain trapped in the form of abortive oligomeric species that fail to generate the functional transmembrane pores. Such an abortive oligomeric assembly appears to represent a distinct, more advanced intermediate state than the pre-pore state. The present study offers critical insights regarding the implications of the physicochemical constraints for regulating the efficient membrane interaction and pore formation by VCC.

  12. A single membrane-bound enzyme catalyzes the conversion of 2,5-diketo-d-gluconate to 4-keto-d-arabonate in d-glucose oxidative fermentation by Gluconobacter oxydans NBRC 3292.

    PubMed

    Tazoe, Masaaki; Oishi, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Setsuko; Hoshino, Tatsuo

    2016-08-01

    4-Keto-d-arabonate synthase (4KAS), which converts 2,5-diketo-d-gluconate (DKGA) to 4-keto-d-arabonate (4KA) in d-glucose oxidative fermentation by some acetic acid bacteria, was solubilized from the Gluconobacter oxydans NBRC 3292 cytoplasmic membrane, and purified in an electrophoretically homogenous state. A single membrane-bound enzyme was found to catalyze the conversion from DKGA to 4KA. The 92-kDa 4KAS was a homodimeric protein not requiring O2 or a cofactor for the conversion, but was stimulated by Mn(2+). N-terminal amino acid sequencing of 4KAS, followed by gene homology search indicated a 1,197-bp open reading frame (ORF), corresponding to the GLS_c04240 locus, GenBank accession No. CP004373, encoding a 398-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 42,818 Da. An Escherichia coli transformant with the 4kas plasmid exhibited 4KAS activity. Furthermore, overexpressed recombinant 4KAS was purified in an electrophoretically homogenous state and had the same molecular size as the natural enzyme.

  13. NK cells are primed by ANRS MVA(HIV)-infected DCs, via a mechanism involving NKG2D and membrane-bound IL-15, to control HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Nieves, Uriel Y; Didier, Céline; Lévy, Yves; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Scott-Algara, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the major antiviral effector cell population of the innate immune system. It has been demonstrated that NK-cell activity can be modulated by the interaction with dendritic cells (DCs). The HIV-1 vaccine candidate Modified Vaccinia Ankara encoding an HIV polypeptide (MVA(HIV)), developed by the French National Agency for Research on AIDS (ANRS), has the ability to prime NK cells to control HIV-1 infection in DCs. However, whether or not MVA(HIV)-primed NK cells are able to better control HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, and the mechanism underlying the specific priming, remain undetermined. In this study, we show that MVA(HIV)-primed NK cells display a greater capacity to control HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4(+) T cells. We also highlight the importance of NKG2D engagement on NK cells and DC-produced IL-15 to achieve the anti-HIV-1 specific priming, as blockade of either NKG2D or IL-15 during MVA(HIV)-priming lead to a subsequent decreased control of HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we show that the decreased control of HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells might be due, at least in part, to the decreased expression of membrane-bound IL-15 (mbIL-15) on DCs when NKG2D is blocked during MVA(HIV)-priming of NK cells.

  14. Robust Expression of the Human Neonatal Fc Receptor in a Truncated Soluble Form and as a Full-Length Membrane-Bound Protein in Fusion with eGFP

    PubMed Central

    Seijsing, Johan; Lindborg, Malin; Löfblom, John; Uhlén, Mathias; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) have revealed a multitude of important functions in mammals, including protection of IgG and serum albumin (SA) from lysosomal degradation. The pharmacokinetic behavior of therapeutic antibodies, IgG-Fc- and SA-containing drugs is therefore influenced by their interaction with FcRn. Pre-clinical development of such drugs is facilitated if their interaction with FcRn can be studied in vitro. For this reason we have developed a robust system for production of the soluble extracellular domain of human FcRn as well as the full-length receptor as fusion to green fluorescent protein, taking advantage of a lentivirus-based gene delivery system where stable over-expressing cells are easily and rapidly generated. Production of the extracellular domain in multiple-layered culture flasks, followed by affinity purification using immobilized IgG, resulted in capture of milligram amounts of soluble receptor per liter cell culture with retained IgG binding. The receptor was further characterized by SDS-PAGE, western blotting, circular dichroism spectroscopy, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance and a temperature stability assay showing a functional and stable protein of high purity. The full-length receptor was found to be successfully over-expressed in a membrane-bound form with retained pH-dependent IgG- and SA-binding. PMID:24260574

  15. Plasma-membrane-bound macromolecules are dynamically aggregated to form non-random codistribution patterns of selected functional elements. Do pattern recognition processes govern antigen presentation and intercellular interactions?

    PubMed

    Vereb, G; Mátyus, L; Bene, L; Panyi, G; Bacsó, Z; Balázs, M; Matkó, J; Szöllösi, J; Gáspár, R; Damjanovich, S

    1995-01-01

    Molecular recognition processes between cell surface elements are discussed with special reference to cell surface pattern formation of membrane-bound integral proteins. The existence, as detected by flow cytometric resonance energy transfer (Appendix), and significance of cell surface patterns involving the interleukin-2 receptor, the T-cell receptor-CD3 system, the intercellular adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and the major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules in the plasma membrane of lymphocytes are described. The modulation of antigen presentation by transmembrane potential changes is discussed, and a general role of transmembrane potential changes, and therefore of ion channel activities, adduced as one of the major regulatory mechanisms of cell-cell communication. A general role in the mediation and regulation of intercellular interactions is suggested for cell-surface macromolecular patterns. The dynamic pattern of protein and lipid molecules in the plasma membrane is generated by the genetic code, but has a remarkable flexibility and may be one of the major instruments of accommodation and recognition processes at the cellular level.

  16. Physico-chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol derived from catechol and guaiacol as a model substance for atmospheric humic-like substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, J.; Krüger, H.-U.; Grothe, H.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Whitmore, K.; Zetzsch, C.

    2010-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol was produced from the aromatic precursors catechol and guaiacol by reaction with ozone in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight and humidity and investigated for its properties as a proxy for humic-like substances (HULIS). Beside a small particle size, a relatively low molecular weight and typical optical features in the UV/VIS spectral range, HULIS contain a typical aromatic and/or olefinic chemical structure and highly oxidized functional groups within a high chemical diversity. Various methods were used to characterize the secondary organic aerosols obtained: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated the formation of different carbonyl containing functional groups as well as structural and functional differences between aerosols formed at different environmental conditions. UV/VIS spectroscopy of filter samples showed that the particulate matter absorbs far into the visible range up to more than 500 nm. Ultrahigh resolved mass spectroscopy (ICR-FT/MS) determined O/C-ratios between 0.3 and 1 and main molecular weights between 200 and 500 Da. Temperature-programmed-pyrolysis mass spectroscopy identified carboxylic acids and lactones as major functional groups. Particle sizing using CNC-DMPS demonstrated the formation of small particles during a secondary organic aerosol formation process. Particle imaging using field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showed spherical particles, forming clusters and chains. Hence, secondary organic aerosols from catechol and guaiacol are appropriate model substances for studies of the processing of aromatic secondary organic aerosols and atmospheric HULIS on the laboratory scale.

  17. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced heme degradation in red blood cells: the protective roles of catalase and glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Nagababu, Enika; Chrest, Francis J; Rifkind, Joseph M

    2003-03-17

    Catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX) react with red cell hydrogen peroxide. A number of recent studies indicate that catalase is the primary enzyme responsible for protecting the red cell from hydrogen peroxide. We have used flow cytometry in intact cells as a sensitive measure of the hydrogen-peroxide-induced formation of fluorescent heme degradation products. Using this method, we have been able to delineate a unique role for GSHPX in protecting the red cell from hydrogen peroxide. For extracellular hydrogen peroxide, catalase completely protected the cells, while the ability of GSHPX to protect the cells was limited by the availability of glutathione. The effect of endogenously generated hydrogen peroxide in conjunction with hemoglobin autoxidation was investigated by in vitro incubation studies. These studies indicate that fluorescent products are not formed during incubation unless the glutathione is reduced to at least 40% of its initial value as a result of incubation or by reacting the glutathione with iodoacetamide. Reactive catalase only slows down the depletion of glutathione, but does not directly prevent the formation of these fluorescent products. The unique role of GSHPX is attributed to its ability to react with hydrogen peroxide generated in close proximity to the red cell membrane in conjunction with the autoxidation of membrane-bound hemoglobin.

  18. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase.

  19. Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Activity of Ficin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yufang; Shen, Dongjun; Long, Yijuan; Xie, Zhixiong; Zheng, Huzhi

    2017-01-01

    Ficin is classified as a sulfhydryl protease isolated from the latex of fig trees. In most cases, a particular enzyme fits a few types of substrate and catalyzes one type of reaction. In this investigation, we found sufficient proofs for the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ficin and designed experiments to examine its effectiveness in a variety of scenarios. Ficin can transform peroxidase substrates to colored products in the existence of H2O2. Our results also indicate that the active sites of peroxidase-like activity of ficin are different from that of protease, which reveals that one enzyme may catalyze more than one kind of substrate to perform different types of reactions. On the basis of these findings, H2O2 releasing from MCF-7 cells was detected successfully. Our findings support a wider application of ficin in biochemistry and open up the possibility of utilizing ficin as enzymatic mimics in biotechnology and environmental monitoring. PMID:28224979

  20. Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Activity of Ficin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yufang; Shen, Dongjun; Long, Yijuan; Xie, Zhixiong; Zheng, Huzhi

    2017-02-01

    Ficin is classified as a sulfhydryl protease isolated from the latex of fig trees. In most cases, a particular enzyme fits a few types of substrate and catalyzes one type of reaction. In this investigation, we found sufficient proofs for the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ficin and designed experiments to examine its effectiveness in a variety of scenarios. Ficin can transform peroxidase substrates to colored products in the existence of H2O2. Our results also indicate that the active sites of peroxidase-like activity of ficin are different from that of protease, which reveals that one enzyme may catalyze more than one kind of substrate to perform different types of reactions. On the basis of these findings, H2O2 releasing from MCF-7 cells was detected successfully. Our findings support a wider application of ficin in biochemistry and open up the possibility of utilizing ficin as enzymatic mimics in biotechnology and environmental monitoring.

  1. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation.

  2. The Maturation Factors HoxR and HoxT Contribute to Oxygen Tolerance of Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase in Ralstonia eutropha H16 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Johannes; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2011-01-01

    The membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase (MBH) of Ralstonia eutropha H16 undergoes a complex maturation process comprising cofactor assembly and incorporation, subunit oligomerization, and finally twin-arginine-dependent membrane translocation. Due to its outstanding O2 and CO tolerance, the MBH is of biotechnological interest and serves as a molecular model for a robust hydrogen catalyst. Adaptation of the enzyme to oxygen exposure has to take into account not only the catalytic reaction but also biosynthesis of the intricate redox cofactors. Here, we report on the role of the MBH-specific accessory proteins HoxR and HoxT, which are key components in MBH maturation at ambient O2 levels. MBH-driven growth on H2 is inhibited or retarded at high O2 partial pressure (pO2) in mutants inactivated in the hoxR and hoxT genes. The ratio of mature and nonmature forms of the MBH small subunit is shifted toward the precursor form in extracts derived from the mutant cells grown at high pO2. Lack of hoxR and hoxT can phenotypically be restored by providing O2-limited growth conditions. Analysis of copurified maturation intermediates leads to the conclusion that the HoxR protein is a constituent of a large transient protein complex, whereas the HoxT protein appears to function at a final stage of MBH maturation. UV-visible spectroscopy of heterodimeric MBH purified from hoxR mutant cells points to alterations of the Fe-S cluster composition. Thus, HoxR may play a role in establishing a specific Fe-S cluster profile, whereas the HoxT protein seems to be beneficial for cofactor stability under aerobic conditions. PMID:21441514

  3. A high-molecular-weight complex of membrane proteins BAP29/BAP31 is involved in the retention of membrane-bound IgD in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Kuppig, Stephan; Becker, Bernd; Gimborn, Kerstin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Reth, Michael

    2003-08-19

    B cell antigen receptors (BCRs) are multimeric transmembrane protein complexes comprising membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mIgs) and Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimers. In most cases, transport of mIgs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface requires assembly with the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta subunits. In addition to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta, mIg molecules also bind two ER-resident membrane proteins, BAP29 and BAP31, and the chaperone heavy chain binding protein (BiP). In this article, we show that neither Ig-alpha/Ig-beta nor BAP29/BAP31 nor BiP bind simultaneously to the same mIgD molecule. Blue native PAGE revealed that only a minor fraction of intracellular mIgD is associated with high-molecular-weight BAP29/BAP31 complexes. BAP-binding to mIgs was found to correlate with ER retention of chimeric mIgD molecules. On high-level expression in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, mIgD molecules were detected on the cell surface in the absence of Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. This aberrant transport was prevented by coexpression of BAP29 and BAP31. Thus, BAP complexes contribute to ER retention of mIg complexes that are not bound to Ig-alpha/Ig-beta. Furthermore, the mechanism of ER retention of both BAP31 and mIgD is not through retrieval from a post-ER compartment, but true ER retention. In conclusion, BAP29 and BAP31 might be the long sought after retention proteins and/or chaperones that act on transmembrane regions of various proteins.

  4. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    PubMed Central

    Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Tolleson, William H.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP), lactoperoxidase (LPO), and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2). Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (Ki  9.5 ± 0.7 mM), and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (Ki  14.5 ± 4.7 mM). The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases. PMID:22852071

  5. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  6. A proposed interplay between peroxidase, amine oxidase and lipoxygenase in the wounding-induced oxidative burst in Pisum sativum seedlings.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Colville, Louise; Beckett, Richard P; Minibayeva, Farida V; Havaux, Michel; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Plant surfaces form the barrier between a plant and its environment. Upon damage, the wound healing process begins immediately and is accompanied by a rapid production of extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), essential in deterring pathogens, signalling responses and cell wall restructuring. Although many enzymes produce extracellular ROS, it is unclear if ROS-producing enzymes act synergistically. We characterised the oxidative burst of superoxide (O2(·-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that follows wounding in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. Rates of ROS production were manipulated by exogenous application of enzyme substrates and inhibitors. The results indicate significant roles for di-amine oxidases (DAO) and peroxidases (Prx) rather than NADPH oxidase. The burst of O2(·-) was strongly dependent on the presence of H2O2 produced by DAO. Potential substrates released from wounded seedlings included linoleic acid that, upon exogenous application, strongly stimulated catalase-sensitive O2(·-) production. Moreover, a 65kD plasma membrane (PM) guaiacol Prx was found in the secretome of wounded seedlings and showed dependence on linoleic acid for O2(·-) production. Lipoxygenases are suggested to modulate O2(·-) production by consuming polyunsaturated fatty acids in the apoplast. Overall, a O2(·-)-producing mechanism involving H2O2-derived from DAO, linoleic acid and a PM-associated Prx is proposed.

  7. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    PubMed

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  8. Feruloylated arabinoxylans are oxidatively cross-linked by extracellular maize peroxidase but not by horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Burr, Sally J; Fry, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extracellular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H2O2/peroxidase, O2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extracellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H2O2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H2O2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H2O2 was also added, indicating a peroxidase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present. Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [3H]arabinoxylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  9. Physico-chemical characterization of SOA derived from catechol and guaiacol - a model substance for the aromatic fraction of atmospheric HULIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, J.; Krüger, H.-U.; Grothe, H.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Whitmore, K.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from the aromatic precursors catechol and guaiacol by reaction with ozone in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight and humidity and investigated for its properties as a proxy for HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS). Beside a small particle size, a relatively low molecular weight and typical optical features in the UV/VIS spectral range, HULIS contain a typical aromatic and/or olefinic chemical structure and highly oxidized functional groups within a high chemical diversity. Various methods were used to characterize the secondary organic aerosols obtained: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated the formation of several carbonyl containing functional groups as well as structural and functional differences between aerosols formed at different environmental conditions. UV/VIS spectroscopy of filter samples showed that the particulate matter absorbs far into the visible range up to more than 500 nm. Ultrahigh resolved mass spectroscopy (ICR-FT/MS) determined O/C-ratios between 0.3 and 1 and observed m/z ratios between 200 and 450 to be most abundant. Temperature-programmed-pyrolysis mass spectroscopy (TPP-MS) identified carboxylic acids and lactones/esters as major functional groups. Particle sizing using a condensation-nucleus-counter and differential-mobility-particle-sizer (CNC/DMPS) monitored the formation of small particles during the SOA formation process. Particle imaging, using field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), showed spherical particles, forming clusters and chains. We conclude that catechol and guaiacol are appropriate precursors for studies of the processing of aromatic SOA with atmospheric HULIS properties on the laboratory scale.

  10. Conversion of aminonitrotoluenes by fungal manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Scheibner, K; Hofrichter, M

    1998-01-01

    Preparations of extracellular manganese peroxidase from the white-rot fungus Nematoloma frowardii and the litter decaying fungus Stropharia rugosoannulata converted rapidly the main intermediates of the explosive 2,4,-trinitrotoluene--the aminonitrotoluenes. In a cell-free system, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene were degraded without formation of identifiable metabolites. Radioactive experiments using a complex mixture of uniform ring-labeled 14C-TNT reduction products demonstrated the partial direct mineralization of these compounds by manganese peroxidase. The extent of aminonitrotoluene conversion as well as the release of 14CO2 from TNT reduction products were considerably enhanced in the presence of thiols like reduced glutathione or the amino acid L-cystein, which probably act as secondary mediators.

  11. Revisiting the Non-Animal Peroxidase Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto, Fernanda; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia

    2015-12-01

    Peroxidases reduce peroxide through substrate oxidation in order to alleviate oxidative stress in aerobic organisms. Since the initial description of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily, great effort has been made to characterize this large and heterogeneous group of proteins. Next generation sequencing data have permitted an in-depth study of the molecular evolution of this superfamily and allowed us to perform a phylogenetic reconstruction. Through this analysis, we identified two additional class I members and, here, we discuss the similarities and differences among members of this class. Our results provide new insights into the organization of these antioxidant enzymes, allowing us to propose a new model for the emergence and evolution of this superfamily.

  12. Biochemical and pathological studies on peroxidases -an updated review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad A; Rahmani, Arshad H; Aldebasi, Yousef H; Aly, Salah M

    2014-05-13

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress.

  13. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  14. Cadmium-induced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the leaf apoplast of Phaseolus aureus and Vicia sativa and the roles of different antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenqin; Zhang, Hongxiao; Wang, Guiping; Xu, Langlai; Shen, Zhenguo

    2009-08-30

    The effects of cadmium (Cd) on the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) in leaves of Phaseolus aureus and Vicia sativa were investigated. Cadmium at 100 microM significantly increased the production of O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2), as well as the activities of plasma membrane-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases and the symplastic and apoplastic activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase in the leaves of both species. Apoplastic guaiacol peroxidase activity was significantly induced in the leaves of both species, particularly in P. aureus exposed to 100 microM Cd. Experiments with diphenylene iodonium as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase and NaN(3) as an inhibitor of peroxidase showed that the majority of Cd-induced reactive oxygen species production in the leaves of both species may involve plasma membrane-bound NADPH oxidase and apoplastic peroxidase. Compared to V. sativa, increases in Cd-induced production of O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) and activities of NADPH oxidase and apoplastic peroxidase were more pronounced in P. aureus. In contrast, V. sativa had higher leaf symplastic superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase activities than P. aureus. The results indicated that V. sativa was more tolerant to Cd than P. aureus.

  15. The Reaction of Coumarins with Horseradish Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Richard W.; Sirois, J.-Claude; Morita, Hirokazu

    1975-01-01

    The peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of indole-3-acetate is inhibited by naturally occurring coumarins such as scopoletin. This inhibition is due to the preferential reactivity of the coumarins with the peroxidase compounds I, II, and III. In view of the possible growth regulatory role of coumarins in plants, the mechanism of oxidation of scopoletin by horse-radish peroxidase has been investigated. Peroxidase catalyzed coumarin oxidation requires either an electron donor and molecular oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. If peroxide is present, the reaction is mediated by peroxidase compound II which reacts rapidly and stoichiometrically with scopoletin. Different oxidation products are formed, depending on whether IAA or hydrogen peroxide promotes the reaction. A scopoletin-free radical intermediate has been isolated from the peroxide reaction mixture but was not detected in the peroxide-free system. When indole-3-acetate is the electron donor, reduced peroxidase combines with molecular oxygen to give peroxidase compound III. Added scopoletin is cooxidized with indole-3-acetate. Compared to the scopoletin peroxidation, this reaction is slower and yields fewer coumarin oxidation products. The differences observed between the two scopoletin oxidation pathways reflect: (a) the competition between indole-3-acetate and scopoletin for peroxidase compounds; (b) the lower reactivity of scopoletin with peroxidase compound III compared with peroxidase compound II. The peroxide-promoted reaction is eliminated by catalase, while the indole-3-acetate initiated oxidation is not affected by excess quantities of either catalase or superoxidase dismutase. PMID:16659024

  16. A PI 4. 6 peroxidase that specifically crosslinks extensin precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Upham, B.L; Alizadeh, H.; Ryan, K.J.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The primary cell wall is a microcomposite of cellulose, pectin, hemicellulose and protein. The warp-weft model of the primary cell wall hypothesize that extensin monomers are intermolecularly crosslinked orthogonal to the cellulose microfibril thus mechanically coupling the major load-bearing polymer: cellulose. Media of tomato cell cultures contains heat labile, peroxide dependent crosslinking activity, as determined by the rate of decrease in monomer concentration analyzed via Superose-6. Isoelectric focusing of tomato cell culture media indicated crosslinking was predominantly in the acidic peroxidase fraction (pI4.6). This peroxidase was partially purified by ultracentrifugation, DEAE-Trisacryl and HPLC-DEAE chromatography techniques resulting in a 90 fold purification and 45% yield. A second acidic peroxidase eluted from the HPLC-DEAE column had 25% of the crosslinking activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. Purified basic peroxidase had only 0.7% of the activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. The specific activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase was 5,473 mg extensin crosslinked/min/mg peroxidase. The pI 4.6 peroxidase crosslinked the following extensins: tomato I and II, carrot, Ginkgo II and did not crosslink Ginkgo I, Douglas Fir, Maize, Asparagus I and II, and sugarbeet extensins as well as bovine serum albumin. Comparison of motifs common to extensins that are crosslinked by the pI 4.6 peroxidase may help identify the crosslink domain(s) of extension.

