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Sample records for membranes preferential interaction

  1. Do local anesthetics interact preferentially with membrane lipid rafts? Comparative interactivities with raft-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-08-01

    Membranous lipid bilayers have been reconsidered as the site of action of local anesthetics (LAs). Recent understanding of biomembranes indicates the existence of lipid raft microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids as potential platforms for channels and receptors. Based on the hypothesis that LAs may interact preferentially with lipid rafts over non-raft membranes, we compared their effects on raft model membranes and cardiolipin-containing biomimetic membranes. Liposomes were prepared with phospholipids, sphingomyelin, cerebroside, and cholesterol to have compositions corresponding to lipid rafts and cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes. After reacting LAs (50-200 microM) with the membrane preparations, their interactivities were determined by measuring fluorescence polarization with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Although bupivacaine and lidocaine acted on different raft-like liquid-ordered membranes to reduce polarization values, their effects on biomimetic less ordered membranes were much greater. LAs interacted with biomimetic membranes with the potency being R(+)-bupivacaine > racemic bupivacaine > S(-)-bupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > prilocaine, which is consistent with the rank order of pharmacotoxicological potency. However, raft model membranes showed neither structure-dependence nor stereoselectivity. The relevance of membrane lipid rafts to LAs is questionable at least in their effects on raft-like liquid-ordered membranes.

  2. 31P and 19F NMR studies of glycophorin-reconstituted membranes: preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Glycophorin A, a major glycoprotein of the erythrocyte membrane, has been incorporated into small unilamellar vesicles composed of a variety of pure and mixed phospholipids. Nuclear spin labels including 31P and 19F have been used at natural abundance or have been synthetically incorporated in lipids to act as probes of lipid-protein interaction. Interactions produce broadening of resonances in several cases and it can be used to demonstrate preferential interaction of certain lipids with glycophorin. 31P and 19F probes show a strong preferential interaction of glycophorin with phosphatidylserine over phosphatidylcholine. There is some evidence that interactions are more pronounced at the inner surface of the bilayer and these results are rationalized in terms of the asymmetric distribution of protein and lipid.

  3. Unilamellar DMPC vesicles in aqueous glycerol: preferential interactions and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Gamma( micro 1), for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Gamma( micro 1) decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of -0.14 +/- 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16 degrees C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction.

  4. Epidermal cells adhere preferentially to type IV (basement membrane) collagen

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Epidermal cells from adult guinea pig skin attach and differentiate preferentially on substrates of type IV (basement membrane) collagen, compared to those of types I--III collagen. In contrast, guinea pig dermal fibroblasts attach equally well to all four collagen substrates. Fibronectin mediates the attachment of fibroblasts but not of epidermal cells to collagen. PMID:422650

  5. Preferential binding of positive nanoparticles on cell membranes is due to electrostatic interactions: A too simplistic explanation that does not take into account the nanoparticle protein corona.

    PubMed

    Forest, Valérie; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2017-01-01

    The internalization of nanoparticles by cells (and more broadly the nanoparticle/cell interaction) is a crucial issue both for biomedical applications (for the design of nanocarriers with enhanced cellular uptake to reach their intracellular therapeutic targets) and in a nanosafety context (as the internalized dose is one of the key factors in cytotoxicity). Many parameters can influence the nanoparticle/cell interaction, among them, the nanoparticle physico-chemical features, and especially the surface charge. It is generally admitted that positive nanoparticles are more uptaken by cells than neutral or negative nanoparticles. It is supposedly due to favorable electrostatic interactions with negatively charged cell membrane. However, this theory seems too simplistic as it does not consider a fundamental element: the nanoparticle protein corona. Indeed, once introduced in a biological medium nanoparticles adsorb proteins at their surface, forming a new interface defining the nanoparticle "biological identity". This adds a new level of complexity in the interactions with biological systems that cannot be any more limited to electrostatic binding. These interactions will then influence cell behavior. Based on a literature review and on an example of our own experience the parameters involved in the nanoparticle protein corona formation as well as in the nanoparticle/cell interactions are discussed.

  6. A Pairwise Preferential Interaction Model for Understanding Peptide Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myungshim

    2010-01-01

    A pairwise preferential interaction model (PPIM), based on Kirkwood–Buff integrals, is developed to quantify and characterize the interactions between some of the functional groups commonly observed in peptides. The existing experimental data are analyzed to determine the preferential interaction (PI) parameters for different amino acid and small peptide systems in aqueous solutions. The PIs between the different functional groups present in the peptides are then isolated and quantified by assuming simple pairwise additivity. The PPIM approach provides consistent estimates for the pair interactions between the same functional groups obtained from different solute molecules. Furthermore, these interactions appear to be chemically intuitive. It is argued that this type of approach can provide valuable information concerning specific functional group correlations which could give rise to peptide aggregation. PMID:20694045

  7. C8-glycosphingolipids preferentially insert into tumor cell membranes and promote chemotherapeutic drug uptake.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Steurer, Barbara; Ciceri, Dalila; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Verheij, Marcel; Goñi, Felix María; Koning, Gerben A; Contreras, F-Xabier

    2015-08-01

    Insufficient drug delivery into tumor cells limits the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. Co-delivery of liposome-encapsulated drug and synthetic short-chain glycosphingolipids (SC-GSLs) significantly improved drug bioavailability by enhancing intracellular drug uptake. Investigating the mechanisms underlying this SC-GSL-mediated drug uptake enhancement is the aim of this study. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the cell membrane lipid transfer intracellular fate of fluorescently labeled C6-NBD-GalCer incorporated in liposomes in tumor and non-tumor cells. Additionally click chemistry was applied to image and quantify native SC-GSLs in tumor and non-tumor cell membranes. SC-GSL-mediated flip-flop was investigated in model membranes to confirm membrane-incorporation of SC-GSL and its effect on membrane remodeling. SC-GSL enriched liposomes containing doxorubicin (Dox) were incubated at 4°C and 37°C and intracellular drug uptake was studied in comparison to standard liposomes and free Dox. SC-GSL transfer to the cell membrane was independent of liposomal uptake and the majority of the transferred lipid remained in the plasma membrane. The transfer of SC-GSL was tumor cell-specific and induced membrane rearrangement as evidenced by a transbilayer flip-flop of pyrene-SM. However, pore formation was measured, as leakage of hydrophilic fluorescent probes was not observed. Moreover, drug uptake appeared to be mediated by SC-GSLs. SC-GSLs enhanced the interaction of doxorubicin (Dox) with the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of tumor cells at 4°C. Our results demonstrate that SC-GSLs preferentially insert into tumor cell plasma membranes enhancing cell intrinsic capacity to translocate amphiphilic drugs such as Dox across the membrane via a biophysical process.

  8. A Contribution to the Theory of Preferential Interaction Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, J. Michael; Rangel, David P.; Aragon, Sergio R.

    2005-01-01

    A simple and complete derivation of the relation between concentration-based preferential interaction coefficients and integrals over the relevant pair correlation functions is presented for the first time. Certain omissions from the original treatment of pair correlation functions in multicomponent thermodynamics are also addressed. Connections between these concentration-based quantities and the more common molality-based preferential interaction coefficients are also derived. The pair correlation functions and preferential interaction coefficients of both solvent (water) and cosolvent (osmolyte) in the neighborhood of a macromolecule contain contributions from short-range repulsions and generic long-range attractions originating from the macromolecule, as well as from osmolyte-solvent exchange reactions beyond the macromolecular surface. These contributions are evaluated via a heuristic analysis that leads to simple insightful expressions for the preferential interaction coefficients in terms of the volumes excluded to the centers of the water and osmolyte molecules and a sum over the contributions of exchanging sites in the surrounding solution. The preferential interaction coefficients are predicted to exhibit the experimentally observed dependence on osmolyte concentration. Molality-based preferential interaction coefficients that were reported for seven different osmolytes interacting with bovine serum albumin are analyzed using the this formulation together with geometrical parameters reckoned from the crystal structure of human serum albumin. In all cases, the excluded volume contribution, which is the volume excluded to osmolyte centers minus that excluded to water centers in units of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\bar {V}}_{1},\\end

  9. Preferential interactions promote blind cooperation and informed defection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escudero, Alfonso; Friedman, Jonathan; Gore, Jeff

    2016-12-06

    It is common sense that costs and benefits should be carefully weighed before deciding on a course of action. However, we often disapprove of people who do so, even when their actual decision benefits us. For example, we prefer people who directly agree to do us a favor over those who agree only after securing enough information to ensure that the favor will not be too costly. Why should we care about how people make their decisions, rather than just focus on the decisions themselves? Current models show that punishment of information gathering can be beneficial because it forces blind decisions, which under some circumstances enhances cooperation. Here we show that aversion to information gathering can be beneficial even in the absence of punishment, due to a different mechanism: preferential interactions with reliable partners. In a diverse population where different people have different-and unknown-preferences, those who seek additional information before agreeing to cooperate reveal that their preferences are close to the point where they would choose not to cooperate. Blind cooperators are therefore more likely to keep cooperating even if conditions change, and aversion to information gathering helps to interact preferentially with them. Conversely, blind defectors are more likely to keep defecting in the future, leading to a preference for informed defectors over blind ones. Both mechanisms-punishment to force blind decisions and preferential interactions-give qualitatively different predictions, which may enable experimental tests to disentangle them in real-world situations.

  10. Steric effects and preferential interactions in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Saquing, C.D.; Lucien, F.P.; Foster, N.R

    1998-10-01

    Solubility data are presented for a mixture of o-hydroxybenzoic acid (o-HBA) and m-HBA in supercritical CO{sub 2} doped with 3.5 mol% methanol. The data were measured at 318 and 328 K and for pressures in the range of 101--201 bar. Some new data for the solubility of pure m-HBA in methanol-doped supercritical CO{sub 2} are also presented. The solubilities of the HBA isomers are enhanced considerably with the addition of methanol to supercritical CO{sub 2}. However, the solubility enhancement is strongly affected by the spatial arrangement of their functional groups (steric effect). There appears to be preferential interaction between the solutes and the cosolvent in the quaternary system, and this phenomenon is consistent with thermodynamic modeling of the system.

  11. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  12. RIBOSOME-MEMBRANE INTERACTION

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, M. R.; Sabatini, David D.; Blobel, Günter

    1973-01-01

    In a medium of high ionic strength, rat liver rough microsomes can be nondestructively disassembled into ribosomes and stripped membranes if nascent polypeptides are discharged from the bound ribosomes by reaction with puromycin. At 750 mM KCl, 5 mM MgCl2, 50 mM Tris·HCl, pH 7 5, up to 85% of all bound ribosomes are released from the membranes after incubation at room temperature with 1 mM puromycin. The ribosomes are released as subunits which are active in peptide synthesis if programmed with polyuridylic acid. The ribosome-denuded, or stripped, rough microsomes (RM) can be recovered as intact, essentially unaltered membranous vesicles Judging from the incorporation of [3H]puromycin into hot acid-insoluble material and from the release of [3H]leucine-labeled nascent polypeptide chains from bound ribosomes, puromycin coupling occurs almost as well at low (25–100 mM) as at high (500–1000 mM) KCl concentrations. Since puromycin-dependent ribosome release only occurs at high ionic strength, it appears that ribosomes are bound to membranes via two types of interactions: a direct one between the membrane and the large ribosomal subunit (labile at high KCl concentration) and an indirect one in which the nascent chain anchors the ribosome to the membrane (puromycin labile). The nascent chains of ribosomes specifically released by puromycin remain tightly associated with the stripped membranes. Some membrane-bound ribosomes (up to 40%) can be nondestructively released in high ionic strength media without puromycin; these appear to consist of a mixture of inactive ribosomes and ribosomes containing relatively short nascent chains. A fraction (∼15%) of the bound ribosomes can only be released from membranes by exposure of RM to ionic conditions which cause extensive unfolding of ribosomal subunits, the nature and significance of these ribosomes is not clear. PMID:4682341

  13. Preferential solvation of polyvinylacetate (PVA) in water-ethanol mixtures and its effect on the permeability properties of PVA-membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Neidlinger, H.H.

    1985-05-01

    The preferential interaction of polyvinylacetate (PVA) with one of the solvent components in water-ethanol mixtures has been investigated by the method of equilibrium dialysis, evaluated by differential refractometry. It has been found that at a 1:1 molar ratio of water-ethanol there occurs an inversion point of preferential solvation. The overall solvation was determined from intrinsic viscosity and equilibrium swelling measurements. Its plot versus the composition of the binary solvent has a maximum that practically coincides with the inversion point of the preferential solvation. These results are compared with those obtained from pervaporation studies carried out on PVA-membranes in the same solvent system, and they are discussed in terms of the existence of special interaction phenomena due to hydrogen bonding effects. It can be concluded that for the system investigated preferential solvation parameters help to understand, but do not necessarily predict, membrane permselectivity. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Protein-solvent preferential interactions, protein hydration, and the modulation of biochemical reactions by solvent components

    PubMed Central

    Timasheff, Serge N.

    2002-01-01

    Solvent additives (cosolvents, osmolytes) modulate biochemical reactions if, during the course of the reaction, there is a change in preferential interactions of solvent components with the reacting system. Preferential interactions can be expressed in terms of preferential binding of the cosolvent or its preferential exclusion (preferential hydration). The driving force is the perturbation by the protein of the chemical potential of the cosolvent. It is shown that the measured change of the amount of water in contact with protein during the course of the reaction modulated by an osmolyte is a change in preferential hydration that is strictly a measure of the cosolvent chemical potential perturbation by the protein in the ternary water–protein–cosolvent system. It is not equal to the change in water of hydration, because water of hydration is a reflection strictly of protein–water forces in a binary system. There is no direct relation between water of preferential hydration and water of hydration. PMID:12097640

  15. Its preferential interactions with biopolymers account for diverse observed effects of trehalose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiang; Gierasch, Lila M; Liu, Zhicheng

    2015-07-07

    Biopolymer homeostasis underlies the health of organisms, and protective osmolytes have emerged as one strategy used by Nature to preserve biopolymer homeostasis. However, a great deal remains unknown about the mechanism of action of osmolytes. Trehalose, as a prominent example, stabilizes proteins against denaturation by extreme temperature and denaturants, preserves membrane integrity upon freezing or in dry conditions, inhibits polyQ-mediated protein aggregation, and suppresses the aggregation of denatured proteins. The underlying thermodynamic mechanisms of such diverse effects of trehalose remain unclear or controversial. In this study, we applied the surface-additive method developed in the Record laboratory to attack this issue. We characterized the key features of trehalose-biopolymer preferential interactions and found that trehalose has strong unfavorable interactions with aliphatic carbon and significant favorable interactions with amide/anionic oxygen. This dissection has allowed us to elucidate the diverse effects of trehalose and to identify the crucial functional group(s) responsible for its effects. With (semi)quantitative thermodynamic analysis, we discovered that 1) the unfavorable interaction of trehalose with hydrophobic surfaces is the dominant factor in its effect on protein stability, 2) the favorable interaction of trehalose with polar amides enables it to inhibit polyQ-mediated protein aggregation and the aggregation of denatured protein in general, and 3) the favorable interaction of trehalose with phosphate oxygens, together with its unfavorable interaction with aliphatic carbons, enables trehalose to preserve membrane integrity in aqueous solution. These results provide a basis for a full understanding of the role of trehalose in biopolymer homeostasis and the reason behind its evolutionary selection as an osmolyte, as well as for a better application of trehalose as a chemical chaperone.

  16. Preferential Interaction of Na+ over K+ to Carboxylate-functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elucidating mechanistic interactions between specific ions (Na+/ K+) and nanoparticle surfaces to alter particle stability in polar media has received little attention. We investigated relative preferential binding of Na+ and K+ to carboxylate-functionalized silver nanoparticles ...

  17. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approachesmore » continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.« less

  18. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  19. Preferential packing of acidic glycosidases and proteases into Bacteroides outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Elhenawy, Wael; Debelyy, Mykhaylo O; Feldman, Mario F

    2014-03-11

    pathways remain uncharacterized. In this article, we show that B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron preferentially pack a large number of hydrolases in outer membrane vesicles (OMV). Most of these hydrolases are acidic and were detected exclusively in OMV. This suggests the presence of a molecular mechanism in Bacteroides responsible for the selection of OMV proteins based on their charge. We propose that OMV contribute to the establishment and balance of the gut microbiota.

  20. An inhibitory interaction of human cortical responses to stimuli preferentially exciting Aδ or C fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tuan D.; Matre, Dagfinn; Casey, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    Finely myelinated (type Aδ) and unmyelinated (type C) fibers are the major afferent inputs to spinothalamic tract neurons mediating sensory and reflex responses to noxious and thermal stimuli. These two fiber types differ in their sensory and biophysical properties, raising questions about the interaction of their supraspinal responses. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of cortical responses to stimuli that preferentially excite these fibers in human subjects using evoked potential recordings in a paired conditioning stimulation (CS) and test stimulation (TS) paradigm. There were two experiments, one with Aδ as CS and C as TS (Aδ-C) and another with these stimuli reversed (C-Aδ). We used intra-epidermal electrical pulses applied to the dorsal left hand at 2 and 1 × pinprick threshold (pp) for the preferential stimulation of Aδ fibers and 37 – 50°C contact heat pulses applied to the left or right thenar and left hypothenar eminences for the preferential stimulation of C fibers. We found that the cortical response to preferential Aδ or C fiber stimulation was attenuated whenever either cortical response preceded the other. Standardized values of peak and integrated amplitudes were < 1 in all paring conditions and in all subjects in both experiments. The suppressive effect varied in magnitude with the intensity of the conditioning stimulus in both Aδ-C and C-Aδ experiments. Furthermore, intra-segmental interaction was differentially effective for Aδ conditioning, (peak amplitude, p < 0.008; ANOVA). Our experiments provide the first neurophysiological evidence for a somatotopically distributed, mutually suppressive interaction between cortical responses to preferentially activated Aδ and C afferents in humans. This suppressive interaction of cortical responses suggests contrasting and possibly mutually exclusive sensori-motor functions mediated through the Aδ and C fiber afferent channels. PMID:18308475

  1. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baul, Upayan Vemparala, Satyavani; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  2. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baul, Upayan; Kuroda, Kenichi; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2014-08-01

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  3. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  4. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

  5. Interaction of tea tree oil with model and cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Cristiano; Molinari, Agnese; Toccacieli, Laura; Calcabrini, Annarica; Stringaro, Annarita; Chistolini, Pietro; Arancia, Giuseppe; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2006-07-27

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is the essential oil steam-distilled from Melaleuca alternifolia, a species of northern New South Wales, Australia. It exhibits a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and an antifungal activity. Only recently has TTO been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of multidrug resistant (MDR) human melanoma cells. It has been suggested that the effect of TTO on tumor cells could be mediated by its interaction with the plasma membrane, most likely by inducing a reorganization of lipid architecture. In this paper we report biophysical and structural results obtained using simplified planar model membranes (Langmuir films) mimicking lipid "rafts". We also used flow cytometry analysis (FCA) and freeze-fracturing transmission electron microscopy to investigate the effects of TTO on actual MDR melanoma cell membranes. Thermodynamic (compression isotherms and adsorption kinetics) and structural (Brewster angle microscopy) investigation of the lipid monolayers clearly indicates that TTO interacts preferentially with the less ordered DPPC "sea" and that it does not alter the more ordered lipid "rafts". Structural observations, performed by freeze fracturing, confirm that TTO interacts with the MDR melanoma cell plasma membrane. Moreover, experiments performed by FCA demonstrate that TTO does not interfere with the function of the MDR drug transporter P-gp. We therefore propose that the effect exerted on MDR melanoma cells is mediated by the interaction with the fluid DPPC phase, rather than with the more organized "rafts" and that this interaction preferentially influences the ATP-independent antiapoptotic activity of P-gp likely localized outside "rafts".

  6. The m-AAA protease processes cytochrome c peroxidase preferentially at the inner boundary membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Suppanz, Ida E; Wurm, Christian A; Wenzel, Dirk; Jakobs, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The m-AAA protease is a conserved hetero-oligomeric complex in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Recent evidence suggests a compartmentalization of the contiguous mitochondrial inner membrane into an inner boundary membrane (IBM) and a cristae membrane (CM). However, little is known about the functional differences of these subdomains. We have analyzed the localizations of the m-AAA protease and its substrate cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) within yeast mitochondria using live cell fluorescence microscopy and quantitative immunoelectron microscopy. We find that the m-AAA protease is preferentially localized in the IBM. Likewise, the membrane-anchored precursor form of Ccp1 accumulates in the IBM of mitochondria lacking a functional m-AAA protease. Only upon proteolytic cleavage the mature form mCcp1 moves into the cristae space. These findings suggest that protein quality control and proteolytic activation exerted by the m-AAA protease take place preferentially in the IBM pointing to significant functional differences between the IBM and the CM.

  7. Membrane-Mediated Interactions Measured Using Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Stefan; Idema, Timon; Schmidt, Thomas; Storm, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cell membrane organization is the result of the collective effect of many driving forces. Several of these, such as electrostatic and van der Waals forces, have been identified and studied in detail. In this article, we investigate and quantify another force, the interaction between inclusions via deformations of the membrane shape. For electrically neutral systems, this interaction is the dominant organizing force. As a model system to study membrane-mediated interactions, we use phase-separated biomimetic vesicles that exhibit coexistence of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered lipid domains. The membrane-mediated interactions between these domains lead to a rich variety of effects, including the creation of long-range order and the setting of a preferred domain size. Our findings also apply to the interaction of membrane protein patches, which induce similar membrane shape deformations and hence experience similar interactions. PMID:19527649

  8. A theoretical and experimental study of preferential-diffusion/stretch interactions of laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh Chae

    Recent work shows that preferential-diffusion/stretch interactions of laminar premixed flames are sufficiently robust to affect the stability of practical strongly-turbulent flames. In addition, past measurements of laminar burning velocities should be re-assessed because there generally was no attempt to control flame stretch. Finally, the sensitivity of laminar premixed flames to stretch (represented by the Markstein number) should be studied to better understand and model the properties of laminar premixed flames. Motivated by these considerations, an experimental and computational study of preferential-diffusion/stretch interactions for laminar premixed flames, for both alkane/alcohol-fuel-vapor-fueled flames (as practical fuels) and hydrogen-fueled flames (considering diluent-variation effects) was carried out during the present investigation. Considering outwardly-propagating spherical laminar premixed flames, laminar burning velocities of fuel-vapor/oxygen/nitrogen flames and hydrogen/oxygen/diluent (nitrogen, argon or helium) flames were measured for various values of stretch, fuel-equivalence ratios (0.6--4.5) and pressures (0.3--3 atm). The measurements were reduced to find fundamental unstretched laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers. The measurements were also used to evaluate corresponding numerical simulations of the experimentally-observed flames, based on contemporary detailed H2/O2 reaction mechanisms. Both measured and predicted ratios of unstretched to stretched laminar burning velocities varied linearly with flame stretch (represented by the Karlovitz number), yielding a constant Markstein number for a particular reactant mixture. The present flames were very sensitive to flame stretch (i.e., they had large Markstein numbers with significant ratios of unstretched to stretched laminar burning velocities) for levels of flame stretch well below quenching conditions. Increasing flame temperatures tended to reduce flame sensitivity to

  9. Membrane Structure: Lipid-Protein Interactions in Microsomal Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Benjamin F.; Duttera, Sue M.; Byrne, William L.; Arstila, Antti U.

    1970-01-01

    The relationships of phospholipid to membrane structure and function were examined in hepatic microsomes. Findings indicate that normal microsomal membrane structure is dependent on lipid-protein interactions and that it correlates closely with glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Modification of most phospholipid with phospholipase-C is associated with widening of the membrane which can be reversed following readdition of phospholipid. Images PMID:4317915

  10. The organochlorine herbicide chloridazon interacts with cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Benites, M; Villena, F; Norris, B; Quevedo, L

    1998-07-01

    Chloridazon is a widely used organochlorine herbicide. In order to evaluate its perturbing effect on cell membranes it was made to interact with human erythrocytes, frog adrenergic neuroepithelial synapse and molecular models. These consisted in multilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and of dimyristoylphosphatidyltidylcholine (DMPC), representative of phospholipid classes located in the inner and outer monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that chloridazon interacted preferentially with DMPC multilayers. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that 0.1 mM chloridazon induced erythrocyte crenation. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this is due to the preferential insertion of chloridazon in the phosphatidylcholine-rich external moiety of the red cell membrane. Electrophysiological measurements showed that nerve stimulation was followed immediately by a transient increase in short-circuit current (SCC) and in the potential difference (PD) of the neuroepithelial synapse. Increasing concentrations of chloridazon caused a dose-dependent and reversible decrease of the responses of both parameters to 76% of their control values. The pesticide induced a similar (28%) significant time-dependent decrease in the basal values of the SCC and of PD. These results are in accordance with a perturbing effect of chloridazon on the phospholipid moiety of the nerve fibre membrane leading to interference with total ion transport across the nerve skin junction.

  11. Presence of membrane-bound proteinases that preferentially degrade oxidatively damaged erythrocyte membrane proteins as secondary antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Beppu, M; Inoue, M; Ishikawa, T; Kikugawa, K

    1994-11-23

    Human erythrocytes were oxidized with xanthine/xanthine oxidase/ferric ion or ADP/ferric ion at 37 degrees C for several hours. Band 3 protein and spectrin of the oxidized cells were found to be significantly modified as analyzed by radiolabeling with tritiated borohydride. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the xanthine/xanthine oxidase/ferric iron-oxidized cells and subsequent immunoblotting with anti band 3 protein showed that band 3 protein was fragmented into smaller molecular-weight fragments. When the cell membrane obtained from the oxidized cells were incubated at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C for several hours in the presence of alpha-tocopherol, extensive degradation of band 3 protein and spectrin was observed. Band 3 protein was found to be most susceptible to the degradation. Degradation of band 3 protein was also observed after similar incubation of the membrane from the ADP/ferric ion-oxidized cells. Membrane-bound serine- and metalloproteinases were responsible for the degradation of band 3 protein, because the degradation was remarkably inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and partially by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Hence, the membrane proteins became susceptible to membrane-bound proteinases by oxidative stress. This observation suggests that these membrane-bound proteinases exist to remove oxidatively damaged proteins from the cell membrane.

  12. Preferential interactions between lithium chloride and glucan chains in N,N-dimethylacetamide drive cellulose dissolution.

    PubMed

    Gross, Adam S; Bell, Alexis T; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2013-03-28

    Naturally occurring cellulose is crystalline as a consequence of the strong interactions between the glucan chains that comprise it and therefore is insoluble in most solvents. One of the few solvent systems able to dissolve cellulose is lithium chloride (LiCl) dissolved in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA). By an integrated application of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, reaction path optimization, free-energy calculations, and a force-matching analysis of coarse-grained atomistic simulations, we establish that DMA-mediated preferential interactions of Li(+) cations and Cl(-) anions with glucan chains enable cellulose dissolution in LiCl/DMA. The relatively weak solvation of Li(+), Cl(-), and glucan chains by DMA results in strong effective interactions of Li(+) and Cl(-) ions with the glucans, leading to cellulose dissolution. The small size of the Li(+) cations allows them to strongly couple to multiple interaction sites on the glucan chains of cellulose, including the spatially restricted regions around the ether linkages connecting neighboring glucose residues. Li(+) cations were thus identified as the main component responsible for driving cellulose dissolution. The mechanism for explaining the solubility of cellulose in the LiCl/DMA system deduced from the analysis of atomistic-scale simulations conducted in this work is also consistent with most of the empirical observations related to cellulose dissolution in salt/amide solvent systems.

  13. Elg1, an alternative subunit of the RFC clamp loader, preferentially interacts with SUMOylated PCNA.

    PubMed

    Parnas, Oren; Zipin-Roitman, Adi; Pfander, Boris; Liefshitz, Batia; Mazor, Yuval; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Jentsch, Stefan; Kupiec, Martin

    2010-08-04

    Replication-factor C (RFC) is a protein complex that loads the processivity clamp PCNA onto DNA. Elg1 is a conserved protein with homology to the largest subunit of RFC, but its function remained enigmatic. Here, we show that yeast Elg1 interacts physically and genetically with PCNA, in a manner that depends on PCNA modification, and exhibits preferential affinity for SUMOylated PCNA. This interaction is mediated by three small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-interacting motifs and a PCNA-interacting protein box close to the N-terminus of Elg1. These motifs are important for the ability of Elg1 to maintain genomic stability. SUMOylated PCNA is known to recruit the helicase Srs2, and in the absence of Elg1, Srs2 and SUMOylated PCNA accumulate on chromatin. Strains carrying mutations in both ELG1 and SRS2 exhibit a synthetic fitness defect that depends on PCNA modification. Our results underscore the importance of Elg1, Srs2 and SUMOylated PCNA in the maintenance of genomic stability.

  14. Preferential interaction of the core histone tail domains with linker DNA.

    PubMed

    Angelov, D; Vitolo, J M; Mutskov, V; Dimitrov, S; Hayes, J J

    2001-06-05

    Within chromatin, the core histone tail domains play critical roles in regulating the structure and accessibility of nucleosomal DNA within the chromatin fiber. Thus, many nuclear processes are facilitated by concomitant posttranslational modification of these domains. However, elucidation of the mechanisms by which the tails mediate such processes awaits definition of tail interactions within chromatin. In this study we have investigated the primary DNA target of the majority of the tails in mononucleosomes. The results clearly show that the tails bind preferentially to "linker" DNA, outside of the DNA encompassed by the nucleosome core. These results have important implications for models of tail function within the chromatin fiber and for in vitro structural and functional studies using nucleosome core particles.

  15. Equilibrium dialysis data and the relationships between preferential interaction parameters for biological systems in terms of Kirkwood-Buff integrals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul E

    2006-02-16

    Equilibrium dialysis data has provided valuable information concerning the preferential interaction of a cosolvent with a biomolecule in aqueous solutions. Here, we formulate the experimental data in terms of Kirkwood-Buff (KB) theory, resulting in equations that provide a simple physical picture of the dialysis experiment and thereby the interaction of a cosolvent with a biomolecule. These results are then used to establish exact relationships between preferential interaction coefficients, defined in different ensembles and/or using different concentration scales, in terms of KB integrals. It is then argued that the molality based equilibrium dialysis data represent the situation most relevant to computer simulations performed in either open or closed systems.

  16. A novel Cryptosporidium parvum antigen, CP2, preferentially associates with membranous structures.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Steven P; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching

    2004-03-01

    The present study addresses the cloning and characterization of a Cryptosporidium parvum antigen, CP2. Sequencing of cDNA and genomic clones revealed a novel gene capable of coding a message of 2,136 nucleotides flanked by 28 and 140 nucleotides of the 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that CP2 is a secreted and/or membrane protein. Immunofluorescence microscopy detected CP2 enrichment in sporozoites that subsequently appeared to encase type I meronts in infected HCT-8 cells. Immunogold electron microscopy revealed that CP2 consistently localized to membranous structures throughout development. In addition, progression from macrogametocyte to sporulated oocyst revealed CP2 initially at the periphery of amylopectin-like granules, in the cytoplasm and discrete vesicles, the parasitophorous vacuole, on the surface of sporozoites, and finally on the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). The observed expression pattern suggests that CP2 may be involved in the invasion process and/or PVM integrity.

  17. Preparation of albumin preferential surfaces on poly(vinyl chloride) membranes via surface self-segregation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Feng, Linxian; Shen, Jiacong; Barbosa, M A

    2002-08-01

    Poly(vinyl chlorides)-graft-[omega-stearyl-poly(ethylene oxide)] (PVC-g-SPEO), which has a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) backbone, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) side chain, and stearyl end groups, has been synthesized. Self-organizing blends of the amphiphilic comb polymer in poly(vinyl chlorides) have been examined as a means to create albumin preferential surfaces on polymer films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates substantial surface segregation of the PVC-g-SPEO. A surface concentration of 59.9 EO wt % is achieved by the solution casting and heat treatment of a film with a bulk concentration of only 3.78 EO wt %. In the aqueous environment, the surface rearrangement of PVC-g-SPEO/PVC blend film is limited and presents a high interfacial energy and high depolar component of interfacial energy due to the "tail-like" SPEO side chain. Protein adsorption tests confirm that PVC-g-SPEO/PVC blend films absorb high levels of albumin and dramatically resist fibrinogen adsorption. Surfaces to attract and reversibly bind albumin, which might diminish the occurrence of thrombosis, inflammation, and infection, are developed by self-organizing blends of the amphiphilic comb polymer in poly(vinyl chlorides).

  18. Preferential accumulation and enhanced relative velocity of inertial droplets due to interactions with homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateson, Colin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present results from wind tunnel experiments on the evolution of small inertial (d ~ 10 - 200 μm) water droplets in homogeneous, isotropic, slowly decaying grid turbulence. High-speed imaging and a Particle Tracking algorithm are used to calculate relative velocity distributions. We analyze the preferential concentration, via the 2D Radial Distribution Function, and enhanced relative velocity of droplets resulting from their inertial interactions with the underlying turbulence. The two-dimensional particle velocities, measured from multi-image tracks along a streamwise plane, are conditionally analyzed with respect to the distance from the nearest particle. We focus on the non-normality of the statistics for the particle-particle separation velocity component to examine the influence of the inertial interaction with the turbulence on the dynamics of the droplets. We observe a negative bias (in the mean and mode) in the separation velocity of particles for short separations, signaling a tendency of particles to collide more frequently than a random agitation by turbulence would predict. The tails of the distribution are interpreted in terms of the collision/coalescence process and the probability of collisions that do not lead to coalescence.

  19. Interactions between Janus particles and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2012-02-01

    Understanding how nanoparticles interact with cell membranes is of great importance in drug/gene delivery. In this paper, we investigate the interactions between Janus particles and membranes by using dissipative particle dynamics, and find that there exist two different modes (i.e., insertion and engulfment) in the Janus particle-membrane interactions. The initial orientation and properties of Janus particles have an important impact on the interactions. When the hydrophilic part of the particle is close to the membrane or the particle has a larger section area and higher hydrophilic coverage, the particle is more likely to be engulfed by the membrane. We also provide insights into the interactions between Janus particles and membranes containing lipid rafts, and find that a Janus particle could easily detach from a membrane after it is engulfed by the raft. The present study suggests a potential way to translocate Janus particles through membranes, which may give some significant suggestions on future nanoparticle design for drug delivery.

  20. Interaction of arginine oligomer with model membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Dandan . E-mail: yi_dandan@yahoo.com.cn; Guoming, Li; Gao, Li; Wei, Liang

    2007-08-10

    Short oligomers of arginine (R8) have been shown to cross readily a variety of biological barriers. A hypothesis was put forward that inverted micelles form in biological membranes in the presence of arginine oligomer peptides, facilitating their transfer through the membranes. In order to define the role of peptide-lipid interaction in this mechanism, we prepared liposomes as the model membrane to study the ability of R8 inducing calcein release from liposomes, the fusion of liposomes, R8 binding to liposomes and membrane disturbing activity of the bound R8. The results show that R8 binding to liposome membrane depends on lipid compositions, negative surface charge density and interior water phase pH values of liposomes. R8 has no activity to induce the leakage of calcein from liposomes or improve liposome fusion. R8 does not permeabilize through the membrane spontaneously. These peptides delivering drugs through membranes may depend on receptors and energy.

  1. Interactions of chrysotile asbestos with erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Brody, A R; Hill, L H

    1983-09-01

    Chrysotile asbestos causes lysis of red blood cells. It has been proposed that the mechanism of hemolysis is mediated through interactions between asbestos and cell membrane glycoproteins. Our studies support this concept and the following results are reported. Electron microscopy shows that asbestos fibers distort red blood cells and bind to cell membranes which may become wrapped around the fibers. This reaction is prevented by pretreatment of the cells with neuraminidase. The distribution of lectins which bind to membrane glycoproteins is altered by treating the cells with asbestos. Cell distortion and membrane deformation consequent to asbestos treatment correlate with a clear increase in the ratio of intracellular Na+:K+ ions.

  2. Preferential interaction between DNA and small ions in mixed-size counterion systems: Monte Carlo simulation and density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Yu, Yang-Xin; Gao, Guang-Hua; Luo, Guang-Sheng

    2007-04-01

    Competitive binding between counterions around DNA molecule is characterized using the preferential interaction coefficient of individual ion in single and mixed electrolyte solutions. The canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation, and density functional theory (DFT) proposed in our previous work [Wang, Yu, Gao, and Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 234904 (2005)] are utilized to calculate the preferential interaction coefficients. The MC simulations and theoretical results show that for single electrolyte around DNA, the preferential interaction coefficient of electrolyte decreases as the cation size is increased, indicating that the larger cation has less accumulation ability in the vicinity of DNA. For the mixed electrolyte solution, it is found that cation diameter has a significant effect on the competitive ability while anion diameter has a negligible effect. It proves that the preferential interaction coefficients of all ions decrease as the total ionic concentration is increased. The DFT generally has better performance than the PB equation does when compared to the MC simulation data. The DFT behaves quite well for the real ionic solutions such as the KCl -NaCl-H2O, NaCl -CaCl2-H2O, and CaCl2-MgCl2-H2O systems.

  3. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Membrane Interactions: Effects of Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; St Clair, Johnna R; London, Erwin; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2017-01-17

    Amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) contributes to β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Perturbation of the β-cell membrane may contribute to IAPP-induced toxicity. We examine the effects of lipid composition, salt, and buffer on IAPP amyloid formation and on the ability of IAPP to induce leakage of model membranes. Even low levels of anionic lipids promote amyloid formation and membrane permeabilization. Increasing the percentage of the anionic lipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (POPS) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(1'-rac-glycerol), enhances the rate of amyloid formation and increases the level of membrane permeabilization. The choice of zwitterionic lipid has no noticeable effect on membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation but in most cases affects leakage, which tends to decrease in the following order: 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > sphingomyelin. Uncharged lipids that increase the level of membrane order weaken the ability of IAPP to induce leakage. Leakage is due predominately to pore formation rather than complete disruption of the vesicles under the conditions used in these studies. Cholesterol at or below physiological levels significantly reduces the rate of vesicle-catalyzed IAPP amyloid formation and decreases the susceptibility to IAPP-induced leakage. The effects of cholesterol on amyloid formation are masked by 25 mol % POPS. Overall, there is a strong inverse correlation between the time to form amyloid and the extent of vesicle leakage. NaCl reduces the rate of membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation by anionic vesicles, but accelerates amyloid formation in solution. The implications for IAPP membrane interactions are discussed, as is the possibility that the loss of phosphatidylserine asymmetry enhances IAPP amyloid formation and membrane damage in vivo via a positive feedback loop.

  4. Cholesterol and the interaction of proteins with membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol is not uniformly distributed in biological membranes. One of the factors influencing the formation of cholesterol-rich domains in membranes is the unequal lateral distribution of proteins in membranes. Certain proteins are found in cholesterol-rich domains. In some of these cases, it is as a consequence of the proteins interacting directly with cholesterol. There are several structural features of a protein that result in the protein preferentially associating with cholesterol-rich domains. One of the best documented of these is certain types of lipidations. In addition, however, there are segments of a protein that can preferentially sequester cholesterol. We discuss two examples of these cholesterol-recognition elements: the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain and the sterol-sensing domain (SSD). The requirements for a CRAC motif are quite flexible and predict that a large number of sequences could recognize cholesterol. There are, however, certain proteins that are known to interact with cholesterol-rich domains of cell membranes that have CRAC motifs, and synthetic peptides corresponding to these segments also promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains. Modeling studies have provided a rationale for certain requirements of the CRAC motif. The SSD is a larger protein segment comprising five transmembrane domains. The amino acid sequence YIYF is found in several SSD and in certain other proteins for which there is evidence that they interact with cholesterol-rich domains. The CRAC sequences as well as YIYF are generally found adjacent to a transmembrane helical segment. These regions appear to have a strong influence of the localization of certain proteins into domains in biological membranes. In addition to the SSD, there is also a domain found in soluble proteins, the START domain, that binds lipids. Certain proteins with START domains specifically bind cholesterol and are believed to function in

  5. Interaction of elaiophylin with model bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, J.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Elaiophylin is a new macrodiolide antibiotic, which is produced by the Streptomyces strains [1]. It displays biological activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The mode of action of this antibiotic has been attributed to an alteration of the membrane permeability. When this antibiotic is inserted into the bilayer membranes destabilization of the membrane and formation of ion-penetrable channels is observed. The macrodiolide antibiotic forms stable cation selective ion channels in synthetic lipid bilayer membranes. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Elaiophylin with model bilayer membranes and to get information on the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers in presence of this antibiotic. Patch-clamp technique [2] were used in the study

  6. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-05

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  7. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    DOE PAGES

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. Thismore » includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.« less

  8. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. This includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.

  9. Rotavirus interaction with isolated membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Alonso-Torre, S R; Charpilienne, A; Vasseur, M; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J; Alvarado, F

    1994-06-01

    To gain information about the mechanism of epithelial cell infection by rotavirus, we studied the interaction of bovine rotavirus, RF strain, with isolated membrane vesicles from apical membrane of pig enterocytes. Vesicles were charged with high (quenching) concentrations of either carboxyfluorescein or calcein, and the rate of fluorophore release (dequenching) was monitored as a function of time after mixing with purified virus particles. Purified single-shelled particles and untrypsinized double-shelled ones had no effect. Trypsinized double-shelled virions induced carboxyfluorescein release according to sigmoid curves whose lag period and amplitude were a function of virus concentration and depended on both temperature and pH. The presence of 100 mM salts (Tris Cl, NaCl, or KCl) was required, since there was no reaction in isoosmotic salt-free sorbitol media. Other membrane vesicle preparations such as apical membranes of piglet enterocyte and rat placenta syncytiotrophoblasts, basolateral membranes of pig enterocytes, and the undifferentiated plasma membrane of cultured MA104 cells all gave qualitatively similar responses. Inhibition by a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that the active species causing carboxyfluorescein release is VP5*. Ca2+ (1 mM), but not Mg2+, inhibited the reaction. In situ solubilization of the outer capsid of trypsinized double-shelled particles changed release kinetics from sigmoidal to hyperbolic and was not inhibited by Ca2+. Our results indicate that membrane destabilization caused by trypsinized outer capsid proteins of rotavirus leads to fluorophore release. From the data presented here, a hypothetical model of the interaction of the various states of the viral particles with the membrane lipid phase is proposed. Membrane permeabilization induced by rotavirus may be related to the mechanism of entry of the virus into the host cell.

  10. Interactions between HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies and Model Lipid Membranes imaged with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauscher, Stefan; Hardy, Gregory; Alam, Munir; Shapter, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Lipid membrane interactions with rare, broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), 2F5 and 4E10, play a critical role in HIV-1 neutralization. Our research is motivated by recent immunization studies that have shown that induction of antibodies that avidly bind the gp41-MPER antigen is not sufficient for neutralization. Rather, it is required that antigen designs induce polyreactive antibodies that recognize MPER antigens as well as the viral lipid membrane. However, the mechanistic details of how membrane properties influence NAb-lipid and NAb-antigen interactions remain unknown. Furthermore, it is well established that the native viral membrane is heterogeneous, representing a mosaic of lipid rafts and protein clustering. However, the size, physical properties, and dynamics of these regions are poorly characterized and their potential roles in HIV-1 neutralization are also unknown. To understand how membrane properties contribute to 2F5/4E10 membrane interactions, we have engineered biomimetic supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and use atomic force microscopy to visualize membrane domains, antigen clustering, and antibody-membrane interactions at sub-nanometer z-resolution. Our results show that localized binding of HIV-1 antigens and NAbs occur preferentially with the most fluid membrane domain. This supports the theory that NAbs may interact with regions of low lateral lipid forces that allow antibody insertion into the bilayer.

  11. Functionalized nanoparticle interactions with polymeric membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, D.A.; Steele, M.; Weir, A.; Hristovski, K.; Westerhoff, P.

    2011-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed to measure the retention of a class of functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) onporous (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) membranes. The findings impact engineered water and wastewater treatment using membrane technology, characterization and analytical schemes for NP detection, and the use of NPs in waste treatment scenarios. The NPs studied were composed of silver, titanium dioxide, and gold; had organic coatings to yield either positive or negative surface charge; and were between 2 and 10 nm in diameter. NP solutions were applied to polymeric membranes composed of different materials and pore sizes (ranging from ~2 nm [3 kDa molecular weight cutoff] to 0.2 μm). Greater than 99% rejection was observed of positively charged NPs by negatively charged membranes even though pore diameters were up to 20 times the NP diameter; thus, sorption caused rejection. Negatively charged NPs were less well rejected, but behavior was dependant not only on surface functionality but on NP core material (Ag, TiO2, or Au). NP rejection depended more upon NP properties than membrane properties; all of the negatively charged polymeric membranes behaved similarly. The NP-membrane interaction behavior fell into four categories, which are defined and described here. PMID:22177020

  12. Membrane–drug interactions studied using model membrane systems

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Jacqueline; Suhendro, Daniel K.; Zieleniecki, Julius L.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Köper, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The direct interaction of drugs with the cell membrane is often neglected when drug effects are studied. Systematic investigations are hindered by the complexity of the natural membrane and model membrane systems can offer a useful alternative. Here some examples are reviewed of how model membrane architectures including vesicles, Langmuir monolayers and solid supported membranes can be used to investigate the effects of drug molecules on the membrane structure, and how these interactions can translate into effects on embedded membrane proteins. PMID:26586998

  13. Self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional version of the generalized Smoluchowski equation is used to analyze the time (or distance) dependent self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins in concentrated membrane systems. This equation provides a well established starting point for descriptions of the diffusion of particles that interact through both direct and hydrodynamic forces; in this initial work only the effects of direct interactions are explicitly considered. Data describing diffusion in the presence of hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions are presented. The effect that interactions have on the self-diffusion coefficient of a real protein molecule from mouse liver gap junctions is also calculated. The results indicate that self diffusion is always inhibited by direct interactions; this observation is interpreted in terms of the caging that will exist at finite protein concentration. It is also noted that, over small distance scales, the diffusion coefficient is determined entirely by the very strong Brownian forces; therefore, as a function of displacement the self-diffusion coefficient decays (rapidly) from its value at infinite dilution to its steady-state interaction-averaged value. The steady-state self-diffusion coefficient describes motion over distance scales that range from approximately 10 nm to cellular dimensions and is the quantity measured in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. The short-ranged behavior of the diffusion coefficient is important on the interparticle-distance scale and may therefore influence the rate at which nearest-neighbor collisional processes take place. The hard-disk theoretical results presented here are in excellent agreement with lattice Monte-Carlo results obtained by other workers. The concentration dependence of experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of antibody-hapten complexes bound to the membrane surface is consistent with that predicted by the theory. The

  14. Microscopic understanding of preferential exclusion of compatible solute ectoine: direct interaction and hydration alteration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Isseki; Jindo, Yoichi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2007-08-30

    Ectoine, a zwitterionic compatible solute (CS), acts as an effective stabilizer of protein function. Using molecular dynamics simulation, solvent spatial distributions around both met-enkephalin (M-Enk) and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) were investigated at the molecular level in ectoine aqueous solution. An unexpected finding was that ectoine exhibits preferential binding, as an overall tendency, around both peptides. However, with the aid of the surficial Kirkwood-Buff parameter, it was clearly shown that the preferential exclusion of ectoine from the peptide surface was weaker in the smaller M-Enk than in the larger CI2. It is concluded that a denser and more structured hydration layer, such as that developed on the surface of CI2, is an important factor in the exclusion of ectoine.

  15. Membrane interactions of a novel viral enterotoxin: rotavirus nonstructural glycoprotein NSP4.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Schroeder, F; Zeng, C; Estes, M K; Schoer, J K; Ball, J M

    2001-04-03

    The rotavirus enterotoxin, NSP4, is a novel secretory agonist that also plays a role in the unique rotavirus morphogenesis that involves a transient budding of newly made immature viral particles into the endoplasmic reticulum. NSP4 and an active peptide corresponding to NSP4 residues 114 to 135 (NSP4(114-135)) mobilize intracellular calcium and induce secretory chloride currents when added exogenously to intestinal cells or mucosa. Membrane-NSP4 interactions may contribute to these alterations; however, details of a lipid-binding domain are unresolved. Therefore, circular dichroism was used to determine (i) the interaction(s) of NSP4 and NSP4(114-135) with model membranes, (ii) the conformational changes elicited in NSP4 upon interacting with membranes, (iii) if NSP4(114-135) is a membrane interacting domain, and (iv) the molar dissociation constant (K(d)) of NSP4(114-135) with defined lipid vesicles. Circular dichroism revealed for the first time that NSP4 and NSP4(114-135) undergo secondary structural changes upon interaction with membrane vesicles. This interaction was highly dependent on both the membrane surface curvature and the lipid composition. NSP4 and NSP4(114-135) preferentially interacted with highly curved, small unilamellar vesicle membranes (SUV), but significantly less with low-curvature, large unilamellar vesicle membranes (LUV). Binding to SUV, but not LUV, was greatly enhanced by negatively charged phospholipids. Increasing the SUV cholesterol content, concomitant with the presence of negatively charged phospholipids, further potentiated the interaction of NSP4(114-135) with the SUV membrane. The K(d) of NSP4(114-135) was determined as well as partitioning of NSP4(114-135) with SUVs in a filtration-binding assay. These data confirmed NSP4 and its active peptide interact with model membranes that mimic caveolae.

  16. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein–protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  17. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein-protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances.

  18. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-lu; Ding, Hong-ming; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2016-03-01

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide-membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field.

  19. Membrane interactivity of charged local anesthetic derivative and stereoselectivity in membrane interaction of local anesthetic enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki

    2008-01-01

    With respect to the membrane lipid theory as a molecular mechanism for local anesthetics, two critical subjects, the negligible effects of charged drugs when applied extracellularly and the stereoselective effects of enantiomers, were verified by paying particular attention to membrane components, phospholipids with the anionic property, and cholesterol with several chiral carbons. The membrane interactivities of structurally-different anesthetics were determined by their induced fluidity changes of liposomal membranes. Lidocaine (3.0 μmol/mL) fluidized phosphatidylcholine membranes, but not its quaternary derivative QX-314 (3.0 μmol/mL). Similarly to the mother molecule lidocaine, however, QX-314 fluidized phosphatidylserine-containing nerve cell model membranes and acidic phospholipids-constituting membranes depending on the acidity of membrane lipids. Positively charged local anesthetics are able to act on lipid bilayers by ion-pairing with anionic (acidic) phospholipids. Bupivacaine (0.75 mol/mL) and ropivacaine (0.75 and 1.0 μmol/mL) fluidized nerve cell model membranes with the potency being S(−)-enantiomer < racemate < R(+)-enantiomer (P < 0.01, vs antipode and racemate) and cardiac cell model membranes with the potency being S(−)-ropivacaine < S(−)-bupivacaine < R(+)-bupivacaine (P < 0.01). However, their membrane effects were not different when removing cholesterol from the model membranes. Stereoselectivity is producible by cholesterol which increases the chirality of lipid bilayers and enables to discriminate anesthetic enantiomers. The membrane lipid interaction should be reevaluated as the mode of action of local anesthetics. PMID:22915858

  20. Membrane interactivity of charged local anesthetic derivative and stereoselectivity in membrane interaction of local anesthetic enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki

    2008-01-01

    With respect to the membrane lipid theory as a molecular mechanism for local anesthetics, two critical subjects, the negligible effects of charged drugs when applied extracellularly and the stereoselective effects of enantiomers, were verified by paying particular attention to membrane components, phospholipids with the anionic property, and cholesterol with several chiral carbons. The membrane interactivities of structurally-different anesthetics were determined by their induced fluidity changes of liposomal membranes. Lidocaine (3.0 μmol/mL) fluidized phosphatidylcholine membranes, but not its quaternary derivative QX-314 (3.0 μmol/mL). Similarly to the mother molecule lidocaine, however, QX-314 fluidized phosphatidylserine-containing nerve cell model membranes and acidic phospholipids-constituting membranes depending on the acidity of membrane lipids. Positively charged local anesthetics are able to act on lipid bilayers by ion-pairing with anionic (acidic) phospholipids. Bupivacaine (0.75 mol/mL) and ropivacaine (0.75 and 1.0 μmol/mL) fluidized nerve cell model membranes with the potency being S(-)-enantiomer < racemate < R(+)-enantiomer (P < 0.01, vs antipode and racemate) and cardiac cell model membranes with the potency being S(-)-ropivacaine < S(-)-bupivacaine < R(+)-bupivacaine (P < 0.01). However, their membrane effects were not different when removing cholesterol from the model membranes. Stereoselectivity is producible by cholesterol which increases the chirality of lipid bilayers and enables to discriminate anesthetic enantiomers. The membrane lipid interaction should be reevaluated as the mode of action of local anesthetics.

  1. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  2. Isoniazid interaction with phosphatidylcholine-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Amanda Vicente; Marengo Trindade, Paulo; Marques, Sheylla; Brum, Tainá; Harte, Etienne; Rodrigues, Marieli Oliveira; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Alves, Isabel Dantas; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2013-11-01

    Interaction between the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) and phosphatidylcholine membranes was investigated in terms of: (i) drug affinity to a lipid bilayer and (ii) drug-induced changes in the dynamic properties of liposomes, such as membrane hydration state, polar head and non-polar acyl chain order and lipid phase transition behavior. These parameters were studied by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR), UV-visible, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. PWR measurements showed an INH membrane dissociation constant value of 0.031 μM to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. INH induced higher membrane perturbation in the plane which is perpendicular to the membrane plane. The INH saturation concentration in phosphatidylcholine liposomes was 170 μM. At this concentration, HATR-FTIR and NMR findings showed that INH may interact with the lipid polar head, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the phosphate region and enhancing the choline motional freedom. DSC measurements showed that, at 115 μM, INH was responsible for a decrease in lipid phase transition temperature of approximately 2 °C and had no influence in the lipid enthalpy variation (ΔH). However, at 170 μM, INH induced the reduction of the ΔH by approximately 52%, suggesting that the drug may increase the distance among lipid molecules and enhance the freedom of the lipid acyl chains methylene groups. This paper provides information on the effects of INH on membrane dynamics which is important to understand liposome targeting of the drug and for the development of anti-TB pharmacologic systems that not only are less susceptible to resistance but also have low toxicity.

  3. Preferential interaction of β-globulin from sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.) with cosolvents is accompanied by the protein structural reorganization.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, P M Guna; Yadav, Jay Kant

    2013-05-01

    The effect of a cosolvent on the structure and stability of a protein depends upon the nature of preferential protein- water, protein-cosolvent or cosolvent-water interactions. The preferential interaction parameters of glycerol, sorbitol and sucrose with β-globulin (from Sesamum indicum L. seeds) were evaluated and the results showed the exclusion of cosolvents and preferential hydration of the protein. Data from fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and thermal stability measurements inferred that the preferential hydration had a considerable effect on the structure of protein under native conditions. Such cosolvent-protein interactions bring out a previously unnoticed, but outstanding phenomenon of cosolvent induced structural effects on the protein. This study reveals that these cosolvents interact with β-globulin in such a way that they induce a structural reshuffling to enhance the protein stability, mostly by intensifying intra-molecular hydrophobic interactions.

  4. Curvature-mediated interactions between membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K S; Neu, J; Oster, G

    1998-01-01

    Membrane proteins can deform the lipid bilayer in which they are embedded. If the bilayer is treated as an elastic medium, then these deformations will generate elastic interactions between the proteins. The interaction between a single pair is repulsive. However, for three or more proteins, we show that there are nonpairwise forces whose magnitude is similar to the pairwise forces. When there are five or more proteins, we show that the nonpairwise forces permit the existence of stable protein aggregates, despite their pairwise repulsions. PMID:9788923

  5. Cell-penetrating compounds preferentially bind glycosaminoglycans over plasma membrane lipids in a charge density- and stereochemistry-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Prevette, Lisa E; Benish, Nicolas C; Schoenecker, Amber R; Braden, Kristin J

    2015-12-01

    Cell-penetrating compounds (CPCs) are often conjugated to drugs and genes to facilitate cellular uptake. We hypothesize that the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged amines of the cell-penetrating compounds and the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) extending from cell surfaces is the initiating step in the internalization process. The interactions of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer, Tat peptide and 25 kDa linear PEI with four different GAGs have been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry to elucidate structure-function relationships that could lead to improved drug and gene delivery methods to a wide variety of cell types. Detailed thermodynamic analysis has determined that CPC-GAG binding constants range from 8.7×10(3) to 2.4×10(6)M(-1) and that affinity is dependent upon GAG charge density and stereochemistry and CPC molecular weight. The effect of GAG composition on affinity is likely due to hydrogen bonding between CPC amines and amides and GAG hydroxyl and amine groups. These results were compared to the association of CPCs with lipid vesicles of varying composition as model plasma membranes to finally clarify the relative importance of each cell surface component in initial cell recognition. CPC-lipid affinity increases with anionic lipid content, but GAG affinity is higher for all cell-penetrating compounds, confirming the role these heterogeneous polysaccharides play in cellular association and clustering.

  6. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  7. Delineating solute-solvent interactions in binary mixtures of ionic liquids in molecular solvents and preferential solvation approach.

    PubMed

    Khupse, Nageshwar D; Kumar, Anil

    2011-02-03

    The effect of solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions on the preferential solvation of solvatochromic indicators in binary mixtures of ionic liquids with molecular solvents has been investigated. The binary mixtures of the pyridinium-based ionic liquids 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([BP][BF4]), 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([3-MBP][BF4]), and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([4-MBP][BF4]) with molecular solvents like water, methanol, and dichloromethane have been selected for this investigation. The effect of addition of ionic liquids to molecular solvents on the polarity parameters E(T)(N), Kamlet-Taft parameters, hydrogen bond donor ability (HBD) (α), hydrogen bond acceptor ability (HBA) (β), and polarizability (π*) was obtained. The polarity parameters of the mixture display nonideality on addition of ionic liquids to water and dichloromethane. On the other hand, strong synergetic effects were seen in the ionic liquid-methanol binary mixtures. The preferential solvation models have been employed to analyze the collected data in order to achieve information on solute-solvent interactions in these binary mixtures.

  8. Directional interactions and cooperativity between mechanosensitive membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2013-03-01

    While modern structural biology has provided us with a rich and diverse picture of membrane proteins, the biological function of membrane proteins is often influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Here we explore the relation between the shape of membrane proteins and the cooperative function of membrane proteins induced by membrane-mediated elastic interactions. For the experimental model system of mechanosensitive ion channels we find that the sign and strength of elastic interactions depend on the protein shape, yielding distinct cooperative gating curves for distinct protein orientations. Our approach predicts how directional elastic interactions affect the molecular structure, organization, and biological function of proteins in crowded membranes.

  9. Mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    The generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is used, together with the two-dimensional pressure equation, to analyze mutual diffusion in concentrated membrane systems. These equations can be used to investigate the role that both direct and hydrodynamic interactions play in determining diffusive behavior. Here only direct interactions are explicitly incorporated into the theory at high densities; however, both direct and hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed for some dilute solutions. We look at diffusion in the presence of weak attractions, soft repulsions, and hard-core repulsions. It is found that, at low densities, attractions retard mutual diffusion while repulsions enhance it. Mechanistically, attractions tend to tether particles together and oppose the dissipation of gradients or fluctuations in concentration, while repulsions provide a driving force that pushes particles apart. At higher concentrations, changes in the structure of the fluid enhance mutual diffusion even in the presence of attractions. It is shown that the theoretical description of postelectrophoresis relaxation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments must be modified if interacting systems are studied. The effects of interactions on mutual diffusion coefficients have probably already been seen in postelectrophoresis relaxation experiments. PMID:2775829

  10. Equilibrium Denaturation and Preferential Interactions of an RNA Tetraloop with Urea.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jacob C; García, Angel E

    2017-02-16

    Urea is an important organic cosolute with implications in maintaining osmotic stress in cells and differentially stabilizing ensembles of folded biomolecules. We report an equilibrium study of urea-induced denaturation of a hyperstable RNA tetraloop through unbiased replica exchange molecular dynamics. We find that, in addition to destabilizing the folded state, urea smooths the RNA free energy landscape by destabilizing specific configurations, and forming favorable interactions with RNA nucleobases. A linear concentration-dependence of the free energy (m-value) is observed, in agreement with the results of other RNA hairpins and proteins. Additionally, analysis of the hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions within RNA primarily show temperature-dependence, while interactions between RNA and urea primarily show concentration-dependence. Our findings provide valuable insight into the effects of urea on RNA folding and describe the thermodynamics of a basic RNA hairpin as a function of solution chemistry.