  17. DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing peroxidase, represents a novel heme peroxidase family: ASP171 replaces the distal histidine of classical peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yasushi; Muramatsu, Riichi; Ichiyanagi, Atsushi; Sato, Takao; Shoda, Makoto

    2007-12-14

    DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing enzyme from the fungus Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1, has been classified as a peroxidase but lacks homology to almost all other known plant peroxidases. The primary structure of DyP shows moderate sequence homology to only two known proteins: the peroxide-dependent phenol oxidase, TAP, and the hypothetical peroxidase, cpop21. Here, we show the first crystal structure of DyP and reveal that this protein has a unique tertiary structure with a distal heme region that differs from that of most other peroxidases. DyP lacks an important histidine residue known to assist in the formation of a Fe4+ oxoferryl center and a porphyrin-based cation radical intermediate (compound I) during the action of ubiquitous peroxidases. Instead, our tertiary structural and spectrophotometric analyses of DyP suggest that an aspartic acid and an arginine are involved in the formation of compound I. Sequence analysis reveals that the important aspartic acid and arginine mentioned above and histidine of the heme ligand are conserved among DyP, TAP, and cpop21, and structural and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that these three enzymes do not belong to any other families of peroxidase. These findings, which strongly suggest that DyP is a representative heme peroxidase from a novel family, should facilitate the identification of additional new family members and accelerate the classification of this novel peroxidase family.

  18. Bioconjugation of Antibodies to Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP).

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross-linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and convenient means to maintain antibody affinity while imparting a functional reporter used for antigen detection. In this chapter, we describe a process by which Sulfo-SMCC is used to generate a stable maleimide-activated HRP that is reactive with sulfhydryl groups generated in antibodies by SATA-mediated thiolation.

  19. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Eduardo Fernandes; Molina, Fernando Javier; Lopes, Flavio Marques; García-Ruíz, Pedro Antonio; Caramori, Samantha Salomão; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG) activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25%) obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein). The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity. PMID:22489198

  20. A Redundant Role of Human Thyroid Peroxidase Propeptide for Cellular, Enzymatic, and Immunological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Góra, Monika; Buckle, Ashley M.; Porebski, Benjamin T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Sutton, Brian J.; Czarnocka, Barbara; Banga, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a dimeric membrane-bound enzyme of thyroid follicular cells, responsible for thyroid hormone biosynthesis. TPO is also a common target antigen in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). With two active sites, TPO is an unusual enzyme, and thus there is much interest in understanding its structure and role in AITD. Homology modeling has shown TPO to be composed of different structural modules, as well as a propeptide sequence. During the course of studies to obtain homogeneous preparations of recombinant TPO for structural studies, we investigated the role of the large propeptide sequence in TPO. Methods: An engineered recombinant human TPO preparation expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells lacking the propeptide (TPOΔpro; amino acid residues 21–108) was characterized and its properties compared to wild-type TPO. Plasma membrane localization was determined by cell surface protein biotinylation, and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate enzymatic activity and the effect of deglycosylation. Immunological investigations using autoantibodies from AITD patients and other epitope-specific antibodies that recognize conformational determinants on TPO were evaluated for binding to TPOΔpro by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Molecular modeling and dynamics simulation of TPOΔpro comprising a dimer of myeloperoxidase-like domains was performed in order to investigate the impact of propeptide removal and the role of glycosylation. Results: The TPOΔpro was expressed on the cell surface at comparable levels to wild-type TPO. The TPOΔpro was enzymatically active and recognized by patients' autoantibodies and a panel of epitope-specific antibodies, confirming structural integrity of the two major conformational determinants recognized by autoantibodies. Faithful intracellular trafficking and N-glycosylation of TPOΔpro was also maintained. Molecular modeling and dynamics

  1. Minimal influence of G-protein null mutations on ozone-induced changes in gene expression, foliar injury, gas exchange and peroxidase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    PubMed

    Booker, Fitzgerald; Burkey, Kent; Morgan, Patrick; Fiscus, Edwin; Jones, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Ozone (O(3)) uptake by plants leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intercellular space of leaves and induces signalling processes reported to involve the membrane-bound heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Therefore, potential G-protein-mediated response mechanisms to O(3) were compared between Arabidopsis thaliana L. lines with null mutations in the α- and β-subunits (gpa1-4, agb1-2 and gpa1-4/agb1-2) and Col-0 wild-type plants. Plants were treated with a range of O(3) concentrations (5, 125, 175 and 300 nL L(-1)) for 1 and 2 d in controlled environment chambers. Transcript levels of GPA1, AGB1 and RGS1 transiently increased in Col-0 exposed to 125 nL L(-1) O(3) compared with the 5 nL L(-1) control treatment. However, silencing of α and β G-protein genes resulted in little alteration of many processes associated with O(3) injury, including the induction of ROS-signalling genes, increased leaf tissue ion leakage, decreased net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, and increased peroxidase activity, especially in the leaf apoplast. These results indicated that many responses to O(3) stress at physiological levels were not detectably influenced by α and β G-proteins.

  2. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity.

  3. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. PMID:22966760

  4. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: guaiacol and catechol derivatives effectively inhibit certain human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I, II, IX and XII).

    PubMed

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Passaponti, Maurizio; Supuran, Claudiu T; Gülçin, İlhami

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are widespread metalloenzymes in higher vertebrates including humans. A series of phenolic compounds, including guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, 4-propylguaiacol, eugenol, isoeugenol, vanillin, syringaldehyde, catechol, 3-methyl catechol, 4-methyl catechol and 3-methoxy catechol were investigated for their inhibition of all the catalytically active mammalian isozymes of the Zn(2+)-containing CA (EC 4.2.1.1). All the phenolic compounds effectively inhibited human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA I, II, IX and XII), with Kis in the range of 2.20-515.98 μM. The various isozymes showed diverse inhibition profiles. Among the tested phenolic derivatives, compounds 4-methyl catechol and 3-methoxy catechol showed potent activity as inhibitors of the tumour-associated transmembrane isoforms (hCA IX and XII) in the submicromolar range, with high selectivity. The results obtained from this research may lead to the design of more effective carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme inhibitors (CAIs) based on such phenolic compound scaffolds.

  5. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  6. Roles of apoplastic peroxidases in plant response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Minibayeva, Farida; Beckett, Richard Peter; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Apoplastic class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) play key roles in the response of plants to pathogen infection and abiotic stresses, including wounding. Wounding is a common stress for plants that can be caused by insect or animal grazing or trampling, or result from agricultural practices. Typically, mechanical damage to a plant immediately induces a rapid release and activation of apoplastic peroxidases, and an oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS), followed by the upregulation of peroxidase genes. We discuss how plants control the expression of peroxidases genes upon wounding, and also the sparse information on peroxidase-mediated signal transduction pathways. Evidence reviewed here suggests that in many plants production of the ROS that comprise the initial oxidative burst results from a complex interplay of peroxidases with other apoplastic enzymes. Later responses following wounding include various forms of tissue healing, for example through peroxidase-dependent suberinization, or cell death. Limited data suggest that ROS-mediated death signalling during the wound response may involve the peroxidase network, together with other redox molecules. In conclusion, the ability of peroxidases to both generate and scavenge ROS plays a key role in the involvement of these enigmatic enzymes in plant stress tolerance.

  7. Tc-cAPX, a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase of Theobroma cacao L. engaged in the interaction with Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causing agent of witches' broom disease.

    PubMed

    Camillo, Luciana Rodrigues; Filadelfo, Ciro Ribeiro; Monzani, Paulo Sérgio; Corrêa, Ronan Xavier; Gramacho, Karina Peres; Micheli, Fabienne; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho

    2013-12-01

    The level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plants signalizes the induction of several genes, including that of ascorbate peroxidase (APX-EC 1.11.1.11). APX isoenzymes play a central role in the elimination of intracellular H2O2 and contribute to plant responses to diverse stresses. During the infection process in Theobroma cacao by Moniliophthora perniciosa oxidative stress is generated and the APX action recruited from the plant. The present work aimed to characterize the T. cacao APX involved in the molecular interaction of T. cacao-M. perniciosa. The peroxidase activity was analyzed in protein extracts from cocoa plants infected by M. perniciosa and showed the induction of peroxidases like APX in resistant cocoa plants. The cytosolic protein of T. cacao (GenBank: ABR68691.2) was phylogenetically analyzed in relation to other peroxidases from the cocoa genome and eight genes encoding APX proteins with conserved domains were also analyzed. The cDNA from cytosolic APX was cloned in pET28a and the recombinant protein expressed and purified (rTc-cAPX). The secondary structure of the protein was analyzed by Circular Dichroism (CD) displaying high proportion of α-helices when folded. The enzymatic assay shows stable activity using ascorbate and guaiacol as an electron donor for H2O2 reduction. The pH 7.5 is the optimum for enzyme activity. Chromatographic analysis suggests that rTc-cAPX is a homodimer in solution. Results indicate that the rTc-cAPX is correctly folded, stable and biochemically active. The purified rTc-cAPX presented biotechnological potential and is adequate for future structural and functional studies.

  8. Horseradish-Peroxidase-Catalyzed Tyrosine Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-02

    The efficiency of protein chemical modification on tyrosine residues with N-methylluminol derivatives was drastically improved by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the previous method, based on the use of hemin and H2 O2 , oxidative side reactions such as cysteine oxidation were problematic for functionalization of proteins selectively on tyrosine residues. Oxidative activation of N-methylluminol derivatives with a minimum amount of H2 O2 prevented the occurrence of oxidative side reactions under HRP-catalyzed conditions. As probes for HRP-catalyzed protein modification, N-methylluminol derivatives showed much higher efficiency than tyramide without inducing oligomerization of probe molecules. Tyrosine modification also proceeded in the presence of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, H2 O2 -free conditions).

  9. Differential peroxidase activities in three different crops upon insect feeding

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpal; Dixit, Sameer; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are the ubiquitous enzyme and reported to be present in all living genera. They catalyses reduction of peroxide and generate reactive oxygen species. In the present study we demonstrated that insect infestation induces peroxidase activity in sap and total soluble protein (TSP) of plant leaves. Three important crop plants viz. tomato, cowpea and cotton were used for this study. After infestation of chewing insect, Peroxidase activity in the sap and TSP of all the studied plants were enhanced in the range of 1.6 to 3.14 fold. Similar observations were also obtained with feeding of sap sucking insects, in which increment in peroxidase activity of sap and TSP was in the range of 1.8 to 2.53 fold. Enhanced peroxidase activity was reconfirmed by in-gel peroxidase assay. Enzyme kinetic study showed turn over efficiency of peroxidase from cotton (~101.3 min-1) was almost similar to tomato (~100.8 min-1) but higher than cowpea (~98.21min-1). MS/MS analysis of observed band showed significant similarity with the reported peroxidases in database. PMID:23857346

  10. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of two chloroplastic peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cys peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Sakihito

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, are generated by the photosystems because photoexcited electrons are often generated in excess of requirements for CO2 fixation and used for reducing molecular oxygen, even under normal environmental conditions. Moreover, ROS generation is increased in chloroplasts if plants are subjected to stresses, such as drought, high salinity and chilling. Chloroplast-localized isoforms of ascorbate peroxidase and possibly peroxiredoxins assume the principal role of scavenging hydrogen peroxide. However, in vitro studies revealed that both types of peroxidases are easily damaged by hydrogen peroxide and lose their catalytic activities. This is one contributing factor for cellular damage that occurs under severe oxidative stress. In this review, I describe mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of these two enzymes and discuss a reason why they became susceptible to damage by hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Intracellular catalase/peroxidase from the phytopathogenic rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea: expression analysis and biochemical characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Bellei, Marzia; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Stadlmann, Johannes; Vlasits, Jutta; Obinger, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi such as the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea are unique in having two catalase/peroxidase (KatG) paralogues located either intracellularly (KatG1) or extracellularly (KatG2). The coding genes have recently been shown to derive from a lateral gene transfer from a (proteo)bacterial genome followed by gene duplication and diversification. Here we demonstrate that KatG1 is expressed constitutively in M. grisea. It is the first eukaryotic catalase/peroxidase to be expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli in high amounts, with high purity and with almost 100% haem occupancy. Recombinant MagKatG1 is an acidic, mainly homodimeric, oxidoreductase with a predominant five-co-ordinated high-spin haem b. At 25 degrees C and pH 7.0, the E(0)' (standard reduction potential) of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple was found to be -186+/-10 mV. It bound cyanide monophasically with an apparent bimolecular rate constant of (9.0+/-0.4)x10(5) M(-1).s(-1) at pH 7.0 and at 25 degrees C and with a K(d) value of 1.5 muM. Its predominantly catalase activity was characterized by a pH optimum at 6.0 and k(cat) and K(m) values of 7010 s(-1) and 4.8 mM respectively. In addition, it acts as a versatile peroxidase with a pH optimum in the range 5.0-5.5 using both one-electron [2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) o-dianisidine, pyrogallol or guaiacol] and two-electron (Br(-), I(-) or ethanol) donors. Structure-function relationships are discussed with respect to data reported for prokaryotic KatGs, as is the physiological role of MagKatG1. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that (intracellular) MagKatG1 can be regarded as a typical representative for catalase/peroxidase of both phytopathogenic and saprotrophic fungi.

  13. Effects of microwaves (900 MHz) on peroxidase systems: A comparison between lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barteri, Mario; De Carolis, Roberta; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Tomassetti, Goliardo; Montemiglio, Linda Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the effects of exposure to an electromagnetic field at 900 MHz on the catalytic activity of the enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Experimental evidence that irradiation causes conformational changes of the active sites and influences the formation and stability of the intermediate free radicals is documented by measurements of enzyme kinetics, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and cyclic voltammetry.

  14. The quantum mixed-spin heme state of barley peroxidase: A paradigm for class III peroxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Howes, B D; Schiodt, C B; Welinder, K G; Marzocchi, M P; Ma, J G; Zhang, J; Shelnutt, J A; Smulevich, G

    1999-01-01

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values, at both room temperature and 20 K, are reported, together with electron paramagnetic resonance spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species coexists with 6- and 5-cHS hemes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the currently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling may be necessary for the QS state. PMID:10388773

  15. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  16. Applications and Prospective of Peroxidase Biocatalysis in the Environmental Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    Environmental protection is, doubtless, one of the most important challenges for the human kind. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, endocrine disruptive chemicals, pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. A large variety of these xenobiotics are substrates for peroxidases and thus susceptible to enzymatic transformation. The literature reports mainly the use of horseradish peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and chloroperoxidase on the transformation of these pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, giving oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to a biological activity loss, a reduction in the bioavailability or due to the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. In addition, when the pollutants are present in soil, peroxidases catalyze a covalent binding to soil organic matter. In most of cases, oxidized products are less toxic and easily biodegradable than the parent compounds. In spite of their versatility and potential use in environmental processes, peroxidases are not applied at large scale yet. Diverse challenges, such as stability, redox potential, and the production of large amounts, should be solved in order to apply peroxidases in the pollutant transformation. In this chapter, we critically review the transformation of different xenobiotics by peroxidases, with special attention on the identified transformation products, the probable reaction mechanisms, and the toxicity reports. Finally, the design and development of an environmental biocatalyst is discussed. The design challenges are

  17. Effect of ploidy levels on the activities of delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in Cenchrus species grown under water stress.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amaresh; Dubey, Archana

    2010-01-01

    The effects of ploidy levels on the activities of delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS; EC not assigned), superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) and guaiacol peroxidase (POX; EC 1.11.1.7), as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) and proline contents were studied in two months old plants of Cenchrus species. The Cenchrus species represent three ploidy levels: diploid, tetraploid, hexaploid and two life spans: annual and perennial. Plants were subjected to water stress for 2, 4, 6 and 8 d by withholding water under glasshouse conditions. Although the levels of proline increased with the magnitude of water stress, the P5CS activity did not show a corresponding increase in all species. Peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities showed an increase or steady state in the early phase of drought and then declined with the further increase in the magnitude of water stress, indicating differing behaviors of species towards drought tolerance. Under drought, diploid Cenchrus species had a higher POX activity, MDA accumulation and lower proline content than tetraploid species. Lower POX and higher P5CS activities and proline contents, however, were observed in hexaploid and tetraploid species. Taken together, our findings suggest that diploid species have a less efficient antioxidant system to scavenge reactive oxygen species than tetra and hexaploid Cenchrus. This may result in a corresponding variability in growth and persistence under natural grasslands. The study also paves the way for investigations on the molecular events associated with drought in Cenchrus species differing in ploidy and life span.

  18. Reactions of the class II peroxidases, lignin peroxidase and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase, with hydrogen peroxide. Catalase-like activity, compound III formation, and enzyme inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Brisset, Nigel C; Smith, Andrew T; Arnao, Marino B; Acosta, Manuel

    2002-07-26

    The reactions of the fungal enzymes Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) and Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase (LiP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) have been studied. Both enzymes exhibited catalase activity with hyperbolic H(2)O(2) concentration dependence (K(m) approximately 8-10 mm, k(cat) approximately 1-3 s(-1)). The catalase and peroxidase activities of LiP were inhibited within 10 min and those of ARP in 1 h. The inactivation constants were calculated using two independent methods; LiP, k(i) approximately 19 x 10(-3) s(-1); ARP, k(i) approximately 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1). Compound III (oxyperoxidase) was detected as the majority species after the addition of H(2)O(2) to LiP or ARP, and its formation was accompanied by loss of enzyme activity. A reaction scheme is presented which rationalizes the turnover and inactivation of LiP and ARP with H(2)O(2). A similar model is applicable to horseradish peroxidase. The scheme links catalase and compound III forming catalytic pathways and inactivation at the level of the [compound I.H(2)O(2)] complex. Inactivation does not occur from compound III. All peroxidases studied to date are sensitive to inactivation by H(2)O(2), and it is suggested that the model will be generally applicable to peroxidases of the plant, fungal, and prokaryotic superfamily.

  19. fPoxDB: fungal peroxidase database for comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peroxidases are a group of oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxide to various electron acceptors. They possess a broad spectrum of impact on industry and fungal biology. There are numerous industrial applications using peroxidases, such as to catalyse highly reactive pollutants and to breakdown lignin for recycling of carbon sources. Moreover, genes encoding peroxidases play important roles in fungal pathogenicity in both humans and plants. For better understanding of fungal peroxidases at the genome-level, a novel genomics platform is required. To this end, Fungal Peroxidase Database (fPoxDB; http://peroxidase.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) has been developed to provide such a genomics platform for this important gene family. Description In order to identify and classify fungal peroxidases, 24 sequence profiles were built and applied on 331 genomes including 216 from fungi and Oomycetes. In addition, NoxR, which is known to regulate NADPH oxidases (NoxA and NoxB) in fungi, was also added to the pipeline. Collectively, 6,113 genes were predicted to encode 25 gene families, presenting well-separated distribution along the taxonomy. For instance, the genes encoding lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase were concentrated in the rot-causing basidiomycetes, reflecting their ligninolytic capability. As a genomics platform, fPoxDB provides diverse analysis resources, such as gene family predictions based on fungal sequence profiles, pre-computed results of eight bioinformatics programs, similarity search tools, a multiple sequence alignment tool, domain analysis functions, and taxonomic distribution summary, some of which are not available in the previously developed peroxidase resource. In addition, fPoxDB is interconnected with other family web systems, providing extended analysis opportunities. Conclusions fPoxDB is a fungi-oriented genomics platform for peroxidases. The sequence

  20. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to [Beta]-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  1. Limits of Versatility of Versatile Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Makovitzki, Arik; Agami, Avi; Lerer, Elad; Mimran, Avishai; Yarden, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Mn2+ is the most abundant substrate of versatile peroxidases (VPs), repression of Pleurotus ostreatus vp1 expression occurred in Mn2+-sufficient medium. This seems to be a biological contradiction. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of direct oxidation by VP1 under Mn2+-deficient conditions, as it was found to be the predominant enzyme during fungal growth in the presence of synthetic and natural substrates. The native VP1 was purified and characterized using three substrates, Mn2+, Orange II (OII), and Reactive Black 5 (RB5), each oxidized by a different active site in the enzyme. While the pH optimum for Mn2+ oxidation is 5, the optimum pH for direct oxidation of both dyes was found to be 3. Indeed, effective in vivo decolorization occurred in media without addition of Mn2+ only under acidic conditions. We have determined that Mn2+ inhibits in vitro the direct oxidation of both OII and RB5 while RB5 stabilizes both Mn2+ and OII oxidation. Furthermore, OII was found to inhibit the oxidation of both Mn2+ and RB5. In addition, we could demonstrate that VP1 can cleave OII in two different modes. Under Mn2+-mediated oxidation conditions, VP1 was able to cleave the azo bond only in asymmetric mode, while under the optimum conditions for direct oxidation (absence of Mn2+ at pH 3) both symmetric and asymmetric cleavages occurred. We concluded that the oxidation mechanism of aromatic compounds by VP1 is controlled by Mn2+ and pH levels both in the growth medium and in the reaction mixture. IMPORTANCE VP1 is a member of the ligninolytic heme peroxidase gene family of the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and plays a fundamental role in biodegradation. This enzyme exhibits a versatile nature, as it can oxidize different substrates under altered environmental conditions. VPs are highly interesting enzymes due to the fact that they contain unique active sites that are responsible for direct oxidation of various aromatic compounds

  2. Purification and characterization of windmill palm tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Caramyshev, Alexei V; Firsova, Yuliya N; Slastya, Evgen A; Tagaev, Andrei A; Potapenko, Nataly V; Lobakova, Elena S; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2006-12-27

    High peroxidase activity was demonstrated to be present in the leaf of several species of cold-resistant palms. Histochemical studies of the leaf of windmill palm tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) showed the peroxidase activity to be localized in hypoderma, epidermis, cell walls, and conducting bundles. However, chlorophyll-containing mesophyll cells had no peroxidase at all. The leaf windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP) was purified to homogeneity and had a specific activity of 6230 units/mg, RZ = 3.0, a molecular mass of 50 kDa, and an isoelectric point of pI 3.5. The electronic spectrum of WPTP with a Soret band at 403 nm was typical of plant peroxidases. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of WPTP was determined. The substrate specificity of WPTP was distinct from that of other palm peroxidases, and the best substrate for WPTP was 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). The palm peroxidase showed an unusually high stability at elevated temperatures and high concentrations of guanidine.

  3. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  4. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized (veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)), we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  5. Thyroid peroxidase activity in human nodular goiters.

    PubMed

    Moura, E G; Rosenthal, D; Carvalho-Guimarães, D P

    1989-01-01

    1. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO, iodide-oxidation) activity was evaluated in nodular and paranodular tissue samples from 27 patients with nodular goiter (19 "cold" and 8 "hot" nodules), and compared to 11 diffuse toxic goiter and 9 normal thyroid tissue samples. 2. In terms of U/g digitonin solubilized protein, TPO activity was increased in hot nodules (P less than 0.05), although not as much as in diffuse toxic goiters (P less than 0.01). 3. The mean TPO activity of tissues paranodular to a cold nodule was not different from that of normal thyroids. 4. Both the highest and the lowest TPO activities were found in cold nodules, but their mean value did not differ from those of their paranodular tissues or normal thyroids. 5. Inter-tissue variability was significantly increased (P less than 0.01) in cold nodules and in tissues paranodular to a hot nodule. 6. These data show that heterogeneity both within and among tissues contributes to the wide range of TPO activity detected in nodular goiters.

  6. Cellular glutathione peroxidase deficiency and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Forgione, Marc A; Weiss, Norbert; Heydrick, Stanley; Cap, André; Klings, Elizabeth S; Bierl, Charlene; Eberhardt, Robert T; Farber, Harrison W; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-04-01

    Cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) is the most abundant intracellular isoform of the GPx antioxidant enzyme family. In this study, we hypothesized that GPx-1 deficiency directly induces an increase in vascular oxidant stress, with resulting endothelial dysfunction. We studied vascular function in a murine model of homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 (GPx-1(-/-)). Mesenteric arterioles of GPx-1(-/-) mice demonstrated paradoxical vasoconstriction to beta-methacholine and bradykinin, whereas wild-type (WT) mice showed dose-dependent vasodilation in response to both agonists. One week of treatment of GPx-1(-/-) mice with L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), which increases intracellular thiol pools, resulted in restoration of normal vascular reactivity in the mesenteric bed of GPx-1(-/-) mice. We observed an increase of the isoprostane iPF(2alpha)-III, a marker of oxidant stress, in the plasma and aortas of GPx-1(-/-) mice compared with WT mice, which returned toward normal after OTC treatment. Aortic sections from GPx-1(-/-) mice showed increased binding of an anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody in the absence of frank vascular lesions. These findings demonstrate that homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 leads to impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilator function presumably due to a decrease in bioavailable nitric oxide and to increased vascular oxidant stress. These vascular abnormalities can be attenuated by increasing bioavailable intracellular thiol pools.

  7. Redundancy among Manganese Peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Salame, Tomer M.; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn2+ amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn2+-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn2+-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn2+-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn2+-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  8. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

  9. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Jovanović, Jelena R; Stefanović, Andrea B; Djokić, Veljko R; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2016-03-01

    Kaolin showed as a very perspective carrier for the enzyme immobilization and it was used for the adsorption of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The effects of the enzyme concentration and pH on the immobilization efficiency were studied in the reaction with pyrogallol and anthraquinone dye C.I. Acid Violet 109 (AV 109). In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analysis by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller were performed for kaolin, thermally activated kaolin and the immobilized enzyme. It has been shown that 0.1 IU of HRP-kaolin decolorized 87 % of dye solution, under the optimal conditions (pH 5.0, temperature 24 °C, dye concentration 40 mg/L and 0.2 mM of H2O2) within 40 min. The immobilized HRP decolorization follows the Ping Pong Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end inhibition by the dye. The biocatalyst retained 35 ± 0.9 % of the initial activity after seven cycles of reuse in the decolorization reaction of AV 109 under optimal conditions in a batch reactor. The obtained kinetic parameters and reusability study confirmed improvement in performances of k-HRP compared to free, indicating that k-HRP has a great potential for environmental purposes.

  10. Molecular characterization of lignin peroxidase from the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes cervina: a novel fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuta; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-01

    The lignin peroxidase (LiP) from Trametes cervina was cloned, characterized, and identified as a novel fungal peroxidase. The sequence of T. cervina LiP encodes the essential amino acids for shaping the heme cavity and calcium-binding sites, which are conserved in plant and fungal peroxidases. However, a sequence homology analysis showed that T. cervina LiP has two unique features: it lacks the conserved tryptophan residue corresponding to the substrate-oxidation site (Trp171) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium LiP and it has a tyrosine residue (Tyr181) that has never been reported in other lignin peroxidases. A tertiary model of T. cervina LiP showed that Tyr181 sterically adjacent to the 6-propionate group of heme is surrounded by acidic amino acids and is exposed to the exterior. These attributes indicate that Tyr181 could be a T. cervina LiP substrate-oxidation site. A phylogenetic analysis showed that T. cervina LiP does not cluster with any other fungal peroxidases, suggesting that it is a unique molecule that is evolutionarily distant from other peroxidases. Thus, we concluded that T. cervina LiP could be a novel secreted peroxidase, among those produced by fungi, with a new oxidation mechanism probably involving Tyr181.

  11. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binding to dental primary afferent projections in the spinal trigeminal complex combined with double immunolabeling of substance P and GABA elements using peroxidase and colloidal gold.

    PubMed

    Matthews, M A; Hoffmann, K D; Hernandez, T V

    1989-01-01

    have a comparable distribution; however, many extended into the dorsal portion of the caudal half of Vi and the ventromedial quadrant of rostral Vi. Electron-microscopic analysis showed that transganglionically labeled dental pulp terminals contained ovoid, complex membrane-bound vacuoles laden with transported HRP. The preterminal axon and synaptic membranes of those dental pulp terminals located in zones of Vc and Vi displaying an affinity for UEA-I were usually characterized by a patchy, electron-dense coating of the peroxidase tag. SP was demonstrated ultrastructurally with Protein-A colloidal gold (3-nm particles), whereas GABA immunoreactivity was revealed by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  12. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  13. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  14. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  15. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    PubMed

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  16. CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF ENDOGENOUS PEROXIDASE IN THYROID FOLLICULAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Judy M.; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    1970-01-01

    Endogenous peroxidase activity in rat thyroid follicular cells is demonstrated cytochemically. Following perfusion fixation of the thyroid gland, small blocks of tissue are incubated in a medium containing substrate for peroxidase, before being postfixed in osmium tetroxide, and processed for electron microscopy. Peroxidase activity is found in thyroid follicular cells in the following sites: (a) the perinuclear cisternae, (b) the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum, (c) the inner few lamellae of the Golgi complex, (d) within vesicles, particularly those found apically, and (e) associated with the external surfaces of the microvilli that project apically from the cell into the colloid. In keeping with the radioautographic evidence of others and the postulated role of thyroid peroxidase in iodination, it is suggested that the microvillous apical cell border is the major site where iodination occurs. However, that apical vesicles also play a role in iodination cannot be excluded. The in vitro effect of cyanide, aminotriazole, and thiourea is also discussed. PMID:4190069

  17. Conversion of adamsite (phenarsarzin chloride) by fungal manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Tsivunchyk, O; Steinbach, K; von Löw, E; Scheibner, K; Hofrichter, M

    2004-02-01

    Fungal manganese peroxidase was found to convert the persistent chemical warfare agent adamsite (phenarsarzin chloride) in a cell-free reaction mixture containing sodium malonate, Mn(2+) ions, and reduced glutathione. The organo-arsenical compound disappeared completely within 48 h accompanied by the formation of a more polar metabolite with a clearly modified UV spectrum. Thus, As(III) in the adamsite molecule was oxidized by manganese peroxidase to As(V) which added dioxygen and released chloride.

  18. Hypocotyl Growth and Peroxidases of Bidens pilosus1

    PubMed Central

    Desbiez, Marie-Odile; Boyer, Nicole; Gaspar, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    Pricking one cotyledon of young Bidens pilosus plants induces rapid inhibition of hypocotyl growth, essentially in its middle portion. Analysis of soluble peroxidases indicates rapid changes (increase of activity) in basic isoenzymes followed by more progressive enhancement of the acidic ones. Pretreatment of the plants with lithium prevents the inhibition of elongation due to pricking as well as the peroxidase changes. The phenomenon is similar to the previously described thigmomorphogenetic process in Bryonia dioica. PMID:16661885

  19. Comparison of lignin peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase for catalyzing the removal of nonylphenol from water.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shipeng; Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Zhou, Lei; Feng, Yiping; Gao, Shixiang

    2014-02-01

    Concentrations of aqueous-phase nonylphenol (NP), a well-known endocrine-disrupting chemical, are shown to be reduced effectively via reaction with lignin peroxidase (LiP) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide. We systematically assessed their reaction efficiencies at varying conditions, and the results have confirmed that the catalytic performance of LiP toward NP was more efficient than that of HRP under experimental conditions. Mass spectrum analysis demonstrated that polymerization through radical-radical coupling mechanism was the pathway leading to NP transformation. Our molecular modeling with the assistance of ab initio suggested the coupling of NP likely proceeded via covalent bonding between two NP radicals at their unsubstituted carbons in phenolic rings. Data from acute immobilization tests with Daphnia confirm that NP toxicity is effectively eliminated by LiP/HRP-catalyzed NP removal. The findings in this study provide useful information for understanding LiP/HRP-mediated NP reactions, and comparison of enzymatic performance can present their advantages for up-scale applications in water/wastewater treatment.

  20. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways.

  1. Roles of horseradish peroxidase in response to terbium stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing

    2014-10-01

    The pollution of the environment by rare earth elements (REEs) causes deleterious effects on plants. Peroxidase plays important roles in plant response to various environmental stresses. Here, to further understand the overall roles of peroxidase in response to REE stress, the effects of the REE terbium ion (Tb(3+)) on the peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents in the leaves and roots of horseradish during different growth stages were simultaneously investigated. The results showed that after 24 and 48 h of Tb(3+) treatment, the peroxidase activity in horseradish leaves decreased, while the H2O2 and lignin contents increased. After a long-term (8 and 16 days) treatment with Tb(3+), these effects were also observed in the roots. The analysis of the changes in peroxidase activity and H2O2 and lignin contents revealed that peroxidase plays important roles in not only reactive oxygen species scavenging but also cell wall lignification in horseradish under Tb(3+) stress. These roles were closely related to the dose of Tb(3+), duration of stress, and growth stages of horseradish.

  2. Identifying the Elusive Sites of Tyrosyl Radicals in Cytochrome c Peroxidase: Implications for Oxidation of Substrates Bound at a Site Remote from the Heme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The location of the Trp radical and the catalytic function of the [Fe(IV)=O Trp191•+] intermediate in cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) are well-established; however, the unambiguous identification of the site(s) for the formation of tyrosyl radical(s) and their possible biological roles remain elusive. We have now performed a systematic investigation of the location and reactivity of the Tyr radical(s) using multifrequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with multiple-site Trp/Tyr mutations in CcP. Two tyrosines, Tyr71 and Tyr236, were identified as those contributing primarily to the EPR spectrum of the tyrosyl radical, recorded at 9 and 285 GHz. The EPR characterization also showed that the heme distal-side Trp51 is involved in the intramolecular electron transfer between Tyr71 and the heme and that formation of Tyr71• and Tyr236• is independent of the [Fe(IV)=O Trp191•+] intermediate. Tyr71 is located in an optimal position to mediate the oxidation of substrates binding at a site, more than 20 Å from the heme, which has been reported recently in the crystal structures of CcP with bound guaicol and phenol [Murphy, E. J., et al. (2012) FEBS J. 279, 1632–1639]. The possibility of discriminating the radical intermediates by their EPR spectra allowed us to identify Tyr71• as the reactive species with the guaiacol substrate. Our assignment of the surface-exposed Tyr236 as the other radical site agrees well with previous studies based on MNP labeling and protein cross-linking [Tsaprailis, G., and English, A. M. (2003) JBIC, J. Biol. Inorg. Chem. 8, 248–255] and on its covalent modification upon reaction of W191G CcP with 2-aminotriazole [Musah, R. A., and Goodin, D. B. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 11665–11674]. Accordingly, while Tyr71 acts as a true reactive intermediate for the oxidation of certain small substrates that bind at a site remote from the heme, the surface-exposed Tyr236 would be more likely related to oxidative stress

  3. Looking for Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Joaquín; Esteban-Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Monolignol polymerization into lignin is catalyzed by peroxidases or laccases. Recently, a Zinnia elegans peroxidase (ZePrx) that is considered responsible for monolignol polymerization in this plant has been molecularly and functionally characterized. Nevertheless, Arabidopsis thaliana has become an alternative model plant for studies of lignification, filling the gaps that may occur with Z. elegans. The arabidopsis genome offers the possibility of performing bioinformatic analyses and data mining that are not yet feasible with other plant species, in order to obtain preliminary evidence on the role of genes and proteins. In our search for arabidopsis homologs to the ZePrx, we performed an exhaustive in silico characterization of everything from the protein to the transcript of Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases (AtPrxs) homologous to ZePrx, with the aim of identifying one or more peroxidases that may be involved in monolignol polymerization. Nine peroxidases (AtPrx 4, 5, 52, 68, 67, 36, 14, 49 and 72) with an E-value greater than 1e-80 with ZePrx were selected for this study. The results demonstrate that a high level of 1D, 2D and 3D homology between these AtPrxs and ZePrx are not always accompanied by the presence of the same electrostatic and mRNA properties that indicate a peroxidase is involved in lignin biosynthesis. In summary, we can confirm that the peroxidases involved in lignification are among AtPrx 4, 52, 49 and 72. Their structural and mRNA features indicate that exert their action in the cell wall similar to ZePrx.

  4. Peroxiredoxin 2, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in the cytosol and membrane of erythrocytes under H2O2-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rocha, S; Gomes, D; Lima, M; Bronze-da-Rocha, E; Santos-Silva, A

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes are continuously exposed to risk of oxidative injury due to oxidant oxygen species. To prevent damage, they have antioxidant agents namely, catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). Our aim was to contribute to a better understanding of the interplay between Prx2, Cat, and GPx under H2O2-induced oxidative stress, by studying their changes in the red blood cell cytosol and membrane, in different conditions. These three enzymes were quantified by immunoblotting. Malondialdehyde, that is, lipoperoxidation (LPO) in the erythrocyte membrane, and membrane-bound hemoglobin (MBH) were evaluated, as markers of oxidative stress. We also studied the erythrocyte membrane protein profile, to estimate how oxidative stress affects the membrane protein structure. We showed that under increasing H2O2 concentrations, inhibition of the three enzymes with or without metHb formation lead to the binding of Prx2 and GPx (but not Cat) to the erythrocyte membrane. Prx2 was detected mainly in its oxidized form and the linkage of metHb to the membrane seems to compete with the binding of Prx2. Catalase played a major role in protecting erythrocytes from high exogenous flux of H2O2, since whenever Cat was active there were no significant changes in any of the studied parameters. When only Cat was inhibited, Prx2 and GPx were unable to prevent H2O2-induced oxidative stress resulting in increasing MBH and membrane LPO. Additionally, the inhibition of one or more of these enzymes induced changes in the anchor/linker proteins of the junctional complexes of the membrane cytoskeleton-lipid bilayer, which might lead to membrane destabilization.

  5. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus

    SciTech Connect

    Mliki, A.; Zimmermann, W. )

    1992-03-01

    Peroxidases play an important role in the oxidation of a large number of aromatic compounds, including recalcitrant substances. An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a K{sub m} of 17.8 {mu}M and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a K{sub m} of 2.07 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C{alpha}-C{beta} bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydroxy-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl) propane, a nonphenolic dimeric lignin model compound. The spectrum of te peroxidase showed a soret band at 405 nm, which disappeared after reduction with sodium dithionite, indicating that the enzyme is a hemoprotein. Testing the effects of various inhibitors on the enzyme activity showed that it is a bifunctional enzyme having catalase and peroxidase activities.

  6. Peroxidase extraction from jicama skin peels for phenol removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiong, T.; Lau, S. Y.; Khor, E. H.; Danquah, M. K.

    2016-06-01

    Phenol and its derivatives exist in various types of industrial effluents, and are known to be harmful to aquatic lives even at low concentrations. Conventional treatment technologies for phenol removal are challenged with long retention time, high energy consumption and process cost. Enzymatic treatment has emerged as an alternative technology for phenol removal from wastewater. These enzymes interact with aromatic compounds including phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, forming free radicals which polymerize spontaneously to produce insoluble phenolic polymers. This work aims to extract peroxidase from agricultural wastes materials and establish its application for phenol removal. Peroxidase was extracted from jicama skin peels under varying extraction conditions of pH, sample-to-buffer ratio (w/v %) and temperature. Experimental results showed that extraction process conducted at pH 10, 40% w/v and 25oC demonstrated a peroxidase activity of 0.79 U/mL. Elevated temperatures slightly enhanced the peroxidase activities. Jicama peroxidase extracted at optimum extraction conditions demonstrated a phenol removal efficiency of 87.5% at pH 7. Phenol removal efficiency was ∼ 97% in the range of 30 - 40oC, and H2O2 dosage has to be kept below 100 mM for maximum removal under phenol concentration tested.

  7. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    PubMed Central

    Ahariz, Mohamed; Courtois, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil) was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30) and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm2 of titanium foil (n = 12). The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate), Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated) and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates) to limit C. albicans biofilm formation. PMID:22915919

  8. Feasible Relation between Glutathione Peroxidase and Febrile Seizure

    PubMed Central

    MAHYAR, Abolfazl; AYAZI, Parviz; DALIRANI, Reza; MOHAMMAD HOSEINI, Behzad; SAROOKHANI, Mohammad Reza; JAVADI, Amir; ESMAEILY, Shiva

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase and febrile seizure. Materials & Methods In this case-control study, 43 children with simple febrile seizure (case group) were compared with 43 febrile children without seizure (control group) in terms of serum glutathione peroxidase level, measured by ELISA method. This study was conducted in Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences in Qazvin, Iran in 2012-2013. The results were analyzed and compared in two groups. Results From 43 children 24 (53%) were male and 19 (47%) were female in children with simple febrile seizure, and 26 (60%) were male and 17 (40%) were female in febrile children without seizure (control group) (P=0.827). Serum glutathione peroxidase level was 166 U/ml (SD=107) in the case group and 141 U/ml (SD=90.5) in the control group of no significant difference. Conclusion There was no significant relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase and simple febrile seizure. Thus, it seems that glutathione peroxidase, an essential component of antioxidant system, does not play any role in the pathogenesis of simple febrile seizure. PMID:28277558

  9. Assay of methylglyoxal and glyoxal and control of peroxidase interference.

    PubMed

    Thornalley, Paul J; Rabbani, Naila

    2014-04-01

    Methylglyoxal and glyoxal are endogenous α-oxoaldehyde metabolites and substrates of the glyoxalase system. These and related α-oxoaldehydes are often determined in cell, tissue and body fluid samples by derivatization with 1,2-diaminobenzene and similar compounds. Peroxidase activity in physiological tissues is a potential interference in estimation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal as it catalyses the conversion of 1,2-diaminobenzene into trace amounts of these dicarbonyl metabolites. Residual peroxidase activity in deproteinized extracts is found to cause significant interference in methylglyoxal and glyoxal estimations. This interference is blocked by the addition of sodium azide in the derivatizing buffer. Estimates of methylglyoxal concentration thereby obtained are in keeping with those predicted by systems modelling of methylglyoxal glycation kinetics in situ. Blocking sample peroxidase activity is important to avoid overestimation in the measurement of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. A dicarbonyl assay protocol resistant to interferences is described in the present article.

  10. Two distinct groups of fungal catalase/peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2009-08-01

    Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional haem b-containing (Class I) peroxidases with overwhelming catalase activity and substantial peroxidase activity with various one-electron donors. These unique oxidoreductases evolved in ancestral bacteria revealing a complex gene-duplicated structure. Besides being found in numerous bacteria of all phyla, katG genes were also detected in genomes of lower eukaryotes, most prominently of sac and club fungi. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates the occurrence of two distinct groups of fungal KatGs that differ in localization, structural and functional properties. Analysis of lateral gene transfer of bacterial katGs into fungal genomes reveals that the most probable progenitor was a katG from a bacteroidetes predecessor. The putative physiological role(s) of both fungal KatG groups is discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships in bacterial KatGs and is related with the acquisition of (phyto)pathogenicity in fungi.