  11. Separation of preferential interaction and excluded volume effects on DNA duplex and hairpin stability

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. B.; LaCroix, Andrew S.; Deines, Nickolas F.; Shkel, Irina; Record, M. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Small solutes affect protein and nucleic acid processes because of favorable or unfavorable chemical interactions of the solute with the biopolymer surface exposed or buried in the process. Large solutes also exclude volume and affect processes where biopolymer molecularity and/or shape changes. Here, we develop an analysis to separate and interpret or predict excluded volume and chemical effects of a flexible coil polymer on a process. We report a study of the concentration-dependent effects of the full series from monomeric to polymeric PEG on intramolecular hairpin and intermolecular duplex formation by 12-nucleotide DNA strands. We find that chemical effects of PEG on these processes increase in proportion to the product of the amount of DNA surface exposed on melting and the amount of PEG surface that is accessible to this DNA, and these effects are completely described by two interaction terms that quantify the interactions between this DNA surface and PEG end and interior groups. We find that excluded volume effects, once separated from these chemical effects, are quantitatively described by the analytical theory of Hermans, which predicts the excluded volume between a flexible polymer and a rigid molecule. From this analysis, we show that at constant concentration of PEG monomer, increasing PEG size increases the excluded volume effect but decreases the chemical interaction effect, because in a large PEG coil a smaller fraction of the monomers are accessible to the DNA. Volume exclusion by PEG has a much larger effect on intermolecular duplex formation than on intramolecular hairpin formation. PMID:21742980

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of PotA, a membrane-associated ATPase of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Kanai, Ken; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2014-01-01

    A membrane-associated ATPase, PotA, is a component of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in prokaryotes that plays an important role in normal cell growth by regulating the cellular polyamine concentration. No three-dimensional structures of membrane-associated ATPases in polyamine-uptake systems have been determined to date. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PotA from Thermotoga maritima are reported. Diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.7 Å resolution from both native and selenomethionine-labelled crystals. Preliminary crystallographic analysis revealed that the crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P3112 (or P3212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 88.9, c = 221.2 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°, indicating that a dimer was present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24915082

  13. Continuum electromechanical modeling of protein-membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y C; Lu, Benzhuo; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2010-10-01

    A continuum electromechanical model is proposed to describe the membrane curvature induced by electrostatic interactions in a solvated protein-membrane system. The model couples the macroscopic strain energy of membrane and the electrostatic solvation energy of the system, and equilibrium membrane deformation is obtained by minimizing the electroelastic energy functional with respect to the dielectric interface. The model is illustrated with the systems with increasing geometry complexity and captures the sensitivity of membrane curvature to the permanent and mobile charge distributions.

  14. Proteins interacting with Membranes: Protein Sorting and Membrane Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Membrane-bound transport in cells requires generating membrane curvature. In addition, transport is selective, in order to establish spatial gradients of membrane components in the cell. The mechanisms underlying cell membrane shaping by proteins and the influence of curvature on membrane composition are active areas of study in cell biophysics. In vitro approaches using Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a useful tool to identify the physical mechanisms that drive sorting of membrane components and membrane shape change by proteins. I will present recent work on the curvature sensing and generation of IRSp53, a protein belonging to the BAR family, whose members, sharing a banana-shaped backbone, are involved in endocytosis. Pulling membrane tubes with 10-100 nm radii from GUVs containing encapsulated IRSp53 have, unexpectedly, revealed a non-monotonic dependence of the protein concentration on the tube as a function of curvature. Experiments also show that bound proteins alter the tube mechanics and that protein phase separation along the tube occurs at low tensions. I will present accompanying theoretical work that can explain these findings based on the competition between the protein's intrinsic curvature and the effective rigidity of a membrane-protein patch.

  15. Classifying Membrane Proteins in the Proteome by Using Artificial Neural Networks Based on the Preferential Parameters of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subrata K.; Browne, Antony; Kazemian, Hassan; White, Kenneth

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are large set of biological macromolecules that play a fundamental role in physiology and pathophysiology for survival. From a pharma-economical perspective, though it is the fact that MPs constitute ˜75% of possible targets for novel drugs but MPs are one of the most understudied groups of proteins in biochemical research. This is mainly because of the technical difficulties of obtaining structural information about trans-membrane regions (these are small sequences that crossways the bilayer lipid membrane). It is quite useful to predict the location of transmembrane segments down the sequence, since these are the elementary structural building blocks defining their topology. There have been several attempts over the last 20 years to develop tools for predicting membrane-spanning regions but current tools are far away from achieving a considerable reliability in prediction. This study aims to exploit the knowledge and current understanding in the field of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in particular data representation through the development of a system to identify and predict membrane-spanning regions by analysing primary amino acids sequence. In this paper we present a novel neural network (NNs) architecture and algorithms for predicting membrane spanning regions from primary amino acids sequences by using their preference parameters.

  16. The Dorsal Medial Prefrontal Cortex Responds Preferentially to Social Interactions during Natural Viewing

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, William M.; Haxby, James V.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2016-01-01

    Humans display a strong tendency to make spontaneous inferences concerning the thoughts and intentions of others. Although this ability relies upon the concerted effort of multiple brain regions, the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) is most closely associated with the ability to reason about other people's mental states and form impressions of their character. Here, we investigated this region's putative social category preference using fMRI as 34 participants engaged in uninstructed viewing of a complex naturalistic stimulus. Using a data-driven “reverse correlation” approach, we characterize the DMPFC's stimulus response profile from ongoing neural responses to a dynamic movie stimulus. Results of this analysis demonstrate that the DMPFC's response profile is dominated by the presence of scenes involving social interactions between characters. Subsequent content analysis of video clips created from this response profile confirmed this finding. In contrast, regions of the inferotemporal and parietal cortex were selectively tuned to faces and actions, both features that often covary with social interaction but may be difficult to disentangle using standard event-related approaches. Together, these findings suggest that the DMPFC is finely tuned for processing social interaction above other categories and that this preference is maintained during unrestricted viewing of complex natural stimuli such as movies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recently, studies have brought into question whether the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC), a region long associated with social cognition, is specialized for the processing of social information. We examine the response profile of this region during natural viewing of a reasonably naturalistic stimulus (i.e., a Hollywood movie) using a data-driven reverse correlation technique. Our findings demonstrate that, during natural viewing, the DMPFC is strongly tuned to the social features of the stimulus above other categories

  17. Molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction at implantation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lien M; Coward, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon the implantation of a competent embryo into a receptive endometrium. Despite major advancement in our understanding of reproductive medicine over the last few decades, implantation failure still occurs in both normal pregnancies and those created artificially by assisted reproductive technology (ART). Consequently, there is significant interest in elucidating the etiology of implantation failure. The complex multistep process of implantation begins when the developing embryo first makes contact with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells within the uterine environment. However, although this biological interaction marks the beginning of a fundamental developmental process, our knowledge of the intricate physiological and molecular processes involved remains sparse. In this synopsis, we aim to provide an overview of our current understanding of the morphological changes which occur to the plasma membrane of the uterine endothelium, and the molecular mechanisms that control communication between the early embryo and the endometrium during implantation. A multitude of molecular factors have been implicated in this complex process, including endometrial integrins, extracellular matrix molecules, adhesion molecules, growth factors, and ion channels. We also explore the development of in vitro models for embryo implantation to help researchers investigate mechanisms which may underlie implantation failure. Understanding the precise molecular pathways associated with implantation failure could help us to generate new prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers, and may identify novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Ca2+ induces clustering of membrane proteins in the plasma membrane via electrostatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zilly, Felipe E; Halemani, Nagaraj D; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Schreiber, Arne; Jahn, Reinhard; Lang, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins and membrane lipids are frequently organized in submicron-sized domains within cellular membranes. Factors thought to be responsible for domain formation include lipid–lipid interactions, lipid–protein interactions and protein–protein interactions. However, it is unclear whether the domain structure is regulated by other factors such as divalent cations. Here, we have examined in native plasma membranes and intact cells the role of the second messenger Ca2+ in membrane protein organization. We find that Ca2+ at low micromolar concentrations directly redistributes a structurally diverse array of membrane proteins via electrostatic effects. Redistribution results in a more clustered pattern, can be rapid and triggered by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and is reversible. In summary, the data demonstrate that the second messenger Ca2+ strongly influences the organization of membrane proteins, thus adding a novel and unexpected factor that may control the domain structure of biological membranes. PMID:21364530

  19. Ca2+ induces clustering of membrane proteins in the plasma membrane via electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Zilly, Felipe E; Halemani, Nagaraj D; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Schreiber, Arne; Jahn, Reinhard; Lang, Thorsten

    2011-04-06

    Membrane proteins and membrane lipids are frequently organized in submicron-sized domains within cellular membranes. Factors thought to be responsible for domain formation include lipid-lipid interactions, lipid-protein interactions and protein-protein interactions. However, it is unclear whether the domain structure is regulated by other factors such as divalent cations. Here, we have examined in native plasma membranes and intact cells the role of the second messenger Ca(2+) in membrane protein organization. We find that Ca(2+) at low micromolar concentrations directly redistributes a structurally diverse array of membrane proteins via electrostatic effects. Redistribution results in a more clustered pattern, can be rapid and triggered by Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and is reversible. In summary, the data demonstrate that the second messenger Ca(2+) strongly influences the organization of membrane proteins, thus adding a novel and unexpected factor that may control the domain structure of biological membranes.

  20. Protein-dependent Membrane Interaction of A Partially Disordered Protein Complex with Oleic Acid: Implications for Cancer Lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Arunima; Prasanna, Xavier; Agiru, Priyanka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Rydström, Anna; Ho, James C. S.; Svanborg, Catharina; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-01-01

    Bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA) forms cytotoxic complexes with oleic acid (OA) that perturbs tumor cell membranes, but molecular determinants of these membrane-interactions remain poorly understood. Here, we aim to obtain molecular insights into the interaction of BLA/BLA-OA complex with model membranes. We characterized the folding state of BLA-OA complex using tryptophan fluorescence and resolved residue-specific interactions of BLA with OA using molecular dynamics simulation. We integrated membrane-binding data using a voltage-sensitive probe and molecular dynamics (MD) to demonstrate the preferential interaction of the BLA-OA complex with negatively charged membranes. We identified amino acid residues of BLA and BLA-OA complex as determinants of these membrane interactions using MD, functionally corroborated by uptake of the corresponding α-LA peptides across tumor cell membranes. The results suggest that the α-LA component of these cytotoxic complexes confers specificity for tumor cell membranes through protein interactions that are maintained even in the lipid complex, in the presence of OA. PMID:27731329

  1. Protein-dependent Membrane Interaction of A Partially Disordered Protein Complex with Oleic Acid: Implications for Cancer Lipidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Arunima; Prasanna, Xavier; Agiru, Priyanka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Rydström, Anna; Ho, James C. S.; Svanborg, Catharina; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-10-01

    Bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA) forms cytotoxic complexes with oleic acid (OA) that perturbs tumor cell membranes, but molecular determinants of these membrane-interactions remain poorly understood. Here, we aim to obtain molecular insights into the interaction of BLA/BLA-OA complex with model membranes. We characterized the folding state of BLA-OA complex using tryptophan fluorescence and resolved residue-specific interactions of BLA with OA using molecular dynamics simulation. We integrated membrane-binding data using a voltage-sensitive probe and molecular dynamics (MD) to demonstrate the preferential interaction of the BLA-OA complex with negatively charged membranes. We identified amino acid residues of BLA and BLA-OA complex as determinants of these membrane interactions using MD, functionally corroborated by uptake of the corresponding α-LA peptides across tumor cell membranes. The results suggest that the α-LA component of these cytotoxic complexes confers specificity for tumor cell membranes through protein interactions that are maintained even in the lipid complex, in the presence of OA.

  2. Preferential inhibition of the plasma membrane NADH oxidase (NOX) activity by diphenyleneiodonium chloride with NADPH as donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    The cell-surface NADH oxidase (NOX) protein of plant and animal cells will utilize both NADH and NADPH as reduced electron donors for activity. The two activities are distinguished by a differential inhibition by the redox inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). Using both plasma membranes and cells, activity with NADPH as donor was markedly inhibited by DPI at submicromolar concentrations, whereas with NADH as donor, DPI was much less effective or had no effect on the activity. The possibility of the inhibition being the result of two different enzymes was eliminated by the use of a recombinant NOX protein. The findings support the concept that NOX proteins serve as terminal oxidases for plasma membrane electron transport involving cytosolic reduced pyridine nucleotides as the natural electron donors and with molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor.

  3. Interaction of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-10-10

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used in a growing number of applications. Their interactions with biological materials, cell membranes in particular, is of interest in applications including drug delivery and for understanding the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations with the MARTINI model to study the interactions of model nanotubes of different thickness, length, and patterns of chemical modification with model membranes. In addition, we characterize the interactions of small bundles of carbon nanotubes with membrane models. Short pristine carbon nanotubes readily insert into membranes and adopt an orientation parallel to the plane of the membrane in the center of the membrane. Larger aggregates and functionalized nanotubes exhibit a range of possible interactions. The distribution and orientation of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by functionalizing the nanotubes. Free energy calculations provide thermodynamic insight into the preferred orientations of different nanotubes and quantify structural defects in the lipid matrix.

  4. Protein-Protein interaction networks: why static MpK model works and preferential attachment does not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingshan; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2007-03-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to explain the observed scale free structure p(k) ˜k^-γ of protein-protein interaction networks. We argue that the preferential attachment coming from gene duplication[1] is questionable. A static ``MpK'' model produces the scale free structure via computer simulations[2] for unexplained reasons. On the other hand, it was analytically proved[3] that deterministic threshold models produce scale free networks (with γ≡2) if fitness distributions are exponential. We study the static MpK model further and find the above analytical proof applicable with extensions, and γ dependent on the threshold parameter. This work not only predicts the dependence of γ on protein concentrations, but also provides a generic mechanism of scale free networks. The clustering coefficient distribution in the model is interpreted by a simple picture. [1] A.-L. Barab'asi and Z. N. Oltvai, Nature Reviews Genetics 5, 101 (2004). [2] E. J. Deeds, O. Ashenberg, E. I. Shakhnovich, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103, 311 (2006). [3] G. Caldarelli, A. Capocci, P. De Los Rios, and M. A. Muñoz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 258702 (2002).

  5. Influence of membrane surface roughness on interfacial interactions with sludge flocs in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the interfacial interactions between sludge flocs and a rough membrane surface in a submerged membrane bioreactor were investigated. Models describing these interfacial interactions were firstly proposed based on the surface element integration (SEI) method. Surface properties of sludge flocs and membrane were experimentally determined to simulate the models through composite Simpson's rule. It was found that, roughness on membrane surface significantly decreased interaction strength, which enabled the sludge flocs to more easily attach on and detach from the rough membrane surface. Further analysis showed that the value of total interaction energy increased with asperity radius, while the strength of total interaction energy decreased with asperity height. Results also demonstrated that increase in floc size would significantly decrease the attractive specific total interaction with rough membrane surface. It was revealed that there existed a critical asperity radius above which the total interaction energy in certain separation distance coverage was continuously repulsive, facilitating membrane fouling control in MBRs. This study demonstrated the possibility to mitigate membrane fouling by "tailoring" membrane surface roughness.

  6. Mode of interaction of phosphofructokinase with the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, J D; Kezdy, F J; Steck, T L

    1985-09-05

    Phosphofructokinase is known to associate with the human erythrocyte membrane both in vitro and in vivo. Such association activates the enzyme in vitro by relieving the allosteric inhibition imposed by ATP (Karadsheh, N.S., and Uyeda, K. (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 7418-7420). We now demonstrate that ADP, ATP, and NADH, all of which are known to bind to the enzyme's adenine nucleotide activation site, are particularly potent in eluting the enzyme from the membrane. In addition, both inside-out red cell membrane vesicles and a 23-kDa fragment containing the amino terminus of the membrane protein, band 3, cause a slow, partial, and reversible inactivation of phosphofructokinase. The dependence of the residual phosphofructokinase activity on phosphofructokinase concentration demonstrates that inactivation occurs through the dissociation of active tetramers to inactive dimers. Dimers of phosphofructokinase associate with the membrane more avidly than tetramers. The kinetics of phosphofructokinase inactivation are consistent with the dissociation of tetramers in solution followed by the binding of dimers to the membrane. There is no indication of an association equilibrium between tetramers and dimers of phosphofructokinase bound to the membrane. Taken together, these results suggest that the amino-terminal segment of band 3 binds to the adenine nucleotide activation site, which is thought to be located in a cleft between the dimeric subunits of phosphofructokinase. As a result, band 3 not only rapidly activates the phosphofructokinase tetramer but also slowly inactivates the enzyme by preferentially binding its dissociated subunits.

  7. Vortex Interaction on Low Aspect Ratio Membrane Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the flight of bats and by recent interest in Micro Air Vehicles, we present measurements on the steady and unsteady behavior of low aspect ratio membrane wings. We conduct wind tunnel experiments with coupled force, kinematic, and flow field measurements, both on the wing and in the near wake. Membrane wings interact strongly with the vortices shed from the leading- and trailing-edges and the wing tips, and the details of the membrane support play an important role in the fluid-structure interaction. Membranes that are supported at the wing tip exhibit less membrane flutter, more coherent tip vortices, and enhanced lift. The interior wake can exhibit organized spanwise vortex shedding, and shows little influence from the tip vortex. In contrast, membranes with an unsupported wing tip show exaggerated static deformation, significant membrane fluttering and a diffuse, unsteady tip vortex. The unsteady tip vortex modifies the behavior of the interior wake, disrupting the wake coherence.

  8. Membrane Interacting Regions of Dengue Virus NS2A Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Dengue virus (DENV) NS2A protein, essential for viral replication, is a poorly characterized membrane protein. NS2A displays both protein/protein and membrane/protein interactions, yet neither its functions in the viral cycle nor its active regions are known with certainty. To highlight the different membrane-active regions of NS2A, we characterized the effects of peptides derived from a peptide library encompassing this protein’s full length on different membranes by measuring their membrane leakage induction and modulation of lipid phase behavior. Following this initial screening, one region, peptide dens25, had interesting effects on membranes; therefore, we sought to thoroughly characterize this region’s interaction with membranes. This peptide presents an interfacial/hydrophobic pattern characteristic of a membrane-proximal segment. We show that dens25 strongly interacts with membranes that contain a large proportion of lipid molecules with a formal negative charge, and that this effect has a major electrostatic contribution. Considering its membrane modulating capabilities, this region might be involved in membrane rearrangements and thus be important for the viral cycle. PMID:25119664

  9. Single vesicle observations of the cardiolipin-cytochrome C interaction: induction of membrane morphology changes.

    PubMed

    Beales, Paul A; Bergstrom, Chris L; Geerts, Nienke; Groves, John T; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2011-05-17

    We present a novel platform for investigating the composition-specific interactions of proteins (or other biologically relevant molecules) with model membranes composed of compositionally distinct domains. We focus on the interaction between a mitochondrial-specific lipid, cardiolipin (CL), and a peripheral membrane protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). We engineer vesicles with compositions such that they phase separate into coexisting liquid phases and the lipid of interest, CL, preferentially localizes into one of the domains (the liquid disordered (L(d)) phase). The presence of CL-rich and CL-depleted domains within the same vesicle provides a built-in control experiment to simultaneously observe the behavior of two membrane compositions under identical conditions. We find that cyt c binds strongly to CL-rich domains and observe fascinating morphological transitions within these regions of membrane. CL-rich domains start to form small buds and eventually fold up into a collapsed state. We also observe that cyt c can induce a strong attraction between the CL-rich domains of adjacent vesicles as demonstrated by the development of large osculating regions between these domains. Qualitatively similar behavior is observed when other polycationic proteins or polymers of a similar size and net charge are used instead of cyt c. We argue that these striking phenomena can be simply understood by consideration of colloidal forces between the protein and the membrane. We discuss the possible biological implications of our observations in relation to the structure and function of mitochondria.

  10. Aqua-vanadyl ion interaction with Nafion® membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Govind, Niranjan; Li, Bin; ...

    2015-03-23

    Lack of comprehensive understanding about the interactions between Nafion membrane and battery electrolytes prevents the straightforward tailoring of optimal materials for redox flow battery applications. In this work, we analyzed the interaction between aqua-vanadyl cation and sulfonic sites within the pores of Nafion membranes using combined theoretical and experimental X-ray spectroscopic methods. Molecular level interactions, namely, solvent share and contact pair mechanisms are discussed based on Vanadium and Sulfur K-edge spectroscopic analysis.

  11. Influence of membrane lipid composition on flavonoid-membrane interactions: Implications on their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Stalin; Krishnaswamy, Sridharan; Devashya, Venkappayya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2015-04-01

    The membrane interactions and localization of flavonoids play a vital role in altering membrane-mediated cell signaling cascades as well as influence the pharmacological activities such as anti-tumour, anti-microbial and anti-oxidant properties of flavonoids. Various techniques have been used to investigate the membrane interaction of flavonoids. These include partition coefficient, fluorescence anisotropy, differential scanning calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, electrophysiological methods and molecular dynamics simulations. Each technique will provide specific information about either alteration of membrane fluidity or localization of flavonoids within the lipid bilayer. Apart from the diverse techniques employed, the concentrations of flavonoids and lipid membrane composition employed in various studies reported in literature also are different and together these variables contribute to diverse findings that sometimes contradict each other. This review highlights different techniques employed to investigate the membrane interaction of flavonoids with special emphasis on erythrocyte model membrane systems and their significance in understanding the nature and extent of flavonoid-membrane interactions. We also attempt to correlate the membrane localization and alteration in membrane fluidity with the biological activities of flavonoids such as anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-microbial properties.

  12. Interfacial interactions between natural RBC membranes and synthetic polymeric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Brian T.; Jack Hu, Che-Ming; Fang, Ronnie H.; Dehaini, Diana; Carpenter, Cody; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-02-01

    The unique structural features and stealth properties of a recently developed red blood cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticle (RBC-NP) platform raise curiosity over the interfacial interactions between natural cellular membranes and polymeric nanoparticle substrates. Herein, several interfacial aspects of the RBC-NPs are examined, including completeness of membrane coverage, membrane sidedness upon coating, and the effects of polymeric particles' surface charge and surface curvature on the membrane cloaking process. The study shows that RBC membranes completely cover negatively charged polymeric nanoparticles in a right-side-out manner and enhance the particles' colloidal stability. The membrane cloaking process is applicable to particle substrates with a diameter ranging from 65 to 340 nm. Additionally, the study reveals that both surface glycans on RBC membranes and the substrate properties play a significant role in driving and directing the membrane-particle assembly. These findings further the understanding of the dynamics between cellular membranes and nanoscale substrates and provide valuable information toward future development and characterization of cellular membrane-cloaked nanodevices.The unique structural features and stealth properties of a recently developed red blood cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticle (RBC-NP) platform raise curiosity over the interfacial interactions between natural cellular membranes and polymeric nanoparticle substrates. Herein, several interfacial aspects of the RBC-NPs are examined, including completeness of membrane coverage, membrane sidedness upon coating, and the effects of polymeric particles' surface charge and surface curvature on the membrane cloaking process. The study shows that RBC membranes completely cover negatively charged polymeric nanoparticles in a right-side-out manner and enhance the particles' colloidal stability. The membrane cloaking process is applicable to particle substrates with a diameter ranging from

  13. The Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Preferentially Interacts with Oral Epithelial Cells in S Phase of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Al-Taweel, Firas B.; Douglas, C. W. Ian

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key periodontal pathogen, is capable of invading a variety of cells, including oral keratinocytes, by exploiting host cell receptors, including alpha-5 beta-1 (α5β1) integrin. Previous studies have shown that P. gingivalis accelerates the cell cycle and prevents apoptosis of host cells, but it is not known whether the cell cycle phases influence bacterium-cell interactions. The cell cycle distribution of oral keratinocytes was characterized by flow cytometry and BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) staining following synchronization of cultures by serum starvation. The effect of cell cycle phases on P. gingivalis invasion was measured by using antibiotic protection assays and flow cytometry, and these results were correlated with gene and surface expression levels of α5 integrin and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). There was a positive correlation (R = 0.98) between the number of cells in S phase and P. gingivalis invasion, the organism was more highly associated with cells in S phase than with cells in G2 and G1 phases, and S-phase cells contained 10 times more bacteria than did cells that were not in S phase. Our findings also show that α5 integrin, but not uPAR, was positively correlated with cells in S phase, which is consistent with previous reports indicating that P. gingivalis invasion of cells is mediated by α5 integrin. This study shows for the first time that P. gingivalis preferentially associates with and invades cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. The mechanism of targeting stable dividing cells may have implications for the treatment of periodontal diseases and may partly explain the persistence of this organism at subgingival sites. PMID:27091929

  14. Membrane interactions of the amphipathic amino terminus of huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Michalek, Matthias; Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Werten, Sebastiaan; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2013-02-05

    The amino-terminal domain of huntingtin (Htt17), located immediately upstream of the decisive polyglutamine tract, strongly influences important properties of this large protein and thereby the development of Huntington's disease. Htt17 markedly increases polyglutamine aggregation rates and the level of huntingtin's interactions with biological membranes. Htt17 adopts a largely helical conformation in the presence of membranes, and this structural transition was used to quantitatively analyze membrane association as a function of lipid composition. The apparent membrane partitioning constants increased in the presence of anionic lipids but decreased with increasing amounts of cholesterol. When membrane permeabilization was tested, a pronounced dye release was observed from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles and 75:25 (molar ratio) POPC/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine vesicles but not across bilayers that better mimic cellular membranes. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance structural investigations indicated that the Htt17 α-helix adopts an alignment parallel to the membrane surface, and that the tilt angle (∼75°) was nearly constant in all of the membranes that were investigated. Furthermore, the addition of Htt17 resulted in a decrease in the lipid order parameter in all of the membranes that were investigated. The lipid interactions of Htt17 have pivotal implications for membrane anchoring and functional properties of huntingtin and concomitantly the development of the disease.

  15. Modeling of Fluid-Membrane Interaction in Cellular Microinjection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Diaz, Jhon; Olgac, Nejat; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular microinjection is a well-accepted method to deliver matters such as sperm, nucleus, or macromolecules into biological cells. To improve the success rate of in vitro fertilization and to establish the ideal operating conditions for a novel computer controlled rotationally oscillating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technology, we investigate the fluid-membrane interactions in the ICSI procedure. The procedure consists of anchoring the oocyte (a developing egg) using a holding pipette, penetrating oocyte's zona pellucida (the outer membrane) and the oolemma (the plasma or inner membrane) using an injection micropipette, and finally to deliver sperm into the oocyte for fertilization. To predict the large deformation of the oocyte membranes up to the piercing of the oolemma and the motion of fluids across both membranes, the dynamic fluid-pipette-membrane interactions are formulated by the coupled Stokes' equations and the continuum membrane model based on Helfrich's energy theory. A boundary integral model is developed to simulate the transient membrane deformation and the local membrane stress induced by the longitudinal motion of the injection pipette. The model captures the essential features of the membranes shown on optical images of ICSI experiments, and is capable of suggesting the optimal deformation level of the oolemma to start the rotational oscillations for piercing into the oolemma.

  16. Interactions of some local anesthetics and alcohols with membranes.

    PubMed

    Frangopol, P T.; Mihăilescu, D

    2001-09-01

    A review of the results obtained by our group in the last decade regarding the interactions of procaine, lidocaine, dibucaine and tetracaine with membranes is presented in the context of the literature data. The action upon membranes, in first approximation monomolecular film of stearic acid spread at the air/water interface used as a membrane model, the modification of biomembrane structure and function using diffraction methods, lipid phase transition, fluidity of lipids and proteins, membrane expansion and platelet aggregation were studied. The thermodynamic knowledge of membrane-alcohol interactions improved by using highly sensitive calorimetric techniques are briefly reported. One of the main conclusions is that the physical state of a monolayer model membrane was the result of competitive interactions between film-film and film-substrate interactions. It was taken into account that local anesthetics, such as lidocaine, carbisocaine, mesocaine, showed changes in the bilayer structure, reflected in macroscopic mechanical properties. This restructuring of the lipid bilayer has a significant influence on the operation of functional subunits, e.g. ionic channels formed by gramicidin. The results support the concept of non-specific interactions of local anesthetics with lipid bilayers. The theoretical modeling of the interactions of local anesthetics is closely compared with experimental data. Our new theory of relaxation for these interactions is using a non-archimedean formalism based on a process resulting from superpositions of different component processes which take place at different scales of time.

  17. [Molecular interactions of membrane proteins and erythrocyte deformability].

    PubMed

    Boivin, P

    1984-06-01

    The structural and functional properties of the erythrocytic membrane constitute one of the essential elements of the red cell deformability. They intervene not only in the flexibility of the membrane, but also in the surface/volume relation and, through transmembrane exchanges, in the internal viscosity of the red cells. These properties depend essentially on the molecular composition of the elements which constitute the membrane, and on their interactions. The shape of the red cell and the flexibility of its membrane depend, to a great extent, on the membrane skeleton, whose main components are spectrin, actin, and protein 4.1. The spectrin basic molecule is a heterodimer, but there occur interactions between dimers in vitro as well as in vivo, which lead to the formation of tetrameric and oligomeric structures of higher complexity. Disturbances of these interactions, such as have been observed in pathological cases, lead to an instability of the membrane, a loss of membrane fragments, and a decrease in the surface/volume relation, with, as a consequence, a reduced deformability. The stability of the membrane skeleton also depends on the interactions between spectrin and protein 4.1. These interactions occur through a binding site on the beta chain of spectrin apparently close to actin and calmodulin binding sites. Other interactions occur between the hydrophobic segment of spectrin and membrane lipids. The cytoskeleton is bound to the transmembrane proteins: by ankyrin to the internal segment of protein band 3, and by protein 4.1 to a glycoprotein named glycoconnectin. There seems to exist other, more direct, lower affinity bindings between the cytoskeleton on the one hand, and band 3 and glycophorin transmembrane proteins on the other hand, whose lateral mobilities are modified when the structure of the skeleton is perturbed. The membrane proteins, which are in contact with the cytosol, interact with the cytosolic proteins, in particular with certain enzymes

  18. Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Lin, Chiann Tso

    2007-11-23

    Numerous approaches have been taken to study protein interactions, such as tagged protein complex isolation followed by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid methods, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, surface plasmon resonance, site-directed mutagenesis, and crystallography. Membrane protein interactions pose significant challenges due to the need to solubilize membranes without disrupting protein-protein interactions. Traditionally, analysis of isolated protein complexes by high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis has been the main method used to obtain an overall picture of proteome constituents and interactions. However, this method is time consuming, labor intensive, detects only abundant proteins and is not suitable for the coverage required to elucidate large interaction networks. In this review, we discuss the application of various methods to elucidate interactions involving membrane proteins. These techniques include methods for the direct isolation of single complexes or interactors as well as methods for characterization of entire subcellular and cellular interactomes.

  19. The Interaction of Polyene Antibiotics with Thin Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Thomas E.; Monahan, Marcia

    1968-01-01

    Optically black, thin lipid membranes prepared from sheep erythrocyte lipids have a high dc resistance (Rm ≅ 108 ohm-cm2) when the bathing solutions contain NaCl or KCl. The ionic transference numbers (Ti) indicate that these membranes are cation-selective (TNa ≅ 0.85; TCl ≅ 0.15). These electrical properties are independent of the cholesterol content of the lipid solutions from which the membranes are formed. Nystatin, and probably amphotericin B, are cyclic polyene antibiotics containing ≈36 ring atoms and a free amino and carboxyl group. When the lipid solutions used to form membranes contained equimolar amounts of cholesterol and phospholipid, these antibiotics reduced Rm to ≈102 ohm-cm2; concomitantly, TCl became ≅0.92. The slope of the line relating log Rm and log antibiotic concentration was ≅4.5. Neither nystatin (2 x 10-5 M) nor amphotericin B (2 x 10-7 M) had any effect on membrane stability. The antibiotics had no effect on Rm or membrane permselectivity when the lipids used to form membranes were cholesterol-depleted. Filipin (10-5 M), an uncharged polyene with 28 ring atoms, produced striking membrane instability, but did not affect Rm or membrane ionic selectivity. These data suggest that amphotericin B or nystatin may interact with membrane-bound sterols to produce multimolecular complexes which greatly enhance the permeability of such membranes for anions (Cl-, acetate), and, to a lesser degree, cations (Na+, K+, Li+). PMID:5672005

  20. Electrostatic sensor for identifying interactions between peptides and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Fitchen, Nicola; O'Shea, Paul; Williams, Paul; Hardie, Kim R

    2003-11-01

    The use of the membrane probe fluorescein phosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) to investigate membrane binding is well established. However, until now, its use has been restricted to studies involving peptides and eukaryotic membranes. This useful tool has been developed to interrogate peptide:prokaryotic membrane interactions by introducing novel methodology to incorporate FPE into the membranes of UV killed, whole bacterial cells. The electrostatic potential of the membrane in the immediate vicinity of the probe affects the protonation state of the xanthene ring system in the fluorescein head group, which is held close to the membrane surface. When altered, e.g. by peptide binding and insertion, a change in fluorescence results, which can be measured spectrophotometrically. Applicability of this technique to bacterial surface interactions was confirmed by production of a binding curve for both a synthetic peptide and a 37kDa protein. Future investigations are anticipated to utilize this technology to characterize interactions of other toxins plus antimicrobial peptides such as lactoferricin and defensins with their target membranes.

  1. Mechanism of interaction of monovalent ions with phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Vácha, Robert; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Petrov, Michal; Berkowitz, Max L; Böckmann, Rainer A; Barucha-Kraszewska, Justyna; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2010-07-29

    Interactions of different anions with phospholipid membranes in aqueous salt solutions were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence solvent relaxation measurements. Both approaches indicate that the anion-membrane interaction increases with the size and softness of the anion. Calculations show that iodide exhibits a genuine affinity for the membrane, which is due to its pairing with the choline group and its propensity for the nonpolar region of the acyl chains, the latter being enhanced in polarizable calculations showing that the iodide number density profile is expanded toward the glycerol level. Solvent relaxation measurements using Laurdan confirm the influence of large soft ions on the membrane organization at the glycerol level. In contrast, chloride exhibits a peak at the membrane surface only in the presence of a surface-attracted cation, such as sodium but not potassium, suggesting that this behavior is merely a counterion effect.

  2. Quantitation of Membrane-Ligand Interactions Using Backscattering Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Kussrow, Amanda K.; Mileni, Mauro; Finn, M.G.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    Though membrane-associated proteins are ubiquitous within all living organisms and represent the majority of drug targets, a general method for direct, label-free measurement of ligand binding to native membranes has not been reported. Here we show backscattering interferometry (BSI) to be a viable technique for quantifying ligand-receptor binding affinities in a variety of membrane environments. By detecting minute changes in the refractive index of a solution, BSI allows binding interactions of proteins with their ligands to be measured at picomolar concentrations. Equilibrium binding constants in the micromolar to picomolar range were obtained for small- and large-molecule interactions in both synthetic- and cell-derived membranes without the use of labels or supporting substrates. The simple and low-cost hardware, high sensitivity, and label-free nature of BSI should make it readily applicable to the study of many membrane-associated proteins of biochemical and pharmacological interest. PMID:21399645

  3. Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging Reveals in Vivo Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher; Stoneman, Michael; Raicu, Valerica; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce the Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging (FSI) method as a new tool to probe the stoichiometry and stability of protein complexes in biological membranes. The FSI method yields two dimensional membrane concentrations and FRET efficiencies in native plasma membranes. It can be used to characterize the association of membrane proteins: to differentiate between monomers, dimers, or oligomers, to produce binding (association) curves, and to measure the free energies of association in the membrane. We use the FSI method to study the lateral interactions of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily, in plasma membranes, in vivo. The knowledge gained through the use of the new method challenges the current understanding of VEGFR2 signaling. PMID:26787445

  4. Interaction of injectable neurotropic drugs with the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Lubszky, Szabina; Thöny, Sandra; Schulzki, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The normal red blood cell (RBC) shape is a biconcave discocyte. An intercalation of a drug in the outer half of the membrane lipid bilayer leads to echinocytosis, an intercalation in the inner half to stomatocytosis. We have used the shape transforming capacity of RBCs as a model to analyse the membrane interaction potential of various neurotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine, clomipramine, citalopram, clonazepam, and diazepam induced a reversible stomatocytosis, phenytoin induced echinocytosis, while the anticonvulsants levetiracetam, valproic acid and phenobarbital had no effect. This diversity of RBC shape transformations suggests that the pharmacological action is not linked to the membrane interaction. We conclude that this simple RBC shape transformation assay could be a useful tool to screen for potential drug interactions with cell membranes.

  5. Interaction of Inorganic Nanoparticles With Cell Membranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-20

    explain the change in the Zeta-potential of the beads we studied the adsorption of protein on Chitosan coated SPIONs. The particles were incubated in...protein adsorption which enables us understand better the pathway of our particles through the membrane and inside the cell. Combined with...investigation regarding the protein adsorption and their influence on the colloidal stability we have now the tools to investigate and perhaps to understand

  6. Multiple Pairwise Analysis of Non-homologous Centromere Coupling Reveals Preferential Chromosome Size-Dependent Interactions and a Role for Bouquet Formation in Establishing the Interaction Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançois, Philippe; Rockmill, Beth; Xie, Pingxing; Roeder, G. Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, chromosomes undergo a homology search in order to locate their homolog to form stable pairs and exchange genetic material. Early in prophase, chromosomes associate in mostly non-homologous pairs, tethered only at their centromeres. This phenomenon, conserved through higher eukaryotes, is termed centromere coupling in budding yeast. Both initiation of recombination and the presence of homologs are dispensable for centromere coupling (occurring in spo11 mutants and haploids induced to undergo meiosis) but the presence of the synaptonemal complex (SC) protein Zip1 is required. The nature and mechanism of coupling have yet to be elucidated. Here we present the first pairwise analysis of centromere coupling in an effort to uncover underlying rules that may exist within these non-homologous interactions. We designed a novel chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based assay to detect all possible interactions between non-homologous yeast centromeres during early meiosis. Using this variant of 3C-qPCR, we found a size-dependent interaction pattern, in which chromosomes assort preferentially with chromosomes of similar sizes, in haploid and diploid spo11 cells, but not in a coupling-defective mutant (spo11 zip1 haploid and diploid yeast). This pattern is also observed in wild-type diploids early in meiosis but disappears as meiosis progresses and homologous chromosomes pair. We found no evidence to support the notion that ancestral centromere homology plays a role in pattern establishment in S. cerevisiae post-genome duplication. Moreover, we found a role for the meiotic bouquet in establishing the size dependence of centromere coupling, as abolishing bouquet (using the bouquet-defective spo11 ndj1 mutant) reduces it. Coupling in spo11 ndj1 rather follows telomere clustering preferences. We propose that a chromosome size preference for centromere coupling helps establish efficient homolog recognition. PMID:27768699

  7. Multiple Pairwise Analysis of Non-homologous Centromere Coupling Reveals Preferential Chromosome Size-Dependent Interactions and a Role for Bouquet Formation in Establishing the Interaction Pattern.

    PubMed

    Lefrançois, Philippe; Rockmill, Beth; Xie, Pingxing; Roeder, G Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-10-01

    During meiosis, chromosomes undergo a homology search in order to locate their homolog to form stable pairs and exchange genetic material. Early in prophase, chromosomes associate in mostly non-homologous pairs, tethered only at their centromeres. This phenomenon, conserved through higher eukaryotes, is termed centromere coupling in budding yeast. Both initiation of recombination and the presence of homologs are dispensable for centromere coupling (occurring in spo11 mutants and haploids induced to undergo meiosis) but the presence of the synaptonemal complex (SC) protein Zip1 is required. The nature and mechanism of coupling have yet to be elucidated. Here we present the first pairwise analysis of centromere coupling in an effort to uncover underlying rules that may exist within these non-homologous interactions. We designed a novel chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based assay to detect all possible interactions between non-homologous yeast centromeres during early meiosis. Using this variant of 3C-qPCR, we found a size-dependent interaction pattern, in which chromosomes assort preferentially with chromosomes of similar sizes, in haploid and diploid spo11 cells, but not in a coupling-defective mutant (spo11 zip1 haploid and diploid yeast). This pattern is also observed in wild-type diploids early in meiosis but disappears as meiosis progresses and homologous chromosomes pair. We found no evidence to support the notion that ancestral centromere homology plays a role in pattern establishment in S. cerevisiae post-genome duplication. Moreover, we found a role for the meiotic bouquet in establishing the size dependence of centromere coupling, as abolishing bouquet (using the bouquet-defective spo11 ndj1 mutant) reduces it. Coupling in spo11 ndj1 rather follows telomere clustering preferences. We propose that a chromosome size preference for centromere coupling helps establish efficient homolog recognition.

  8. Curvature forces in membrane lipid-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael F

    2012-12-11

    Membrane biochemists are becoming increasingly aware of the role of lipid-protein interactions in diverse cellular functions. This review describes how conformational changes in membrane proteins, involving folding, stability, and membrane shape transitions, potentially involve elastic remodeling of the lipid bilayer. Evidence suggests that membrane lipids affect proteins through interactions of a relatively long-range nature, extending beyond a single annulus of next-neighbor boundary lipids. It is assumed the distance scale of the forces is large compared to the molecular range of action. Application of the theory of elasticity to flexible soft surfaces derives from classical physics and explains the polymorphism of both detergents and membrane phospholipids. A flexible surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. Chemically nonspecific properties of the lipid bilayer modulate the conformational energetics of membrane proteins. The new biomembrane model challenges the standard model (the fluid mosaic model) found in biochemistry texts. The idea of a curvature force field based on data first introduced for rhodopsin gives a bridge between theory and experiment. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress are all explained by the FSM. An increased awareness of curvature forces suggests that research will accelerate as structural biology becomes more closely entwined with the physical chemistry of lipids in explaining membrane structure and function.

  9. Curvature Forces in Membrane Lipid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane biochemists are becoming increasingly aware of the role of lipid-protein interactions in diverse cellular functions. This review describes how conformational changes of membrane proteins—involving folding, stability, and membrane shape transitions—potentially involve elastic remodeling of the lipid bilayer. Evidence suggests that membrane lipids affect proteins through interactions of a relatively long-range nature, extending beyond a single annulus of next-neighbor boundary lipids. It is assumed the distance scale of the forces is large compared to the molecular range of action. Application of the theory of elasticity to flexible soft surfaces derives from classical physics, and explains the polymorphism of both detergents and membrane phospholipids. A flexible surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. Chemically nonspecific properties of the lipid bilayer modulate the conformational energetics of membrane proteins. The new biomembrane model challenges the standard model (the fluid mosaic model) found in biochemistry texts. The idea of a curvature force field based on data first introduced for rhodopsin gives a bridge between theory and experiment. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress are all explained by the FSM. An increased awareness of curvature forces suggests that research will accelerate as structural biology becomes more closely entwined with the physical chemistry of lipids in explaining membrane structure and function. PMID:23163284

  10. Interactions between peroxiredoxin 2, hemichrome and the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Simone B; Low, Felicia M; Hampton, Mark B; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2016-12-01

    Peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2) is an abundant antioxidant protein in erythrocytes that protects against hemolytic anemia resulting from hemoglobin oxidation and Heinz body formation. A small fraction of Prx2 is bound to the cell membrane, but the mechanism and relevance of binding are not clear. We have investigated Prx2 interactions with the erythrocyte membrane and oxidized hemoglobin and whether these interactions are dependent on Prx2 redox state. Membrane binding of Prx2 in erythrocytes decreased when the cells were treated with H2O2, but studies with purified Prx2 and isolated ghosts showed that the interaction was independent of Prx2 redox state. Hemoglobin oxidation leads to the formation of hemichrome, a denatured form of the protein that binds to Band3 protein in the cell membrane as part of the senescence process and is a precursor of Heinz bodies. Hemichrome competed with Prx2 and decreased Prx2 binding to the membrane, potentially explaining the decreased binding in oxidant-exposed cells. The increased membrane binding of Prx2 seen with increasing intracellular calcium was less sensitive to H2O2 or hemichrome, suggesting an alternative mode of binding. Prx2 was also shown to exhibit chaperone-like activity by retarding the precipitation of pre-formed hemichrome. Our results suggest that Prx2, by restricting membrane binding of hemichrome, could impede Band3 clustering and exposure of senescence antigens. This mechanism, plus the observed chaperone activity for oxidized hemoglobin, may help protect against hemolytic anemia.

  11. Influences of acid-base property of membrane on interfacial interactions related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor based on thermodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Qu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meijia; Lin, Hongjun; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Mei, Rongwu; Hong, Huachang

    2016-08-01

    Failure of membrane hydrophobicity in predicting membrane fouling requires a more reliable indicator. In this study, influences of membrane acid base (AB) property on interfacial interactions in two different interaction scenarios in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were studied according to thermodynamic approaches. It was found that both the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and foulant samples in the MBR had relatively high electron donor (γ(-)) component and low electron acceptor (γ(+)) component. For both of interaction scenarios, AB interaction was the major component of the total interaction. The results showed that, the total interaction monotonically decreased with membrane γ(-), while was marginally affected by membrane γ(+), suggesting that γ(-) could act as a reliable indicator for membrane fouling prediction. This study suggested that membrane modification for fouling mitigation should orient to improving membrane surface γ(-) component rather than hydrophilicity.

  12. Multiple Membrane Interactions and Versatile Vesicle Deformations Elicited by Melittin

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Fumimasa; Yokoyama, Yasunori; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Homma, Michio; Takiguchi, Kingo

    2013-01-01

    Melittin induces various reactions in membranes and has been widely studied as a model for membrane-interacting peptide; however, the mechanism whereby melittin elicits its effects remains unclear. Here, we observed melittin-induced changes in individual giant liposomes using direct real-time imaging by dark-field optical microscopy, and the mechanisms involved were correlated with results obtained using circular dichroism, cosedimentation, fluorescence quenching of tryptophan residues, and electron microscopy. Depending on the concentration of negatively charged phospholipids in the membrane and the molecular ratio between lipid and melittin, melittin induced the “increasing membrane area”, “phased shrinkage”, or “solubilization” of liposomes. In phased shrinkage, liposomes formed small particles on their surface and rapidly decreased in size. Under conditions in which the increasing membrane area, phased shrinkage, or solubilization were mainly observed, the secondary structure of melittin was primarily estimated as an α-helix, β-like, or disordered structure, respectively. When the increasing membrane area or phased shrinkage occurred, almost all melittin was bound to the membranes and reached more hydrophobic regions of the membranes than when solubilization occurred. These results indicate that the various effects of melittin result from its ability to adopt various structures and membrane-binding states depending on the conditions. PMID:23594437

  13. Interaction of gentamicin polycation with model and cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Eugenia; Savopol, Tudor; Iordache, Maria-Minodora; Săplăcan, Lavinia; Sobaru, Iuliana; Istrate, Claudia; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Moisescu, Mihaela-Georgeta

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of positively-charged antibiotic gentamicin with cell membranes was studied to determine if any changes in membrane organization were induced by the drug. Opossum kidney epithelia (OK) cells were used as models of eukaryotic cells. Two methods were used: laurdan fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy recordings on 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene p-toluenesulfonate (TMA-DPH) labeled cell suspensions. Both methods showed an altered membrane hydration and fluidity of gentamicin treated cells. Liposomes prepared from dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) mixed with cardiolipin, which mimics the heterogeneous charge composition of the natural cell membrane, were used to determine the effect of gentamicin on artificial bilayers. The membrane lipid packing as revealed by generalized polarization (GP) and fluorescence anizotropy variation with increasing temperature was studied. It was found that the generalized polarization of liposomal membranes containing a negatively charged lipid (cardiolipin) is higher in the presence of gentamicin; in the membrane of living cell (OK), gentamicin induces, on the contrary, a decrease of general polarization. Considering the role of membrane organization in the function of transmembrane channels and receptors, our findings suggest hypotheses that may explain the permeation of gentamicin through the living cell membrane by using these channels.

  14. Membrane Interactions Of The Anthracycline Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas G.; Doroshow, James H.; Tritton, Thomas R.

    1988-06-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence properties of the anthracycline antitumor antibiotics were exploited here to study the manner in which a 14-valerate substituent modulated relative drug location and dynamics in fluid-phase bilayers at 37°C. Using Adriamycin (A), N,N-dimethyladriamycin (NDA), N-trifluoroacetyladriamycin (NTA), N-benzyladriamycin (NBA), and their corresponding valerate-substituted analogs (AD48, AD199, AD32 and AD198, respectively), the accessibilities of bound fluorophores to membrane-impermeable iodide were evaluated in quenching experiments conducted at constant ionic strength, while the diffusive motions of these agents were studied through the use of lifetime-resolved anisotropy plots. Incorporation of a bulky 14-valerate side chain into an anthracycline was found to enhance the hindered rotations experienced by a bound drug molecule, with limiting anisotropy (a.) values increasing from 0.166 to 0.258 for NTA and from 0 243 to 1 0.264 for NBA. However, the bimolecular quenching rate constants (x10 M ls ) for membrane-bound A (1.4), AD48 (1.1), NDA (1.8), AD199 (1.1), NBA (0.8), AD198 (0.7), NTA (0.4) and AD32 (0.5) indicate that the hydrophobic side chain was not, in general, a strong modulator of fluorophore penetration into the bilayer.

  15. MPM Simulations of Fluid-Membrane Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulsky, Deborah; York, Allen; Schreyer, Howard

    1998-11-01

    The material-point method (MPM) uses unconnected, Lagrangian material points to discretize solids, fluids, or membranes. All variables in the solution to continuum equations are associated with these points; so for example, they carry mass, velocity, stress and strain. A background Eulerian mesh is used to solve the momentum equation. Data mapped from the material points is used to initialize variables on the background mesh. In the case of multiple materials, the stress from each material contributes to internal forces at nearby mesh points, so the solution of the momentum equation includes all materials. The material-point variables are updated from the mesh solution. This simple algorithm treats all materials in a uniform manner, avoids complicated mesh construction, and automatically applies a no slip contact algorithm at no additional cost. Several examples demonstrate the method, including simulation of a pressurized membrane, with complicated geometry, expanding to its equilibrium, circular shape, and simulation of the impact of a probe with a pre-inflated airbag.

  16. Probing the interaction of amphiphilic triblockcopolymers with a biomimetic membrane.

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, M. A.; Seifert, S.

    2002-02-04

    In the last several years, there has been growing interest in the use of synthetic surfactants to augment cellular repair. Amphiphilic triblock copolymers such as PEO-PPO-PEO have been demonstrated to aid in the repair of a variety of cells. In spite of the reported success of these compounds in clinical trials, the mechanism of their interaction with cell membranes remains poorly understood. In this work, they describe their efforts to examine the effect of the mode of incorporation of triblock polyalkyleneoxide copolymers on membrane structure and stability. For this work, they have employed a model biomembrane whose structure and physical properties have been previously determined. Several modes of polymer incorporation are examined: introduction via a membrane spanning triblock copolymer, grafting onto a phospholipid headgroup, or introduction via a partially inserted triblock copolymer. The polymer-membrane interactions are probed by small angle X-ray scattering and thermal analysis.

  17. Interaction of tau protein with model lipid membranes induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emmalee M.; Dubey, Manish; Camp, Phillip J.; Vernon, Briana C.; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Chi, Eva Y.

    2012-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of the intrinsically disordered, microtubule-associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity remain unknown. Recent work has shown that lipid membrane can induce tau aggregation and that membrane permeabilization may serve as a pathway by which protein aggregates exert toxicity, suggesting that the plasma membrane may play dual roles in tau pathology. This prompted our investigation to assess tau's propensity to interact with membranes and to elucidate the mutually disruptive structural perturbations the interactions induce in both tau and the membrane. We show that although highly charged and soluble, the full-length tau (hTau40) is also highly surface active, selectively inserts into anionic DMPG lipid monolayers and induces membrane morphological changes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of hTau40 associated with lipid membranes, X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are utilized. X-ray reflectivity indicates hTau40's presence underneath a DMPG monolayer and penetration into the lipid headgroups and tailgroups, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows that hTau40 insertion disrupts lipid packing. Moreover, both air/water and DMPG lipid membrane interfaces induce the disordered hTau40 to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to that of a folded protein. Neutron reflectivity shows that tau completely disrupts supported DMPG bilayers while leaving the neutral DPPC bilayer intact. Our results show that hTau40's strong interaction with anionic lipids induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption, suggesting possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22401494

  18. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  19. Interaction of amphiphiles with integral membrane proteins. II. A simple, minimal model for the nonspecific interaction of amphiphiles with the anion exchanger of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H J

    1988-10-20

    In a previous paper we have reported on the structural perturbation of the erythrocyte membrane anion exchanger by a regular series of model amphiphiles, as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (Gruber, H.J. and Low, P.S., Biochim. Biophys. Acta, preceding article). Now the data are interpreted by a model in which the effects of amphiphile structure upon buffer-membrane partitioning are well separated from the dependence of the intrinsic potencies of membrane-bound amphiphiles upon amphiphile structure. The buffer-membrane partitioning situation was demonstrated to regularly change between extremes within a series of homologous amphiphiles, i.e. from a negligible to a predominant fraction of total amphiphile in the sample residing in the membrane. Based upon this demonstration a large number of reports on the chain length dependence of apparent potency could be reinterpreted in terms of chain length profiles of intrinsic potency, allowing for a comparison of the responses of various membrane proteins to homologous series of amphiphiles. The response patterns for chain length variation could be divided into three distinct classes: the intrinsic potency (i) can be independent of chain length over a very wide range of length, (ii) it can be rather independent up to a critical length where a sudden cut-off in potency occurs, or (iii) it can drop monotonically over a wide range of chain length. The intrinsic potency values of saturated fatty acids in destabilizing the anion exchanger were interpreted by very simple assumptions: only direct interactions between amphiphiles and target proteins and a simple amphiphile partition equilibrium between a pool of equivalent low affinity sites on the protein and the bulk lipid matrix. The observed monotonic decay of the intrinsic potency of saturated fatty acids with increasing chain length from C8 to C20 was translated into a constant increment of free energy by which each additional CH2 favors the transfer away from sites

  20. Membrane interaction of Pasteurella multocida toxin involves sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Michael C; Ho, Mengfei; Maharjan, Ram; Clemons, Nathan C; Bannai, Yuka; Waites, Mark A; Faulkner, Melinda J; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Blanke, Steven R; Rienstra, Chad M; Wilson, Brenda A

    2011-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is an AB toxin that causes pleiotropic effects in targeted host cells. The N-terminus of PMT (PMT-N) is considered to harbor the membrane receptor binding and translocation domains responsible for mediating cellular entry and delivery of the C-terminal catalytic domain into the host cytosol. Previous studies have implicated gangliosides as the host receptors for PMT binding. To gain further insight into the binding interactions involved in PMT binding to cell membranes, we explored the role of various membrane components in PMT binding, utilizing four different approaches: (a) TLC-overlay binding experiments with (125) I-labeled PMT, PMT-N or the C-terminus of PMT; (b) pull-down experiments using reconstituted membrane liposomes with full-length PMT; (c) surface plasmon resonance analysis of PMT-N binding to reconstituted membrane liposomes; (d) and surface plasmon resonance analysis of PMT-N binding to HEK-293T cell membranes without or with sphingomyelinase, phospholipase D or trypsin treatment. The results obtained revealed that, in our experimental system, full-length PMT and PMT-N did not bind to gangliosides, including monoasialogangliosides GM(1) , GM(2) or GM(3) , but instead bound to membrane phospholipids, primarily the abundant sphingophospholipid sphingomyelin or phosphatidylcholine with other lipid components. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the importance of sphingomyelin for PMT binding to membranes and suggest the involvement of a protein co-receptor.

  1. Interaction of chiral rafts in self-assembled colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Sheng; Hagan, Michael F.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal membranes are monolayer assemblies of rodlike particles that capture the long-wavelength properties of lipid bilayer membranes on the colloidal scale. Recent experiments on colloidal membranes formed by chiral rodlike viruses showed that introducing a second species of virus with different length and opposite chirality leads to the formation of rafts—micron-sized domains of one virus species floating in a background of the other viruses [Sharma et al., Nature (London) 513, 77 (2014), 10.1038/nature13694]. In this article we study the interaction of such rafts using liquid crystal elasticity theory. By numerically minimizing the director elastic free energy, we predict the tilt angle profile for both a single raft and two rafts in a background membrane, and the interaction between two rafts as a function of their separation. We find that the chiral penetration depth in the background membrane sets the scale for the range of the interaction. We compare our results with the experimental data and find good agreement for the strength and range of the interaction. Unlike the experiments, however, we do not observe a complete collapse of the data when rescaled by the tilt angle at the raft edge.

  2. Biophysical studies of the interactions between the phage varphiKZ gp144 lytic transglycosylase and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Isabelle; Paradis-Bleau, Catherine; Giroux, Anne-Marie; Pigeon, Xavier; Arseneault, Marjolaine; Levesque, Roger C; Auger, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    The use of naturally occurring lytic bacteriophage proteins as specific antibacterial agents is a promising way to treat bacterial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. The opportunity to develop bacterial resistance to these agents is minimized by their broad mechanism of action on bacterial membranes and peptidoglycan integrity. In the present study, we have investigated lipid interactions of the gp144 lytic transglycosylase from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage varphiKZ. Interactions with zwitterionic lipids characteristic of eukaryotic cells and with anionic lipids characteristic of bacterial cells were studied using fluorescence, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, circular dichroism, Langmuir monolayers, and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). Gp144 interacted preferentially with anionic lipids, and the presence of gp144 in anionic model systems induced membrane disruption and lysis. Lipid domain formation in anionic membranes was observed by BAM. Gp144 did not induce disruption of zwitterionic membranes but caused an increase in rigidity of the lipid polar head group. However, gp144 interacted with zwitterionic and anionic lipids in a model membrane system containing both lipids. Finally, the gp144 secondary structure was not significantly modified upon lipid binding.

  3. Interaction of human apolipoprotein A-I with model membranes exhibiting lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Arnulphi, Cristina; Sánchez, Susana A; Tricerri, M Alejandra; Gratton, Enrico; Jonas, Ana

    2005-07-01

    Several mechanisms for cell cholesterol efflux have been proposed, including membrane microsolubilization, suggesting that the existence of specific domains could enhance the transfer of lipids to apolipoproteins. In this work isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and two-photon microscopy are used to study the interaction of lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and sphingomyelin (SM), with and without cholesterol. Below 30 degrees C the calorimetric results show that apoA-I interaction with POPC/SM SUVs produces an exothermic reaction, characterized as nonclassical hydrophobic binding. The heat capacity change (DeltaCp degrees ) is small and positive, whereas it was larger and negative for pure POPC bilayers, in the absence of SM. Inclusion of cholesterol in the membranes induces changes in the observed thermodynamic pattern of binding and counteracts the formation of alpha-helices in the protein. Above 30 degrees C the reactions are endothermic. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of identical composition to the SUVs, and two-photon fluorescence microscopy techniques, were utilized to further characterize the interaction. Fluorescence imaging of the GUVs indicates coexistence of lipid domains under 30 degrees C. Binding experiments and Laurdan generalized-polarization measurements suggest that there is no preferential binding of the labeled apoA-I to any particular domain. Changes in the content of alpha-helix, binding, and fluidity data are discussed in the framework of the thermodynamic parameters.