  11. Glutathione peroxidase in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, P; Velander, G; Mai, J; Thorling, E B; Dupont, E

    1991-01-01

    A defective antioxidant scavenging system plays a major role in one of the theories of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a general difference in antioxidant activity between early and advanced cases of Parkinson's disease. Twenty five recently diagnosed patients, without any clinical fluctuations (group A), and 25 patients in a late phase of the disease with severe fluctuations in response to levodopa therapy (group B) were included in the study. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase was determined as a measure of antioxidant activity and significantly lower values were found in group B than in group A. Regression analyses in groups A and B showed significant correlation between glutathione peroxidase and duration of disease, but not between glutathione peroxidase and age of patients. Images PMID:1940936

  12. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases.

  13. Secretion-related uptake of horseradish peroxidase in neurohypophysial axons

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    During secretion of the neurohypophysial hormones, oxytocin and vasopressin, secretory granule membrane is added to the plasma membrane of the axon terminals. It is generally assumed that subsequent internalization of this additional membrane occurs by endocytosis. In order to study this process, we have traced the uptake of intravenously injected horseradish peroxidase by neurohypophysial axons in rats and golden hamsters. Peroxidase reaction product within the secretory axons was found mainly in vacuolar and C-shaped structures of a size comparable with or larger than the neurosecretory granules. Our observations suggest that these large horseradish peroxidase (HRP)- impregnated vacuoles arise directly by a form of macropinocytosis. Morphometric analysis indicated that this form of membrane retrieval increased significantly after the two types of stimuli used, reversible hemorrhage and electrical stimulation of the pituitary stalk. Microvesicular uptake of HRP was found to be comparatively less. PMID:181385

  14. Inorganic chemistry of defensive peroxidases in the human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ashby, M T

    2008-10-01

    The innate host response system is comprised of various mechanisms for orchestrating host response to microbial infection of the oral cavity. The heterogeneity of the oral cavity and the associated microenvironments that are produced give rise to different chemistries that affect the innate defense system. One focus of this review is on how these spatial differences influence the two major defensive peroxidases of the oral cavity, salivary peroxidase (SPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). With hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidant, the defensive peroxidases use inorganic ions to produce antimicrobials that are generally more effective than H(2)O(2) itself. The concentrations of the inorganic substrates are different in saliva vs. gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Thus, in the supragingival regime, SPO and MPO work in unison for the exclusive production of hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-), a reactive inorganic species), which constantly bathes nascent plaques. In contrast, MPO is introduced to the GCF during inflammatory response, and in that environment it is capable of producing hypochlorite (OCl(-)), a chemically more powerful oxidant that is implicated in host tissue damage. A second focus of this review is on inter-person variation that may contribute to different peroxidase function. Many of these differences are attributed to dietary or smoking practices that alter the concentrations of relevant inorganic species in the oral cavity (e.g.: fluoride, F(-); cyanide, CN(-); cyanate, OCN(-); thiocyanate, SCN(-); and nitrate, NO(3)(-)). Because of the complexity of the host and microflora biology and the associated chemistry, it is difficult to establish the significance of the human peroxidase systems during the pathogenesis of oral diseases. The problem is particularly complex with respect to the gingival sulcus and periodontal pockets (where the very different defensive stratagems of GCF and saliva co-mingle). Despite this complexity, intriguing in vitro and in vivo

  15. Removal of phenolic compounds from wastewaters using soybean peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.; Nicell, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Toxic and odiferous phenolic compounds are present in wastewaters generated by a variety of industries including petroleum refining, plastics, resins, textiles, and iron and steel manufacturing among others. Due to its commercial availability in purified form, its useful presence in raw plant material, and its proven ability to remove a variety of phenolic contaminants from wastewaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) appears to be the peroxidase enzyme of choice in enzymatic wastewater treatment studies. Problems with HRP catalyzed phenol removal, however, include the formation of toxic soluble reaction by-products, the cost of the enzyme, and costs associated with disposal of the phenolic precipitate generated. Enzyme costs are incurred because the enzyme is inactivated during the phenol removal process by various side reactions. While recent work has shown that enzyme inactivation can be reduced using chemical additives, the problem of enzyme cost could be circumvented by using a less expensive source of enzyme. In 1991, the seed coat of the soybean was identified as a very rich source of peroxidase enzyme. Since the seed coat of the soybean is a waste product of the soybean food industry, soybean peroxidase (SBP) has the potential of being a cost effective alternative to HRP in wastewater treatment. In this study, SBP is characterized in terms of its catalytic activity, its stability, and its ability to promote removal of phenolic compounds from synthetic wastewaters. Results obtained are discussed and compared to similar investigations using HRP.

  16. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675...

  19. Mammalian heme peroxidases: from molecular mechanisms to health implications.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L; Pattison, David I; Rees, Martin D

    2008-07-01

    A marked increase in interest has occurred over the last few years in the role that mammalian heme peroxidase enzymes, primarily myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase, and lactoperoxidase, may play in both disease prevention and human pathologies. This increased interest has been sparked by developments in our understanding of polymorphisms that control the levels of these enzymes, a greater understanding of the basic chemistry and biochemistry of the oxidants formed by these species, the development of specific biomarkers that can be used in vivo to detect damage induced by these oxidants, the detection of active forms of these peroxidases at most, if not all, sites of inflammation, and a correlation between the levels of these enzymes and a number of major human pathologies. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the enzymology, chemistry, biochemistry and biologic roles of mammalian peroxidases and the oxidants that they generate, the potential role of these oxidants in human disease, and the use of the levels of these enzymes in disease prognosis.

  20. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  1. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification.

  2. Immobilization of peroxidase on SPEU film via radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongfei, Ha; Guanghui, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    The acrylic acid or acrylamide were grafted via radiation onto segmented polyetherurethane (SPEU) film which is a kind of biocompatible material. Then the Horse radish peroxidase was immobilized on the grafted SPEU film through chemical binding. Some quantitative relationships between the percent graft and the activity, amount of immobilized enzyme were given. The properties and application of obtained biomaterial was studied as well.

  3. Calorimetric studies of the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Kresheck, G.C.; Erman, J.E.

    1988-04-05

    Two endotherms are observed by differential scanning calorimetry during the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase at pH 7.0. The transition midpoint temperatures (t/sub m/) were 43.9 +- 1.4 and 63.3 +- 1.6 /sup 0/C, independent of concentration. The two endotherms were observed at all pH values between 4 and 8, with the transition temperatures varying with pH. Precipitation was observed between pH 4 and 6, and only qualitative data are presented for this region. The thermal unfolding of cytochrome c peroxidase was sensitive to the presence and ligation state of the heme. Only a single endotherm was observed for the unfolding of the apoprotein, and this transition was similar to the high-temperature transition in the holoenzyme. Addition of KCN to the holoenzyme increases the midpoint of the high-temperature transition whereas the low-temperature transition was increased upon addition of KF. Binding of the natural substrate ferricytochrome c to the enzyme increases the low-temperature transition by 4.8 +- 1.3 /sup 0/C but has no effect on the high-temperature transition at pH 7. The presence of cytochrome c peroxidase decreases the stability of cytochrome c, and both proteins appear to unfold simultaneously. The results are discussed in terms of the two domains evident in the X-ray crystallographic structure of cytochrome c peroxidase

  4. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification. PMID:24632343

  5. Ethylene production and peroxidase activity in aphid-infested barley.

    PubMed

    Argandoña, V H; Chaman, M; Cardemil, L; Muñoz, O; Zúñiga, G E; Corcuera, L J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether ethylene is involved in the oxidative and defensive responses of barley to the aphids Schizaphis graminum (biotype C) and Rhopalophum padi. The effect of aphid infestation on ethylene production was measured in two barley cultivars (Frontera and Aramir) that differ in their susceptibility to aphids. Ethylene evolution was higher in plants infested for 16 hr than in plants infested for 4 hr in both cultivars. Under aphid infestation, the production of ethylene was higher in cv. Frontera than in Aramir, the more aphid susceptible cultivar. Ethylene production also increases with the degree of infestation. Maximum ethylene evolution was detected after 16 hr when plants were infested with 10 or more aphids. Comparing the two species of aphids, Schizaphis graminum induced more ethylene evolution than Rhopalosiphum padi. Infestation with S. graminum increased hydrogen peroxide content and total soluble peroxidase activity in cv. Frontera, with a maximum level of H2O2 observed after 20 min of infestation and the maximum in soluble peroxidase activity after 30 min of infestation. When noninfested barley seedlings from cv. Frontera were exposed to ethylene, an increase in hydrogen peroxide and in total peroxidase activity was detected at levels similar to those of infested plants from cv. Frontera. When noninfested plants were treated with 40 ppm of ethylene, the maximum levels of H2O2 and soluble peroxidase activity were at 10 and 40 min, respectively. Ethylene also increased the activity of both cell-wall-bound peroxidases types (ionically and covalently bound), comparable with infestation. These results suggest that ethylene is involved in the oxidative responses of barley plants induced by infestation.

  6. Degradation of textile dyes mediated by plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Nair, R Aswathi; Abraham, T Emilia

    2002-01-01

    The peroxidase enzyme from the plants Ipomea palmata (1.003 IU/g of leaf) and Saccharum spontaneum (3.6 IU/g of leaf) can be used as an alternative to the commercial source of horseradish and soybean peroxidase enzyme for the decolorization of textile dyes, mainly azo dyes. Eight textiles dyes currently used by the industry and seven other dyes were selected for decolorization studies at 25-200 mg/L levels using these plant enzymes. The enzymes were purified prior to use by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and ion exchange and gel permeation chromatographic techniques. Peroxidase of S. spontaneum leaf (specific activity of 0.23 IU/mg) could completely degrade Supranol Green and Procion Green HE-4BD (100%) dyes within 1 h, whereas Direct Blue, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G and Chrysoidine were degraded >70% in 1 h. Peroxidase of Ipomea (I. palmata leaf; specific activity of 0.827 U/mg) degraded 50 mg/L of the dyes Methyl Orange (26%), Crystal Violet (36%), and Supranol Green (68%) in 2-4 h and Brilliant Green (54%), Direct Blue (15%), and Chrysoidine (44%) at the 25 mg/L level in 1 to 2 h of treatment. The Saccharum peroxidase was immobilized on a hydrophobic matrix. Four textile dyes, Procion Navy Blue HER, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G, Procion Green HE-4BD, and Supranol Green, at an initial concentration of 50 mg/L were completely degraded within 8 h by the enzyme immobilized on the modified polyethylene matrix. The immobilized enzyme was used in a batch reactor for the degradation of Procion Green HE-4BD and the reusability was studied for 15 cycles, and the half-life was found to be 60 h.

  7. Phenol removal by peroxidases extracted from Chinese cabbage root

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, H.I.; Jeong, Y.H.

    1995-12-31

    More than four million tons of Chinese cabbages are produced in Korea. Most of them are used as raw materials for Kimchi, but root parts of them are discarded as agricultural wastes. A trial for the application of agricultural waste to industrial waste water treatment was made as an effort to the efficient use of natural resources and to reduce water pollution problem simultaneously. Peroxidases of both solid and liquid phases were obtained from Chinese cabbage roots by using commercial juicer. The differences in peroxidase activity among the various cultivars of Chinese cabbages in Korea were little and electrophoretic patterns of various peroxidases will be discussed. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity will be discussed also. Since peroxidases are distributed into 66% in liquid (juice) and 34% in solid phase (pulp), enzymes from both phases were applied to investigate the enzymatic removal of phenol from waste water. After phenol solution at 150 ppm being reacted with liquid phase enzyme (1,800 unit/1) for 3 hours in a batch stirred reactor, 96% of phenol could be removed through polymerization and precipitation. Also, phenol could be removed from initial 120 ppm to final 5 ppm by applying solid phase enzyme in an air lift reactor (600 unit/1). Almost equivalent efficiencies of phenol removal were observed between two systems, even though only one third of the enzymes in batch stirred reactor was applied in air lift reactor. The possible reason for this phenomenon is because peroxidases exist as immobilized forms in solid phase.

  8. Pleurotus ostreatus heme peroxidases: an in silico analysis from the genome sequence to the enzyme molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Fernández, Elena; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2011-11-01

    An exhaustive screening of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was performed to search for nucleotide sequences of heme peroxidases in this white-rot fungus, which could be useful for different biotechnological applications. After sequence identification and manual curation of the corresponding genes and cDNAs, the deduced amino acid sequences were converted into structural homology models. A comparative study of these sequences and their structural models with those of known fungal peroxidases revealed the complete inventory of heme peroxidases of this fungus. This consists of cytochrome c peroxidase and ligninolytic peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase and versatile peroxidase but not lignin peroxidase, as representative of the "classical" superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases; and members of two relatively "new" peroxidase superfamilies, namely heme-thiolate peroxidases, here described for the first time in a fungus from the genus Pleurotus, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases, already known in P. ostreatus but still to be thoroughly explored and characterized.

  9. Chlorpromazine as permeabilizer and reagent for detection of microbial peroxidase and peroxidaselike activities.

    PubMed Central

    Galeazzi, L; Turchetti, G; Grilli, G; Groppa, G; Giunta, S

    1986-01-01

    Chlorpromazine was used to perform a test for the detection of microbial peroxidase activities. The compound acts as both a cell permeabilizer and a reagent in the procedure developed which allows the detection of peroxidase and peroxidase like reactions both semiquantitatively in whole cell determinations and quantitatively in cell-free supernatants. PMID:3539020

  10. Lignin-degrading peroxidases from genome of selective ligninolytic fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E; Martínez, Angel T

    2012-05-11

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora.

  11. Peroxidase Activity in Relation to Suberization and Respiration in White Spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) Seedling Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Flanagan, Anne M.; Owens, John N.

    1985-01-01

    Peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) activity is associated with suberization during endodermal development and metacutization in roots of white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) seedlings. Histochemical analysis indicates a relationship between suberization and peroxidase activity, but peroxidase is ubiquitous. Increased peroxidase activity results from the induction of four anodic peroxidase isozymes in addition to quantitative increases in two anodic peroxidase isozymes. Four of these polymerized eugenol. Cold temperatures induce formation of two anodic isozymes and result in suberization. The increased peroxidase activity associated with suberization is correlated to residual respiration. In an attempt to elucidate this relationship, the effect of respiratory inhibitors on respiration and peroxidase activity are compared. PMID:16664352

  12. Oxidative activation of benzidine and its derivatives by peroxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Josephy, P D

    1985-01-01

    Benzidine (4,4'-diaminobiphenyl) is a known human carcinogen; exposure to this substance resulted in an epidemic of bladder cancer among workers in the dye industry in Europe and North America. The chemical or enzymatic oxidation of benzidine proceeds via a racial cation detectable by electron spin resonance. Peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of benzidine generates reactive electrophiles which readily form adducts with phenol and thiol compounds. The structures of these novel metabolites are described. Peroxidases, including prostaglandin synthase, catalyze benzidine binding to protein and nucleic acid; the nature of the resulting adducts is unknown. The relevance of these processes to benzidine carcinogenesis in vivo is the subject of research and debate. A central question remains: is benzidine activated in extra-hepatic target tissues such as bladder epithelium, or transported to these tissues following hepatic oxidative metabolism? PMID:3007087

  13. Steady state equivalence among autocatalytic peroxidase-oxidase reactions.

    PubMed

    Méndez-González, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-12-14

    Peroxidase-oxidase is an enzymatic reaction that can exhibit dynamical scenarios such as bistability, sustained oscillations, and Shilnikov chaos. In this work, we apply the chemical reaction network theory approach to find kinetic constants such that the associated mass action kinetics ordinary differential equations induced by three four dimensional structurally different enzymatic reaction systems can support the same steady states for several chemical species despite differences in their chemical nature.

  14. Steady state equivalence among autocatalytic peroxidase-oxidase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-González, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    Peroxidase-oxidase is an enzymatic reaction that can exhibit dynamical scenarios such as bistability, sustained oscillations, and Shilnikov chaos. In this work, we apply the chemical reaction network theory approach to find kinetic constants such that the associated mass action kinetics ordinary differential equations induced by three four dimensional structurally different enzymatic reaction systems can support the same steady states for several chemical species despite differences in their chemical nature.

  15. Determining the Topology of Membrane-Bound Proteins Using PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Howe, Vicky; Brown, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical methods can help elucidate the membrane topology of hydrophobic membrane proteins where X-ray crystallography is difficult or impractical, providing important structural data. Here, we describe the method of PEGylation, which uses a cysteine-reactive molecule, maleimide polyethylene glycol (mPEG), to determine the cytosolic accessibility of introduced cysteine residues. This accessibility is visualized using Western blotting to detect a band shift that indicates cysteine labeling by mPEG. Using scanning cysteine mutagenesis, followed by PEGylation, one can map the accessibility of the introduced cysteines, hence inferring the membrane topology of the protein.We used PEGylation to determine the membrane topology of the sterol regulatory domain of a cholesterol synthesis enzyme, squalene monooxygenase, identifying that it is anchored to the membrane via a re-entrant loop.

  16. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  17. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. )

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  18. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Jay, D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of disulfiram on succinate oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities of beef heart submitochondrial particles was studied. Results show that disulfiram inhibits both functions. Succinate and malonate suppress the inhibitory action of disulfiram when succinate dehydrogenase is stabilized in an active conformation. Disulfiram is not able to inhibit the enzyme when succinate dehydrogenase is inactivated by oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram is reverted by the addition of dithiothreitol. From these results, it is proposed that disulfiram inhibits the utilization of succinate by a direct modification of an -SH group located in the catalytically active site of succinate dehydrogenase.

  19. Substrate access channel topology in membrane-bound prostacyclin synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hui; Huang, Aimin; So, Shui-Ping; Lin, Yue-Zhen; Ruan, Ke-He

    2002-01-01

    Results from our molecular-modelling and site-directed-mutagenesis studies of prostaglandin I(2) synthase (PGIS) have suggested that the large PGIS cytoplasmic domain is anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by the N-terminal segment in a way that orients the substrate access channel opening to face the membrane. To test this hypothesis we have explored the accessibility of the PGIS substrate channel opening to site-specific antibodies. The working three-dimensional PGIS model constructed by protein homology modelling was used to predict surface portions near the substrate access channel opening. Two peptides corresponding to the surface immediately near the opening [residues 66-75 (P66-75) and 95-116 (P95-116)], and two other peptides corresponding to the surface about 10-20 A (1 A=0.1 nm) away from the opening [residues 366-382 (P366-382) and 472-482 (P472-482)] were used to prepare site-specific antibodies. All four antipeptide antibodies specifically recognized the synthetic segments of human PGIS and recombinant PGIS, as shown by binding assays and Western-blot analysis. The site-specific antibodies were used to probe the accessibility of the substrate access channel opening in transiently transfected COS-1 cells expressing recombinant human PGIS, and in spontaneously transformed human endothelial cell line ECV cells expressing endogenous human PGIS. Immunofluorescence staining was performed for cells selectively permeabilized with streptolysin O and for cells whose membranes were permeabilized with detergent. Antibodies to peptides in the immediate vicinity of the substrate channel (P66-75 and P95-116) bound to their targets only after general permeabilization with Triton X-100. In contrast, the two antibodies to peptides further from the channel opening (P366-382 and P472-482) bound to their targets even in cells with intact ER membranes. These observations support our topology model in which the PGIS substrate access channel opening is positioned close to the ER membrane. PMID:11879180

  20. Transient domain formation in membrane-bound organelles undergoing maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Sens, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The membrane components of cellular organelles have been shown to segregate into domains as the result of biochemical maturation. We propose that the dynamical competition between maturation and lateral segregation of membrane components regulates domain formation. We study a two-component fluid membrane in which enzymatic reaction irreversibly converts one component into another and phase separation triggers the formation of transient membrane domains. The maximum domain size is shown to depend on the maturation rate as a power law similar to the one observed for domain growth with time in the absence of maturation, despite this time dependence not being verified in the case of irreversible maturation. This control of domain size by enzymatic activity could play a critical role in regulating exchange between organelles or within compartmentalized organelles such as the Golgi apparatus.

  1. Luminol-hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence produced by sweet potato peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Alpeeva, Inna S; Yu Sakharov, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Anionic sweet potato peroxidase (SPP; Ipomoea batatas) was shown to efficiently catalyse luminol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide, forming a long-term chemiluminescence (CL) signal. Like other anionic plant peroxidases, SPP is able to catalyse this enzymatic reaction efficiently in the absence of any enhancer. Maximum intensity produced in SPP-catalysed oxidation of luminol was detected at pH 7.8-7.9 to be lower than that characteristic of other peroxidases (8.4-8.6). Varying the concentrations of luminol, hydrogen peroxide and Tris buffer in the reaction medium, we determined favourable conditions for SPP catalysis (100 mmol/L Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.8, containing 5 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide and 8 mmol/L luminol). The SPP detection limit in luminol oxidation was 1.0 x 10(-14) mol/L. High sensitivity in combination with the long-term CL signal and high stability is indicative of good promise for the application of SPP in CL enzyme immunoassay.

  2. Detoxification of pesticides aqueous solution using horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    El-Said, Saad Mohamed

    2013-03-15

    There are pesticide residues in agriculture wastewater and that compounds must be removed before discharge of wastewater in native waters. Thus the aim of this study was to remove toxic pesticide in waste water by the addition of horseradish peroxidase enzyme. The process of pesticide (methyl-parathion (O,O-Diethyl- O-4-nitro-phenylthiophosphate), atrazine (1-chloro-3-ethylamino-5-isopropylamino-2,4,6-triazine) and triazophos (O,O-diethyl O-1-phenyl-1H-1,2,4- triazol-3-yl phosphorothioate) removal from synthetic wastewater using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide has been analyzed. The technical feasibility of the process was studied using 0.001-3.0 mM synthetic pesticides solutions. Experiments were carried out at different time, HRP and H2O2 dose and pH to determine the optimum removing conditions. The removal of the three pesticides increases with an increase in HRP and hydrogen peroxide dose. The optimum HRP dose is 2.0 U L(-1) and 10 mM for H2O2. The contact needed to reach equilibrium was found to be 360 min. Maximum removal was achieved up to 74% at pH 8. Also, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of the effluent reduced at the end of 6 h from 2111-221 mg L(-1) (at pH 8). Tests based upon horseradish peroxidase, at optimized parameters, show the reduction of toxicity to non-toxic levels.

  3. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group and a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.

  4. Relative binding affinities of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase

    DOE PAGES

    Sangha, Amandeep K.; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2016-07-22

    Monolignol binding to the peroxidase active site is the first step in lignin polymerization in plant cell walls. Using molecular dynamics, docking, and free energy perturbation calculations, we investigate the binding of monolignols to horseradish peroxidase C. Our results suggest that p-coumaryl alcohol has the strongest binding affinity followed by sinapyl and coniferyl alcohol. Stacking interactions between the monolignol aromatic rings and nearby phenylalanine residues play an important role in determining the calculated relative binding affinities. p-Coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols bind in a pose productive for reaction in which a direct H-bond is formed between the phenolic –OH group andmore » a water molecule (W2) that may facilitate proton transfer during oxidation. In contrast, in the case of sinapyl alcohol there is no such direct interaction, the phenolic –OH group instead interacting with Pro139. Furthermore, since proton and electron transfer is the rate-limiting step in monolignol oxidation by peroxidase, the binding pose (and thus the formation of near attack conformation) appears to play a more important role than the overall binding affinity in determining the oxidation rate.« less

  5. Biochemical and Pathological Studies on Peroxidases –An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amjad A.; Rahmani, Arshad H.; Aldebasi, Yousef H.; Aly, Salah M.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress. PMID:25168993

  6. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to wall-localized peroxidases from corn seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Terry, M. E.; Hoops, P.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A library of 22 hybridomas, which make antibodies to soluble wall antigens from the coleoptiles and primary leaves of etiolated corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings, was raised and cloned three times by limit dilution to assure monoclonal growth and stability. Two of these hybridomas made immunoglobulin G antibodies, designated mWP3 and mWP19, which both effectively immunoprecipitated peroxidase activity from crude and partially purified preparations of wall peroxidases. Direct peroxidase-binding assays revealed that both antibodies bound enzymes with peroxidase activity. As judged by immunoblot analyses, mWP3 recognized a Mr 98,000 wall peroxidase with an isoelectric point near 4.2, and mWP19 recognized a Mr 58,000 wall peroxidase. Immunogold localization studies showed both peroxidases are predominately in cell walls.

  7. Cu-hemin metal-organic frameworks with peroxidase-like activity as peroxidase mimics for colorimetric sensing of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fenfen; He, Juan; Zeng, Mulang; Hao, Juan; Guo, Qiaohui; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a facile strategy to synthesize Cu-hemin metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with peroxidase-like activity was reported. The prepared Cu-hemin MOFs were characterized by various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible absorbance spectra, and so on. The results showed that the prepared Cu-hemin MOFs looked like a ball-flower with an average diameter of 10 μm and provided a large specific surface area. The Cu-hemin MOFs possessing peroxidase-like activity could be used to catalyze the peroxidase substrate of 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine in the presence of H2O2, which was employed to detect H2O2 quantitatively with the linear range from 1.0 μM to 1.0 mM and the detection limit was 0.42 μM. Furthermore, with the additional help of glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective method to detect glucose was developed by using the Cu-hemin MOFs as catalyst and the linear range was from 10.0 μM to 3.0 mM and the detection limit was 6.9 μM. This work informs researchers of the advantages of MOFs for preparing biomimetic catalysts and extends the functionality of MOFs for biosensor application.

  8. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products.

  9. The role of stigma peroxidases in flowering plants: insights from further characterization of a stigma-specific peroxidase (SSP) from Senecio squalidus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    McInnis, Stephanie M; Emery, David C; Porter, Robert; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John T; Hiscock, Simon J

    2006-01-01

    Angiosperm stigmas have long been known to exhibit high levels of peroxidase activity when they are mature and most receptive to pollen but the biological function of stigma peroxidases is not known. A novel stigma-specific class III peroxidase gene, SSP (stigma-specific peroxidase) expressed exclusively in the stigmas of Senecio squalidus L. (Asteraceae) has recently been identified. Expression of SSP is confined to the specialized secretory cells (papillae) that compose the stigma epidermis. The literature on stigma peroxidases and hypotheses on their function(s) is reviewed here before further characterization of SSP and an attempt to determine its function are described. It is shown that SSP is localized to cytoplasmic regions of stigmatic papillae and also to the surface of these cells, possibly as a component of the pellicle, a thin layer of condensed protein typical of "dry" stigmas. Enzyme assays on recombinant SSP showed it to be a peroxidase with a preference for diphenolic substrates (ABTS and TMB) and a pH optimum of approximately 4.5. In such assays the peroxidase activity of SSP was low when compared with horseradish peroxidase. To explore the function of SSP and other stigmatic peroxidases, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stigmas of S. squalidus were investigated. Relatively large amounts of ROS, principally H(2)O(2), were detected in S. squalidus stigmas where most ROS/H(2)O(2) was localized to the stigmatic papillae, the location of SSP. These observations are discussed in the context of possible functions for SSP, other peroxidases, and ROS in the stigmas of angiosperms.

  10. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  11. Peroxidase and fluorescein isothiocyanate as antibody markers. A quantitative comparison of two peroxidase conjugates prepared with glutaraldehyde or periodate anda fluorescein conjugate.

    PubMed

    Broorsma, D M; Steefkerk, J G; Kors, N

    1976-09-01

    Batches of rabbit anti-human immunoglobulin G antibodies were labeled either with horseradish peroxidase, using the two-step glutaraldehyde method or the periodate method, or with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The peroxidase conjugates were isolated by chromatography using two different gel types. The five types of conjugates thus obtained were standardized to the same amount of rabbit immunoglobulin G. The antibody activity, as estimated by means of single radial immunodiffusion and passive hemagglutination, and the enzyme activity, determined with orthodianisidine, were compared. The ultimate dilutions and absolute amounts of the five conjugates giving positive reactions were determined in direct and indirect immunohistochemical tests, using both cryostat sections of skin and the agarose bead model system. It appeared that during the peroxidase conjugation procedures there was a considerable loss of abtibody and enzyme activity, whereas in the FITC conjugation procedure the antibody activity remained intact. Neverthe less, peroxidase conjugates prepared with glutaraldehyde still gave positive staining reactions in equal or somewhat higher dilutions than the fluorescin conjugate did. The peroxidase conjugates prepared with periodate could not be diluted to the same extent. For the detection of antibodies by indirect immunohistochemical methods, the peroxidase conjugate, prepared with glutaraldehyde, was comparable to the FITC conjugate. The peroxidase conjugate, prepared with periodate, was less effective.

  12. Indomethacin inactivates gastric peroxidase to induce reactive-oxygen-mediated gastric mucosal injury and curcumin protects it by preventing peroxidase inactivation and scavenging reactive oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Ishita; Bandyopadhyay, Uday; Biswas, Kaushik; Maity, Pallab; Banerjee, Ranajit K

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the mechanism of indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the gastroprotective effect of curcumin thereon. Curcumin dose-dependently blocks indomethacin-induced gastric lesions, showing 82% protection at 25 mg/kg. Indomethacin-induced oxidative damage by ROS as shown by increased lipid peroxidation and thiol depletion is almost completely blocked by curcumin. Indomethacin causes nearly fivefold increase in hydroxyl radical (()OH) and significant inactivation of gastric mucosal peroxidase to elevate endogenous H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2)-derived ()OH, which is prevented by curcumin. In vitro studies indicate that indomethacin inactivates peroxidase irreversibly only in presence of H(2)O(2) by acting as a suicidal substrate. 5,5-Dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) protects the peroxidase, indicating involvement of indomethacin radical in the inactivation. Indomethacin radical was also detected in the peroxidase-indomethacin-H(2)O(2) system as DMPO adduct (a(N) = 15 G, a(beta)(H) = 16 G) by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Curcumin protects the peroxidase in a concentration-dependent manner and consumes H(2)O(2) for its oxidation as a suitable substrate of the peroxidase, thereby blocking indomethacin oxidation. Curcumin can also scavenge ()OH in vitro. We suggest that curcumin protects gastric damage by efficient removal of H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2) -derived ()OH by preventing peroxidase inactivation by indomethacin.

  13. Three differentially expressed basic peroxidases from wound-lignifying Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Kirsten B; Andreasen, Per H; Eckloff, Reinhard M G; Kristensen, Brian K; Rasmussen, Søren K

    2003-10-01

    The activity of ionically bound peroxidases from an asparagus spear increased from 5-24 h post-harvest. Isoelectric focusing showed that the post-harvest increase of the total peroxidase activity was due to the increase of several distinct isoperoxidases. Concomitantly, a decrease in the activity of two anionic peroxidases was observed. Peroxidases with pI 5.9, 6.4 and 9.2 were detected only at 24 h post-harvest, whereas four peroxidases, with pI 8.7, 8.1, 7.4, and 6.7, detected throughout the time-course, increased in their activity. Histochemical staining demonstrated that lignin and peroxidase activity were located in the vascular bundles throughout the period of measurement. Lignin was detected in the cell walls of the protoxylem in the vascular bundles of the asparagus stem. A cDNA library of mRNA isolated from asparagus spears 24 h post-harvest was screened for peroxidases using homologous and heterologous probes. Three clones were isolated and the corresponding mature asparagus peroxidases displayed 70%, 76% and 81% amino acid sequence identity to each other. These new asparagus peroxidases are typical class III plant peroxidases in terms of conserved regions with a calculated pI >9.2, which is consistent with most basic peroxidases. One of the genes was shown to be a constitutively expressed single-copy gene, whereas the others showed an increased expression at post-harvest. The highest similarity in the amino acid sequence (71-77%) was found in peroxidases from roots of winter grown turnip TP7, to Arabidopsis AtP49, to an EST sequence from cotton fibres and to TMV-infected tobacco.

  14. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuta; Pogni, Rebecca; Acebes, Sandra; Lucas, Fátima; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Fernández, María I; de los Ríos, Vivian; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Basosi, Riccardo; Hammel, Kenneth E; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-06-15

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2 and VA) lacked this lag, and H2O2-LiP (H2O2-treated LiP) was inactive. MS analyses revealed that VA-LiP includes one VA molecule covalently bound to the side chain of Tyr181, whereas H2O2-LiP contains a hydroxylated Tyr181. No adduct is formed in the Y171N variant. Molecular docking showed that VA binding is favoured by sandwich π stacking with Tyr181 and Phe89. EPR spectroscopy after peroxide activation of the pre-treated LiPs showed protein radicals other than the tyrosine radical found in pristine LiP, which were assigned to a tyrosine-VA adduct radical in VA-LiP and a dihydroxyphenyalanine radical in H2O2-LiP. Both radicals are able to oxidize large low-redox-potential substrates, but H2O2-LiP is unable to oxidize high-redox-potential substrates. Transient-state kinetics showed that the tyrosine-VA adduct strongly promotes (>100-fold) substrate oxidation by compound II, the rate-limiting step in catalysis. The novel activation mechanism is involved in ligninolysis, as demonstrated using lignin model substrates. The present paper is the first report on autocatalytic modification, resulting in functional alteration, among class II peroxidases.

  15. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved. PMID:26496708

  16. Improving the pH-stability of Versatile Peroxidase by Comparative Structural Analysis with a Naturally-Stable Manganese Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) from the white-rot fungus Pleurotus eryngii is a high redox potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest able to oxidize a wide range of recalcitrant substrates including lignin, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds and dyes. However, the relatively low stability towards pH of this and other fungal peroxidases is a drawback for their industrial application. A strategy based on the comparative analysis of the crystal structures of VP and the highly pH-stable manganese peroxidase (MnP4) from Pleurotus ostreatus was followed to improve the VP pH stability. Several interactions, including hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, and charged residues exposed to the solvent were identified as putatively contributing to the pH stability of MnP4. The eight amino acid residues responsible for these interactions and seven surface basic residues were introduced into VP by directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, two cysteines were also included to explore the effect of an extra disulfide bond stabilizing the distal Ca2+ region. Three of the four designed variants were crystallized and new interactions were confirmed, being correlated with the observed improvement in pH stability. The extra hydrogen bonds and salt bridges stabilized the heme pocket at acidic and neutral pH as revealed by UV-visible spectroscopy. They led to a VP variant that retained a significant percentage of the initial activity at both pH 3.5 (61% after 24 h) and pH 7 (55% after 120 h) compared with the native enzyme, which was almost completely inactivated. The introduction of extra solvent-exposed basic residues and an additional disulfide bond into the above variant further improved the stability at acidic pH (85% residual activity at pH 3.5 after 24 h when introduced separately, and 64% at pH 3 when introduced together). The analysis of the results provides a rational explanation to the pH stability improvement achieved.

  17. Enzymatic degradation of Congo Red by turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ahmedi, Afaf; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Couvert, Annabelle; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme peroxidase is known for its capacity to remove phenolic compounds and aromatic amines from aqueous solutions and also to decolourize textile effluents. This study aims at evaluating the potential of a turnip (Brassica rapa) peroxidase (TP) preparation in the discolouration of textile azo dyes and effluents. An azo dye, Congo Red (CR), was used as a model pollutant for treatment by the enzyme. The effects of various operating conditions like pH value, temperature, initial dye and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, contact time, and enzyme concentration were evaluated. The optimal conditions for maximal colour removal were at pH 2.0, 40 degrees C, 50 mM hydrogen peroxide, 50 mg/l CR dye, and TP activity of 0.45 U/ml within 10 min of incubation time. Analysis of the by-products from the enzymatic treatment by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy showed no residual compounds in the aqueous phase and a precipitate of polymeric nature.

  18. Design of more powerful iron-TAML peroxidase enzyme mimics.

    PubMed

    Ellis, W Chadwick; Tran, Camly T; Denardo, Matthew A; Fischer, Andreas; Ryabov, Alexander D; Collins, Terrence J

    2009-12-23

    Environmentally useful, small molecule mimics of the peroxidase enzymes must exhibit very high reactivity in water near neutral pH. Here we describe the design and structural and kinetic characterization of a second generation of iron(III)-TAML activators with unprecedented peroxidase-mimicking abilities. Iterative design has been used to remove the fluorine that led to the best performers in first-generation iron-TAMLs. The result is a superior catalyst that meets a green chemistry objective by being comprised exclusively of biochemically common elements. The rate constants for bleaching at pH 7, 9, and 11 of the model substrate, Orange II, shows that the new Fe(III)-TAML has the fastest reactivity at pH's closer to neutral of any TAML activator to date. Under appropriate conditions, the new catalyst can decolorize Orange II without loss of activity for at least 10 half-lives, attesting to its exceptional properties as an oxidizing enzyme mimic.

  19. Kinetics of phenolic polymerization catalyzed by peroxidase in organic media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.P.; Huang, G.L; Yu, Y.T.

    1995-07-05

    Phenolic polymerization was carried out by enzymatic catalysis in organic media, and its kinetics was studied by using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Phenols and aromatic amines with electron-withdrawing groups could hardly be polymerized by HRP catalysis, but phenols and aromatic amines with electron-donating groups could easily by polymerized. The reaction rate of either the para-substituted substrate or meta-substituted substrate was higher than that of ortho-substituted substrate. When ortho-position of hydroxy group of phenols was occupied by an electron-donating group and if another electron-donating group occupied para-position of hydroxy group, the reaction rate increased. Horseradish peroxidase and lactoperoxidase could easily catalyze the polymerization, but chloroperoxidase and laccase failed to yield polymers. Metallic ions such as Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 3+}, and Cu{sup 2+} could poison horseradish peroxidase to various extents, but ions such as Co{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and K{sup +} were not found to inhibit the reaction.

  20. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaonan; Corgié, Stéphane C; Aneshansley, Daniel J; Wang, Peng; Walker, Larry P; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2014-04-04

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2 O2 , producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes.

  1. High Conformational Stability of Secreted Eukaryotic Catalase-peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; García-Fernández, Queralt; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio; Obinger, Christian; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional heme enzymes widely spread in archaea, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. Here we present the first crystal structure (1.55 Å resolution) of an eukaryotic KatG, the extracellular or secreted enzyme from the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea. The heme cavity of the homodimeric enzyme is similar to prokaryotic KatGs including the unique distal +Met-Tyr-Trp adduct (where the Trp is further modified by peroxidation) and its associated mobile arginine. The structure also revealed several conspicuous peculiarities that are fully conserved in all secreted eukaryotic KatGs. Peculiarities include the wrapping at the dimer interface of the N-terminal elongations from the two subunits and cysteine residues that cross-link the two subunits. Differential scanning calorimetry and temperature- and urea-mediated unfolding followed by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that secreted eukaryotic KatGs have a significantly higher conformational stability as well as a different unfolding pattern when compared with intracellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic catalase-peroxidases. We discuss these properties with respect to the structure as well as the postulated roles of this metalloenzyme in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22822072

  2. Peroxidase-catalysed interfacial adhesion of aquatic caddisworm silk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Pan, Huaizhong; Weerasekare, G. Mahika; Stewart, Russell J.

    2015-01-01

    Casemaker caddisfly (Hesperophylax occidentalis) larvae use adhesive silk fibres to construct protective shelters under water. The silk comprises a distinct peripheral coating on a viscoelastic fibre core. Caddisworm silk peroxinectin (csPxt), a haem-peroxidase, was shown to be glycosylated by lectin affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Using high-resolution H2O2 and peroxidase-dependent silver ion reduction and nanoparticle deposition, imaged by electron microscopy, csPxt activity was shown to be localized in the peripheral layer of drawn silk fibres. CsPxt catalyses dityrosine cross-linking within the adhesive peripheral layer post-draw, initiated perhaps by H2O2 generated by a silk gland-specific superoxide dismutase 3 (csSOD3) from environmental reactive oxygen species present in natural water. CsSOD3 was also shown to be a glycoprotein and is likely localized in the peripheral layer. Using a synthetic fluorescent phenolic copolymer and confocal microscopy, it was shown that csPxt catalyses oxidative cross-linking to external polyphenolic compounds capable of diffusive interpenetration into the fuzzy peripheral coating, including humic acid, a natural surface-active polyphenol. The results provide evidence of enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of a natural bioadhesive to polyphenol conditioned interfaces as a mechanism of permanent adhesion underwater. PMID:26490632

  3. An analysis of horseradish peroxidase enzyme for effluent treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nunavath, Hanumalal; Banoth, Chandrasekhar; Talluri, Venkateswar Rao; Bhukya, Bhima

    2016-01-01

    The present study explains computational methods to design thermostable horseradish peroxidase enzyme using the crystal structure available from Protein Data Bank (PDB ID: 6ATJ). Multiple mutations were introduced to the original enzyme and developed a model by using Modeler9.14. After designing the model functional effect was confirmed in terms of protein ligand binding by molecular docking using Autodock 4.2. The implementation of modeling steps is demonstrated in the context of performing mutations for particular amino acid residue on the ligand pocket of the horseradish peroxidase, to derive the desired ligand binding properties. The docking investigation of modelled HRP with Quercetindihydroxide using Autodock 4.2 software that six amino acid residues, P139, H42, A31, L174, A38, and G169 are involved in hydrogen bonding. More importantly, it provides insight into understanding and properly interpreting the data produced by these methods. The 3D model was docked with Quercetindihydroxide (a known horseradish modulator) to understand molecular interactions at the active site region. PMID:28293074

  4. Glutathione peroxidase 4 and vitamin E cooperatively prevent hepatocellular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bradley A; Tobe, Ryuta; Yefremova, Elena; Tsuji, Petra A; Hoffmann, Victoria J; Schweizer, Ulrich; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L; Conrad, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is an essential mammalian glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells against detrimental lipid peroxidation and governs a novel form of regulated necrotic cell death, called ferroptosis. To study the relevance of Gpx4 and of another vitally important selenoprotein, cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1), for liver function, mice with conditional deletion of Gpx4 in hepatocytes were studied, along with those lacking Txnrd1 and selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA (Trsp) in hepatocytes. Unlike Txnrd1- and Trsp-deficient mice, Gpx4(-/-) mice died shortly after birth and presented extensive hepatocyte degeneration. Similar to Txnrd1-deficient livers, Gpx4(-/-) livers manifested upregulation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) response genes. Remarkably, Gpx4(-/-) pups born from mothers fed a vitamin E-enriched diet survived, yet this protection was reversible as subsequent vitamin E deprivation caused death of Gpx4-deficient mice ~4 weeks thereafter. Abrogation of selenoprotein expression in Gpx4(-/-) mice did not result in viable mice, indicating that the combined deficiency aggravated the loss of Gpx4 in liver. By contrast, combined Trsp/Txnrd1-deficient mice were born, but had significantly shorter lifespans than either single knockout, suggesting that Txnrd1 plays an important role in supporting liver function of mice lacking Trsp. In sum our study demonstrates that the ferroptosis regulator Gpx4 is critical for hepatocyte survival and proper liver function, and that vitamin E can compensate for its loss by protecting cells against deleterious lipid peroxidation.