  4. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca2+-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca2+. Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14211.001 PMID:27083046

  5. Direct simulation of amphiphilic nanoparticle mediated membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Mukarram; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Membrane fusion is a critical step in the transport of biological cargo through membrane-bound compartments like vesicles. Membrane proteins that alleviate energy barriers for initial stalk formation and eventual rupture of the hemifusion intermediate during fusion generally assist this process. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with a combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic alkanethiol ligands have recently been shown to induce membrane re-arrangements that are similar to those associated with these fusion proteins. In this work, we utilize molecular dynamics simulation to systematically design nanoparticles that exhibit targeted interactions with membranes. We introduce a method for rapidly parameterizing nanoparticle topology for the MARTINI biomolecular force field to permit long timescale simulation of their interactions with lipid bilayers. We leverage this model to investigate how ligand chemistry governs the nanoparticle's insertion efficacy and the perturbations it generates in the membrane environment. We further demonstrate through unbiased simulations that these nanoparticles can direct the fusion of lipid assemblies such as micelles and vesicles in a manner that mimics the function of biological fusion peptides and SNARE proteins.

  6. Spectral studies of Lanthanide interactions with membrane surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Karukstis, K.K.; Kao, M.Y.; Savin, D.A.; Bittker, R.A.; Kaphengst, K.J.; Emetarom, C.M.; Naito, N.R.; Takamoto, D.Y.

    1995-03-23

    We have monitored the interactions of the series of trivalent lanthanide cations with the thylakoid membrane surface of spinach chloroplasts using two complementary spectral techniques. Measurements of the fluorescence emission of the extrinsic probe 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) and the absorbance of the intrinsic chromophore chlorophyll provide two sensitive means of characterizing the dependence of the cation-membrane interaction on the nature of the cation. In these systems, added lanthanide cations adsorb onto the membrane surface to neutralize exposed segments of membrane-embedded protein complexes. The lanthanide-induced charge neutralization increases the proximity of added TNS anion to the membrane surface as evidenced by variations in the TNS fluorescence level and wavelength of maximum emission. Our results reveal a strong dependence of TNS fluorescence parameters on both lanthanide size and total orbital angular momentum L value. Lanthanides with greater charge density (small size and/or low L value) enhance the TNS fluorescence level to a greater extent. A possible origin for the lanthanide-dependent TNS fluorescence levels is suggested in terms of a heterogeneity in the number and type of TNS binding sites. The data are consistent with the proposal that larger lanthanides with smaller enthalpies of hydration induce more significant membrane appression. 59 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Cis and trans interactions between atlastin molecules during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tina Y.; Bian, Xin; Romano, Fabian B.; Shemesh, Tom; Rapoport, Tom A.; Hu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Atlastin (ATL), a membrane-anchored GTPase that mediates homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, is required for formation of the tubular network of the peripheral ER. How exactly ATL mediates membrane fusion is only poorly understood. Here we show that fusion is preceded by the transient tethering of ATL-containing vesicles caused by the dimerization of ATL molecules in opposing membranes. Tethering requires GTP hydrolysis, not just GTP binding, because the two ATL molecules are pulled together most strongly in the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Most tethering events are futile, so that multiple rounds of GTP hydrolysis are required for successful fusion. Supported lipid bilayer experiments show that ATL molecules sitting on the same (cis) membrane can also undergo nucleotide-dependent dimerization. These results suggest that GTP hydrolysis is required to dissociate cis dimers, generating a pool of ATL monomers that can dimerize with molecules on a different (trans) membrane. In addition, tethering and fusion require the cooperation of multiple ATL molecules in each membrane. We propose a comprehensive model for ATL-mediated fusion that takes into account futile tethering and competition between cis and trans interactions. PMID:25825753

  8. Effects of cholesterol concentration on the interaction of cytarabine with lipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Karami, Leila; Jalili, Seifollah

    2015-01-01

    Liposomal cytarabine, DepoCyt, is a chemotherapy agent which is used in cancer treatment. This form of cytarabine has more efficacy and fewer side effects relative to the other forms. Since DepoCyt contains the cytarabine encapsulated within phosphatidylcholine and the sterol molecules, we modeled dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol bilayer membrane as a carrier for cytarabine to study drug-bilayer interactions. For this purpose, we performed a series of united-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 25 ns to investigate the interactions between cytarabine and cholesterol-containing DOPC lipid bilayers. Only the uncharged form of cytarabine molecule was investigated. In this study, different levels of the cholesterol content (0, 20, and 40%) were used. MD simulations allowed us to determine dynamical and structural properties of the bilayer membrane and to estimate the preferred location and orientation of the cytarabine molecule inside the bilayer membrane. Properties such as membrane thickness, area per lipid, diffusion coefficient, mass density, bilayer packing, order parameters, and intermolecular interactions were examined. The results show that by increasing the cholesterol concentration in the lipid bilayers, the bilayer thickness increases and area per lipid decreases. Moreover, in accordance with the experiments, our calculations show that cholesterol molecules have ordering effect on the hydrocarbon acyl chains. Furthermore, the cytarabine molecule preferentially occupies the polar region of the lipid head groups to form specific interactions (hydrogen bonds). Our results fully support the experimental data. Our finding about drug-bilayer interaction is crucial for the liposomal drug design.

  9. Glutamate receptor δ1 induces preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cortical neurons by interacting with neurexins through cerebellin precursor protein subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Misato; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Lee, Sung-Jin; Uemura, Takeshi; Joo, Jae-Yeol; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) δ1 is widely expressed in the developing forebrain, whereas GluRδ2 is selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Recently, we found that trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic GluRδ2 and pre-synaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin precursor protein (Cbln) 1 mediates excitatory synapse formation in the cerebellum. Thus, a question arises whether GluRδ1 regulates synapse formation in the forebrain. In this study, we showed that the N-terminal domain of GluRδ1 induced inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of some populations of cultured cortical neurons. When Cbln1 or Cbln2 was added to cultures, GluRδ1 expressed in HEK293T cells induced preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cultured cortical neurons. The synaptogenic activity of GluRδ1 was suppressed by the addition of the extracellular domain of NRXN1α or NRXN1β containing splice segment 4. Cbln subtypes directly bound to the N-terminal domain of GluRδ1. The synaptogenic activity of GluRδ1 in the presence of Cbln subtypes correlated well with their binding affinities. When transfected to cortical neurons, GluRδ1 stimulated inhibitory synapse formation in the presence of Cbln1 or Cbln2. These results together with differential interactions of Cbln subtypes with NRXN variants suggest that GluRδ1 induces preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cortical neurons by interacting with NRXNs containing splice segment 4 through Cbln subtypes.

  10. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays.

  11. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    PubMed Central

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays. PMID:28102305

  12. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin.

    PubMed

    Verly, Rodrigo M; Resende, Jarbas M; Junior, Eduardo F C; de Magalhães, Mariana T Q; Guimarães, Carlos F C R; Munhoz, Victor H O; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C L; Santoro, Marcelo M; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-19

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays.

  13. Interaction and conformational dynamics of membrane-spanning protein helices

    PubMed Central

    Langosch, Dieter; Arkin, Isaiah T

    2009-01-01

    Within 1 or 2 decades, the reputation of membrane-spanning α-helices has changed dramatically. Once mostly regarded as dull membrane anchors, transmembrane domains are now recognized as major instigators of protein–protein interaction. These interactions may be of exquisite specificity in mediating assembly of stable membrane protein complexes from cognate subunits. Further, they can be reversible and regulatable by external factors to allow for dynamic changes of protein conformation in biological function. Finally, these helices are increasingly regarded as dynamic domains. These domains can move relative to each other in different functional protein conformations. In addition, small-scale backbone fluctuations may affect their function and their impact on surrounding lipid shells. Elucidating the ways by which these intricate structural features are encoded by the amino acid sequences will be a fascinating subject of research for years to come. PMID:19530249

  14. Interaction measurement of particles bound to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfati, Raphael; Dufresne, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The local shape and dynamics of the plasma membrane play important roles in many cellular processes. Local membrane deformations are often mediated by the adsorption of proteins (notably from the BAR family), and their subsequent self-assembly. The emerging hypothesis is that self-assembly arises from long-range interactions of individual proteins through the membrane's deformation field. We study these interactions in a model system of micron-sized colloidal particles adsorbed onto a lipid bilayer. We use fluorescent microscopy, optical tweezers and particle tracking to measure dissipative and conservative forces as a function of the separation between the particles. We find that particles are driven together with forces of order 100 fN and remain bound in a potential well with a stiffness of order 100 fN/micron.

  15. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  16. Local Anesthetics and Antipsychotic Phenothiazines Interact Nonspecifically with Membranes and Inhibit Hexose Transporters in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Uesono, Yukifumi; Toh-e, Akio; Kikuchi, Yoshiko; Araki, Tomoyuki; Hachiya, Takushi; Watanabe, Chihiro K.; Noguchi, Ko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Action mechanisms of anesthetics remain unclear because of difficulty in explaining how structurally different anesthetics cause similar effects. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, local anesthetics and antipsychotic phenothiazines induced responses similar to those caused by glucose starvation, and they eventually inhibited cell growth. These drugs inhibited glucose uptake, but additional glucose conferred resistance to their effects; hence, the primary action of the drugs is to cause glucose starvation. In hxt0 strains with all hexose transporter (HXT) genes deleted, a strain harboring a single copy of HXT1 (HXT1s) was more sensitive to tetracaine than a strain harboring multiple copies (HXT1m), which indicates that quantitative reduction of HXT1 increases tetracaine sensitivity. However, additional glucose rather than the overexpression of HXT1/2 conferred tetracaine resistance to wild-type yeast; therefore, Hxts that actively transport hexoses apparently confer tetracaine resistance. Additional glucose alleviated sensitivity to local anesthetics and phenothiazines in the HXT1m strain but not the HXT1s strain; thus, the glucose-induced effects required a certain amount of Hxt1. At low concentrations, fluorescent phenothiazines were distributed in various membranes. At higher concentrations, they destroyed the membranes and thereby delocalized Hxt1-GFP from the plasma membrane, similar to local anesthetics. These results suggest that the aforementioned drugs affect various membrane targets via nonspecific interactions with membranes. However, the drugs preferentially inhibit the function of abundant Hxts, resulting in glucose starvation. When Hxts are scarce, this preference is lost, thereby mitigating the alleviation by additional glucose. These results provide a mechanism that explains how different compounds induce similar effects based on lipid theory. PMID:26757771

  17. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  18. Evolutionary plasticity of plasma membrane interaction in DREPP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Petrášek, Jan; Schwarzerová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    The plant-specific DREPP protein family comprises proteins that were shown to regulate the actin and microtubular cytoskeleton in a calcium-dependent manner. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that DREPPs first appeared in ferns and that DREPPs have a rapid and plastic evolutionary history in plants. Arabidopsis DREPP paralogues called AtMDP25/PCaP1 and AtMAP18/PCaP2 are N-myristoylated, which has been reported as a key factor in plasma membrane localization. Here we show that N-myristoylation is neither conserved nor ancestral for the DREPP family. Instead, by using confocal microscopy and a new method for quantitative evaluation of protein membrane localization, we show that DREPPs rely on two mechanisms ensuring their plasma membrane localization. These include N-myristoylation and electrostatic interaction of a polybasic amino acid cluster. We propose that various plasma membrane association mechanisms resulting from the evolutionary plasticity of DREPPs are important for refining plasma membrane interaction of these signalling proteins under various conditions and in various cells.

  19. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  20. Peptide-membrane Interactions by Spin-labeling EPR

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Tatyana I.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established method that has recently grown in popularity as an experimental technique, with multiple applications in protein and peptide science. The growth is driven by development of labeling strategies, as well as by considerable technical advances in the field, that are paralleled by an increased availability of EPR instrumentation. While the method requires an introduction of a paramagnetic probe at a well-defined position in a peptide sequence, it has been shown to be minimally destructive to the peptide structure and energetics of the peptide-membrane interactions. In this chapter, we describe basic approaches for using SDSL EPR spectroscopy to study interactions between small peptides and biological membranes or membrane mimetic systems. We focus on experimental approaches to quantify peptide-membrane binding, topology of bound peptides, and characterize peptide aggregation. Sample preparation protocols including spin-labeling methods and preparation of membrane mimetic systems are also described. PMID:26477253

  1. Revisiting the membrane interaction mechanism of a membrane-damaging β-barrel pore-forming toxin Vibrio cholerae cytolysin.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) permeabilizes target cell membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel pores. VCC has been shown to associate with the target membranes via amphipathicity-driven spontaneous partitioning into the membrane environment. More specific interaction(s) of VCC with the membrane components have also been documented. In particular, specific binding of VCC with the membrane lipid components is believed to play a crucial role in determining the efficacy of the pore-formation process. However, the structural basis and the functional implications of the VCC interaction with the membrane lipids remain unclear. Here we show that the distinct loop sequences within the membrane-proximal region of VCC play critical roles to determine the functional interactions of the toxin with the membrane lipids. Alterations of the loop sequences via structure-guided mutagenesis allow amphipathicity-driven partitioning of VCC to the membrane lipid bilayer. Alterations of the loop sequences, however, block specific interactions of VCC with the membrane lipids and abort the oligomerization, membrane insertion, pore-formation and cytotoxic activity of the toxin. Present study identifies the structural signatures in VCC implicated for its functional interactions with the membrane lipid components, a process that presumably acts to drive the subsequent steps of the oligomeric β-barrel pore-formation and cytotoxic responses.

  2. Interaction forces and membrane charge tunability: Oleic acid containing membranes in different pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, James; Suga, Keishi; Kuhl, Tonya L

    2017-02-01

    Oleic acid is known to interact with saturated lipid molecules and increase the fluidity of gel phase lipid membranes. In this work, the thermodynamic properties of mixed monolayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and oleic acid at the air-water interface were determined using Langmuir isotherms. The isotherm study revealed an attractive interaction between oleic acid and DPPC. The incorporation of oleic acid also monotonically decreased the elastic modulus of the monolayer indicative of higher fluidity with increasing oleic acid content. Using the surface force apparatus, intermembrane force-distance profiles were obtained for substrate supported DPPC membranes containing 30mol% oleic acid at pH5.8 and 7.4. Three different preparation conditions resulted in distinct force profiles. Membranes prepared in pH5.8 subphase had a low number of nanoscopic defects ≤1% and an adhesion magnitude of ~0.6mN/m. A slightly higher defect density of 1-4% was found for membranes prepared in a physiological pH7.4 subphase. The presence of the exposed hydrophobic moieties resulted in a higher adhesion magnitude of 2.9mN/m. Importantly, at pH7.4, some oleic acid deprotonates resulting in a long-range electrostatic repulsion. Even though oleic acid increased the DPPC bilayer fluidity and the number of defects, no membrane restructuring was observed indicating that the system maintained a stable configuration.

  3. Interactions of Lipid Membranes with Fibrillar Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Girych, Mykhailo; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are an intriguing class of protein aggregates with distinct physicochemical, structural and morphological properties. They display peculiar membrane-binding behavior, thus adding complexity to the problem of protein-lipid interactions. The consensus that emerged during the past decade is that amyloid cytotoxicity arises from a continuum of cross-β-sheet assemblies including mature fibrils. Based on literature survey and our own data, in this chapter we address several aspects of fibril-lipid interactions, including (i) the effects of amyloid assemblies on molecular organization of lipid bilayer; (ii) competition between fibrillar and monomeric membrane-associating proteins for binding to the lipid surface; and (iii) the effects of lipids on the structural morphology of fibrillar aggregates. To illustrate some of the processes occurring in fibril-lipid systems, we present and analyze fluorescence data reporting on lipid bilayer interactions with fibrillar lysozyme and with the N-terminal 83-residue fragment of amyloidogenic mutant apolipoprotein A-I, 1-83/G26R/W@8. The results help understand possible mechanisms of interaction and mutual remodeling of amyloid fibers and lipid membranes, which may contribute to amyloid cytotoxicity.

  4. Phosphocreatine interacts with phospholipids, affects membrane properties and exerts membrane-protective effects.

    PubMed

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R; Meier, Beat H; Epand, Richard M; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are still controversial and far from being understood. The reversible conversion of Cr and ATP into PCr and ADP by creatine kinase, generating highly diffusible PCr energy reserves, is certainly an important element. However, some protective effects of Cr and analogues cannot be satisfactorily explained solely by effects on the cellular energy state. Here we used mainly liposome model systems to provide evidence for interaction of PCr and PcCr with different zwitterionic phospholipids by applying four independent, complementary biochemical and biophysical assays: (i) chemical binding assay, (ii) surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), (iii) solid-state (31)P-NMR, and (iv) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SPR revealed low affinity PCr/phospholipid interaction that additionally induced changes in liposome shape as indicated by NMR and SPR. Additionally, DSC revealed evidence for membrane packing effects by PCr, as seen by altered lipid phase transition. Finally, PCr efficiently protected against membrane permeabilization in two different model systems: liposome-permeabilization by the membrane-active peptide melittin, and erythrocyte hemolysis by the oxidative drug doxorubicin, hypoosmotic stress or the mild detergent saponin. These findings suggest a new molecular basis for non-energy related functions of PCr and its cyclic analogue. PCr/phospholipid interaction and alteration of membrane structure may not only protect cellular membranes against various insults, but could

  5. Structural and thermodynamic properties of water-membrane interphases: significance for peptide/membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Disalvo, E A; Martini, M F; Bouchet, A M; Hollmann, A; Frías, M A

    2014-09-01

    Water appears as a common intermediary in the mechanisms of interaction of proteins and polypeptides with membranes of different lipid composition. In this review, how water modulates the interaction of peptides and proteins with lipid membranes is discussed by correlating the thermodynamic response and the structural changes of water at the membrane interphases. The thermodynamic properties of the lipid-protein interaction are governed by changes in the water activity of monolayers of different lipid composition according to the lateral surface pressure. In this context, different water populations can be characterized below and above the phase transition temperature in relation to the CH₂ conformers' states in the acyl chains. According to water species present at the interphase, lipid membrane acts as a water state regulator, which determines the interfacial water domains in the surface. It is proposed that those domains are formed by the contact between lipids themselves and between lipids and the water phase, which are needed to trigger adsorption-insertion processes. The water domains are essential to maintain functional dynamical properties and are formed by water beyond the hydration shell of the lipid head groups. These confined water domains probably carries information in local units in relation to the lipid composition thus accounting for the link between lipidomics and aquaomics. The analysis of these results contributes to a new insight of the lipid bilayer as a non-autonomous, responsive (reactive) structure that correlates with the dynamical properties of a living system.

  6. Inner field compensation as a tool for the characterization of asymmetric membranes and Peptide-membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Hagge, Sven O; Wiese, Andre; Seydel, Ulrich; Gutsmann, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    Symmetric and asymmetric planar lipid bilayers prepared according to the Montal-Mueller method are a powerful tool to characterize peptide-membrane interactions. Several electrical properties of lipid bilayers such as membrane current, membrane capacitance, and the inner membrane potential differences and their changes can be deduced. The time-resolved determination of peptide-induced changes in membrane capacitance and inner membrane potential difference are of high importance for the characterization of peptide-membrane interactions. Intercalation and accumulation of peptides lead to changes in membrane capacitance, and membrane interaction of charged peptides induces changes in the charge distribution within the membrane and with that to changes in the membrane potential profile. In this study, we establish time-resolved measurements of the capacitance minimization potential DeltaPsi on various asymmetric planar lipid bilayers using the inner field compensation method. The results are compared to the respective ones of inner membrane potential differences DeltaPhi determined from ion carrier transport measurements. Finally, the time courses of membrane capacitances and of DeltaPsi have been used to characterize the interaction of cathelicidins with reconstituted lipid matrices of various Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Insulin receptor: Interaction with nonreceptor glycoprotein from liver cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Joseph M.; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    1978-01-01

    In crude receptor preparations (either particulate or soluble) of rat liver membranes, the insulin receptor exhibits complicated binding kinetics (two binding plateaus, half-saturated at approximately 60 pM and 700 pM insulin) and an apparent chromatographic heterogeneity, suggested by the presence of two detectable, soluble insulin-binding components with apparent Stokes radii of 72 Å and 38 Å. In contrast, the insulin receptor isolated by affinity chromatography exhibits a simple binding isotherm (half-maximal saturation of binding at 700 pM insulin) without evidence for negative cooperativity and behaves as a single component (apparent Stokes radius of 38 Å) upon chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The apparent discrepancies between the properties of the unpurified insulin receptor and the affinity-purified receptor can be attributed to the presence in crude preparations of a nonreceptor constituent(s) having properties consistent with those of a membrane glycoprotein. A glycoprotein fraction from such crude soluble membrane preparations, freed from insulin receptor and subsequently partially purified using concanavalin-A-agarose, when combined with affinity-purified insulin receptor, causes both a reappearance of the complicated binding kinetics and an increase in the receptor's apparent Stokes radius from 38 Å to 72 Å. Similar results are observed for a glycoprotein fraction obtained from rat adipocyte membranes but are not observed for an identical fraction isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. We conclude that the insulin receptor in rat liver membranes can interact with another nonreceptor membrane glycoprotein that may represent either a nonrecognition moiety of the receptor oligomer or an effector molecule to the biological action of insulin. PMID:277909

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hemolysis: Evidence for direct membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brauckmann, Stephan; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; de Groot, Herbert; Nagel, Michael; Mayer, Christian; Peters, Jürgen; Hartmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While hemolysis in patients with sepsis is associated with increased mortality its mechanisms are unknown and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mediated effects, complement-mediated hemolysis, or direct cell membrane effects are all conceivable mechanisms. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as non-toxic RS-LPS evokes hemolysis (1) by direct membrane effects, and (2) independent of the complement system and TLR-4 activation. We found, that incubation with LPS resulted in a marked time and concentration dependent increase of free hemoglobin concentration and LDH activity in whole blood and washed red cells. Red cell integrity was diminished as shown by decreased osmotic resistance, formation of schistocytes and rolls, and a decrease in red cell membrane stiffness. Non-toxic RS-LPS inhibited the LPS-evoked increase in TNF-α concentration demonstrating its TLR-4 antagonism, but augmented LPS-induced increase in supernatant hemoglobin concentration and membrane disturbances. Removal of plasma components in washed red cell assays failed to attenuate hemolysis. In summary, this study demonstrates direct physicochemical interactions of LPS with red cell membranes resulting in hemolysis under in vitro conditions. It might thus be hypothesized, that not all effects of LPS are mediated by TLR and may explain LPS toxicity in cells missing TLR. PMID:27759044

  9. Interaction of Boron Nitride Nanosheets with Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gaston, Nicola

    2016-06-03

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted attention for biomedical applications, due to their improved biocompatibility when compared with carbon nanomaterials. Recently, graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets have been shown, both experimentally and computationally, to destructively extract phospholipids from Escherichia coli. Boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) have exciting potential biological and environmental applications, for example the ability to remove oil from water. These applications are likely to increase the exposure of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to BNNSs. Yet, despite their promise, the interaction between BNNSs and cell membranes has not yet been investigated. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were used to demonstrate that BNNSs are spontaneously attracted to the polar headgroups of the lipid bilayer. The BNNSs do not passively cross the lipid bilayer, most likely due to the large forces experienced by the BNNSs. This study provides insight into the interaction of BNNSs with cell membranes and may aid our understanding of their improved biocompatibility.

  10. Molecular interactions between proteins and synthetic membrane polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Pincet, F.; Perez, E.; Belfort, G.

    1995-04-01

    To help understand the effects of protein adsorption on membrane filtration performance, we have measured the molecular interactions between cellulose acetate films and two proteins with different properties (ribonuclease A and human serum albumin) with a surface force apparatus. Comparison of forces between two protein layers with those between a protein layer and a cellulose acetate (CA) film shows that, at high pH, both proteins retained their native conformation on interacting with the CA film while at the isoelectric point (pI) or below the tertiary structure of proteins was disturbed. These measurements provide the first molecular evidence that disruption of protein tertiary structure could be responsible for the reduced permeation flows observed during membrane filtration of protein solutions and suggest that operating at high pH values away from the pI of proteins will reduce such fouling. 60 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Membrane interaction and functional plasticity of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Braun, Werner; Schein, Catherine H

    2014-05-06

    In this issue of Structure, Trésaugues and colleagues determined the interaction of membrane-bound phosphoinositides with three clinically significant human inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (I5Ps). A comparison to the structures determined with soluble substrates revealed differences in the binding mode and suggested how the I5Ps and apurinic endonuclease (APE1) activities evolved from the same metal-binding active center.

  12. Live cell imaging of membrane/cytoskeleton interactions and membrane topology.

    PubMed

    Chierico, Luca; Joseph, Adrian S; Lewis, Andrew L; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2014-09-10

    We elucidate the interaction between actin and specific membrane components, using real time live cell imaging, by delivering probes that enable access to components, that cannot be accessed genetically. We initially investigated the close interplay between Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and the F-actin network. We show that, during the early stage of cell adhesion, PIP2 forms domains within the filopodia membrane. We studied these domains alongside cell spreading and observed that these very closely follow the actin tread-milling. We show that this mechanism is associated with an active transport of PIP2 rich organelles from the cell perinuclear area to the edge, along actin fibers. Finally, mapping other phospholipids and membrane components we observed that the PIP2 domains formation is correlated with sphingosine and cholesterol rafts.

  13. Interaction of poloxamine block copolymers with lipid membranes: Role of copolymer structure and membrane cholesterol content.

    PubMed

    Sandez-Macho, Isabel; Casas, Matilde; Lage, Emilio V; Rial-Hermida, M Isabel; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    Interactions of X-shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PEO-PPO) block copolymers with cell membranes were investigated recording the π-A isotherms of monolayer systems of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC):cholesterol 100:0; 80:20 and 60:40 mol ratio and evaluating the capability of the copolymers to trigger haemolysis or to protect from haemolytic agents. Four varieties of poloxamine (Tetronic 904, 908, 1107 and 1307) were chosen in order to cover a wide range of EO and PO units contents and molecular weights, and compared to a variety of poloxamer (Pluronic P85). The π-A isotherms revealed that the greater the content in cholesterol, the stronger the interaction of the block copolymers with the lipids monolayer. The interactions were particularly relevant at low pressures and low lipid proportions, mimicking the conditions of damaged membranes. Relatively hydrophobic copolymers bearing short PEO blocks (e.g., T904 and P85) intercalated among the lipids expanding the surface area (ΔGexc) but not effectively sealing the pores. These varieties showed haemolytic behavior. Oppositely, highly hydrophilic copolymers bearing long PEO blocks (e.g., T908, T1107 and T1307) caused membrane contraction and outer leaflet sealing due to strong interactions of PEO with cholesterol and diamine core with phospholipids. These later varieties were not haemolytic and exerted a certain protective effect against spontaneous haemolysis for both intact erythrocytes and cholesterol-depleted erythrocytes.

  14. Interaction between a rodlike inclusion and a supported bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiyi; Ma, Yuqiang

    2006-10-28

    The interactions between a rodlike inclusion and a supported copolymer bilayer membrane are investigated by using the self-consistent field theory. For different system parameters, physical observables, such as the interaction free energy, entropy, and translocation energy barrier, are obtained. Particular emphasis is put on the closely energetic and entropic analyses of the interaction. It shows that the interfacial energy provides a qualitative trend and dominates the basic shape of the interaction free energy curve; the combination of chemical potential energy and total entropy contribution is responsible for the translocation energy barrier and the weak attraction in the vicinity of upper monolayer surface. We also specify the nature, height, and shape of the energy barrier to translocation. Particularly, the height is roughly proportional to the rod radius.

  15. Influence of nanoparticle-membrane electrostatic interactions on membrane fluidity and bending elasticity.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Velikonja, Aljaž; Perutkova, Šarka; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Kulkarni, Mukta; Genova, Julia; Eleršič, Kristina; Iglič, Aleš; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between the nanoparticles and the membrane lipids on altering the physical properties of the liposomal membrane such as fluidity and bending elasticity. For this purpose, we have used nanoparticles and lipids with different surface charges. Positively charged iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, neutral and negatively charged cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles were encapsulated in neutral lipid 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine lipid mixture. Membrane fluidity was assessed through the anisotropy measurements using the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Though the interaction of both the types of nanoparticles reduced the membrane fluidity, the results were more pronounced in the negatively charged liposomes encapsulated with positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles due to strong electrostatic attractions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results also confirmed the presence of significant quantity of positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles in negatively charged liposomes. Through thermally induced shape fluctuation measurements of the giant liposomes, a considerable reduction in the bending elasticity modulus was observed for cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. The experimental results were supported by the simulation studies using modified Langevin-Poisson-Boltzmann model.

  16. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  17. Modulation and interactions of charged biomimetic membranes with bivalent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe

    The biological membrane of an eukaryotic cell is a two-dimensional structure of mostly phospholipids with embedded proteins. This two-dimensional structure plays many key roles in the life of a cell. Transmembrane proteins, for example, play the role of a gate for different ions (such as Ca2+). Also found are peripheral proteins that are used as enzymes for different purposes in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Phospholipids, in particular play three key roles. Firstly, some members of this group are used to store energy. Secondly, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties inherent to phospholipids enable them to be used as building blocks of the cell membrane by forming an asymmetric bilayer. This provides a shielding protection against the outer environment while at the same time keeping the organelles and cytosol from leaking out of the cell. Finally lipids are involved in regulating the aggregation of proteins in the membrane. In addition, some subspecies such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) are second messenger molecules in their own right, thus playing an important role in cellular signaling events. In my work presented in this thesis, I am focusing on the role of some phospholipids as signaling molecules and in particular the physicochemical underpinnings that could be used in their spatiotemporal organization in the cellular plasma membrane. I am specifically concerned with the important family of phosphatidylinositol lipids. PtdIns are very well known for their role as signaling molecules in numerous cell events. They are located in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane as well as part of the membrane of other organelles. Studies of these signaling molecules in their in vivo environment present many challenges: Firstly, the complexity of interactions due to the numerous entities present in eukaryotic cell membranes makes it difficult to establish clear cause and effect relationships. Secondly, due to their size, our inability to probe these

  18. Interactions of anesthetics with the membrane-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Cieplak, P.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the potency of conventional anesthetics correlates with lipophilicity, an affinity to water also is essential. It was recently found that compounds with very low affinities to water do not produce anesthesia regardless of their lipophilicity. This finding implies that clinical anesthesia might arise because of interactions at molecular sites near the interface of neuronal membranes with the aqueous environment and, therefore, might require increased concentrations of anesthetic molecules at membrane interfaces. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we calculated in molecular dynamics simulations the free energy profiles for the transfer of anesthetic 1,1,2-trifluoroethane and nonanesthetic perfluoroethane across water-membrane and water-hexane interfaces. Consistent with the hypothesis, it was found that trifluoroethane, but not perfluoroethane, exhibits a free energy minimum and, therefore, increased concentrations at both interfaces. The transfer of trifluoroethane from water to the nonpolar hexane or interior of the membrane is accompanied by a considerable, solvent-induced shift in the conformational equilibrium around the C-C bond.

  19. Integral membrane protein interaction with Triton cytoskeletons of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P

    1979-10-19

    The organization of erythrocyte membrane lipids and proteins has been studied following the release of cytoplasmic components with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. After detergent extraction, a detergent-resistant complex called the erythrocyte cytoskeleton is separated from detergent, solubilized lipid and protein by sucrose buoyant density sedimentation. In cytoskeletons prepared under isotonic conditions all of the major erythrocyte membrane proteins are retained except for the integral protein, glycophorin, which is quantitatively solubilized and another integral glycoprotein, band 3, which is only 60% removed. When cytoskeletons are prepared in hypertonic KCl solutions, band 3 is fully solubilized along with bands 2.1 and 4.2 and several minor components. The resulting cytoskeletons have the same morphology as those prepared in isotonic buffer but they are composed of only three major peripheral proteins, spectrin, actin and band 4.1. We have designated this peripheral protein complex the 'shell' of the erythrocyte membrane, and have shown that the attachment of band 3 to the shell satisfies the criteria for a specific interaction. Although Triton did affect erythrocyte shape, cytoskeleton lipid content and the activity of membrane proteases, there was no indication that Triton altered the attachment of band 3 to the shell. We suggest that band 3 attaches to the shell as part of a ternary complex of bands 2.1, 3 and 4.2.

  20. On the Importance of Hydrodynamic Interactions in Lipid Membrane Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Tadashi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions (HI) give rise to collective motions between molecules, which are known to be important in the dynamics of random coil polymers and colloids. However, their role in the biological self-assembly of many molecule systems has not been investigated. Here, using Brownian dynamics simulations, we evaluate the importance of HI on the kinetics of self-assembly of lipid membranes. One-thousand coarse-grained lipid molecules in periodic simulation boxes were allowed to assemble into stable bilayers in the presence and absence of intermolecular HI. Hydrodynamic interactions reduce the monomer-monomer association rate by 50%. In contrast, the rate of association of lipid clusters is much faster in the presence of intermolecular HI. In fact, with intermolecular HI, the membrane self-assembly rate is 3–10 times faster than that without intermolecular HI. We introduce an analytical model to describe the size dependence of the diffusive encounter rate of particle clusters, which can qualitatively explain our simulation results for the early stage of the membrane self-assembly process. These results clearly suggest that HI greatly affects the kinetics of self-assembly and that simulations without HI will significantly underestimate the kinetic parameters of such processes. PMID:23332062

  1. Interaction of vitamin D with membrane-based signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, María Jesús; González-Sancho, José Manuel; Bonilla, Félix; Muñoz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Many studies in different biological systems have revealed that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) modulates signaling pathways triggered at the plasma membrane by agents such as Wnt, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and others. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 may affect gene expression by paracrine mechanisms that involve the regulation of cytokine or growth factor secretion by neighboring cells. Moreover, post-transcriptional and post-translational effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 add to or overlap with its classical modulation of gene transcription rate. Together, these findings show that vitamin D receptor (VDR) cannot be considered only as a nuclear-acting, ligand-modulated transcription factor that binds to and controls the transcription of target genes. Instead, available data support the view that much of the complex biological activity of 1α,25(OH)2D3 resides in its capacity to interact with membrane-based signaling pathways and to modulate the expression and secretion of paracrine factors. Therefore, we propose that future research in the vitamin D field should focus on the interplay between 1α,25(OH)2D3 and agents that act at the plasma membrane, and on the analysis of intercellular communication. Global analyses such as RNA-Seq, transcriptomic arrays, and genome-wide ChIP are expected to dissect the interactions at the gene and molecular levels. PMID:24600406

  2. Characterization of membrane protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Situ, Alan J; Schmidt, Thomas; Mazumder, Parichita; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2014-10-23

    Understanding the structure, folding, and interaction of membrane proteins requires experimental tools to quantify the association of transmembrane (TM) helices. Here, we introduce isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure integrin αIIbβ3 TM complex affinity, to study the consequences of helix-helix preorientation in lipid bilayers, and to examine protein-induced lipid reorganization. Phospholipid bicelles served as membrane mimics. The association of αIIbβ3 proceeded with a free energy change of -4.61±0.04kcal/mol at bicelle conditions where the sampling of random helix-helix orientations leads to complex formation. At bicelle conditions that approach a true bilayer structure in effect, an entropy saving of >1kcal/mol was obtained from helix-helix preorientation. The magnitudes of enthalpy and entropy changes increased distinctly with bicelle dimensions, indicating long-range changes in bicelle lipid properties upon αIIbβ3 TM association. NMR spectroscopy confirmed ITC affinity measurements and revealed αIIbβ3 association and dissociation rates of 4500±100s(-1) and 2.1±0.1s(-1), respectively. Thus, ITC is able to provide comprehensive insight into the interaction of membrane proteins.

  3. Transport parameters in the human red cell membrane: solute-membrane interactions of amides and ureas.

    PubMed

    Toon, M R; Solomon, A K

    1991-04-02

    We have studied the permeability of a series of hydrophilic amides and ureas through the red cell membrane by determining the three phenomenological coefficients which describe solute-membrane interaction: the hydraulic permeability (Lp), the phenomenological permeability coefficient (omega i) and the reflection coefficient (sigma i). In 55 experiments on nine solutes, we have determined that the reflection coefficient (after a small correction for solute permeation by membrane dissolution) is significantly less than 1.0 (P less than 0.003, t-test), which provides very strong evidence that solute and water fluxes are coupled as they cross the red cell membrane. It is proposed that the aqueous channel is a tripartite assembly, comprising H-bond exchange regions at both faces of the membrane, joined by a narrower sieve-specific region which crosses the lipid. The solutes bind to the H-bond exchange regions to exchange their solvation shell with the H-bonds of the channel; the existence of these regions is confirmed by the finding that the permeation of all the amides and ureas requires binding to well-characterized sites with Km values of 0.1-0.5 M. The sieve-specific regions provide the steric restraints which govern the passage of the solutes according to their size; their existence is shown by the findings that: (1) the reflection coefficient (actually the function [1-corrected sigma i]) is linearly dependent upon the solute molecular diameter; and (2) the permeability coefficient is linearly dependent upon solute molar volume. These several observations, taken together, provide strong arguments which lead to the conclusion that the amides and urea cross the red cell membrane in an aqueous pore.

  4. Specific interaction of IM30/Vipp1 with cyanobacterial and chloroplast membranes results in membrane remodeling and eventually in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Jennifer; Thurotte, Adrien; Schneider, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The photosynthetic light reaction takes place within the thylakoid membrane system in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. Besides its global importance, the biogenesis, maintenance and dynamics of this membrane system are still a mystery. In the last two decades, strong evidence supported the idea that these processes involve IM30, the inner membrane-associated protein of 30kDa, a protein also known as the vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (Vipp1). Even though we just only begin to understand the precise physiological function of this protein, it is clear that interaction of IM30 with membranes is crucial for biogenesis of thylakoid membranes. Here we summarize and discuss forces guiding IM30-membrane interactions, as the membrane properties as well as the oligomeric state of IM30 appear to affect proper interaction of IM30 with membrane surfaces. Interaction of IM30 with membranes results in an altered membrane structure and can finally trigger fusion of adjacent membranes, when Mg(2+) is present. Based on recent results, we finally present a model summarizing individual steps involved in IM30-mediated membrane fusion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  5. Probing protein-lipid interactions by FRET between membrane fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Gadjev, Nikolai

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful fluorescence technique that has found numerous applications in medicine and biology. One area where FRET proved to be especially informative involves the intermolecular interactions in biological membranes. The present study was focused on developing and verifying a Monte-Carlo approach to analyzing the results of FRET between the membrane-bound fluorophores. This approach was employed to quantify FRET from benzanthrone dye ABM to squaraine dye SQ-1 in the model protein-lipid system containing a polycationic globular protein lysozyme and negatively charged lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. It was found that acceptor redistribution between the lipid bilayer and protein binding sites resulted in the decrease of FRET efficiency. Quantification of this effect in terms of the proposed methodology yielded both structural and binding parameters of lysozyme-lipid complexes.

  6. Membrane interactions between secretion granules and plasmalemma in three exocrine glands

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; De Camilli, P; Meldolesi, J

    1980-01-01

    significant increase of the frequency of IMP-free flat appositions between parotid granules. In contrast, no such areas were seen between freeze-fractured pancreatic granules, although some focal pentalaminar appositions appeared in section after centrifugation at 50 and 100,000 g for 10 min. On the basis of the observation that, in secretory cells, IMP clearing always develops in deformed membrane areas (bulges, depressions, flat areas), it is suggested that it might result from the forced mechanical apposition of the interacting membranes. This might be a preliminary process not sufficient to initiate fusion. In the pancreas, IMP clearing could occur over surface areas too small to be detected. In stimulated parotid and lacrimal glands they were exceptional. These structures were either attached at the sites of continuity between granule and plasma membranes, or free in the acinar lumen, with a preferential location within exocytotic pockets or in their proximity. Experiments designed to investigate the nature of these blisters and vesicles revealed that they probably arise artifactually during glutaraldehyde fixation. In fact, (a) they were large and numerous in poorly fixed samples but were never observed in thin sections of specimens fixed in one step with glutaraldehyde and OsO(4); and (b) no increase in concentration of phospholipids was observed in the parotid saliva and pancreatic juice after stimulation of protein discharge, as was to be expected if release of membrane material were occurring after exocytosis. PMID:7380885

  7. Interaction energy evaluation of soluble microbial products (SMP) on different membrane surfaces: role of the reconstructed membrane topology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Tian, Yu; Cao, Chu-qing; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhi-neng

    2012-05-15

    Soluble microbial products (SMP), a majority of organic matter in effluents, play a key role in membrane fouling. A series of filtration experiments were conducted, and demonstrated that the flux decrement rate was in order of cellulose acetate membrane (CA, 65.4%), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF, 47.9%) and polyether sulfones (PES, 29.2%). Results showed that the fouling behavior of membrane should be predicted from the combined knowledge of solution chemistry, surface chemical properties and surface morphology. To better understand the interactions between the SMP and different membranes, a technique for reconstructing the membrane surface topology was developed on the basis of statistical parameters obtained from atomic force microscopy. The interaction energy, represented by extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) potential, was calculated by surface element integration, allowing exploring the interaction energy profiles for different surfaces and providing considerable insights into the role of such interactions on the macroscopic fouling behavior. The resulting interaction energy differed considerably from the corresponding interaction between perfectly smooth surfaces. The great influence of protrusion on the membrane surface was to reduce the primary energy barrier height, thus rendering rough surface more favorable for deposition. An attractive energy region was immediately surrounded by each positive asperity as demonstrated in the roughness-engendered interaction energy maps. As the SMP approached closer to the membrane, they had a high probability of getting trapped in the attractive energy region, leading to a more rapid loss of flux than smooth membrane.

  8. Solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions in the preferential solvation of 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide in 24 binary solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Tharly; Gonçalves, Thaini F; Venturini, Cristina de G; Machado, Vanderlei G

    2006-11-01

    The molar transition energy (E(T)) polarity values for the dye 4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide were collected in binary mixtures comprising a hydrogen-bond accepting (HBA) solvent (acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)) and a hydrogen-bond donating (HBD) solvent (water, methanol, ethanol, propan-2-ol, and butan-1-ol). Data referring to mixtures of water with alcohols were also analyzed. These data were used in the study of the preferential solvation of the probe, in terms of both solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. These latter interactions are of importance in explaining the synergistic behavior observed for many mixed solvent systems. All data were successfully fitted to a model based on solvent-exchange equilibria. The E(T) values of the dye dissolved in the solvents show that the position of the solvatochromic absorption band of the dye is dependent on the medium polarity. The solvation of the dye in HBA solvents occurs with a very important contribution from ion-dipole interactions. In HBD solvents, the hydrogen bonding between the dimethylamino group in the dye and the OH group in the solvent plays an important role in the solvation of the dye. The interaction of the hydroxylic solvent with the other component in the mixture can lead to the formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes, which solvate the dye using a lower polar moiety, i.e. alkyl groups in the solvents. The dye has a hydrophobic nature and a dimethylamino group with a minor capability for hydrogen bonding with the medium in comparison with the phenolate group present in Reichardt's pyridiniophenolate. Thus, the probe is able to detect solvent-solvent interactions, which are implicit to the observed synergistic behavior.

  9. Molecular interactions between amantadine and model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Gen; Yang, Pei; Zhang, Chi; Li, Bolin; Han, Xiaofeng; Song, Minghu; Chen, Zhan

    2014-07-22

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was applied to study molecular interactions between amantadine and substrate supported lipid bilayers serving as model cell membranes. Both isotopically asymmetric and symmetric lipid bilayers were used in the research. SFG results elucidated how the water-soluble drug, amantadine, influenced the packing state of each leaflet of a lipid bilayer and how the drugs affected the lipid flip-flop process. It is difficult to achieve such detailed molecular-level information using other analytical techniques. Especially, from the flip-flop rate change of isotopically asymmetric lipid bilayer induced by amantadine, important information on the drug-membrane interaction mechanism can be derived. The results show that amantadine can be associated with zwitterionic PC bilayers but has a negligible influence on the flip-flop behavior of PC molecules unless at high concentrations. Different effects of amantadine on the lipid bilayer were observed for the negatively charged DPPG bilayer; low concentration amantadine (e.g., 0.20 mM) in the subphase could immediately disturb the outer lipid leaflet and then the lipid associated amantadine molecules gradually reorganize to cause the outer leaflet to return to the original orderly packed state. Higher concentration amantadine (e.g., 5.0 mM) immediately disordered the packing state of the outer lipid leaflet. For both the high and low concentration cases, amantadine molecules only bind to the outer PG leaflet and cannot translocate to the inner layer. The presence of amantadine within the negatively charged lipid layers has certain implications for using liposomes as drug delivery carriers for amantadine. Besides, by using PC or PG bilayers with both leaflets deuterated, we were able to examine how amantadine is distributed and/or oriented within the lipid bilayer. The present work demonstrates that SFG results can provide an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms of

  10. Studies on the interactions between parabens and lipid membrane components in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Gawryś, Maciej; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between parabens (PBs) and lipid components of mammalian and bacterial cell membranes were investigated in model systems of Langmuir monolayers. Me-, Et-, Pr- and Bu-paraben studied in this paper are frequently applied as cosmetics and food preservatives, since they possess broad antimicrobial activity. The mode of PB action is connected with their incorporation into the membrane of bacterial organisms, however; it is not known what is the role of the respective lipid species in this mechanism. This problem is crucial to understand the differences in paraben activity toward individual microorganisms and to shed the light onto the problem of PB cytotoxicity reported in studies on mammalian cells. In this paper, the mentioned aspects were investigated with application of the Langmuir monolayer technique complemented with BAM and GIXD. Our experiments revealed that the influence of PBs depends on their chemical structure, solution concentration and on the class of lipid. The strongest modification of the monolayer characteristics, leading to its collapse at low surface pressure, occurred in the presence of BuPB, having the largest chain. PBs interact preferentially with the monolayers possessing low degree of condensation, whereas for LC state, the effect was weaker and observed only as modification of the 2D unit cells. In the model systems, PBs interact with phospholipids characteristic for mammalian membranes (phosphatidylcholine) stronger than with bacterial (phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin). This strong influence of parabens on the model systems composed of animal lipids may explain cytotoxic activity of these preservatives.

  11. Identification of membrane proteins mediating the interaction of human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, D; Jennings, L; Edwards, H

    1980-01-01

    Membrane glycoproteins that mediate platelet-platelet interactions were investigated by identifying those associated with the cytoskeletal structures from aggregated platelets. The cytoskeletal structures from washed platelets, thrombin-activated platelets (platelets incubated with thrombin in the presence of mM EDTA to prevent aggregation) and thrombin- aggregated platelets (platelets activated in the presence of mM Ca(++) were prepared by first treating platelet suspensions with 1 percent Triton X-100 and 5 mM EGTA and then isolating the insoluble residue by centrifugation. The readily identifiable structures in electron micrographs of the residue from washed platelets had the shape and dimensions of actin filaments. Analysis of this residue from washed platelets had the shape and dimensions of actin filaments. Analysis of this residue by SDS gel electrophoresis showed that it consisted primarily of three proteins: actin (mol wt = 43,000), myosin (mol wt = 200,000) and a high molecular weight polypeptide (mol wt = 255,000) which had properties indentical to actin-binding protein (filamin). When platelets are activated with thrombin in the presence of EDTA to prevent aggregation, there was a marked increase in the amount of insoluble precipitate in the subsequent Triton extraction. Transmission electron microscopy showed that this residue not only contained the random array of actin filaments as seen above, but also organized structures from individual platelets which appeared as balls of electron-dense filamentous material approximately 1mum in diameter. SDS polyacrylamide gel analysis of the Triton residue of activated platelets showed that this preparation contained more actin, myosin and actin-binding protein than that from washed platelets plus polypeptides with mol wt of 56,000 and 90,000 and other minor polypeptides. Thus, thrombin activation appeared to increase polymerization of actin in association with other cytoskeletal proteins into structures that

  12. Regulation of AKAP-membrane interactions by calcium.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Shumay, Elena; McLaughlin, Stuart; Wang, Hsien-yu; Malbon, Craig C

    2006-08-18

    The AKAP gravin is a scaffold for protein kinases, phosphatases, and adaptor molecules obligate for resensitization and recycling of beta2-adrenergic receptors. Gravin binds to the receptor through well characterized protein-protein interactions. These interactions are facilitated approximately 1000-fold when gravin is anchored to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Although the N-terminal region (approximately 550 residues) is highly negatively charged and probably natively unfolded, it could anchor gravin to the inner leaflet through hydrophobic insertion of its N-terminal myristate and electrostatic binding of three short positively charged domains (PCDs). Loss of the site of N-myristoylation was found to affect neither AKAP macroscopic localization nor AKAP function. Synthetic peptides corresponding to PCD1-3 bound in vitro to unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with high affinity, a binding reversed by calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+. In vivo gravin localization is regulated by intracellular Ca2+, a function mapping to the N terminus of the protein harboring PCD1, PCD2, and PCD3. Mutation of any two PCDs eliminates membrane association of the non-myristoylated gravin, the sensitivity to Ca2+/calmodulin, and the ability of this scaffold to catalyze receptor resensitization and recycling.

  13. Elucidating how bamboo salt interacts with supported lipid membranes: influence of alkalinity on membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Hee; Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Min Chul; Park, Jae Hyeon; Herrin, Jason Scott; Kim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Haiwon; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-07-01

    Bamboo salt is a traditional medicine produced from sea salt. It is widely used in Oriental medicine and is an alkalizing agent with reported antiinflammatory, antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic properties. Notwithstanding, linking specific molecular mechanisms with these properties has been challenging to establish in biological systems. In part, this issue may be related to bamboo salt eliciting nonspecific effects on components found within these systems. Herein, we investigated the effects of bamboo salt solution on supported lipid bilayers as a model system to characterize the interaction between lipid membranes and bamboo salt. The atomic composition of unprocessed and processed bamboo salts was first analyzed by mass spectrometry, and we identified several elements that have not been previously reported in other bamboo salt preparations. The alkalinity of hydrated samples was also measured and determined to be between pH 10 and 11 for bamboo salts. The effect of processed bamboo salt solutions on the fluidic properties of a supported lipid bilayer on glass was next investigated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. It was demonstrated that, with increasing ionic strength of the bamboo salt solution, the fluidity of a lipid bilayer increased. On the contrary, increasing the ionic strength of near-neutral buffer solutions with sodium chloride salt diminished fluidity. To reconcile these two observations, we identified that solution alkalinity is critical for the effects of bamboo salt on membrane fluidity, as confirmed using three additional commercial bamboo salt preparations. Extended-DLVO model calculations support that the effects of bamboo salt on lipid membranes are due to the alkalinity imparting a stronger hydration force. Collectively, the results of this work demonstrate that processing of bamboo salt strongly affects its atomic composition and that the alkalinity of bamboo salt solutions contributes to its effect on membrane

  14. (13)C heteronuclear NMR studies of the interaction of cultured neurons and astrocytes and aluminum blockade of the preferential release of citrate from astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Meshitsuka, Shunsuke; Aremu, David A

    2008-02-01

    Citrate has been identified as a major tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle constituent preferentially released by astrocytes. We undertook the present study to examine further the nature of metabolic compartmentation in central nervous system tissues using (13)C-labeled glucose and to provide new information on the influence of aluminum on the metabolic interaction between neurons and astrocytes. Metabolites released into the culture medium from astrocytes and neuron-astrocyte coculture, as well as the perchloric acid extracts of the cells were analyzed using 2D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Astrocytes released citrate into the culture medium and the released citrate was consumed by neurons in coculture. Citrate release by astrocytes was blocked in the presence of aluminum, with progressive accumulation of citrate within the cells. We propose citrate supply is a more efficient energy source than lactate for neurons to produce ATP, especially in the hypoglycemic state on account of it being a direct component of the TCA cycle. Astrocytes may be the cellular compartment for aluminum accumulation as a citrate complex in the brain.

  15. Preferential hydrophobic interactions are responsible for a preference of D-amino acids in the aminoacylation of 5'-AMP with hydrophobic amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C. Jr; Wickramasinghe, N. S.; Sabatini, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of aminoacyl AMP to model reactions at the 3' terminus of aminoacyl tRNA for the purpose of understanding the origin of protein synthesis. The present studies relate to the D, L preference in the esterification of 5'-AMP. All N-acetyl amino acids we studied showed faster reaction of the D-isomer, with a generally decreasing preference for D-isomer as the hydrophobicity of the amino acid decreased. The beta-branched amino acids, Ile and Val, showed an extreme preference for D-isomer. Ac-Leu, the gamma-branched amino acid, showed a slightly low D/L ratio relative to its hydrophobicity. The molecular basis for these preferences for D-isomer is understandable in the light of our previous studies and seems to be due to preferential hydrophobic interaction of the D-isomer with adenine. The preference for hydrophobic D-amino acids can be decreased by addition of an organic solvent to the reaction medium. Conversely, peptidylation with Ac-PhePhe shows a preference for the LL isomer over the DD isomer.

  16. Similarities and differences of serotonin and its precursors in their interactions with model membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Irene; Martini, M. Florencia; Pickholz, Mónica

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report a molecular dynamics (MD) simulations study of relevant biological molecules as serotonin (neutral and protonated) and its precursors, tryptophan and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, in a fully hydrated bilayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-choline (POPC). The simulations were carried out at the fluid lamellar phase of POPC at constant pressure and temperature conditions. Two guest molecules of each type were initially placed at the water phase. We have analyzed, the main localization, preferential orientation and specific interactions of the guest molecules within the bilayer. During the simulation run, the four molecules were preferentially found at the water-lipid interphase. We found that the interactions that stabilized the systems are essentially hydrogen bonds, salt bridges and cation-π. None of the guest molecules have access to the hydrophobic region of the bilayer. Besides, zwitterionic molecules have access to the water phase, while protonated serotonin is anchored in the interphase. Even taking into account that these simulations were done using a model membrane, our results suggest that the studied molecules could not cross the blood brain barrier by diffusion. These results are in good agreement with works that show that serotonin and Trp do not cross the BBB by simple diffusion.

  17. G protein-membrane interactions I: Gαi1 myristoyl and palmitoyl modifications in protein-lipid interactions and its implications in membrane microdomain localization.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Rafael; López, David J; Casas, Jesús; Lladó, Victoria; Higuera, Mónica; Nagy, Tünde; Barceló, Miquel; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2015-11-01

    G proteins are fundamental elements in signal transduction involved in key cell responses, and their interactions with cell membrane lipids are critical events whose nature is not fully understood. Here, we have studied how the presence of myristic and palmitic acid moieties affects the interaction of the Gαi1 protein with model and biological membranes. For this purpose, we quantified the binding of purified Gαi1 protein and Gαi1 protein acylation mutants to model membranes, with lipid compositions that resemble different membrane microdomains. We observed that myristic and palmitic acids not only act as membrane anchors but also regulate Gαi1 subunit interaction with lipids characteristics of certain membrane microdomains. Thus, when the Gαi1 subunit contains both fatty acids it prefers raft-like lamellar membranes, with a high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content and little phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine. By contrast, the myristoylated and non-palmitoylated Gαi1 subunit prefers other types of ordered lipid microdomains with higher phosphatidylserine content. These results in part explain the mobility of Gαi1 protein upon reversible palmitoylation to meet one or another type of signaling protein partner. These results also serve as an example of how membrane lipid alterations can change membrane signaling or how membrane lipid therapy can regulate the cell's physiology.

  18. Ionic channels and nerve membrane lipids. Cholesterol-tetrodotoxin interaction.

    PubMed

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V; Camejo, G

    1970-04-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate possible interactions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) with lipid molecules isolated from nerve fiber plasma membranes of the squid Dosidicus gigas. TTX has a highly selective ability to block the channel normally used by Na(+) to cross the axolemma during nervous impulse conduction. In order to investigate the interaction each lipid sample was spread on 5 x 10(-7)M TTX and TTX-free 0.15 M NaCl solutions adjusted to pH 7.4 with 7 x 10(-3)M phosphate buffer. The surface pressure-area diagrams of the lipid monolayers revealed that TTX interacts only with cholesterol. The expansion of the cholesterol monolayers at 5 x 10(-7)M TTX was 2 A(2)/molecule at zero pressure for the experiments at 20 degrees C and 2.5 A(2)/molecule for those at 25 degrees C. Similar results were obtained in KCl subphases. The apparent dissociation constant of the cholesterol-TTX complex calculated from dose-response experiments is 2.6 x 10(-7)M. Experiments at pH 10.1 revealed that the zwitter ionic form of TTX is less active. Experiments with cholesterol derivatives (cholesteryl acetate, cholesterol methyl ether, cholestanol, and cholestanyl acetate) indicate that for the interaction with TTX a partial negatively charged group at C-3 and a double bond between C-5 and C-6 on the steroid nucleus are required. Tetrodonic acid, a biologically inactive derivative of TTX, does not interact with cholesterol. The results lead us to propose that cholesterol is part of the Na(+) channel.

  19. Interaction of aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pizzimenti, Stefania; Ciamporcero, Eric; Daga, Martina; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Gianpaolo; Minelli, Rosalba; Dianzani, Chiara; Lepore, Alessio; Gentile, Fabrizio; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA) and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24027536

  20. Host-microbe interactions via membrane transport systems.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Hiroaki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Living organisms take in essential molecules and get rid of wastes effectively through the selective transport of materials. Especially in the digestive tract, advanced transport systems are indispensable for the absorption of nutrients and elimination of waste products. These transport pathways control physiological functions by modulating the ionic environment inside and outside the cells. Moreover, recent studies have shown the importance of the expression of trafficking-related molecules and the population of gut microbiota. We found that the molecules secreted from microorganisms are imported into the cells via transporters or endocytosis and that they activate cell survival pathways of intestinal epithelial cells. These findings indicate that the interactions between the gut microbiota and host cells are mediated, at least partly, by the membrane transport systems. In addition, it is well known that the breakdown of transport systems induces various diseases. This review highlights the significance of the transport systems as the pathogenic molecules and therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal disorders. For example, abnormal expression of the genes encoding membrane transport-related molecules is frequently involved in digestive diseases, such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. We herein review the significance of these molecules as pathogenic and therapeutic targets for digestive diseases.