  5. Polyclonal antibodies mediated immobilization of a peroxidase from ammonium sulphate fractionated bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) proteins.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aiman; Husain, Qayyum

    2007-06-01

    Polyclonal antibody bound Sepharose 4B support has been exploited for the immobilization of bitter gourd peroxidase directly from ammonium sulphate precipitated proteins. Immunoaffinity immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase exhibited high yield of immobilization. IgG-Sepharose 4B bound bitter gourd peroxidase showed a higher stability against heat, chaotropic agents (urea and guanidinium chloride), detergents (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and Surf Excel), proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) and water-miscible organic solvents (propanol, THF and dioxane). The activity of immobilized bitter gourd peroxidase was significantly enhanced in the presence of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and after treatment with trypsin as compared to soluble enzyme.

  6. Systematic characterization of the peroxidase gene family provides new insights into fungal pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Park, Sook-Young; Abu Sadat, Md; Kim, Seongbeom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-07-02

    Fungal pathogens have evolved antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced as a part of host innate immunity. Recent studies proposed peroxidases as components of antioxidant defense system. However, the role of fungal peroxidases during interaction with host plants has not been explored at the genomic level. Here, we systematically identified peroxidase genes and analyzed their impact on fungal pathogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Phylogeny reconstruction placed 27 putative peroxidase genes into 15 clades. Expression profiles showed that majority of them are responsive to in planta condition and in vitro H2O2. Our analysis of individual deletion mutants for seven selected genes including MoPRX1 revealed that these genes contribute to fungal development and/or pathogenesis. We identified significant and positive correlations among sensitivity to H2O2, peroxidase activity and fungal pathogenicity. In-depth analysis of MoPRX1 demonstrated that it is a functional ortholog of thioredoxin peroxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for detoxification of the oxidative burst within host cells. Transcriptional profiling of other peroxidases in ΔMoprx1 suggested interwoven nature of the peroxidase-mediated antioxidant defense system. The results from this study provide insight into the infection strategy built on evolutionarily conserved peroxidases in the rice blast fungus.

  7. A structural and functional perspective of DyP-type peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toru; Sugano, Yasushi

    2015-05-15

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta Dec 1 (DyP) is a heme peroxidase. This name reflects its ability to degrade several anthraquinone dyes. The substrate specificity, the amino acid sequence, and the tertiary structure of DyP are different from those of the other heme peroxidase (super)families. Therefore, many proteins showing the similar amino acid sequences to that of DyP are called DyP-type peroxidase which is a new family of heme peroxidase identified in 2007. In fact, all structures of this family show a similar structure fold. However, this family includes many proteins whose amino acid sequence identity to DyP is lower than 15% and/or whose catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) is a few orders of magnitude less than that of DyP. A protein showing an activity different from peroxidase activity (dechelatase activity) has been also reported. In addition, the precise physiological roles of DyP-type peroxidases are unknown. These facts raise a question of whether calling this family DyP-type peroxidase is suitable. Here, we review the differences and similarities of structure and function among this family and propose the reasonable new classification of DyP-type peroxidase family, that is, class P, I and V. In this contribution, we discuss the adequacy of this family name.

  8. Wound-induced deposition of polyphenols in transgenic plants overexpressing peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with a chimeric tobacco anionic peroxidase gene have previously been shown to synthesize high levels of peroxidase in all tissues throughout the plant. One of several distinguishable phenotypes of transformed plants is the rapid browning of pith tissue upon wounding. Pith tissue from plants expressing high levels of peroxidase browned within 24 hours of wounding, while tissue from control plants did not brown as late as 7 days after wounding. A correlation between peroxidase activity and wound-induced browning was observed, whereas no relationship between polyphenol oxidase activity and browning was found. The purified tobacco anionic peroxidase was subjected to kinetic analysis with substrates which resemble the precursors of lignin or polyphenolic acid. The purified enzyme was found to readily polymerize phenolic acids in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via a modified ping-pong mechanism. The percentage of lignin and lignin-related polymers in cell walls was nearly twofold greater in pith tissue isolated from peroxidase-overproducer plants compared to control plants. Lignin deposition in wounded pith tissue from control plants closely followed the induction of peroxidase activity. However, wound-induced lignification occurred 24 to 48 hours sooner in plants overexpressing the anionic peroxidase. This suggests that the availability of peroxidase rather than substrate may delay polyphenol deposition in wounded tissue.

  9. Platelet peroxidase deficiency in a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, M; Jarry, M T; Tulliez, M; Breton-Gorius, J

    1983-01-01

    Morphological and functional abnormalities of the megakaryocytic series have been well described in myelodysplastic syndromes. Platelet peroxidase has always been demonstrated in abnormal megakaryocytes and early megakaryoblasts in such syndromes. We have studied a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with marked morphological abnormalities of megakaryocytes in which ultrastructural studies showed the coexistence of platelet peroxidase positive and platelet peroxidase negative megakaryocytes. This enzymatic deficiency was confirmed by the ultrastructural study of circulating platelets. This case appears to be the first report of a partial platelet peroxidase deficiency. It adds to the enzymatic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome already described for the red cells and the granulocytic cells. Images PMID:6630573

  10. Synergistic activation of ENaC by three membrane-bound channel-activating serine proteases (mCAP1, mCAP2, and mCAP3) and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Vallet, Véronique; Jaeger, Nicole Fowler; Hummler, Edith; Rossier, Bernard C

    2002-08-01

    Sodium balance is maintained by the precise regulation of the activity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the kidney. We have recently reported an extracellular activation of ENaC-mediated sodium transport (I(Na)) by a GPI-anchored serine protease (mouse channel-activating protein, mCAP1) that was isolated from a cortical collecting duct cell line derived from mouse kidney. In the present study, we have identified two additional membrane-bound serine proteases (mCAP2 and mCAP3) that are expressed in the same cell line. We show that each of these proteases is able to increase I(Na) 6-10-fold in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. I(Na) and the number (N) of channels expressed at the cell surface (measured by binding of a FLAG monoclonal I(125)-radioiodinated antibody) were measured in the same oocyte. Using this assay, we show that mCAP1 increases I(Na) 10-fold (P < 0.001) but N remained unchanged (P = 0.9), indicating that mCAP1 regulates ENaC activity by increasing its average open probability of the whole cell (wcP(o)). The serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (Sgk1) involved in the aldosterone-dependent signaling cascade enhances I(Na) by 2.5-fold (P < 0.001) and N by 1.6-fold (P < 0.001), indicating a dual effect on N and wcP(o). Compared with Sgk1 alone, coexpression of Sgk1 with mCAP1 leads to a ninefold increase in I(Na) (P < 0.001) and 1.3-fold in N (P < 0.02). Similar results were observed for mCAP2 and mCAP3. The synergism between CAPs and Sgk1 on I(Na) was always more than additive, indicating a true potentiation. The synergistic effect of the two activation pathways allows a large dynamic range for ENaC-mediated sodium regulation crucial for a tight control of sodium homeostasis.

  11. Advantages of soybean peroxidase over horseradish peroxidase as the enzyme label in chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of sulfamethoxypyridazine.

    PubMed

    Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Berlina, Anna N; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2010-03-24

    An indirect competitive chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CL-ELISA) of sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMP) was developed. The conjugates of streptavidin with cationic horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and anionic soybean peroxidase (SbP) were used in CL-ELISA for the detection of biotinylated anti-SMP antibodies. For streptavidin-HRP conjugate-catalyzed chemiluminescence measured 20 s after the initiation of the enhanced chemiluminescence reaction (ECR), the limit of detection (IC(10)), the IC(50) value, and the working range in CL-ELISA of SMP are 0.3, 12.4, and 1.2-85.0 ng/mL, respectively. An increase in the time interval between the ECR initiation and the luminescence measurement results in the loss in the quality of analytical measurements because of the time-dependent quenching of chemiluminescence typical of the HRP-catalyzed ECR. In the case of SbP-based CL-ELISA of SMP, the limit of detection, the IC(50) value, and the working range (0.025, 0.17, and 0.045-0.63 ng/mL, respectively) are better than those for HRP-based CL-ELISA. Furthermore, the analytical parameters of SbP-based CL-ELISA remain unchanged during a long period of time (for at least 30 min). The recovery values from four spiked milk samples with different concentrations of SMP in SbP-based CL-ELISA vary from 70 to 130%.

  12. Role of manganese peroxidases and lignin peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the decolorization of kraft bleach plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Michel, F C; Dass, S B; Grulke, E A; Reddy, C A

    1991-08-01

    The role of lignin peroxidases (LIPs) and manganese peroxidases (MNPs) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in decolorizing kraft bleach plant effluent (BPE) was investigated. Negligible BPE decolorization was exhibited by a per mutant, which lacks the ability to produce both the LIPs and the MNPs. Also, little decolorization was seen when the wild type was grown in high-nitrogen medium, in which the production of LIPs and MNPs is blocked. A lip mutant of P. chrysosporium, which produces MNPs but not LIPs, showed about 80% of the activity exhibited by the wild type, indicating that the MNPs play an important role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with 100 ppm of Mn(II), high levels of MNPs but no LIPs were produced, and this culture also exhibited high rates of BPE decolorization, lending further support to the idea that MNPs play a key role in BPE decolorization. When P. chrysosporium was grown in a medium with no Mn(II), high levels of LIPs but negligible levels of MNPs were produced and the rate and extent of BPE decolorization by such cultures were quite low, indicating that LIPs play a relatively minor role in BPE decolorization. Furthermore, high rates of BPE decolorization were seen on days 3 and 4 of incubation, when the cultures exhibit high levels of MNP activity but little or no LIP activity. These results indicate that MNPs play a relatively more important role than LIPs in BPE decolorization by P. chrysosporium.

  13. Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation: Heme Destruction and Influence of Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation. PMID:24185130

  14. Inhibition of thyroid peroxidase by Myrcia uniflora flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andrea C F; Neto, Jair C; da Silva, Alba C M; Kuster, Ricardo M; Carvalho, Denise P

    2006-03-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the key enzyme in thyroid hormone biosynthesis, is inhibited by dietary flavonoids; thus, a high consumption of plants containing inhibitory flavonoids may affect thyroid function and lead to hypothyroidism. In this work, TPO inhibition by the aqueous partition of Myrcia uniflora and its isolated compounds has been evaluated. The aqueous partition of the methanolic extract of M. uniflora is able to inhibit TPO activity in vitro. Two known flavonoids were isolated and characterized by mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR from plant extracts: mearnsitrin and myricitrin. The degree of TPO inhibition produced by the aqueous solution of the flavonoids was very high, with a 50% inhibition of the original TPO activity (IC(50)) obtained at 1.97 microM mearnsitrin and at 2.88 microM myricitrin. These results suggest that the indiscriminated consumption of M. uniflora pharmaceutical products allied to the nutritional deficiency of iodine might contribute to the development of hypothyroidism and goiter.

  15. Asparagus byproducts as a new source of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-03

    Soluble peroxidase (POD) from asparagus byproducts was purified by ion exchange chromatographies, and its kinetic and catalytic properties were studied. The isoelectric point of the purified isoperoxidases was 9.1, and the optimum pH and temperature values were 4.0 and 25 °C, respectively. The cationic asparagus POD (CAP) midpoint inactivation temperature was 57 °C, which favors its use in industrial processes. The Km values of cationic asparagus POD for H₂O₂ and ABTS were 0.318 and 0.634 mM, respectively. The purified CAP is economically obtained from raw materials using a simple protocol and possesses features that make it advantageous for the potential use of this enzyme in a large number of processes with demonstrated requirements of thermostable POD. The results indicate that CAP can be used as a potential candidate for removing phenolic contaminants.

  16. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  17. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction.

  18. Electroenzymatic degradation of azo dye using an immobilized peroxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gha-Young; Lee, Ki-Beom; Cho, Seung-Hee; Shim, Joonmok; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2005-11-11

    Azo dyes are largely resistant to biodegradation and persist in conventional wastewater treatment processes. Combining enzymatic catalysis and the electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an electroenzymatic process was developed, which is a potential alternative to traditional processes. In this study, an electroenzymatic method that uses an immobilized horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP), was investigated to degrade orange II (azo dye) within a two-compartment packed-bed flow reactor. To evaluate the electroenzymatic degradation of orange II, electrolytic experiments were carried out with 0.42 U/mL HRP at -0.5 V. It was found that removal of orange II was partly due to its adsorption to the graphite felt. The overall application of the electroenzymatic led to a greater degradation rate than the use of electrolysis alone. Also the by-products formed were found to consist primarily of an aromatic amine, sulfanilic acid, and unknown compounds.

  19. Production and purification of the multifunctional enzyme horseradish peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The oxidoreductase horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used in numerous industrial and medical applications. In this review, we briefly describe this well-studied enzyme and focus on its promising use in targeted cancer treatment. In combination with a plant hormone, HRP can be used in specific enzyme–prodrug therapies. Despite this outstanding application, HRP has not found its way as a biopharmaceutical into targeted cancer therapy yet. The reasons therefore lie in the present low-yield production and cumbersome purification of this enzyme from its natural source. However, surface glycosylation renders the recombinant production of HRP difficult. Here, we compare different production hosts for HRP and summarize currently used production and purification strategies for this enzyme. We further present our own strategy of glycoengineering this powerful enzyme to allow recombinant high-yield production in Pichia pastoris and subsequent simple downstream processing. PMID:24683473

  20. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lizeng; Zhuang, Jie; Nie, Leng; Zhang, Jinbin; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Wang, Taihong; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Perrett, Sarah; Yan, Xiyun

    2007-09-01

    Nanoparticles containing magnetic materials, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), are particularly useful for imaging and separation techniques. As these nanoparticles are generally considered to be biologically and chemically inert, they are typically coated with metal catalysts, antibodies or enzymes to increase their functionality as separation agents. Here, we report that magnetite nanoparticles in fact possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in natural peroxidases, which are widely used to oxidize organic substrates in the treatment of wastewater or as detection tools. Based on this finding, we have developed a novel immunoassay in which antibody-modified magnetite nanoparticles provide three functions: capture, separation and detection. The stability, ease of production and versatility of these nanoparticles makes them a powerful tool for a wide range of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  1. Involvement of peroxidase activity in developing somatic embryos of Medicago arborea L. Identification of an isozyme peroxidase as biochemical marker of somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Piedad; Martin, Luisa; Blazquez, Antonio; Guerra, Hilario; Villalobos, Nieves

    2014-01-15

    The legume Medicago arborea L. is very interesting as regards the regeneration of marginal arid soils. The problem is that it does not have a good germinative yield. It was therefore decided to regenerate via somatic embryogenesis and find a marker of embryogenic potential. In this study, peroxidase activity was evaluated in non-embryogenic and embryogenic calli from M. arborea L. A decrease in soluble peroxidase activity is observed in its embryonic calli at the time at which the somatic embryos begin to appear. This activity is always lower in embryonic calli than in non-embryonic ones (unlike what happens in the case of wall-bound peroxidases). These results suggest that peroxidases can be considered to be enzymes involved in somatic embryogenesis in M. arborea. In addition, isozyme analyses were carried out on protein extracts using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The band called P5 was detected only in embryogenic cultures at very early stages of development. This band was digested with trypsin and analyzed using linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometer. In P5 isoform a peroxidase-L-ascorbate peroxidase was identified. It can be used as a marker that allows the identification of embryological potential.

  2. Structural and Functional Features of Peroxidases with a Potential as Industrial Biocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    This chapter begins with a description of the main structural features of heme peroxidases representative of the two large superfamilies of plant-fungal-bacterial and animal peroxidases, and the four additional (super)families described to date. Then, we focus on several fungal peroxidases of high biotechnological potential as industrial biocatalysts. These include (1) ligninolytic peroxidases from white-rot basidiomycetes being able to oxidize high redox-potential substrates at an exposed protein radical; (2) heme-thiolate peroxidases that are structural hybrids of typical peroxidases and cytochrome P450 enzymes and, after their discovery in sooty molds, are being described in basidiomycetes with even more interesting catalytic properties, such as selective aromatic oxygenation; and (3) the so-called dye-decolorizing peroxidases that are still to be thoroughly investigated but have been identified in different basidiomycete genomes. The structural-functional description of these peroxidases includes an analysis of the heme environment and a description of their substrate oxidation sites, with the purpose of understanding their interesting catalytic properties and biotechnological potential.

  3. The kinetic properties producing the perfunctory pH profiles of catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert L; Powell, Luke J; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2008-06-01

    Many structure-function relationship studies performed on the catalase-peroxidase enzymes are based on limited kinetic data. To provide a more substantive understanding of catalase-peroxidase function, we undertook a more exhaustive evaluation of catalase-peroxidase catalysis as a function of pH. Kinetic parameters across a broad pH range for the catalase and peroxidase activities of E. coli catalase peroxidase (KatG) were obtained, including the separate analysis of the oxidizing and reducing substrates of the peroxidase catalytic cycle. This investigation identified ABTS-dependent inhibition of peroxidase activity, particularly at low pH, unveiling that previously reported pH optima are clearly skewed. We show that turnover and efficiency of peroxidase activity increases with decreasing pH until the protein unfolds. The data also suggest that the catalase pH optimum is more complex than it is often assumed to be. The apparent optimum is in fact the intersection of the optimum for binding (7.00) and the optimum for activity (5.75). We also report the apparent pK(a)s for binding and catalysis of catalase activity as well as approximate values for certain peroxidatic and catalatic steps.

  4. Induction of soluble and cell wall peroxidases by aphid infestation in barley.

    PubMed

    Chaman, M E; Corcuera, L J; Zúñiga, G E; Cardemil, L; Argandoña, V H

    2001-05-01

    Peroxidase enzymes have been found in soluble, ionically bound, and covalently bound forms and have been implicated in several physiological processes in plants. This paper investigates the effect of aphid infestation on soluble and bound-cell wall peroxidase activity and bound-cell wall isoform changes of barley plants. Peroxidase activity was measured in control plants and plants infested with the aphid Schizaphis graminum (Rondani). The activity of soluble peroxidases increased with time of infestation, older plants being more affected than younger ones. The increase in bound-cell wall peroxidase activity as a function of age was higher in infested than in control plants, being higher in ionically bound than in covalently bound peroxidases. When the aphids were removed from plants, the activities of both types of peroxidases decreased to control levels. Isoelectrofocusing analyses of the ionically bound peroxidases showed changes in the isoform pattern. A new isoform was induced by infestation. The activities of all covalently bound isoforms increased after infestation. The physiological implications of these changes are discussed.

  5. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  6. Enzymatic activity and proteomic profile of class III peroxidases during sugarcane stem development.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Sampaio Mayer, Juliana Lischka; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    Class III peroxidases are present as large multigene families in all land plants. This large number of genes together with the diversity of processes catalyzed by peroxidases suggests possible functional specialization of each isoform. However, assigning a precise role for each individual peroxidase gene has continued to be a major bottleneck. Here we investigated the enzyme activity and translational profile of class III peroxidases during stem development of sugarcane as a first step in the estimation of physiological functions of individual isoenzymes. Internodes at three different developmental stages (young, developing and mature) were divided into pith (inner tissue) and rind (outer tissue) fractions. The rind of mature internodes presented the highest enzymatic activity and thus could be considered the ideal tissue for the discovery of peroxidase gene function. In addition, activity staining of 2DE gels revealed different isoperoxidase profiles and protein expression regulation among different tissue fractions. In-gel tryptic digestion of excised spots followed by peptide sequencing by LC-MS/MS positively matched uncharacterized peroxidases in the sugarcane database SUCEST. Multiple spots matching the same peroxidase gene were found, which reflects the generation of more than one isoform from a particular gene by post-translational modifications. The identified sugarcane peroxidases appear to be monocot-specific sequences with no clear ortholog in dicot model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  7. Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Resistant and Susceptible Warm- Season Turfgrasses Challenged by Blissus Occiduus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxidases play an important role in plant stress related interactions. This research assessed the role of peroxidases in the defense response of resistant and susceptible buffalograsses [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm] and zoysiagrasses (Zoysia japonica Steudel) to the western chinch bug, Bli...

  8. Participation of chitin-binding peroxidase isoforms in the wilt pathogenesis of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific chitin-binding isozymes of peroxidase (POX) play an important role in pathogenesis of plant diseases caused with fungi. We studied the dynamics of peroxidase activity in two varieties of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.); one was a susceptible and the other resistant to the plant pathogen Vert...

  9. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  10. Computational Modeling of the Catalytic Cycle of Glutathione Peroxidase Nanomimic.

    PubMed

    Kheirabadi, Ramesh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-12-29

    To elucidate the role of a derivative of ebselen as a mimic of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase, density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE) were applied to model the reaction mechanism in a catalytic cycle. This mimic plays the role of glutathione peroxidase through a four-step catalytic cycle. The first step is described as the oxidation of 1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, while selenoxide is reduced by methanthiol at the second step. In the third step of the reaction, the reduction of selenenylsulfide occurs by methanthiol, and the selenenic acid is dehydrated at the final step. Based on the kinetic parameters, step 4 is the rate-determining step (RDS) of the reaction. The bond strength of the atoms involved in the RDS is discussed with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Low value of electron density, ρ(r), and positive Laplacian values are the evidence for the covalent nature of the hydrogen bonds rupture (O30-H31, O33-H34). A change in the sign of the Laplacian, L(r), from the positive value in the reactant to a negative character at the transition state indicates the depletion of the charge density, confirming the N5-H10 and O11-Se1 bond breaking. The analysis of electron location function (ELF) and localized orbital locator (LOL) of the Se1-N5 and Se1-O11 bonds have been done by multi-WFN program. High values of ELF and LOL at the transition state regions between the Se, N, and O atoms display the bond formation. Finally, the main donor-acceptor interaction energies were analyzed using the natural bond orbital analysis for investigation of their stabilization effects on the critical bonds at the RDS.