  1. Biphasic interaction of Triton detergents with the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Trägner, D; Csordas, A

    1987-01-01

    Octylphenoxy polyoxyethylene ethers (Triton detergents) interact with the erythrocyte membrane in a biphasic manner, i.e. they stabilize erythrocytes against hypo-osmotic haemolysis at low concentrations (0.0001-0.01%, v/v), but become haemolytic at higher concentrations. This biphasic behaviour was demonstrated with Triton X-114, Triton X-100 and Triton X-102. However, a critical chain length is a prerequisite for the haemolytic effect, because Triton X-45, which differs from the other Tritons only by the shorter chain of the polyoxyethylene residue, does not exhibit this biphasic behaviour, but goes on protecting against osmotic rupture up to saturating concentrations. Even a 1% solution of Triton X-45 does not cause haemolysis. This structural specificity of Triton X-45, namely the lack of haemolysis and efficient stabilization against osmolysis even at higher concentrations of the detergent, is exhibited at 0 degree and 37 degrees C as well as at room temperature. Three conclusions are reached: (i) a critical chain length of the octylphenoxy polyoxyethylene ethers is required for the haemolytic effect; (ii) the different structural requirements would suggest that different mechanisms are responsible for the haemolytic and the stabilizing effect of amphiphilic substances; (iii) the results suggest that haemolysis is not caused simply by dissolution of the membrane by the detergent but is a rather more specific process. PMID:3446180

  2. Chemical studies of viral entry mechanisms: I. Hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions during Sendai virus membrane fusion. II. Kinetics of bacteriophage. lambda. DNA injection

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Sendai virus glycoprotein interactions with target membranes during the early stages of fusion were examined using time-resolved hydrophobic photoaffinity labeling with the lipid-soluble carbene generator 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m({sup 125}I) iodophenyl)diazirine. During Sendai virus fusion with liposomes composed of cardiolipin or phosphatidylserine, the viral fusion (F) protein is preferentially labeled at early time points, supporting the hypothesis that hydrophobic interaction of the fusion peptide at the N-terminus of the F{sub 1} subunit with the target membrane is an initiating event in fusion. Correlation of hydrophobic interactions with independently monitored fusion kinetics further supports this conclusion. The F{sub 1} subunit, containing the putative hydrophobic fusion sequence, is exclusively labeled, and the F{sub 2} subunit does not participate in fusion. Labeling shows temperature and pH dependence consistent with a need for protein conformational mobility and fusion at neutral pH. Higher amounts of labeling during fusion with CL vesicles than during virus-PS vesicle fusion reflects membrane packing regulation of peptide insertion into target membranes. Labeling of the viral hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) at low pH indicates that HN-mediated fusion is triggered by hydrophobic interactions. Controls for diffusional labeling exclude a major contribution from this source. Labeling during reconstituted Sendai virus envelope-liposome fusion shows that functional reconstitution involves protein retention of the ability to undergo hydrophobic interactions. Examination of Sendai virus fusion with erythrocyte membranes indicates that hydrophobic interactions also trigger fusion between biological membranes. The data show that hydrophobic fusion protein interaction with both artificial and biological membranes is a triggering event in fusion.

  3. Schwann cells and myasthenia gravis. Preferential uptake of soluble and membrane-bound AChR by normal and immortalized Schwann cells, and immunogenic presentation to AChR-specific T line lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. P.; Porter, S.; Wekerle, H.

    1990-01-01

    The normal neuromuscular synapse is formed by the intimate association of nerve endings, postsynaptic end-plate foldings in the muscle fiber, and nonmyelinating Schwann cells (SC) sealing the synaptic ramifications. Because SC have been recognized recently to have an immunogenic potential inducible to present protein autoantigens to autoimmune T lymphocytes, and considering their close proximity to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-bearing postsynaptic membranes, presentation of soluble and membrane vesicle-bound AChR to appropriate T cells was investigated. Short-term monolayer cultures of SC isolated from neonatal rat sciatic nerves, as well as cells of an immortalized SC line of similar origin, were fully able to present the relevant molecular epitopes to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) compatible AChR-specific T line lymphocytes immunogenically. Presentation of AChR was restricted by RT1.B (I-A) MHC class II products. Both types of cultured rat SC were inducible to expression of MHC class I and II products, and they were able to phagocytose AChR-enriched membrane vesicles preferentially. In contrast, phagocytosis of latex particles by SC was negligible. These data qualify perisynaptic SC as potential presenter cells of autoimmunogenic AChR in myasthenia gravis. Thus, SC may play a critical and as-yet unpredicted regulatory role in the cellular pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 5 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:1688688

  4. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  5. Ionic protein-lipid interaction at the plasma membrane: what can the charge do?

    PubMed

    Li, Lunyi; Shi, Xiaoshan; Guo, Xingdong; Li, Hua; Xu, Chenqi

    2014-03-01

    Phospholipids are the major components of cell membranes, but they have functional roles beyond forming lipid bilayers. In particular, acidic phospholipids form microdomains in the plasma membrane and can ionically interact with proteins via polybasic sequences, which can have functional consequences for the protein. The list of proteins regulated by ionic protein-lipid interaction has been quickly expanding, and now includes membrane proteins, cytoplasmic soluble proteins, and viral proteins. Here we review how acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane regulate protein structure and function via ionic interactions, and how Ca(2+) regulates ionic protein-lipid interactions via direct and indirect mechanisms.

  6. Interaction of bilirubin with human erythrocyte membranes. Bilirubin binding to neuraminidase- and phospholipase-treated membranes.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Aono, S; Semba, R; Kashiwamata, S

    1987-11-15

    Saturable bilirubin binding to human erythrocyte membranes was measured before and after digestion with neuraminidase and phospholipases. Neuraminidase-treated erythrocyte membranes did not show any change in their binding properties, indicating that gangliosides could be excluded as candidates for saturable bilirubin-binding sites on erythrocyte membranes. Although bilirubin-binding properties of the membranes did not change after phospholipase D digestion, either, phospholipase C treatment greatly enhanced bilirubin binding. Thus it is suggested that a negatively charged phosphoric acid moiety of phospholipids on the membrane surface may play a role to prevent a large amount of bilirubin from binding to the membranes. Further saturable bilirubin binding to inside-out sealed erythrocyte membrane vesicles showed values comparable with those of the right-side-out sealed membranes, suggesting that the bilirubin-binding sites may be distributed on both outer and inner surfaces of the membranes, or may exist in the membranes where bilirubin may be accessible from either side.

  7. Interaction of murine macrophage-membrane proteins with components of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M L; Duarte-Escalante, E; Reyes-Montes, M R; Elizondo, N; Maldonado, G; Zenteno, E

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin, a crude antigen of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum, was studied using murine peritoneal macrophages. Membrane proteins were purified via membrane attachment to polycationic beads and solubilized in Tris–HCl/SDS/DTT/glycerol for protein extraction; afterwards they were adsorbed or not with H. capsulatum yeast or lectin binding-enriched by affinity chromatography. Membrane proteins and histoplasmin interactions were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting assays using anti-H. capsulatum human or mouse serum and biotinylated goat anti-human or anti-mouse IgG/streptavidin-peroxidase system to reveal the interaction. Results indicate that macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components interact in a dose-dependent reaction, and adsorption of macrophage-membrane proteins by yeast cells induces a critical decrease in the interaction. Macrophage-membrane glycoproteins with terminal d-galactosyl residues, purified by chromatography with Abrus precatorius lectin, bound to histoplasmin; and two bands of 68 kD and 180 kD of transferred membrane protein samples interacted with histoplasmin components, as revealed by immunoblot assays. Specificity for β-galactoside residues on the macrophage-membrane was confirmed by galactose inhibition of the interaction between macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components, in competitive ELISA using sugars, as well as by enzymatic cleavage of the galactoside residues. PMID:9737672

  8. Interactions among Cytochromes P450 in Microsomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitri R.; Davydova, Nadezhda Y.; Sineva, Elena V.; Halpert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The body of evidence of physiologically relevant P450-P450 interactions in microsomal membranes continues to grow. Here we probe oligomerization of human CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP2E1 in microsomal membranes. Using a technique based on luminescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrate that all three proteins are subject to a concentration-dependent equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric states. We also observed the formation of mixed oligomers in CYP3A4/CYP3A5, CYP3A4/CYP2E1, and CYP3A5/CYP2E1 pairs and demonstrated that the association of either CYP3A4 or CYP3A5 with CYP2E1 causes activation of the latter enzyme. Earlier we hypothesized that the intersubunit interface in CYP3A4 oligomers is similar to that observed in the crystallographic dimers of some microsomal drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (Davydov, D. R., Davydova, N. Y., Sineva, E. V., Kufareva, I., and Halpert, J. R. (2013) Pivotal role of P450-P450 interactions in CYP3A4 allostery: the case of α-naphthoflavone. Biochem. J. 453, 219–230). Here we report the results of intermolecular cross-linking of CYP3A4 oligomers with thiol-reactive bifunctional reagents as well as the luminescence resonance energy transfer measurements of interprobe distances in the oligomers of labeled CYP3A4 single-cysteine mutants. The results provide compelling support for the physiological relevance of the dimer-specific peripheral ligand-binding site observed in certain CYP3A4 structures. According to our interpretation, these results reveal an important general mechanism that regulates the activity and substrate specificity of the cytochrome P450 ensemble through interactions between multiple P450 species. As a result of P450-P450 cross-talk, the catalytic properties of the cytochrome P450 ensemble cannot be predicted by simple summation of the properties of the individual P450 species. PMID:25533469

  9. Lipid-protein interactions in Escherichia coli membranes over-expressing the sugar-H(+) symporter, GalP EPR of spin-labelled lipids.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Anne; Henderson, Peter J F; Marsh, Derek

    2003-04-01

    The D-galactose-H(+) symport protein (GalP) of Escherichia coli is a homologue of the human glucose transport protein, GLUT1. After amplified expression of the GalP transporter in E. coli, lipid-protein interactions were studied in gradient-purified inner membranes by using spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Phosphatidylethanolamine, -glycerol, -choline and -serine, in addition to phosphatidic and stearic acids, were spin-labelled at the 14 C-atom of the sn-2 chain. EPR spectra of these spin labels at probe amounts in GalP membranes consist of two components. One component corresponds to a lipid population whose motion is restricted by direct interaction with the transmembrane sections of the integral protein. The other component corresponds to a lipid population with greater chain mobility, and is similar to the single-component EPR spectrum of the spin-labelled lipids in membranes of E. coli lipid extract. Quantitation of the protein-interacting spin-label component allows determination of the stoichiometry and selectivity of lipid-protein interactions. On average, approximately 20 mol of lipid are motionally restricted per 52 kDa of protein in GalP membranes. At the pH of the transport assay, there is relatively little selectivity between the different phospholipids tested. Only stearic acid displays a stronger preferential interaction with this protein.

  10. Molecular Interaction between Magainin 2 and Model Membranes in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoi; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Ye, Shuji; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the molecular interactions of Magainin 2 with model cell membranes using Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance – Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Symmetric 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (POPG) and 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (POPC) bilayers, which model the bacterial and mammalian cell membranes respectively, were used in the studies. It was observed by SFG that Magainin 2 orients relatively parallel to the POPG lipid bilayer surface at low solution concentrations, around 200 nM. When increasing the Magainin 2 concentration to 800 nM, both SFG and ATR-FTIR results indicate that Magainin 2 molecules insert into the POPG bilayer and adopt a transmembrane orientation with an angle of about 20 degrees from the POPG bilayer normal. For the POPC bilayer, even at a much higher peptide concentration of 2.0 µM, no ATR-FTIR signal was detected. For this concentration on POPC, SFG studies indicated that Magainin 2 molecules adopt an orientation nearly parallel to the bilayer surface, with an orientation angle of 75 degrees from the surface normal. This shows that SFG has a much better detection limit than ATR-FTIR and can therefore be applied to study interfacial molecules with much lower surface coverage. This Magainin 2 orientation study and further investigation of the lipid bilayer SFG signals support the proposed toroidal pore model for the antimicrobial activity of Magainin 2. PMID:19728722

  11. The adrenal specific toxicant mitotane directly interacts with lipid membranes and alters membrane properties depending on lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Haralampiev, Ivan; Theisgen, Stephan; Schirbel, Andreas; Sbiera, Silviu; Huster, Daniel; Kroiss, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Mitotane (o,p'.-DDD) is an orphan drug approved for the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma. The mechanisms, which are responsible for this activity of the drug, are not completely understood. It can be hypothesized that an impact of mitotane is mediated by the interaction with cellular membranes. However, an interaction of mitotane with (lipid) membranes has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we characterized the interaction of mitotane and its main metabolite o,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroacetic acid (o,p'-DDA) with lipid membranes by applying a variety of biophysical approaches of nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that mitotane and o,p'-DDA bind to lipid membranes by inserting into the lipid-water interface of the bilayer. Mitotane but not o,p'-DDA directly causes a disturbance of bilayer structure leading to an increased permeability of the membrane for polar molecules. Mitotane induced alterations of the membrane integrity required the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and/or cholesterol. Collectively, our data for the first time characterize the impact of mitotane on the lipid membrane structure and dynamics, which may contribute to a better understanding of specific mitotane effects and side effects.

  12. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

    1997-06-10

    Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

  13. Embedded Together: The Life and Death Consequences of Interaction of the Bcl-2 Family with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Leber, Brian; Lin, Jialing; Andrews, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane is the point of no return in most programmed cell deaths. This critical step is mainly regulated by the various protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions of the Bcl-2 family proteins. The two main models for regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, direct activation and displacement do not account for all of the experimental data and both largely neglect the importance of the membrane. We propose the embedding together model to emphasize the critical importance of Bcl-2 family protein interactions with and within membranes. The embedding together model proposes that both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins engage in similar dynamic interactions that are governed by membrane dependent conformational changes and culminate in either aborted or productive membrane permeabilization depending on the final oligomeric state of pro-apoptotic Bax and/or Bak. PMID:17453159

  14. Interaction of the Intermembrane Space Domain of Tim23 Protein with Mitochondrial Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Munari, Francesca; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tim23 mediates protein translocation into mitochondria. Although inserted into the inner membrane, the dynamic association of its intermembrane space (IMS) domain with the outer membrane promotes protein import. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the IMS domain of Tim23 tightly associates with both inner and outer mitochondrial membrane-like membranes through a hydrophobic anchor at its N terminus. The structure of membrane-bound Tim23IMS is highly dynamic, allowing recognition of both the incoming presequence and other translocase components at the translocation contact. Cardiolipin enhances Tim23 membrane attachment, suggesting that cardiolipin can influence preprotein import. PMID:25349212

  15. Characterization of glycolytic enzyme interactions with murine erythrocyte membranes in wild-type and membrane protein knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Campanella, M Estela; Chu, Haiyan; Wandersee, Nancy J; Peters, Luanne L; Mohandas, Narla; Gilligan, Diana M; Low, Philip S

    2008-11-01

    Previous research has shown that glycolytic enzymes (GEs) exist as multienzyme complexes on the inner surface of human erythrocyte membranes. Because GE binding sites have been mapped to sequences on the membrane protein, band 3, that are not conserved in other mammalian homologs, the question arose whether GEs can organize into complexes on other mammalian erythrocyte membranes. To address this, murine erythrocytes were stained with antibodies to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase and analyzed by confocal microscopy. GEs were found to localize to the membrane in oxygenated erythrocytes but redistributed to the cytoplasm upon deoxygenation, as seen in human erythrocytes. To identify membrane proteins involved in GE assembly, erythrocytes from mice lacking each of the major erythrocyte membrane proteins were examined for GE localization. GEs from band 3 knockout mice were not membrane associated but distributed throughout the cytoplasm, regardless of erythrocyte oxygenation state. In contrast, erythrocytes from mice lacking alpha-spectrin, ankyrin, protein 4.2, protein 4.1, beta-adducin, or dematin headpiece exhibited GEs bound to the membrane. These data suggest that oxygenation-dependent assembly of GEs on the membrane could be a general phenomenon of mammalian erythrocytes and that stability of these interactions depends primarily on band 3.

  16. Surface interactions and fouling properties of Micrococcus luteus with microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Li, Xiufen; Song, Ping; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate microbial adhesion of Micrococcus luteus to polypropylene (PP) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes in relation to the variation of the interfacial energies in the membrane-bacteria systems, for revealing effects of short-range surface interactions on filtration behavior. Both the membranes and M. luteus showed typical strong electron donors and hydrophilic properties. The AB component was dominant in the interfacial energies of the two membrane-bacteria systems. M. luteus presented larger negative U(mlb)(XDLVO) to the PP membrane than to the PVDF membrane. The adhesion experiments also proved that M. luteus had higher adhesion percentage to the PP membrane. This study demonstrated that the adhesion potentials of M. luteus to the PP and PVDF membranes might be explained in terms of bacterium, membrane, and intervening medium surface properties, which are mainly determined by the interfacial energies in the systems according to the XDLVO theory.

  17. The HOPS/Class C Vps Complex Tethers High-Curvature Membranes via a Direct Protein-Membrane Interaction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Membrane tethering is a physical association of two membranes before their fusion. Many membrane tethering factors have been identified, but the interactions that mediate inter-membrane associations remain largely a matter of conjecture. Previously, we reported that the homotypic fusion and protein sorting/Class C vacuolar protein sorting (HOPS/Class C Vps) complex, which has two binding sites for the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p, can tether two low-curvature liposomes when both membranes bear Ypt7p. Here, we show that HOPS tethers highly curved liposomes to Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes even when the high-curvature liposomes are protein-free. Phosphorylation of the curvature-sensing amphipathic lipid-packing sensor (ALPS) motif from the Vps41p HOPS subunit abrogates tethering of high-curvature liposomes. A HOPS complex without its Vps39p subunit, which contains one of the Ypt7p binding sites in HOPS, lacks tethering activity, though it binds high-curvature liposomes and Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes. Thus, HOPS tethers highly curved membranes via a direct protein-membrane interaction. Such high-curvature membranes are found at the sites of vacuole tethering and fusion. There, vacuole membranes bend sharply, generating large areas of vacuole-vacuole contact. We propose that HOPS localizes via the Vps41p ALPS motif to these high-curvature regions. There, HOPS binds via Vps39p to Ypt7p in an apposed vacuole membrane.

  18. Nonbonded interactions in membrane active cyclic biopolymers. IV - Cation dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, S.; Prasad, C. V.; Brinda, S. R.; Macelroy, R. D.; Sundaram, K.

    1980-01-01

    Interactions of valinomycin and form of its analogs in several conformations with the central ions Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) are investigated as part of a study of the specific preference of valinomycin for potassium and the mechanisms of carrier-mediated ion transport across membranes. Ion binding energies and conformational potential energies are calculated taking into account polarization energy formulas and repulsive energy between the central ion and the ligand atoms for conformations representing various stages in ion capture and release for each of the two ring chiralities of valinomycin and its analogs. Results allow the prediction of the chirality and conformation most likely to be observed for a given analog, and may be used to synthesize analogs with a desired rigidity or flexibility. The binding energies with the alkali metal cations are found to decrease with increasing ion size, and to be smaller than the corresponding ion hydration energies. It is pointed out that the observed potassium preference may be explainable in terms of differences between binding and hydration energies. Binding energies are also noted to depend on ligand conformation.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions and its implications for membrane fouling control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianrong; Shen, Liguo; Zhang, Meijia; Hong, Huachang; He, Yiming; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    Concept of hydrophobicity always fails to accurately assess the interfacial interaction and membrane fouling, which calls for reliable parameters for this purpose. In this study, effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions related to membrane fouling were investigated based on thermodynamic analysis. It was found that, total interaction energy between sludge foulants and membrane monotonically decreases and increases with water and glycerol contact angle, respectively, indicating that these two parameters can be reliable indicators predicting total interaction energy and membrane fouling. Membrane roughness decreases interaction strength for over 20 times, and effects of membrane roughness on membrane fouling should consider water and glycerol contact angle on membrane. It was revealed existence of a critical water and glycerol contact angle for a given membrane bioreactor. Meanwhile, diiodomethane contact angle has minor effect on the total interaction, and cannot be regarded as an effective indicator assessing interfacial interactions and membrane fouling.

  20. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation.

  1. Interaction of serum sex steroid-binding globulin with cell membranes of human decidual tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Avvakumov, G.V.; Survilo, L.I.; Strel'chenok, O.A.

    1986-01-20

    The interaction of the sex steroid-binding globulin (SBG) of human blood with plasma membranes of cells from human decidual tissue - the target tissue of estradiol - was studied. It was shown that SBG in complex with estradiol is capable of interacting specifically with these membranes. The dissociation (K/sub dis/) of this interaction is equal to (3.5 +/- 2.0) 10/sup -12/ M. The interaction of the SBG-estradiol complex with the membranes is characterized by high selectivity: such blood serum globulins as albumin, orosomucoid, transferrin, transcortin, and thyroxine-binding globulin do not compete with SBG for its binding sites on the membranes. The SBG-testosterone complex and SBG without steroid are also incapable of interacting with the membranes.

  2. Membrane interaction of antimicrobial peptides using E. coli lipid extract as model bacterial cell membranes and SFG spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Soblosky, Lauren; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2015-04-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are used as a convenient model cell membrane system to study biologically important molecule-lipid interactions in situ. However, the lipid bilayer models are often simple and the acquired results with these models may not provide all pertinent information related to a real cell membrane. In this work, we use sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular-level interactions between the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) MSI-594, ovispirin-1 G18, magainin 2 and a simple 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (dDPPG)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) bilayer. We compared such interactions to those between the AMPs and a more complex dDPPG/Escherichia coli (E. coli) polar lipid extract bilayer. We show that to fully understand more complex aspects of peptide-bilayer interaction, such as interaction kinetics, a heterogeneous lipid composition is required, such as the E. coli polar lipid extract. The discrepancy in peptide-bilayer interaction is likely due in part to the difference in bilayer charge between the two systems since highly negative charged lipids can promote more favorable electrostatic interactions between the peptide and lipid bilayer. Results presented in this paper indicate that more complex model bilayers are needed to accurately analyze peptide-cell membrane interactions and demonstrates the importance of using an appropriate lipid composition to study AMP interaction properties.

  3. Interaction between bending and tension forces in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, T W

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the bending mechanics of a membrane consisting of two tightly-coupled leaflets, each of which shears and bends readily but strongly resists area changes. Structures of this type have been proposed to model biological membranes such as red blood cell membrane. It is shown that when such a membrane is bent, anisotropic components of resultant membrane tension (shear stresses) are induced, even when the tension in each leaflet is isotropic. The induced shear stresses increase as the square of the membrane curvature, and become significant for moderate curvatures (when the radius of curvature is much larger than the distance between the leaflets). This effect has implications for the analysis of shape and deformation of freely suspended and flowing red blood cells. PMID:3224154

  4. Biophysical interactions with model lipid membranes: applications in drug discovery and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Stine, Andrew; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The transport of drugs or drug delivery systems across the cell membrane is a complex biological process, often difficult to understand because of its dynamic nature. In this regard, model lipid membranes, which mimic many aspects of cell-membrane lipids, have been very useful in helping investigators to discern the roles of lipids in cellular interactions. One can use drug-lipid interactions to predict pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, such as their transport, biodistribution, accumulation, and hence efficacy. These interactions can also be used to study the mechanisms of transport, based on the structure and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of drug molecules. In recent years, model lipid membranes have also been explored to understand their mechanisms of interactions with peptides, polymers, and nanocarriers. These interaction studies can be used to design and develop efficient drug delivery systems. Changes in the lipid composition of cells and tissue in certain disease conditions may alter biophysical interactions, which could be explored to develop target-specific drugs and drug delivery systems. In this review, we discuss different model membranes, drug-lipid interactions and their significance, studies of model membrane interactions with nanocarriers, and how biophysical interaction studies with lipid model membranes could play an important role in drug discovery and drug delivery. PMID:19432455

  5. The residue at position 5 of the N-terminal region of Src and Fyn modulates their myristoylation, palmitoylation, and membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb-Abraham, Efrat; Gutman, Orit; Pai, Govind M.; Rubio, Ignacio; Henis, Yoav I.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of Src family kinases (SFKs) with the plasma membrane are crucial for their activity. They depend on their fatty-acylated N-termini, containing N-myristate and either a polybasic cluster (in Src) or palmitoylation sites (e.g., Fyn). To investigate the roles of these moieties in SFK membrane association, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching beam-size analysis to study the membrane interactions of c-Src-GFP (green fluorescent protein) or Fyn-GFP fatty-acylation mutants. Our studies showed for the first time that the membrane association of Fyn is more stable than that of Src, an effect lost in a Fyn mutant lacking the palmitoylation sites. Unexpectedly, Src-S3C/S6C (containing cysteines at positions 3/6, which are palmitoylated in Fyn) exhibited fast cytoplasmic diffusion insensitive to palmitoylation inhibitors, suggesting defective fatty acylation. Further replacement of the charged Lys-5 by neutral Gln to resemble Fyn (Src-S3C/S6C/K5Q) restored Fyn-like membrane interactions, indicating that Lys-5 in the context of Src-S3C/S6C interferes with its myristoylation/palmitoylation. This was validated by direct myristoylation and palmitoylation studies, which indicated that the residue at position 5 regulates the membrane interactions of Src versus Fyn. Moreover, the palmitoylation levels correlated with targeting to detergent-resistant membranes (rafts) and to caveolin-1. Palmitoylation-dependent preferential containment of Fyn in rafts may contribute to its lower transformation potential. PMID:27733622

  6. Suppressing Membrane Height Fluctuations Leads to a Membrane–Mediated Interaction Among Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Kayla; Maibaum, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-induced interactions can play a significant role in the spatial distribution of membrane-bound proteins. We develop a model that combines a continuum description of lipid bilayers with a discrete particle model of proteins to probe the emerging structure of the combined membrane-protein system. Our model takes into account the membrane’s elastic behavior, the steric repulsion between proteins, and the quenching of membrane shape fluctuations due to the presence of the proteins. We employ coupled Langevin equations to describe the dynamics of the system. We show that coupling to the membrane induces an attractive interaction among proteins, which may contribute to the clustering of proteins in biological membranes. We investigate the lateral protein diffusion and find that it is reduced due to transient fluctuations in membrane shape. PMID:27967200

  7. Realization of quantifying interfacial interactions between a randomly rough membrane surface and a foulant particle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Zhang, Meijia; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Quantification of interfacial interaction with randomly rough surface is the prerequisite to quantitatively understand and control the interface behaviors such as adhesion, flocculation and membrane fouling. In this study, it was found that membrane surface was randomly rough with obvious fractal characteristics. The randomly rough surface of membrane could be well reconstructed by the fractal geometry represented by a modified Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function. A novel method, which combined composite Simpson's approach, surface element integration method and approximation by computer programming, was developed. By using this method, this study provided the first realization of quantifying interfacial energy between randomly rough surface of membrane and a foulant particle. The calculated interactions with randomly rough surface of membrane were significantly different from those with smooth surface of membrane, indicating the significant effect of surface topography on interactions. This proposed method could be also potentially used to investigate various natural interface environmental phenomena.

  8. Establishing the importance of oil-membrane interactions on the transmembrane diffusion of physicochemically diverse compounds.

    PubMed

    Najib, Omaima N; Martin, Gary P; Kirton, Stewart B; Sallam, Al-Sayed; Murnane, Darragh

    2016-06-15

    The diffusion process through a non-porous barrier membrane depends on the properties of the drug, vehicle and membrane. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a series of oily vehicles might have the potential to interact to varying degrees with synthetic membranes and to determine whether any such interaction might affect the permeation of co-formulated permeants: methylparaben (MP); butylparaben (BP) or caffeine (CF). The oils (isopropyl myristate (IPM), isohexadecane (IHD), hexadecane (HD), oleic acid (OA) and liquid paraffin (LP)) and membranes (silicone, high density polyethylene and polyurethane) employed in the study were selected such that they displayed a range of different structural, and physicochemical properties. Diffusion studies showed that many of the vehicles were not inert and did interact with the membranes resulting in a modification of the permeants' flux when corrected for membrane thickness (e.g. normalized flux of MP increased from 1.25±0.13μgcm(-1)h(-1) in LP to 17.94±0.25μgcm(-1)h(-1)in IPM). The oils were sorbed differently to membranes (range of weight gain: 2.2±0.2% for polyurethane with LP to 105.6±1.1% for silicone with IHD). Membrane interaction was apparently dependent upon the physicochemical properties including; size, shape, flexibility and the Hansen solubility parameter values of both the membranes and oils. Sorbed oils resulted in modified permeant diffusion through the membranes. No simple correlation was found to exist between the Hansen solubility parameters of the oils or swelling of the membrane and the normalized fluxes of the three compounds investigated. More sophisticated modelling would appear to be required to delineate and quantify the key molecular parameters of membrane, permeant and vehicle compatibility and their interactions of relevance to membrane permeation.

  9. Effect of lipid head group interactions on membrane properties and membrane-induced cationic β-hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Sai J; Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    2016-07-21

    Stages in POPS membrane induced SVS-1 folding. One key characteristic of mIFs is the dielectric gradient and subsequently, electrostatic potential that arises from dipolar interactions in the head group region. In this work, we present a coarse-grained (CG) model for anionic and zwitterionic lipids that accounts for dipolar intricacies in the head group region. Prior work on adding dipolar interactions in a coarse grained (CG) model for peptides enabled us to achieve α/β secondary structure content de novo, without any added bias. We have now extended this idea to lipids. To mimic dipolar interactions, two dummy particles with opposite charges are added to CG polar beads. These two dummy charges represent a fluctuating dipole that introduces structural polarization into the head group region. We have used POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and POPS (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine) as our model lipids. We characterize structural, dynamic, and dielectric properties of our CG bilayer, along with the effect of monovalent ions. We observe head group dipoles to play a significant role in membrane dielectric gradient and lipid clustering induced by dipole-dipole interactions in POPS lipids. In addition, we studied membrane-induced peptide folding of a cationic antimicrobial peptide with anticancer activity, SVS-1. We find that membrane-induced peptide folding is driven by both (a) cooperativity in peptide self-interaction and (b) cooperativity in membrane-peptide interaction. In particular, dipolar interactions between the peptide backbone and lipid head groups contribute to stabilizing folded conformations.

  10. Conformational transitions of duplex and triplex nucleic acid helices: thermodynamic analysis of effects of salt concentration on stability using preferential interaction coefficients.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. P.; Anderson, C. F.; Record, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    For order-disorder transitions of double- and triple-stranded nucleic acid helices, the midpoint temperatures Tm depend strongly on a +/-, the mean ionic activity of uniunivalent salt. Experimental determinations of dTm/d ln a +/- and of the enthalpy change (delta H(o)) accompanying the transition in excess salt permit evaluation of delta gamma, the stoichiometrically weighted combination of preferential interaction coefficients, each of which reflects thermodynamic effects of interactions of salt ions with a reactant or product of the conformational transition (formula; see text) Here delta H(o) is defined per mole of nucleotide by analogy to delta gamma. Application of Eq. 1 to experimental values of delta H(o) and Tm yields values of delta gamma for the denaturation of B-DNA over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-0.20 M (Privalov et al. (1969), Biopolymers 8,559) and for each of four order-disorder transitions of poly rA.(poly rU)n, n = 1, 2 over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-1.0 M (Krakauer and Sturtevant (1968), Biopolymers 6, 491). For denaturation of duplexes and triplexes, delta gamma is negative and not significantly dependent on a +/-, but delta gamma is positive and dependent on a +/- for the disproportionation transition of poly rA.poly rU duplexes. Quantitative interpretations of these trends and magnitudes of delta gamma in terms of coulombic and excluded volume effects are obtained by fitting separately each of the two sets of thermodynamic data using Eq. 1 with delta gamma PB evaluated from the cylindrically symmetric Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for a standard model of salt-polyelectrolyte solutions. The only structural parameters required by this model are: b, the mean axial distance between the projections of adjacent polyion charges onto the cylindrical axis; and a, the mean distance of closest approach between a salt ion center and the cylindrical axis. Fixing bMS and aMS for the multi-stranded (ordered) conformations, we

  11. Wrapping of a deformable nanoparticle by the cell membrane: Insights into the flexibility-regulated nanoparticle-membrane interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huayuan; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-09-01

    Although many researches have been conducted on the interaction of the cell membrane with the rigid nanoparticle (NP), relatively little is known about the interaction of the membrane with the deformable NP, which is a promising kind of drug delivery carrier. In this paper, we investigate the wrapping of a deformable NP by the membrane, with particular attention paid to the location of the NP. Phase diagrams with respect to the normalized NP-membrane adhesion strength and the bending stiffness ratio between the NP and membrane are presented. The results show that the NP is easier to be fully wrapped but harder to be shallowly wrapped when the NP locates outside than inside the vesicle. For the system with an outside NP, there are three distinct stages separated by two critical bending stiffness ratios as the NP becomes softer. Moreover, the critical normalized adhesion strength required for a deformable NP to be fully wrapped is the same as that for a rigid NP when the bending stiffness ratio is higher than a critical value, which is different from the wrapping behavior by an initially flat membrane. In addition, a larger vesicle size facilitates the full wrapping configuration when the NP is inside, whereas it prohibits it when the NP is outside. These results are consistent with the previous research and can provide guidelines for the design of drug delivery systems based on the flexibility-tunable NPs.

  12. Aggregation and vesiculation of membrane proteins by curvature-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynwar, Benedict J.; Illya, Gregoria; Harmandaris, Vagelis A.; Müller, Martin M.; Kremer, Kurt; Deserno, Markus

    2007-05-01

    Membrane remodelling plays an important role in cellular tasks such as endocytosis, vesiculation and protein sorting, and in the biogenesis of organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum or the Golgi apparatus. It is well established that the remodelling process is aided by specialized proteins that can sense as well as create membrane curvature, and trigger tubulation when added to synthetic liposomes. Because the energy needed for such large-scale changes in membrane geometry significantly exceeds the binding energy between individual proteins and between protein and membrane, cooperative action is essential. It has recently been suggested that curvature-mediated attractive interactions could aid cooperation and complement the effects of specific binding events on membrane remodelling. But it is difficult to experimentally isolate curvature-mediated interactions from direct attractions between proteins. Moreover, approximate theories predict repulsion between isotropically curving proteins. Here we use coarse-grained membrane simulations to show that curvature-inducing model proteins adsorbed on lipid bilayer membranes can experience attractive interactions that arise purely as a result of membrane curvature. We find that once a minimal local bending is realized, the effect robustly drives protein cluster formation and subsequent transformation into vesicles with radii that correlate with the local curvature imprint. Owing to its universal nature, curvature-mediated attraction can operate even between proteins lacking any specific interactions, such as newly synthesized and still immature membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Membrane skeleton-bilayer interaction is not the major determinant of membrane phospholipid asymmetry in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gudi, S R; Kumar, A; Bhakuni, V; Gokhale, S M; Gupta, C M

    1990-03-30

    Transbilayer phospholipid distribution, membrane skeleton dissociation/association, and spectrin structure have been analysed in human erythrocytes after subjecting them to heating at 50 degrees C for 15 min. The membrane skeleton dissociation/association was determined by measuring the Tris-induced dissociation of Triton-insoluble membrane skeletons (Triton shells), the spectrin-actin extractability under low ionic conditions, and the binding of spectrin-actin with normal erythrocyte membrane inside-out vesicles (IOVs). The spectrin structure was ascertained by measuring the spectrin dimer-to-tetramer ratio as well as the spectrin tryptophan fluorescence. Both the Tris-induced Triton shell dissociation and the spectrin-actin extractability under low ionic conditions were considerably reduced by the heat treatment. Also, the binding of heated erythrocyte spectrin-actin to IOVs was significantly smaller than that observed with the normal cell spectrin-actin. Further, the quantity of spectrin dimers was appreciably increased in heat-treated erythrocytes as compared to the normal cells. This change in the spectrin dimer-to-tetramer ratio was accompanied by marked changes in the spectrin tryptophan fluorescence. In spite of these heat-induced alterations in structure and bilayer interactions of the membrane skeleton, the inside-outside glycerophospholipid distribution remained virtually unaffected in the heat-treated cells, as judged by employing bee venom and pancreatic phospholipase A2, fluorescamine and Merocyanine 540 as the external membrane probes. These results strongly indicate that membrane bilayer-skeleton interaction is not the major factor in determining the transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in human erythrocyte membrane.

  14. Stabilization of membranes upon interaction of amphipathic polymers with membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; Duval-Terrié, Caroline; Dé, Emmanuelle; Champeil, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Amphipathic polymers derived from polysaccharides, namely hydrophobically modified pullulans, were previously suggested to be useful as polymeric substitutes of ordinary surfactants for efficient and structure-conserving solubilization of membrane proteins, and one such polymer, 18C10, was optimized for solubilization of proteins derived from bacterial outer membranes (Duval-Terrié et al. 2003). We asked whether a similar ability to solubilize proteins could also be demonstrated in eukaryotic membranes, namely sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fragments, the major protein of which is SERCA1a, an integral membrane protein with Ca2+-dependent ATPase and Ca2+-pumping activity. We found that 18C10-mediated solubilization of these SR membranes did not occur. Simultaneously, however, we found that low amounts of this hydrophobically modified pullulan were very efficient at preventing long-term aggregation of these SR membranes. This presumably occurred because the negatively charged polymer coated the membranous vesicles with a hydrophilic corona (a property shared by many other amphipathic polymers), and thus minimized their flocculation. Reminiscent of the old Arabic gum, which stabilizes Indian ink by coating charcoal particles, the newly designed amphipathic polymers might therefore unintentionally prove useful also for stabilization of membrane suspensions. PMID:15459343

  15. Acylation of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2: Interaction with Lipid Membranes and In Vitro Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt

    2014-01-01

    Background Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation as well as increasing enzymatic stability without disrupting biological potency. Acylation has furthermore been shown to increase interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells. The extent to which such interactions hinder or benefit delivery of acylated peptide drugs across cellular barriers such as the intestinal epithelia is currently unknown. The present study investigates the effect of acylating peptide drugs from a drug delivery perspective. Purpose We hypothesize that the membrane interaction is an important parameter for intestinal translocation, which may be used to optimize the acylation chain length for intestinal permeation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the intestinotrophic Glucagon-like peptide-2 by systematically increasing acyl chain length, in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. Results Peptide self-association and binding to both model lipid and cell membranes was found to increase gradually with acyl chain length, whereas translocation across Caco-2 cells depended non-linearly on chain length. Short and medium acyl chains increased translocation compared to the native peptide, but long chain acylation displayed no improvement in translocation. Co-administration of a paracellular absorption enhancer was found to increase translocation irrespective of acyl chain length, whereas a transcellular enhancer displayed increased synergy with the long chain acylation. Conclusions These results show that membrane interactions play a prominent role during intestinal translocation of an acylated peptide. Acylation benefits permeation for shorter and medium chains due to increased membrane interactions, however, for longer chains insertion in the membrane becomes dominant and hinders translocation, i.e. the peptides get ‘stuck’ in the cell

  16. Structure and Membrane Interaction of Myristoylated ARF1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Kahn, Richard A.; Prestegard, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are small (21 kDa), monomeric GTPases that are important regulators of membrane traffic. When membrane bound, they recruit soluble adaptors to membranes and trigger the assembly of coating complexes involved in cargo selection and vesicular budding. N-myristoylation is a conserved feature of all ARF proteins that is required for its biological functions, though the mechanism(s) by which the myristate acts in ARF functions is not fully understood. Here, we present the first structure of a myristoylated ARF1 protein, determined by solution NMR methods, and an assessment of the influence of myristoylation on association of ARF1·GDP and ARF1·GTP with lipid bilayers. A model in which myristoylation contributes to both the regulation of guanine nucleotide exchange and stable membrane association is supported. PMID:19141284

  17. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  18. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  19. Interaction between plant polyphenols and the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Cyboran, Sylwia; Oszmiański, Jan; Kleszczyńska, Halina

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the effect of polyphenols contained in extracts from apple, strawberry and blackcurrant on the properties of the erythrocyte membrane, treated as a model of the biological membrane. To this end, the effect of the substances used on hemolysis, osmotic resistance and shape of erythrocytes, and on packing order in the hydrophilic region of the erythrocyte membrane was studied. The investigation was performed with spectrophotometric and fluorimetric methods, and using the optical microscope. The hemolytic studies have shown that the extracts do not induce hemolysis at the concentrations used. The results obtained from the spectrophotometric measurements of osmotic resistance of erythrocytes showed that the polyphenols contained in the extracts cause an increase in the resistance, rendering them less prone to hemolysis in hypotonic solutions of sodium chloride. The fluorimetric studies indicate that the used substances cause a decrease of packing order in the hydrophilic area of membrane lipids. The observations of erythrocyte shapes in a biological optical microscope have shown that, as a result of the substances' action, the erythrocytes become mostly echinocytes, which means that the polyphenols of the extracts localize in the outer lipid monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. The results obtained indicate that, in the concentration range used, the plant extracts are incorporated into the hydrophilic area of the membrane, modifying its properties.

  20. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of Phytochrome B

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A.; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Quail, Peter H.; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2016-01-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a Phytochrome Interacting Factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  1. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    DOE PAGES

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; ...

    2015-12-28

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein–DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressormore » activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. Additionally, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. Our results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Finally, although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses.« less

  2. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, André M; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Quail, Peter H; Margarida Oliveira, M; Saibo, Nelson J M

    2016-02-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses.

  3. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    SciTech Connect

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A.; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B. F.; Quail, Peter H.; Margarida Oliveira, M.; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2015-12-28

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein–DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. Additionally, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. Our results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Finally, although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses.

  4. Paper-PEG-based membranes for hydrophobic interaction chromatography: purification of monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deqiang; Chen, Xiaonong; Pelton, Robert; Ghosh, Raja

    2008-04-15

    This article discusses the preparation of novel Paper-PEG interpenetrating polymer network-based membranes as inexpensive alternative to currently available adsorptive membranes. The Paper-PEG membranes were developed for carrying out hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (HIMC). PEG is normally very hydrophilic but can undergo phase separation and become hydrophobic in the presence of high antichaotropic salt concentrations. Two variants of the Paper-PEG membranes, Paper-PEG 1 and Paper-PEG 2 were prepared by grafting different amounts of the polymer on filter paper and these were tested for their hydraulic properties and antibody binding capacity. The better of the two membranes (Paper-PEG 1) was then used for purifying the monoclonal antibody hIgG1-CD4 from simulated mammalian cell culture supernatant. The processing conditions required for purification were systematically optimized. The dynamic antibody binding capacity of the Paper-PEG 1 membrane was about 9 mg/mL of bed volume. A single step membrane chromatographic process using Paper-PEG 1 membrane gave high monoclonal antibody purity and recovery. The hydraulic permeability of the paper-based membrane was high and was maintained even after many runs, indicating that membrane fouling was negligible and the membrane was largely incompressible.

  5. Membrane interaction of the factor VIIIa discoidin domains in atomistic detail

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jesper J.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Peters, Günther H.; Faber, Johan H.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Olsen, Ole H.

    2016-01-01

    A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor (F)VIIIa, the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipid membrane by partial or full insertion of their extruding loops (the spikes). However, the two domains adopted different molecular orientations in their membrane-bound states; FVIII C2 roughly positioned normal to the membrane plane, while FVIII C1 displayed a multitude of tilted orientations. The results indicate that FVIII C1 may be important in modulating the orientation of the FVIIIa molecule to optimize the interaction with FIXa, which is anchored to the membrane via its γ-carboxyglutamic acid-rich (Gla)-domain. Additionally, a structural change was observed in FVIII C1 in the coiled main chain leading the first spike. A tight interaction with one lipid per domain, similar to what has been suggested for the homologous FVa C2, is characterized. Finally, we rationalize known FVIII antibody epitopes and the scarcity of documented hemophilic missense mutations related to improper membrane binding of FVIIIa, based on the prevalent non-specificity of ionic interactions in the simulated membrane-bound states of FVIII C1 and FVIII C2. PMID:26346528

  6. Cyclotides Insert into Lipid Bilayers to Form Membrane Pores and Destabilize the Membrane through Hydrophobic and Phosphoethanolamine-specific Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Conan K.; Wacklin, Hanna P.; Craik, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclotides are a family of plant-derived circular proteins with potential therapeutic applications arising from their remarkable stability, broad sequence diversity, and range of bioactivities. Their membrane-binding activity is believed to be a critical component of their mechanism of action. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we studied the binding of the prototypical cyclotides kalata B1 and kalata B2 (and various mutants) to dodecylphosphocholine micelles and phosphoethanolamine-containing lipid bilayers. Although binding is predominantly an entropy-driven process, suggesting that hydrophobic forces contribute significantly to cyclotide-lipid complex formation, specific binding to the phosphoethanolamine-lipid headgroup is also required, which is evident from the enthalpic changes in the free energy of binding. In addition, using a combination of dissipative quartz crystal microbalance measurements and neutron reflectometry, we elucidated the process by which cyclotides interact with bilayer membranes. Initially, a small number of cyclotides bind to the membrane surface and then insert first into the outer membrane leaflet followed by penetration through the membrane and pore formation. At higher concentrations of cyclotides, destabilization of membranes occurs. Our results provide significant mechanistic insight into how cyclotides exert their bioactivities. PMID:23129773

  7. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark A.; Hoch, Martin M.

    1997-01-01

    Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

  8. Interaction of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with human red blood cell membranes: size and surface effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Guannan; Trewyn, Brian G; Slowing, Igor I; Lin, Victor S-Y

    2011-02-22

    The interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) of different particle sizes and surface properties with human red blood cell (RBC) membranes were investigated by membrane filtration, flow cytometry, and various microscopic techniques. Small MCM-41-type MSNs (∼100 nm) were found to adsorb to the surface of RBCs without disturbing the membrane or morphology. In contrast, adsorption of large SBA-15-type MSNs (∼600 nm) to RBCs induced a strong local membrane deformation leading to spiculation of RBCs, internalization of the particles, and eventual hemolysis. In addition, the relationship between the degree of MSN surface functionalization and the degree of its interaction with RBC, as well as the effect of RBC-MSN interaction on cellular deformability, were investigated. The results presented here provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of RBC-MSN interaction and the hemolytic activity of MSNs and will assist in the rational design of hemocompatible MSNs for intravenous drug delivery and in vivo imaging.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    PubMed

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  10. Interactions of sugar-based bolaamphiphiles with biomimetic systems of plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Lins, Laurence; Obounou Akong, Firmin; Haudrechy, Arnaud; Bouquillon, Sandrine; Deleu, Magali

    2016-11-01

    Glycolipids constitute a class of molecules with various biological activities. Among them, sugar-based bolaamphiphiles characterized by their biocompatibility, biodegradability and lower toxicity, became interesting for the development of efficient and low cost lipid-based drug delivery systems. Their activity seems to be closely related to their interactions with the lipid components of the plasma membrane of target cells. Despite many works devoted to the chemical synthesis and characterization of sugar-based bolaamphiphiles, their interactions with plasma membrane have not been completely elucidated. In this work, two sugar-based bolaamphiphiles differing only at the level of their sugar residues were chemically synthetized. Their interactions with membranes have been investigated using model membranes containing or not sterol and with in silico approaches. Our findings indicate that the nature of sugar residues has no significant influence for their membrane interacting properties, while the presence of sterol attenuates the interactions of both bolaamphiphiles with the membrane systems. The understanding of this distinct behavior of bolaamphiphiles towards sterol-containing membrane systems could be useful for their applications as drug delivery systems.

  11. Vaccinia virus interactions with the cell membrane studied by new chromatic vesicle and cell sensor assays.

    PubMed

    Orynbayeva, Z; Kolusheva, S; Groysman, N; Gavrielov, N; Lobel, L; Jelinek, R

    2007-02-01

    The potential danger of cross-species viral infection points to the significance of understanding the contributions of nonspecific membrane interactions with the viral envelope compared to receptor-mediated uptake as a factor in virus internalization and infection. We present a detailed investigation of the interactions of vaccinia virus particles with lipid bilayers and with epithelial cell membranes using newly developed chromatic biomimetic membrane assays. This analytical platform comprises vesicular particles containing lipids interspersed within reporter polymer units that emit intense fluorescence following viral interactions with the lipid domains. The chromatic vesicles were employed as membrane models in cell-free solutions and were also incorporated into the membranes of epithelial cells, thereby functioning as localized membrane sensors on the cell surface. These experiments provide important insight into membrane interactions with and fusion of virions and the kinetic profiles of these processes. In particular, the data emphasize the significance of cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains (lipid rafts) as a crucial factor promoting bilayer insertion of the viral particles. Our analysis of virus interactions with polymer-labeled living cells exposed the significant role of the epidermal growth factor receptor in vaccinia virus infectivity; however, the data also demonstrated the existence of additional non-receptor-mediated mechanisms contributing to attachment of the virus to the cell surface and its internalization.

  12. An ultrasensitive tool exploiting hydration dynamics to decipher weak lipid membrane-polymer interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Yu; Kausik, Ravinath; Lee, Ka Yee C; Han, Songi

    2012-02-01

    We introduce a newly developed tool, (1)H Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP), to sensitively explore weak macromolecular interactions by site-specifically probing the modulation of the translational dynamics of hydration water at the interaction interface, in the full presence of bulk water. Here, ODNP is employed on an illustrative example of a membrane-active triblock copolymer, poloxamer 188 (P188), which is known to restore the integrity of structurally compromised cell membranes. We observe a distinct change in the translational dynamics of the hydration layer interacting with the lipid membrane surface and the bilayer-interior as P188 is added to a solution of lipid vesicles, but no measurable changes in the dynamics or structure of the lipid membranes. This study shows that hydration water is an integral constituent of a lipid membrane system, and demonstrates for the first time that the modulation of its translational diffusivity can sensitively report on weak polymer-membrane interactions, as well as mediate essential lipid membrane functions. ODNP holds much promise as a unique tool to unravel molecular interactions at interfaces even in the presence of bulk water under ambient conditions.

  13. Molecular Characteristics of Membrane Glutamate Receptor-Ionophore Interaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-15

    accompanied by an increase in membrane permeability to sodium ions and to a lesser extent to potassium ions (Anwyl, 1977; Krnjevic, 1974). Clearly the issues...been examined in the last three years are: (1) Whether L-glutamic acid does activate a sodium ionophore in synaptic membranes from brain. Na+ fluxes...the presence of 10 pM kainic acid (I) or L-- glutamat ~e (I| ) was compared to the basal SCN"uptake (0O). (C) InfluJx of SCN" in the presence of 10 p H

  14. Radiation Interaction with Therapeutic Drugs and Cell Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Diana I.; Manaila, Elena N.; Matei, Constantin I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Moisescu, Mihaela I.; Savopol, Tudor D.; Kovacs, Eugenia A.; Cinca, Sabin A.; Margaritescu, Irina D.

    2007-04-23

    This transient permeabilized state of the cell membrane, named the 'cell electroporation' (CE) can be used to increase cells uptake of drugs that do not readily pass cell membrane, thus enabling their cytotoxicity. The anticancer drugs, such as bleomycin (BL) and cisplatin, are the most candidates for the combined use with ionizing and non-ionizing radiation fields. The methods and installations for the cell electroporation by electron beam (EB) and microwave (MW) irradiation are presented. The viability tests of the human leukocytes under EB and MW exposure with/without the BL in the cell cultures are discussed.

  15. Nanoengineered field induced charge separation membranes manufacture thereof

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Kevin C.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Bourcier, William L.; Floyd, III, William Clary

    2016-08-02

    A device according to one embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge and pore configuration characterized by a double layer overlap effect being present in pores of the membrane, where the porous membrane includes functional groups that preferentially interact with either cations or anions. A device according to another embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge in pores thereof sufficient to impart anion or cation selectivity in the pores. Additional devices, systems and methods are also presented.

  16. The role of vehicle interactions on permeation of an active through model membranes and human skin.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, G; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-12-01

    Previous work from this group has focused on the molecular mechanism of alcohol interaction with model membranes, by conducting thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of alcohol uptake, membrane partitioning and transport studies of a model compound (i.e. methyl paraben) in silicone membranes. In this article, similar membrane transport and partitioning studies were conducted in silicone membranes to further extend the proposed model of alcohol interactions with silicone membranes to include other vehicles more commonly used in dermal formulations, that is, isopropyl myristate (IPM), dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 200, PEG 400 and Transcutol P® (TC). More importantly, membrane partitioning studies were conducted using human SC to evaluate the application of the proposed model of solvent-enhanced permeation in simple model membranes for the more complex biological tissue. The findings support a model of vehicle interactions with model membranes and skin where high solvent uptake promotes drug partitioning (i.e. K) by enabling the solute to exist within the solvent fraction/solvent-rich areas inside the membrane or skin in a concentration equivalent to that in the bulk solvent/vehicle. High solvent sorption may also ultimately impact on the membrane diffusional characteristics, and thus the diffusion coefficient of the solute across the membrane. The implications for skin transport are that increased partitioning of a drug into the SC may be achieved by (i) selecting vehicles that are highly taken up by the skin and also (ii) by having a relatively high concentration (i.e. molar fraction) of the drug in the vehicle. It follows that, in cases where significant co-transport of the solvent into and across the skin may occur, its depletion from the formulation and ultimately from the skin may lead to drug crystallization, thus affecting dermal absorption.

  17. Computational analysis of the tether pulling experiment to probe plasma membrane - cytoskeleton interaction in cells

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Kristopher R.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Anvari, Bahman; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Tethers are thin membrane tubes that can be formed when relatively small and localized forces are applied to cellular membranes and lipid bilayers. Tether pulling experiments have been used to better understand the fine membrane properties. These include the interaction between the plasma membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, which is an important factor affecting membrane mechanics. We use a computational method aimed at the interpretation and design of tether pulling experiments in cells with a strong membrane-cytoskeleton attachment. In our model, we take into account the detailed information on the topology of bonds connecting the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. We compute the force-dependent piecewise membrane deflection and bending as well as modes of stored energy in three major regions of the system: body of the tether, membrane-cytoskeleton attachment zone, and the transition zone between the two. We apply our method to three cells: cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. OHCs have a special system of pillars connecting the membrane and the cytoskeleton, and HEK and CHO cells have a bond arrangement via bonds (e.g., PIP2) which is common to many other cells. We also present a validation of our model by using experimental data on CHO and HEK cells. The proposed method can be an effective tool in the analyses of experiments to probe the properties of cellular membranes. PMID:19905340

  18. Transmembrane domains interactions within the membrane milieu: principles, advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fink, Avner; Sal-Man, Neta; Gerber, Doron; Shai, Yechiel

    2012-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions within the membrane are involved in many vital cellular processes. Consequently, deficient oligomerization is associated with known diseases. The interactions can be partially or fully mediated by transmembrane domains (TMD). However, in contrast to soluble regions, our knowledge of the factors that control oligomerization and recognition between the membrane-embedded domains is very limited. Due to the unique chemical and physical properties of the membrane environment, rules that apply to interactions between soluble segments are not necessarily valid within the membrane. This review summarizes our knowledge on the sequences mediating TMD-TMD interactions which include conserved motifs such as the GxxxG, QxxS, glycine and leucine zippers, and others. The review discusses the specific role of polar, charged and aromatic amino acids in the interface of the interacting TMD helices. Strategies to determine the strength, dynamics and specificities of these interactions by experimental (ToxR, TOXCAT, GALLEX and FRET) or various computational approaches (molecular dynamic simulation and bioinformatics) are summarized. Importantly, the contribution of the membrane environment to the TMD-TMD interaction is also presented. Studies utilizing exogenously added TMD peptides have been shown to influence in vivo the dimerization of intact membrane proteins involved in various diseases. The chirality independent TMD-TMD interactions allows for the design of novel short d- and l-amino acids containing TMD peptides with advanced properties. Overall these studies shed light on the role of specific amino acids in mediating the assembly of the TMDs within the membrane environment and their contribution to protein function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Folding in Membranes.

  19. Detergent interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes for protein reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccio, Matteo; Zan Goh, Haw; Loesche, Mathias

    2009-03-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are self-assembled biomimetic structures in which the membrane is separated from a solid substrate by a nm-thick hydrated submembrane space. These model systems are being used in binding studies of peripheral proteins and exotoxins. Here we aim at their application for the reconstitution of water-insoluble integral membrane proteins. As an alternative to fusion of preformed proteoliposomes we study the direct reconstitution of such proteins for applications in biosensing and pharmaceutical screening. For reconstitution, highly insulating tBLMs (R˜10^5-10^6 φ) were temporarily incubated with a detergent to screen for conditions that keep the detergent-saturated membranestable and ready to incorporate detergent-solubilized proteins. We assess the electrical characteristics, i.e. specific resistance and capacitance, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under timed incubation with decylmaltoside and dodecylmaltoside detergents in a regime around their critical micelle concentration, 1.8 mM and 0.17 mM respectively and demonstrate the restoration of the tBLM upon detergent removal. Thereby a range of concentration and incubation times was identified, that represents optimal conditions for the subsequent membrane protein reconstitution.

  20. Molecular Characteristics of Membrane Glutamate Receptor-Ionophore Interaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-29

    Neurochemical - Research , 1984, 9, 29-44. Chang, H.H., Michaelis, E.K. & Roy, S. Functional characteristics of . -Z L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate...receptors in isolated brain synaptic membranes. Neurochemical Research , 1984, 9, 901-913. Michaelis, E. K., Galton, N. and Early, S. L. Spider venous

  1. Mass-Sensitive Biosensor Systems to Determine the Membrane Interaction of Analytes.

    PubMed

    Hoß, Sebastian G; Bendas, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Biosensors are devices that transform a biological interaction into a readout signal, which is evaluable for analytical purposes. The general strength of biosensor approaches is the avoidance of time-consuming and cost-intensive labeling procedures of the analytes. In this chapter, we give insight into a mass-sensitive surface-acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, which represents an elegant and highly sensitive method to investigate binding events at a molecular level. The principle of SAW technology is based on the piezoelectric properties of the sensors, so as to binding events and their accompanied mass increase at the sensor surface are detectable by a change in the oscillation of the surface acoustic wave. In combination with model membranes, transferred to the sensor surface, the analytical value of SAW biosensors has strongly been increased and extended to different topics of biomedical investigations, including antibiotic research. The interaction with the bacterial membrane or certain target structures therein is the essential mode of action for various antibacterial compounds. Beside targeted interaction, an unspecific membrane binding or membrane insertion of drugs can contribute to the antibacterial activity by changing the lateral order of membrane constituents or by interfering with the membrane barrier function. Those pleiotropic effects are hardly to illustrate in the bacterial systems and need a detailed view at the in vitro level. Here, we illustrate the usefulness of a SAW biosensor in combination with model membranes to investigate the mode of membrane interaction of antibiotic active peptides. Using two different peptides we exemplary describe the interaction analysis in a two-step gain of information: (1) a binding intensity or affinity by analyzing the phase changes of oscillation, and (2) mode of membrane interaction, i.e., surface binding or internalization of the peptide by following the amplitude of oscillation.

  2. Drug-Membrane Interactions Studied by Vibrational Sum-Frequency Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Lauren; Briggman, Kimberly

    2008-03-01

    The activity of a number of drugs depends directly on their interaction with cell membranes and, thus, an understanding of drug-membrane interactions is necessary for improving their pharmacological performance. Drug molecules can interact with membranes by directly binding to membrane-bound proteins or by intercalating into the lipid matrix itself, altering membrane properties such as fluidity, thickness, internal pressure, and phase transition temperature. Here, we focus on the effects of local anesthetics incorporated into the lipid matrix, studying the structural changes induced in supported lipid bilayers by vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy (VSFS). We find that in addition to depressing the phase transition temperature of the lipid bilayers, most anesthetics also sharpen the gel to liquid- crystalline transition, suggesting an increase in membrane constituent cooperativity. This behavior contrasts the effects of cholesterol on lipid bilayers, which increases membrane rigidity and broadens the phase transition. The structure of the membrane-intercalated anesthetics themselves will also be discussed. This work demonstrates the potential of using supported lipid bilayers and surface-sensitive techniques for future pharmacological studies.

  3. Studies on the interactions of bisphenols with anionic phospholipids of decomposer membranes in model systems.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Sobolewska, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenols constitute a class of organic pollutants, which because of their estrogenic properties, low dose activity and bioaccumulation pose considerable risk for public health as well as for the environment. Accumulated in the sediment bisphenols can endanger the decomposers' populations being incorporated into their cellular membranes; however, the mechanism of their membrane activity is unknown. Therefore, to study these phenomena we applied anionic phospholipid Langmuir monolayers as simple but versatile models of decomposers biomembranes. Phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins are not only the main components of bacterial membranes but also of crucial importance in mitochondrial and thylakoid membranes in eukaryotic cells. In our investigations we applied five compounds of the bisphenol class most commonly detected in the environment. To characterize the bisphenols-model membrane interactions we applied multiple mutually independent methods of physical chemistry; namely: the Langmuir monolayer technique, surface potential measurements, Brewster angle microscopy for the visualization of the monolayers' texture and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction for the discussion of the phospholipids packing within the monolayers. Our studies indicated that all the investigated bisphenols interact with the model membrane, but the strength of the interactions is dependent on the bisphenol structure and hydrophobicity and the fluidity of the model membranes. We proved that bisphenol S often treated as the least toxic BPA analog can also be incorporated to the model membranes changing their structure and fluidity.

  4. Interaction of the NMDA receptor noncompetitive antagonist MK-801 with model and native membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Moring, J; Niego, L A; Ganley, L M; Trumbore, M W; Herbette, L G

    1994-01-01

    MK-801, a noncompetitive antagonist of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor, has protective effects against excitotoxicity and ethanol withdrawal seizures. We have determined membrane/buffer partition coefficients (Kp[mem]) of MK-801 and its rates of association with and dissociation from membranes. Kp[mem] (+/- SD) = 1137 (+/- 320) in DOPC membranes and 485 (+/- 99) in synaptoneurosomal (SNM) lipid membranes from rat cerebral cortex (unilamellar vesicles). In multilamellar vesicles, Kp[mem] was higher: 3374 (+/- 253) in DOPC and 6879 (+/- 947) in SNM. In cholesterol/DOPC membranes, Kp[mem] decreased as the cholesterol content increased. MK-801 associated with and dissociated from membranes rapidly. Addition of ethanol to SNM did not affect Kp[mem]. MK-801 decreased the cooperative unit size of DMPC membranes. The decrease was smaller than that caused by 1,4-dihydropyridine drugs, indicating a weaker interaction with the hydrocarbon core. Small angle x-ray diffraction, with multilayer autocorrelation difference function modeling, indicated that MK-801 in a cholesterol/DOPC membrane (mole ratio = 0.6) causes a perturbation at approximately 16.0 A from the bilayer center. In bilayers of cholesterol/DOPC = 0.15 (mole ratio) or pure DOPC, the perturbation caused by MK-801 was more complex. The physical chemical interactions of MK-801 with membranes in vitro are consistent with a fast onset and short duration of action in vivo. PMID:7696477

  5. UV-Visible and Infrared Methods for Investigating Lipid-Rhodopsin Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Experimental UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods are described for characterizing lipid-protein interactions for the example of rhodopsin in a membrane bilayer environment. The combined use of FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy monitors the structural and functional changes during rhodopsin activation. Such studies investigate how membrane lipids stabilize the various rhodopsin photoproducts, analogous to mutating the protein. Interpretation of the results entails a non-specific flexible surface model for explaining the role of membrane lipid-protein interactions in biological functions. PMID:22976026

  6. What does make an amyloid toxic: morphology, structure or interaction with membrane?

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Cullin, Christophe; Lecomte, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of amyloids is a subject under intense scrutiny. Many studies link this toxicity to the existence of various intermediate structures prior to the fiber formation and/or their specific interaction with membranes. Membranes can also be a catalyst of amyloidogenesis and the composition or the charge of membrane lipids may be of particular importance. Despite intensive research in the field, such intermediates are not yet fully characterized probably because of the lack of adapted methods for their analyses, and the mechanisms of interaction with the membrane are far to be understood. The purpose of this mini-review is to highlight some in vitro characteristics that seem to be convergent to explain the toxicity observed for some amyloids. Based on a comparison between the behavior of a model non-toxic amyloid (the Prion Forming Domain of HET-s) and its toxic mutant (M8), we could establish that short oligomers and/or fibers assembled in antiparallel β-sheets strongly interact with membrane leading to its disruption. Many recent evidences are in favor of the formation of antiparallel toxic oligomers assembled in β-helices able to form pores. We may also propose a new model of amyloid interaction with membranes by a "raft-like" mode of insertion that could explain important destabilization of membranes and thus amyloid toxicity.

  7. Dynamic interactions between a membrane binding protein and lipids induce fluctuating diffusivity

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Kalli, Antreas C.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains are membrane-binding lipid recognition proteins that interact with phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) molecules in eukaryotic cell membranes. Diffusion of PH domains plays a critical role in biological reactions on membrane surfaces. Although diffusivity can be estimated by long-time measurements, it lacks information on the short-time diffusive nature. We reveal two diffusive properties of a PH domain bound to the surface of a PIP-containing membrane using molecular dynamics simulations. One is fractional Brownian motion, attributed to the motion of the lipids with which the PH domain interacts. The other is temporally fluctuating diffusivity; that is, the short-time diffusivity of the bound protein changes substantially with time. Moreover, the diffusivity for short-time measurements is intrinsically different from that for long-time measurements. This fluctuating diffusivity results from dynamic changes in interactions between the PH domain and PIP molecules. Our results provide evidence that the complexity of protein-lipid interactions plays a crucial role in the diffusion of proteins on biological membrane surfaces. Changes in the diffusivity of PH domains and related membrane-bound proteins may in turn contribute to the formation/dissolution of protein complexes in membranes. PMID:28116358

  8. Atomic force microscopy: a multifaceted tool to study membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands.

    PubMed

    Whited, Allison M; Park, Paul S-H

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins are embedded in lipid bilayers and facilitate the communication between the external environment and the interior of the cell. This communication is often mediated by the binding of ligands to the membrane protein. Understanding the nature of the interaction between a ligand and a membrane protein is required to both understand the mechanism of action of these proteins and for the development of novel pharmacological drugs. The highly hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins and the requirement of a lipid bilayer for native function have hampered the structural and molecular characterizations of these proteins under physiologically relevant conditions. Atomic force microscopy offers a solution to studying membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands under physiologically relevant conditions and can provide novel insights about the nature of these critical molecular interactions that facilitate cellular communication. In this review, we provide an overview of the atomic force microscopy technique and discuss its application in the study of a variety of questions related to the interaction between a membrane protein and a ligand. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterization of membrane protein-ligand binding.

  9. Interactions of divalent calcium ions with head groups of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Velikonja, Aljaž; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Iglič, Aleš; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of the divalent calcium ions with the zwitterionic lipid membranes was studied by measuring the lipid order parameter which is inversely proportional to the membrane fluidity. Small unilamellar lipid vesicles were prepared from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and then treated with different concentrations of divalent calcium ions. An increase in the order parameter and decrease in the fluidity of the liposomal membranes were observed after treatment with the calcium ions. The presence of positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles in the suspension of liposomes negligibly changed the results. The results of experiments were discussed theoretically within modified Langevin-Poisson-Boltzmann (MLPB) model leading to the conclusion that the membrane fluidity and ordering of the membrane lipids are primarily altered by the accumulation of calcium ions in the region of negatively charged phosphate groups within the head groups of the membrane lipids.

  10. Procyanidins can interact with Caco-2 cell membrane lipid rafts: involvement of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Sandra V; Jaggers, Grayson K; Fraga, Cesar G; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2013-11-01

    Large procyanidins (more than three subunits) are not absorbed at the gastrointestinal tract but could exert local effects through their interactions with membranes. We previously showed that hexameric procyanidins (Hex), although not entering cells, interact with membranes modulating cell signaling and fate. This paper investigated if Hex, as an example of large procyanidins, can selectively interact with lipid rafts which could in part explain its biological actions. This mechanism was studied in both synthetic membranes (liposomes) and Caco-2 cells. Hex promoted Caco-2 cell membrane rigidification and dehydration, effects that were abolished upon cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD). Hex prevented lipid raft structure disruption induced by cholesterol depletion/redistribution by MCD or sodium deoxycholate. Supporting the involvement of cholesterol-Hex bonding in Hex interaction with lipid rafts, the absence of cholesterol markedly decreased the capacity of Hex to prevent deoxycholate- and Triton X-100-mediated disruption of lipid raft-like liposomes. Stressing the functional relevance of this interaction, Hex mitigated lipid raft-associated activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Results support the capacity of a large procyanidin (Hex) to interact with membrane lipid rafts mainly through Hex-cholesterol bondings. Procyanidin-lipid raft interactions can in part explain the capacity of large procyanidins to modulate cell physiology.

  11. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  12. Membrane Interactions of the Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus Matrix Protein and Its Budding Deficient Mutants.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Tomáš; Langerová, Hana; Doležal, Michal; Prchal, Jan; Spiwok, Vojtěch; Hunter, Eric; Rumlová, Michaela; Hrabal, Richard; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-11-20

    Matrix proteins (MAs) play a key role in the transport of retroviral proteins inside infected cells and in the interaction with cellular membranes. In most retroviruses, retroviral MAs are N-terminally myristoylated. This modification serves as a membrane targeting signal and also as an anchor for membrane interaction. The aim of this work was to characterize the interactions anchoring retroviral MA at the plasma membrane of infected cell. To address this issue, we compared the structures and membrane affinity of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) wild-type MA with its two budding deficient double mutants, that is, T41I/T78I and Y28F/Y67F. The structures of the mutants were determined using solution NMR spectroscopy, and their interactions with water-soluble phospholipids were studied. Water-soluble phospholipids are widely used models for studying membrane interactions by solution NMR spectroscopy. However, this approach might lead to artificial results due to unnatural hydrophobic interactions. Therefore, we used a new approach based on the measurement of the loss of the (1)H NMR signal intensity of the protein sample induced by the addition of the liposomes containing phospholipids with naturally long fatty acids. HIV-1 MA was used as a positive control because its ability to interact with liposomes has already been described. We found that in contrast to HIV-1, the M-PMV MA interacted with the liposomes differently and much weaker. In our invivo experiments, the M-PMV MA did not co-localize with lipid rafts. Therefore, we concluded that M-PMV might adopt a different membrane binding mechanism than HIV-1.

  13. Helix-helix interactions in membrane domains of bitopic proteins: Specificity and role of lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Mineev, Konstantin S; Pavlov, Konstantin V; Akimov, Sergey A; Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Efremov, Roman G; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2017-04-01

    Interaction between transmembrane helices often determines biological activity of membrane proteins. Bitopic proteins, a broad subclass of membrane proteins, form dimers containing two membrane-spanning helices. Some aspects of their structure-function relationship cannot be fully understood without considering the protein-lipid interaction, which can determine the protein conformational ensemble. Experimental and computer modeling data concerning transmembrane parts of bitopic proteins are reviewed in the present paper. They highlight the importance of lipid-protein interactions and resolve certain paradoxes in the behavior of such proteins. Besides, some properties of membrane organization provided a clue to understanding of allosteric interactions between distant parts of proteins. Interactions of these kinds appear to underlie a signaling mechanism, which could be widely employed in the functioning of many membrane proteins. Treatment of membrane proteins as parts of integrated fine-tuned proteolipid system promises new insights into biological function mechanisms and approaches to drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  14. Polymeric blend nanocomposite membranes for ethanol dehydration-effect of morphology and membrane-solvent interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanocomposite membranes (NCMs) of sodium alginate/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) blend polymers incorporated with varying concentrations of phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40) (PWA) nanoparticles have been prepared and used in ethanol dehydration by the pervaporation (PV) technique. Effe...

  15. Comparison of helix interactions in membrane and soluble alpha-bundle proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Markus; Patel, Ashish B; Liu, Wei; Smith, Steven O

    2002-01-01

    Helix-helix interactions are important for the folding, stability, and function of membrane proteins. Here, two independent and complementary methods are used to investigate the nature and distribution of amino acids that mediate helix-helix interactions in membrane and soluble alpha-bundle proteins. The first method characterizes the packing density of individual amino acids in helical proteins based on the van der Waals surface area occluded by surrounding atoms. We have recently used this method to show that transmembrane helices pack more tightly, on average, than helices in soluble proteins. These studies are extended here to characterize the packing of interfacial and noninterfacial amino acids and the packing of amino acids in the interfaces of helices that have either right- or left-handed crossing angles, and either parallel or antiparallel orientations. We show that the most abundant tightly packed interfacial residues in membrane proteins are Gly, Ala, and Ser, and that helices with left-handed crossing angles are more tightly packed on average than helices with right-handed crossing angles. The second method used to characterize helix-helix interactions involves the use of helix contact plots. We find that helices in membrane proteins exhibit a broader distribution of interhelical contacts than helices in soluble proteins. Both helical membrane and soluble proteins make use of a general motif for helix interactions that relies mainly on four residues (Leu, Ala, Ile, Val) to mediate helix interactions in a fashion characteristic of left-handed helical coiled coils. However, a second motif for mediating helix interactions is revealed by the high occurrence and high average packing values of small and polar residues (Ala, Gly, Ser, Thr) in the helix interfaces of membrane proteins. Finally, we show that there is a strong linear correlation between the occurrence of residues in helix-helix interfaces and their packing values, and discuss these results with

  16. Probing Induced Structural Changes in Biomimetic Bacterial Cell Membrane Interactions with Divalent Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Allison M; Standaert, Robert F; Jubb, Aaron M; Katsaras, John; Johs, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes, formed primarily by the self-assembly of complex mixtures of phospholipids, provide a structured scaffold for compartmentalization and structural processes in living cells. The specific physical properties of phospholipid species present in a given membrane play a key role in mediating these processes. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a zwitterionic lipid present in bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cell membranes, is exceptional. In addition to undergoing the standard lipid polymorphic transition between the gel and liquid-crystalline phase, it can also assume an unusual polymorphic state, the inverse hexagonal phase (HII). Divalent cations are among the factors that drive the formation of the HII phase, wherein the lipid molecules form stacked tubular structures by burying the hydrophilic head groups and exposing the hydrophobic tails to the bulk solvent. Most biological membranes contain a lipid species capable of forming the HII state suggesting that such lipid polymorphic structural states play an important role in structural biological processes such as membrane fusion. In this study, the interactions between Mg2+ and biomimetic bacterial cell membranes composed of PE and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) were probed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The lipid phase transitions were examined at varying ratios of PE to PG and upon exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of Mg2+. An understanding of these basic interactions enhances our understanding of membrane dynamics and how membrane-mediated structural changes may occur in vivo.

  17. Study of interactions between polymer nanoparticles and cell membranes at atomistic levels

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Chin W.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how the structure of nanoparticles and the interactions with biological cell membranes is important not only for understanding nanotoxicological effects on human, animal health and the environment, but also for better understanding of nanoparticle fabrication for biomedical applications. In this work, we use molecular modelling techniques, namely molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to explore how polymer nanoparticles interact with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid cell membranes. Two different polymers have been considered: 100 monomer units of polyethylene (approx. 2.83 kDa) and polystyrene (approx. 10.4 kDa), both of which have wide industrial applications. We found that, despite the polar lipid head groups acting as an effective barrier to prevent the nanoparticles from interacting with the membrane surface, irreversible adhesion can be initiated by insertion of dangling chain ends from the polymer into the hydrophobic interior of the membrane. In addition, alignment of chain segments from the polymers with that of hydrocarbon chains in the interior of the membrane facilitates the complete immersion of the nanoparticles into the cell membrane. These findings highlight the importance of the surface and the topological structures of the polymer particles that dictate the absorption behaviour into the membrane and, subsequently, induce the possible translocation into the cell. PMID:25533094

  18. Membrane interactions of fusogenic coiled-coil peptides: implications for lipopeptide mediated vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Martin; Schwieger, Christian; Zope, Harshal R; Versluis, Frank; Kros, Alexander

    2014-07-08

    Fusion of lipid membranes is an important natural process for the intra- and intercellular exchange of molecules. However, little is known about the actual fusion mechanism at the molecular level. In this study we examine a system that models the key features of this process. For the molecular recognition between opposing membranes two membrane anchored heterodimer coiled-coil forming peptides called 'E' (EIAALEK)3 and 'K' (KIAALKE)3 were used. Lipid monolayers and IR reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) revealed the interactions of the peptides 'E', 'K', and their parallel coiled-coil complex 'E/K' with the phospholipid membranes and thereby mimicked the pre- and postfusion states, respectively. The peptides adopted α-helical structures and were incorporated into the monolayers with parallel orientation. The strength of binding to the monolayer differed for the peptides and tethering them to the membrane increased the interactions even further. Remarkably, these interactions played a role even in the postfusion state. These findings shed light on important mechanistic details of the membrane fusion process in this model system. Furthermore, their implications will help to improve the rational design of new artificial membrane fusion systems, which have a wide range of potential applications in supramolecular chemistry and biomedicine.

  19. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lomize, Andrei L; Pogozheva, Irina D; Lomize, Mikhail A; Mosberg, Henry I

    2007-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM) database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our results demonstrate that

  20. Interaction of Spin-Labeled Lipid Membranes with Transition Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The large values of spin relaxation enhancement (RE) for PC spin-labels in the phospholipid membrane induced by paramagnetic metal salts dissolved in the aqueous phase can be explained by Heisenberg spin exchange due to conformational fluctuations of the nitroxide group as a result of membrane fluidity, flexibility of lipid chains, and, possibly, amphiphilic nature of the nitroxide label. Whether the magnetic interaction occurs predominantly via Heisenberg spin exchange (Ni) or by the dipole–dipole (Gd) mechanism, it is essential for the paramagnetic ion to get into close proximity to the nitroxide moiety for efficient RE. For different salts of Ni the RE in phosphatidylcholine membranes follows the anionic Hofmeister series and reflects anion adsorption followed by anion-driven attraction of paramagnetic cations on the choline groups. This adsorption is higher for chaotropic ions, e.g., perchlorate. (A chaotropic agent is a molecule in water solution that can disrupt the hydrogen bonding network between water molecules.) However, there is no anionic dependence of RE for model membranes made from negatively charged lipids devoid of choline groups. We used Ni-induced RE to study the thermodynamics and electrostatics of ion/membrane interactions. We also studied the effect of membrane composition and the phase state on the RE values. In membranes with cholesterol a significant difference is observed between PC labels with nitroxide tethers long enough vs not long enough to reach deep into the membrane hydrophobic core behind the area of fused cholesterol rings. This study indicates one must be cautious in interpreting data obtained by PC labels in fluid membranes in terms of probing membrane properties at different immersion depths when it can be affected by paramagnetic species at the membrane surface. PMID:26490692

  1. Interaction of Spin-Labeled Lipid Membranes with Transition Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Dzikovski, Boris; Livshits, Vsevolod; Freed, Jack

    2015-10-22

    The large values of spin relaxation enhancement (RE) for PC spin-labels in the phospholipid membrane induced by paramagnetic metal salts dissolved in the aqueous phase can be explained by Heisenberg spin exchange due to conformational fluctuations of the nitroxide group as a result of membrane fluidity, flexibility of lipid chains, and, possibly, amphiphilic nature of the nitroxide label. Whether the magnetic interaction occurs predominantly via Heisenberg spin exchange (Ni) or by the dipole-dipole (Gd) mechanism, it is essential for the paramagnetic ion to get into close proximity to the nitroxide moiety for efficient RE. For different salts of Ni the RE in phosphatidylcholine membranes follows the anionic Hofmeister series and reflects anion adsorption followed by anion-driven attraction of paramagnetic cations on the choline groups. This adsorption is higher for chaotropic ions, e.g., perchlorate. (A chaotropic agent is a molecule in water solution that can disrupt the hydrogen bonding network between water molecules.) However, there is no anionic dependence of RE for model membranes made from negatively charged lipids devoid of choline groups. We used Ni-induced RE to study the thermodynamics and electrostatics of ion/membrane interactions. We also studied the effect of membrane composition and the phase state on the RE values. In membranes with cholesterol a significant difference is observed between PC labels with nitroxide tethers long enough vs not long enough to reach deep into the membrane hydrophobic core behind the area of fused cholesterol rings. This study indicates one must be cautious in interpreting data obtained by PC labels in fluid membranes in terms of probing membrane properties at different immersion depths when it can be affected by paramagnetic species at the membrane surface.

  2. Chemotherapy drugs form ion pores in membranes due to physical interactions with lipids.

    PubMed

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad; Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Duszyk, Marek; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the effects on membrane of the tubulin-binding chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside and taxol. Electrophysiology recordings across lipid membranes in aqueous phases containing drugs were used to investigate the drug effects on membrane conductance. Molecular dynamics simulation of the chemotherapy drug-lipid complexes was used to elucidate the mechanism at an atomistic level. Both drugs are observed to induce stable ion-flowing pores across membranes. Discrete pore current-time plots exhibit triangular conductance events in contrast to rectangular ones found for ion channels. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that drugs and lipids experience electrostatic and van der Waals interactions for short periods of time when found within each other's proximity. The energies from these two interactions are found to be similar to the energies derived theoretically using the screened Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions between peptides and lipids due to mainly their charge properties while forming peptide-induced ion channels in lipid bilayers. Experimental and in silico studies together suggest that the chemotherapy drugs induce ion pores inside lipid membranes due to drug-lipid physical interactions. The findings reveal cytotoxic effects of drugs on the cell membrane, which may aid in novel drug development for treatment of cancer and other diseases.

  3. Conformational transitions and interactions underlying the function of membrane embedded receptor protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Sharonov, Georgy V; Bocharova, Olga V; Pavlov, Konstantin V

    2017-01-25

    Among membrane receptors, the single-span receptor protein kinases occupy a broad but specific functional niche determined by distinctive features of the underlying transmembrane signaling mechanisms that are briefly overviewed on the basis of some of the most representative examples, followed by a more detailed discussion of several hierarchical levels of organization and interactions involved. All these levels, including single-molecule interactions (e.g., dimerization, liganding, chemical modifications), local processes (e.g. lipid membrane perturbations, cytoskeletal interactions), and larger scale phenomena (e.g., effects of membrane surface shape or electrochemical potential gradients) appear to be closely integrated to achieve the observed diversity of the receptor functioning. Different species of receptor protein kinases meet their specific functional demands through different structural features defining their responses to stimulation, but certain common patterns exist. Signaling by receptor protein kinases is typically associated with the receptor dimerization and clustering, ligand-induced rearrangements of receptor domains through allosteric conformational transitions with involvement of lipids, release of the sequestered lipids, restriction of receptor diffusion, cytoskeleton and membrane shape remodeling. Understanding of complexity and continuity of the signaling processes can help identifying currently neglected opportunities for influencing the receptor signaling with potential therapeutic implications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interactions between membrane receptors in cellular membranes edited by Kalina Hristova.

  4. Prediction of the most favorable configuration in the ACBP-membrane interaction based on electrostatic calculations.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Diego F; Zamarreño, Fernando; Guérin, Diego M A; Grigera, J Raul; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2009-03-01

    Acyl-CoA binding proteins (ACBPs) are highly conserved 10 kDa cytosolic proteins that bind medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. They act as intracellular carriers of acyl-CoA and play a role in acyl-CoA metabolism, gene regulation, acyl-CoA-mediated cell signaling, transport-mediated lipid synthesis, membrane trafficking and also, ACBPs were indicated as a possible inhibitor of diazepam binding to the GABA-A receptor. To estimate the importance of the non-specific electrostatic energy in the ACBP-membrane interaction, we computationally modeled the interaction of HgACBP with both anionic and neutral membranes. To compute the Free Electrostatic Energy of Binding (dE), we used the Finite Difference Poisson Boltzmann Equation (FDPB) method as implemented in APBS. In the most energetically favorable orientation, ACBP brings charged residues Lys18 and Lys50 and hydrophobic residues Met46 and Leu47 into membrane surface proximity. This conformation suggests that these four ACBP amino acids are most likely to play a leading role in the ACBP-membrane interaction and ligand intake. Thus, we propose that long range electrostatic forces are the first step in the interaction mechanism between ACBP and membranes.

  5. Aggregation Modulators Interfere with Membrane Interactions of β2-Microglobulin Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sheynis, Tania; Friediger, Anat; Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Tipping, Kevin W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibril accumulation is a pathological hallmark of several devastating disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, prion diseases, type II diabetes, and others. Although the molecular factors responsible for amyloid pathologies have not been deciphered, interactions of misfolded proteins with cell membranes appear to play important roles in these disorders. Despite increasing evidence for the involvement of membranes in amyloid-mediated cytotoxicity, the pursuit for therapeutic strategies has focused on preventing self-assembly of the proteins comprising the amyloid plaques. Here we present an investigation of the impact of fibrillation modulators upon membrane interactions of β2-microglobulin (β2m) fibrils. The experiments reveal that polyphenols (epigallocatechin gallate, bromophenol blue, and resveratrol) and glycosaminoglycans (heparin and heparin disaccharide) differentially affect membrane interactions of β2m fibrils measured by dye-release experiments, fluorescence anisotropy of labeled lipid, and confocal and cryo-electron microscopies. Interestingly, whereas epigallocatechin gallate and heparin prevent membrane damage as judged by these assays, the other compounds tested had little, or no, effect. The results suggest a new dimension to the biological impact of fibrillation modulators that involves interference with membrane interactions of amyloid species, adding to contemporary strategies for combating amyloid diseases that focus on disruption or remodeling of amyloid aggregates. PMID:23931322

  6. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-01

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation. PMID:28028215

  7. Stereostructure-based differences in the interactions of cardiotoxic local anesthetics with cholesterol-containing biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki

    2011-06-01

    Amide-type pipecoloxylidide local anesthetics, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine, show cardiotoxic effects with the potency depending on stereostructures. Cardiotoxic drugs not only bind to cardiomyocyte membrane channels to block them but also modify the physicochemical property of membrane lipid bilayers in which channels are embedded. The opposite configurations allow enantiomers to be discriminated by their enantiospecific interactions with another chiral molecule in membranes. We compared the interactions of local anesthetic stereoisomers with biomimetic membranes consisting of chiral lipid components, the differences of which might be indicative of the drug design for reducing cardiotoxicity. Fluorescent probe-labeled biomimetic membranes were prepared with cardiolipin and cholesterol of varying compositions and different phospholipids. Local anesthetics were reacted with the membrane preparations at a cardiotoxically relevant concentration of 200 μM. The potencies to interact with biomimetic membranes and change their fluidity were compared by measuring fluorescence polarization. All local anesthetics acted on lipid bilayers to increase membrane fluidity. Chiral cardiolipin was ineffective in discriminating S(-)-enantiomers from their antipodes. On the other hand, cholesterol produced the enantiospecific membrane interactions of bupivacaine and ropivacaine with increasing its composition in membranes. In 40 mol% and more cholesterol-containing membranes, the membrane-interacting potency was S(-)-bupivacaineinteracted with biomimetic membranes in increasing order of intensity. The rank order of membrane interactivity agreed with that of known cardiotoxicity. The stereoselective membrane interactions determined by cholesterol with higher chirality appears to be associated with the

  8. Interaction of HIV-1 gag and membranes in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuzhan; Ratner, Lee

    2002-10-10

    A coupled transcription-translation (TNT) reticulocyte lysate system was used to examine posttranslational alterations in HIV-1 Gag upon addition of Jurkat T cell membranes. Incubation of the Gag precursor protein, Pr55gag, with membranes resulted in a time-dependent alteration in Gag resulting in partial resistance to trypsin treatment. Treatment of membranes and TNT extract with apyrase or pretreatment of membranes with trypsin prevented this posttranslational alteration of Gag. In contrast, this activity was not disrupted by pretreatment of membranes with Triton X-100 at 4 degrees C, under conditions which do not solubilize raft-associated proteins. Flotation studies revealed that acquisition of trypsin-resistance was accompanied by Gag binding to membranes. The myristylation signal and nucleocapsid domain were found to mediate Gag binding to membranes. The posttranslational alteration of Gag accompanying membrane interaction may represent a conformational change, oligomerization, and/or association with or envelopment by membranes. These findings provide new clues to the stepwise process of HIV-1 assembly.

  9. Mapping membrane protein interactions in cell signaling systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Hadi, Masood Z.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2003-12-01

    We proposed to apply a chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and modeling method called MS3D to the structure determination of the rhodopsin-transducin membrane protein complex (RTC). Herein we describe experimental progress made to adapt the MS3D approach for characterizing membrane protein systems, and computational progress in experimental design, data analysis and protein structure modeling. Over the past three years, we have developed tailored experimental methods for all steps in the MS3D method for rhodopsin, including protein purification, a functional assay, cross-linking, proteolysis and mass spectrometry. In support of the experimental effort. we have out a data analysis pipeline in place that automatically selects the monoisotopic peaks in a mass spectrometric spectrum, assigns them and stores the results in a database. Theoretical calculations using 24 experimentally-derived distance constraints have resulted in a backbone-level model of the activated form of rhodopsin, which is a critical first step towards building a model of the RTC. Cross-linked rhodopsin-transducin complexes have been isolated via gel electrophoresis and further mass spectrometric characterization of the cross-links is underway.

  10. Assessment of sulfur mustard interaction with basement membrane components

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Peters, B.P.; Monteiro-Rivier, N.A.

    1995-08-01

    Bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, RD) is a bifunctional alkylating agent which causes severe vesication characterized by slow wound healing. Our previous studies have shown that the vesicant RD disrupts the epidermal-dermal junction at the lamina lucida of the basement membrane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether RD directly modifies basement membrane components (BMCs), and to evaluate the effect of RD on the cell adhesive activity of BMCs. EHS laminin was incubated with (14C)HRD, and extracted by gel filtration. Analysis of the (14C)HRD-conjugated laminin fraction by a reduced sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis (SD S-PAGE) revealed the incorporation of radioactivity into both laminin subunits and a laminin trimer resistant to dissociation in reduced SDS-PAGE sample buffer, suggesting direct alkylation and cross-linking of EHS laminin by (14C)HD. Normal human foreskin epidermal keratinocytes were biosynthetically labeled with (35S)cysteine. (35S)-labeled laminin isoforms, Ae.Ble.B2e. laminin and K.Ble.B2e. laminin (using the nomenclature of Engel), fibronectin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were isolated by irnmunoprecipitation from the cell culture medium, treated with RD or ethanol as control, and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE.

  11. Characterization of protein-membrane binding interactions via a microplate assay employing whole liposome immobilization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew D; Best, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Protein-cell membrane binding interactions control numerous vital biological processes, many of which can go awry during disease onset. However, the study of these events is complicated by the complexity of the membrane bilayer. These efforts would benefit from a rapid and easily accessible method for characterizing protein-membrane recognition events. Herein, we describe a microplate-based method for the detection of protein-membrane binding that employs whole liposome immobilization using a biotin anchor. First, control studies are detailed to test for nonspecific liposome immobilization (fluorescence assay; see Subheading 3.2), and to ensure that liposomes remain intact on the microplate surface (dye leakage assay; see Subheading 3.3). Finally, a protein-membrane binding detection assay is described through the example of protein kinase Cα binding to surface-immobilized whole liposomes (see Subheading 3.4).

  12. Interactions of the antiviral and antiparkinson agent amantadine with lipid membranes and human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Altamirano, Mariella; Villena, Fernando; Dukes, Nathan; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-07-01

    Aimed to better understand the molecular mechanisms of its interactions with cell membranes, human erythrocyte and molecular models of the red cell membrane were utilized. The latter consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of amantadine to perturb the bilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In an attempt to further elucidate its effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined amantadine influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicated that amantadine induced morphological changes to human erythrocytes and interacted in a concentration-dependent manner with DMPC bilayers in contrast to DMPE that was hardly affected by the presence of the drug.

  13. Balancing torques in membrane-mediated interactions: exact results and numerical illustrations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martin Michael; Deserno, Markus; Guven, Jemal

    2007-07-01

    Torques on interfaces can be described by a divergence-free tensor which is fully encoded in the geometry. This tensor consists of two terms, one originating in the couple of the stress, the other capturing an intrinsic contribution due to curvature. In analogy to the description of forces in terms of a stress tensor, the torque on a particle can be expressed as a line integral along a contour surrounding the particle. Interactions between particles mediated by a fluid membrane are studied within this framework. In particular, torque balance places a strong constraint on the shape of the membrane. Symmetric two-particle configurations admit simple analytical expressions which are valid in the fully nonlinear regime; in particular, the problem may be solved exactly in the case of two membrane-bound parallel cylinders. This apparently simple system provides some flavor of the remarkably subtle nonlinear behavior associated with membrane-mediated interactions.

  14. Effect of trehalose on amyloid β (29-40)-membrane interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Allam S.; Izmitli, Aslin; de Pablo, J. J.

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the interaction between amyloid β peptide and lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer disease. Recent experimental evidence also suggests that trehalose, a simple disaccharide, reduces the toxicity of amyloid β peptide. Molecular simulations are used to examine the effect of trehalose on the conformational stability of amyloid β peptide in aqueous solution and its effect on the interaction between amyloid β peptide and a model phospholipid bilayer membrane. It is found that, in aqueous solution, the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation but, in the presence of trehalose, it adopts an alpha helical conformation. It is then shown that the insertion of amyloid β peptide into a membrane is more favorable when the peptide is folded into an α-helix than in a random coil conformation, thereby suggesting that trehalose promotes the insertion of α-helical amyloid β into biological membranes.

  15. Effect of trehalose on amyloid beta (29-40)-membrane interaction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Allam S; Izmitli, Aslin; de Pablo, J J

    2009-08-28

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer disease. Recent experimental evidence also suggests that trehalose, a simple disaccharide, reduces the toxicity of amyloid beta peptide. Molecular simulations are used to examine the effect of trehalose on the conformational stability of amyloid beta peptide in aqueous solution and its effect on the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and a model phospholipid bilayer membrane. It is found that, in aqueous solution, the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation but, in the presence of trehalose, it adopts an alpha helical conformation. It is then shown that the insertion of amyloid beta peptide into a membrane is more favorable when the peptide is folded into an alpha-helix than in a random coil conformation, thereby suggesting that trehalose promotes the insertion of alpha-helical amyloid beta into biological membranes.

  16. Rubber particle proteins, HbREF and HbSRPP, show different interactions with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Zhendre, Vanessa; Henry, Sarah; Thévenot, Julie; Dufourc, Erick J; Alves, Isabel D; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The biomembrane surrounding rubber particles from the hevea latex is well known for its content of numerous allergen proteins. HbREF (Hevb1) and HbSRPP (Hevb3) are major components, linked on rubber particles, and they have been shown to be involved in rubber synthesis or quality (mass regulation), but their exact function is still to be determined. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with various membrane models (lipid monolayers, liposomes or supported bilayers, and multilamellar vesicles) to mimic the latex particle membrane. We combined various biophysical methods (polarization-modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS)/ellipsometry, attenuated-total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR), fluorescence spectroscopy) to elucidate their interactions. Small rubber particle protein (SRPP) shows less affinity than rubber elongation factor (REF) for the membranes but displays a kind of "covering" effect on the lipid headgroups without disturbing the membrane integrity. Its structure is conserved in the presence of lipids. Contrarily, REF demonstrates higher membrane affinity with changes in its aggregation properties, the amyloid nature of REF, which we previously reported, is not favored in the presence of lipids. REF binds and inserts into membranes. The membrane integrity is highly perturbed, and we suspect that REF is even able to remove lipids from the membrane leading to the formation of mixed micelles. These two homologous proteins show affinity to all membrane models tested but neatly differ in their interacting features. This could imply differential roles on the surface of rubber particles.

  17. Tamoxifen-model membrane interactions: an FT-IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyar, Handan; Severcan, Feride

    1997-06-01

    The temperature- and concentration-induced effects of tamoxifen (TAM) on dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) model membranes were investigated by the Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic technique. An investigation of the C-H stretching region and the CO mode reveals that the inclusion of TAM changes the physical properties of the DPPC multibilayers by (i) shifting the main phase transition to lower temperatures; (ii) broadening the transition profile slightly; (iii) disordering the system in the gel and in the liquid crystalline phases; (iv) increasing the dynamics in the gel phase and decreasing the dynamics of the acyl chains in the liquid crystalline phase; (v) increasing the mobility of the terminal methyl group region of the bilayer in the gel phase and decreasing it in the liquid crystalline phase; (vi) increasing the frequency of the CO stretching mode both in the gel and in the liquid crystalline phases, i.e. non-bonding with carbonyl groups.

  18. Multivalent Rab interactions determine tether-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lürick, Anna; Gao, Jieqiong; Kuhlee, Anne; Yavavli, Erdal; Langemeyer, Lars; Perz, Angela; Raunser, Stefan; Ungermann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Membrane fusion at endomembranes requires cross-talk between Rab GTPases and tethers to drive SNARE-mediated lipid bilayer mixing. Several tethers have multiple Rab-binding sites with largely untested function. Here we dissected the lysosomal HOPS complex as a tethering complex with just two binding sites for the Rab7-like Ypt7 protein to determine their relevance for fusion. Using tethering and fusion assays combined with HOPS mutants, we show that HOPS-dependent fusion requires both Rab-binding sites, with Vps39 being the stronger Ypt7 interactor than Vps41. The intrinsic amphipathic lipid packaging sensor (ALPS) motif within HOPS Vps41, a target of the vacuolar kinase Yck3, is dispensable for tethering and fusion but can affect tethering if phosphorylated. In combination, our data demonstrate that a multivalent tethering complex uses its two Rab bindings to determine the place of SNARE assembly and thus fusion at endomembranes. PMID:27852901

  19. Phospholipid interactions in model membrane systems. II. Theory.

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, D; Mingins, J; Dill, K A

    1992-01-01

    We describe statistical thermodynamic theory for the lateral interactions among phospholipid head groups in monolayers and bilayers. Extensive monolayer experiments show that at low surface densities, PC head groups have strong lateral repulsions which increase considerably with temperature, whereas PE interactions are much weaker and have no significant temperature dependence (see the preceding paper). In previous work, we showed that the second virial coefficients for these interactions can be explained by: (a) steric repulsions among the head groups, and (b) a tilting of the P-N+ dipole of PC so that the N+ end enters the oil phase, to an extent that increases with temperature. It was also predicted that PE interactions should be weaker and less temperature dependent because the N+ terminal of the PE head-group is hydrophilic, hence, it is tilted into the water phase, so dipolar contributions among PE's are negligible due to the high dielectric constant of water. In the present work, we broaden the theory to treat phospholipid interactions up to higher lateral surface densities. We generalize the Hill interfacial virial expansion to account for dipoles and to include the third virial term. We show that to account for the large third virial coefficients for both PC and PE requires that the short range lateral attractions among the head groups also be taken into account. In addition, the third virial coefficient includes fluctuating head group dipoles, computed by Monte Carlo integration assuming pairwise additivity of the instantaneous pair potentials. We find that because the dipole fluctuations are correlated, the average triplet interactions do not equal the sum of the average dipole pair potentials. This is important for predicting, the magnitude and the independence of temperature of the third virial coefficients for PC. The consistency of the theory with data of both the second and the third virial coefficients extends the applicability of the head

  20. Protein–protein interactions and the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kleanthous, Colin; Rassam, Patrice; Baumann, Christoph G

    2015-01-01

    It has until recently been unclear whether outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria are organized or distributed randomly. Studies now suggest promiscuous protein–protein interactions (PPIs) between β-barrel OMPs in Escherichia coli govern their local and global dynamics, engender spatiotemporal patterning of the outer membrane into micro-domains and are the basis of β-barrel protein turnover. We contextualize these latest advances, speculate on areas of bacterial cell biology that might be influenced by the organization of OMPs into supramolecular assemblies, and highlight the new questions and controversies this revised view of the bacterial outer membrane raises. PMID:26629934

  1. Structure-dependent interactions of polyphenols with a biomimetic membrane system.

    PubMed

    Phan, Huong T T; Yoda, Tsuyoshi; Chahal, Bindu; Morita, Masamune; Takagi, Masahiro; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji C

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenols are naturally-occurring compounds, reported to be biologically active, and through their interactions with cell membranes. Although association of the polyphenols with the bilayer has been reported, the detailed mechanism of interaction is not yet well elucidated. We report on spatio-temporal real-time membrane dynamics observed in the presence of polyphenols. Two distinct membrane dynamics, corresponding to the two classes of polyphenols used, were observed. Flavonoids (epi-gallocatechin-3-gallate, gallocatechin, theaflavin and theaflavin-3-gallate) caused lipid membrane aggregation and rigidification. As simple structural modification through opening of the aromatic C-ring into an olefin bond, present in trans-stilbenes (resveratrol and picead), completely changed the membrane properties, increasing fluidity and inducing fluctuation. There were differences in the membrane transformations within the same class of polyphenols. Structure-dependent classification of membrane dynamics may contribute to a better understanding of the physicochemical mechanism involved in the bioactivity of polyphenols. In general, an increase in the number of hydrophilic side chains (galloyl, hydroxyl, glucoside, gallate) increased the reactivity of the polyphenols. Most notable was the difference observed through a simple addition of the gallate group. Unraveling the importance of these polyphenols, at a functional group level further opens the key to tailored design of bioactive compounds as potential drug candidates.

  2. Heat-induced alterations in monkey erythrocyte membrane phospholipid organization and skeletal protein structure and interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Gudi, S R; Gokhale, S M; Bhakuni, V; Gupta, C M

    1990-12-14

    Rhesus monkey erythrocytes were subjected to heating at 50 degrees C for 5-15 min, and the heat-induced effects on the membrane structure were ascertained by analysing the membrane phospholipid organization and membrane skeleton dynamics and interactions in the heated cells. Membrane skeleton dynamics and interactions were determined by measuring the Tris-induced dissociation of the Triton-insoluble membrane skeleton (Triton shells), the spectrin-actin extractability at low ionic strength, spectrin self-association and spectrin binding to normal monkey erythrocyte membrane inside-out vesicles (IOVs). The Tris-induced Triton shell dissociation and spectrin-actin extractability were markedly decreased by the erythrocyte heating. Also, the binding of the heated erythrocyte membrane spectrin-actin with the IOVs was much smaller than that observed with the normal erythrocyte spectrin-actin. Further, the spectrin structure was extensively modified in the heated cells, as compared to the normal erythrocytes. Transbilayer phospholipid organization was ascertained by employing bee venom and pancreatic phospholipases A2, fluorescamine, and Merocyanine 540 as the external membrane probes. The amounts of aminophospholipids hydrolysed by phospholipases A2 or labeled by fluorescamine in intact erythrocytes considerably increased after subjecting them to heating at 50 degrees C for 15 min. Also, the fluorescent dye Merocyanine 540 readily stained the 15-min-heated cells but not the fresh erythrocytes. Unlike these findings, the extent of aminophospholipid hydrolysis in 5-min-heated cells by phospholipases A2 depended on the incubation time. While no change in the membrane phospholipid organization could be detected in 10 min, prolonged incubations led to the increased aminophospholipid hydrolysis. Similarly, fluorescamine failed to detect any change in the transbilayer phospholipid distribution soon after the 5 min heating, but it labeled greater amounts of aminophospholipids in

  3. Biochemical Characterization of Rous Sarcoma Virus MA Protein Interaction with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Amanda K.; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.

    2005-01-01

    The MA domain of retroviral Gag proteins mediates association with the host cell membrane during assembly. The biochemical nature of this interaction is not well understood. We have used an in vitro flotation assay to directly measure Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) MA-membrane interaction in the absence of host cell factors. The association of purified MA and MA-containing proteins with liposomes of defined composition was electrostatic in nature and depended upon the presence of a biologically relevant concentration of negatively charged lipids. A mutant MA protein known to be unable to promote Gag membrane association and budding in vivo failed to bind to liposomes. These results were supported by computational modeling. The intrinsic affinity of RSV MA for negatively charged membranes appears insufficient to promote efficient plasma membrane binding during assembly. However, an artificially dimerized form of MA bound to liposomes by at least an order of magnitude more tightly than monomeric MA. This result suggests that the clustering of MA domains, via Gag-Gag interactions during virus assembly, drives membrane association in vivo. PMID:15858007

  4. Molecular determinants of α–synuclein mutants’ oligomerization and membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tsigelny, Igor F.; Sharikov, Yuriy; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Wrasidlo, Wolf; Overk, Cassia; Gonzalez, Tania; Trejo, Margarita; Spencer, Brian; Kosberg, Kori; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with the formation of toxic α-synuclein oligomers and their penetration the cell membrane. Familial forms of PD are caused by the point mutations A53T, A30P, E46K, and H50Q. Artificial point mutations E35K and E57K also increase oligomerization and pore formation. We generated structural conformations of α-synuclein and the abovementioned mutants using molecular dynamics. We elucidated four main regions in these conformers contacting the membrane and found that the region including residues 37–45 (Zone2) may have maximum membrane penetration. E57K mutant had the highest rate of interaction with the membrane by Zone2, followed by A53T, E46K, E35K mutants, and wt α-synuclein. The mutant A30P had the smallest percentage of conformers that contact the membrane than all other mutants and wt α-synuclein. These results were confirmed by experiments. We identified the key amino acids that can interact with the membrane (Y38, E62, and N65 (1st hydrophilic layer); E104, E105, and D115 (2nd hydrophilic layer), and V15 and V26 (central hydrophobic layer)) and the residues that are involved in the interprotein contacts (L38, V48, V49, Q62, and T64). Understanding the molecular interactions of α-synuclein mutants is important for the design of compounds blocking the formation of toxic oligomers. PMID:25561023

  5. Structural characterization of AS1-membrane interactions from a subset of HAMP domains

    PubMed Central

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Mäler, Lena; Draheim, Roger R.

    2011-01-01

    HAMP domains convert an extracellular sensory input into an intracellular signaling response in a wide variety of membrane-embedded bacterial proteins. These domains are almost invariably found adjacent to the inner leaflet of the cell membrane. We therefore examined the interaction of peptides corresponding to either AS1 or AS2 of four different, well-characterized HAMP domains with several membrane model systems. The proteins included an Archaeoglobus fulgidus protein (Af1503), the Escherichia coli osmosensor EnvZEc, the E. coli nitrate/nitrite sensor NarXEc, and the aspartate chemoreceptor of E. coli (TarEc). Far-UV CD and NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the induction of secondary structure upon association with neutral or acidic large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and bicelles. We observed significant increases in α-helicity within AS1 from NarXEc and TarEc but not in AS1 from the other proteins. To characterize these interactions further, we determined the solution structure of AS1 from TarEc associated with acidic bicelles. The bulk of AS1 formed an amphipathic α-helix, whereas the N-terminal control cable, the region between TM2 and AS1, remained unstructured. We observed that the conserved prolyl residue found in AS1 of many membrane-adjacent HAMP domains defined the boundary between the unstructured and helical regions. In addition, two positively charged residues that flank the hydrophobic surface of AS1 are thought to facilitate electrostatic interactions with the membrane. We interpret these results within the context of the helix-interaction model for HAMP signaling and propose roles for AS1-membrane interactions during the membrane assembly and transmembrane communication of HAMP-containing receptors. PMID:21763270

  6. Quantitative evaluation of the interfacial interactions between a randomly rough sludge floc and membrane surface in a membrane bioreactor based on fractal geometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijia; Zhou, Xiaoling; Shen, Liguo; Cai, Xiang; Wang, Fangyuan; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Li, Renjie; Wu, Xilin; Liao, Bao-Qiang

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a new method for quantification of interfacial interactions between a randomly rough particle and membrane surface was proposed. It was found that sludge flocs in a membrane bioreactor were of apparent fractal characteristics, and could be modeled by the modified two-variable Weierstrass-Mandelbrot (WM) function. By combining the surface element integration (SEI) method, differential geometry and composite Simpson's rule, the quantitation method for calculating such interfacial interactions was further developed. The correctness and feasibility of the new method were verified. This method was then applied to evaluate the interfacial interactions between a randomly rough particle and membrane surface. It was found that, randomly rough particle possesses stronger interaction strength than regularly rough particle but weaker strength than smooth particle with membrane surface, indicating significant effects of surface morphology and roughness. The proposed method in this study has broad application prospect in membrane fouling study.

  7. Cholesterol modulates the interaction of the islet amyloid polypeptide with membranes.

    PubMed

    Caillon, Lucie; Duma, Luminita; Lequin, Olivier; Khemtemourian, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of insoluble amyloid fibrils resulting from the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) within the islet of Langerhans is a pathological feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Increasing evidence indicates that biological membranes play a key role in amyloid aggregation, modulating among others the kinetics of amyloid formation, and being the target of toxic species generated during amyloid formation. In T2DM patients, elevated levels of cholesterol, an important determinant of the physical state of biological membranes, are observed in β-cells and are thought to directly impair β-cell function and insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether cholesterol enhances membrane-interaction or membrane-insertion of hIAPP. In this study, we investigated the effect of cholesterol incorporated in zwitterionic and anionic membranes. Our circular dichroism and liquid state NMR data reveal that 10-30% of cholesterol slightly affects the aggregational and conformational behaviour of hIAPP. Additional fluorescence results indicate that 10 and 20% of cholesterol slightly slow down the kinetics of oligomer and fibril formation while anionic lipids accelerate this kinetics. This behavior might be caused by differences in membrane insertion and therefore in membrane binding of hIAPP. The membrane binding affinity was evaluated using (1)H NMR experiments and our results show that the affinity of hIAPP for membranes containing cholesterol is significantly smaller than that for membranes containing anionic lipids. Furthermore, we found that hIAPP-induced membrane damage is synchronized to fibril formation in the absence and in the presence of cholesterol.

  8. Preferential Solvation of a Highly Medium Responsive Pentacyanoferrate(II) Complex in Binary Solvent Mixtures: Understanding the Role of Dielectric Enrichment and the Specificity of Solute-Solvent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello

    2016-09-08

    In this work, the preferential solvation of an intensely solvatochromic ferrocyanide(II) dye involving a 4,4'-bipyridine-based ligand was examined in various binary solvent mixtures. Its solvatochromic behavior was rationalized in terms of specific and nonspecific solute-solvent interactions. An exceptional case of solvatochromic inversion was observed when going from alcohol/water to amide/water mixtures. These effects were quantified using Onsager's solvent polarity function. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the solvatochromism of the dye was determined using various solvatochromic parameters such as π* expressing the dipolarity/polarizability of solvents and α expressing the hydrogen-bond-donor acidity of solvents. This analysis was useful for the rationalization of the selective solvation phenomena occurring in the three types of alcohol/water and amide/water mixtures studied. Furthermore, two preferential solvation models were employed for the interpretation of the experimental spectral results in binary solvent mixtures, namely, the model of Suppan on dielectric enrichment [J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 1 1987, 83, 495-509] and the model of Bosch, Rosés, and co-workers [J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1995, 8, 1607-1615]. The first model successfully predicted the charge transfer energies of the dye in formamide/water and N-methylformamide/water mixtures, but in the case of MeOH/water mixtures, the prediction was less accurate because of the significant contribution of specific solute-solvent interactions in that case. The second model gave more insights for both specific solute-solvent as well as solvent-solvent interactions in the cybotactic region. The role of dielectric enrichment and specific interactions was discussed based on the findings.

  9. The membrane as the gatekeeper of infection: Cholesterol in host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Aditya; Jafurulla, Md; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    The cellular plasma membrane serves as a portal for the entry of intracellular pathogens. An essential step for an intracellular pathogen to gain entry into a host cell therefore is to be able to cross the cell membrane. In this review, we highlight the role of host membrane cholesterol in regulating the entry of intracellular pathogens using insights obtained from work on the interaction of Leishmania and Mycobacterium with host cells. The entry of these pathogens is known to be dependent on host membrane cholesterol. Importantly, pathogen entry is inhibited either upon depletion (or complexation), or enrichment of membrane cholesterol. In other words, an optimum level of host membrane cholesterol is necessary for efficient infection by pathogens. In this overall context, we propose a general mechanism, based on cholesterol-induced conformational changes, involving cholesterol binding sites in host cell surface receptors that are implicated in this process. A therapeutic strategy targeting modulation of membrane cholesterol would have the advantage of avoiding the commonly encountered problem of drug resistance in tackling infection by intracellular pathogens. Insights into the role of host membrane cholesterol in pathogen entry would be instrumental in the development of novel therapeutic strategies to effectively tackle intracellular pathogenesis.

  10. Interactions between magainin 2 and Salmonella typhimurium outer membranes: Effect of lipopolysaccharide structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, F.R.; Macias, E.A.; Sultany, C.M.; Modzrakowski, M.C.; Blazyk, J. )

    1991-06-18

    The role of the outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the interaction between the small cationic antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 and the Gram-negative cell envelope was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. Magainin 2 alters the thermotropic properties of the outer membrane-peptidoglycan complexes from wild-type Salmonella typhimurium and a series of LPS mutants which display differential susceptibility to the bactericidal activity of cationic antibiotics. These results are correlated with the LPS phosphorylation pattern and charge (characterized by high-resolution {sup 31}P NMR) and outer membrane lipid composition, and are compared to the bactericidal susceptibility. LPS mutants show a progressive loss of resistance to killing by magainin 2 as the length of the LPS polysaccharide moiety decreases. Disordering of the outer membrane lipid fatty acyl chains by magainin 2, however, depends primarily upon the magnitude of PLS charge rather than the length of the LPS polysaccharide. While disruption of outer membrane structure most likely is not the primary factor leading to cell death, the susceptibility of Gram-negative cells to magainin 2 is associated with factors that facilitate the transport of the peptide across the outer membrane, such as the magnitude and location of LPS charge, and concentration of LPS in the outer membrane, outer membrane molecular architecture, and the presence or absence of the O-antigen side chain.

  11. Interaction of capsaicinoids with cell membrane models does not correlate with pungency of peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Ziglio, Analine C.; Gonçalves, Débora; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2017-04-01

    Mixed monolayers were prepared using phospholipids in order to mimic cell membranes and fractions of capsaicinoids (extracted from Malagueta, Caps-M, and Bhut Jolokia, Caps-B, peppers). According to their surface-pressure isotherms and polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectra (PM-IRRAS), weak molecular-level interactions were observed between Caps and phospholipids. Both Caps-M and Caps-B penetrated into the alkyl tail region of the monolayer, interacted with the phosphate group of the phospholipids and affected hydration of their Cdbnd O groups. Since the physiological activity of Caps is not governed solely by interaction with cell membranes, it should require participation of a neuronal membrane receptor, e.g. vanilloid receptor (TRPV1).

  12. Characterization of Type Three Secretion System Translocator Interactions with Phospholipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Adam, Philip R; Barta, Michael L; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2017-01-01

    In vitro characterization of type III secretion system (T3SS) translocator proteins has proven challenging due to complex purification schemes and their hydrophobic nature that often requires detergents to provide protein solubility and stability. Here, we provide experimental details for several techniques that overcome these hurdles, allowing for the direct characterization of the Shigella translocator protein IpaB with respect to phospholipid membrane interaction. The techniques specifically discussed in this chapter include membrane interaction/liposome flotation, liposome sensitive fluorescence quenching, and protein-mediated liposome disruption assays. These assays have provided valuable insight into the role of IpaB in T3SS-mediated phospholipid membrane interactions by Shigella and should readily extend to other members of this important class of proteins.

  13. Purified JC virus T antigen derived from insect cells preferentially interacts with binding site II of the viral core origin under replication conditions.

    PubMed

    Bollag, B; Mackeen, P C; Frisque, R J

    1996-04-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) establishes persistent, asymptomatic infections in most individuals, but in severely immunocompromised hosts it may cause the fatal demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In cell culture JCV multiplies inefficiently and exhibits a narrow host range. This restricted behavior occurs, in part, at the level of DNA replication, which is regulated by JCV's multifunctional large tumor protein (TAg). To prepare purified JCV TAg (JCT) for biochemical analyses, the recombinant baculovirus B-JCT was generated by cotransfection of insect cells with wild-type baculovirus and the vector pVL-JCT(Int-) containing the JCT-coding sequence downstream of the efficient polyhedrin promoter. JCT expressed in infected cells was immunoaffinity purified using the anti-JCT monoclonal antibody PAb 2000. Characterization of the viral oncoprotein indicated that it exists in solution as a mixture of monomeric and oligomeric species. With the addition of ATP, the population of monomers decreased and that of hexamers and double hexamers increased. A DNA mobility shift assay indicated that origin binding occurred primarily with the double-hexamer form. A comparison of the specific DNA-binding activities of JCT and SV40 TAg (SVT) revealed that JCT generally exhibited greater affinity for binding site II relative to binding site I (B.S. I) of both viral origin regions, whereas SVT preferentially bound B.S. I. Furthermore, JCT bound nonviral DNA more efficiently than did SVT. These functional differences between the two TAgs may contribute to the reduced DNA replication potential of JCV in vitro, and to the virus' ability to establish persistent infections in vivo.

  14. Using proximity biotinylation to detect herpesvirus entry glycoprotein interactions: Limitations for integral membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajko, Michelle; Haddad, Alexander F; Robinson, Carolyn A; Connolly, Sarah A

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires coordinated interactions among several viral transmembrane glycoproteins. Viral glycoproteins bind to receptors and interact with other glycoproteins to trigger virus-cell membrane fusion. Details of these glycoprotein interactions are not well understood because they are likely transient and/or low affinity. Proximity biotinylation is a promising protein-protein interaction assay that can capture transient interactions in live cells. One protein is linked to a biotin ligase and a second protein is linked to a short specific acceptor peptide (AP). If the two proteins interact, the ligase will biotinylate the AP, without requiring a sustained interaction. To examine herpesvirus glycoprotein interactions, the ligase and AP were linked to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) gD and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) gB. Interactions between monomers of these oligomeric proteins (homotypic interactions) served as positive controls to demonstrate assay sensitivity. Heterotypic combinations served as negative controls to determine assay specificity, since HSV1 gD and EBV gB do not interact functionally. Positive controls showed strong biotinylation, indicating that viral glycoprotein proximity can be detected. Unexpectedly, the negative controls also showed biotinylation. These results demonstrate the special circumstances that must be considered when examining interactions among glycosylated proteins that are constrained within a membrane.

  15. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.

  16. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine andmore » phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.« less

  17. Interaction of a P. aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal with Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Rebecca; Hall, Amelia; Hutchison, Ellen; Nguyen, Thuc; Cooley, Benjamin; Gordon, Vernita

    2011-03-01

    Bacteria use a signaling and regulatory system called ``quorum sensing'' to alter their gene expressions in response to the concentration of neighboring bacteria and to environmental conditions that make collective activity favorable for bacteria. P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses quorum sensing to govern processes such as virulence and biofilm formation. This organism's two main quorum sensing circuits use two different signaling molecules that are amphiphilic and differ primarily in the length of their hydrocarbon side chain and thus in their hydrophobic physical chemistry. How these physical chemistries govern the propagation and spatial localization of signals and thus of quorum sensing is not known. We present preliminary results showing that signals preferentially sequester to amphiphilic lipid membranes, which can act as reservoirs for signal. This is promising for future characterization of how the quorum sensing signals of many bacteria and yeast partition to spatially-differentiated amphiphilic environments, in a host or biofilm.

  18. Interaction study between maltose-modified PPI dendrimers and lipidic model membranes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Appelhans, Dietmar; Signorelli, Marco; Wiesner, Brigitte; Fessas, Dimitrios; Scheler, Ulrich; Voit, Brigitte; Maly, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The influence of maltose-modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPC/DMPG) (3%) liposomes was studied. Fourth generation (G4) PPI dendrimers with primary amino surface groups were partially (open shell glycodendrimers - OS) or completely (dense shell glycodendrimers - DS) modified with maltose residues. As a model membrane, two types of 100nm diameter liposomes were used to observe differences in the interactions between neutral DMPC and negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Interactions were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate the membrane fluidity of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the lipid bilayer and using differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermodynamic parameter changes. Pulsed-filed gradient NMR experiments were carried out to evaluate common diffusion coefficient of DMPG and DS PPI in D2O when using below critical micelle concentration of DMPG. Both OS and DS PPI G4 dendrimers show interactions with liposomes. Neutral DS dendrimers exhibit stronger changes in membrane fluidity compared to OS dendrimers. The bilayer structure seems more rigid in the case of anionic DMPC/DMPG liposomes in comparison to pure and neutral DMPC liposomes. Generally, interactions of dendrimers with anionic DMPC/DMPG and neutral DMPC liposomes were at the same level. Higher concentrations of positively charged OS dendrimers induced the aggregation process with negatively charged liposomes. For all types of experiments, the presence of NaCl decreased the strength of the interactions between glycodendrimers and liposomes. Based on NMR diffusion experiments we suggest that apart from electrostatic interactions for OS PPI hydrogen bonds play a major role in maltose-modified PPI dendrimer interactions with anionic and neutral model membranes where a contact surface is needed for undergoing multiple H-bond interactions between

  19. A Laboratory Exercise to Illustrate Protein-Membrane Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weers, Paul M. M.; Prenner, Elmar J.; Curic, Spomenka; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory protocol presented here takes about 3 hours to perform and investigates protein and lipid interactions. Students first purify His6-tagged human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) with Ni-NTA affinity resin in a simple batch protocol and prepare multilamellar vesicles (MLV) from pre-dried phospholipid films. When apoA-I is added to the MLV,…

  20. Effect of lipid structural modifications on their intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions and membrane functions.