  11. Characterization of Anionic Peroxidases in Tomato Isolines Infected by Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Zacheo, G.; Orlando, C.; Bleve-Zacheo, T.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in peroxidase activity during nematode infection were studied using root extracts of tomato near-isogenic lines differing in resistance to Meloidogyne incognita. Total peroxidase activity increased slightly in crude extracts of four susceptible isolines but doubled in two resistant lines, Monita and Motaci. Nematode infection enhanced levels of both p-phenylenediamine-pyrocatechol oxidase and syringaldazine oxidase 7 days after inoculation, especially in resistant lines. This elevated peroxidase activity in resistant isolines was caused by an increase in anionic peroxidase activity. These enzymes, which likely are involved in lignification, were isolated and purified from tomato isolines by ammonium sulfate precipitation, high performance ion-exchange chromatography, and gel electrophoresis. The purified anionic peroxidase extracts contained an electrophoretic band with Rf 0.51 that was present in extracts of infected but not uninfected roots. PMID:19279765

  12. Suppression of Arabidopsis peroxidase 72 alters cell wall and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María A; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Class III peroxidases are glycoproteins with a major role in cell wall maturation such as lignin formation. Peroxidases are usually present in a high number of isoenzymes, which complicates to assign specific functions to individual peroxidase isoenzymes. Arabidopsis genome encodes for 73 peroxidases, among which AtPrx72 has been shown to participate in lignification. Here, we report by using knock out peroxidase mutants how the disruption of AtPrx72 causes thinner secondary walls in interfascicular fibres but not in the xylem of the stem. This effect is also age-dependent, and AtPrx72 function seems to be particularly important when lignification prevails over elongation processes. Finally, the suppression AtPrx72 leads to the down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis pathway, as well as genes and transcription factors involved in secondary wall thickening.

  13. Chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay based on Pt nanoparticle with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Min; Jung, Ha-Wook; Chang, Young Wook; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    A lateral flow immunoassay (LF-immunoassay) with an enhanced sensitivity and thermostability was developed by using Pt nanoparticles with a peroxidase activity. The Pt nanoparticles were synthesized by citrate reduction method, and the peroxidase activity of Pt nanoparticles was optimized by adjusting reaction conditions. The peroxidase activity was estimated by using Michaelis-Menten kinetics model with TMB as a chromogenic substrate. The kinetics parameters of KM and Vmax were calculated and compared with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The thermal stability of the Pt nanoparticles was compared with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) according to the storage temperature and long-term storage period. The feasibility of lateral flow immunoassay with a chemiluminescent signal band was demonstrated by the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) as a model analyte, and the sensitivity was determined to be improved by as much as 1000-fold compared to the conventional rapid test based on colored gold-colloids.

  14. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in Polyporales: an evolutionary survey based on 10 sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Lundell, Taina; Floudas, Dimitrios; Nagy, Laszlo G; Barrasa, José M; Hibbett, David S; Martínez, Angel T

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity of ligninolytic and related peroxidase genes in this Basidiomycota order that includes most wood-rotting fungi. The survey was completed by analyzing the heme-peroxidase genes in the already available genomes of seven more Polyporales species representing the antrodia, gelatoporia, core polyporoid and phlebioid clades. The study confirms the absence of ligninolytic peroxidase genes from the manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) families, in the brown-rot fungal genomes (all of them from the antrodia clade), which include only a limited number of predicted low redox-potential generic peroxidase (GP) genes. When members of the heme-thiolate peroxidase (HTP) and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) superfamilies (up to a total of 64 genes) also are considered, the newly sequenced B. adusta appears as the Polyporales species with the highest number of peroxidase genes due to the high expansion of both the ligninolytic peroxidase and DyP (super)families. The evolutionary relationships of the 111 genes for class-II peroxidases (from the GP, MnP, VP, LiP families) in the 10 Polyporales genomes is discussed including the existence of different MnP subfamilies and of a large and homogeneous LiP cluster, while different VPs mainly cluster with short MnPs. Finally, ancestral state reconstructions showed that a putative MnP gene, derived from a primitive GP that incorporated the Mn(II)-oxidation site, is the precursor of all the class-II ligninolytic peroxidases. Incorporation of an exposed tryptophan residue involved in oxidative degradation of lignin in a short MnP apparently resulted in evolution of the first VP. One of these ancient VPs might have lost the Mn(II)-oxidation site being at the origin of all the LiP enzymes, which are found only in

  15. Substrate oxidation by dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from wood- and litter-degrading agaricomycetes compared to other fungal and plant heme-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Liers, Christiane; Pecyna, Marek J; Kellner, Harald; Worrich, Anja; Zorn, Holger; Steffen, Kari T; Hofrichter, Martin; Ullrich, René

    2013-07-01

    Catalytic and physicochemical properties of representative fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) of wood- (WRF) and litter-decomposing white-rot fungi (LDF) are summarized and compared, including one recombinant Mycetinis scorodonius DyP (rMscDyP; LDF), the wild-type Auricularia auricula-judae DyP (AauDyP; WRF), and two new DyPs secreted by the jelly fungi Exidia glandulosa (EglDyP; WRF) and Mycena epipterygia (MepDyP; LDF). Homogeneous preparations of these DyPs were obtained after different steps of fast protein liquid chromatography, and they increase the total number of characterized fungal DyP proteins to eight. The peptide sequences of AauDyP, MepDyP, and EglDyP showed highest homologies (52-56%) to the DyPs of M. scorodonius. Five out of the eight characterized fungal DyPs were used to evaluate their catalytic properties compared to classic fungal and plant heme peroxidases, namely lignin peroxidase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium (PchLiP; WRF), versatile peroxidase of Bjerkandera adusta (BadVP; WRF), and generic peroxidases of Coprinopsis cinerea (CiP) and Glycine max (soybean peroxidase=SBP). All DyPs tested possess unique properties regarding the stability at low pH values: 50-90% enzymatic activity remained after 4-h exposition at pH 2.5, and the oxidation of nonphenolic aromatic substrates (lignin model compounds) was optimal below pH 3. Furthermore, all DyPs efficiently oxidized recalcitrant dyes (e.g., Azure B) as well as the phenolic substrate 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. Thus, DyPs combine features of different peroxidases on the functional level and may be part of the biocatalytic system secreted by fungi for the oxidation of lignin and/or toxic aromatic compounds.

  16. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-03-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to {Beta}-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  17. Characterization of Antisense Transformed Plants Deficient in the Tobacco Anionic Peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L. M.; Gingas, V.; Finger, F.; Rothstein, S.; Liu, TTY.

    1997-01-01

    On the basis of the biological compounds that they metabolize, plant peroxidases have long been implicated in plant growth, cell wall biogenesis, lignification, and host defenses. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that underexpress anionic peroxidase were generated using antisense RNA. The antisense RNA was found to be specific for the anionic isoenzyme and highly effective, reducing endogenous transcript levels and total peroxidase activity by as much as 1600-fold. Antisense-transformed plants appeared normal at initial observation; however, growth studies showed that plants with reduced peroxidase activity grow taller and flower sooner than control plants. In contrast, previously transformed plants overproducing anionic peroxidase were shorter and flowered later than controls. Axillary buds were more developed in antisense-transformed plants and less developed in plants overproducing this enzyme. It was found that the lignin content in leaf, stem, and root was unchanged in antisense-transformed plants, which does not support a role for anionic peroxidase in the lignification of secondary xylem vessels. However, studies of wounded tissue show some reduction in wound-induced deposition of lignin-like polymers. The data support a possible role for tobacco anionic peroxidase in host defenses but not without a reduction in growth potential. PMID:12223765

  18. Production and Preliminary Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Cationic Peanut Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunfang; Carbonera, Daniela; van Huystee, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) have been produced against the cationic peroxidase from peanut suspension cell culture. Eight of these antibodies were found to be of the immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 subclass and two were of IgA subclass. A combination of competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting analysis, and direct antigen-binding assay revealed that the antibodies are directed against four different epitopes on the cationic peroxidase and the McAbs can be subdivided into four groups. Only group A inhibits peroxidase activity. Group B and D bind equally well to the native and the denatured form of cationic peroxidase, whereas the remaining McAbs react with more or less reduced affinity to the denatured antigen. Group C probably recognizes a conformation-dependent epitope. All the McAbs cross react weakly with the anionic peanut peroxidase, suggesting a structural nonidentity as well as some similarity between these two peroxidase isozymes. Cross reactivities of these McAbs with peroxidases of various plant species were also demonstrated. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665674

  19. Crystal structure analysis of peroxidase from the palm tree Chamaerops excelsa.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Amanda; Textor, Larissa C; Santos, Jademilson C; Cuadrado, Nazaret Hidalgo; Kostetsky, Eduard Ya; Roig, Manuel G; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Muniz, João R C; Shnyrov, Valery L; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Palm tree peroxidases are known to be very stable enzymes and the peroxidase from the Chamaerops excelsa (CEP), which has a high pH and thermal stability, is no exception. To date, the structural and molecular events underscoring such biochemical behavior have not been explored in depth. In order to identify the structural characteristics accounting for the high stability of palm tree peroxidases, we solved and refined the X-ray structure of native CEP at a resolution of 2.6 Å. The CEP structure has an overall fold typical of plant peroxidases and confirmed the conservation of characteristic structural elements such as the heme group and calcium ions. At the same time the structure revealed important modifications in the amino acid residues in the vicinity of the exposed heme edge region, involved in substrate binding, that could account for the morphological variations among palm tree peroxidases through the disruption of molecular interactions at the second binding site. These modifications could alleviate the inhibition of enzymatic activity caused by molecular interactions at the latter binding site. Comparing the CEP crystallographic model described here with other publicly available peroxidase structures allowed the identification of a noncovalent homodimer assembly held together by a number of ionic and hydrophobic interactions. We demonstrate, that this dimeric arrangement results in a more stable protein quaternary structure through stabilization of the regions that are highly dynamic in other peroxidases. In addition, we resolved five N-glycosylation sites, which might also contribute to enzyme stability and resistance against proteolytic cleavage.

  20. Probing the two-domain structure of homodimeric prokaryotic and eukaryotic catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Srijib; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are ancestral bifunctional heme peroxidases found in archaeons, bacteria and lower eukaryotes. In contrast to homologous cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APx) homodimeric KatGs have a two-domain monomeric structure with a catalytic N-terminal heme domain and a C-terminal domain of high sequence and structural similarity but without obvious function. Nevertheless, without its C-terminal counterpart the N-terminal domain exhibits neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Except some hybrid-type proteins all other members of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily lack this C-terminal domain. In order to probe the role of the two-domain monomeric structure for conformational and thermal stability urea and temperature-dependent unfolding experiments were performed by using UV-Vis-, electronic circular dichroism- and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Recombinant prokaryotic (cyanobacterial KatG from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803) and eukaryotic (fungal KatG from Magnaporthe grisea) were investigated. The obtained data demonstrate that the conformational and thermal stability of bifunctional KatGs is significantly lower compared to homologous monofunctional peroxidases. The N- and C-terminal domains do not unfold independently. Differences between the cyanobacterial and the fungal enzyme are relatively small. Data will be discussed with respect to known structure and function of KatG, CcP and APx.

  1. Uncovering a new role for peroxidase enzymes as drivers of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Zinonos, Irene; Leach, Damien A; Hay, Shelley J; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Ingman, Wendy V; DeNichilo, Mark O; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Peroxidases are heme-containing enzymes released by activated immune cells at sites of inflammation. To-date their functional role in human health has mainly been limited to providing a mechanism for oxidative defence against invading bacteria and other pathogenic microorganisms. Our laboratory has recently identified a new functional role for peroxidase enzymes in stimulating fibroblast migration and collagen biosynthesis, offering a new insight into the causative association between inflammation and the pro-fibrogenic events that mediate tissue repair and regeneration. Peroxidases are found at elevated levels within and near blood vessels however, their direct involvement in angiogenesis has never been reported. Here we report for the first time that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are readily internalised by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) where they promote cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and stimulate angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These pro-angiogenic effects were attenuated using the specific peroxidase inhibitor 4-ABAH, indicating the enzyme's catalytic activity is essential in mediating this response. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that MPO and EPO regulate endothelial FAK, Akt, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and stabilisation of HIF-2α, culminating in transcriptional regulation of key angiogenesis pathways. These findings uncover for the first time an important and previously unsuspected role for peroxidases as drivers of angiogenesis, and suggest that peroxidase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of angiogenesis related diseases driven by inflammation.

  2. Localization of gastric peroxidase and its inhibition by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, U; Bhattacharyya, D K; Chatterjee, R; Banerjee, R K

    1992-01-01

    Mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI) is a potent inducer of gastric acid secretion which is associated with significant inhibition of peroxidase activity of rat gastric mucosa in vivo. A time-dependent increase in acid secretion correlates well with time-dependent decrease in the peroxidase activity. In a chamber experiment in vitro using isolated gastric mucosa, MMI stimulates acid secretion, showing an almost linear response up to 600 microM. The time-dependent increase in acid secretion is also correlated with time-dependent inhibition of the peroxidase activity. This effect is not mediated through oxidation of MMI by flavin-containing mono-oxygenase, which is absent from gastric mucosa. The peroxidase has been localized mainly in parietal cells isolated and purified from gastric mucosa by controlled digestion with collagenase followed by Percoll-density-gradient centrifugation. Peroxidase activity was further localized in the outer membrane of the purified mitochondria of the parietal cell by some membrane-impermeant reagents, indicating outward orientation of the enzyme. MMI can inhibit the peroxidase activity of both the parietal cell and its mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. The possible involvement of the parietal-cell peroxidase-H2O2 system in MMI-induced acid secretion may be suggested. PMID:1318028

  3. [Oxidative destruction of estradiol after treatment with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase and methemoglobin].

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Iu M; Matiushin, A I; Titov, V Iu

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that estradiol in the presence of horse radish peroxidase interacts with hydrogen peroxide, which is evidenced by an increase in its optical density at 280 nm. The photometering of samples containing estradiol and horse radish peroxidase upon their titration with hydrogen peroxide indicated that the increase in optical density stops after introducing hydrogen peroxide equimolar in concentration to estradiol. The stoichiometric ratio of estradiol consumed during oxidative destruction to hydrogen peroxide was 1:1. In the presence of ascorbate, the oxidative destruction of estradiol by the action of hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by horse radish peroxidase, was observed only after a latent period and showed the same regularities as in the absence of ascorbate. It was found by calorimetry that, during the latent period, estradiol catalyzes the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbate without undergoing oxidative destruction. The substrates of the peroxidase reaction benzidine, 1-naphthol, and phenol interact with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ascorbate and horse radish peroxidase in a similar way. Presumably, upon interaction with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of horse radish peroxidase, estradiol, like other substrates of this reaction, undergoes oxidative destruction by the mechanism of peroxidase reaction. It is shown that oxidative destruction of estradiol by the action of hydrogen peroxide can also be catalyzed by methemoglobin by the same mechanism. These data are important for understanding the role of estradiol in the organism and the pathways of its metabolic conversions.

  4. Minimal influence of G-protein null mutations on ozone-induced changes in gene expression, foliar injury, gas-exchange and peroxidase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone uptake by plants leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intercellular space of leaves and induces signalling processes reported to involve the membrane-bound heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Therefore, potential G-protein-mediated response mechanisms to ozone were compar...

  5. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR.

  6. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and abscisic acid induction of a suberization-associated highly anionic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Kolattukudy, P E

    1989-06-01

    A highly anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing cells was suggested to be the key enzyme involved in polymerization of phenolic monomers to generate the aromatic matrix of suberin. The enzyme encoded by a potato cDNA was found to be highly homologous to the anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing tomato fruit. A tomato genomic library was screened using the potato anionic peroxidase cDNA and one genomic clone was isolated that contained two tandemly oriented anionic peroxidase genes. These genes were sequenced and were 96% and 87% identical to the mRNA for potato anionic peroxidase. Both genes consist of three exons with the relative positions of their two introns being conserved between the two genes. Primer extension analysis showed that only one of the genes is expressed in the periderm of 3 day wound-healed tomato fruits. Southern blot analyses suggested that there are two copies each of the two highly homologous genes per haploid genome in both potato and tomato. Abscisic acid (ABA) induced the accumulation of the anionic peroxidase transcripts in potato and tomato callus tissues. Northern blots showed that peroxidase mRNA was detectable at 2 days and was maximal at 8 days after transfer of potato callus to solid agar media containing 10(-4) M ABA. The transcripts induced by ABA in both potato and tomato callus were identical in size to those induced in wound-healing potato tuber and tomato fruit. The anionic peroxidase peptide was detected in extracts of potato callus grown on the ABA-containing media by western blot analysis. The results support the suggestion that stimulation of suberization by ABA involves the induction of the highly anionic peroxidase.

  7. Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Long-term objectives are to elucidate the role and mechanism of the various isozymes in lignin biodegradation. Work is described on electrochemical studies on lignin and Mn peroxidases. This study was performed to investigate the structural aspects which confer the lignin and Mn peroxidases with their high reactivity. The experimentally determined redox potential of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple for the lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8 and H10 are very similar, near-130 mV. The redox potential for the Mn peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are similar to each other ({minus}88 mV and {minus}95 mV, respectively) and are more positive than the lignin peroxidases. The higher redox potential for the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} couple is consistent with the heme active site of these fungal peroxidases being more electron deficient. To investigate the accessibility of the heme active site to the substrate which is oxidized [veratryl alcohol and Mn (II)], we investigated whether these substrates had any affect on the redox potential of the heme. The E{sub m7} value for lignin and Mn peroxidases are not affected by their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn (II). These results suggest that substrates do not directly interact with the ferric heme-iron as axial ligands. This is consistent with the present model for peroxidase catalysis. Suicide inhibitor (1) and nmr studies (2) indicate that the heme-iron of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is not fully accessible to bulky substrates occur at the periphery of the heme.

  8. Identification of a copper-sensitive ascorbate peroxidase in the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum.

    PubMed

    Sauser, K R; Liu, J K; Wong, T Y

    1997-07-01

    Extracts from the unicellular green alga Selenastrum capricornutum exhibit high superoxide dismutase activity, but only traces of catalase activity. The excess hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the superoxide dismutase in S. capricornutum may be degraded by a unique peroxidase. This peroxidase has a high specificity for ascorbate as its electron donor. The enzyme has an optimum pH at 8, is insensitive to cyanide and is inhibited by oxine. Addition of low concentrations of copper to algal cultures stimulates the peroxidase activity threefold. This enzymatic system could be used as a sensitive bioindicator for copper in fresh water.

  9. Oxidation of Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Amino Acid Conjugates by Horseradish Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ro Dong; Park, Chang Kyu

    1987-01-01

    The stability of 21 amino acid conjugates of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) toward horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. The IAA conjugates of Arg, Ile, Leu, Tyr, and Val were oxidized readily by peroxidase. Those of Ala, β-Ala, Asp, Cys, Gln, Glu, Gly, and Lys were not degraded and their recovery was above 92% after 1 hour incubation with HRP. A correlation between the stability of IAA conjugates toward peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation and the hydrophobicity of the amino acid moiety conjugated to IAA was demonstrated. Polar amino acid conjugates of IAA are more resistant to HRP-catalyzed oxidation. PMID:16665529

  10. Thyroid peroxidase inhibition by Kalanchoe brasiliensis aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A C; Rosenthal, D; Carvalho, D P

    2000-05-01

    Flavonoids are known inhibitors of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and some are components of Kalanchoe brasiliensis, a plant used in popular medicine to treat tissue injuries, enlarged ganglia and peptic ulcer. As K. brasiliensis extract is currently used, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of K. brasiliensis aqueous extract on TPO activity. We show here that TPO iodide-oxidation activity was significantly inhibited by K. brasiliensis aqueous extract and that TPO inhibition seems to be competitive, since the enzyme V(max) was unchanged and K(m) for iodide was significantly increased in the presence of the plant extract. Furthermore, TPO inhibitory activity produced by K. brasiliensis extract was unchanged after boiling or by incubation with hepatic enzymes (activated S9 fraction), suggesting that at least the antithyroid component of this plant infusion could probably reach systemic circulation. We also report that K. brasiliensis aqueous extract is able to scavenge H(2)O(2), in vitro. As H(2)O(2) is an essential TPO cofactor, it is possible that the H(2)O(2) trapping effect of K. brasiliensis may be responsible, at least in part, for the inhibition of the iodide-oxidation reaction catalysed by this enzyme. Thus, K. brasiliensis aqueous extract has antithyroid effects in vitro, suggesting that its chronic consumption could contribute to the development of goitre and hypothyroidism, mainly in areas of low iodine intake.

  11. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  12. Modification of photosynthetic regulation in tomato overexpressing glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Herbette, Stephane; Menn, Aline Le; Rousselle, Patrick; Ameglio, Thierry; Faltin, Zehava; Branlard, Gérard; Eshdat, Yuval; Julien, Jean-Louis; Drevet, Joël R; Roeckel-Drevet, Patricia

    2005-06-20

    To investigate the function of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in plants, we produced transgenic tomato plants overexpressing an eukaryotic selenium-independent GPX (GPX5). We show here that total GPX activity was increased by 50% in transgenic plants, when compared to control plants transformed with the binary vector without the insert (PZP111). A preliminary two-dimensional electrophoretic protein analysis of the GPX overexpressing plants showed notably a decrease in the accumulation of proteins identified as rubisco small subunit 1 and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, two proteins involved in photosynthesis. These observations, together with the fact that in standard culture conditions, GPX-overexpressing plants were not phenotypically distinct from control plants prompted us to challenge the plants with a chilling treatment that is known to affect photosynthesis activity. We found that upon chilling treatment with low light level, photosynthesis was not affected in GPX-overexpressing plants while it was in control plants, as revealed by chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and fructose-1,6-biphosphatase activity. These results suggest that overexpression of a selenium-independent GPX in tomato plants modifies specifically gene expression and leads to modifications of photosynthetic regulation processes.