    PubMed

    Boggs, J M

    1986-01-01

    The large number of different membrane lipids with various structural modifications and properties and the characteristic lipid composition of different types of membranes suggest that different lipids have specific functions in the membrane. Many of the varying properties of lipids with different polar head groups and in different ionization states can be attributed to the presence of interactive or repulsive forces between the head groups in the bilayer. The interactive forces are hydrogen bonds between hydrogen bond donating groups such as --P--OH,--OH, and--NH3+ and hydrogen bond accepting groups such as --P--O- and --COO-. These interactions increase the lipid phase transition temperature and can account for the tendency of certain lipids to go into the hexagonal phase and the dependence of this tendency on the pH and ionization state of the lipid. The presence or absence of these interactions can also affect the penetration of hydrophobic substances into the bilayer, including hydrophobic residues of membrane proteins. Evidence for this suggestion has been gathered from studies of the myelin basic protein, a water-soluble protein with a number of hydrophobic residues. In this way the lipid composition can affect the conformation and activity of membrane proteins. Since hydrogen-bonding interactions depend on the ionization state of the lipid, they can be altered by changes in the environment which affect the pK of the ionizable groups. The formation of the hexagonal phase or inverted micelles, the conformation and activity of membrane proteins, and other functions mediated by lipids could thus be regulated in this way.

  1. The Role of Protein-Protein and Protein-Membrane Interactions on P450 Function

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Emily E.; Wolf, C. Roland; Otyepka, Michal; Humphreys, Sara C.; Reed, James R.; Henderson, Colin J.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Paloncýová, Markéta; Navrátilová, Veronika; Berka, Karel; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dahal, Upendra P.; Barnaba, Carlo; Brozik, James A.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Estrada, D. Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Park, Ji Won

    2016-01-01

    This symposium summary, sponsored by the ASPET, was held at Experimental Biology 2015 on March 29, 2015, in Boston, Massachusetts. The symposium focused on: 1) the interactions of cytochrome P450s (P450s) with their redox partners; and 2) the role of the lipid membrane in their orientation and stabilization. Two presentations discussed the interactions of P450s with NADPH-P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5. First, solution nuclear magnetic resonance was used to compare the protein interactions that facilitated either the hydroxylase or lyase activities of CYP17A1. The lyase interaction was stimulated by the presence of b5 and 17α-hydroxypregnenolone, whereas the hydroxylase reaction was predominant in the absence of b5. The role of b5 was also shown in vivo by selective hepatic knockout of b5 from mice expressing CYP3A4 and CYP2D6; the lack of b5 caused a decrease in the clearance of several substrates. The role of the membrane on P450 orientation was examined using computational methods, showing that the proximal region of the P450 molecule faced the aqueous phase. The distal region, containing the substrate-access channel, was associated with the membrane. The interaction of NADPH-P450 reductase (CPR) with the membrane was also described, showing the ability of CPR to “helicopter” above the membrane. Finally, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was shown to be heterogeneous, having ordered membrane regions containing cholesterol and more disordered regions. Interestingly, two closely related P450s, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, resided in different regions of the ER. The structural characteristics of their localization were examined. These studies emphasize the importance of P450 protein organization to their function. PMID:26851242

  2. HIV-1 p6 - a structured to flexible multifunctional membrane-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Solbak, Sara Marie Øie; Reksten, Tove Ragna; Hahn, Friedrich; Wray, Victor; Henklein, Petra; Henklein, Peter; Halskau, Øyvind; Schubert, Ulrich; Fossen, Torgils

    2013-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p6 protein has recently been recognized as a docking site for several cellular and viral binding partners and is important for the formation of infectious viruses. Most of its known functions are suggested to occur under hydrophobic conditions near the cytoplasmic membrane, where the protein is presumed to exist in its most structured state. Although p6 is involved in manifold specific interactions, the protein has previously been considered to possess a random structure in aqueous solution. We show that p6 exhibits a defined structure with N- and C-terminal helical domains, connected by a flexible hinge region in 100mM dodecylphosphocholine micelle solution at pH 7 devoid of any organic co-solvents, indicating that this is a genuine limiting structural feature of the molecule in a hydrophobic environment. Furthermore, we show that p6 directly interacts with a cytoplasmic model membrane through both N-terminal and C-terminal regions by use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Phosphorylation of Ser-40 located in the center of the C-terminal α-helix does not alter the secondary structure of the protein but amplifies the interaction with membranes significantly, indicating that p6 binds to the polar head groups at the surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. The increased hydrophobic membrane interaction of p6(23-52) S40F correlated with the observed increased amount of the polyprotein Gag in the RIPA insoluble fraction when Ser40 of p6 was mutated with Phe indicating that p6 modulates the membrane interactions of HIV-1 Gag.

  3. Peptides at the Interface: Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Designer Peptides and Their Membrane Interaction Propensity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling amphiphilic designer peptides have been successfully applied as nanomaterials in biomedical applications. Understanding molecular interactions at the peptide–membrane interface is crucial, since interactions at this site often determine (in)compatibility. The present study aims to elucidate how model membrane systems of different complexity (in particular single-component phospholipid bilayers and lipoproteins) respond to the presence of amphiphilic designer peptides. We focused on two short anionic peptides, V4WD2 and A6YD, which are structurally similar but showed a different self-assembly behavior. A6YD self-assembled into high aspect ratio nanofibers at low peptide concentrations, as evidenced by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy. These supramolecular assemblies coexisted with membranes without remarkable interference. In contrast, V4WD2 formed only loosely associated assemblies over a large concentration regime, and the peptide promoted concentration-dependent disorder on the membrane arrangement. Perturbation effects were observed on both membrane systems although most likely induced by different modes of action. These results suggest that membrane activity critically depends on the peptide’s inherent ability to form highly cohesive supramolecular structures. PMID:27741400

  4. Peptides at the Interface: Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Designer Peptides and Their Membrane Interaction Propensity.

    PubMed

    Kornmueller, Karin; Lehofer, Bernhard; Meindl, Claudia; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Leitinger, Gerd; Amenitsch, Heinz; Prassl, Ruth

    2016-11-14

    Self-assembling amphiphilic designer peptides have been successfully applied as nanomaterials in biomedical applications. Understanding molecular interactions at the peptide-membrane interface is crucial, since interactions at this site often determine (in)compatibility. The present study aims to elucidate how model membrane systems of different complexity (in particular single-component phospholipid bilayers and lipoproteins) respond to the presence of amphiphilic designer peptides. We focused on two short anionic peptides, V4WD2 and A6YD, which are structurally similar but showed a different self-assembly behavior. A6YD self-assembled into high aspect ratio nanofibers at low peptide concentrations, as evidenced by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy. These supramolecular assemblies coexisted with membranes without remarkable interference. In contrast, V4WD2 formed only loosely associated assemblies over a large concentration regime, and the peptide promoted concentration-dependent disorder on the membrane arrangement. Perturbation effects were observed on both membrane systems although most likely induced by different modes of action. These results suggest that membrane activity critically depends on the peptide's inherent ability to form highly cohesive supramolecular structures.

  5. The interaction of acetylcholine receptors in porcine atrial membranes with three kinds of G proteins.

    PubMed

    Haga, T; Ikegaya, T; Haga, K

    1990-09-01

    We developed a simple procedure to detect the interaction of muscarinic receptors in atrial membranes with exogenous GTP-binding proteins (G proteins). The procedure consists of mixing atrial membranes with G proteins in the presence of sodium cholate, diluting the mixture with a salt buffer and then measuring the ligand binding activity. The displacement by carbachol of [3H] QNB binding to muscarinic receptors in the atrial membranes was not affected by guanine nucleotides when the membranes had been treated at 60 degrees C for 30 min or with N-ethylmeleimide (NEM) and became affected by them after mixing the heat- or NEM-treated membranes with G proteins. The displacement curves in the presence of GTP were essentially the same irrespective of the presence or absence of G proteins. Those in the absence of GTP shifted to a lower concentration of carbachol with addition of a higher concentration of G proteins, indicating an increase in GTP-sensitive high affinity agonist binding sites. The highest affinity for carbachol was detected with membranes treated with NEM and then mixed with G proteins. The GTP-sensitive high affinity agonist binding could be detected with any one of three kinds of G proteins (Gi, Go, Gn) which were purified from porcine cerebrum, indicating that the muscarinic receptor m2 subtype may interact with and possibly activate these three kinds of G proteins.

  6. Optical Detection of Aqueous Phase Analytes via Host-Guest Interactions on a Lipid Membrane Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, D.Y.; Waggoner, T.A.

    1999-01-11

    The organization and assembly of molecules in cellular membranes is orchestrated through the recognition and binding of specific chemical signals. A simplified version of the cellular membrane system has been developed using a synthetically prepared membrane receptor incorporated into a biologically derived lipid bilayer. Through an interplay of electrostatic and van der Wards interactions, aggregation or dispersion of molecular components could be executed on command using a specific chemical signal. A pyrene fluorophore was used as an optical probe to monitor the aggregational state of the membrane receptors in the bilayer matrix. The pyrene excimer emission to monomer emission (E/M) intensity ratio gave a relative assessment of the local concentration of receptors in the membrane. Bilayers were prepared with receptors selective for the divalent metal ions of copper, mercury, and lead. Addition of the metal ions produced a rapid dispersion of aggregated receptor components at nano- to micro-molar concentrations. The process was reversible by sequestering the metal ions with EDTA. Receptors for proteins and polyhistidine were also prepared and incorporated into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. In this case, the guest molecules bound to the membrane through multiple points of interaction causing aggregation of initially dispersed receptor molecules. The rapid, selective, and sensitive fluorescence optical response of these lipid assemblies make them attractive in sensor applications for aqueous phase metal ions and polypeptides.

  7. Fluctuation Limit for Interacting Diffusions with Partial Annihilations Through Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-Qing; Fan, Wai-Tong Louis

    2016-08-01

    We study fluctuations of the empirical processes of a non-equilibrium interacting particle system consisting of two species over a domain that is recently introduced in Chen and Fan (Ann Probab, to appear) and establish its functional central limit theorem. This fluctuation limit is a distribution-valued Gaussian Markov process which can be represented as a mild solution of a stochastic partial differential equation. The drift of our fluctuation limit involves a new partial differential equation with nonlinear coupled term on the interface that characterized the hydrodynamic limit of the system. The covariance structure of the Gaussian part consists two parts, one involving the spatial motion of the particles inside the domain and other involving a boundary integral term that captures the boundary interactions between two species. The key is to show that the Boltzmann-Gibbs principle holds for our non-equilibrium system. Our proof relies on generalizing the usual correlation functions to the join correlations at two different times.

  8. Cholesterol drives aβ(1-42) interaction with lipid rafts in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Seghezza, Silvia; Diaspro, Alberto; Canale, Claudio; Dante, Silvia

    2014-11-25

    The molecular mechanism at the basis of the neurodegenerative process related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) is triggered by the local composition of the neural plasma membrane. The role of cholesterol is controversial. In this investigation the interaction of the AD peptide amyloid-beta (1-42) with model membranes containing lipid rafts has been investigated by atomic force microscopy techniques. Supported lipid membranes made of phospholipids/sphingomyelin/cholesterol have been investigated as a function of the molar content of cholesterol, in a range spanning the phase diagram of the lipid system. The administration of amyloid-beta induced a phase reorganization of the lipid domains, when the cholesterol molar fraction was below 5%. At the same time, a mechanical destabilization and an appreciable thinning of the membrane induced by the peptide were detected. The major interaction was observed in the presence of the gel phase Lβ, and was enhanced by a low cholesterol amount. With the appearance of the liquid ordered phase Lo, the effect was hindered. At high cholesterol content (20% mol), no detectable effects in the bilayer morphology or in its mechanical stability were recorded. These findings give new insights on the molecular mechanism of the amyloid/membrane interaction, highlighting the peculiar role of cholesterol.

  9. A mirror code for protein-cholesterol interactions in the two leaflets of biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Evans, Luke S.; Williamson, Philip T. F.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol controls the activity of a wide range of membrane receptors through specific interactions and identifying cholesterol recognition motifs is therefore critical for understanding signaling receptor function. The membrane-spanning domains of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor for acetylcholine (AChR) display a series of cholesterol consensus domains (referred to as “CARC”). Here we use a combination of molecular modeling, lipid monolayer/mutational approaches and NMR spectroscopy to study the binding of cholesterol to a synthetic CARC peptide. The CARC-cholesterol interaction is of high affinity, lipid-specific, concentration-dependent, and sensitive to single-point mutations. The CARC motif is generally located in the outer membrane leaflet and its reverse sequence CRAC in the inner one. Their simultaneous presence within the same transmembrane domain obeys a “mirror code” controlling protein-cholesterol interactions in the outer and inner membrane leaflets. Deciphering this code enabled us to elaborate guidelines for the detection of cholesterol-binding motifs in any membrane protein. Several representative examples of neurotransmitter receptors and ABC transporters with the dual CARC/CRAC motifs are presented. The biological significance and potential clinical applications of the mirror code are discussed. PMID:26915987

  10. Glucocorticoid interactions with ethanol effects on synaptic plasma membranes: influence on [125I]calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1996-02-01

    Ca(++)-dependent binding of calmodulin (CaM) to brain synaptic plasma membranes is known to be inhibited by ethanol and stimulated by glucocorticoids. These opposite neurochemical actions between ethanol and the steroids in vitro are consistent with glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol-induced sedation reported to occur in vivo. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interactions of corticosterone with ethanol effects on [125I]CaM binding in synaptic plasma membranes. From the shift of concentration-response curves when corticosterone and ethanol were present in combination, the interaction between steroid stimulation and ethanol inhibition occurred in an additive relationship over the range of their effective concentrations. From Scatchard analyses, ethanol-induced decrease in membrane affinity for [125I]CaM was antagonized by steroid-induced increase in the membrane affinity, indicating that the convergent event in their interaction was the alteration of membrane affinity for CaM. Glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol inhibition of [125I]CaM binding exhibited a high degree of steroid specificity; steroids with glucocorticoid activity including cortisol, dexamethasone and triamcinolone were effective, whereas gonadal steroids and excitatory neuroactive steroid metabolites were ineffective. The demonstration that glucocorticoids antagonized the inhibition of CaM binding by ethanol provides support for the hypothesis that these steroids are among the endogenous factors that modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol.

  11. A mirror code for protein-cholesterol interactions in the two leaflets of biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Jacques; di Scala, Coralie; Evans, Luke S.; Williamson, Philip T. F.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-02-01

    Cholesterol controls the activity of a wide range of membrane receptors through specific interactions and identifying cholesterol recognition motifs is therefore critical for understanding signaling receptor function. The membrane-spanning domains of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor for acetylcholine (AChR) display a series of cholesterol consensus domains (referred to as “CARC”). Here we use a combination of molecular modeling, lipid monolayer/mutational approaches and NMR spectroscopy to study the binding of cholesterol to a synthetic CARC peptide. The CARC-cholesterol interaction is of high affinity, lipid-specific, concentration-dependent, and sensitive to single-point mutations. The CARC motif is generally located in the outer membrane leaflet and its reverse sequence CRAC in the inner one. Their simultaneous presence within the same transmembrane domain obeys a “mirror code” controlling protein-cholesterol interactions in the outer and inner membrane leaflets. Deciphering this code enabled us to elaborate guidelines for the detection of cholesterol-binding motifs in any membrane protein. Several representative examples of neurotransmitter receptors and ABC transporters with the dual CARC/CRAC motifs are presented. The biological significance and potential clinical applications of the mirror code are discussed.

  12. Interaction between Polyamines and Bacterial Outer Membranes as Investigated with Ion-Selective Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Katsu, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hideki; Yasuda, Keiko

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed the interaction between polyamines and the outer membrane of Escherichia coli cells using potentiometric measurements with Ca2+, tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+), and K+ electrodes. The Ca2+ electrode was used to examine the ability of the polyamines to release Ca2+ from the outer membrane. The TPP+ electrode was used to examine the ability to permeabilize the outer membrane, since the uptake of TPP+ was enhanced when the permeability barrier of the outer membrane was disrupted. The K+ electrode was used to examine permeabilization in the cytoplasmic membrane by monitoring the efflux of K+ in cytosol. Although Ca2+ release was remarkably enhanced by increasing the number of amino groups in polyamines, no TPP+ uptake was observed with polyamines of a simple structure, such as ethylenediamine, spermidine, and spermine. TPP+ uptake was observed when appropriate lipophilic moieties were further attached to the polyamines with three or four amino groups, indicating that the existence of bulky moieties as well as the number of amino groups is important to induce outer membrane permeabilization. Thus, 1-naphthylacetylspermine and N,N′-bis[6-[[(2-methoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]hexyl]-1,8-octanediamine (methoctramine) were especially effective in increasing the permeability of the outer membrane of E. coli cells, being comparable to polymyxin B nonapeptide, a well-known cationic peptide showing such action. PMID:11897592

  13. Characterization of the interaction of two oscillating bubbles near a thin elastic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghdam, A. Hajizadeh; Farhangmehr, V.; Ohl, S. W.; Khoo, B. C.; Shervani-Tabar, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Oscillating bubbles appear in the bodily fluid during many medical treatments, for example in Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. We report a systematic study on the complex interaction between two such bubbles and an elastic membrane, which could be a biological membrane in the human body. We have grouped our analysis into similarly sized bubbles, and differently sized bubbles. All bubbles are created at the same time. For the similarly sized bubbles, it can be broadly characterized as the splitting up of two bubbles in vertical direction perpendicular to (vertical split) and at an angle to (oblique split) the membrane surface, jetting towards each other and bubble coalescence. For the two differently sized bubbles, there is the jetting towards or away from the large bubble for the small bubble and the `catapult' effect observed. The two bubbles dynamics depend on the relative bubble sizes, the distance from the membrane, and the inter-bubble distance.

  14. Analysis of the interactions of sulfur-containing amino acids in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Cordomí, Arnau; Olivella, Mireia; Mayol, Eduardo; Fourmy, Daniel; Pardo, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of Met and Cys with other amino acid side chains have received little attention, in contrast to aromatic-aromatic, aromatic-aliphatic or/and aliphatic-aliphatic interactions. Precisely, these are the only amino acids that contain a sulfur atom, which is highly polarizable and, thus, likely to participate in strong Van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the interactions present in membrane protein crystal structures, together with the characterization of their strength in small-molecule model systems at the ab-initio level, predicts that Met-Met interactions are stronger than Met-Cys ≈ Met-Phe ≈ Cys-Phe interactions, stronger than Phe-Phe ≈ Phe-Leu interactions, stronger than the Met-Leu interaction, and stronger than Leu-Leu ≈ Cys-Leu interactions. These results show that sulfur-containing amino acids form stronger interactions than aromatic or aliphatic amino acids. Thus, these amino acids may provide additional driving forces for maintaining the 3D structure of membrane proteins and may provide functional specificity.

  15. Lipid-lipid and lipid-drug interactions in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynowycz, Michael W.

    Interactions between lipids and drug molecules in biological membranes help govern proper biological function in organisms. The mechanisms responsible for hydrophobic drug permeation remain elusive. Many small molecule drugs are hydrophobic. These drugs inhibit proteins in the cellular interior. The rise of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is thought to be caused by mutations in protein structure, changing drug kinetics to favor growth. However, small molecule drugs have been shown to have different mechanisms depending in the structure of the lipid membrane of the target cell. Biological membranes are investigated using Langmuir monolayers at the air-liquid interface. These offer the highest level of control in the mimetic system and allow them to be investigated using complementary techniques. Langmuir isotherms and insertion assays are used to determine the area occupied by each lipid in the membrane and the change in area caused by the introduction of a drug molecule, respectively. Specular X-ray reflectivity is used to determine the electron density of the monolayer, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction is used to determine the in-plane order of the monolayer. These methods determine the affinity of the drug and the mechanism of action. Studies are presented on hydrophobic drugs with mammalian membrane mimics using warfarin along with modified analogues, called superwarfarins. Data shows that toxicity of these modified drugs are modulated by the membrane cholesterol content in cells; explaining several previously unexplained effects of the drugs. Membrane mimics of bacteria are investigated along with their interactions with a hydrophobic antibiotic, novobiocin. Data suggests that permeation of the drug is mediated by modifications to the membrane lipids, and completely ceases translocation under certain circumstances. Circumventing deficiencies in small, hydrophobic drugs is approached by using biologically mimetic oligomers. Peptoids, mimetic of host

  16. Lipid demixing and protein-protein interactions in the adsorption of charged proteins on mixed membranes.

    PubMed Central

    May, S; Harries, D; Ben-Shaul, A

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption free energy of charged proteins on mixed membranes, containing varying amounts of (oppositely) charged lipids, is calculated based on a mean-field free energy expression that accounts explicitly for the ability of the lipids to demix locally, and for lateral interactions between the adsorbed proteins. Minimization of this free energy functional yields the familiar nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the boundary condition at the membrane surface that allows for lipid charge rearrangement. These two self-consistent equations are solved simultaneously. The proteins are modeled as uniformly charged spheres and the (bare) membrane as an ideal two-dimensional binary mixture of charged and neutral lipids. Substantial variations in the lipid charge density profiles are found when highly charged proteins adsorb on weakly charged membranes; the lipids, at a certain demixing entropy penalty, adjust their concentration in the vicinity of the adsorbed protein to achieve optimal charge matching. Lateral repulsive interactions between the adsorbed proteins affect the lipid modulation profile and, at high densities, result in substantial lowering of the binding energy. Adsorption isotherms demonstrating the importance of lipid mobility and protein-protein interactions are calculated using an adsorption equation with a coverage-dependent binding constant. Typically, at bulk-surface equilibrium (i.e., when the membrane surface is "saturated" by adsorbed proteins), the membrane charges are "overcompensated" by the protein charges, because only about half of the protein charges (those on the hemispheres facing the membrane) are involved in charge neutralization. Finally, it is argued that the formation of lipid-protein domains may be enhanced by electrostatic adsorption of proteins, but its origin (e.g., elastic deformations associated with lipid demixing) is not purely electrostatic. PMID:11023883

  17. The interaction of polyglutamine peptides with lipid membranes is regulated by flanking sequences associated with huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kathleen A; Kauffman, Karlina J; Umbaugh, C Samuel; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-05-24

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (poly(Q)) repeat near the N terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded poly(Q) facilitates formation of htt aggregates, eventually leading to deposition of cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies containing htt. Flanking sequences directly adjacent to the poly(Q) domain, such as the first 17 amino acids on the N terminus (Nt17) and the polyproline (poly(P)) domain on the C-terminal side of the poly(Q) domain, heavily influence aggregation. Additionally, htt interacts with a variety of membraneous structures within the cell, and Nt17 is implicated in lipid binding. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid membranes, a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy, Langmuir trough techniques, and vesicle permeability assays were used to directly monitor the interaction of a variety of synthetic poly(Q) peptides with different combinations of flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q35-P10-KK, Nt17-Q35-KK, and Nt17-Q35-P10-KK) on model membranes and surfaces. Each peptide aggregated on mica, predominately forming extended, fibrillar aggregates. In contrast, poly(Q) peptides that lacked the Nt17 domain did not appreciably aggregate on or insert into lipid membranes. Nt17 facilitated the interaction of peptides with lipid surfaces, whereas the poly(P) region enhanced this interaction. The aggregation of Nt17-Q35-P10-KK on the lipid bilayer closely resembled that of a htt exon1 construct containing 35 repeat glutamines. Collectively, this data suggests that the Nt17 domain plays a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes, and this lipid/htt interaction can be further modulated by the presence of the poly(P) domain.

  18. Mechanisms of interaction of pesticides with the lipid bilayer in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, V. N.

    1993-07-01

    The available information about the mechanisms of the interaction of pesticides having different chemical structures with the lipid bilayer in cell membranes is presented. It is shown that, depending on the degree of lipophilicity, the molecular dipole moment, and certain other characteristics of the pesticide compound, its interaction with the lipid bilayer generally takes place via one of the three main mechanisms involving the incorporation of the pesticide molecules in the hydrocarbon region within the bilayer, the adsorption of these molecules in the zone of the polar membrane phospholipids, or the incorporation of the amphiphilic pesticide compounds in both the non-polar and polar regions of the membrane. The bibliography includes 109 references.

  19. Lipid-protein interactions of integral membrane proteins: a comparative simulation study.

    PubMed

    Deol, Sundeep S; Bond, Peter J; Domene, Carmen; Sansom, Mark S P

    2004-12-01

    The interactions between membrane proteins and their lipid bilayer environment play important roles in the stability and function of such proteins. Extended (15-20 ns) molecular dynamics simulations have been used to explore the interactions of two membrane proteins with phosphatidylcholine bilayers. One protein (KcsA) is an alpha-helix bundle and embedded in a palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer; the other (OmpA) is a beta-barrel outer-membrane protein and is in a dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer. The simulations enable analysis in detail of a number of aspects of lipid-protein interactions. In particular, the interactions of aromatic amphipathic side chains (i.e., Trp, Tyr) with lipid headgroups, and "snorkeling" interactions of basic side chains (i.e., Lys, Arg) with phosphate groups are explored. Analysis of the number of contacts and of H-bonds reveal fluctuations on an approximately 1- to 5-ns timescale. There are two clear bands of interacting residues on the surface of KcsA, whereas there are three such bands on OmpA. A large number of Arg-phosphate interactions are seen for KcsA; for OmpA, the number of basic-phosphate interactions is smaller and shows more marked fluctuations with respect to time. Both classes of interaction occur in clearly defined interfacial regions of width approximately 1 nm. Analysis of lateral diffusion of lipid molecules reveals that "boundary" lipid molecules diffuse at about half the rate of bulk lipid. Overall, these simulations present a dynamic picture of lipid-protein interactions: there are a number of more specific interactions but even these fluctuate on an approximately 1- to 5-ns timescale.

  20. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to…

  1. Rapid mobilization of membrane lipids in wheat leaf-sheathes during incompatible interactions with hessian fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) is a biotrophic parasitic insect that interacts with wheat on a typical gene-for-gene basis. In this study, we systematically profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing resistance ge...

  2. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Biophysical Interactions of Seven Green Tea Catechins with Cell Membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the interactions of bioactive catechins (flavonoids) commonly found in green tea with lipid bilayers, as model for cell membranes. Previously, a number of experimental studies rationalized catechin’s anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, and other be...

  3. Preferential interactions in pigmented, polymer blends - C.I. Pigment Blue 15:4 and C.I. Pigment Red 122 - as used in a poly(carbonate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) polymer blend.

    PubMed

    Fagelman, K E; Guthrie, J T

    2005-11-18

    Some important characteristics of selected pigments have been evaluated, using the inverse gas chromatography (IGC) technique, that indicate the occurrence of preferential interactions in pigmented polymer blends. Attention has been given to copper phthalocyanine pigments and to quinacridone pigments incorporated in polycarbonate-poly(butylene terephthalate) blends. Selected supporting techniques were used to provide supplementary information concerning the pigments of interest, C.I. Pigment Blue 15:4 and C.I. Pigment Red 122. For C.I. Pigment Red 122 and for C.I. Pigment Blue, the dispersive component of the surface free energy decreases as the temperature increases, indicating the relative ease with which the molecules can be removed from the surface.

  4. Membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase and inhibits enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Thai Leong; Velayati, Arash; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in GBA, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, the lysosomal enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease increase the risk for developing Parkinson disease. Recent research suggests a relationship between glucocerebrosidase and the Parkinson disease-related amyloid-forming protein, α-synuclein; however, the specific molecular mechanisms responsible for association remain elusive. Previously, we showed that α-synuclein and glucocerebrosidase interact selectively under lysosomal conditions, and proposed that this newly identified interaction might influence cellular levels of α-synuclein by either promoting protein degradation and/or preventing aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase, and that this complex formation inhibits enzyme function. Using site-specific fluorescence and Förster energy transfer probes, we mapped the protein-enzyme interacting regions on unilamellar vesicles. Our data suggest that on the membrane surface, the glucocerebrosidase-α-synuclein interaction involves a larger α-synuclein region compared to that found in solution. In addition, α-synuclein acts as a mixed inhibitor with an apparent IC50 in the submicromolar range. Importantly, the membrane-bound, α-helical form of α-synuclein is necessary for inhibition. This glucocerebrosidase interaction and inhibition likely contribute to the mechanism underlying GBA-associated parkinsonism. PMID:23266198

  5. Comparative study of the interaction of CHAPS and Triton X-100 with the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Rodi, P M; Bocco Gianello, M D; Corregido, M C; Gennaro, A M

    2014-03-01

    The zwitterionic detergent CHAPS, a derivative of the bile salts, is widely used in membrane protein solubilization. It is a "facial" detergent, having a hydrophilic side and a hydrophobic back. The objective of this work is to characterize the interaction of CHAPS with a cell membrane. To this aim, erythrocytes were incubated with a wide range of detergent concentrations in order to determine CHAPS partition behavior, and its effects on membrane lipid order, hemolytic effects, and the solubilization of membrane phospholipids and cholesterol. The results were compared with those obtained with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. It was found that CHAPS has a low affinity for the erythrocyte membrane (partition coefficient K=0.06mM(-1)), and at sub-hemolytic concentrations it causes little effect on membrane lipid order. CHAPS hemolysis and phospholipid solubilization are closely correlated. On the other side, binding of Triton X-100 disorders the membrane at all levels, and has independent mechanisms for hemolysis and solubilization. Differential behavior was observed in the solubilization of phospholipids and cholesterol. Thus, the detergent resistant membranes (DRM) obtained with the two detergents will have different composition. The behaviors of the two detergents are related to the differences in their molecular structures, suggesting that CHAPS does not penetrate the lipid bilayer but binds in a flat position on the erythrocyte surface, both in intact and cholesterol depleted erythrocytes. A relevant result for Triton X-100 is that hemolysis is not directly correlated with the solubilization of membrane lipids, as it is usually assumed.

  6. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  7. Reacquisition of cocaine conditioned place preference and its inhibition by previous social interaction preferentially affect D1-medium spiny neurons in the accumbens corridor

    PubMed Central

    Prast, Janine M.; Schardl, Aurelia; Schwarzer, Christoph; Dechant, Georg; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    We investigated if counterconditioning with dyadic (i.e., one-to-one) social interaction, a strong inhibitor of the subsequent reacquisition of cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP), differentially modulates the activity of the diverse brain regions oriented along a mediolateral corridor reaching from the interhemispheric sulcus to the anterior commissure, i.e., the nucleus of the vertical limb of the diagonal band, the medial septal nucleus, the major island of Calleja, the intermediate part of the lateral septal nucleus, and the medial accumbens shell and core. We also investigated the involvement of the lateral accumbens core and the dorsal caudate putamen. The anterior cingulate 1 (Cg1) region served as a negative control. Contrary to our expectations, we found that all regions of the accumbens corridor showed increased expression of the early growth response protein 1 (EGR1, Zif268) in rats 2 h after reacquisition of CPP for cocaine after a history of cocaine CPP acquisition and extinction. Previous counterconditioning with dyadic social interaction inhibited both the reacquisition of cocaine CPP and the activation of the whole accumbens corridor. EGR1 activation was predominantly found in dynorphin-labeled cells, i.e., presumably D1 receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs), with D2-MSNs (immunolabeled with an anti-DRD2 antibody) being less affected. Cholinergic interneurons or GABAergic interneurons positive for parvalbumin, neuropeptide Y or calretinin were not involved in these CPP-related EGR1 changes. Glial cells did not show any EGR1 expression either. The present findings could be of relevance for the therapy of impaired social interaction in substance use disorders, depression, psychosis, and autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25309368

  8. Contact probing of stretched membranes and adhesive interactions: graphene and other two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodich, Feodor M.; Galanov, Boris A.

    2016-11-01

    Contact probing is the preferable method for studying mechanical properties of thin two-dimensional (2D) materials. These studies are based on analysis of experimental force-displacement curves obtained by loading of a stretched membrane by a probe of an atomic force microscope or a nanoindenter. Both non-adhesive and adhesive contact interactions between such a probe and a 2D membrane are studied. As an example of the 2D materials, we consider a graphene crystal monolayer whose discrete structure is modelled as a 2D isotropic elastic membrane. Initially, for contact between a punch and the stretched circular membrane, we formulate and solve problems that are analogies to the Hertz-type and Boussinesq frictionless contact problems. A general statement for the slope of the force-displacement curve is formulated and proved. Then analogies to the JKR (Johnson, Kendall and Roberts) and the Boussinesq-Kendall contact problems in the presence of adhesive interactions are formulated. General nonlinear relations among the actual force, displacements and contact radius between a sticky membrane and an arbitrary axisymmetric indenter are derived. The dimensionless form of the equations for power-law shaped indenters has been analysed, and the explicit expressions are derived for the values of the pull-off force and corresponding critical contact radius.

  9. Structural plasticity in the topology of the membrane-interacting domain of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J; Wimley, William C; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2014-02-04

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662-683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning.

  10. Interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2008-03-01

    Chronic usage of Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) leads to gastrointestinal toxicity and clinical evidences point the cause to direct interactions between NSAIDs and phospholipid membranes. Also, NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipid vesicles are shown to be safer and therapeutically more effective than unmodified ones. Our initial experiments and simulations on the partitioning of Aspirin and Ibuprofen clearly indicate role played by the drug structure in drug-membrane interactions. Those results motivated systematic molecular dynamics simulations of membranes with NSAIDs of different size, structure and pKa values. Our results suggest high partition coefficients for these NSAIDs in the membrane compared to water and thinning effect on the bilayer. Our small angle neutron scattering and reflectivity studies on DMPC-Ibuprofen systems indicate that the drug affects both ˜5 nm thick bilayer and overall ˜100 nm diameter vesicle, indicating that NSAIDs affect vesicles on various length scales. We will discuss the structural perturbations to membranes due to NSAIDs at clinically relevant molar ratios and their implications on the use of vesicles as delivery vehicles for NSAIDs.

  11. Contact probing of stretched membranes and adhesive interactions: graphene and other two-dimensional materials

    PubMed Central

    Galanov, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    Contact probing is the preferable method for studying mechanical properties of thin two-dimensional (2D) materials. These studies are based on analysis of experimental force–displacement curves obtained by loading of a stretched membrane by a probe of an atomic force microscope or a nanoindenter. Both non-adhesive and adhesive contact interactions between such a probe and a 2D membrane are studied. As an example of the 2D materials, we consider a graphene crystal monolayer whose discrete structure is modelled as a 2D isotropic elastic membrane. Initially, for contact between a punch and the stretched circular membrane, we formulate and solve problems that are analogies to the Hertz-type and Boussinesq frictionless contact problems. A general statement for the slope of the force–displacement curve is formulated and proved. Then analogies to the JKR (Johnson, Kendall and Roberts) and the Boussinesq–Kendall contact problems in the presence of adhesive interactions are formulated. General nonlinear relations among the actual force, displacements and contact radius between a sticky membrane and an arbitrary axisymmetric indenter are derived. The dimensionless form of the equations for power-law shaped indenters has been analysed, and the explicit expressions are derived for the values of the pull-off force and corresponding critical contact radius. PMID:27956879

  12. Perturbation of polysome - membrane interaction by aflatoxin B/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Erki, L.; Patterson, W.J. Jr.; delRosario, R.; Devlin, T.M.; Ch'ih, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    In this study AFB/sup 1/ was used to assess the interaction between polysomes and the membrane. Hepatocytes treated with 50 ..mu..M AFB/sub 1/ showed no significant quantitative changes in phospholipid, protein, and RNA as compared with untreated cells. Mitochondrial and microsomal fractions isolated from AFB/sub 1/ treated cells showed 10-20% increases in protein and phospholipid. Determinations of membrane components of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and RER isolated from AFB/sub 1/ treated S-10 reaction gave similar results. To study AFB/sub 1/ activation and modification along with polysome and membrane interactions, SER or RER was incubated in the presence or absence of polysomes. In the presence of 0.25, 1 and 3 mg polysomes, (/sup 3/H)AFB/sub 1/ activation was inhibited by 28, 38, and 59%, respectively. When SER was incubated with (/sup 3/H)AFB/sub 1/ for 20 min in the absence of polysomes, the subsequent addition of varying amounts of polysomes resulted in a concentration dependent modification of polysomes. This concentration dependent modification and inhibition of AFB/sub 1/ activation by polysomes and the lack of changes in membrane components by AFB/sub 1/ indicated that the membrane sites for AFB/sub 1/ activation and polysome attachment are in close proximity.

  13. Interaction of the Most Membranotropic Region of the HCV E2 Envelope Glycoprotein with Membranes. Biophysical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Guillén, Jaime; Moreno, Miguel R.; Gómez-Sánchez, Ana I.; Pabst, George; Laggner, Peter; Villalaín, José

    2008-01-01

    The previously identified membrane-active regions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins led us to identify different segments that might be implicated in viral membrane fusion, membrane interaction, and/or protein-protein binding. HCV E2 glycoprotein contains one of the most membranotropic segments, segment 603–634, which has been implicated in CD81 binding, E1/E2 and E2/E2 dimerization, and membrane interaction. Through a series of complementary experiments, we have carried out a study of the binding and interaction with the lipid bilayer of a peptide corresponding to segment 603–634, peptide E2FP, as well as the structural changes induced by membrane binding that take place in both the peptide and the phospholipid molecules. Here, we demonstrate that peptide E2FP binds to and interacts with phospholipid model membranes, modulates the polymorphic phase behavior of membrane phospholipids, is localized in a shallow position in the membrane, and is probably oligomerized in the presence of membranes. These data support the role of E2FP in HCV-mediated membrane fusion, and sustain the notion that this segment of the E2 envelope glycoprotein, together with other segments of E2 and E1 glycoproteins, provides the driving force for the merging of the viral and target cell membranes. PMID:18339752

  14. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble (apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  15. Influence of counterions on the interaction of pyridinium salts with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sarapuk, J; Kleszczyńska, H; Pernak, J; Kalewska, J; Rózycka-Roszak, B

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of pyridinium salts (PS) with red blood cells and planar lipid membranes was studied. The aim of the work was to find whether certain cationic surfactant counterion influence its possible biological activity. The counterions studied were Cl-, Br-, I-, ClO4-, BF4- and NO3-. The model membranes used were erythrocyte and planar lipid membranes (BLM). At high concentration the salts caused 100% erythrocyte hemolysis (C100) or broke BLMs (CC). Both parameters describe mechanical properties of model membranes. It was found that the efficiency of the surfactant to destabilize model membranes depended to some degree on its counterion. In both, erythrocyte and BLM experiments, the highest efficiency was observed for Br-, the lowest for NO3-. The influence of all other anions on surfactant efficiency changed between these two extremities; that of chloride and perchlorate ions was similar. Some differences were found in the case of BF4- ion. Its influence on hemolytic possibilities of PS was significant while BLM destruction required relatively high concentration of this anion. Apparently, the influence of various anions on the destructive action of PS on the model membrane used may be attributed to different mobilities and radii of hydrated ions and hence, to different possibilities of particular anions to modify the surface potential of model membranes. This can lead to a differentiated interaction of PS with modified bilayers. Moreover, the effect of anions on the water structure must be taken into account. It is important whether the anions can be classified as water ordering kosmotropes that hold the first hydration shell tightly or water disordering chaotropes that hold water molecules in that shell loosely.

  16. Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Is a Conserved Feature of Cyclotide-Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Huang, Yen-Hua; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Bagatolli, Luis A.; Sonza, Secondo; Tachedjian, Gilda; Daly, Norelle L.; Craik, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclotides are bioactive cyclic peptides isolated from plants that are characterized by a topologically complex structure and exceptional resistance to enzymatic or thermal degradation. With their sequence diversity, ultra-stable core structural motif, and range of bioactivities, cyclotides are regarded as a combinatorial peptide template with potential applications in drug design. The mode of action of cyclotides remains elusive, but all reported biological activities are consistent with a mechanism involving membrane interactions. In this study, a diverse set of cyclotides from the two major subfamilies, Möbius and bracelet, and an all-d mirror image form, were examined to determine their mode of action. Their lipid selectivity and membrane affinity were determined, as were their toxicities against a range of targets (red blood cells, bacteria, and HIV particles). Although they had different membrane-binding affinities, all of the tested cyclotides targeted membranes through binding to phospholipids containing phosphatidylethanolamine headgroups. Furthermore, the biological potency of the tested cyclotides broadly correlated with their ability to target and disrupt cell membranes. The finding that a broad range of cyclotides target a specific lipid suggests their categorization as a new lipid-binding protein family. Knowledge of their membrane specificity has the potential to assist in the design of novel drugs based on the cyclotide framework, perhaps allowing the targeting of peptide drugs to specific cell types. PMID:22854971

  17. Therapeutic design of peptide modulators of protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Deber, Charles M

    2017-04-01

    Membrane proteins play the central roles in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from nutrient uptake and signalling, to cell-cell communication. Their biological functions are directly related to how they fold and assemble; defects often lead to disease. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) within the membrane are therefore of great interest as therapeutic targets. Here we review the progress in the application of membrane-insertable peptides for the disruption or stabilization of membrane-based PPIs. We describe the design and preparation of transmembrane peptide mimics; and of several categories of peptidomimetics used for study, including d-enantiomers, non-natural amino acids, peptoids, and β-peptides. Further aspects of the review describe modifications to membrane-insertable peptides, including lipidation and cyclization via hydrocarbon stapling. These approaches provide a pathway toward the development of metabolically stable, non-toxic, and efficacious peptide modulators of membrane-based PPIs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  18. Fluid-Structure interaction analysis and performance evaluation of a membrane blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedi, M.; Wüchner, R.; Bletzinger, K.-U.

    2016-09-01

    Examining the potential of a membrane blade concept is the goal of the current work. In the sailwing concept the surface of the wing, or the blade in this case, is made from pre-tensioned membranes which meet at the pre-tensioned edge cable at the trailing edge. Because of the dependency between membrane deformation and applied aerodynamic load, two-way coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis is necessary for evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of such a configuration. The in-house finite element based structural solver, CARAT++, is coupled with OpenFOAM in order to tackle the multi-physics problem. The main aerodynamic characteristics of the membrane blade including lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift to drag ratio are compared with its rigid counterpart. A single non-rotating NREL phase VI blade is studied here as a first step towards analyzing the concept for the rotating case. Compared with the rigid blade, the membrane blade has a higher slope of the lift curve. For higher angles of attack, lift and drag coefficients as well as the lift to drag ratio is higher for the membrane blade. A single non-rotating blade is studied here as a first step towards analyzing the concept for the rotating case.

  19. Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Zareba, Mariusz; Subczynski, Witold Karol

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that a high dietary intake of carotenoids may offer protection against age-related macular degeneration, cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Humans cannot synthesize carotenoids and depend on their dietary intake. Major carotenoids that have been found in human plasma can be divided into two groups, carotenes (nonpolar molecules, such as β-carotene, α-carotene or lycopene) and xanthophylls (polar carotenoids that include an oxygen atom in their structure, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin). Only two dietary carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin (macular xanthophylls), are selectively accumulated in the human retina. A third carotenoid, meso-zeaxanthin, is formed directly in the human retina from lutein. Additionally, xanthophylls account for about 70% of total carotenoids in all brain regions. Some specific properties of these polar carotenoids must explain why they, among other available carotenoids, were selected during evolution to protect the retina and brain. It is also likely that the selective uptake and deposition of macular xanthophylls in the retina and brain are enhanced by specific xanthophyll-binding proteins. We hypothesize that the high membrane solubility and preferential transmembrane orientation of macular xanthophylls distinguish them from other dietary carotenoids, enhance their chemical and physical stability in retina and brain membranes and maximize their protective action in these organs. Most importantly, xanthophylls are selectively concentrated in the most vulnerable regions of lipid bilayer membranes enriched in polyunsaturated lipids. This localization is ideal if macular xanthophylls are to act as lipid-soluble antioxidants, which is the most accepted mechanism through which lutein and zeaxanthin protect neural tissue against degenerative diseases. PMID:27030822

  20. H7N9 influenza viruses interact preferentially with α2,3-linked sialic acids and bind weakly to α2,6-linked sialic acids.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Irene; Krammer, Florian; Hai, Rong; Aguilera, Domingo; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Steel, John; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2013-11-01

    The recent human outbreak of H7N9 avian influenza A virus has caused worldwide concerns. Receptor binding specificity is critical for viral pathogenicity, and still not thoroughly studied for this emerging virus. Here, we evaluated the receptor specificity of the haemagglutinin (HA) of two human H7N9 isolates (A/Shanghai/1/13 and A/Anhui/1/13) through a solid-phase binding assay and a flow cytometry-based assay. In addition, we compared it with those from several HAs from human and avian influenza viruses. We observed that the HAs from the novel H7 isolates strongly interacted with α2,3-linked sialic acids. Importantly, they also showed low levels of binding to α2,6-linked sialic acids, but significantly higher than other avian H7s.

  1. High-order power series expansion of the elastic interaction between conical membrane inclusions.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Jean-Baptiste; Galatola, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    We revisit the problem of the long-range interaction between two conical proteins inserted into a lipid membrane and interacting via the induced deformation of the membrane, first considered by Goulian et al. (M. Goulian, R. Bruinsma, P. Pincus, Europhys. Lett. 22, 145 (1993); Europhys. Lett. 23, 155 (1993)). By means of a complex variables formulation and an iterative solution, we determine analytically an arbitrary high-order expansion of the interaction energy in powers of the inverse distance between two inclusions of different sizes. At leading order and for inclusions of equal sizes, we recover the result obtained by Goulian et al.. We generalize the development to inclusions of different sizes and give explicit formulas that increase the precision by ten orders in the inverse distance.

  2. Assembly and Preferential Localization of Nup116p on the Cytoplasmic Face of the Nuclear Pore Complex by Interaction with Nup82p

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Albert K.; Shen, Tian Xiang; Ryan, Kathryn J.; Kiseleva, Elena; Levy, Marilyn Aach; Allen, Terence D.; Wente, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoporin Nup116p serves as a docking site for both nuclear import and export factors. However, the mechanism for assembling Nup116p into the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has not been resolved. By conducting a two-hybrid screen with the carboxy (C)-terminal Nup116p region as bait, we identified Nup82p. The predicted coiled-coil region of Nup82p was not required for Nup116p interaction, making the binding requirements distinct from those for the Nsp1p-Nup82p-Nup159p subcomplex (N. Belgareh, C. Snay-Hodge, F. Pasteau, S. Dagher, C. N. Cole, and V. Doye, Mol. Biol. Cell 9:3475–3492, 1998). Immunoprecipitation experiments using yeast cell lysates resulted in the coisolation of a Nup116p-Nup82p subcomplex. Although the absence of Nup116p had no effect on the NPC localization of Nup82p, overexpression of C-terminal Nup116p in a nup116 null mutant resulted in Nup82p mislocalization. Moreover, NPC localization of Nup116p was specifically diminished in a nup82-Δ108 mutant after growth at 37°C. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed Nup116p was localized on both the cytoplasmic and nuclear NPC faces. Its distribution was asymmetric with the majority at the cytoplasmic face. Taken together, these results suggest that Nup82p and Nup116p interact at the cytoplasmic NPC face, with nucleoplasmic Nup116p localization utilizing novel binding partners. PMID:10891509

  3. Interaction of LL-37 with Model Membrane Systems of Different Complexity: Influence of the Lipid Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Sevcsik, E.; Pabst, G.; Richter, W.; Danner, S.; Amenitsch, H.; Lohner, K.

    2008-01-01

    As the main difference between bacterial and mammalian cell membranes is their net charge, the focal point of consideration in many model membrane experiments with antimicrobial peptides is lipid headgroup charge. We studied the interaction of the human multifunctional peptide LL-37 with single phospholipid monolayers, bilayers, and bilayers composed of binary mixtures of the four phospholipid species predominantly used in model membrane experiments (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylserine). We found that 1), the effects on single lipid monolayers are not comparable to those on the corresponding bilayers; 2), there are four different effects of LL-37 on bilayers of the four lipids; 3), the preference of LL-37 for the specific lipids is roughly inversely related to chain packing density; and 4), in the binary lipid mixtures, one lipid—and not necessarily the charged one—generally governs the mode of lipid/peptide interaction. Thus, our results show that lipid net charge is not the decisive factor determining the membrane-perturbing mechanism of LL-37, but only one of several parameters, among them packing density, the ability to form intermolecular H-bonds, and lipid molecular shape, which emphasizes how profoundly the choice of the model system can influence the outcome of a study of lipid/peptide interaction. PMID:18326643

  4. Structural Basis for Ca2+-mediated Interaction of the Perforin C2 Domain with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hiromasa; Conroy, Paul J.; Leung, Eleanor W. W.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Whisstock, James C.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes deploy perforin and granzymes to kill infected host cells. Perforin, secreted by immune cells, binds target membranes to form pores that deliver pro-apoptotic granzymes into the target cell. A crucial first step in this process is interaction of its C2 domain with target cell membranes, which is a calcium-dependent event. Some aspects of this process are understood, but many molecular details remain unclear. To address this, we investigated the mechanism of Ca2+ and lipid binding to the C2 domain by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Calcium titrations, together with dodecylphosphocholine micelle experiments, confirmed that multiple Ca2+ ions bind within the calcium-binding regions, activating perforin with respect to membrane binding. We have also determined the affinities of several of these binding sites and have shown that this interaction causes a significant structural rearrangement in CBR1. Thus, it is proposed that Ca2+ binding at the weakest affinity site triggers changes in the C2 domain that facilitate its interaction with lipid membranes. PMID:26306037

  5. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

  6. Interaction of polyene antibiotics with sterols in phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes as studied by spin probes.

    PubMed

    Ohki, K; Nozawa, Y; Ohnishi, S I

    1979-06-13

    Interaction of filipin and amphotericin B with sterols in phosphatidylcholine membranes has been studied using various spin probes; epiandrosterone, cholestanone, phosphatidylcholine with 12-nitroxide or 5-nitroxide stearate attached to 2 position and also with tempocholine at the head group. Filipin caused increase in the fluidity of cholesterol-containing phosphatidylcholine membranes near the center, while it rather decreased the fluidity near the polar surface. On the other hand, amphotericin B did not apparently affect the fluidity. In the electron spin resonance spectrum of steriod spin probes in the antibiotic-containing membranes, both bound and free signals were observed and the association constant was calculated from the siganal intensity. In the binding of steriods with filipin, both 3 and 17 positions were involved, while the 17 positions was less involved in the binding with amphotericin B. Phase change in the host membrane markedly affected the interaction of filipin with epiandrosterone probe. The bound fraction jumped from 0.4 to 0.8 on going to the crystalline state and increased further with decrease in temperature. The overall splitting of the bound signal also increased on lowering the temperature below phase transition. This change was attributed to aggregate formation of filipin-steriod complexes in the crystalline state. On the other hand, effect of phase transition was much smaller on the interaction of amphotericin B with the steriod probe.

  7. Ionic channels and nerve membrane constituents. Tetrodotoxin-like interaction of saxitoxin with cholesterol monolayers.

    PubMed

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V

    1972-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) have the same striking property of blocking the Na(+) channels in the axolemma. Experiments with nerve plasma membrane components of the squid Dosidicus gigas have shown that TTX interacts with cholesterol monolayers. Similar experiments were carried out with STX. The effect of STX on the surface pressure-area diagrams of lipid monolayers and on the fluorescence emission spectra of sonicated nerve membranes was studied. The results indicate a TTX-like interaction of STX with cholesterol monolayers. The expansion of the monolayers caused by 10(-6)M STX was 2.2 A(2)/cholesterol molecule at 25 degrees C. From surface pressure measurements at constant cholesterol area (39 A(2)/molecule) in media with various STX concentrations, it was calculated that the STX/cholesterol surface concentration ratio is 0.54. The apparent dissociation constant of the STX-cholesterol monolayer complex is 4.0 x 10(-7)M. The STX/cholesterol ratio and the apparent dissociation constant are similar to those determined for TTX. The presence of other lipids in the monolayers affects the STX-cholesterol association. The interactions of STX and TTX with cholesterol monolayers suggest (a) that cholesterol molecules may be part of the nerve membrane Na(+) channels, or (b) that the toxin receptor at the nerve membrane shares similar chemical features with the cholesterol monolayers.

  8. Interaction of amphipathic α-helical peptides with a lipid membrane: Adsorption and pore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2014-05-01

    Amphipathic α-helical peptides often exhibit antimicrobial or antiviral properties. Adsorption of such peptides at a lipid membrane may result in pore formation. Current phenomenological models of the latter process imply that the peptide-peptide lateral interaction is repulsive and that the conditions for pore formation depend on the difference of the peptide energies at the membrane surface and in a pore. There is, however, experimental evidence that the kinetics of peptide adsorption at small vesicles (about 100 nm diameter) may be cooperative and accordingly the peptide-peptide lateral interaction may be attractive. In addition, the experiments indicate that the peptide-induced pore formation is often observed at the conditions close to those corresponding to pore formation under externally induced tensile stress where the difference of the peptide energies at the membrane surface and in a pore is irrelevant. Here, a model describing both types of peptide-peptide lateral interactions at a membrane is proposed. In addition, a new scenario of peptide-induced pore formation naturally explaining the similarity of this process under different conditions is suggested.

  9. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y. )

    1991-05-25

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100{degree}C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein.

  10. Direct interaction with filamins modulates the stability and plasma membrane expression of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Thelin, William R.; Chen, Yun; Gentzsch, Martina; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sallee, Jennifer L.; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Jacobson, Ken; Stutts, M. Jackson; Milgram, Sharon L.

    2007-01-01

    The role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as a cAMP-dependent chloride channel on the apical membrane of epithelia is well established. However, the processes by which CFTR is regulated on the cell surface are not clear. Here we report the identification of a protein-protein interaction between CFTR and the cytoskeletal filamin proteins. Using proteomic approaches, we identified filamins as proteins that associate with the extreme CFTR N terminus. Furthermore, we identified a disease-causing missense mutation in CFTR, serine 13 to phenylalanine (S13F), which disrupted this interaction. In cells, filamins tethered plasma membrane CFTR to the underlying actin network. This interaction stabilized CFTR at the cell surface and regulated the plasma membrane dynamics and confinement of the channel. In the absence of filamin binding, CFTR was internalized from the cell surface, where it prematurely accumulated in lysosomes and was ultimately degraded. Our data demonstrate what we believe to be a previously unrecognized role for the CFTR N terminus in the regulation of the plasma membrane stability and metabolic stability of CFTR. In addition, we elucidate the molecular defect associated with the S13F mutation. PMID:17235394

  11. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations.

  12. Inhibition of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-interacting Kinase (MNK) Preferentially Affects Translation of mRNAs Containing Both a 5'-Terminal Cap and Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Nadejda L; Song, Anren; Gram, Hermann; Edens, Mary Ann; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-02-12

    The MAPK-interacting kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1 and MNK2) are activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) or p38 in response to cellular stress and extracellular stimuli that include growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. Modulation of MNK activity affects translation of mRNAs involved in the cell cycle, cancer progression, and cell survival. However, the mechanism by which MNK selectively affects translation of these mRNAs is not understood. MNK binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and phosphorylates the cap-binding protein eIF4E. Using a cell-free translation system from rabbit reticulocytes programmed with mRNAs containing different 5'-ends, we show that an MNK inhibitor, CGP57380, affects translation of only those mRNAs that contain both a cap and a hairpin in the 5'-UTR. Similarly, a C-terminal fragment of human eIF4G-1, eIF4G(1357-1600), which prevents binding of MNK to intact eIF4G, reduces eIF4E phosphorylation and inhibits translation of only capped and hairpin-containing mRNAs. Analysis of proteins bound to m(7)GTP-Sepharose reveals that both CGP and eIF4G(1357-1600) decrease binding of eIF4E to eIF4G. These data suggest that MNK stimulates translation only of mRNAs containing both a cap and 5'-terminal RNA duplex via eIF4E phosphorylation, thereby enhancing the coupled cap-binding and RNA-unwinding activities of eIF4F.

  13. Physical landscapes in biological membranes: physico-chemical terrains for spatio-temporal control of biomolecular interactions and behaviour.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Paul

    2005-02-15

    The evolving complexities of biological membranes are discussed from the point of view of potential roles of the physical constitution of the membrane. These include features of the surface and dipole potentials and membrane 'rafts'. These properties are outlined; they emphasize that protein-lipid and specific lipid environments are influential parameters in how biomolecular interactions may take place with and within membranes. Several fluorescence detection technologies directed towards measurement of these properties are also outlined that permit high-resolution experimental determination of intermolecular interactions with membranes by measuring small changes of these potentials. These point to the possibility that the membrane dipole potential in particular is enormously influential in determining the behaviour of receptor and signalling systems within membrane rafts, and offers the means of a novel mechanism for biological control.

  14. Krit 1 interactions with microtubules and membranes are regulated by Rap1 and integrin cytoplasmic domain associated protein-1.

    PubMed

    Béraud-Dufour, Sophie; Gautier, Romain; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Chardin, Pierre; Faurobert, Eva

    2007-11-01

    The small G protein Rap1 regulates diverse cellular processes such as integrin activation, cell adhesion, cell-cell junction formation and cell polarity. It is crucial to identify Rap1 effectors to better understand the signalling pathways controlling these processes. Krev interaction trapped 1 (Krit1), a protein with FERM (band four-point-one/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain, was identified as a Rap1 partner in a yeast two-hybrid screen, but this interaction was not confirmed in subsequent studies. As the evidence suggests a role for Krit1 in Rap1-dependent pathways, we readdressed this question. In the present study, we demonstrate by biochemical assays that Krit1 interacts with Rap1A, preferentially its GTP-bound form. We show that, like other FERM proteins, Krit1 adopts two conformations: a closed conformation in which its N-terminal NPAY motif interacts with its C-terminus and an opened conformation bound to integrin cytoplasmic domain associated protein (ICAP)-1, a negative regulator of focal adhesion assembly. We show that a ternary complex can form in vitro between Krit1, Rap1 and ICAP-1 and that Rap1 binds the Krit1 FERM domain in both closed and opened conformations. Unlike ICAP-1, Rap1 does not open Krit1. Using sedimentation assays, we show that Krit1 binds in vitro to microtubules through its N- and C-termini and that Rap1 and ICAP-1 inhibit Krit1 binding to microtubules. Consistently, YFP-Krit1 localizes on cyan fluorescent protein-labelled microtubules in baby hamster kidney cells and is delocalized from microtubules upon coexpression with activated Rap1V12. Finally, we show that Krit1 binds to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-P(2)-containing liposomes and that Rap1 enhances this binding. Based on these results, we propose a model in which Krit1 would be delivered by microtubules to the plasma membrane where it would be captured by Rap1 and ICAP-1.

  15. Unsteady fluid-structure interactions with a heaving compliant membrane wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon Tzezana, Gali; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings have been shown to provide some benefits over rigid wings at the low Reynolds number regime (Re 103 to 105), specifically improved thrust in flapping flight. Here we present results from a theoretical framework used to characterize the unsteady aeroelastic behavior of compliant membrane wings executing a heaving motion. An analytical model is developed using 2D unsteady thin airfoil theory, coupled with an unsteady membrane equation. Chebyshev collocation methods are used to solve the coupled system efficiently. The model is used to explore the effects of wing compliance, inertia (including added mass effect) and flapping kinematics on the aerodynamic performance, identifying optimal conditions for maximum thrust and propulsive efficiency. A resonant frequency of the coupled system is identified and characterized for different fluid-structure interaction regimes. Extensions to pitching kinematics are also discussed.

  16. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

  17. Selective sorption of latex membranes with ethanol-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Y.; Huang, R.Y.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Latex membranes have recently found use in pervaporation separation. The sorption of water-ethanol mixtures to latex membranes was carried out on three types of latex membranes, poly(acrylonitrile-co-butyl acrylate) [P(AN-BuA)], poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate) [P(MMA-BuA)], and poly(styrene-co-butyl acrylate) [P(ST-BuA)], which were prepared in our laboratory by direct casting of polymer latexes synthesized by emulsion polymerization. These latex membranes all exhibit preferential sorption and permeation toward water. Both water and ethanol sorption to the latex membranes exhibited nonideal sorption, with water sorption being enhanced greatly by the presence of ethanol. It was shown that the solubility parameter theory did not give correct predictions for the preferential sorption of latex membranes. Better results were obtained by using the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. ATP-Dependent Interactions between Escherichia coli Min Proteins and the Phospholipid Membrane In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Laura L.; Raskin, David M.; de Boer, Piet A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Proper placement of the division apparatus in Escherichia coli requires pole-to-pole oscillation of the MinC division inhibitor. MinC dynamics involves a membrane association-dissociation cycle that is driven by the activities of the MinD ATPase and the MinE topological specificity factor, which themselves undergo coupled oscillatory localization cycles. To understand the biochemical mechanisms underlying Min protein dynamics, we studied the interactions of purified Min proteins with phospholipid vesicles and the role of ATP in these interactions. We show that (i) the ATP-bound form of MinD (MinD.ATP) readily associates with phospholipid vesicles in the presence of Mg2+, whereas the ADP-bound form (MinD.ADP) does not; (ii) MinD.ATP binds membrane in a self-enhancing fashion; (iii) both MinC and MinE can be recruited to MinD.ATP-decorated vesicles; (iv) MinE stimulates dissociation of MinD.ATP from the membrane in a process requiring hydrolysis of the nucleotide; and (v) MinE stimulates dissociation of MinC from MinD.ATP-membrane complexes, even when ATP hydrolysis is blocked. The results support and extend recent work by Z. Hu et al. (Z. Hu, E. P. Gogol, and J. Lutkenhaus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:6761-6766, 2002) and support models of protein oscillation wherein MinE induces Min protein dynamics by stimulating the conversion of the membrane-bound form of MinD (MinD.ATP) to the cytoplasmic form (MinD.ADP). The results also indicate that MinE-stimulated dissociation of MinC from the MinC-MinD.ATP-membrane complex can, and may, occur prior to hydrolysis of the nucleotide. PMID:12533449

  19. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers.

  20. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  1. Feedback Interactions of Polymerized Actin with the Cell Membrane: Waves, Pulses, and Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders

    Polymerized filaments of the protein actin have crucial functions in cell migration, and in bending the cell membrane to drive endocytosis or the formation of protrusions. The nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments are controlled by upstream agents in the cell membrane, including nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) that activate the Arp2/3 complex to form new branches on pre-existing filaments. But polymerized actin (F-actin) also feeds back on the assembly of NPFs. We explore the effects of the resulting feedback loop of F-actin and NPFs on two phenomena: actin pulses that drive endocytosis in yeast, and actin waves traveling along the membrane of several cell types. In our model of endocytosis in yeast, the actin network is grown explicitly in three dimensions, exerts a negative feedback interaction on localized patch of NPFs in the membrane, and bends the membrane by exerting a distribution of forces. This model explains observed actin and NPF pulse dynamics, and the effects of several interventions including i) NPF mutations, ii) inhibition of actin polymerization, and iii) deletion of a protein that allows F-actin to bend the cell membrane. The model predicts that mutation of the active region of an NPF will enhance the accumulation of that NPF, and we confirm this prediction by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. For actin waves, we treat a similar model, with NPFs distributed over a larger region of the cell membrane. This model naturally generates actin waves, and predicts a transition from wave behavior to spatially localized oscillations when NPFs are confined to a small region. We also predict a transition from waves to static polarization as the negative-feedback coupling between F-actin and the NPFs is reduced. Supported by NIGMS Grant R01 GM107667.

  2. Interactions of fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine membranes: X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics studies

    PubMed Central

    Cordomí, Arnau; Prades, Jesús; Frau, Juan; Vögler, Oliver; Funari, Sérgio S.; Perez, Juan J.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE) membranes containing fatty acids (FAs) was performed by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The study was aimed at understanding the interactions of several structurally related FAs with biomembranes, which is necessary for further rational lipid drug design in membrane-lipid therapy. The main effect of FAs was to promote the formation of a HII phase, despite a stabilization of the coexisting Lα + HII phases. Derivatives of OA exhibited a specific density profile in the direction perpendicular to the bilayer that reflects differences in the relative localization of the carboxylate group within the polar region of the membrane as well as in the degree of membrane penetration of the FA acyl chain. Hydroxyl and methyl substituents at carbon-2 in the FA acyl chain were identified as effective modulators of the position of carboxylate group in the lipid bilayer. Our data highlight the specific potential of each FA in modulating the membrane structure properties. PMID:19965616

  3. Kinetics of the enzyme-vesicle interaction including the formation of rafts and membrane strain.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    In cells, an appreciable part of enzymes is associated with lipid membranes. Academic experimental studies of the function of membrane enzymes (e.g., PLA(2) representing a prototype for interfacial enzymology) are often focused on the enzyme-vesicle interaction or, more specifically, on conversion of lipid forming the external leaflet of the vesicle membrane. The corresponding kinetics are complicated by many factors inherent to the interfacial physics and chemistry. The understanding of the relative role of such factors and how they should be quantitatively described is still limited. Here, we present the mean-field kinetic equations, taking the formation of rafts in the membrane and the product-induced membrane strain into account, and analyze various scenarios of lipid conversion. In particular, we scrutinize the conditions when the kinetics may exhibit a transition from a relatively long latency period to a steady-state regime with fast nearly constant reaction rate. Specifically, we discuss the likely role of the pore formation in the external lipid layer in this transition. The latter effect may be caused by the product-induced tensile strain in this layer.

  4. Interaction between model membranes and a new class of surfactants with antioxidant function.

    PubMed Central

    Przestalski, S; Hladyszowski, J; Kuczera, J; Rózycka-Roszak, B; Trela, Z; Chojnacki, H; Witek, S; Fisicaro, E

    1996-01-01

    The effect of two series of amphiphilic quaternary ammonium salts on some properties of phospholipid membranes was studied. The compounds of one series, N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-alkyl ammonium bromides, exert a destructive effect on membranes and are treated as reference compounds. The compounds of the other series, N-(3,5-di-t-butyl-4-hydroxy)benzyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-alkyl ammonium bromides, are derivatives of the former ones, exhibit antioxidant properties, and do only relatively slight damage to the membranes. The aim of the work was to explain the difference in molecular interaction with membranes between the two kinds of hydrophobic compounds. Thermodynamic methods, a new mixing technique, and monolayer and quantum calculation methods were used. It has been shown that the antioxidant molecules are less hydrophobic than those of the reference compounds and disturb the membrane organization to a lesser extent. On the basis of monolayer data, we suggest that the studied antioxidant behaves like a substitutional impurity, whereas the reference behaves like an interstitial one. Images FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 PMID:9172744

  5. Interaction of anionic phenylene ethynylene polymers with lipids: from membrane embedding to liposome fusion.

    PubMed

    Karam, Pierre; Hariri, Amani A; Calver, Christina F; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Schanze, Kirk S; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2014-09-09

    Here we report spectroscopic studies on the interaction of negatively charged, amphiphilic polyphenylene ethynylene (PPE) polymers with liposomes prepared either from negative, positive or zwitterionic lipids. Emission spectra of PPEs of 7 and 49 average repeat units bearing carboxylate terminated side chains showed that the polymer embeds within positively charged lipids where it exists as free chains. No interaction was observed between PPEs and negatively charged lipids. Here the polymer remained aggregated giving rise to broad emission spectra characteristic of the aggregate species. In zwitterionic lipids, we observed that the majority of the polymer remained aggregated yet a small fraction readily embedded within the membrane. Titration experiments revealed that saturation of zwitterionic lipids with polymer typically occurred at a polymer repeat unit to lipid mole ratio close to 0.05. No further membrane embedding was observed above that point. For liposomes prepared from positively charged lipids, saturation was observed at a PPE repeat unit to lipid mole ratio of ∼0.1 and liposome precipitation was observed above this point. FRET studies showed that precipitation was preceded by lipid mixing and liposome fusion induced by the PPEs. This behavior was prominent for the longer polymer and negligible for the shorter polymer at a repeat unit to lipid mole ratio of 0.05. We postulate that fusion is the consequence of membrane destabilization whereby the longer polymer gives rise to more extensive membrane deformation than the shorter polymer.

  6. Harvesting energy of interaction between bacteria and bacteriophage in a membrane-less fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ragini; Bekele, Wasihun; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2013-11-01

    When a fuel and oxidant flow in laminar contact through a micro-fluidic channel, a sharp interface appears between the two liquids, which eliminate the need of a proton exchange membrane. This principle has been used to generate potential in a membrane-less fuel cell. This study use such a cell to harvest energy of interaction between a bacteria having negative charge on its surface and a bacteriophage with positive and negative charges on its tail and head, respectively. When Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp6) and phage (P-Kp6) are pumped through a fuel cell fitted with two copper electrodes placed at its two sides, interaction between these two charged species at the interface results in a constant open circuit potential which varies with concentration of charged species but gets generated for both specific and non-specific bacteria and phage system. Oxygenation of bacteria or phage however diminishes the potential unlike in conventional microbial fuel cells.

  7. Interaction of elastocapillary flows in parallel microchannels across a thin membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. P.; Samy, R. A.; Sen, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    We report the interaction of counter elastocapillary flows in parallel microchannels across a thin membrane. At the crossing point, the interaction between the capillary flows via the thin membrane leads to significant retardation of capillary flow. The drop in velocity at the crossing point and velocity variation after the crossing point are predicted using the analytical model and measured from experiments. A non-dimensional parameter J, which is the ratio of the capillary force to the mechanical restoring force, governs the drop in velocity at the crossing point with the maximum drop of about 60% for J = 1. The meniscus velocity after the crossing point decreases (J < 0.5), remains constant (0.5 < J < 0.6), or increases (J > 0.6) depending on the value of J. The proposed technique can be applied for the manipulation of capillary flows in microchannels.

  8. Proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), a host membrane-deforming protein, is critical for membranous web formation in hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ti-Chun; Su, Wen-Chi; Huang, Jing-Ying; Chen, Yung-Chia; Jeng, King-Song; Wang, Horng-Dar; Lai, Michael M C

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reorganizes intracellular membranes to establish sites of replication. How viral and cellular proteins target, bind, and rearrange specific membranes into the replication factory remains a mystery. We used a lentivirus-based RNA interference (RNAi) screening approach to identify the potential cellular factors that are involved in HCV replication. A protein with membrane-deforming activity, proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), was identified as a potential factor. Knockdown of PSTPIP2 in HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring and HCV-infected cells was associated with the reduction of HCV protein and RNA expression. PSTPIP2 was localized predominantly in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), which contain the RNA replication complex. PSTPIP2 knockdown caused a significant reduction of the formation of HCV- and NS4B-induced membranous webs. A PSTPIP2 mutant defective in inducing membrane curvature failed to support HCV replication, confirming that the membrane-deforming ability of PSTPIP2 is essential for HCV replication. Taking these results together, we suggest that PSTPIP2 facilitates membrane alterations and is a key player in the formation of the membranous web, which is the site of the HCV replication complex.

  9. Characterization of In Vitro Interactions between a Truncated TonB Protein from Escherichia coli and the Outer Membrane Receptors FhuA and FepA

    PubMed Central

    Moeck, Gregory S.; Letellier, Lucienne

    2001-01-01

    High-affinity iron uptake in gram-negative bacteria depends upon TonB, a protein which couples the proton motive force in the cytoplasmic membrane to iron chelate receptors in the outer membrane. To advance studies on TonB structure and function, we expressed a recombinant form of Escherichia coli TonB lacking the N-terminal cytoplasmic membrane anchor. This protein (H6-′TonB; Mr, 24,880) was isolated in a soluble fraction of lysed cells and was purified by virtue of a hexahistidine tag located at its N terminus. Sedimentation experiments indicated that the H6-′TonB preparation was almost monodisperse and the protein was essentially monomeric. The value found for the Stokes radius (3.8 nm) is in good agreement with the value calculated by size exclusion chromatography. The frictional ratio (2.0) suggested that H6-′TonB adopts a highly asymmetrical form with an axial ratio of 15. H6-′TonB captured both the ferrichrome-iron receptor FhuA and the ferric enterobactin receptor FepA from detergent-solubilized outer membranes in vitro. Capture was enhanced by preincubation of the receptors with their cognate ligands. Cross-linking assays with the purified proteins in vitro demonstrated that there was preferential interaction between TonB and ligand-loaded FhuA. Purified H6-′TonB was found to be stable and thus shows promise for high-resolution structural studies. PMID:11292793

  10. Identification of lipopolysaccharide-interacting plasma membrane-type proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vilakazi, Cornelius S; Dubery, Ian A; Piater, Lizelle A

    2017-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an amphiphatic bacterial glycoconjugate found on the external membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This endotoxin is considered as a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecule and has been shown to elicit defense responses in plants. Here, LPS-interacting proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane (PM)-type fractions were captured and identified in order to investigate those involved in LPS perception and linked to triggering of innate immune responses. A novel proteomics-based affinity-capture strategy coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed for the enrichment and identification of LPS-interacting proteins. As such, LPS isolated from Burkholderia cepacia (LPSB.cep.) was immobilized on three independent and distinct affinity-based matrices to serve as bait for interacting proteins from A. thaliana leaf and callus tissue. These were resolved by 1D electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Proteins specifically bound to LPSB.cep. have been implicated in membrane structure (e.g. COBRA-like and tubulin proteins), membrane trafficking and/or transport (e.g. soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, patellin, aquaporin, PM instrinsic proteins (PIP) and H(+)-ATPase), signal transduction (receptor-like kinases and calcium-dependent protein kinases) as well as defense/stress responses (e.g. hypersensitive-induced response (HIR) proteins, jacalin-like lectin domain-containing protein and myrosinase-binding proteins). The novel affinity-capture strategy for the enrichment of LPS-interacting proteins proved to be effective, especially in the binding of proteins involved in plant defense responses, and can thus be used to elucidate LPS-mediated molecular recognition and disease mechanism(s).

  11. Sensing small molecule interactions with lipid membranes by local pH modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Wei; Yang, Tinglu; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-11-05

    Herein, we utilized a label-free sensing platform based on pH modulation to detect the interactions between tetracaine, a positively charged small molecule used as a local anesthetic, and planar supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLBs were patterned inside a flow cell, allowing for various concentrations of tetracaine to be introduced over the surface in a buffer solution. Studies with membranes containing POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) yielded an equilibrium dissociation constant value of Kd = 180 ± 47 μm for this small molecule-membrane interaction. Adding cholesterol to the SLBs decreased the affinity between tetracaine and the bilayers, while this interaction tightened when POPE (1-hexadecanoyl-2-(9-Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) was added. Studies were also conducted with three negatively charged membrane lipids, POPG (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (sodium salt)), POPS (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (sodium salt)), and ganglioside GM1. All three measurements gave rise to a similar tightening of the apparent Kd value compared with pure POPC membranes. The lack of chemical specificity with the identity of the negatively charged lipid indicated that the tightening was largely electrostatic. Through a direct comparison with ITC measurements, it was found that the pH modulation sensor platform offers a facile, inexpensive, highly sensitive, and rapid method for the detection of interactions between putative drug candidates and lipid bilayers. As such, this technique may potentially be exploited as a screen for drug development and analysis.

  12. Interaction of a peptide derived from C-terminus of human TRPA1 channel with model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Witschas, Katja; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Korkut, Dursun Nizam; Vladan, Maria Magdalena; Salgado, Gilmar; Lecomte, Sophie; Vlachova, Viktorie; Alves, Isabel D

    2015-05-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) belongs to the TRP cation channel superfamily that responds to a panoply of stimuli such as changes in temperature, calcium levels, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and lipid mediators among others. The TRP superfamily has been implicated in diverse pathological states including neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, inflammation, pain and cancer. The intracellular C-terminus is an important regulator of TRP channel activity. Studies with this and other TRP superfamily members have shown that the C-terminus association with lipid bilayer alters channel sensitivity and activation, especially interactions occurring through basic residues. Nevertheless, it is not yet clear how this process takes place and which regions in the C-terminus would be responsible for such membrane recognition. With that in mind, herein the first putative membrane interacting region of the C-terminus of human TRPA1, (corresponding to a 29 residue peptide, IAEVQKHASLKRIAMQVELHTSLEKKLPL) named H1 due to its potential helical character was chosen for studies of membrane interaction. The affinity of H1 to lipid membranes, H1 structural changes occurring upon this interaction as well as effects of this interaction in lipid organization and integrity were investigated using a biophysical approach. Lipid models systems composed of zwitterionic and anionic lipids, namely those present in the lipid membrane inner leaflet, where H1 is prone to interact, where used. The study reveals a strong interaction and affinity of H1 as well as peptide structuration especially with membranes containing anionic lipids. Moreover, the interactions and peptide structure adoption are headgroup specific.

  13. Identification of Novel ErbB3-Interacting Factors Using the Split-Ubiquitin Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid System

    PubMed Central

    Thaminy, Safia; Auerbach, Daniel; Arnoldo, Anthony; Stagljar, Igor

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of membrane protein interactions is difficult because of the hydrophobic nature of these proteins, which often renders conventional biochemical and genetic assays fruitless. This is a substantial problem because proteins that are integral or associated with membranes represent approximately one-third of all proteins in a typical eukaryotic cell. We have shown previously that the modified split-ubiquitin system can be used as a genetic assay for the in vivo detection of interactions between the two characterized yeast transmembrane proteins, Ost1p and Wbp1p. This so-called split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (YTH) system uses the split-ubiquitin approach in which reconstitution of two ubiquitin halves is mediated by a protein–protein interaction. Here we converted the split-ubiquitin membrane YTH system into a generally applicable in vivo screening approach to identify interacting partners of a particular mammalian transmembrane protein. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach by using the mammalian ErbB3 receptor as bait and have identified three previously unknown ErbB3-interacting proteins. In addition, we have confirmed one of the newly found interactions between ErbB3 and the membrane-associated RGS4 protein by coimmunoprecipitating the two proteins from human cells. We expect the split-ubiquitin membrane YTH technology to be valuable for the identification of potential interacting partners of integral membrane proteins from many model organisms. PMID:12840049

  14. Imidazolium-Based Lipid Analogues and Their Interaction with Phosphatidylcholine Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da; de Jong, Djurre H; Rühling, Andreas; Lesch, Volker; Shimizu, Karina; Wulff, Stephanie; Heuer, Andreas; Glorius, Frank; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2016-12-06

    4,5-Dialkylated imidazolium lipid salts are a new class of lipid analogues showing distinct biological activities. The potential effects of the imidazolium lipids on artificial lipid membranes and the corresponding membrane interactions was analyzed. Therefore, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) was employed to create an established lipid monolayer model and a bilayer membrane. Mixed monolayers of DPPC and 4,5-dialkylimidazolium lipids differing by their alkyl chain length (C7, C11, and C15) were characterized by surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms using a Wilhelmy film balance in combination with epifluorescence microscopy. Monolayer hysteresis for binary mixtures was examined by recording triplicate consecutive compression-expansion cycles. The lipid miscibility and membrane stability of DPPC/imidazolium lipids were subsequently evaluated by the excess mean molecular area (ΔA(ex)) and the excess Gibbs free energy (ΔG(ex)) of mixing. Furthermore, the thermotropic behavior of mixed liposomes of DPPC/imidazolium lipids was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The C15-imidazolium lipid (C15-IMe·HI) forms a thermodynamically favored and kinetically reversible Langmuir monolayer with DPPC and exhibits a rigidification effect on both DPPC monolayer and bilayer structures at low molar fractions (X ≤ 0.3). However, the incorporation of the C11-imidazolium lipid (C11-IMe·HI) causes the formation of an unstable and irreversible Langmuir-Gibbs monolayer with DPPC and disordered DPPC liposomes. The C7-imidazolium lipid (C7-IMe·HI) displays negligible membrane activity. To better understand these results on a molecular level, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed. The simulations yield two opposing molecular mechanisms governing the different behavior of the three imidazolium lipids: a lateral ordering effect and a free volume/stretching effect. Overall, our study provides the first evidence that the membrane

  15. Radioiodinated, photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine: transfer properties and differential photoreactive interaction with human erythrocyte membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schroit, A.J.; Madsen, J.; Ruoho, A.E.

    1987-04-07

    An isotopically labeled cross-linking reagent, succinimido 3-(3-(/sup 125/I)iodo-4-azidophenyl)propionate, has been synthesized and coupled to 1-acyl-2-(aminocaproyl)phosphatidylcholine according to previously described procedures. /sup 125/I- and N/sub 3/-labeled phosphatidylserine (/sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PS) was produced from the phosphatidylcholine (PC) analog by phospholipase D catalyzed base exchange in the presence of L-serine. These phospholipid analogues are photoactivatable, are labeled with /sup 125/I at high specific activity, completely incorporate into synthetic vesicles, and spontaneously transfer between membranes. When an excess of acceptor vesicles or red blood cells (RBC) was mixed with a population of donor vesicles containing the /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-phospholipids, approximately 40% of the analogues transferred to the acceptor population. After transfer in the dark to RBC, all of the /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PC incorporated into the cells could be removed by washing with serum, whereas the /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PS could not. After photolabeling of intact RBC, approx.50% of the PC and 20% of the PS cross-linked to membrane proteins as determined by their insolubility in CHCl/sub 3//MeOH. Analysis of probe distribution by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that /sup 125/I-N/sub 3/-PS preferentially labeled a M/sub r/ 30,000 peptide which contained approx.30% of the protein-bound label.

  16. Energy of the interaction between membrane lipid domains calculated from splay and tilt deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimzyanov, T. R.; Molotkovsky, R. J.; Kheyfets, B. B.; Akimov, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Specific domains, called rafts, are formed in cell membranes. Similar lipid domains can be formed in model membranes as a result of phase separation with raft size may remaining small (˜10-100 nm) for a long time. The characteristic lifetime of a nanoraft ensemble strongly depends on the nature of mutual raft interactions. The interaction energy between the boundaries of two rafts has been calculated under the assumption that the thickness of the raft bilayer is greater than that of the surrounding membrane, and elastic deformations appear in order to smooth the thickness mismatch at the boundary. When rafts approach each other, deformations from their boundaries overlap, making interaction energy profile sophisticated. It has been shown that raft merger occurs in two stages: rafts first merge in one monolayer of the lipid bilayer and then in another monolayer. Each merger stage requires overcoming of an energy barrier of about 0.08-0.12 k BT per 1 nm of boundary length. These results allow us to explain the stability of the ensemble of finite sized rafts.

  17. Brownian dynamics simulations of lipid bilayer membrane with hydrodynamic interactions in LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Szu-Pei; Young, Yuan-Nan; Peng, Zhangli; Yuan, Hongyan

    2016-11-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes have been extensively studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Numerical efficiencies have been reported in the cases of aggressive coarse-graining, where several lipids are coarse-grained into a particle of size 4 6 nm so that there is only one particle in the thickness direction. Yuan et al. proposed a pair-potential between these one-particle-thick coarse-grained lipid particles to capture the mechanical properties of a lipid bilayer membrane (such as gel-fluid-gas phase transitions of lipids, diffusion, and bending rigidity). In this work we implement such interaction potential in LAMMPS to simulate large-scale lipid systems such as vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs). We also consider the effect of cytoskeleton on the lipid membrane dynamics as a model for red blood cell (RBC) dynamics, and incorporate coarse-grained water molecules to account for hydrodynamic interactions. The interaction between the coarse-grained water molecules (explicit solvent molecules) is modeled as a Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential. We focus on two sets of LAMMPS simulations: 1. Vesicle shape transitions with varying enclosed volume; 2. RBC shape transitions with different enclosed volume. This work is funded by NSF under Grant DMS-1222550.

  18. Rapid Mobilization of Membrane Lipids in Wheat Leaf-Sheaths during Incompatible Interactions with Hessian Fly*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lieceng; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Haiyan; Khajuria, Chitvan; Reese, John C.; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Welti, Ruth; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2013-01-01

    Hessian fly (HF) is a biotrophic insect that interacts with wheat on a gene-for-gene basis. We profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing the resistance gene H13. Our results revealed a 32 to 45% reduction in total concentrations of 129 lipid species in resistant plants during incompatible interactions within 24 h after HF attack. A smaller and delayed response was observed in susceptible plants during compatible interactions. Microarray and real-time PCR analyses of 168 lipid-metabolism related transcripts revealed that the abundance of many of these transcripts increased rapidly in resistant plants after HF attack, but did not change in susceptible plants. In association with the rapid mobilization of membrane lipids, the concentrations of some fatty acids and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) increased specifically in resistant plants. Exogenous application of OPDA increased mortality of HF larvae significantly. Collectively, our data, along with previously published results, indicate that the lipids were mobilized through lipolysis, producing free fatty acids, which were likely further converted into oxylipins and other defense molecules. Our results suggest that rapid mobilization of membrane lipids constitutes an important step for wheat to defend against HF attack. PMID:22668001

  19. Cooperative interactions of LPPR family members in membrane localization and alteration of cellular morphology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Panpan; Agbaegbu, Chinyere; Malide, Daniela A.; Wu, Xufeng; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Hammer, John A.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lipid phosphate phosphatase-related proteins (LPPRs), also known as plasticity-related genes (PRGs), are classified as a new brain-enriched subclass of the lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP) superfamily. They induce membrane protrusions, neurite outgrowth or dendritic spine formation in cell lines and primary neurons. However, the exact roles of LPPRs and the mechanisms underlying their effects are not certain. Here, we present the results of a large-scale proteome analysis to determine LPPR1-interacting proteins using co-immunoprecipitation coupled to mass spectrometry. We identified putative LPPR1-binding proteins involved in various biological processes. Most interestingly, we identified the interaction of LPPR1 with its family member LPPR3, LPPR4 and LPPR5. Their interactions were characterized by co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization analysis using confocal and super-resolution microscopy. Moreover, co-expressing two LPPR members mutually elevated their protein levels, facilitated their plasma membrane localization and resulted in an increased induction of membrane protrusions as well as the phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein. Taken together, we revealed a new functional cooperation between LPPR family members and discovered for the first time that LPPRs likely exert their function through forming complex with its family members. PMID:26183180

  20. Interactions of a bacterial trehalose lipid with phosphatidylglycerol membranes at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio; Aranda, Francisco J

    2014-07-01

    Trehalose lipids are bacterial biosurfactants which present interesting physicochemical and biological properties. These glycolipids have a number of different commercial applications and there is an increasing interest in their use as therapeutic agents. The amphiphilic nature of trehalose lipids points to the membrane as their hypothetical site of action and therefore the study of the interaction between these biosurfactants and biological membranes is critical. In this study, we examine the interactions between a trehalose lipid (TL) from Rhodococcus sp. and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) membranes at low ionic strength, by means of differential scanning calorimetry, light scattering, fluorescence polarization and infrared spectroscopy. We describe that there are extensive interactions between TL and DMPG involving the perturbation of the thermotropic intermediate phase of the phospholipid, the destabilization and shifting of the DMPG gel to liquid crystalline phase transition to lower temperatures, the perturbation of the sample transparency, and the modification of the order of the phospholipid palisade in the gel phase. We also report an increase of fluidity of the phosphatidylglycerol acyl chains and dehydration of the interfacial region of the bilayer. These changes would increase the monolayer negative spontaneous curvature of the phospholipid explaining the destabilizing effect on the intermediate state exerted by this biosurfactant. The observations contribute to get insight into the biological mechanism of action of the biosurfactant and help to understand the properties of the intermediate phase display by DMPG at low ionic strength.

  1. Protein corona mitigates the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide by reducing its physical interaction with cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guangxin; Kang, Seung-gu; Tian, Xin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhao, Lin; Ge, Cuicui; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-10-07

    Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called "protein corona" formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical to understand how absorbed proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles alter their biological effects. In this work, we have demonstrated with both experimental and theoretical approaches that protein BSA coating can mitigate the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by reducing its cell membrane penetration. Our cell viability and cellular uptake experiments showed that protein corona decreased cellular uptake of GO, thus significantly mitigating the potential cytotoxicity of GO. The electron microscopy images also confirmed that protein corona reduced the cellular morphological damage by limiting GO penetration into the cell membrane. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations validated the experimental results and revealed that the adsorbed BSA in effect weakened the interaction between the phospholipids and graphene surface due to a reduction of the available surface area plus an unfavorable steric effect, thus significantly reducing the graphene penetration and lipid bilayer damaging. These findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of this important graphene protein corona interaction with cell membranes, and should have implications in future development of graphene-based biomedical applications.

  2. Effects of cooperative ion-channel interactions on the dynamics of excitable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarubin, Dmitry; Zhuchkova, Ekaterina; Schreiber, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    Cooperative interactions between ion channels are known to exist, but have so far received relatively little attention in the study of excitable membranes. Based on bifurcation analysis and stochastic simulations of an extended Morris-Lecar model, we show that cooperativity and anticooperativity can modify the range of sustained firing and cell-intrinsic noise, induce multistability, and account for a number of experimental observations, including prolongation of action-potential duration. We hypothesize that channel interactions could be an efficient mechanism to regulate the activity of neurons or cardiac muscle cells.

  3. Homo- and heteromeric interaction strengths of the synergistic antimicrobial peptides PGLa and magainin 2 in membranes.

    PubMed

    Zerweck, Jonathan; Strandberg, Erik; Bürck, Jochen; Reichert, Johannes; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Kukharenko, Olga; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-09-01

    PGLa and magainin 2 (MAG2) are amphiphilic α-helical frog peptides with synergistic antimicrobial activity. In vesicle leakage assays we observed the strongest synergy for equimolar mixtures of PGLa and MAG2. This result was consistent with solid-state (15)N-NMR data on the helix alignment in model membranes. The Hill coefficients determined from the vesicle leakage data showed that the heterodimeric (PGLa-MAG2) interactions were stronger than the homodimeric (PGLa-PGLa and MAG2-MAG2) interactions. This result was also reflected in the free energy of dimerization determined from oriented circular dichroism and quantitative solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis.

  4. Valosin-containing Protein-interacting Membrane Protein (VIMP) Links the Endoplasmic Reticulum with Microtubules in Concert with Cytoskeleton-linking Membrane Protein (CLIMP)-63*

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Chikano; Kimura, Hana; Arasaki, Kohei; Matsushita, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Wakana, Yuichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in mammalian cells depend on both dynamic and static interactions of ER membrane proteins with microtubules (MTs). Cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein (CLIMP)-63 is exclusively localized in sheet-like ER membranes, typical structures of the rough ER, and plays a pivotal role in the static interaction with MTs. Our previous study showed that the 42-kDa ER-residing form of syntaxin 5 (Syn5L) regulates ER structure through the interactions with both CLIMP-63 and MTs. Here, we extend our previous study and show that the valosin-containing protein/p97-interacting membrane protein (VIMP)/SelS is also a member of the family of proteins that shape the ER by interacting with MTs. Depletion of VIMP causes the spreading of the ER to the cell periphery and affects an MT-dependent process on the ER. Although VIMP can interact with CLIMP-63 and Syn5L, it does not interact with MT-binding ER proteins (such as Reep1) that shape the tubular smooth ER, suggesting that different sets of MT-binding ER proteins are used to organize different ER subdomains. PMID:25008318

  5. Interaction of the Alzheimer Aβ(25-35) peptide segment with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Cuco, Andreia; Serro, Ana Paula; Farinha, José Paulo; Saramago, Benilde; da Silva, Amélia Gonçalves

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain. The main components of these plaques are the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) peptides but the Aβ(25-35) sequence is the most frequently studied fragment because it represents a biologically active region of the longer Aβ peptides. In the present work, the interactions of Aβ(25-35) peptide with model membranes were investigated, taking into consideration the aggregation state of the peptide. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: the equimolar ternary mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol) and the equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with the monolayers, investigated at low concentrations (0.25-4μM), suggested a three step mechanism: adsorption-monomers or dimers adsorb at the polar region of the lipid monolayer; nucleation-adsorbed peptides act as nucleation sites for higher aggregates; and penetration-these aggregates insert in the hydrophobic region of the monolayer. Chol slightly enhances the peptide-lipid monolayer interaction. The large aggregates nucleated in the bulk solution evidenced a weak interaction with monolayers. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with liposomes, followed by a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) in a large range of peptide concentrations (10-80μM), was very small, independently of the peptide concentration.

  6. Cell-permeable ceramides preferentially inhibit coated vesicle formation and exocytosis in Chinese hamster ovary compared with Madin-Darby canine kidney cells by preventing the membrane association of ADP-ribosylation factor.

    PubMed Central

    Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Hobman, Tom C; Dewald, Jay; Garbutt, Michael; Brindley, David N

    2002-01-01

    Differential effects of acetyl(C2-) ceramide (N-acetylsphingosine) were studied on coated vesicle formation from Golgi-enriched membranes of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. C2-ceramide blocked the translocation of ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF-1) and protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) to the membranes from CHO cells, but not those of MDCK cells. Consequently, C2-ceramide blocked the stimulation of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) by the cytosol and guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) in membranes from CHO cells. Basal specific activity of PLD1 and the concentration of ARF-1 were 3-4 times higher in Golgi-enriched membranes from MDCK cells compared with CHO cells. Moreover, PLD1 activity in MDCK cells was stimulated less by cytosol and GTP[S]. PLD2 was not detectable in the Golgi-enriched membranes. Incubation of intact CHO cells or their Golgi-enriched membranes with C2-ceramide also inhibited COP1 vesicle formation by membranes from CHO, but not MDCK, cells. Specificity was demonstrated, since dihydro-C2-ceramide had no significant effect on ARF-1 translocation, PLD1 activation or vesicle formation in membranes from both cell types. C2-ceramide also decreased the secretion of virus-like particles to a greater extent in CHO compared with MDCK cells, whereas dihydro-C2-ceramide had no significant effect. The results demonstrate a biological effect of C2-ceramide in CHO cells by decreasing ARF-1 and PKC-alpha binding to Golgi-enriched membranes, thereby preventing COP1 vesicle formation. PMID:11802796

  7. Snake Cytotoxins Bind to Membranes via Interactions with Phosphatidylserine Head Groups of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Konshina, Anastasia G.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Utkin, Yuri N.; Omel'kov, Anton V.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2011-01-01

    The major representatives of Elapidae snake venom, cytotoxins (CTs), share similar three-fingered fold and exert diverse range of biological activities against various cell types. CT-induced cell death starts from the membrane recognition process, whose molecular details remain unclear. It is known, however, that the presence of anionic lipids in cell membranes is one of the important factors determining CT-membrane binding. In this work, we therefore investigated specific interactions between one of the most abundant of such lipids, phosphatidylserine (PS), and CT 4 of Naja kaouthia using a combined, experimental and modeling, approach. It was shown that incorporation of PS into zwitterionic liposomes greatly increased the membrane-damaging activity of CT 4 measured by the release of the liposome-entrapped calcein fluorescent dye. The CT-induced leakage rate depends on the PS concentration with a maximum at approximately 20% PS. Interestingly, the effects observed for PS were much more pronounced than those measured for another anionic lipid, sulfatide. To delineate the potential PS binding sites on CT 4 and estimate their relative affinities, a series of computer simulations was performed for the systems containing the head group of PS and different spatial models of CT 4 in aqueous solution and in an implicit membrane. This was done using an original hybrid computational protocol implementing docking, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. As a result, at least three putative PS-binding sites with different affinities to PS molecule were delineated. Being located in different parts of the CT molecule, these anion-binding sites can potentially facilitate and modulate the multi-step process of the toxin insertion into lipid bilayers. This feature together with the diverse binding affinities of the sites to a wide variety of anionic targets on the membrane surface appears to be functionally meaningful and may adjust CT action against different types of

  8. Computational analysis of the tether-pulling experiment to probe plasma membrane-cytoskeleton interaction in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Kristopher R.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Anvari, Bahman; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2009-10-01

    Tethers are thin membrane tubes that can be formed when relatively small and localized forces are applied to cellular membranes and lipid bilayers. Tether pulling experiments have been used to better understand the fine membrane properties. These include the interaction between the plasma membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, which is an important factor affecting membrane mechanics. We use a computational method aimed at the interpretation and design of tether pulling experiments in cells with a strong membrane-cytoskeleton attachment. In our model, we take into account the detailed information in the topology of bonds connecting the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. We compute the force-dependent piecewise membrane deflection and bending as well as modes of stored energy in three major regions of the system: body of the tether, membrane-cytoskeleton attachment zone, and the transition zone between the two. We apply our method to three cells: cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. OHCs have a special system of pillars connecting the membrane and the cytoskeleton, and HEK and CHO cells have the membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion arrangement via bonds (e.g., PIP2), which is common to many other cells. We also present a validation of our model by using experimental data on CHO and HEK cells. The proposed method can be an effective tool in the analyses of experiments to probe the properties of cellular membranes.

  9. Understanding the fouling of algogenic organic matter in microfiltration using membrane-foulant interaction energy analysis: effects of organic hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weiwei; Chu, Huaqiang; Dong, Bingzhi

    2014-10-01

    Fouling caused by algogenic organic matter (AOM) in membrane filtration is a critical problem in algae-rich waters, and understanding fouling mechanisms, particularly by identifying the predominant membrane foulants, could have significant effects on algal fouling prediction and pretreatment. In this work, the fouling behavior of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (APF)- and Anabaena flos-aquae (ANF)-AOM fractions was analyzed using the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory. The results show that the interfacial energy of membranes and foulants could be used for AOM membrane fouling analysis. The attractive energy was highest between the membrane and the neutral hydrophilic fractions (N-HPI) on clean membrane surfaces, followed by the energy associated with the hydrophobic fractions (HPO) and the transphilic fractions (TPI) in both of the AOMs; on the other hand, the negatively charged hydrophilic organics (C-HPI) in the APF-AOM suffered from repulsive interactions when nearing the membrane surface, which was consistent with their initial filtration flux. After the formation of an initial fouling layer on the membrane surface, membrane fouling was controlled mainly by the cohesion free energy between the approaching foulants and the foulants on the fouled membranes. In addition, it was observed that the interfacial energy between foulants was the dominant factor controlling membrane fouling in AOM filtration. Finally, the interfacial energies between the N-HPI fractions had the greatest effect on both APF-AOM and ANF-AOM membrane fouling.

  10. Engineering the van der Waals interaction in cross-linking-free hydroxide exchange membranes for low swelling and high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuang; Skovgard, Jason; Yan, Yushan S

    2012-05-01

    What a swell for hydroxides: The typical trade-off between swelling control and ion conductivity in ion-conducting polymer membranes is overcome by enhancement of van der Waals interactions among polymer chains. Using a quaternary phosphonium-functionalized polymer, the simple combination of high electron density of the polymer and large dipole moment of the functional group leads to low membrane swelling, high hydroxide conductivity, and excellent hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell performance.

  11. Biophysical characterization of genistein-membrane interaction and its correlation with biological effect on cells - The case of EYPC liposomes and human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Pawlęga, Bożena; Misiak, Lucjan E; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna; Zarzyka, Barbara; Paduch, Roman; Gawron, Antoni; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2014-08-01

    With application of EPR and (1)H NMR techniques genistein interaction with liposomes formed with egg yolk lecithin and with erythrocyte membranes was assessed. The present study addressed the problem of genistein localization and its effects on lipid membrane fluidity and protein conformation. The range of microscopic techniques was employed to study genistein effects on HeLa cells and human erythrocytes. Moreover, DPPH bioassay, superoxide anion radical test and enzymatic measurements were performed in HeLa cells subjected to genistein. The gathered results from both EPR and NMR techniques indicated strong ordering effect of genistein on the motional freedom of lipids in the head group region and the adjacent hydrophobic zone in liposomal as well as in red blood cell membranes. EPR study of human ghost showed also the changes in the erythrocyte membrane protein conformation. The membrane effects of genistein were correlated with the changes in internal membranes arrangement of HeLa cells as it was noticed using transmission electron microscopic and fluorescent techniques. Scanning electron and light microscopy methods showed that one of the aftermaths of genistein incorporation into membranes was creation of echinocytic form of the red blood cells with reduced diameter. Genistein improved redox status of HeLa cells treated with H2O2 by lowering radicals' level. In conclusion, the capacity of genistein to incorporate, to affect membrane organization and to change its biophysical properties is correlated with the changes inside the cells.

  12. Analyses of Coronavirus Assembly Interactions with Interspecies Membrane and Nucleocapsid Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Lili; Hurst-Hess, Kelley R.; Koetzner, Cheri A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The coronavirus membrane (M) protein is the central actor in virion morphogenesis. M organizes the components of the viral membrane, and interactions of M with itself and with the nucleocapsid (N) protein drive virus assembly and budding. In order to further define M-M and M-N interactions, we constructed mutants of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) in which all or part of the M protein was replaced by its phylogenetically divergent counterpart from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We were able to obtain viable chimeras containing the entire SARS-CoV M protein as well as mutants with intramolecular substitutions that partitioned M protein at the boundaries between the ectodomain, transmembrane domains, or endodomain. Our results show that the carboxy-terminal domain of N protein, N3, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with M protein. However, despite some previous genetic and biochemical evidence that mapped interactions with N to the carboxy terminus of M, it was not possible to define a short linear region of M protein sufficient for assembly with N. Thus, interactions with N protein likely involve multiple linearly discontiguous regions of the M endodomain. The SARS-CoV M chimera exhibited a conditional growth defect that was partially suppressed by mutations in the envelope (E) protein. Moreover, virions of the M chimera were markedly deficient in spike (S) protein incorporation. These findings suggest that the interactions of M protein with both E and S protein are more complex than previously thought. IMPORTANCE The assembly of coronavirus virions entails concerted interactions among the viral structural proteins and the RNA genome. One strategy to study this process is through construction of interspecies chimeras that preserve or disrupt particular inter- or intramolecular associations. In this work, we replaced the membrane (M) protein of the model coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus with its

  13. Theoretical analysis of hydrophobic matching and membrane-mediated interactions in lipid bilayers containing gramicidin.

    PubMed Central

    Harroun, T A; Heller, W T; Weiss, T M; Yang, L; Huang, H W

    1999-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the effects of hydrophobic matching and membrane-mediated protein-protein interactions exhibited by gramicidin embedded in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) bilayers (Harroun et al., 1999. Biophys. J. 76:937-945). Incorporating gramicidin, at 1:10 peptide/lipid molar ratio, decreases the phosphate-to-phosphate (PtP) peak separation in the DMPC bilayer from 35.3 A without gramicidin to 32.7 A. In contrast, the same molar ratio of gramicidin in DLPC increases the PtP from 30.8 A to 32.1 A. Concurrently, x-ray in-plane scattering showed that the most probable nearest-neighbor separation between gramicidin channels was 26.8 A in DLPC, but reduced to 23.3 A in DMPC. In this paper we review the idea of hydrophobic matching in which the lipid bilayer deforms to match the hydrophobic surface of the embedded proteins. We use a simple elasticity theory, including thickness compression, tension, and splay terms to describe the membrane deformation. The energy of membrane deformation is compared with the energy cost of hydrophobic mismatch. We discuss the boundary conditions between a gramicidin channel and the lipid bilayer. We used a numerical method to solve the problem of membrane deformation profile in the presence of a high density of gramicidin channels and ran computer simulations of 81 gramicidin channels to find the equilibrium distributions of the channels in the plane of the bilayer. The simulations contain four parameters: bilayer thickness compressibility 1/B, bilayer bending rigidity Kc, the channel-bilayer mismatch Do, and the slope of the interface at the lipid-protein boundary s. B, Kc, and Do were experimentally measured; the only free parameter is s. The value of s is determined by the requirement that the theory produces the experimental values of bilayer thinning by gramicidin and the shift in the peak position of the in-plane scattering due to membrane-mediated channel

  14. Effects of impaired membrane interactions on α-synuclein aggregation and neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ysselstein, Daniel; Joshi, Mehul; Mishra, Vartika; Griggs, Amy M.; Asiago, Josephat M.; McCabe, George P.; Stanciu, Lia A.; Post, Carol Beth; Rochet, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The post-mortem brains of individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other synucleinopathy disorders are characterized by the presence of aggregated forms of the presynaptic protein α-synuclein (aSyn). Understanding the molecular mechanism of aSyn aggregation is essential for the development of neuroprotective strategies to treat these diseases. In this study, we examined how interactions between aSyn and phospholipid vesicles influence the protein’s aggregation and toxicity to dopaminergic neurons. Two-dimensional NMR data revealed that two familial aSyn mutants, A30P and G51D, populated an exposed, membrane-bound conformer in which the central hydrophobic region was dissociated from the bilayer to a greater extent than in the case of wild-type aSyn. A30P and G51D had a greater propensity to undergo membrane-induced aggregation and elicited greater toxicity to primary dopaminergic neurons compared to the wild-type protein. In contrast, the non-familial aSyn mutant A29E exhibited a weak propensity to aggregate in the presence of phospholipid vesicles or to elicit neurotoxicity, despite adopting a relatively exposed membrane-bound conformation. Our findings suggest that the aggregation of exposed, membrane-bound aSyn conformers plays a key role in the protein’s neurotoxicity in PD and other synucleinopathy disorders. PMID:25931201

  15. Membrane interactions and biological activity of antimicrobial peptides from Australian scorpion.

    PubMed

    Luna-Ramírez, Karen; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Jiménez-Vargas, Juana María; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Winkel, Kenneth D; Wright, Christine E; Possani, Lourival D; Separovic, Frances

    2014-09-01

    UyCT peptides are antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of the Australian scorpion. The activity of the UyCT peptides against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and red blood cells was determined. The membrane interactions of these peptides were evaluated by dye release (DR) of the fluorophore calcein from liposomes and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC); and their secondary structure was determined by circular dichroism (CD). Three different lipid systems were used to mimic red blood cells, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus membranes. UyCT peptides exhibited broad spectrum antimicrobial activity with low MIC for S. aureus and multi-drug resistant Gram negative strains. Peptide combinations showed some synergy enhancing their potency but not hemolytic activity. The UyCT peptides adopted a helical structure in lipid environments and DR results confirmed that the mechanism of action is by disrupting the membrane. ITC data indicated that UyCT peptides preferred prokaryotic rather than eukaryotic membranes. The overall results suggest that UyCT peptides could be pharmaceutical leads for the treatment of Gram negative multiresistant bacterial infections, especially against Acinetobacter baumanni, and candidates for peptidomimetics to enhance their potency and minimize hemolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova.

  16. Atomic detail peptide-membrane interactions: molecular dynamics simulation of gramicidin S in a DMPC bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, D; Smith, J C

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed of the sequence-symmetric cyclic decapeptide antibiotic gramicidin S (GS), in interaction with a hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, and the results compared with a "control" simulation of the system in the absence of GS. Following experimental evidence, the GS was initially set in a single antiparallel beta-sheet conformation with two Type II' beta-turns in an amphiphilic interaction with the membrane. This conformation and position remained in the 6.5 ns simulation. Main-chain dihedrals are on average approximately 26 degrees from those determined by NMR experiment on GS in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution. Sequence-symmetric main-chain and side-chain dihedral angle pairs converge to within approximately 5 degrees and approximately 10 degrees, respectively. The area per lipid, lipid tail order parameters, and quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation times of the control simulation are mostly in good agreement with corresponding experiments. The GS has little effect on the membrane dipole potential or water permeability. However, it is found to have a disordering effect (in agreement with experiment) and a fluidifying effect on lipids directly interacting with it, and an ordering effect on those not directly interacting. PMID:11023880

  17. Ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning/Kidins220 protein interacts with mammalian Septin 5.

    PubMed

    Park, Han Jeong; Park, Hwan-Woo; Lee, Shin-Jae; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Park, Young-Seok; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Paik, Ki-Suk; Chao, Moses V; Chang, Mi-Sook

    2010-08-01

    Neurotrophin receptors utilize specific adaptor proteins to activate signaling pathways involved in various neuronal functions, such as neurite outgrowth and cytoskeletal remodeling. The Ankyrin-Repeat Rich Membrane Spanning (ARMS)/kinase D-interacting substrate-220 kDa (Kidins220) serves as a unique downstream adaptor protein of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases. To gain insight into the role of ARMS/Kidins220, a yeast two-hybrid screen of a rat dorsal root ganglion library was performed using the C-terminal region of ARMS/Kidins220 as bait. The screen identified a mammalian septin, Septin 5 (Sept5), as an interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation using lysates from transiently transfected HEK-293 cells revealed the specific interaction between ARMS/Kidins220 and Sept5. Endogenous ARMS/Kidins220 and Sept5 proteins were colocalized in primary hippocampal neurons and were also predominantly expressed at the plasma membrane and in the tips of growing neurites in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells. Mapping of Sept5 domains important for ARMS/Kidins220 binding revealed a highly conserved N-terminal region of Sept5. The direct interaction between ARMS/Kidins220 and Sept5 suggests a possible role of ARMS/Kidins220 as a functional link between neurotrophin receptors and septins to mediate neurotrophin-induced intracellular signaling events, such as neurite outgrowth and cytoskeletal remodeling.

  18. Interaction between Antibacterial Peptide Apep10 and Escherichia coli Membrane Lipids Evaluated Using Liposome as Pseudo-Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man

    2017-01-01

    Liposomes constructed from Escherichia coli membrane lipids were used as a pseudo-stationary phase in capillary electrophoresis and immobilised liposome chromatography to evaluate the interaction between antibacterial peptide (ABP) Apep10 and bacterial membrane lipids. The peptide mobility decreased as the concentration of liposomes increased, providing evidence for the existence of this interaction. The binding constant between Apep10 and the Escherichia coli membranes lipid liposome was higher than that of Apep10 with a mixed phospholipids liposome at the same temperature. The capillary electrophoresis results indicate that the binding ability of Apep10 with a liposome was dependent on the liposome’s lipid compositions. Thermodynamic analysis by immobilised liposome chromatography indicated that hydrophobic and electrostatic effects contributed to the partitioning of Apep10 in the membrane lipids. The liposomes constructed from bacterial membrane lipid were more suitable as the model membranes used to study dynamic ABP/membrane interactions than those constructed from specific ratios of particular phospholipids, with its more biomimetic phospholipid composition and contents. This study provides an appropriate model for the evaluation of ABP-membrane interactions. PMID:28052090

  19. Interaction of syncollin with GP-2, the major membrane protein of pancreatic zymogen granules, and association with lipid microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Ina; Hodel, Alois; Koch, Annett; Kleene, Ralf; Edwardson, J Michael; Schrader, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Syncollin, a novel pancreatic zymogen granule protein, is present on the luminal side of the granule membrane. To address the function of syncollin, we searched for putative binding partners. Cross-linking experiments with purified syncollin, and granule content and membrane proteins revealed a direct interaction between syncollin and GP-2, a major glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane glycoprotein. An interaction was also observed when cross-linking was performed with recombinant GP-2. In addition, syncollin could be cross-linked to itself, supporting the suggestion that it exists as a homo-oligomer. Cleavage of the GPI anchor of GP-2 by treatment of granule membranes with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C had no effect on the membrane attachment of syncollin, indicating that it is not mediated exclusively via an interaction with GP-2. Syncollin was found to be associated with detergent-insoluble cholesterol/glycolipid-enriched complexes. These complexes floated to the lighter fractions of sucrose-density gradients and also contained GP-2, the lectin ZG16p, sulphated matrix proteoglycans and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) syntaxin 3 and synaptobrevin 2. Our results indicate that membrane-associated syncollin is a component of lipid rafts, where it interacts both with GP-2 and membrane lipids. We suggest that the syncollin-GP-2 complex might play a role in signal transduction across the granule membrane. PMID:11853552

  20. Interactions of borneol with DPPC phospholipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-11-06

    Borneol, known as a "guide" drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol's penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol's presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol's penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol.

  1. Interactions of Borneol with DPPC Phospholipid Membranes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Borneol, known as a “guide” drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol’s penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol’s presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol’s penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol. PMID:25383679

  2. Interaction of membrane/lipid rafts with the cytoskeleton: impact on signaling and function

    PubMed Central

    Head, Brian P.; Patel, Hemal H.; Insel, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The plasma membrane in eukaryotic cells contains microdomains that are enriched in certain glycosphingolipids, gangliosides, and sterols (such as cholesterol) to form membrane/lipid rafts (MLR). These regions exist as caveolae, morphologically observable flask-like invaginations, or as a less easily detectable planar form. MLR are scaffolds for many molecular entities, including signaling receptors and ion channels that communicate extracellular stimuli to the intracellular milieu. Much evidence indicates that this organization and/or the clustering of MLR into more active signaling platforms depends upon interactions with and dynamic rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to MLR and help regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids in response to extracellular events (e.g., receptor activation, shear stress, electrical conductance, and nutrient demand). MLR regulate cellular polarity, adherence to the extracellular matrix, signaling events (including ones that affect growth and migration), and are sites of cellular entry of certain pathogens, toxins and nanoparticles. The dynamic interaction between MLR and the underlying cytoskeleton thus regulates many facets of the function of eukaryotic cells and their adaptation to changing environments. Here, we review general features of MLR and caveolae and their role in several aspects of cellular function, including polarity of endothelial and epithelial cells, cell migration, mechanotransduction, lymphocyte activation, neuronal growth and signaling, and a variety of disease settings. PMID:23899502

  3. Exploring the interactions of gliadins with model membranes: effect of confined geometry and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Banc, Amélie; Desbat, Bernard; Renard, Denis; Popineau, Yves; Mangavel, Cécile; Navailles, Laurence

    2009-08-01

    Mechanisms leading to the assembly of wheat storage proteins into proteins bodies within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of endosperm cells are unresolved today. In this work, physical chemistry parameters which could be involved in these processes were explored. To model the confined environment of proteins within the ER, the dynamic behavior of gamma-gliadins inserted inside lyotropic lamellar phases was studied using FRAP experiments. The evolution of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the lamellar periodicity enabled to propose the hypothesis of an interaction between gamma-gliadins and membranes. This interaction was further studied with the help of phospholipid Langmuir monolayers. gamma- and omega-gliadins were injected under DMPC and DMPG monolayers and the two-dimensional (2D) systems were studied by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and surface tension measurements. Results showed that both gliadins adsorbed under phospholipid monolayers, considered as biological membrane models, and formed micrometer-sized domains at equilibrium. However, their thicknesses, probed by reflectance measurements, were different: omega-gliadins aggregates displayed a constant thickness, consistent with a monolayer, while the thickness of gamma-gliadins aggregates increased with the quantity of protein injected. These different behaviors could find some explanations in the difference of aminoacid sequence distribution: an alternate repeated - unrepeated domain within gamma-gliadin sequence, while one unique repeated domain was present within omega-gliadin sequence. All these findings enabled to propose a model of gliadins self-assembly via a membrane interface and to highlight the predominant role of wheat prolamin repeated domain in the membrane interaction. In the biological context, these results would mean that the repeated domain could be considered as an anchor for the interaction with

  4. Interaction of Phenylalanine with DPPC Model Membranes: More Than a Hydrophobic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Rosa, A S; Cutro, A C; Frías, M A; Disalvo, E A

    2015-12-31

    The negative free energy previously reported is explained by the stabilization of a PC-Phe (phosphocholine-phenylalanine) complex in the presence of water shown by the decrease in the symmetric stretching frequency of the phosphate group of the lipid (PO2(-)). An entropic contribution due to the disruption of the water network around the phenyl and in the membrane defect may be invoked. The dipole potential decrease is explained by the orientation of the carboxylate opposing to the CO of the lipids with oxygen moiety toward the low hydrated hydrocarbon core. The symmetric bending frequency of NH3(+) group of Phe, decreases in 5.2 cm(-1) in relation to water congruent with zeta potential shift to positive values. The Phe to DPPC dissociation constant is Kd = 2.23 ± 0.09 mM, from which the free energy change is about -4.54 kcal/mol at 25 °C. This may be due to hydrophobic contributions and two hydrogen bonds.

  5. Probing the Interaction between Nanoparticles and Lipid Membranes by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Nariman; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with model surfaces. The high sensitivity, ease of use and the ability to monitor interactions in real-time has made it a popular technique for colloid chemists, biologists, bioengineers, and biophysicists. QCM-D has been recently used to probe the interaction of NPs with supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) as model cell membranes. The interaction of NPs with SLBs is highly influenced by the quality of the lipid bilayers. Unlike many surface sensitive techniques, by using QCM-D, the quality of SLBs can be assessed in real-time, hence QCM-D studies on SLB-NP interactions are less prone to the artifacts arising from bilayers that are not well formed. The ease of use and commercial availability of a wide range of sensor surfaces also have made QCM-D a versatile tool for studying NP interactions with lipid bilayers. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art on QCM-D based techniques for probing the interactions of NPs with lipid bilayers. PMID:27995125

  6. Probing the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid membranes by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Nariman; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    There is increasing interest in using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with model surfaces. The high sensitivity, ease of use and the ability to monitor interactions in real-time has made it a popular technique for colloid chemists, biologists, bioengineers and biophysicists. QCM-D has been recently used to probe the interaction of NPs with supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) as model cell membranes. The interaction of NPs with SLBs is highly influenced by the quality of the lipid bilayers. Unlike many surface sensitive techniques, using QCM-D, the quality of SLBs can be assessed in real-time, hence QCM-D studies on SLB-NP interactions are less prone to the artefacts arising from bilayers that are not well formed. The ease of use and commercial availability of a wide range of sensor surfaces also have made QCM-D a versatile tool for studying NP interactions with lipid bilayers. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art on QCM-D based techniques for probing the interactions of NPs with lipid bilayers.

  7. Effects of structure on the interactions between five natural antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of bacterial cell membrane on model monolayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be...

  8. Interactions of the baicalin and baicalein with bilayer lipid membranes investigated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xuejing; Wang, Lei; Yu, Miao; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-02-01

    The baicalin and baicalein are the major flavonoids found in Radix Scutellariae, an essential herb in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. The interactions of the baicalin and baicalein with lipid bilayer membranes were studied using cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The thickness d of supported bilayer lipid membranes was calculated as d=4.59(±0.36) nm using AC impedance spectroscopy. The baicalein interacted with egg PC bilayer membranes in a dose-dependent manner. The responses of K3Fe(CN)6 on lipid bilayer membrane modified Pt electrode linearly increased in a concentration range of baicalein from 6.25μM to 25μM with a detection limit of 0.1μM and current-concentration sensitivity of 0.11(±0.01) μA/μM, and then reached a plateau from 25μM to 50μM. However the baicalin showed much weaker interactions with egg PC bilayer membranes. UV-Vis spectroscopy also confirmed that the baicalein could interact with egg PC membranes noticeably, but the interaction of baicalin with membranes was hard to be detected. The results provide useful information on understanding the mechanism of action of Radix Scutellariae in vivo.

  9. Theoretical comparison of the self diffusion and mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Scalettar, B A; Abney, J R; Owicki, J C

    1988-01-01

    Self diffusion and mutual diffusion in two-dimensional membrane systems are analyzed. It is shown that interprotein interactions can produce markedly different density-dependent changes in the diffusion coefficients describing these two processes; the qualitative differences are illustrated by using a theoretical formalism valid for dilute solutions. Results are obtained for three analytical potentials: hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions. Self diffusion is inhibited by all three interactions. In contrast, mutual diffusion is inhibited by attractions but is enhanced by repulsions. It is shown that such interaction-dependent differences in self diffusion and mutual diffusion could underlie, among other things, the disparity in protein diffusion coefficients extracted from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and postelectrophoresis relaxation data. PMID:3413121

  10. Structural basis for phosphoinositide substrate recognition, catalysis, and membrane interactions in human inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Trésaugues, Lionel; Silvander, Camilla; Flodin, Susanne; Welin, Martin; Nyman, Tomas; Gräslund, Susanne; Hammarström, Martin; Berglund, Helena; Nordlund, Pär

    2014-05-06

    SHIP2, OCRL, and INPP5B belong to inositol polyphosphate 5-phophatase subfamilies involved in insulin regulation and Lowes syndrome. The structural basis for membrane recognition, substrate specificity, and regulation of inositol polyphosphate 5-phophatases is still poorly understood. We determined the crystal structures of human SHIP2, OCRL, and INPP5B, the latter in complex with phosphoinositide substrate analogs, which revealed a membrane interaction patch likely to assist in sequestering substrates from the lipid bilayer. Residues recognizing the 1-phosphate of the substrates are highly conserved among human family members, suggesting similar substrate binding modes. However, 3- and 4-phosphate recognition varies and determines individual substrate specificity profiles. The high conservation of the environment of the scissile 5-phosphate suggests a common reaction geometry for all members of the human 5-phosphatase family.

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization, modal membrane interaction and anti-tumor cell line studies of nitrophenyl ferrocenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaf, Ataf Ali; Lal, Bhajan; Badshah, Amin; Usman, Muhammad; Chatterjee, Pabitra B.; Huq, Fazlul; Ullah, Shafiq; Crans, Debbie C.

    2016-06-01

    A series of nitrophenyl ferrocens (A1 - A5) were synthesized and fully characterized in solid state (using CHN analysis, FTIR and single crystal XRD) as well as in solution phase (1H &13C NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy). Micelle interface interactions of these compounds were explored and found to have ability across a micelle membrane interface. Interestingly, these compounds exhibited π-electronic push pull systems and oxidation of ferrocene to ferrocenium on crossing the negative interface of the micelle membrane. Selective compounds were screened for antitumor activity against parental and drug resistant human ovarian tumor models i.e. A2780 and A2780cisR, A2780ZD0473R. Screened compounds were found to overcome resistance factor compared to cisplatin.

  12. Alkyl Galactofuranosides Strongly Interact with Leishmania donovani Membrane and Provide Antileishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Muhammad; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Legentil, Laurent; Belaz, Sorya; Cabezas, Yari; Manuel, Christelle; Dureau, Rémy; Sergent, Odile; Burel, Agnès; Daligault, Franck; Ferrières, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effects of four alkyl-galactofuranoside derivatives, i.e., octyl-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 1), 6-amino-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 2), 6-N-acetamido-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 3), and 6-azido-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 4), on Leishmania donovani. Their mechanism of action was explored using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ultrastructural alterations were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compound 1 showed the most promising effects by inhibiting promastigote growth at a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8.96 ± 2.5 μM. All compounds exhibit low toxicity toward human macrophages. Compound 1 had a higher selectivity index than the molecule used for comparison, i.e., miltefosine (159.7 versus 37.9, respectively). EPR showed that compound 1 significantly reduced membrane fluidity compared to control promastigotes and to compound 3. The furanose ring was shown to support this effect, since the isomer galactopyranose had no effect on parasite membrane fluidity or growth. NMR showed a direct interaction of all compounds (greatest with compound 1, followed by compounds 2, 3, and 4, in descending order) with the promastigote membrane and with octyl-galactopyranose and octanol, providing evidence that the n-octyl chain was primarily involved in anchoring with the parasite membrane, followed by the putative crucial role of the furanose ring in the antileishmanial activity. A morphological analysis of compound 1-treated promastigotes by TEM revealed profound alterations in the parasite membrane and organelles, but this was not the case with compound 3. Quantification of annexin V binding by flow cytometry confirmed that compound 1 induced apoptosis in >90% of promastigotes. The effect of compound 1 was also assessed on intramacrophagic amastigotes and showed a reduction in amastigote growth associated with an increase of reactive oxygen

  13. The role of membrane thickness in charged protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo B; Vorobyov, Igor; Allen, Toby W

    2012-02-01

    Charged amino acids are known to be important in controlling the actions of integral and peripheral membrane proteins and cell disrupting peptides. Atomistic molecular dynamics studies have shed much light on the mechanisms of membrane binding and translocation of charged protein groups, yet the impact of the full diversity of membrane physico-chemical properties and topologies has yet to be explored. Here we have performed a systematic study of an arginine (Arg) side chain analog moving across saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers of variable hydrocarbon tail length from 10 to 18 carbons. For all bilayers we observe similar ion-induced defects, where Arg draws water molecules and lipid head groups into the bilayers to avoid large dehydration energy costs. The free energy profiles all exhibit sharp climbs with increasing penetration into the hydrocarbon core, with predictable shifts between bilayers of different thickness, leading to barrier reduction from 26 kcal/mol for 18 carbons to 6 kcal/mol for 10 carbons. For lipids of 10 and 12 carbons we observe narrow transmembrane pores and corresponding plateaus in the free energy profiles. Allowing for movements of the protein and side chain snorkeling, we argue that the energetic cost for burying Arg inside a thin bilayer will be small, consistent with recent experiments, also leading to a dramatic reduction in pK(a) shifts for Arg. We provide evidence that Arg translocation occurs via an ion-induced defect mechanism, except in thick bilayers (of at least 18 carbons) where solubility-diffusion becomes energetically favored. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms of ion movement through membranes of varying composition, with implications for a range of charged protein-lipid interactions and the actions of cell-perturbing peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  14. Alkyl galactofuranosides strongly interact with Leishmania donovani membrane and provide antileishmanial activity.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Legentil, Laurent; Belaz, Sorya; Cabezas, Yari; Manuel, Christelle; Dureau, Rémy; Sergent, Odile; Burel, Agnès; Daligault, Franck; Ferrières, Vincent; Robert-Gangneux, Florence

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effects of four alkyl-galactofuranoside derivatives, i.e., octyl-β-D-galactofuranoside (compound 1), 6-amino-β-D-galactofuranoside (compound 2), 6-N-acetamido-β-D-galactofuranoside (compound 3), and 6-azido-β-D-galactofuranoside (compound 4), on Leishmania donovani. Their mechanism of action was explored using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ultrastructural alterations were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compound 1 showed the most promising effects by inhibiting promastigote growth at a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8.96±2.5 μM. All compounds exhibit low toxicity toward human macrophages. Compound 1 had a higher selectivity index than the molecule used for comparison, i.e., miltefosine (159.7 versus 37.9, respectively). EPR showed that compound 1 significantly reduced membrane fluidity compared to control promastigotes and to compound 3. The furanose ring was shown to support this effect, since the isomer galactopyranose had no effect on parasite membrane fluidity or growth. NMR showed a direct interaction of all compounds (greatest with compound 1, followed by compounds 2, 3, and 4, in descending order) with the promastigote membrane and with octyl-galactopyranose and octanol, providing evidence that the n-octyl chain was primarily involved in anchoring with the parasite membrane, followed by the putative crucial role of the furanose ring in the antileishmanial activity. A morphological analysis of compound 1-treated promastigotes by TEM revealed profound alterations in the parasite membrane and organelles, but this was not the case with compound 3. Quantification of annexin V binding by flow cytometry confirmed that compound 1 induced apoptosis in >90% of promastigotes. The effect of compound 1 was also assessed on intramacrophagic amastigotes and showed a reduction in amastigote growth associated with an increase of reactive oxygen

  15. Characterization of membrane and protein interaction determinants of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB11 ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Rashkova, S; Spudich, G M; Christie, P J

    1997-01-01

    The VirB11 ATPase is a putative component of the transport machinery responsible for directing the export of nucleoprotein particles (T complexes) across the Agrobacterium tumefaciens envelope to susceptible plant cells. Fractionation and membrane treatment studies showed that approximately 30% of VirB11 partitioned as soluble protein, whereas the remaining protein was only partially solubilized with urea from cytoplasmic membranes of wild-type strain A348 as well as a Ti-plasmidless strain expressing virB11 from an IncP replicon. Mutations in virB11 affecting protein function were mapped near the amino terminus (Q6L, P13L, and E25G), just upstream of a region encoding a Walker A nucleotide-binding site (F154H;L155M), and within the Walker A motif (P170L, K175Q, and delta GKT174-176). The K175Q and delta GKT174-176 mutant proteins partitioned almost exclusively with the cytoplasmic membrane, suggesting that an activity associated with nucleotide binding could modulate the affinity of VirB11 for the cytoplasmic membrane. The virB11F154H;L155M allele was transdominant over wild-type virB11 in a merodiploid assay, providing strong evidence that at least one form of VirB11 functions as a homo- or heteromultimer. An allele with a deletion of the first half of the gene, virB11 delta1-156, was transdominant in a merodiploid assay, indicating that the C-terminal half of VirB11 contains a protein interaction domain. Products of both virB11 delta1-156 and virB11 delta158-343, which synthesizes the N-terminal half of VirB11, associated tightly with the A. tumefaciens membrane, suggesting that both halves of VirB11 contain membrane interaction determinants. PMID:9006008

  16. Interaction of caldesmon with endoplasmic reticulum membrane: effects on the mobility of phospholipids in the membrane and on the phosphatidylserine base-exchange reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, P; Makuch, R; Sikorski, A F; Jezierski, A; Pikula, S; Dabrowska, R

    1997-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated by tryptophan fluorescence the interaction of caldesmon with anionic phospholipid vesicles [Czurylo, Zborowski and Dabrowska (1993) Biochem. J. 291, 403-408]. In the present work we investigated the interaction of caldesmon with natural-membrane (rat liver endoplasmic reticulum) phospholipids by co-sedimentation assay. The results indicate that 1 mol of caldesmon binds approx. 170 mol of membrane phospholipids with a binding affinity constant of 7.3 x 10(6) M-1. The caldesmon-membrane phospholipid complex dissociates with increasing salt concentration and in the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin. As indicated by EPR measurements of membrane lipids labelled with 5-doxyl stearate and TEMPO-phosphatidylethanolamine, binding of caldesmon results in an increase in mobility of the acyl chains (in the region of carbon 5) and a decrease in polar headgroup mobility of phospholipids. Interaction of caldesmon with phospholipids is accompanied by inhibition of phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis via a phospholipid base-exchange reaction, with phosphatidylserine as substrate. This shows that, of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane phospholipids, the main target of caldesmon is phosphatidylserine. PMID:9371708

  17. Electrodynamics of lipid membrane interactions in the presence of zwitterionic buffers.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Megan M; Palacio, Luis A; Wright, Johnnie W; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Ray, Bruce D; Petrache, Horia I

    2011-07-20

    Due to thermal motion and molecular polarizability, electrical interactions in biological systems have a dynamic character. Zwitterions are dipolar molecules that typically are highly polarizable and exhibit both a positive and a negative charge depending on the pH of the solution. We use multilamellar structures of common lipids to identify and quantify the effects of zwitterionic buffers that go beyond the control of pH. We use the fact that the repeat spacing of multilamellar lipid bilayers is a sensitive and accurate indicator of the force balance between membranes. We show that common buffers can in fact charge up neutral membranes. However, this electrostatic effect is not immediately recognized because of the concomitant modification of dispersion (van der Waals) forces. We show that although surface charging can be weak, electrostatic forces are significant even at large distances because of reduced ionic screening and reduced van der Waals attraction. The zwitterionic interactions that we identify are expected to be relevant for interfacial biological processes involving lipid bilayers, and for a wide range of biomaterials, including amino acids, detergents, and pharmaceutical drugs. An appreciation of zwitterionic electrodynamic character can lead to a better understanding of molecular interactions in biological systems and in soft materials in general.

  18. Kinetics of membrane adhesion mediated by ligand-receptor interaction studied with a biomimetic system.

    PubMed Central

    Boulbitch, A; Guttenberg, Z; Sackmann, E

    2001-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the kinetics of adhesion of a single giant vesicle controlled by the competition between membrane-substrate interaction mediated by ligand-receptor interaction, gravitation, and Helfrich repulsion. To model the cell-tissue interaction, we doped the vesicles with lipid-coupled polymers (mimicking the glycocalix) and the reconstituted ligands selectively recognized by alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin-mediating specific attraction forces. The integrin was grafted on glass substrates to act as a target cell. The adhesion of the vesicle membrane to the integrin-covered surface starts with the spontaneous formation of a small (approximately 200 nm) domain of tight adhesion, which then gradually grows until the whole adhesion area is in the state of tight adhesion. The time of adhesion varies from few tens of seconds to about one hour depending on the ligand and lipopolymer concentration. At small ligand concentrations, we observed the displacement xi of the front of tight adhesion following the square root law xi approximately t(1/2), whereas, at high concentrations, we found a linear law xi approximately t. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the t(1/2)-regime is dominated by diffusion of ligands, and the xi approximately t-regime by the kinetics of ligands-receptors association. PMID:11606287

  19. Elastic interaction between "hard" or "soft" pointwise inclusions on biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, D; Fournier, J-B

    2003-06-01

    We calculate the induced elastic interaction between pointwise membrane inclusions that locally interact up to quadratic order with the membrane curvature tensor. For isotropic inclusions, we recover the usual interaction proportional to the inverse fourth power of the separation, however with a prefactor showing a non-trivial dependence on the rigidity Gamma of the quadratic potential. In the large-Gamma limit, corresponding to "hard" inclusions, we recover the standard prefactor first obtained by Goulian et al. (Europhys. Lett. 22, 145 (1993)). In the small-Gamma limit, corresponding to "soft" inclusions, we recover the recent result of Marchenko and Misbah (Eur. Phys. J. E 8, 477 (2002)). This shows that the latter result bears no fundamental discrepancy with previous works, but simply corresponds to the limit of soft inclusions. We discuss how the same inclusion can be depicted as hard or soft according to the degree of coarse-graining of the pointwise description. Finally, we argue that conical transmembrane proteins should be fundamentally considered as hard inclusions.

  20. Complex Cooperative Networks from Evolutionary Preferential Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Poncela, Julia; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Floría, Luis M.; Sánchez, Angel; Moreno, Yamir

    2008-01-01

    In spite of its relevance to the origin of complex networks, the interplay between form and function and its role during network formation remains largely unexplored. While recent studies introduce dynamics by considering rewiring processes of a pre-existent network, we study network growth and formation by proposing an evolutionary preferential attachment model, its main feature being that the capacity of a node to attract new links depends on a dynamical variable governed in turn by the node interactions. As a specific example, we focus on the problem of the emergence of cooperation by analyzing the formation of a social network with interactions given by the Prisoner's Dilemma. The resulting networks show many features of real systems, such as scale-free degree distributions, cooperative behavior and hierarchical clustering. Interestingly, results such as the cooperators being located mostly on nodes of intermediate degree are very different from the observations of cooperative behavior on static networks. The evolutionary preferential attachment mechanism points to an evolutionary origin of scale-free networks and may help understand similar feedback problems in the dynamics of complex networks by appropriately choosing the game describing the interaction of nodes. PMID:18560601

  1. Interaction of amphiphysins with AP-1 clathrin adaptors at the membrane.

    PubMed

    Huser, Sonja; Suri, Gregor; Crottet, Pascal; Spiess, Martin

    2013-02-15

    The assembly of clathrin/AP (adaptor protein)-1-coated vesicles on the trans-Golgi network and endosomes is much less studied than that of clathrin/AP-2 vesicles at the plasma membrane for endocytosis. In vitro, the association of AP-1 with protein-free liposomes had been shown to require phosphoinositides, Arf1 (ADP-ribosylation factor 1)-GTP and additional cytosolic factor(s). We have purified an active fraction from brain cytosol and found it to contain amphiphysin 1 and 2 and endophilin A1, three proteins known to be involved in the formation of AP-2/clathrin coats at the plasma membrane. Assays with bacterially expressed and purified proteins showed that AP-1 stabilization on liposomes depends on amphiphysin 2 or the amphiphysin 1/2 heterodimer. Activity is independent of the SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, but requires interaction of the WDLW motif with γ-adaptin. Endogenous amphiphysin in neurons and transfected protein in cell lines co-localize perinuclearly with AP-1 at the trans-Golgi network. This localization depends on interaction of clathrin and the adaptor sequence in the amphiphysins and is sensitive to brefeldin A, which inhibits Arf1-dependent AP-1 recruitment. Interaction between AP-1 and amphiphysin 1/2 in vivo was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation after cross-linking. These results suggest an involvement of amphiphysins not only with AP-2 at the plasma membrane, but also in AP-1/clathrin coat formation at the trans-Golgi network.

  2. INTERACTION OF INSULIN WITH THE CELL MEMBRANE: THE PRIMARY ACTION OF INSULIN

    PubMed Central

    Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1969-01-01

    Insulin can be covalently attached to a large polymers of Sepharose through the α-amino group of the N-terminal residue of the B chain, or through the ε-amino group of its lysyl residue. Such derivatives effectively increase the utilization of glucose, and suppress the hormone-stimulated lipolysis, of isolated fat cells. The effects occur with concentrations of insulin-Sepharose that are nearly as low as those of native insulin, and the maximal responses are the same. The results indicate that interaction of insulin with superficial membrane structures alone may suffice to initiate transport as well as other metabolic alterations. PMID:5257136

  3. Quantification of chemical mixture interactions modulating dermal absorption using a multiple membrane fiber array.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Ronald E; Xia, Xin Rui; Imran, Mudassar; Riviere, Jim E

    2008-03-01

    Dermal exposures to chemical mixtures can potentially increase or decrease systemic bioavailability of toxicants in the mixture. Changes in dermal permeability can be attributed to changes in physicochemical interactions between the mixture, the skin, and the solute of interest. These physicochemical interactions can be described as changes in system coefficients associated with molecular descriptors described by Abraham's linear solvation energy relationship (LSER). This study evaluated the effects of chemical mixtures containing either a solvent (ethanol) or a surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate, SLS) on solute permeability and partitioning by quantifying changes in system coefficients in skin and a three-membrane-coated fiber (MCF) system, respectively. Regression analysis demonstrated that changes in system coefficients in skin were strongly correlated ( R2 = 0.89-0.98) to changes in system coefficients in the three-membrane MCF array with mixtures containing either 1% SLS or 50% ethanol. The PDMS fiber appeared to play a significant role (R2 = 0.84-0.85) in the MCF array in predicting changes in solute permeability, while the WAX fiber appeared to contribute less (R2 = 0.59-0.77) to the array than the other two fibers. On the basis of changes in system coefficients that are part of a LSER, these experiments were able to link physicochemical interactions in the MCF with those interactions in skin when either system is exposed to 1% SLS or 50% ethanol. These experiments further demonstrated the utility of a MCF array to adequately predict changes in dermal permeability when skin is exposed to mixtures containing either a surfactant or a solvent and provide some insight into the nature of the physiochemical interactions that modulate dermal absorptions.

  4. Resonance energy transfer imaging of phospholipid vesicle interaction with a planar phospholipid membrane: undulations and attachment sites in the region of calcium-mediated membrane--membrane adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Membrane fusion of a phospholipid vesicle with a planar lipid bilayer is preceded by an initial prefusion stage in which a region of the vesicle membrane adheres to the planar membrane. A resonance energy transfer (RET) imaging microscope, with measured spectral transfer functions and a pair of radiometrically calibrated video cameras, was used to determine both the area of the contact region and the distances between the membranes within this zone. Large vesicles (5-20 microns diam) were labeled with the donor fluorophore coumarin- phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), while the planar membrane was labeled with the acceptor rhodamine-PE. The donor was excited with 390 nm light, and separate images of donor and acceptor emission were formed by the microscope. Distances between the membranes at each location in the image were determined from the RET rate constant (kt) computed from the acceptor:donor emission intensity ratio. In the absence of an osmotic gradient, the vesicles stably adhered to the planar membrane, and the dyes did not migrate between membranes. The region of contact was detected as an area of planar membrane, coincident with the vesicle image, over which rhodamine fluorescence was sensitized by RET. The total area of the contact region depended biphasically on the Ca2+ concentration, but the distance between the bilayers in this zone decreased with increasing [Ca2+]. The changes in area and separation were probably related to divalent cation effects on electrostatic screening and binding to charged membranes. At each [Ca2+], the intermembrane separation varied between 1 and 6 nm within each contact region, indicating membrane undulation prior to adhesion. Intermembrane separation distances < or = 2 nm were localized to discrete sites that formed in an ordered arrangement throughout the contact region. The area of the contact region occupied by these punctate attachment sites was increased at high [Ca2+]. Membrane fusion may be initiated at these sites of

  5. Interactions of sarin with polyelectrolyte membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-01-10

    Nanostructured polyelectrolyte membranes (PEMs), which are widely used as permselective diffusion barriers in fuel cell technologies and electrochemical processing, are considered as protective membranes suitable for blocking warfare toxins, including water-soluble nerve agents such as sarin. In this article, we examine the mechanisms of sorption and diffusion of sarin in hydrated PEMs by means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Three PEMs are considered: Nafion, sulfonated polystyrene (sPS) that forms the hydrophilic subphase of segregated sPS-polyolefin block copolymers, and random sPS-polyethylene copolymer. We found that sarin concentrates at the interface between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic subphases of hydrated Nafion acting as a surfactant. In hydrated sPS, where the scale of water-polymer segregation is much smaller (1-2 nm), sarin also interacts favorably with hydrophobic and hydrophilic components. Water diffusion slows as the sarin content increases despite the overall increase in solvent content, which suggests that sarin and water have somewhat different pathways through the segregated membrane. Upon replacement of counterions of monovalent potassium with those of divalent calcium, sarin diffusion slows but remains substantial in all ionomers considered, especially at high sarin concentrations. The behavior of sarin is similar to that of its common simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate.

  6. FRAP to Characterize Molecular Diffusion and Interaction in Various Membrane Environments

    PubMed Central

    Pincet, Frédéric; Adrien, Vladimir; Yang, Rong; Delacotte, Jérôme; Rothman, James E.; Urbach, Wladimir

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is a standard method used to study the dynamics of lipids and proteins in artificial and cellular membrane systems. The advent of confocal microscopy two decades ago has made quantitative FRAP easily available to most laboratories. Usually, a single bleaching pattern/area is used and the corresponding recovery time is assumed to directly provide a diffusion coefficient, although this is only true in the case of unrestricted Brownian motion. Here, we propose some general guidelines to perform FRAP experiments under a confocal microscope with different bleaching patterns and area, allowing the experimentalist to establish whether the molecules undergo Brownian motion (free diffusion) or whether they have restricted or directed movements. Using in silico simulations of FRAP measurements, we further indicate the data acquisition criteria that have to be verified in order to obtain accurate values for the diffusion coefficient and to be able to distinguish between different diffusive species. Using this approach, we compare the behavior of lipids in three different membrane platforms (supported lipid bilayers, giant liposomes and sponge phases), and we demonstrate that FRAP measurements are consistent with results obtained using other techniques such as Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) or Single Particle Tracking (SPT). Finally, we apply this method to show that the presence of the synaptic protein Munc18-1 inhibits the interaction between the synaptic vesicle SNARE protein, VAMP2, and its partner from the plasma membrane, Syn1A. PMID:27387979

  7. Flavonoid-membrane interactions: involvement of flavonoid-metal complexes in raft signaling.

    PubMed

    Tarahovsky, Yury S; Kim, Yuri A; Yagolnik, Elena A; Muzafarov, Eugeny N

    2014-05-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds produced by plants and delivered to the human body through food. Although the epidemiological analyses of large human populations did not reveal a simple correlation between flavonoid consumption and health, laboratory investigations and clinical trials clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of flavonoids in the prevention of cardiovascular, carcinogenic, neurodegenerative and immune diseases, as well as other diseases. At present, the abilities of flavonoids in the regulation of cell metabolism, gene expression, and protection against oxidative stress are well-known, although certain biophysical aspects of their functioning are not yet clear. Most flavonoids are poorly soluble in water and, similar to lipophilic compounds, have a tendency to accumulate in biological membranes, particularly in lipid rafts, where they can interact with different receptors and signal transducers and influence their functioning through modulation of the lipid-phase behavior. In this study, we discuss the enhancement in the lipophilicity and antioxidative activity of flavonoids after their complexation with transient metal cations. We hypothesize that flavonoid-metal complexes are involved in the formation of molecular assemblies due to the facilitation of membrane adhesion and fusion, protein-protein and protein-membrane binding, and other processes responsible for the regulation of cell metabolism and protection against environmental hazards.

  8. The interaction of the carbon nanoparticles with human cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overchuk, M.; Prylutska, S.; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Prylutsky, Yu.; Ritter, U.

    2013-09-01

    The study of carbon nanostructures is a highly topical branch of bionanotechnology because of their potential application in biomedicine. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known for their ability to kill tumor cells causing hyperthermia shock and can be used in photothermal therapy respectively. Also chemically modified CNTs can be used for drug delivery. The needle-like shape of CNTs allows them to penetrate into the cell plasma membrane without killing the cell. C60 fullerenes are regarded as valuable nanocarriers for different hydrophobic molecules as well as potential antiviral agents or photosensitizers. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that all types of carbon nanoparticles cause externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the inner to the outer layer of the cell membrane in the small local patches (points of contact), leaving the other parts of plasma membrane PS-negative. In the current work there were studied the interactions of pristine C60 fullerenes and different types of CNTs with human blood cells (erythrocytes and Jurkat T-cells). We have shown, that carbon nanoparticles do not have any hemolytic effects, if judged by the dynamics of acidic hemolysis, although they are capable of permeabilizating the cells and facilitating the internalization of propidium iodide into the nuclei.

  9. Effect of chemical interactions in pentachlorophenol mixtures on skin and membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Ronald E; Brooks, James D; Mumtaz, Moiz; Riviere, Jim E

    2002-10-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been widely used as a pesticide, and topical exposure to a chemical mixture can alter its dermal absorption. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of single and binary solvent systems (ethanol, EtOH, and water), a surfactant (6% sodium lauryl sulfate, SLS), and a rubifacient/vasodilator (1.28% methyl nicotinate, MNA) on PCP membrane transport, and to correlate these effects with physiochemical characteristics of the PCP mixtures. Partitioning, diffusion, and absorption parameters of (14)C-PCP at low (4 microg/cm(2)) and high (40 microg/cm(2)) doses were assessed in porcine skin and silastic membranes in vitro. In these 8-h, flow-through diffusion studies, PCP was dosed with the following vehicles: 100% EtOH, 100% water, 40% EtOH + 60% water, 40% EtOH + 60% water + SLS, 40% EtOH + 60% water + MNA, and 40% EtOH + 60% water + SLS + MNA. PCP absorption ranged from 1.55-15.62% for the high dose and 0.43-7.20% for the low dose. PCP absorption, flux, and apparent permeability were influenced by PCP solubility, and PCP apparent permeability was correlated with log PC (r2 = 0.66). Although PCP was very soluble in pure ethanol (100%), this vehicle evaporated very rapidly, and PCP absorption in ethanol was the lowest with this vehicle when compared to pure water (100%) or aqueous ethanol mixtures in general. MNA had no significant effect on membrane absorption or relative permeability R(P) in aqueous ethanol solutions, but the presence of the surfactant, SLS, significantly reduced PCP absorption and R(P) in both membrane systems. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated that modification in mixture composition with either a solvent and/or a surfactant can influence PCP diffusion in skin. Physicochemical interactions between these mixture components on the skin surface and stratum corneum contributed significantly to PCP transport, and these interactions were identified by simultaneously assessing chemical diffusion in biological

  10. Disease mutations in desmoplakin inhibit Cx43 membrane targeting mediated by desmoplakin–EB1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipal M.; Dubash, Adi D.; Kreitzer, Geri

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms by which microtubule plus ends interact with regions of cell–cell contact during tissue development and morphogenesis are not fully understood. We characterize a previously unreported interaction between the microtubule binding protein end-binding 1 (EB1) and the desmosomal protein desmoplakin (DP), and demonstrate that DP–EB1 interactions enable DP to modify microtubule organization and dynamics near sites of cell–cell contact. EB1 interacts with a region of the DP N terminus containing a hotspot for pathogenic mutations associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC). We show that a subset of AC mutations, in addition to a mutation associated with skin fragility/woolly hair syndrome, impair gap junction localization and function by misregulating DP–EB1 interactions and altering microtubule dynamics. This work identifies a novel function for a desmosomal protein in regulating microtubules that affect membrane targeting of gap junction components, and elucidates a mechanism by which DP mutations may contribute to the development of cardiac and cutaneous diseases. PMID:25225338

  11. PIP2 regulates psychostimulant behaviors through its interaction with a membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Peter J; Belovich, Andrea N; Khelashvili, George; Saunders, Christine; Erreger, Kevin; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sitte, Harald H; Weinstein, Harel; Matthies, Heinrich J G; Galli, Aurelio

    2014-07-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) regulates the function of ion channels and transporters. Here, we demonstrate that PIP2 directly binds the human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT), a key regulator of DA homeostasis and a target of the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH). This binding occurs through electrostatic interactions with positively charged hDAT N-terminal residues and is shown to facilitate AMPH-induced, DAT-mediated DA efflux and the psychomotor properties of AMPH. Substitution of these residues with uncharged amino acids reduces hDAT-PIP2 interactions and AMPH-induced DA efflux without altering the hDAT physiological function of DA uptake. We evaluated the significance of this interaction in vivo using locomotion as a behavioral assay in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of mutated hDAT with reduced PIP2 interaction in Drosophila DA neurons impairs AMPH-induced locomotion without altering basal locomotion. We present what is to our knowledge the first demonstration of how PIP2 interactions with a membrane protein can regulate the behaviors of complex organisms.

  12. Disease mutations in desmoplakin inhibit Cx43 membrane targeting mediated by desmoplakin-EB1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipal M; Dubash, Adi D; Kreitzer, Geri; Green, Kathleen J

    2014-09-15

    Mechanisms by which microtubule plus ends interact with regions of cell-cell contact during tissue development and morphogenesis are not fully understood. We characterize a previously unreported interaction between the microtubule binding protein end-binding 1 (EB1) and the desmosomal protein desmoplakin (DP), and demonstrate that DP-EB1 interactions enable DP to modify microtubule organization and dynamics near sites of cell-cell contact. EB1 interacts with a region of the DP N terminus containing a hotspot for pathogenic mutations associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC). We show that a subset of AC mutations, in addition to a mutation associated with skin fragility/woolly hair syndrome, impair gap junction localization and function by misregulating DP-EB1 interactions and altering microtubule dynamics. This work identifies a novel function for a desmosomal protein in regulating microtubules that affect membrane targeting of gap junction components, and elucidates a mechanism by which DP mutations may contribute to the development of cardiac and cutaneous diseases.

  13. Interaction of poly(L-arginine) with negatively charged DPPG membranes: calorimetric and monolayer studies.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Christian; Blume, Alfred

    2009-08-10

    The interaction of poly(L-arginine) (PLA) with dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) bilayer membranes and monolayers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and monolayer experiments. The binding of PLA affected the main transition temperature of lipid bilayers (T(m)) only marginally. Depending on the PLA chain length, T(m) was slightly increased or decreased. This finding was attributed to the superposition of two counteracting effects on the transition after PLA binding. The main transition enthalpy (DeltaH(m)) was decreased upon PLA binding and the formation of a ripple phase (P(beta)') was suppressed. ITC experiments showed that two distinct processes are involved in binding of PLA to gel phase (L(beta)') membranes. At low peptide content the binding reaction is endothermic, and at high peptide concentration the binding becomes exothermic. However, the enthalpy of binding to fluid (L(alpha)) membranes was exothermic for all peptide-to-lipid ratios. The temperature dependence of PLA binding to fluid palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) membranes showed a decrease in binding enthalpy with increasing temperature (Delta(R)C(p) < 0), indicating hydrophobic contributions to the free energy of binding. For longer PLA chains, the binding enthalpy for L(alpha) membranes was more exothermic than for shorter chains. Monolayer adsorption experiments showed two consecutive binding processes. At low initial surface pressures (pi(0)) a condensation of the lipid film (Deltapi < 0) is first observed after PLA injection into the subphase, followed by an increase in film pressure (Deltapi > 0) due to insertion of peptide side chains into the monolayer. At higher pi(0) only an increase in film pressure can be observed due to the insertion of the side chains. Deltapi increases with increasing pi(0). The insertion of the peptide into the monolayer is corroborated by the observed shift of pi-A isotherms to higher

  14. Lipid shape is a key factor for membrane interactions of amphipathic helical peptides.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Erik; Tiltak, Deniz; Ehni, Sebastian; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-07-01

    The membrane alignment of the amphiphilic alpha-helical model peptide MSI-103 (sequence [KIAGKIA]3-NH2) was examined by solid state 2H-NMR in different lipid systems by systematically varying the acyl chain length and degree of saturation, the lipid head group type, and the peptide-to-lipid molar ratio. In liquid crystalline phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids with saturated chains, the amphiphilic helix changes its orientation from a surface-bound "S-state" to a tilted "T-state" with increasing peptide concentration. In PC lipids with unsaturated chains, on the other hand, the S-state is found throughout all concentrations. Using phosphatidylethanolamine lipids with a small head group or by addition of lyso-lipids with only one acyl chain, the spontaneous curvature of the bilayer was purposefully changed. In the first case with a negative curvature only the S-state was found, whereas in systems with a positive curvature the peptide preferred the obliquely immersed T-state at high concentration. The orientation of MSI-103 thus correlates very well with the shape of the lipid molecules constituting the membrane. Lipid charge, on the other hand, was found to affect only the initial electrostatic attraction to the membrane surface but not the alignment preferences. In bilayers that are "sealed" with 20% cholesterol, MSI-103 cannot bind in a well-oriented manner and forms immobilized aggregates instead. We conclude that the curvature properties of a membrane are a key factor in the interactions of amphiphilic helical peptides in general, whose re-alignment and immersion preferences may thus be inferred in a straightforward manner from the lipid-shape concept.

  15. Interactions of dendritic glycopolymer with erythrocytes, red blood cell ghosts and membrane enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Janaszewska, Anna; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte; Bryszewska, Maria; Maly, Jan

    2015-12-30

    Interactions between maltose functionalized hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s (95% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI A; 33% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI B) and red blood cells (RBCs) and between red blood cell membranes were investigated. We monitored the degree of hemolysis, the change in cell shape, the influence of polymers on the fluidity of the cell membrane and some cell membrane enzymes to determine their possible cytotoxic impact on them. To observe the extent of hemolysis, the RBCs were incubated with different concentrations of Mal-PEIs. The first significant lysis of RBCs was observed after 6h of incubation. Prolongation of the incubation time increased the number of ruptured cells. Moreover, we observed that Mal-PEI B was more hemolytic than Mal-PEI A in buffer solution. In contrast, an incubation of RBCs with Mal-PEIs in human plasma significantly decreased the hemolytic process and showed higher hemolytic property of Mal-PEI A compared to Mal-PEI B. Also several changes in the shape of the RBCs occurred after incubation with Mal-PEIs. Some of the erythrocytes shrank (echinocytes), but their morphology generally remained unchanged during the incubation. As shown by fluorescence experiments, both polymers induced the increase of fluidity of RBCs membranes. In summary, both types of hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s were practically non-hemolytic even at high polymer concentrations. Mal-PEI B was slightly more noxious than the Mal-PEI A in a buffer solution, while in blood plasma, the situation was opposite. Decrease of Na+/K+ ATPase and total ATPase enzymes activity was related with molecule size and number of maltose groups on the surface of molecule. The low hemolytic properties only observed at higher concentration (100μM and 400μM) indicated that Mal-PEIs are promising macromolecules in the area of drug delivery systems.

  16. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  17. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-08-03

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  18. Interaction of Bile Salts with Model Membranes Mimicking the Gastrointestinal Epithelium: A Study by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Coreta-Gomes, Filipe M; Martins, Patrícia A T; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrián; Vaz, Winchil L C; Geraldes, Carlos F G; Moreno, Maria João

    2015-08-25

    Bile salts (BS) are biosurfactants synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestinal lumen where they solubilize cholesterol and other hydrophobic compounds facilitating their gastrointestinal absorption. Partition of BS toward biomembranes is an important step in both processes. Depending on the loading of the secreted BS micelles with endogeneous cholesterol and on the amount of cholesterol from diet, this may lead to the excretion or absorption of cholesterol, from cholesterol-saturated membranes in the liver or to gastrointestinal membranes, respectively. The partition of BS toward the gastrointestinal membranes may also affect the barrier properties of those membranes affecting the permeability for hydrophobic and amphiphilic compounds. Two important parameters in the interaction of the distinct BS with biomembranes are their partition coefficient and the rate of diffusion through the membrane. Altogether, they allow the calculation of BS local concentrations in the membrane as well as their asymmetry in both membrane leaflets. The local concentration and, most importantly, its asymmetric distribution in the bilayer are a measure of induced membrane perturbation, which is expected to significantly affect its properties as a cholesterol donor and hydrophobic barrier. In this work we have characterized the partition of several BS, nonconjugated and conjugated with glycine, to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) in the liquid-disordered phase and with liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase coexistence, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The partition into the liquid-disordered bilayer was characterized by large partition coefficients and favored by enthalpy, while association with the more ordered membrane was weak and driven only by the hydrophobic effect. The trihydroxy BS partitions less efficiently toward the membranes but shows faster translocation rates, in agreement with a membrane protective effect of those BS. The rate of translocation

  19. The lipid composition of Legionella dumoffii membrane modulates the interaction with Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Reszczyńska, Emilia; Luchowski, Rafał; Kania, Magdalena; Gisch, Nicolas; Waldow, Franziska; Mak, Paweł; Danikiewicz, Witold; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), an insect homologue of human apolipoprotein E (apoE), is a widely used model protein in studies on protein-lipid interactions, and anti-Legionella activity of Galleria mellonella apoLp-III has been documented. Interestingly, exogenous choline-cultured Legionella dumoffii cells are considerably more susceptible to apoLp-III than non-supplemented bacteria. In order to explain these differences, we performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of L. dumoffii lipids and a comparative lipidomic analysis of membranes of bacteria grown without and in the presence of exogenous choline. (31)P NMR analysis of L. dumoffii phospholipids (PLs) revealed a considerable increase in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content in bacteria cultured on choline medium and a decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in approximately the same range. The interactions of G. mellonella apoLp-III with lipid bilayer membranes prepared from PLs extracted from non- and choline-supplemented L. dumoffii cells were examined in detail by means of attenuated total reflection- and linear dichroism-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the kinetics of apoLp-III binding to liposomes formed from L. dumoffii PLs was analysed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using fluorescently labelled G. mellonella apoLp-III. Our results indicated enhanced binding of apoLp-III to and deeper penetration into lipid membranes formed from PLs extracted from the choline-supplemented bacteria, i.e. characterized by an increased PC/PE ratio. This could explain, at least in part, the higher susceptibility of choline-cultured L. dumoffii to G. mellonella apoLp-III.

  20. Interactions Between Membranes and 'Metaphilic' Polypeptide Architectures with Diverse Sidechain Populations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michelle W; Han, Ming; Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Snell, Carly; Song, Ziyuan; Tang, Haoyu; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun; May, Sylvio; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C L

    2017-02-17

    At physiological conditions, most proteins or peptides can fold into relatively stable structures that present on their molecular surfaces specific chemical patterns partially smeared out by thermal fluctuations. These nanoscopically defined patterns of charge, hydrogen bonding, and/or hydrophobicity, along with their elasticity and shape stability (folded proteins have Young's moduli of ~1 × 10(8) Pa), largely determine and limit the interactions of these molecules, such as molecular recognition and allosteric regulation. In this work, we show that the membrane-permeating activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be significantly enhanced using prototypical peptides with 'molten' surfaces: metaphilic peptides with quasi-liquid surfaces and adaptable shapes. These metaphilic peptides have a bottlebrush-like architecture consisting of a rigid helical core decorated with mobile sidechains that are terminated by cationic or hydrophobic groups. Computer simulations show that these flexible sidechains can undergo significant rearrangement in response to different environments, giving rise to adaptable surface chemistry of the peptide. This quality makes it possible to control their hydrophobicity over a broad range while maintaining water solubility, unlike many AMPs and CPPs. Thus, we are able to show how the activity of these peptides is amplified by hydrophobicity and cationic charge, and rationalize these results using a quantitative mean-field theory. Computer simulations show that the shape-changing properties of the peptides and the resultant adaptive presentation of chemistry play a key enabling role in their interactions with membranes.

  1. Interactions of lectins with plasma membrane glycoproteins of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Nachbar, M S; Oppenheim, J D; Aull, F

    1976-02-06

    Several aspects of the interaction of various lectins with the surface of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells are described. The order of agglutinating activity for various lectins is Ricinus communis greater than wheat germ greater than or equal to concanavalin A greater than or equal to soybean greater than Limulus polyphemus. No agglutination was noted for Ulex europaeus. Using 125I-labeled lectins it was determined that there are 1.6 and 7 times as many Ricinus communis lectin binding sites for concanavalin A and soybean lectins. Sodium deoxycholate-solubilized plasma membrane material was subjected to lectin affinity chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The lectin receptors of the plasma membrane appeared to be heterogeneous and some qualitative differences could be discerned among the electrophoretically analyzed material, which bound to and was specifically eluted from the various lectin affinity columns. The characteristics of elution of bound material from individual lectin columns indicated secondary hydrophobic interactions between concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin and their respective lectin receptor molecules.

  2. Membrane-Sugar Interactions Probed by Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Spin Labels.

    PubMed

    Konov, Konstantin B; Leonov, Dmitry V; Isaev, Nikolay P; Fedotov, Kirill Yu; Voronkova, Violeta K; Dzuba, Sergei A

    2015-08-13

    Sugars can stabilize biological systems under extreme desiccation and freezing conditions. Hypothetical molecular mechanisms suggest that the stabilization effect may be determined either by specific interactions of sugars with biological molecules or by the influence of sugars on the solvating shell of the biomolecule. To explore membrane-sugar interactions, we applied electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy, a pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), to phospholipid bilayers with spin-labeled lipids added and solvated by aqueous deuterated sucrose and trehalose solutions. The phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC). The spin-labeled lipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(TEMPO)choline (T-PCSL), with spin-label TEMPO at the lipid polar headgroup. The deuterium ESEEM amplitude was calibrated using known concentrations of glassy deuterated sugar solvents. The data obtained indicated that the sugar concentration near the membrane surface obeyed a simple Langmuir model of monolayer adsorption, which assumes direct sugar-molecule bonding to the bilayer surface.

  3. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of doxycycline/β-cyclodextrin supramolecular complex and its bacterial membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Diego F; Consuegra, Jessika; Trajano, Vivianne C; Gontijo, Sávio M L; Guimarães, Pedro P G; Cortés, Maria E; Denadai, Ângelo L; Sinisterra, Rubén D

    2014-06-01

    Doxycycline is a semi-synthetic antibiotic commonly used for the treatment of many aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It inhibits the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and affects cell proliferation. In this study, the structural and thermodynamic parameters of free DOX and a DOX/βCD complex were investigated, as well as their interactions and effects on Staphylococcus aureus cells and cellular cytotoxicity. Complexation of DOX and βCD was confirmed to be an enthalpy- and entropy-driven process, and a low equilibrium constant was obtained. Treatment of S. aureus with higher concentrations of DOX or DOX/βCD resulted in an exponential decrease in S. aureus cell size, as well as a gradual neutralization of zeta potential. These thermodynamic profiles suggest that ion-pairing and hydrogen bonding interactions occur between DOX and the membrane of S. aureus. In addition, the adhesion of βCD to the cell membrane via hydrogen bonding is hypothesized to mediate a synergistic effect which accounts for the higher activity of DOX/βCD against S. aureus compared to pure DOX. Lower cytotoxicity and induction of osteoblast proliferation was also associated with DOX/βCD compared with free DOX. These promising findings demonstrate the potential for DOX/βCD to mediate antimicrobial activity at lower concentrations, and provides a strategy for the development of other antimicrobial formulations.

  4. Demonstration of the interactions between aromatic compound-loaded lipid nanocapsules and Acinetobacter baumannii bacterial membrane.

    PubMed

    Montagu, A; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Guillet, C; Bejaud, J; Rossines, E; Saulnier, P

    2016-06-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that is resistant to many commonly-used antibiotics. One strategy for treatment is the use of aromatic compounds (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde) against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the interactions between bacteria and lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) over time based on the fluorescence of 3,3'-Dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine Perchlorate-LNCs (DiO-LNCs) and the properties of trypan blue to analyse the physicochemical mechanisms occurring at the level of the biological membrane. The results demonstrated the capacity of carvacrol-loaded LNCs to interact with and penetrate the bacterial membrane in comparison with cinnamaldehyde-loaded LNCs and unloaded LNCs. Modifications of carvacrol after substitution of hydroxyl functional groups by fatty acids demonstrated the crucial role of hydroxyl functions in antibacterial activity. Finally, after contact with the efflux pump inhibitor, carbonylcyanide-3-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP), the results indicated the total synergistic antibacterial effect with Car-LNCs, showing that CCCP is associated with the action mechanism of carvacrol, especially at the level of the efflux pump mechanism.

  5. Hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. Thermodynamic analysis of tetraphenylphosphonium binding to vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, R F; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the interaction of the hydrophobic ion tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) with egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles were studied in detail by equilibrium dialysis and spin label techniques. A partition coefficient of beta = 4.2 + 0.4 x 10(-6) cm (K congruent to 100) was determined. Electrostatic saturation sets in at approximately 600 microM (about one absorbed TPP+ molecule per 100 lipids), and is not screened by salt. The temperature dependence of binding was determined, which reveals that the binding is entropy-driven with a positive (repulsive) enthalpy of binding, a result to be compared with hydrophobic anions in which the binding enthalpy is negative. The membrane dipole potential may be responsible for this binding difference. Activity coefficients are determined and shown to be significantly different from those of most common salts, an important result that should be considered in all hydrophobic ion studies. Comparison of the TPP+ results with those of its anionic structural analogue, tetraphenylboron (TPB-), permits a general analysis of hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. A theoretical model consistent with the entire set of data is developed in an accompanying article. PMID:3006814

  6. Dynamic assessment of Amyloid oligomers - cell membrane interaction by advanced impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, M.; David, S.; Polonschii, C.; Bratu, D.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and onset of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that Aβ1-42 treatment influences the expression of tight junction protein complexes, stress fibre formation, disruption and aggregation of actin filaments and cellular gap formation. Aiming for functional characterization of model cells upon Aβ1-42 treatment, we deployed an advanced Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for monitoring cell evolution. A precision Impedance Analyzer with a multiplexing module developed in house was used for recording individual electrode sets in the 40 Hz - 100 KHz frequency range. In a step forward from the classical ECIS assays, we report on a novel data analysis algorithm that enables access to cellular and paracellular electrical parameters and cell surface interaction with fully developed cell monolayers. The evolution of the impedance at selected frequencies provides evidence for a dual effect of Aβ42 exposure, at both paracellular permeability and cell adherence level, with intricate dynamics that open up new perspectives on Aβ1-42 oligomers - cell membrane interaction. Validation of electrical impedance assays of the amyloid fibrils effect on cell membrane structure is achieved by both AFM analysis and Surface Plasmon Resonance studies. The capabilities of this noninvasive, real time platform for cell analysis in a wider applicative context are outlined.

  7. Developing a high-quality scoring function for membrane protein structures based on specific inter-residue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Andrew J.; Li, Zhijun

    2012-03-01

    Membrane proteins are of particular biological and pharmaceutical importance, and computational modeling and structure prediction approaches play an important role in studies of membrane proteins. Developing an accurate model quality assessment program is of significance to the structure prediction of membrane proteins. Few such programs are proposed that can be applied to a broad range of membrane protein classes and perform with high accuracy. We developed a new model scoring function Interaction-based Quality assessment (IQ), based on the analysis of four types of inter-residue interactions within the transmembrane domains of helical membrane proteins. This function was tested using three high-quality model sets: all 206 models of GPCR Dock 2008, all 284 models of GPCR Dock 2010, and all 92 helical membrane protein models of the HOMEP set. For all three sets, the scoring function can select the native structures among all of the models with the success rates of 93, 85, and 100% respectively. For comparison, these three model sets were also adopted for a recently published model assessment program for membrane protein structures, ProQM, which gave the success rates of 85, 79, and 92% separately. These results suggested that IQ outperforms ProQM when only the transmembrane regions of the models are considered. This scoring function should be useful for the computational modeling of membrane proteins.

  8. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  9. Interactions of Organics within Hydrated Selective Layer of Reverse Osmosis Desalination Membrane: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Dražević, Emil; Szymczyk, Anthony

    2017-03-07

    In this work we have examined a computational approach in predicting the interactions between uncharged organic solutes and polyamide membranes. We used three model organic molecules with identical molecular weights (100.1 g/mol), 4-aminopiperidine, 3,3-dimethyl-2-butanone (pinacolone) and methylisobutyl ketone for which we obtained experimental data on partitioning, diffusion and separation on a typical seawater reverse osmosis (RO) membrane. The interaction energy between the solutes and the membrane phase (fully aromatic polyamide) was computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the resulting sequence was found to correlate well with the experimental rejections and sorption data. Sorption of the different organic solutes within the membrane skin layer determined from attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) nicely agreed with interaction energies computed from molecular simulations. Qualitative information about solute diffusivity inside the membrane was also extracted from MD simulations while ATR-FTIR experiments indicated strongly hindered diffusion with diffusion coefficients in the membrane about 10(-15) m(2)/s. The computational approach presented here could be a first step toward predicting rejections trends of, for example, hormones and pharmaceuticals by RO dense membranes.

  10. Interaction of the Antimicrobial Peptide Polymyxin B1 with Both Membranes of E. coli: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, Damien; Sessions, Richard B.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small, cationic proteins that can induce lysis of bacterial cells through interaction with their membranes. Different mechanisms for cell lysis have been proposed, but these models tend to neglect the role of the chemical composition of the membrane, which differs between bacterial species and can be heterogeneous even within a single cell. Moreover, the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli contains two membranes with differing compositions. To this end, we report the first molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of the antimicrobial peptide, polymyxin B1 with complex models of both the inner and outer membranes of E. coli. The results of >16 microseconds of simulation predict that polymyxin B1 is likely to interact with the membranes via distinct mechanisms. The lipopeptides aggregate in the lipopolysaccharide headgroup region of the outer membrane with limited tendency for insertion within the lipid A tails. In contrast, the lipopeptides readily insert into the inner membrane core, and the concomitant increased hydration may be responsible for bilayer destabilization and antimicrobial function. Given the urgent need to develop novel, potent antibiotics, the results presented here reveal key mechanistic details that may be exploited for future rational drug development. PMID:25885324

  11. Xenopus laevis Oocytes as a Model System for Studying the Interaction Between Asbestos Fibres and Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Bernareggi, Annalisa; Ren, Elisa; Borelli, Violetta; Vita, Francesca; Constanti, Andrew; Zabucchi, Giuliano

    2015-06-01

    The mode of interaction of asbestos fibres with cell membranes is still debatable. One reason is the lack of a suitable and convenient cellular model to investigate the causes of asbestos toxicity. We studied the interaction of asbestos fibres with Xenopus laevis oocytes, using electrophysiological and morphological methods. Oocytes are large single cells, with a limited ability to endocytose molecular ligands; we therefore considered these cells to be a good model for investigating the nature of asbestos/membrane interactions. Electrophysiological recordings were performed to compare the passive electrical membrane properties, and those induced by applying positive or negative voltage steps, in untreated oocytes and those exposed to asbestos fibre suspensions. Ultrastructural analysis visualized in detail, any morphological changes of the surface membrane caused by the fibre treatment. Our results demonstrate that Amosite and Crocidolite-type asbestos fibres significantly modify the properties of the membrane, starting soon after exposure. Cells were routinely depolarized, their input resistance decreased, and the slow outward currents evoked by step depolarizations were dramatically enhanced. Reducing the availability of surface iron contained in the structure of the fibres with cation chelators, abolished these effects. Ultrastructural analysis of the fibre-exposed oocytes showed no evidence of phagocytic events. Our results demonstrate that asbestos fibres modify the oocyte membrane, and we propose that these cells represent a viable model for studying the asbestos/cell membrane interaction. Our findings also open the possibly for finding specific competitors capable of hindering the asbestos-cell membrane interaction as a means of tackling the long-standing asbestos toxicity problem.

  12. Computational study of the RGD-peptide interactions with perovskite-type BFO-(1 1 1) membranes under aqueous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-long; Bian, Liang; Hou, Wen-ping; Dong, Fa-Qin; Song, Mian-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Wang, Li-sheng

    2016-07-01

    We elucidated a number of facets regarding arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-bismuth ferrite (BFO)-(1 1 1) membrane interactions and reactivity that have previously remained unexplored on a molecular level. Results demonstrate the intra-molecular interaction facilitates a ;horseshoe; structure of RGD adsorbed onto the BFO-(1 1 1) membrane, through the electrostatic (Asp-cation-Fe) and water-bridge (Osbnd H2O and H2Osbnd NH2) interactions. The effect of structural and electron-transfer interactions is attributed to the cation-valences, indicating that the divalent cations are electron-acceptors and the monovalent cations as electron-donors. Notably, the strongly bound Ca2+ ion exerts a ;gluing; effect on the Asp-side-chain, indicating a tightly packed RGD-BFO configuration. Thus, modulating the biological response of BFO-(1 1 1) membrane will allow us to design more appropriate interfaces for implantable diagnostic and therapeutic perovskite-type micro-devices.

  13. Synthetic peptides from Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) specifically interacting with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, J; Rodríguez, L; Vera, R; Puentes, A; Curtidor, H; Cortés, J; Rosas, J; Patarroyo, M E

    2006-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is expressed during both the sporozoite and merozoite stage of the parasite's life cycle. The role placed by AMA-1 during sporozoite invasion of hepatocytes has not been made sufficiently clear to date. Identifying the sequences involved in binding to hepatocytes is an important step towards understanding the structural basis for sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction. Binding assays between P. falciparum AMA-1 peptides and HepG2 cell were performed in this study to identify possible AMA-1 functional regions. Four AMA-1 high activity binding peptides (HABPs) bound specifically to hepatocytes: 4310 ((74)QHAYPIDHEGAEPAPQEQNL(93)), 4316 ((194)TLDEMRHFYKDNKYVKNLDE(213)), 4321 ((294)VVDNWEKVCPRKNLQNAKFGY(313)) and 4332 ((514)AEVTSNNEVVVKEEYKDEYA(533)). Their binding to these cells became saturable and resistant to treatment with neuraminidase. Most of these peptides were located in AMA-1 domains I and III, these being target regions for protective antibody responses. These peptides interacted with 36 and 58 kDa proteins on the erythrocyte surface. Some of the peptides were found in exposed regions of the AMA-1 protein, thereby facilitating their interaction with host cells. It is thus probable that AMA-1 regions defined by the four peptides mentioned above are involved in sporozoite-hepatocyte interaction.

  14. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIFff14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bi...

  15. Interactions of amiodarone with model membranes and amiodarone-photoinduced peroxidation of lipids.

    PubMed

    Sautereau, A M; Tournaire, C; Suares, M; Tocanne, J F; Paillous, N

    1992-06-23

    The potent antiarrhythmic drug, amiodarone (AMIO) exhibits phototoxicity, which is thought to be related to its interaction with biological membranes. We report here a spectroscopic study of the interactions of this drug with phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes used as membrane model systems. A linear increase in absorbance at 300 nm was observed with increasing addition of AMIO to dimyristoyl-DL-PC (DMPC) liposomes over all the drugs-lipid molar ratio (Ri)s tested. In contrast, in the dimyristoyl-DL-PG (DMPG) liposomes, there was a dramatic increase in absorbance at values of Ri above unity. Light scattering by DMPG liposomes at 350 nm increased with increasing AMIO concentration up to a Ri = 1, and then decreased with increasing drug concentration. Such changes were not observed with the DMPC liposomes. Moreover, addition of AMIO changed the fluorescence polarization rate of 1,6-diphenyl 1,3,5-hexatriene embedded in these liposomes. It reduced the rate below the phase transition temperature (Tt) of the lipid, but increased it above this temperature. These effects on the lipidic phases observed at low Ri were more pronounced on the DMPG than on the DMPC liposomes. The strong interactions of AMIO with phospholipids, especially the acidic ones, were confirmed by liposome size determinations. All these data strongly suggest that the drug was incorporated in the core of the lipid bilayers. Such a penetration would favor a drug-photoinduced peroxidation of lipids. Indeed, UV irradiation of AMIO-DOPG mixtures led to the disappearance of the unsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids, checked by gas chromatography measurements, which was correlated with the amount of oxygen consumed. This showed that AMIO did photosensitize phospholipid peroxidation.

  16. Thermodynamic evidence of non-muscle myosin II-lipid-membrane interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schewkunow, Vitali; Sharma, Karan P.; Diez, Gerold; Klemm, Anna H.; Sharma, Pal C.; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.

    2008-02-08

    A unique feature of protein networks in living cells is that they can generate their own force. Proteins such as non-muscle myosin II are an integral part of the cytoskeleton and have the capacity to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directional movement. Non-muscle myosin II can move actin filaments against each other, and depending on the orientation of the filaments and the way in which they are linked together, it can produce contraction, bending, extension, and stiffening. Our measurements with differential scanning calorimetry showed that non-muscle myosin II inserts into negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Using lipid vesicles made of DMPG/DMPC at a molar ratio of 1:1 at 10 mg/ml in the presence of different non-muscle myosin II concentrations showed a variation of the main phase transition of the lipid vesicle at around 23 deg. C. With increasing concentrations of non-muscle myosin II the thermotropic properties of the lipid vesicle changed, which is indicative of protein-lipid interaction/insertion. We hypothesize that myosin tail binds to acidic phospholipids through an electrostatic interaction using the basic side groups of positive residues; the flexible, amphipathic helix then may partially penetrate into the bilayer to form an anchor. Using the stopped-flow method, we determined the binding affinity of non-muscle myosin II when anchored to lipid vesicles with actin, which was similar to a pure actin-non-muscle myosin II system. Insertion of myosin tail into the hydrophobic region of lipid membranes, a model known as the lever arm mechanism, might explain how its interaction with actin generates cellular movement.

  17. Interaction between Soluble and Membrane-Embedded Potassium Channel Peptides Monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Ramesh, Bala; Srai, Surjit K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the utility of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in dynamic monitoring of soluble protein-protein interactions. Here, we investigated the applicability of FTIR to detect interaction between synthetic soluble and phospholipid-embedded peptides corresponding to, respectively, a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel inactivation domain (ID) and S4–S6 of the Shaker Kv channel (KV1; including the S4–S5 linker “pre-inactivation” ID binding site). KV1 was predominantly α-helical at 30°C when incorporated into dimyristoyl-l-α-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. Cooling to induce a shift in DMPC from liquid crystalline to gel phase reversibly decreased KV1 helicity, and was previously shown to partially extrude a synthetic S4 peptide. While no interaction was detected in liquid crystalline DMPC, upon cooling to induce the DMPC gel phase a reversible amide I peak (1633 cm−1) consistent with novel hydrogen bond formation was detected. This spectral shift was not observed for KV1 in the absence of ID (or vice versa), nor when the non-inactivating mutant V7E ID was applied to KV1 under similar conditions. Alteration of salt or redox conditions affected KV1-ID hydrogen bonding in a manner suggesting electrostatic KV1-ID interaction favored by a hairpin conformation for the ID and requiring