  13. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Omar, Haneen; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-03-04

    Uranyl (UO2(2+)) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) with a detection limit of 1.86 μM. In the absence of UO2(2+), the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2(2+), this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2(2+) was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2(2+) and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2(2+) from seawater.

  14. Role of eosinophil peroxidase in host defense and disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Slungaard, Arne

    2006-01-15

    Three unusual substrates-bromide (Br(-)), nitrite (NO(2)(-)), and thiocyanate (SCN(-))-compete for oxidation by eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in physiologic fluids in the presence of H(2)O(2) to yield, respectively, hypobromous acid (HOBr), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)()), or hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN). These oxidant products have strikingly different reactivities: HOBr and NO(2)() are potent, widely reactive, membrane-lytic oxidants whereas HOSCN is a weak, SH-specific oxidant that penetrates into cells and imposes an intracellular oxidant stress that can activate kinase pathways and transcription factors that profoundly influence gene expression in host cells. All three oxidants are lethal for pathogens. SCN(-) is the strongly preferred substrate for the EPO/H(2)O(2). Specific biomarkers document that EPO-dependent oxidants are generated at sites of inflammation, but direct evidence that these oxidants cause disease is confined to the observation that an EPO knockout mouse line has dramatically less pathologic damage than do wild type animals in a murine model of ulcerative colitis.

  15. Mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 disruption causes male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuela; Förster, Heidi; Boersma, Auke; Seiler, Alexander; Wehnes, Helga; Sinowatz, Fred; Neumüller, Christine; Deutsch, Manuel J; Walch, Axel; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ursini, Fulvio; Roveri, Antonella; Maleszewski, Marek; Maiorino, Matilde; Conrad, Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Selenium is linked to male fertility. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4), first described as an antioxidant enzyme, is the predominant selenoenzyme in testis and has been suspected of being vital for spermatogenesis. Cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear isoforms are all encoded by the same gene. While disruption of entire GPx4 causes early embryonic lethality in mice, inactivation of nuclear GPx4 does not impair embryonic development or fertility. Here, we show that deletion of mitochondrial GPx4 (mGPx4) allows both normal embryogenesis and postnatal development, but causes male infertility. Infertility was associated with impaired sperm quality and severe structural abnormalities in the midpiece of spermatozoa. Knockout sperm display higher protein thiol content and recapitulate features typical of severe selenodeficiency. Interestingly, male infertility induced by mGPx4 depletion could be bypassed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. We also show for the first time that mGPx4 is the prevailing GPx4 product in male germ cells and that mGPx4 disruption has no effect on proliferation or apoptosis of germinal or somatic tissue. Our study finally establishes that mitochondrial GPx4 confers the vital role of selenium in mammalian male fertility and identifies cytosolic GPx4 as the only GPx4 isoform being essential for embryonic development and apoptosis regulation.

  16. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca(2+) ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca(2+) concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca(2+) binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance.

  17. Ultrastructural Localization of Peroxidase Activity in Human Platelets and Megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Breton-Gorius, Janine; Guichard, Josette

    1972-01-01

    Normal human platelets and megakaryocytes were examined for peroxidase activity by the diaminobenzidine (DAB) cytochemical technic. When the fixation and the incubation were adequate, a strong reaction was present in the dense tubular system of platelets suspended in plasma or spread on carbon. The black reaction product was ascribed to enzyme activity, since the reaction was completely eliminated when H2O2 or DAB were omitted, or when H2O2 was in excess. In addition, the reaction was inhibited by aminotriazole, cyanide and azide. In the human megakaryocytes, the reaction was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum including the perinuclear envelope. The Golgi complex and the clear vacuolar system were negative for the reaction. After platelet release, the reaction was always seen in the perinuclear space. The nature and function of the enzyme, as well as its possible relationships with catalase, are discussed. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16 PMID:5009974

  18. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL−1, specific activity 78 U mg−1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4–5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+, Cu2+, Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2. H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL−1 enzyme activities. PMID:24948923

  19. Comparative permeability of different glioma models to horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Groothuis, D R; Fischer, J M; Vick, N A; Bigner, D D

    1981-01-01

    Seven different experimental glioma models were studied to determine their capillary permeability to horseradish peroxidase. The models were the autochthonous ASV-viral model, intracerebral (ic) and (sc) injections of rat 9L and RG-2 tumor cell lines, the sc rat S-69C15 tumor cell line, and human glioblastoma cell lines in nude mice. The ASV-viral model showed an average HRP permeability of 63% of tumor volume, the ic RG-2 tumors were 100% permeable, and the ic 9L tumors were 41% permeable. The permeability of the marginal zone (brain-tumor interface) showed similar variation from group to group. In contrast, all of the sc tumors were 100% permeable regardless of the cell line used to create the tumors. Our results show the variability between these glioma models, and suggest that RG-2 ic gliomas and all sc gliomas should be optimal to assess the tumoricidal effect of drugs, because access to the tumor compartment from the vascular compartment is complete.

  20. Thiol Chemistry in Peroxidase Catalysis and Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fukuto, Jon M.; Forman, Henry Jay

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The oxidation chemistry of thiols and disulfides of biologic relevance is described. The review focuses on the interaction and kinetics of hydrogen peroxide with low-molecular-weight thiols and protein thiols and, in particular, on sulfenic acid groups, which are recognized as key intermediates in several thiol oxidation processes. In particular, sulfenic and selenenic acids are formed during the catalytic cycle of peroxiredoxins and glutathione peroxidases, respectively. In turn, these enzymes are in close redox communication with the thioredoxin and glutathione systems, which are the major controllers of the thiol redox state. Oxidants formed in the cell originate from several different sources, but the major producers are NADPH oxidases and mitochondria. However, a different role of the oxygen species produced by these sources is apparent as oxidants derived from NADPH oxidase are involved mainly in signaling processes, whereas those produced by mitochondria induce cell death in pathways including also the thioredoxin system, presently considered an important target for cancer chemotherapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 10, 1549–1564. PMID:18479206

  1. Phenol removal from refinery wastewater by mutant recombinant horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Asad, Sedigheh; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Khajeh, Khosro

    2014-01-01

    Application of mutated recombinant horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for phenol removal from refinery effluents is reported. Recombinant HRP produced in Escherichia coli suffers from the disadvantage of lacking glycosylation, which affects its catalytic efficiency and stability toward inactivating parameters such as increased temperature and enhanced amounts of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, the previously reported variant (in which Asn268 was substituted with Asp, N268D) with improved stability characteristics and catalytic efficiency was used to remove phenol from a petroleum refinery effluent. The presence and removal of phenol was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography; the precipitated oxidized phenol was also observed and removed from the sample by centrifugation. Results showed that the N268D variant can remove 61%, 67%, and 81% of phenol from effluent in 1, 2, and 16 H, respectively. By exploiting the N268D mutant, removal of 50% phenol could be achieved in 42 Min, which was more than 22 times less than the treatment time required by native recombinant enzyme.

  2. Glutathione Peroxidase 4 Is Required for Maturation of Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ueta, Takashi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Furukawa, Takahisa; Tamaki, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Yasuhito; Imai, Hirotaka; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathologies of photoreceptor cells, and the protective role of antioxidant enzymes for photoreceptor cells have been well understood. However, their essentiality has remained unknown. In this study we generated photoreceptor-specific conditional knock-out (CKO) mice of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) and showed the critical role of GPx4 for photoreceptor cells. In the wild-type retina the dominant GPx4 expression was in the mitochondria, indicating the mitochondrial variant was the major GPx4 in the retina. In the GPx4-CKO mice, although photoreceptor cells developed and differentiated into rod and cone cells by P12, they rapidly underwent drastic degeneration and completely disappeared by P21. The photoreceptor cell death in the GPx4-CKO mice was associated with the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and TUNEL-positive cells. Photoreceptor cells before undergoing apoptosis (P11) exhibited decreased mitochondrial biomass, decreased number of connecting cilia, as well as disorganized structure of outer segments. These findings indicate that GPx4 is a critical antioxidant enzyme for the maturation and survival of photoreceptor cells. PMID:22207760

  3. Decolorization of direct dyes by immobilized turnip peroxidase in batch and continuous processes.

    PubMed

    Matto, Mahreen; Husain, Qayyum

    2009-03-01

    An inexpensive immobilized turnip peroxidase has been employed for the decolorization of some direct dyes in batch and continuous reactors. Wood shaving was investigated as an inexpensive material for the preparation of bioaffinity support. Concanavalin A-wood shaving bound turnip peroxidase exhibited 67% of the original enzyme activity. Both soluble and immobilized turnip peroxidase could effectively remove more than 50% color from dyes in the presence of metals/salt and 0.6mM 1-hydroxybenzotriazole, after 1h of incubation. The columns containing immobilized peroxidase could decolorize 64% direct red 23% and 50% mixture of direct dyes at 4 and 3 months of operation, respectively. Total organic carbon analysis of treated dye or mixture of dyes revealed that these results were quite comparable to the loss of color from solutions. Thus, this study showed that the immobilized enzyme could be efficiently used for the removal of synthetic dyes from industrial effluents.

  4. Bromination of deoxycytidine by eosinophil peroxidase: A mechanism for mutagenesis by oxidative damage of nucleotide precursors

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Byun, Jaeman; Williams, Michelle V.; McCormick, Michael L.; Parks, William C.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidants generated by eosinophils during chronic inflammation may lead to mutagenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Eosinophil peroxidase, a heme enzyme released by eosinophils, generates hypobromous acid that damages tissue in inflammatory conditions. We show that human eosinophils use eosinophil peroxidase to produce 5-bromodeoxycytidine. Flow cytometric, immunohistochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses all demonstrated that 5-bromodeoxycytidine generated by eosinophil peroxidase was taken up by cultured cells and incorporated into genomic DNA as 5-bromodeoxyuridine. Although previous studies have focused on oxidation of chromosomal DNA, our observations suggest another mechanism for oxidative damage of DNA. In this scenario, peroxidase-catalyzed halogenation of nucleotide precursors yields products that subsequently can be incorporated into DNA. Because the thymine analog 5-BrUra mispairs with guanine in DNA, generation of brominated pyrimidines by eosinophils might constitute a mechanism for cytotoxicity and mutagenesis at sites of inflammation. PMID:11172002

  5. Interaction of metals with peroxidase--mediated luminol-enhanced, chemiluminescence (PLmCL).

    PubMed

    Coteur, G; Dubois, P

    2004-01-01

    The peroxidase-mediated luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (PLmCL) method has been used to study the in vitro effect of contaminants such as heavy metals on the reactive oxygen species production by immunocytes. We were interested to know whether metals could directly affect peroxidase-mediated luminescence, taking horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model enzyme, since this could contribute to the inhibition of immunocyte LmCL. Copper inhibited PLmCL in a dose-dependent manner, while cadmium, iron, silver and lead only partly decreased the signal in the concentration range tested. In contrast, zinc enhanced the signal at high concentrations. Eventually, chromium, mercury and aluminium did not affect PLmCL. It is suggested that these effects reflect the ability of the metals to interact with the active site of the peroxidase. These results demonstrate that such interactions have to be considered when interpreting the effects of metals on immunocytes using the LmCL method.

  6. Amino acid sequence of anionic peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei.

    PubMed

    Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Li, Qing X

    2014-12-10

    Palm peroxidases are extremely stable and have uncommon substrate specificity. This study was designed to fill in the knowledge gap about the structures of a peroxidase from the windmill palm tree Trachycarpus fortunei. The complete amino acid sequence and partial glycosylation were determined by MALDI-top-down sequencing of native windmill palm tree peroxidase (WPTP), MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS of WPTP tryptic peptides, and cDNA sequencing. The propeptide of WPTP contained N- and C-terminal signal sequences which contained 21 and 17 amino acid residues, respectively. Mature WPTP was 306 amino acids in length, and its carbohydrate content ranged from 21% to 29%. Comparison to closely related royal palm tree peroxidase revealed structural features that may explain differences in their substrate specificity. The results can be used to guide engineering of WPTP and its novel applications.

  7. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Marcela . E-mail: maa@ibt.unam.mx; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-06-08

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple.

  8. Degradation of disperse dye from textile effluent by free and immobilized Cucurbita pepo peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucherit, N.; Abouseoud, M.; Adour, L.

    2012-06-01

    Disperse dyes constitute the largest group of dyes used in local textile industry. This work evaluates the potential of the Cucurbita peroxidase(C-peroxidase) extracted from courgette in the decolourization of disperse dye in free and immobilized form. The optimal conditions for immobilization of C-peroxidase in Ca-alginate were identified. The immobilization was optimized at 2%(w/v) of sodium alginate and 0.2 M of calcium chloride. After optimization of treatment parameters, the results indicate that at pH 2, dye concentration: 80 mg/L(for FCP) and 180 mg/L(for ICP), H2O2 dose: 0,02M (for FCP) and 0,12M(for ICP), the decolourization by free and immobilized C-peroxidase were 72.02% and 69.71 % respectively. The degradation pathway and the metabolic products formed after the degradation were also predicted using UV-vis spectroscopy analysis.

  9. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1978-01-01

    Dwarf Marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition, and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required corrections for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  10. The SKPO-1 peroxidase functions in the hypodermis to protect Caenorhabditis elegans from bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Tiller, George R; Garsin, Danielle A

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the synergistic relationship between NADPH oxidase (NOX)/dual oxidase (DUOX) enzymes and peroxidases has received increased attention. Peroxidases utilize NOX/DUOX-generated H2O2 for a myriad of functions including, but not limited to, thyroid hormone biosynthesis, cross-linking extracellular matrices (ECM), and immune defense. We postulated that one or more peroxidases produced by Caenorhabditis elegans would act in host defense, possibly in conjunction with BLI-3, the only NOX/DUOX enzyme encoded by the genome that is expressed. Animals exposed to RNA interference (RNAi) of the putative peroxidase genes were screened for susceptibility to the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. One of three genes identified, skpo-1 (ShkT-containing peroxidase), was studied in depth. Animals mutant for this gene were significantly more susceptible to E. faecalis, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A slight decrease in longevity was also observed. The skpo-1 mutant animals had a dumpy phenotype of incomplete penetrance; half the animals displayed a dumpy phenotype ranging from slight to severe, and half were morphologically wild type. The SKPO-1 protein contains the critical catalytic residues necessary for peroxidase activity, and in a whole animal assay, more H2O2 was detected from the mutant compared to the wild type, consistent with the loss of an H2O2 sink. By using tissue-specific skpo-1 RNAi and immunohistochemical localization with an anti-SKPO-1 antibody, it was determined that the peroxidase is functionally and physically present in the hypodermis. In conclusion, these results characterize a peroxidase that functions protectively in the hypodermis during exposure to E. faecalis.

  11. Effects of experimental hypogravity on peroxidase and cell wall constituents in the dwarf marigold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S.; Speitel, T.; Shiraki, D.; Fukumoto, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dwarf marigolds grown from seed under experimental hypogravity are modified in lignin content, hemicellulose composition and peroxidase activity. The two conditions used, clinostats and flotation, induced changes differing in magnitude but qualitatively similar. Most responses on clinostats required correction for vertical axis rotational effects, thus limiting the value of these instruments in free-fall simulation. These findings extend earlier observations suggesting that increased peroxidase and decreased lignin are characteristic of growth under experimental hypogravity.

  12. Evaluation of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 role in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinguo; Lin, Yan; Li, Jinling; Liu, Mengchun; Wang, Jingli; Li, Xueying; Liu, Jingjing; Jia, Xuewen; Jing, Zhongcui; Huang, Zuzhou; Chu, Kaiqiu; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome that may be lifethreatening to pregnancies and fetus. Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (GPx4) is a powerful antioxidant enzyme that can provide protection from oxidative stress damage which plays a pivotal role in the pathology of PE. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between Gpx4 polymorphisms and the susceptibility to PE in Chinese Han women. TaqMan allelic discrimination real-time PCR was used to perform the genotyping of rs713041 and rs4807542 in 1008 PE patients and 1386 normotensive pregnancies. Obviously statistical difference of genotypic and allelic frequencies were found of rs713041 in GPx4 between PE patients and controls and the C allele has the higher risk for pathogenesis of PE (χ2 = 12.292, P = 0.002 by genotype; χ2 = 11.035, P = 0.001, OR = 1.216, 95% CI 1.084–1.365 by allele). Additionally, when subdividing these samples into CC + CT and TT groups, we found a significant difference between the two groups (χ2 = 11.241, P = 0.001, OR = 1.417, 95% CI 1.155–1.738). Furthermore, the genotype of rs713041 was found to be associated with the mild, severe and early-onset PE. Our results suggest that rs713041 in GPx4 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27641822

  13. Thiocyanate, a plausible physiological electron donor of gastric peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Das, D; De, P K; Banerjee, R K

    1995-01-01

    Gastric peroxidase (GPO) was purified to apparent homogeneity to characterize its major physiological electron donor. The enzyme (RZ = 0.7), with a subunit molecular mass of 50 kDa, is a glycoprotein, with a relative abundance of aspartic and glutamic acid over arginine and lysine. It has a Soret maximum at 412 nm, which is shifted to 426 nm by H2O2 due to formation of compound II. Although the physiological electron donors I-, Br- and SCN-, but not Cl-, are oxidized by GPO optimally at acid pH, only I- and SCN- are oxidized appreciably at physiological pH. Considering that the I- concentration in stomach is less than 1 microM, whereas the SCN- concentration is about 250 microM, SCN- may act as a major electron donor for GPO. Moreover, SCN- oxidation remains unaltered in the presence of physiological concentrations of other halides. The second-order rate constant for the reaction of GPO with H2O2 (k1) and compound I with SCN- (k2) at pH 7 was found to be 8 x 10(7) M-1.s-1 and 2 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 respectively. GPO has significant pseudocatalase activity also in the presence of I- or Br-, but it is blocked by SCN-. The SCN- oxidation product OSCN- may be reduced back to SCN- by cellular GSH, and GSSG may be reduced back to GSH by glutathione reductase and NADPH. In a system reconstituted with pure glutathione reductase, NADPH, GSH, SCN- and H2O2. GPO-catalysed SCN- oxidation could be coupled to NADPH oxidation. This system where GPO utilizes SCN- as the major physiological electron donor may operate efficiently to scavenge intracellular H2O2. Images Figure 1 PMID:7826354

  14. Determinants of human plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3) expression.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Charlene; Voetsch, Barbara; Jin, Richard C; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2004-06-25

    Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3) is a selenocysteine-containing protein with antioxidant properties. GPx-3 deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke. The regulation of GPx-3 expression remains largely uncharacterized, however, and we studied its transcriptional and translational determinants in a cultured cell system. In transient transfections of a renal cell line (Caki-2), the published sequence cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene produced minimal activity (relative luminescence (RL) = 0.6 +/- 0.4). Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to identify a novel transcription start site that is located 233 bp downstream (3') of the published site and that produced a >25-fold increase in transcriptional activity (RL = 16.8 +/- 1.9; p < 0.0001). Analysis of the novel GPx-3 promoter identified Sp-1- and hypoxia-inducible factor-1-binding sites, as well as the redox-sensitive metal response element and antioxidant response element. Hypoxia was identified as a strong transcriptional regulator of GPx-3 expression, in part through the presence of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1-binding site, leading to an almost 3-fold increase in expression levels after 24 h compared with normoxic conditions (normalized RL = 3.5 +/- 0.3 versus 1.2 +/- 0.1; p < 0.001). We also investigated the role of the translational cofactors tRNA(Sec), SECIS-binding protein-2, and SelD (selenophosphate synthetase D) in GPx-3 protein expression. tRNA(Sec) and SelD significantly enhanced GPx-3 expression, whereas SECIS-binding protein-2 showed a trend toward increased expression. These results demonstrate the presence of a novel functional transcription start site for the human GPx-3 gene with a promoter regulated by hypoxia, and identify unique translational determinants of GPx-3 expression.

  15. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M.; Barja, Maria V.; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K.; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  16. Horseradish peroxidase mediated free radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Kalra, B; Gross, R A

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports the free radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). A novel method was developed whereby MMA polymerization can be carried out at ambient temperatures in the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and 2,4-pentanedione in a mixture of water and a water-miscible solvent. Polymers of MMA formed were highly stereoregular with predominantly syndiotactic sequences (syn-dyad fractions from 0.82 to 0.87). Analyses of the chloroform-soluble fraction of syndio-PMMA products by GPC showed that they have number-average molecular weights, Mn, that range from 7500 to 75,000. By using 25% v/v of the cosolvents dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, acetone, and dimethylformamide, 85, 45, 7 and 2% product yields, respectively, resulted after 24 h. Increasing the proportion of dioxane to water from 1:3 to 1:1 and 3:1 resulted in a decrease in polymer yield from 45 to 38 and 7%, respectively. Increase in the enzyme concentration from 70 to 80 and 90 mg/mL resulted in increased reaction kinetics. By adjustment of the molar ratio of 2,4-pentanedione to hydrogen peroxide between 1.30:1.0 and 1.45:1.0, the product yields and Mn values were increased. On the basis of the catalytic properties of HRP and studies herein, we believe that the keto-enoxy radicals from 2,4-pentanedione are the first radical species generated. Then, initiation may take place through this radical or by the radical transfer to another molecule.

  17. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Manuel A; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M; Barja, Maria V; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzy