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Sample records for memory cell characteristics

  1. SONOS Nonvolatile Memory Cell Programming Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Phillips, Thomas A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile memory is gaining favor over conventional EEPROM FLASH memory technology. This paper characterizes the SONOS write operation using a nonquasi-static MOSFET model. This includes floating gate charge and voltage characteristics as well as tunneling current, voltage threshold and drain current characterization. The characterization of the SONOS memory cell predicted by the model closely agrees with experimental data obtained from actual SONOS memory cells. The tunnel current, drain current, threshold voltage and read drain current all closely agreed with empirical data.

  2. Factors analysis on the physical properties of the low-temperature SOC of memory cell characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Doyoung; Kim, Jaeyeol; Park, Jihoon; Park, Jeonqsu; Lee, Sungkoo; Kim, Seomin; Jung, Taewoo; Kim, Hyeongsoo

    2017-03-01

    In recent year, the thermal effect has become a critical issue on the operation of memory cell. As heating time or temperature increases, the performances of memory cells are degraded due to its low thermal stabilities. Therefore, processes working at low temperature are necessary not to hurt the thermal stability. In this paper, we introduced LTSOC (Low Temperature Spin-On Carbon), which is believed to minimize the thermal loads because its cross-linker works at low temperature. Also, it would be important to fulfill the needs for the other properties of SOC like filling ability and etching resistance. So, we verified all these basic characteristics with proper resist and etching processes by getting good final pattern profile. As a result, LT-SOC is suggested for etching barrier without affecting on cell operation of memory devices.

  3. Akt inhibition enhances expansion of potent tumor-specific lymphocytes with memory cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Joseph G.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Clever, David; Gros, Alena; Eil, Robert; Tran, Eric; Hanada, Ken-ichi; Yu, Zhiya; Palmer, Douglas C.; Kerkar, Sid P.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Upham, Trevor; Leonardi, Anthony; Aquavella, Nicholas; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gattinoni, Luca; Muranski, Pawel; Sundrud, Mark S.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) can result in complete regression of advanced cancer in some patients, but the efficacy of this potentially curative therapy might be limited by poor persistence of TIL after adoptive-transfer. Pharmacologic inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase Akt has recently been shown to promote immunologic memory in viral-specific murine models, but whether this approach may enhance features of memory (e.g. long-term persistence) in TIL which are characteristically exhausted and senescent is not established. Here we show that pharmacologic inhibition of Akt enables expansion of TIL with the transcriptional, metabolic and functional properties characteristic of memory T cells. Consequently, Akt inhibition results in enhanced persistence of TIL after adoptive transfer into an immunodeficient animal model and augments anti-tumor immunity of CD8 T cells in a mouse model of cell-based immunotherapy. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt represents a novel immunometabolomic approach to enhance the persistence of anti-tumor T cells and improve the efficacy of cell-based immunotherapy for metastatic cancer. PMID:25432172

  4. Characteristics of a Nonvolatile SRAM Memory Cell Utilizing a Ferroelectric Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Cody; Laws, Crystal; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    The SRAM cell circuit is a standard for volatile data storage. When utilizing one or more ferroelectric transistors, the hysteresis characteristics give unique properties to the SRAM circuit, providing for investigation into the development of a nonvolatile memory cell. This paper discusses various formations of the SRAM circuit, using ferroelectric transistors, n-channel and p-channel MOSFETs, and resistive loads. With varied source and supply voltages, the effects on the timing and retention characteristics are investigated, including retention times of up to 24 hours.

  5. Disturbance characteristics of half-selected cells in a cross-point resistive switching memory array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Li, Haitong; Chen, Hong-Yu; Chen, Bing; Liu, Rui; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Feifei; Jiang, Zizhen; Ye, Hongfei; Gao, Bin; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Yu, Shimeng

    2016-05-01

    Disturbance characteristics of cross-point resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays are comprehensively studied in this paper. An analytical model is developed to quantify the number of pulses (#Pulse) the cell can bear before disturbance occurs under various sub-switching voltage stresses based on physical understanding. An evaluation methodology is proposed to assess the disturb behavior of half-selected (HS) cells in cross-point RRAM arrays by combining the analytical model and SPICE simulation. The characteristics of cross-point RRAM arrays such as energy consumption, reliable operating cycles and total error bits are evaluated by the methodology. A possible solution to mitigate disturbance is proposed.

  6. Innate Memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  7. Temperature dependence of SET switching characteristics in phase-change memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Chang; Meng, Xiang-ru; Peng, Ju-hong; Lai, Zhi-bo; Miao, Xiang-shui

    2016-09-01

    The temperature dependence of crystallization kinetics of phase-change materials raises a series of reliability issues, while phase-change memory cells work at high temperature or thermal-disturbance condition. These issues hinder the development of ultrahigh-density storage devices. We investigate the evolution of SET switching characteristics of phase-change memory cells at high operating temperature. We show that the high temperature strongly impacts the SET state resistance. As a result, SET failure has been observed with elevated ambient temperature. Our SPICE simulations indicate that transient amorphization behavior during a complete SET pulse period is considered as the potential mechanism of SET failure. By modifying the SET pulse intensity and width linearly, we successfully reduce the SET failure in the experiments. The results illustrate that the demonstrated linear properties may optimize SET pulse performance.

  8. Effect of embedded metal nanocrystals on the resistive switching characteristics in NiN-based resistive random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Man Hong, Seok; Hyun Park, Ju; Su Jeon, Dong; Geun Kim, Tae

    2014-03-07

    The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells are formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.

  9. Human memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Küppers, R

    2016-12-01

    A key feature of the adaptive immune system is the generation of memory B and T cells and long-lived plasma cells, providing protective immunity against recurring infectious agents. Memory B cells are generated in germinal center (GC) reactions in the course of T cell-dependent immune responses and are distinguished from naive B cells by an increased lifespan, faster and stronger response to stimulation and expression of somatically mutated and affinity matured immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Approximately 40% of human B cells in adults are memory B cells, and several subsets were identified. Besides IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B cells, ∼50% of peripheral blood memory B cells express IgM with or without IgD. Further smaller subpopulations have additionally been described. These various subsets share typical memory B cell features, but likely also fulfill distinct functions. IgM memory B cells appear to have the propensity for refined adaptation upon restimulation in additional GC reactions, whereas reactivated IgG B cells rather differentiate directly into plasma cells. The human memory B-cell pool is characterized by (sometimes amazingly large) clonal expansions, often showing extensive intraclonal IgV gene diversity. Moreover, memory B-cell clones are frequently composed of members of various subsets, showing that from a single GC B-cell clone a variety of memory B cells with distinct functions is generated. Thus, the human memory B-cell compartment is highly diverse and flexible. Several B-cell malignancies display features suggesting a derivation from memory B cells. This includes a subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and marginal zone lymphomas. The exposure of memory B cells to oncogenic events during their generation in the GC, the longevity of these B cells and the ease to activate them may be key determinants for their malignant transformation.

  10. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  11. Memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Kometani, Kohei; Ise, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    The immune system can remember a previously experienced pathogen and can evoke an enhanced response to reinfection that depends on memory lymphocyte populations. Recent advances in tracking antigen-experienced memory B cells have revealed the existence of distinct classes of cells that have considerable functional differences. Some of these differences seem to be determined by the stimulation history during memory cell formation. To induce rapid recall antibody responses, the contributions of other types of cells, such as memory T follicular helper cells, have also now begun to be appreciated. In this Review, we discuss these and other recent advances in our understanding of memory B cells, focusing on the underlying mechanisms that are required for rapid and effective recall antibody responses.

  12. Natural Killer Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Timothy E.; Sun, Joseph C.; Lanier, Lewis L.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner, and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity, and can acquire immunological memory in a similar manner to T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence for NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes. PMID:26488815

  13. Natural Killer Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Sun, Joseph C; Lanier, Lewis L

    2015-10-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells have historically been considered short-lived cytolytic cells that can rapidly respond against pathogens and tumors in an antigen-independent manner and then undergo cell death. Recently, however, NK cells have been shown to possess traits of adaptive immunity and can acquire immunological memory in a manner similar to that of T and B cells. In this review, we discuss evidence of NK cell memory and the mechanisms involved in the generation and survival of these innate lymphocytes.

  14. Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Erin M.; Smith, Robin A.; Simonich, Cassandra A.; Niyonzima, Nixon; Carter, Joseph J.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide near complete protection against the types of HPV that most commonly cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (HPV 16 and 18) when administered to individuals naive to these types. These vaccines, like most other prophylactic vaccines, appear to protect by generating antibodies. However, almost nothing is known about the immunological memory that forms following HPV vaccination, which is required for long-term immunity. Here, we have identified and isolated HPV 16-specific memory B cells from female adolescents and young women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the absence of pre-existing immunity, using fluorescently conjugated HPV 16 pseudoviruses to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells. Antibodies cloned and expressed from these singly sorted HPV 16-pseudovirus labeled memory B cells were predominantly IgG (>IgA>IgM), utilized diverse variable genes, and potently neutralized HPV 16 pseudoviruses in vitro despite possessing only average levels of somatic mutation. These findings suggest that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine provides an excellent model for studying the development of B cell memory; and, in the context of what is known about memory B cells elicited by influenza vaccination/infection, HIV-1 infection, or tetanus toxoid vaccination, indicates that extensive somatic hypermutation is not required to achieve potent vaccine-specific neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:25330199

  15. I-V Characteristics of a Static Random Access Memory Cell Utilizing Ferroelectric Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, Crystal; Mitchell, Cody; Hunt, Mitchell; Ho, Fat D.; MacLeod, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    I-V characteristics for FeFET different than that of MOSFET Ferroelectric layer features hysteresis trend whereas MOSFET behaves same for both increasing and decreasing VGS FeFET I-V characteristics doesn't show dependence on VDS A Transistor with different channel length and width as well as various resistance and input voltages give different results As resistance values increased, the magnitude of the drain current decreased.

  16. Tier identification (TID) for tiered memory characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jichuan; Lim, Kevin T; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-25

    A tier identification (TID) is to indicate a characteristic of a memory region associated with a virtual address in a tiered memory system. A thread may be serviced according to a first path based on the TID indicating a first characteristic. The thread may be serviced according to a second path based on the TID indicating a second characteristic.

  17. Memory B cells: total recall.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tri Giang; Tangye, Stuart G

    2017-03-28

    Immunological memory is a cornerstone of adaptive immune responses in higher vertebrates. The remarkable ability to generate memory cells following Ag exposure, in the context of natural infection or immunization, provides long-lived protection against infectious diseases, often for the hosts' lifetime. Indeed, the generation of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells underpins the success of most vaccines. The concept of immunological memory is not new-it was first proposed nearly 2500 years ago. While our understanding of the complexities of humoral and cell-mediated memory continues to evolve, important aspects of this process remain unresolved. Here, we will provide an overview of recent advances in B-cell memory in mice and humans, and in health and disease.

  18. Improving Read Disturb Characteristics by Using Double Common Source Line and Dummy Switch Architecture in Multi Level Cell NAND Flash Memory with Low Power Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Myounggon; Park, Ki-Tae; Song, Youngsun; Lim, Youngho; Suh, Kang-Deog; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2011-04-01

    Two new NAND structures using double common source line (CSL) and dummy switch and their read operation schemes as a solution for NAND flash memories have been proposed. Compared with conventional scheme, the proposed read schemes improves read disturb characteristics beyond sub-30 nm technology node. By using proposed read scheme, the number of fail bits of proposed NAND was decreased than those of conventional NAND at read cycles. Also, it was proven that they contribute to improve the performance and suppress the power consumption. The proposed NAND was verified by both simulation and experimental measurements in a fabricated 40 nm multi level cell (MLC) NAND device.

  19. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    PubMed Central

    Macallan, Derek C.; Borghans, José A. M.; Asquith, Becca

    2017-01-01

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:28165397

  20. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View.

    PubMed

    Macallan, Derek C; Borghans, José A M; Asquith, Becca

    2017-02-04

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  1. Characteristics of Positive Autobiographical Memories in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluck, Susan; Alea, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of positive autobiographical memory narratives were examined in younger and older adults. Narratives were content-coded for the extent to which they contained indicators of affect, sensory imagery, and cognition. Affect was additionally assessed through self-report. Young adults expressed more positive affect and less sensory…

  2. Characteristics of Positive Autobiographical Memories in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluck, Susan; Alea, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of positive autobiographical memory narratives were examined in younger and older adults. Narratives were content-coded for the extent to which they contained indicators of affect, sensory imagery, and cognition. Affect was additionally assessed through self-report. Young adults expressed more positive affect and less sensory…

  3. Memory B cells in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Anita S.; Sciammas, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research on the humoral response to allografts has focused on circulating serum antibodies and the long-lived plasma cells that produce these antibodies. In contrast, the interrogation of the quiescent memory B cell compartment is technically more challenging and thus has not been incorporated into the clinical diagnostic or prognostic toolkit. In this review, we discuss new technologies that have allowed this heretofore enigmatic subset of B cells to be identified at quiescence and during a recall response. These technologies in experimental models are providing new insights into memory B cell heterogeneity with respect to their phenotype, cellular function and the antibodies they produce. Similar technologies are also allowing for the identification of comparable memory alloreactive B cells in transplant recipients. While much of the focus in transplant immunology has been on controlling the alloreactive B cell population, long-term transplant patient survival is critically dependent on protection by pathogen-specific memory B cells. Techniques are also available that allow the interrogation of memory B cell response to pathogen re-encounter. Thus we are poised in our ability toinvestigate how immunosuppression affects allo- as well as pathogen-specific memory B cells, and reason that these investigation can yield new insights that will be beneficial for graft as well as patient survival. PMID:25525921

  4. Initial T cell frequency dictates memory CD8+ T cell lineage commitment

    PubMed Central

    Marzo, Amanda L; Klonowski, Kimberly D; Le Bon, Agnes; Borrow, Persephone; Tough, David F; Lefrançois, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Memory T cells can be divided into central memory T cell (TCM cell) and effector memory T cell (TEM cell) subsets based on homing characteristics and effector functions. Whether TEM and TCM cells represent interconnected or distinct lineages is unclear, although the present paradigm suggests that TEM and TCM cells follow a linear differentiation pathway from naive T cells to effector T cells to TEM cells to TCM cells. We show here that naive T cell precursor frequency profoundly influenced the pathway along which CD8+ memory T cells developed. At low precursor frequency, those TEM cells generated represented a stable cell lineage that failed to further differentiate into TCM cells. These findings do not adhere to the present dogma regarding memory T cell generation and provide a means for identifying factors controlling memory T cell lineage commitment. PMID:16025119

  5. Cell memory-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers 'memory-based therapy', which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Cell memory-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers ‘memory-based therapy’, which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  7. Characteristics of near-death experiences memories as compared to real and imagined events memories.

    PubMed

    Thonnard, Marie; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Brédart, Serge; Dehon, Hedwige; Ledoux, Didier; Laureys, Steven; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memories of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ--Johnson et al., 1988): target memories (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all ps<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contained more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon.

  8. Characteristics of Near-Death Experiences Memories as Compared to Real and Imagined Events Memories

    PubMed Central

    Brédart, Serge; Dehon, Hedwige; Ledoux, Didier; Laureys, Steven; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memories of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memories (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all ps<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contained more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. PMID:23544039

  9. On the bipolar resistive-switching characteristics of Al₂O₃- and HfO₂-based memory cells operated in the soft-breakdown regime

    SciTech Connect

    Goux, L. Fantini, A.; Nigon, R.; Strangio, S.; Degraeve, R.; Kar, G.; Chen, Y. Y.; Jurczak, M.; Raghavan, N.; De Stefano, F.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-10-07

    In this article, we investigate extensively the bipolar-switching properties of Al₂O₃- and HfO₂-based resistive-switching memory cells operated at low current down to <1 μA. We show that the switching characteristics differ considerably from those typically reported for larger current range (>15 μA), which we relate as intrinsic to soft-breakdown (SBD) regime. We evidence a larger impact of the used switching-oxide in this current range, due to lower density of oxygen-vacancy (V{sub o}) defects in the SBD regime. In this respect, deep resetting and large memory window may be achieved using the stoichiometric Al₂O₃ material due to efficient V{sub o} annihilation, although no complete erasure of the conductive-filament (CF) is obtained. We finally emphasize that the conduction may be described by a quantum point-contact (QPC) model down to very low current level where only a few V{sub o} defects compose the QPC constriction. The large switching variability inherent to this latter aspect is mitigated by CF shape tuning through adequate engineering of an Al₂O₃\\HfO₂ bilayer.

  10. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  11. A hybrid ferroelectric-flash memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hyo; Byun, Chang Woo; Seok, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Chae, Hee Jae; Lee, Sol Kyu; Son, Se Wan; Ahn, Donghwan; Joo, Seung Ki

    2014-09-01

    A ferroelectric-flash (F-flash) memory cells having a metal-ferroelectric-nitride-oxynitride-silicon structure are demonstrated, and the ferroelectric materials were perovskite-dominated Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) crystallized by Pt gate electrode. The PZT thin-film as a blocking layer improves electrical and memorial performance where programming and erasing mechanism are different from the metal-ferroelectric-insulator-semiconductor device or the conventional silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon device. F-flash cells exhibit not only the excellent electrical transistor performance, having 442.7 cm2 V-1 s-1 of field-effect mobility, 190 mV dec-1 of substhreshold slope, and 8 × 105 on/off drain current ratio, but also a high reliable memory characteristics, having a large memory window (6.5 V), low-operating voltage (0 to -5 V), faster P/E switching speed (50/500 μs), long retention time (>10 years), and excellent fatigue P/E cycle (>105) due to the boosting effect, amplification effect, and energy band distortion of nitride from the large polarization. All these characteristics correspond to the best performances among conventional flash cells reported so far.

  12. Viral inoculum dose impacts memory T-cell inflation.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Anke; Welten, Suzanne P M; Arens, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Memory T-cell inflation develops during certain persistent viral infections and is characterized by the accumulation and maintenance of large numbers of effector-memory T cells, albeit with varying degrees in size and phenotype among infected hosts. The underlying mechanisms that control memory T-cell inflation are not yet fully understood. Here, we dissected CMV-specific memory T-cell formation and its connection to the initial infectious dose by varying the inoculum size. After low dose inoculum with mouse CMV, the accumulation of inflationary memory T cells was severely hampered and correlated with reduced reservoirs of latent virus in nonhematopoietic cells and diminished antigen-driven T-cell proliferation. Moreover, lowering of the initial viral dose turned the characteristic effector memory-like inflationary T cells into more central memory-like cells as evidenced by the cell-surface phenotype of CD27(high) , CD62L(+) , CD127(+) , and KLRG1(-) , and by improved secondary expansion potential. These data show the impact of the viral inoculum on the degree of memory T-cell inflation and provide a rationale for the observed variation of human CMV-specific T-cell responses in terms of magnitude and phenotype. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Effect of NiO crystallinity on forming characteristics in Pt/NiO/Pt cells as resistive switching memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yusuke; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2016-09-01

    Resistive switching (RS) in metal/oxide/metal stack structures plays a key role in resistive RAM. The formation and rupture of conductive filaments have been widely accepted as an origin of RS mechanism especially in binary transition metal oxides. Forming exhibits some analogies with a dielectric breakdown of SiO2 thin films. In this study, Time-Dependent Forming (TDF) characteristics of Pt/NiO/Pt stack structures have been investigated. The results revealed that the formation of conductive filaments at the forming process by applying constant voltage followed a weakest-link theory and that the weakest spots were almost randomly distributed in NiO thin films according to the Poisson statistics. Furthermore, the distribution of TDF characteristics depends on NiO crystallinity. A small variation of initial resistance tends to result in a large variation of time to forming and vice versa.

  14. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Novel therapies for memory cells in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, P; Calabresi, P A

    2015-06-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a major cause of morbidity, and their incidence and prevalence continue to rise. Treatments for these diseases are non-specific and result in significant adverse effects. Targeted therapies may help in improving the risk : benefit ratio associated with treatment. Immunological memory is an important feature of the vertebrate immune system that results in the production of cells that are long-lived and able to respond to antigens in a more robust manner. In the setting of autoimmunity this characteristic becomes detrimental due to the ongoing response to a self-antigen(s). These memory cells have been shown to play key roles in various autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. Memory T cells and B cells can be identified based on various molecules expressed on their surface. Memory T cells can be divided into three main categories - central memory, effector memory and resident memory cells. These subsets have different proliferative potential and cytokine-producing abilities. Utilizing differentially expressed surface molecules or downstream signalling pathway proteins in these cells it is now possible to target memory cells while sparing naive cells. We will discuss the various available options for such a strategy and several potential strategies that may yield successful therapies in the future.

  16. Vantage perspective during encoding: The effects on phenomenological memory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Nora; Krans, Julie; Näring, Gérard W B; Moulds, Michelle L; van Minnen, Agnes

    2016-05-01

    The vantage perspective from which a memory is retrieved influences the memory's emotional impact, intrusiveness, and phenomenological characteristics. This study tested whether similar effects are observed when participants were instructed to imagine the events from a specific perspective. Fifty student participants listened to a verbal report of car-accidents and visualized the scenery from either a field or observer perspective. There were no between-condition differences in emotionality of memories and the number of intrusions, but imagery experienced from a relative observer perspective was rated as less self-relevant. In contrast to earlier studies on memory retrieval, vantage perspective influenced phenomenological memory characteristics of the memory representation such as sensory details, and ratings of vividness and distancing of the memory. However, vantage perspective is most likely not a stable phenomenological characteristic itself. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  17. Energy-band engineering for tunable memory characteristics through controlled doping of reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Yang, Qing Dan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Yan, Yan; Lee, Chun-Sing; Roy, Vellaisamy A L

    2014-02-25

    Tunable memory characteristics are used in multioperational mode circuits where memory cells with various functionalities are needed in one combined device. It is always a challenge to obtain control over threshold voltage for multimode operation. On this regard, we use a strategy of shifting the work function of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in a controlled manner through doping gold chloride (AuCl3) and obtained a gradient increase of rGO work function. By inserting doped rGO as floating gate, a controlled threshold voltage (Vth) shift has been achieved in both p- and n-type low voltage flexible memory devices with large memory window (up to 4 times for p-type and 8 times for n-type memory devices) in comparison with pristine rGO floating gate memory devices. By proper energy band engineering, we demonstrated a flexible floating gate memory device with larger memory window and controlled threshold voltage shifts.

  18. Memory T cells in organ transplantation: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Jaclyn R.; Samy, Kannan P.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2017-01-01

    Antigen-experienced T cells, also known as memory T cells, are functionally and phenotypically distinct from naive T cells. Their enhanced expression of adhesion molecules and reduced requirement for co-stimulation enables them to mount potent and rapid recall responses to subsequent antigen encounters. Memory T cells generated in response to prior antigen exposures can cross-react with other nonidentical, but similar, antigens. This heterologous cross-reactivity not only enhances protective immune responses, but also engenders de novo alloimmunity. This latter characteristic is increasingly recognized as a potential barrier to allograft acceptance that is worthy of immunotherapeutic intervention, and several approaches have been investigated. Calcineurin inhibition effectively controls memory T-cell responses to allografts, but this benefit comes at the expense of increased infectious morbidity. Lymphocyte depletion eliminates allospecific T cells but spares memory T cells to some extent, such that patients do not completely lose protective immunity. Co-stimulation blockade is associated with reduced adverse-effect profiles and improved graft function relative to calcineurin inhibition, but lacks efficacy in controlling memory T-cell responses. Targeting the adhesion molecules that are upregulated on memory T cells might offer additional means to control co-stimulation-blockade-resistant memory T-cell responses. PMID:26923209

  19. Phenomenological Characteristics of Emotional Memories in Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mickley, Katherine R.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults sometimes show a “positivity effect” in memory, remembering proportionally more positive information than young adults. Using a modified Memory Characteristics, the present study examined whether emotional valence impacts the phenomenological qualities associated with young and older adults’ memories. Aging did not impact the effect of valence on the qualities of high-arousal memories. However, aging sometimes impacted subjective memory for detail of low-arousal memories: In Experiment 2, older adults reported remembering more thoughts, feelings, and temporal order details about positive low-arousal stimuli, while young adults’ ratings for those dimensions were higher for negative low-arousal stimuli. These findings suggest that valence most readily affects the qualities of young and older adults’ emotional memories when those memories are low in arousal. PMID:19468956

  20. Enhancement of the electrical characteristics for vertical NAND flash memory devices using a modified array structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sung Woo; Kim, Tae Whan

    2017-04-01

    The electrical characteristics of vertical NAND flash memory devices with a modified structure were investigated by using a technology computer-aided design simulation tool in order to reduce the cell-to-cell interference. The threshold voltage shift of memory devices with a modified cell with a protruding distance of 3 nm was reduced by 88% compared to that of conventional cell. When the programming operation of the target cell with a modified array structure is performed, the cell-to-cell interference decreases due to the programmed charges of adjacent cells.

  1. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-08-12

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5(+) TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses.

  2. Predicting which childhood memories persist: contributions of memory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carole; Morris, Gwynn; Baker-Ward, Lynne; Flynn, Susan

    2014-02-01

    This investigation identified memory-level predictors of the survivability of 4- to 13-year-old children's earliest recollections over a 2-year period. Data previously reported by Peterson, Warren, and Short (2011) were coded for inclusion of emotion terms and thematic, chronological, and contextual narrative coherence. In addition, the uniqueness and content of the reported events were classified, and the presence or absence of event reminders was recorded. The use of logistic multilevel modeling indicated that emotion and each dimension of coherence added to the prediction of a memory's survivability over and above age-related variance. In contrast, event uniqueness, content category, reminders, and word count were not associated with retention. The findings help explain why particular early memories endure over time.

  3. Intensity and memory characteristics of near-death experiences.

    PubMed

    Martial, Charlotte; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Cassol, Héléna; Didone, Vincent; Van Der Linden, Martial; Laureys, Steven

    2017-07-08

    Memories of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) seem to be very detailed and stable over time. At present, there is still no satisfactory explanation for the NDEs' rich phenomenology. Here we compared phenomenological characteristics of NDE memories with the reported experience's intensity. We included 152 individuals with a self-reported "classical" NDE (i.e. occurring in life-threatening conditions). All participants completed a mailed questionnaire that included a measure of phenomenological characteristics of memories (the Memory Characteristics Questionnaire; MCQ) and a measure of NDE's intensity (the Greyson NDE scale). Greyson NDE scale total score was positively correlated with MCQ total score, suggesting that participants who described more intense NDEs also reported more phenomenological memory characteristics of NDE. Using MCQ items, our study also showed that NDE's intensity is associated in particular with sensory details, personal importance and reactivation frequency variables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Mark A.; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR–peptide–MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool. PMID:26697013

  5. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Mark A; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR-peptide-MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool.

  6. Phenomenological characteristics of autobiographical memory in Korsakoff's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Haj, Mohamad; Nandrino, Jean-Louis

    2017-10-01

    A body of research suggests compromise of autobiographical memory in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS). The present paper extends this literature by investigating the subjective experience of autobiographical recall in the syndrome. Patients with KS and controls were asked to retrieve autobiographical memories. After memory retrieval, participants were asked to rate phenomenological characteristics of their memories (i.e., reliving, back in time, remembering, realness, visual imagery, auditory imagery, language, emotion, rehearsal, importance, spatial recall and temporal recall). Analysis showed lower "Mean Phenomenological Experience" in the Korsakoff patients than in controls. However, the Korsakoff patients attributed relatively high emotional value and importance to their memories. Although our findings suggest compromised phenomenological reliving of autobiographical memory in patients with KS, affective characteristics such as emotion and importance are likely to play a main role in the subjective experience of the past in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resistive switching characteristics and mechanisms in silicon oxide memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Wu, Xiaohan; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic unipolar SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAM) characterization, switching mechanisms, and applications have been investigated. Device structures, material compositions, and electrical characteristics are identified that enable ReRAM cells with high ON/OFF ratio, low static power consumption, low switching power, and high readout-margin using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS)-compatible SiOx-based materials. These ideas are combined with the use of horizontal and vertical device structure designs, composition optimization, electrical control, and external factors to help understand resistive switching (RS) mechanisms. Measured temperature effects, pulse response, and carrier transport behaviors lead to compact models of RS mechanisms and energy band diagrams in order to aid the development of computer-aided design for ultralarge-v scale integration. This chapter presents a comprehensive investigation of SiOx-based RS characteristics and mechanisms for the post-CMOS device era.

  8. The cellular memory disc of reprogrammed cells.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2013-04-01

    The crucial facts underlying the low efficiency of cellular reprogramming are poorly understood. Cellular reprogramming occurs in nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation, cell fusion, and lineage-switching experiments. Despite these advances, there are three fundamental problems to be addressed: (1) the majority of cells cannot be reprogrammed, (2) the efficiency of reprogramming cells is usually low, and (3) the reprogrammed cells developed from a patient's own cells activate immune responses. These shortcomings present major obstacles for using reprogramming approaches in customised cell therapy. In this Perspective, the author synthesises past and present observations in the field of cellular reprogramming to propose a theoretical picture of the cellular memory disc. The current hypothesis is that all cells undergo an endogenous and exogenous holographic memorisation such that parts of the cellular memory dramatically decrease the efficiency of reprogramming cells, act like a barrier against reprogramming in the majority of cells, and activate immune responses. Accordingly, the focus of this review is mainly to describe the cellular memory disc (CMD). Based on the present theory, cellular memory includes three parts: a reprogramming-resistance memory (RRM), a switch-promoting memory (SPM) and a culture-induced memory (CIM). The cellular memory arises genetically, epigenetically and non-genetically and affects cellular behaviours. [corrected].

  9. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROCs) in Recognition Memory: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Parks, Colleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is being used increasingly to examine the memory processes underlying recognition memory. The authors discuss the methodological issues involved in conducting and analyzing ROC results, describe the various models that have been developed to account for these results, review the behavioral empirical…

  10. Memory T cells in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Nelson D; Scott, Phillip

    2016-11-01

    Leishmania causes a spectrum of diseases that range from self-healing to fatal infections. Control of leishmania is dependent upon generating CD4+ Th1 cells that produce IFNγ, leading to macrophage activation and killing of the intracellular parasites. Following resolution of the disease, short-lived effector T cells, as well as long-lived central memory T cells and skin resident memory T cells, are retained and able to mediate immunity to a secondary infection. However, there is no vaccine for leishmaniasis, and the drugs used to treat the disease can be toxic and ineffective. While a live infection generates immunity, a successful vaccine will depend upon generating memory T cells that can be maintained without the continued presence of parasites. Since both central memory and skin resident memory T cells are long-lived, they may be the appropriate targets for a leishmaniasis vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  12. Targeting memory T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Mario R; Rigby, Mark R

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that leads to progressive destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Compared to healthy controls, a characteristic feature of patients with T1D is the presence of self-reactive T cells with a memory phenotype. These autoreactive memory T cells in both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) compartments are likely to be long-lived, strongly responsive to antigenic stimulation with less dependence on costimulation for activation and clonal expansion, and comparatively resistant to suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs) or downregulation by immune-modulating agents. Persistence of autoreactive memory T cells likely contributes to the difficulty in preventing disease progression in new-onset T1D and maintaining allogeneic islet transplants by regular immunosuppressive regimens. The majority of immune interventions that have demonstrated some success in preserving beta cell function in the new-onset period have been shown to deplete or modulate memory T cells. Based on these and other considerations, preservation of residual beta cells early after diagnosis or restoration of beta cell mass by use of stem cell or transplantation technology will require a successful strategy to control the autoreactive memory T cell compartment, which could include depletion, inhibition of homeostatic cytokines, induction of hyporesponsiveness, or a combination of these approaches.

  13. Spatiotemporal characteristics of soil temperature memory in China from observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jingyong

    2016-11-01

    Similar to soil moisture, soil temperature has a memory of atmospheric anomalies. However, soil temperature memory over China is still largely unclear, especially in observation. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics of soil temperature memory over China using subsurface (10-80 cm) and deep (160-320 cm) soil temperature data for 626 stations during the period of 1981 to 2005. The red noise method is adopted to estimate soil temperature memory. Results show that the soil temperature memory differs spatially and varies with soil depth and season. Influenced by climate regimes, soil temperature memory at all six layers (with depths of 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 cm) shows a similar spatial pattern dominated by a northwest to southeast gradient, with relatively high values over arid and semiarid areas of northwestern part of China and relatively low values over humid and semihumid areas of southeastern part of China. During all four seasons, memory lengths increase with soil depth. The average memory of subsurface soil over China can last several months, and for soil at 320 cm, it can be 1 year or more. We also find that seasonal and regional differences of soil temperature memory are stronger in deep soil layers than those in subsurface soil layers. Our findings suggest that soil temperature memory can offer potential for improving seasonal climate prediction over northwestern China. In the meanwhile, the limitations of the methods used in this study should be recognized.

  14. Associative memory cells: Formation, function and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-Hui; Cui, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Associative learning and memory are common activities in life, and their cellular infrastructures constitute the basis of cognitive processes. Although neuronal plasticity emerges after memory formation, basic units and their working principles for the storage and retrieval of associated signals remain to be revealed. Current reports indicate that associative memory cells, through their mutual synapse innervations among the co-activated sensory cortices, are recruited to fulfill the integration, storage and retrieval of multiple associated signals, and serve associative thinking and logical reasoning. In this review, we aim to summarize associative memory cells in their formation, features and functional impacts. PMID:28408978

  15. Memory characteristics of Co nanocrystal memory device with HfO2 as blocking oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F. M.; Chang, T. C.; Liu, P. T.; Yeh, P. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Lin, J. Y.; Sze, S. M.; Lou, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    In this letter, the Co nanocrystals using SiO2 and HfO2 as the tunneling and the control dielectric with memory effect has been fabricated. A significant memory effect was observed through the electrical measurements. Under the low voltage operation of 5V, the memory window was estimated to ˜1V. The retention characteristics were tested to be robust. Also, the endurance of the memory device was not degraded up to 106 write/erase cycles. The processing of the structure is compatible with the current manufacturing technology of semiconductor industry.

  16. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease.

  17. Development and psychometric properties of a new measure for memory phenomenology: The Autobiographical Memory Characteristics Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Boyacioglu, Inci; Akfirat, Serap

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a valid and reliable measure for the phenomenology of autobiographical memories. The psychometric properties of the Autobiographical Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (AMCQ) were tested in three studies: the factor structure of the AMCQ was examined for childhood memories in Study 1 (N = 305); for autobiographical memories related to romantic relationships in Study 2 (N = 197); and for self-defining memories in Study 3 (N = 262). The explanatory factor analyses performed for each memory type demonstrated the consistency of the AMCQ factor structure across all memory types; while a confirmatory factor analysis on the data garnered from all three studies supported the constructs for the autobiographical memory characteristics defined by the researchers. The AMCQ consists of 63 items and 14 factors, and the internal consistency values of all 14 scales were ranged between .66 and .97. The relationships between the AMCQ scales related to gender and individual emotions, as well as the intercorrelations among the scales, were consistent with both theoretical expectations and previous findings. The results of all the three studies indicated that this new instrument is a reliable and robust measure for memory phenomenology.

  18. The Evolving Roles of Memory Immune Cells in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhao; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C

    2015-10-01

    Memory cells are the products of immune responses but also exert significant impact on subsequent immunity and immune tolerance, thus placing them in a unique position in transplant research. Memory cells are heterogeneous, including not only memory T cells but also memory B cells and innate memory cells. Memory cells are a critical component of protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially in immunosuppressed patients, but they also mediate graft loss and tolerance resistance. Recent studies suggest that some memory cells unexpectedly act as regulatory cells, promoting rather than hindering transplant survival. This functional diversity makes therapeutic targeting of memory cells a challenging task in transplantation. In this article, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of memory cells, focusing on diversity of memory cells and mechanisms involved in their induction and functions. We also provide a broad overview on the challenges and opportunities in targeting memory cells in the induction of transplant tolerance.

  19. The evolving roles of memory immune cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenhao; Ghobrial, Rafik M.; Li, Xian C.

    2015-01-01

    Memory cells are the products of immune responses but also exert significant impact on subsequent immunity and immune tolerance, thus placing them in a unique position in transplant research. Memory cells are heterogeneous, including not only memory T cells but also memory B cells and innate memory cells. Memory cells are a critical component of protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially in immunosuppressed patients, but they also mediate graft loss and tolerance resistance. Recent studies suggest that some memory cells unexpectedly act as regulatory cells, promoting rather than hindering transplant survival. This functional diversity makes therapeutic targeting of memory cells a challenging task in transplantation. In this article we highlight recent advances in our understanding of memory cells, focusing on diversity of memory cells and mechanisms involved in their induction and functions. We also provide a broad overview on the challenges and opportunities in targeting memory cells in the induction of transplant tolerance. PMID:26102615

  20. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  1. Modeling of Sonos Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories (NVSMS) have many advantages. These memories are electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs). They utilize low programming voltages, endure extended erase/write cycles, are inherently resistant to radiation, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. The SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. The SONOS floating gate charge and voltage, tunneling current, threshold voltage, and drain current were characterized during an erase cycle. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental device data.

  2. In utero development of memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhivaki, Dania; Lo-Man, Richard

    2017-09-12

    Pathogen-specific immune memory develops subsequent to primary exposure to antigen, mainly in the context of infection or vaccination to provide protection. Although a safe fetal life requires a tolerogenic environment in order to circumvent unnecessary inflammatory responses, it needs to be prepared in utero to face the microbial environment outside the womb. The possibility of immune memory generation in the fetus would help such transition providing protection in early life. This requires fetal T cell exposure to foreign antigens presented by dendritic cells. There are evidences of fetal T cell priming in several cases of congenital infections or in uninfected children born of infected mothers. Fetal T cell memory seems to arise also without any reported infection during pregnancy. Such memory T cells display various effector functions, including Th1, Th2, or Th17 profiles, raising the issue of benefits and risks for postnatal life when considering maternal vaccination, susceptibility to infection, or environmental allergen sensitization.

  3. Memory Engram Cells Have Come of Age.

    PubMed

    Tonegawa, Susumu; Liu, Xu; Ramirez, Steve; Redondo, Roger

    2015-09-02

    The idea that memory is stored in the brain as physical alterations goes back at least as far as Plato, but further conceptualization of this idea had to wait until the 20(th) century when two guiding theories were presented: the "engram theory" of Richard Semon and Donald Hebb's "synaptic plasticity theory." While a large number of studies have been conducted since, each supporting some aspect of each of these theories, until recently integrative evidence for the existence of engram cells and circuits as defined by the theories was lacking. In the past few years, the combination of transgenics, optogenetics, and other technologies has allowed neuroscientists to begin identifying memory engram cells by detecting specific populations of cells activated during specific learning epochs and by engineering them not only to evoke recall of the original memory, but also to alter the content of the memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular regulation of effector and memory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, John T; Wherry, E John; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a cardinal feature of adaptive immunity and an important goal of vaccination strategies. Here we highlight advances in the understanding of the diverse T lymphocyte subsets that provide acute and long-term protection from infection. These include new insights into the transcription factors, and the upstream ‘pioneering’ factors that regulate their accessibility to key sites of gene regulation, as well as metabolic regulators that contribute to the differentiation of effector and memory subsets; ontogeny and defining characteristics of tissue-resident memory lymphocytes; and origins of the remarkable heterogeneity exhibited by activated T cells. Collectively, these findings underscore progress in delineating the underlying pathways that control diversification in T cell responses but also reveal gaps in the knowledge, as well as the challenges that arise in the application of this knowledge to rationally elicit desired T cell responses through vaccination and immunotherapy. PMID:25396352

  5. Hoxb4 Overexpression in CD4 Memory Phenotype T Cells Increases the Central Memory Population upon Homeostatic Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marilaine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Bijl, Janet J.

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation. PMID:24324706

  6. Innate and virtual memory T cells in man.

    PubMed

    Van Kaer, Luc

    2015-07-01

    A hallmark of the antigen-specific B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is their capacity to "remember" pathogens long after they are first encountered, a property that forms the basis for effective vaccine development. However, studies in mice have provided strong evidence that some naive T cells can develop characteristics of memory T cells in the absence of foreign antigen encounters. Such innate memory T cells may develop in response to lymphopenia or the presence of high levels of the cytokine IL-4, and have also been identified in unmanipulated animals, a phenomenal referred to as "virtual memory." While the presence of innate memory T cells in mice is now widely accepted, their presence in humans has not yet been fully validated. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Jacomet et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45:1926-1933] provide the best evidence to date for innate memory T cells in humans. These findings may contribute significantly to our understanding of human immunity to microbial pathogens and tumors.

  7. Conditions of steady switching in phase-transition memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. I. Salnikov, S. M.; Anufriev, Yu. V.

    2015-04-15

    Three types of non-volatile memory cells of different designs based on phase transitions are developed and implemented. The effect of the design features of the cells and their active-region sizes on the switching characteristics and normal operation of the cells is considered as a whole. The causes of failure of the cells are analyzed from the obtained series of scanning electron images upon level-by-level etching of the samples. It is shown that the cell design is the most critical factor from the viewpoint of switching to the high-resistance state. The causes of this fact are analyzed and the criterion for providing the steady operation of cells of non-volatile memory based on phase transitions is formulated.

  8. Optimal memory configuration analysis in tri-hybrid solid-state drives with storage class memory and multi-level cell/triple-level cell NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Chihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Sugiyama, Yusuke; Yamaga, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Ken

    2017-04-01

    This paper analyzes the best mix of memories in a tri-hybrid solid-state drive (SSD) with storage class memory (SCM) and multi-level cell (MLC)/triple-level cell (TLC) NAND flash memory. SCM is fast but its cost is high. Although MLC NAND flash memory is slow, it is more cost effective than SCM. For further cost efficiency, TLC NAND flash memory is denser and less expensive than MLC NAND flash. Performance of tri-hybrid SSD is evaluated in various memory configurations. Moreover, the optimum memory configuration is changed according to the application characteristics. If 10% cost increase is allowed compared to the MLC NAND flash only SSD, SCM/MLC NAND flash hybrid SSD provides the best performance with hot/random workload, whereas SCM/MLC/TLC NAND flash tri-hybrid SSD achieves the best for hot/sequential and cold/random workloads. In addition, it is possible to add long latency but low-cost SCM to the tri-hybrid SSD. As a result, tri-hybrid SSD with slow SCM achieves the best performance.

  9. Akt signaling is critical for memory CD8(+) T-cell development and tumor immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Rogel, Anne; Willoughby, Jane E; Buchan, Sarah L; Leonard, Henry J; Thirdborough, Stephen M; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen

    2017-02-14

    Memory CD8(+) T cells confer long-term immunity against tumors, and anticancer vaccines therefore should maximize their generation. Multiple memory CD8(+) T-cell subsets with distinct functional and homing characteristics exist, but the signaling pathways that regulate their development are ill defined. Here we examined the role of the serine/threonine kinase Akt in the generation of protective immunity by CD8(+) T cells. Akt is known to be activated by the T-cell antigen receptor and the cytokine IL-2, but its role in T-cell immunity in vivo has not been explored. Using CD8(+) T cells from pdk1(K465E/K465E) knockin mice, we found that decreased Akt activity inhibited the survival of T cells during the effector-to-memory cell transition and abolished their differentiation into C-X-C chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3)(lo)CD43(lo) effector-like memory cells. Consequently, antitumor immunity by CD8(+) T cells that display defective Akt signaling was substantially diminished during the memory phase. Reduced memory T-cell survival and altered memory cell differentiation were associated with up-regulation of the proapoptotic protein Bim and the T-box transcription factor eomesodermin, respectively. These findings suggest an important role for effector-like memory CD8(+) T cells in tumor immune surveillance and identify Akt as a key signaling node in the development of protective memory CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  10. Akt signaling is critical for memory CD8+ T-cell development and tumor immune surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Anne; Willoughby, Jane E.; Buchan, Sarah L.; Leonard, Henry J.; Thirdborough, Stephen M.; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen

    2017-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells confer long-term immunity against tumors, and anticancer vaccines therefore should maximize their generation. Multiple memory CD8+ T-cell subsets with distinct functional and homing characteristics exist, but the signaling pathways that regulate their development are ill defined. Here we examined the role of the serine/threonine kinase Akt in the generation of protective immunity by CD8+ T cells. Akt is known to be activated by the T-cell antigen receptor and the cytokine IL-2, but its role in T-cell immunity in vivo has not been explored. Using CD8+ T cells from pdk1K465E/K465E knockin mice, we found that decreased Akt activity inhibited the survival of T cells during the effector-to-memory cell transition and abolished their differentiation into C-X-C chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3)loCD43lo effector-like memory cells. Consequently, antitumor immunity by CD8+ T cells that display defective Akt signaling was substantially diminished during the memory phase. Reduced memory T-cell survival and altered memory cell differentiation were associated with up-regulation of the proapoptotic protein Bim and the T-box transcription factor eomesodermin, respectively. These findings suggest an important role for effector-like memory CD8+ T cells in tumor immune surveillance and identify Akt as a key signaling node in the development of protective memory CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:28137869

  11. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen.

  12. Hippocampal place cells, context, and episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Smith, David M; Mizumori, Sheri J Y

    2006-01-01

    Although most observers agree that the hippocampus has a critical role in learning and memory, there remains considerable debate about the precise functional contribution of the hippocampus to these processes. Two of the most influential accounts hold that the primary function of the hippocampus is to generate cognitive maps and to mediate episodic memory processes. The well-documented spatial firing patterns (place fields) of hippocampal neurons in rodents, along with the spatial learning impairments observed with hippocampal damage support the cognitive mapping hypothesis. The amnesia for personally experienced events seen in humans with hippocampal damage and the data of animal models, which show severe memory deficits associated with hippocampal lesions, support the episodic memory account. Although an extensive literature supports each of these hypotheses, a specific contribution of place cells to episodic memory has not been clearly demonstrated. Recent data from our laboratory, together with previous findings, indicate that hippocampal place fields and neuronal responses to task-relevant stimuli are highly sensitive to the context, even when the contexts are defined by abstract task demands rather than the spatial geometry of the environment. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that place fields reflect a more general context processing function of the hippocampus. Hippocampal context representations could serve to differentiate contexts and prime the relevant memories and behaviors. Since episodic memories, by definition, include information about the time and place where the episode occurred, contextual information is a necessary prerequisite for any episodic memory. Thus, place fields contribute importantly to episodic memory as part of the needed context representations. Additionally, recent findings indicate that hippocampal neurons differentiate contexts at progressively finer levels of detail, suggesting a hierarchical coding scheme which

  13. Adoptive transfer of effector CD8+ T cells derived from central memory cells establishes persistent T cell memory in primates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolina; Jensen, Michael C; Lansdorp, Peter M; Gough, Mike; Elliott, Carole; Riddell, Stanley R

    2008-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells that have been expanded ex vivo is being actively pursued to treat infections and malignancy in humans. The T cell populations that are available for adoptive immunotherapy include both effector memory and central memory cells, and these differ in phenotype, function, and homing. The efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy requires that transferred T cells persist in vivo, but identifying T cells that can reproducibly survive in vivo after they have been numerically expanded by in vitro culture has proven difficult. Here we show that in macaques, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell clones derived from central memory T cells, but not effector memory T cells, persisted long-term in vivo, reacquired phenotypic and functional properties of memory T cells, and occupied memory T cell niches. These results demonstrate that clonally derived CD8+ T cells isolated from central memory T cells are distinct from those derived from effector memory T cells and retain an intrinsic capacity that enables them to survive after adoptive transfer and revert to the memory cell pool. These results could have significant implications for the selection of T cells to expand or to engineer for adoptive immunotherapy of human infections or malignancy.

  14. A Novel Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Memory Cell Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; Bailey, Mark; Ho, Fat Duen

    2004-01-01

    The use of a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MFSFET) in a resistive-load SRAM memory cell has been investigated A typical two-transistor resistive-load SRAM memory cell architecture is modified by replacing one of the NMOS transistors with an n-channel MFSFET. The gate of the MFSFET is connected to a polling voltage pulse instead of the other NMOS transistor drain. The polling voltage pulses are of sufficient magnitude to saturate the ferroelectric gate material and force the MFSFET into a particular logic state. The memory cell circuit is further modified by the addition of a PMOS transistor and a load resistor in order to improve the retention characteristics of the memory cell. The retention characteristics of both the "1" and "0" logic states are simulated. The simulations show that the MFSFET memory cell design can maintain both the "1" and "0" logic states for a long period of time.

  15. The analysis of polarization characteristics on 40nm memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Minae; Park, Chanha; You, Taejun; Yang, Hyunjo; Min, Young-Hong; Park, Ki-Yeop; Yim, Donggyu; Park, Sungki

    2009-03-01

    Hyper NA system has been introduced to develop sub-60nm node memory devices. Especially memory industries including DRAM and NAND Flash business have driven much finer technology to improve productivity. Polarization at hyper NA has been well known as important optical technology to enhance imaging performance and also achieve very low k1 process. The source polarization on dense structure has been used as one of the major RET techniques. The process capabilities of various layers under specific illumination and polarization have been explored. In this study, polarization characteristic on 40nm memory device will be analyzed. Especially, TE (Transverse Electric) polarization and linear X-Y polarization on hyper NA ArF system will be compared and investigated. First, IPS (Intensity in Preferred State) value will be measured with PMM (Polarization Metrology Module) to confirm polarization characteristic of each machine before simulation. Next simulation will be done to estimate the CD variation impact of each polarization to different illumination. Third, various line and space pattern of DRAM and Flash device will be analyzed under different polarized condition to see the effect of polarization on CD of actual wafer. Finally, conclusion will be made for this experiment and future work will be discussed. In this paper, the behavior of 40nm node memory devices with two types of polarization is presented and the guidelines for polarization control is discussed based on the patterning performances.

  16. Island cells control temporal association memory.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takashi; Pignatelli, Michele; Suh, Junghyup; Kohara, Keigo; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Abe, Kuniya; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2014-02-21

    Episodic memory requires associations of temporally discontiguous events. In the entorhinal-hippocampal network, temporal associations are driven by a direct pathway from layer III of the medial entorhinal cortex (MECIII) to the hippocampal CA1 region. However, the identification of neural circuits that regulate this association has remained unknown. In layer II of entorhinal cortex (ECII), we report clusters of excitatory neurons called island cells, which appear in a curvilinear matrix of bulblike structures, directly project to CA1, and activate interneurons that target the distal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Island cells suppress the excitatory MECIII input through the feed-forward inhibition to control the strength and duration of temporal association in trace fear memory. Together, the two EC inputs compose a control circuit for temporal association memory.

  17. Experimental realization of a multiplexed quantum memory with 225 individually accessible memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Y-F; Jiang, N.; Chang, W.; Yang, H-X; Li, C.; Duan, L-M

    2017-01-01

    To realize long-distance quantum communication and quantum network, it is required to have multiplexed quantum memory with many memory cells. Each memory cell needs to be individually addressable and independently accessible. Here we report an experiment that realizes a multiplexed DLCZ-type quantum memory with 225 individually accessible memory cells in a macroscopic atomic ensemble. As a key element for quantum repeaters, we demonstrate that entanglement with flying optical qubits can be stored into any neighboring memory cells and read out after a programmable time with high fidelity. Experimental realization of a multiplexed quantum memory with many individually accessible memory cells and programmable control of its addressing and readout makes an important step for its application in quantum information technology. PMID:28480891

  18. Experimental realization of a multiplexed quantum memory with 225 individually accessible memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Y.-F.; Jiang, N.; Chang, W.; Yang, H.-X.; Li, C.; Duan, L.-M.

    2017-05-01

    To realize long-distance quantum communication and quantum network, it is required to have multiplexed quantum memory with many memory cells. Each memory cell needs to be individually addressable and independently accessible. Here we report an experiment that realizes a multiplexed DLCZ-type quantum memory with 225 individually accessible memory cells in a macroscopic atomic ensemble. As a key element for quantum repeaters, we demonstrate that entanglement with flying optical qubits can be stored into any neighboring memory cells and read out after a programmable time with high fidelity. Experimental realization of a multiplexed quantum memory with many individually accessible memory cells and programmable control of its addressing and readout makes an important step for its application in quantum information technology.

  19. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  20. Memory B cell subpopulations in the aged.

    PubMed

    Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Aquino, Alessandra; Bulati, Matteo; Di Lorenzo, Gabriele; Listì, Florinda; Vitello, Salvatore; Lio, Domenico; Candore, Giuseppina; Clesi, Gioacchino; Caruso, Calogero

    2006-01-01

    The literature on immunosenescence has focused mainly on T cell impairment. With the aim of gaining insight into B cell immunosenescence, the authors investigated the serum IgD levels in 24 young and 21 old people and analyzed their relationship with the number of CD19+CD27+ memory cells. Serum IgD were quantified by the use of radial immunodiffusion and the lymphocyte population CD19+CD27+ was identified by a FACScan flow cytometer. Serum IgD levels were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) in old subjects, and the percentage of CD19+CD27+ lymphocytes were significantly increased (p = 0.01) in old subjects. Finally, a significant negative correlation was found (p = 0.01) between serum concentrations of IgD and CD19+CD27+. The present results show that the levels of IgD are negatively age-related to the amount of B memory cells. This suggests that the B repertoire available to respond to new antigenic challenges is decreased in the elderly. In fact, many memory IgD- B cells fill immunologic space, and the number of naïve IgD+ B cells is dramatically decreased. Therefore, these preliminary results suggest that a decrease of naïve IgD+CD27- B cells and a concomitant increase of memory IgD-CD27+ B cells could represent hallmarks of B immunosenescence, might provide biomarkers related to the lifespan of humans, and could be useful for the evaluation of antiaging treatments.

  1. Memory characteristics of MNOS capacitors fabricated with PECVD silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliq, M. A.; Shams, Q. A.; Brown, W. D.; Naseem, H. A.

    1988-08-01

    The memory performance of metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) capacitors, fabricated with "as-deposited" PECVD silicon nitride, have been evaluated using high-frequency, capacitance-voltage characteristics. A 4.2 V memory window was achieved for a programming field of 6 × 10 6V/ cm and a pulse width of 1 μs. Decay rates varied between 0.1 and 1.0 V per decade of time in seconds depending on nitride deposition conditions and initial window size. Devices endurance cycled to 10 8 suffered a small decrease in window size and a slight shift in memory window center. Retention data taken following endurance cycling to 10 7 showed a negligible degradation of decay rate. Vertical scaling of the nitride layer to approximately 100 Å yielded devices which could be programmed with 5-8 V. Nitride films were annealed at temperatures of 400-800°C. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis revealed a severe loss of hydrogen for temperatures above 400°C. Memory performance of the films degraded in parallel with loss of hydrogen.

  2. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape ‘A’ to a memorized permanent shape ‘B’ upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology.

  3. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape ‘A’ to a memorized permanent shape ‘B’ upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology. PMID:27877747

  4. IMMUNOLOGIC MEMORY CELLS OF BONE MARROW ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Harold C.; Cudkowicz, Gustavo

    1972-01-01

    Individual immunocompetent precursor cells of (C57BL/10 x C3H)F1 mouse marrow generate, on transplantation, three to five times more antibody-forming cells localized in recipient spleens during secondary than during primary immune responses. The increased burst size is immunologically specific since antigens of horse and chicken erythrocytes and of Salmonella typhimurium do not cause this effect in marrow cells responsive to sheep red blood cells. Both sensitized and nonsensitized precursors require the helper function of thymus-derived cells and antigen for the final steps of differentiation and maturation. The burst size of primed precursor cells is the same after cooperative interactions with virgin or educated helper cells of thymic origin. The greater potential of these marrow precursors may be attributable to self-replication and migration before differentiation into antibody-forming descendants. In fact, the progeny cells of primed precursor units are distributed among a multiplicity of foci, whereas those of nonimmune precursors are clustered into one focus. The described properties of specifically primed marrow precursors are those underlying immunologic memory. It remains to be established whether memory cells are induced or selected by antigens and whether the thymus plays a role in this process. PMID:4553850

  5. Effect with high density nano dot type storage layer structure on 20 nm planar NAND flash memory characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Seo, Moon-Sik; Park, Sung-kye; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The merits, concerns and design principle for the future nano dot (ND) type NAND flash memory cell are clarified, by considering the effect of storage layer structure on NAND flash memory characteristics. The characteristics of the ND cell for a NAND flash memory in comparison with the floating gate type (FG) is comprehensively studied through the read, erase, program operation, and the cell to cell interference with device simulation. Although the degradation of the read throughput (0.7% reduction of the cell current) and slower program time (26% smaller programmed threshold voltage shift) with high density (10 × 1012 cm-2) ND NAND are still concerned, the suppress of the cell to cell interference with high density (10 × 1012 cm-2) plays the most important part for scaling and multi-level cell (MLC) operation in comparison with the FG NAND. From these results, the design knowledge is shown to require the control of the number of nano dots rather than the higher nano dot density, from the viewpoint of increasing its memory capacity by MLC operation and suppressing threshold voltage variability caused by the number of dots in the storage layer. Moreover, in order to increase its memory capacity, it is shown the tunnel oxide thickness with ND should be designed thicker (>3 nm) than conventional designed ND cell for programming/erasing with direct tunneling mechanism.

  6. MEMORY T CELLS IN TRANSPLANTATION—PROGRESS AND CHALLENGES

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian C.; Kloc, Malgosia; Ghobrial, Rafik M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Memory T cells present a different set of challenges to transplant patients; they are needed for protection again invading pathogens, especially under conditions of immunosuppression. But their presence also threatens transplant survival, as some of them are alloreactive. Efforts to resolve this paradox will be critical in the induction of transplant tolerance. Recent findings There has been significant progress made in the past few years in the areas of population diversity of memory T cells, metabolic control of their induction, and mechanisms and pathways involved in memory cell exhaustion. Multiple targets on memory T cells have been identified and some of which are under vigorous testing in various transplant models. Summary Memory T cells are both friends and foes to transplant patients, and tolerance strategies should selectively target alloreactive memory T cells and leave other memory cells unaltered. This remains a major challenge in the clinic. PMID:23838642

  7. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.

  8. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    DOE PAGES

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-08

    Here, the tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valuedmore » non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.« less

  9. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    PubMed Central

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-01-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing. PMID:28176866

  10. Combination of volatile and non-volatile functions in a single memory cell and its scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Hwang, Sungmin; Lee, Jong-Ho; Park, Byung-Gook

    2017-04-01

    A single memory cell which combines volatile memory and non-volatile memory functions has been demonstrated with an independent asymmetric dual-gate structure. Owing to the second gate whose dielectric is composed of oxide/nitride/oxide layers, floating body effect was observed even on a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator device and the non-volatile memory function was measured. In addition, read retention characteristics of the volatile memory function depending on the non-volatile memory state were evaluated and analyzed. Further scalability in body thickness was also verified through simulation studies. These results indicate that the proposed device is a promising candidate for high-density embedded memory applications.

  11. Memory characteristics of recently imagined events and real events experienced previously.

    PubMed

    Stern, E R; Rotello, C M

    2000-01-01

    In two experiments, we evaluated the memory characteristics of real and imagined events as they changed over time. Memories of real events were richer than memories of imagined events, and memories of recent events were richer than of events from a week earlier. These differences interacted such that memories of real events performed in week 1 were very similar to memories of events that were imagined in week 2. Source monitoring was tested and implications for the repressed or recovered memory debate are considered.

  12. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  13. Transactive memory system links work team characteristics and performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Xue; Hempel, Paul S; Han, Yu-Lan; Tjosvold, Dean

    2007-11-01

    Teamwork and coordination of expertise among team members with different backgrounds are increasingly recognized as important for team effectiveness. Recently, researchers have examined how team members rely on transactive memory system (TMS; D. M. Wegner, 1987) to share their distributed knowledge and expertise. To establish the ecological validity and generality of TMS research findings, this study sampled 104 work teams from a variety of organizational settings in China and examined the relationships between team characteristics, TMS, and team performance. The results suggest that task interdependence, cooperative goal interdependence, and support for innovation are positively related to work teams' TMS and that TMS is related to team performance; moreover, structural equation analysis indicates that TMS mediates the team characteristics-performance links. Findings have implications both for team leaders to manage their work teams effectively and for team members to improve their team performance. (c) 2007 APA

  14. Spanish Adaptation of the Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ).

    PubMed

    Pegalajar, Joaquín; Acosta, Alberto; Castillo, Miguel; Higueras, Lorenzo; Padilla, José-Luis

    2015-12-23

    The Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ) was developed by Johnson, Foley, Suengas, and Raye (1988) to assess the characteristics of memories of external and internal origin, postulated in the source monitoring model (Johnson, Hashtroudi, & Lindsay, 1993). The MCQ was translated into Spanish using a back-translation method. Psychometric properties of the translated MCQ were tested using responses collected from an experimental study simulating a forensic context. Ten police officers and 8 psychologists individually interviewed 240 university students who completed the MCQ after reporting what they had seen in a film. Half of the participants were asked to tell the truth, while the other half were asked to lie. The results have shown adequate psychometric properties of the Spanish MCQ items for the total sample and across experimental conditions. Cronbach's alpha value was .79 for the total sample, .78 for the honest condition, and .76 for the lie condition. Validity evidence of dimensionality supports that the factor structure of Spanish MCQ was equivalent to that proposed by the authors of the original version. Also, a two-factor ANOVA (video clip x condition) was performed to analyze experimental data. Neither interaction effects, F(236) = 1.189; p = .277, nor main effects were found to be significant between those asked to tell the truth and those asked to lie. These results demonstrate that the Spanish MCQ has adequate psychometric properties.

  15. Antigen Experience Shapes Phenotype and Function of Memory Th1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Aaruni; Williams, Matthew A.; Harty, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Primary and secondary (boosted) memory CD8 T cells exhibit differences in gene expression, phenotype and function. The impact of repeated antigen stimulations on memory CD4 T cells is largely unknown. To address this issue, we utilized LCMV and Listeria monocytogenes infection of mice to characterize primary and secondary antigen (Ag)-specific Th1 CD4 T cell responses. Ag-specific primary memory CD4 T cells display a CD62LloCCR7hi CD27hi CD127hi phenotype and are polyfunctional (most produce IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2). Following homologous prime-boost immunization we observed pathogen-specific differences in the rate of CD62L and CCR7 upregulation on memory CD4 T cells as well as in IL-2+IFNγco-production by secondary effectors. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of memory Th1 cells was observed following heterologous prime-boost immunization, wherein secondary memory CD4 T cells acquired phenotypic and functional characteristics dictated by the boosting agent rather than the primary immunizing agent. Our data also demonstrate that secondary memory Th1 cells accelerated neutralizing Ab formation in response to LCMV infection, suggesting enhanced capacity of this population to provide quality help for antibody production. Collectively these data have important implications for prime-boost vaccination strategies that seek to enhance protective immune responses mediated by Th1 CD4 T cell responses. PMID:23762323

  16. Pulse area dependent gradual resistance switching characteristics of CMOS compatible SiNx-based resistive memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Hwi; Kim, Sungjun; Bang, Suhyun; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Lee, Dong Keun; Cho, Seongjae; Lee, Jong-Ho; Park, Byung-Gook

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we investigated the gradual resistance switching phenomenon of our fabricated silicon nitride-based bipolar RRAM. By positive (set) and negative (reset) pulses applied between top electrode (TE) and bottom electrode (BE), the resistance state of the RRAM cell was delicately controlled. We checked the effect of pulse width, rise and fall time and pulse amplitude on the change of the resistance state. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that change of resistance state is determined by applied pulse area above a certain threshold voltage. The memory cell and gradual resistance change characteristics would be used to implement accurate and reliable synaptic devices in low power neuromorphic system.

  17. Memory B Cells of Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Florian; Shlomchik, Mark

    2017-01-30

    Wecomprehensively review memory B cells (MBCs), covering the definition of MBC and their identities and subsets, how MBCs are generated, where they are localized, how they are maintained, and how they are reactivated. Whereas naive B cells adopt multiple fates upon stimulation, MBCs are more restricted in their responses. Evolving work reveals that the MBC compartment in mice and humans consists of distinct subpopulations with differing effector functions. We discuss the various approaches to define subsets and subset-specific roles. A major theme is the need to both deliver faster effector function upon reexposure and readapt to antigenically variant pathogens while avoiding burnout, which would be the result if all MBCs generated only terminal effector function. We discuss cell-intrinsic differences in gene expression and signaling that underlie differences in function between MBCs and naive B cells and among MBC subsets and how this leads to memory responses. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Immunology Volume 35 is April 26, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  18. CD4 T-Cell Memory Generation and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, David J.; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance. PMID:24940912

  19. CD4 T-cell memory generation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gasper, David J; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance.

  20. Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-02-10

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  1. Quantifying Susceptibility of CD4+ Stem Memory T-Cells to Infection by Laboratory Adapted and Clinical HIV-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs. PMID:24517971

  2. Quiescence of Memory CD8(+) T Cells Is Mediated by Regulatory T Cells through Inhibitory Receptor CTLA-4.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vandana; Penny, Laura Anne; Yuzefpolskiy, Yevgeniy; Baumann, Florian Martin; Sarkar, Surojit

    2015-06-16

    Immune memory cells are poised to rapidly expand and elaborate effector functions upon reinfection yet exist in a functionally quiescent state. The paradigm is that memorycells remain inactive due to lack of T cell receptor (TCR) stimuli. Here, we report that regulatory T (Treg) cells orchestrate memorycell quiescence by suppressing effector and proliferation programs through inhibitory receptor, cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 (CTLA-4). Loss of Treg cells resulted in activation of genome-wide transcriptional programs characteristic of effector T cells and drove transitioning as well as established memory CD8(+) T cells toward terminally differentiated KLRG-1(hi)IL-7Rα(lo)GzmB(hi) phenotype, with compromised metabolic fitness, longevity, polyfunctionality, and protective efficacy. CTLA-4 functionally replaced Treg cells in trans to rescue memorycell defects and restore homeostasis. These studies present the CTLA-4-CD28-CD80/CD86 axis as a potential target to accelerate vaccine-induced immunity and improve T cell memory quality in current cancer immunotherapies proposing transient Treg cell ablation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Statistical analysis of the correlations between cell performance and its initial states in contact resistive random access memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Yun Feng; Hsieh, Wei Ting; Che Chen, Chun; King, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2017-04-01

    Variability has been one of the critical challenges in the implementation of large resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays. Wide variations in set/reset, read and cycling characteristics can significantly reduce the design margin and feasibility of a memory array. Predicting the characteristics of RRAM cells is constructive to provide insights and to adjust the memory operations accordingly. In this study, a strong correlation between the cell performance and its initial state is found in contact RRAM (CRRAM) cells by 28 nm CMOS logic technology. Furthermore, a verify-reset operation is proposed to identify the type of conductive filament (CF) in a cell. Distinctive CRRAM characteristics are found to be linked directly to initial CFs, enabling preliminary screening and adaptive resets to address the large variability problems in sizable CRRAM arrays.

  4. Heterogeneity within T Cell Memory: Implications for Transplant Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Krummey, Scott M.; Ford, Mandy L.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in both mouse and man results in the generation of immunological memory. Memory T cells are both friend and foe to transplant recipients, as they are intimately involved and in many cases absolutely required for the maintenance of protective immunity in the face immunosuppression, yet from the evidence presented herein they clearly constitute a formidable barrier for the successful implementation of tolerance induction strategies in transplantation. This review describes the experimental evidence demonstrating the increased resistance of memory T cells to many distinct tolerance induction strategies, and outlines recent advances in our knowledge of the ways in which alloreactive memory T cells arise in previously untransplanted individuals. Understanding the impact of alloreactive memory T cell specificity, frequency, and quality might allow for better donor selection in order to minimize the donor-reactive memory T cell barrier in an individual transplant recipient, thus allowing stratification of relative risk of alloreactive memory T cell mediated rejection, and conversely increase the likelihood of successful establishment of tolerance. However, further research into the molecular and cellular pathways involved in alloreactive memory T cell-mediated rejection is required in order to design new strategies to overcome the memory T cell barrier, without critically impairing protective immunity. PMID:22566919

  5. Memory-like Responses of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Megan A.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes with the capacity to produce cytokines and kill target cells upon activation. NK cells have long been categorized as members of the innate immune system and as such have been thought to follow the ‘rules’ of innate immunity, including the principle that they have no immunologic memory, a property thought to be strictly limited to adaptive immunity. However, recent studies have suggested that NK cells have the capacity to alter their behavior based on prior activation. This property is analogous to adaptive immune memory; however, some NK cell memory-like functions are not strictly antigen-dependent and can be demonstrated following cytokine stimulation. Here we discuss the recent evidence that NK cells can exhibit properties of immunologic memory, focusing on the ability of cytokines to non-specifically induce memory-like NK cells with enhanced responses to restimulation. PMID:20536571

  6. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  7. How intention and monitoring your thoughts influence characteristics of autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Barzykowski, Krystian; Staugaard, Søren Risløv

    2017-09-05

    Involuntary autobiographical memories come to mind effortlessly and unintended, but the mechanisms of their retrieval are not fully understood. We hypothesize that involuntary retrieval depends on memories that are highly accessible (e.g., intense, unusual, recent, rehearsed), while the elaborate search that characterizes voluntary retrieval also produces memories that are mundane, repeated or distant - memories with low accessibility. Previous research provides some evidence for this 'threshold hypothesis'. However, in almost every prior study, participants have been instructed to report only memories while ignoring other thoughts. It is possible that such an instruction can modify the phenomenological characteristics of involuntary memories. This study aimed to investigate the effects of retrieval intentionality (i.e., wanting to retrieve a memory) and selective monitoring (i.e., instructions to report only memories) on the phenomenology of autobiographical memories. Participants were instructed to (1) intentionally retrieve autobiographical memories, (2) intentionally retrieve any type of thought (3) wait for an autobiographical memory to spontaneously appear, or (4) wait for any type of thought to spontaneously appear. They rated the mental content on a number of phenomenological characteristics both during retrieval and retrospectively following retrieval. The results support the prediction that highly accessible memories mostly enter awareness unintended and without selective monitoring, while memories with low accessibility rely on intention and selective monitoring. We discuss the implications of these effects. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Preexisting high frequencies of memory CD8+ T cells favors rapid memory differentiation and preservation of proliferative potential upon boosting

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Kathryn A.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Memory CD8+ T cell quantity and quality determine protective efficacy against reinfection. Heterologous prime boost vaccination minimizes contraction of anamnestic effectors and maximizes memory CD8+ T cell quantity, but reportedly erodes proliferative potential and protective efficacy. This study exploited heterologous prime boost vaccination to discover parameters regulating effector CD8+ T cell contraction and memory differentiation. When abundant memory T cells were established, boosting induced only 5-8 cell divisions, unusually rapid memory T cell differentiation as measured by phenotype and mitochondrial bioenergetic function, long-lived survival of 50% of effector T cells, and preservation of proliferative potential. Conversely, boosting in situations of low memory CD8+ T cell frequencies induced many cell divisions, increased contraction of effector cells, and caused senescence, low mitochondrial membrane potential, and poorly protective memory. Thus, anamnestic memory T cell differentiation is flexible, and abundant quantity can be achieved while maximizing protective efficacy and preserving proliferative potential. PMID:23890070

  9. TUMOR-SPECIFIC T CELL MEMORY: CLEARING THE Treg HURDLE

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Anik L.; Usherwood, Edward J.; Turk, Mary Jo

    2009-01-01

    Anti-tumor immune responses can be stimulated by interfering with regulatory T cell (Treg) function. However this effect is short-lived unless T cell memory to tumor antigens can be generated. Our recent studies show that Treg cells not only limit primary responses to tumor/self antigens in tumor-bearing hosts, but also prevent the natural generation of T cell memory to such antigens. Here we discuss the role of regulatory T cells in suppressing T cell memory after surgical excision of tumors, and the potential clinical benefits of overcoming this suppression. PMID:18339838

  10. Trade-Off Relationship of Size and Density of Platinum Nanocrystal in Nonvolatile Memory Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jungmok; Lee, Taeyoon

    2010-10-01

    The replacement of metal nanocrystal (NC)-based nonvolatile memories (NVMs) with polycrystalline silicon floating-gate memories is very attractive, since they demonstrate superior capability of charge localization and a reduction in cell-to-cell interference. Varying the size (ranging from 15.1 to 55.2 nm) and density (from 5.6×1011 to 3.2×1010 cm-2) of the metal NC affects the entire memory properties such as the charging/discharging process, retention characteristic, and charge storage capability. Here, we investigated the effects of the size and density of platinum (Pt) NCs on the aforementioned memory characteristics by fabricating Pt-NC-embedded metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors using a direct self-assemble method. The flatband voltage shift, a measure of charge storage capability for NC-based NVMs, increased from 5.75 to 13.05 V as the mean size of the NCs was varied from 15.1 to 55.2 nm, which was relatively higher than that of other NC-based NVMs. Our studies revealed that the flatband voltage shift depends on not only the size and density of the NCs, but also the tunneling probability of the electrons, which is closely related to the applied electric field at a tunneling oxide. The relationships among the flatband voltage shift, the size and density of the NCs, and the applied electric field, which are revealed in this study, can be generally applicable to other NVMs based on various metal and semiconducting NCs.

  11. T cell memory. Resident memory CD8 T cells trigger protective innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Jason M; Fraser, Kathryn A; Beura, Lalit K; Pauken, Kristen E; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2014-10-03

    The pathogen recognition theory dictates that, upon viral infection, the innate immune system first detects microbial products and then responds by providing instructions to adaptive CD8 T cells. Here, we show in mice that tissue resident memory CD8 T cells (T(RM) cells), non-recirculating cells located at common sites of infection, can achieve near-sterilizing immunity against viral infections by reversing this flow of information. Upon antigen resensitization within the mouse female reproductive mucosae, CD8(+) T(RM) cells secrete cytokines that trigger rapid adaptive and innate immune responses, including local humoral responses, maturation of local dendritic cells, and activation of natural killer cells. This provided near-sterilizing immunity against an antigenically unrelated viral infection. Thus, CD8(+) T(RM) cells rapidly trigger an antiviral state by amplifying receptor-derived signals from previously encountered pathogens. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Role of Memory T Cells in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Benichou, Gilles; Gonzalez, Bruno; Marino, Jose; Ayasoufi, Katayoun; Valujskikh, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Memory T cells are characterized by their low activation threshold, robust effector functions, and resistance to conventional immunosuppression and costimulation blockade. Unlike their naïve counterparts, memory T cells reside in and recirculate through peripheral non-lymphoid tissues. Alloreactive memory T cells are subdivided into different categories based on their origins, phenotypes, and functions. Recipients whose immune systems have been directly exposed to allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules display high affinity alloreactive memory T cells. In the absence of any prior exposure to allogeneic MHC molecules, endogenous alloreactive memory T cells are regularly generated through microbial infections (heterologous immunity). Regardless of their origin, alloreactive memory T cells represent an essential element of the allograft rejection process and a major barrier to tolerance induction in clinical transplantation. This article describes the different subsets of alloreactive memory T cells involved in transplant rejection and examine their generation, functional properties, and mechanisms of action. In addition, we discuss strategies developed to target deleterious allospecific memory T cells in experimental animal models and clinical settings. PMID:28293238

  13. Memory NK Cells Take Out the (Mitochondrial) Garbage.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julia A; Fehniger, Todd A

    2015-08-18

    The molecular mechanisms important to generate innate natural killer cell "memory" are poorly understood. In this issue of Immunity, O'Sullivan et al. (2015) demonstrate that mitophagy plays a critical role in natural killer cell memory formation following viral infection.

  14. Empirical study of the metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor device characteristics deduced from a microscopic model of memory traps

    SciTech Connect

    Ngai, K.L.; Hsia, Y.

    1982-07-15

    A graded-nitride gate dielectric metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) memory transistor exhibiting superior device characteristics is presented and analyzed based on a qualitative microscopic model of the memory traps. The model is further reviewed to interpret some generic properties of the MNOS memory transistors including memory window, erase-write speed, and the retention-endurance characteristic features.

  15. Empirical study of the metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor device characteristics deduced from a microscopic model of memory traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, Kia L.; Hsia, Yukun

    1982-07-01

    A graded-nitride gate dielectric metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) memory transistor exhibiting superior device characteristics is presented and analyzed based on a qualitative microscopic model of the memory traps. The model is further reviewed to interpret some generic properties of the MNOS memory transistors including memory window, erase-write speed, and the retention-endurance characteristic features.

  16. NK cells: walking three paths down memory lane

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hendricks, Deborah W.; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunological memory has traditionally been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response, mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. All other hematopoietic cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, are classified as innate immune cells, which have been considered short-lived but can respond rapidly against pathogens in a manner not thought to be driven by antigen. Interestingly, NK cells have recently been shown to survive long term after antigen exposure and subsequently mediate antigen-specific recall responses. In this review, we will address the similarities between, and the controversies surrounding, three major viewpoints of NK memory that have arisen from these recent studies: (i) MCMV (mouse cytomegalovirus)-induced memory; (ii) cytokine-induced memory; (iii) liver-restricted memory cells. PMID:23499559

  17. Memory B cells in Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xing, Chunye; Hao, Yanlei; Shi, Qiguang; Qi, Ziyou; Lv, Zhanyun; Song, Yan; Xu, Peng; Feng, Xungang; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yuzhong; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2017-04-15

    IgG autoantibodies against gangliosides show the highest titers at the disease onset of axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), in which there are no IgM anti-ganglioside antibodies. We hypothesized that memory B cells take part in the development of producing IgG autoantibodies. In this study, we analyzed the memory B cells in patients with GBS using flow cytometry. There was significantly higher percentage of memory B cells in patients with GBS than the healthy controls. The Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated that increased percentage of memory B cells was positively correlated with the clinical severity of the patients with GBS. Our study provides the evidences that memory B cells may be involved in mechanism of GBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A solar cell characteristics plotter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Y. W.

    1981-11-01

    This paper describes a solar-cell characteristics plotter with its associated sample holder. The plotter has facilities for both manual and auto-plotting, with built-in current limit against damage of the solar cell under test. Either current or power output can be plotted as a function of terminal voltage, and there is provision for marking the maximum power point on the curve. The sample holder allows the temperature of the solar cell to be varied over a range from approximately -188 to 250 C and permits investigation of other properties of materials used in the making of the solar cell, e.g. the antireflection layer. If temperature variation is not required the holder can be water cooled to prevent overheating of the solar cell during test. The plotter can also be used for the investigation of other semiconductor devices, and is ideal for use in small research and development laboratories.

  19. Study of Multi-level Characteristics for 3D Vertical Resistive Switching Memory

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yue; Wu, Huaqiang; Wu, Riga; Zhang, Ye; Deng, Ning; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integration and multi-level cell (MLC) are two attractive technologies to achieve ultra-high density for mass storage applications. In this work, a three-layer 3D vertical AlOδ/Ta2O5-x/TaOy resistive random access memories were fabricated and characterized. The vertical cells in three layers show good uniformity and high performance (e.g. >1000X HRS/LRS windows, >1010 endurance cycles, >104 s retention times at 125°C). Meanwhile, four level MLC is demonstrated with two operation strategies, current controlled scheme (CCS) and voltage controlled scheme (VCS). The switching mechanism of 3D vertical RRAM cells is studied based on temperature-dependent transport characteristics. Furthermore, the applicability of CCS and VCS in 3D vertical RRAM array is compared using resistor network circuit simulation. PMID:25047906

  20. Memory T cells maintain protracted protection against malaria.

    PubMed

    Krzych, Urszula; Zarling, Stasya; Pichugin, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Immunologic memory is one of the cardinal features of antigen-specific immune responses, and the persistence of memory cells contributes to prophylactic immunizations against infectious agents. Adequately maintained memory T and B cell pools assure a fast, effective and specific response against re-infections. However, many aspects of immunologic memory are still poorly understood, particularly immunologic memory inducible by parasites, for example, Plasmodium spp., the causative agents of malaria. For example, memory responses to Plasmodium antigens amongst residents of malaria endemic areas appear to be either inadequately developed or maintained, because persons who survive episodes of childhood malaria remain vulnerable to intermittent malaria infections. By contrast, multiple exposures of humans and laboratory rodents to radiation-attenuated Plasmodium sporozoites (γ-spz) induce sterile and long-lasting protection against experimental sporozoite challenge. Multifactorial immune mechanisms maintain this protracted and sterile protection. While the presence of memory CD4 T cell subsets has been associated with lasting protection in humans exposed to multiple bites from Anopheles mosquitoes infected with attenuated Plasmodium falciparum, memory CD8 T cells maintain protection induced with Plasmodium yoelii and Plasmodium berghei γ-spz in murine models. In this review, we discuss our observations that show memory CD8 T cells specific for antigens expressed by P. berghei liver stage parasites as an indispensable component for the maintenance of protracted protective immunity against experimental malaria infection; moreover, the provision of an Ag-depot assures a quick recall of memory T cells as IFN-γ-producing effector CD8 T cells and IL-4- producing CD4 T cells that collaborate with B cells for an effective antibody response. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Phenotype and functions of memory Tfh cells in human blood.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh) lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here, we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines.

  2. Adults’ reports of their earliest memories: Consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults’ earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2 to 4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. PMID:24836979

  3. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-11-24

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy.

  4. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy. PMID:27883012

  5. Quantifying memory CD8 T cells reveals regionalization of immunosurveillance

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Elizabeth M.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Beura, Lalit K.; Manlove, Luke S.; Igyártó, Botond Z.; Southern, Peter J.; Masopust, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary Memory CD8 T cells protect against intracellular pathogens by scanning host cell surfaces, thus infection detection rates depend on memory cell number and distribution. Population analyses rely on isolation from whole organs and interpretation is predicated on presumptions of near complete cell recovery. Paradigmatically, memory is parsed into central, effector, and resident subsets, ostensibly defined by immunosurveillance patterns, but in practice identified by phenotypic markers. Because isolation methods ultimately inform models of memory T cell differentiation, protection, and vaccine translation, we tested their validity via parabiosis and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of a mouse memory CD8 T cell population. We report three major findings: lymphocyte isolation fails to recover most cells and biases against certain subsets, residents greatly outnumber recirculating cells within nonlymphoid tissues, and memory subset homing to inflammation does not conform to previously hypothesized migration patterns. These results indicate that most host cells are surveyed for reinfection by segregated residents rather than by recirculating cells that migrate throughout the blood and body. PMID:25957682

  6. Hidden memories: Front line memory T cells and early pathogen interception

    PubMed Central

    Masopust, David; Picker, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Immunologic memory reflects the ability of a host to more effectively respond to a re-encounter with a particular pathogen than the first encounter, and when a vaccine mimics the first encounter, comprises the basis of vaccine efficacy. For T cells, memory is often equated with the anamnestic response, the ability of secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT)-based(central) memory T cells to respond to pathogen exposure with a more rapid and higher magnitude production and infection-site delivery of pathogen-specific effector cells than observed in naïve hosts. However, increasing evidence supports a fundamentally different kind of T cell memory in which differentiated, long-lived effector memory T cells (TEM), pre-positioned in sites of potential pathogen invasion or rapidly mobilized to such sites from blood and marginated pools, intercept and potentially control/eliminate pathogen within hours of infection. Here, we review the evidence for this “hidden” T cell memory, and its implication for vaccine development. PMID:22675215

  7. Molecular signatures distinguish human central memory from effector memory CD8 T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Willinger, Tim; Freeman, Tom; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; McMichael, Andrew J; Callan, Margaret F C

    2005-11-01

    Memory T cells are heterogeneous in terms of their phenotype and functional properties. We investigated the molecular profiles of human CD8 naive central memory (T(CM)), effector memory (T(EM)), and effector memory RA (T(EMRA)) T cells using gene expression microarrays and phospho-protein-specific intracellular flow cytometry. We demonstrate that T(CM) have a gene expression and cytokine signaling signature that lies between that of naive and T(EM) or T(EMRA) cells, whereas T(EM) and T(EMRA) are closely related. Our data define the molecular basis for the different functional properties of central and effector memory subsets. We show that T(EM) and T(EMRA) cells strongly express genes with known importance in CD8 T cell effector function. In contrast, T(CM) are characterized by high basal and cytokine-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, reflecting their capacity for self-renewal. Altogether, our results distinguish T(CM) and T(EM)/T(EMRA) at the molecular level and are consistent with the concept that T(CM) represent memory stem cells.

  8. Human memory, but not naive, CD4+ T cells expressing transcription factor T-bet might drive rapid cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-fei; Zhang, Yan-nan; Yang, Bin-yan; Wu, Chang-you

    2014-12-19

    We found that after stimulation for a few hours, memory but not naive CD4(+) T cells produced a large amount of IFN-γ; however, the mechanism of rapid response of memory CD4(+) T cells remains undefined. We compared the expression of transcription factors in resting or activated naive and memory CD4(+) T cells and found that T-bet, but not pSTAT-1 or pSTAT-4, was highly expressed in resting memory CD4(+) T cells and that phenotypic characteristics of T-bet(+)CD4(+) T cells were CD45RA(low)CD62L(low) CCR7(low). After short-term stimulation, purified memory CD4(+) T cells rapidly produced effector cytokines that were closely associated with the pre-existence of T-bet. By contrast, resting naive CD4(+) T cells did not express T-bet, and they produced cytokines only after sustained stimulation. Our further studies indicated that T-bet was expressed in the nuclei of resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which might have important implications for rapid IFN-γ production. Our results indicate that the pre-existence and nuclear mobilization of T-bet in resting memory CD4(+) T cells might be a possible transcriptional mechanism for rapid production of cytokines by human memory CD4(+) T cells.

  9. Three Types of Memory for Childhood Sexual Abuse: Relationships to Characteristics of Abuse and Psychological Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, M. Sue

    2008-01-01

    Data from a clinical sample (N = 88) reporting childhood sexual abuse was compared by types of memory, abuse characteristics, and psychological symptoms. Three types of memory were identified from a questionnaire ("Always" n = 27 [31%], "Recovered" n = 41 [46%], and "Both" n = 20 [23%]). When compared with narrative…

  10. Characteristics of memory dysfunction in body dysmorphic disorder.

    PubMed

    Deckersbach, T; Savage, C R; Phillips, K A; Wilhelm, S; Buhlmann, U; Rauch, S L; Baer, L; Jenike, M A

    2000-09-01

    Although body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is receiving increasing empirical attention, very little is known about neuropsychological deficits in this disorder. The current study investigated the nature of memory dysfunction in BDD, including the relationship between encoding strategies and verbal and nonverbal memory performance. We evaluated 17 patients with BDD and 17 healthy controls using the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (RCFT) and the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT). BDD patients differed significantly from healthy controls on verbal and nonverbal learning and memory indices. Multiple regression analyses revealed that group differences in free recall were statistically mediated by deficits in organizational strategies in the BDD cohort. These findings are similar to patterns previously observed in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), suggesting a potential relationship between OCD and BDD. Studies in both groups have shown that verbal and nonverbal memory deficits are affected by impaired strategic processing.

  11. The Memories of NK Cells: Innate-Adaptive Immune Intrinsic Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Ortolani, Claudio; del Zotto, Genny; Luchetti, Francesca; Canonico, Barbara; Artico, Marco; Papa, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Although NK cells are considered part of the innate immune system, a series of evidences has demonstrated that they possess characteristics typical of the adaptive immune system. These NK adaptive features, in particular their memory-like functions, are discussed from an ontogenetic and evolutionary point of view. PMID:28078307

  12. Autoimmune effector memory T cells: the bad and the good

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Chen, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of adaptive immunity, a defense mechanism endowed to vertebrates during evolution. However, an autoimmune pathogenic role of memory lymphocytes is also emerging with accumulating evidence, despite reasonable skepticism on their existence in a chronic setting of autoimmune damage. It is conceivable that autoimmune memory would be particularly harmful since memory cells would constantly “remember” and attack the body's healthy tissues. It is even more detrimental given the resistance of memory T cells to immunomodulatory therapies. In this review, we focus on self-antigen-reactive CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, surveying the evidence for the role of the TEM compartment in autoimmune pathogenesis. We will also discuss the role of TEM cells in chronic and acute infectious disease settings and how they compare to their counterparts in autoimmune diseases. With their long-lasting potency, the autoimmune TEM cells could also play a critical role in anti-tumor immunity, which may be largely based on their reactivity to self-antigens. Therefore, although autoimmune TEM cells are “bad” due to their role in relentless perpetration of tissue damage in autoimmune disease settings, they are unlikely a by-product of industrial development along the modern surge of autoimmune disease prevalence. Rather, they may be a product of evolution for their “good” in clearing damaged host cells in chronic infections and malignant cells in cancer settings. PMID:24203440

  13. KLRG1 restricts memory T cell antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Wan, Shanshan; Tao, Kaixiong; Wang, Guobin; Zhao, Ende

    2016-01-01

    Killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G member 1 (KLRG1) has been found on human memory T lymphocytes. However, the roles of KLRG1 on human T cells especially in tumor microenvironment have not been fully understood. Our results showed KLRG1 expression on T cells significantly increased in tumor microenvironment. KLRG1+ T cells exhibited poor proliferative capacity with decreased effector cytokine production. Meanwhile, KLRG1+ T cells expressed abundant pro-inflammatory cytokines and demonstrated high level of Foxp3 expression. KLRG1+ T cells showed decreased expression of miRNA-101 and higher expression of CtBP2. Our results indicated KLRG1 might contribute to the impaired antitumor immunity of memory T cells in tumor microenvironment. Thus, repressing KLRG1 on human memory T cells might be a novel therapeutics against cancer. PMID:27557510

  14. Leishmania infantum antigens modulate memory cell subsets of liver resident T lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A; Claro, M; Alexandre-Pires, G; Santos-Mateus, D; Martins, C; Valério-Bolas, A; Rafael-Fernandes, M; Pereira, M A; Pereira da Fonseca, I; Tomás, A M; Santos-Gomes, G

    2017-02-01

    In the recent years, the liver has been recognized as an important immune organ with major regulatory functions and immune memory, adding to the well-described vital metabolic functions. There are evidences from experimental infections performed with visceral Leishmania species that immune responses to parasite infection can be organ-specific. The liver is the compartment of acute resolving infection, with minimal tissue damage and resistance to reinfection, whereas the spleen is the compartment of parasite persistence. Control of hepatic infection in mice requires a coordinated immune response that involves the development of inflammatory granulomas. It is also described that the liver harbors populations of resident lymphocytes, which may exhibit memory characteristics. Therefore, the present study aims to address the role of the liver as an immune memory organ in the context of Leishmania infantum infection, by characterizing phenotypically resident liver T lymphocytes. The dynamics of memory T cells in L. infantum infected BALB/c mice and the effect of anti-leishmanial treatment in the differentiation of memory cell subsets were analyzed. The potential of recognition, differentiation and selection of memory lymphocytes by three L. infantum recombinant proteins were also explored. L. infantum infection generates effector and central memory T cells, but the cells did not expand when recalled, demonstrating a possible parasite silencing effect. The treatment with a leishmanicidal drug (antimoniate meglumine) increases the levels of memory and effector T cells, eliciting a more robust hepatic immune response. L. infantum parasites with a decreased sensitivity to the leishmanicidal drug favor the expansion of memory CD8(+) T cell subset, but inhibit the proliferation of CD8(+) T effector cells, possibly assuring their own survival. The recombinant proteins LirCyp1 and LirSOD are strongly recognized by memory cells of treated mice, indicating that these proteins

  15. Memory cell operation based on small Josephson junctions arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiman, Y.; Nair, N.; Rezac, J.; Imam, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a cryogenic memory cell circuit based on a small coupled array of Josephson junctions. All the basic memory operations (e.g., write, read, and reset) are implemented on the same circuit and different junctions in the array can in principle be utilized for these operations. The presented memory operation paradigm is fundamentally different from conventional single quantum flux operation logics (SFQ). As an example, we demonstrate memory operation driven by a SFQ pulse employing an inductively coupled array of three Josephson junctions. We have chosen realistic Josephson junction parameters based on state-of-the-art fabrication capabilities and have calculated access times and access energies for basic memory cell operations. We also implemented an optimization procedure based on the simulated annealing algorithm to calculate the optimized and typical values of access times and access energies.

  16. T Cell Factor 1-Expressing Memory-like CD8(+) T Cells Sustain the Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Utzschneider, Daniel T; Charmoy, Mélanie; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Pousse, Laurène; Ferreira, Daniela Pais; Calderon-Copete, Sandra; Danilo, Maxime; Alfei, Francesca; Hofmann, Maike; Wieland, Dominik; Pradervand, Sylvain; Thimme, Robert; Zehn, Dietmar; Held, Werner

    2016-08-16

    Chronic infections promote the terminal differentiation (or "exhaustion") of T cells and are thought to preclude the formation of memorycells. In contrast, we discovered a small subpopulation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that sustained the T cell response during chronic infections. These cells were defined by, and depended on, the expression of the transcription factor Tcf1. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this population shared key characteristics of central memory cells but lacked an effector signature. Unlike conventional memory cells, Tcf1-expressing T cells displayed hallmarks of an "exhausted" phenotype, including the expression of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1 and Lag-3. This population was crucial for the T cell expansion that occurred in response to inhibitory receptor blockade during chronic infection. These findings identify a memory-like T cell population that sustains T cell responses and is a prime target for therapeutic interventions to improve the immune response in chronic infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mass cytometry analysis shows that a novel memory phenotype B cell is expanded in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Leo; Blum, Lisa; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Liedtke, Michaela; Robinson, William H.; Davis, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    It would be very beneficial if the status of cancers could be determined from a blood specimen. However, peripheral blood leukocytes are very heterogeneous between individuals and thus high resolution technologies are likely required. We used cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) and next generation sequencing to ask whether a plasma cell cancer (multiple myeloma) and related pre-cancerous states had any consistent effect on the peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotypes of patients. Analysis of peripheral blood samples from 13 cancer patients, 9 pre-cancer patients, and 9 healthy individuals revealed significant differences in the frequencies of the T, B, and natural killer cell compartments. Most strikingly, we identified a novel B-cell population that normally accounts for 4.0±0.7% (mean±SD) of total B cells and is up to 13-fold expanded in multiple myeloma patients with active disease. This population expressed markers previously associated with both memory (CD27+) and naïve (CD24loCD38+) phenotypes. Single-cell immunoglobulin gene sequencing showed polyclonality, indicating that these cells are not precursors to the myeloma, and somatic mutations, a characteristic of memory cells. SYK, ERK, and p38 phosphorylation responses, and the fact that most of these cells expressed isotypes other than IgM or IgD, confirmed the memory character of this population, defining it as a novel type of memory B cells. PMID:25711758

  18. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  19. Memory B Cells and Pneumococcal Antibody After Splenectomy1

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstrom, Heather; Bussel, James; Lim, Lony C.-L.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Splenectomized patients are susceptible to bloodstream infections with encapsulated bacteria, potentially due to loss of blood filtering but also defective production of anticarbohydrate Ab. Recent studies propose that a lack of Ab is related to reduced numbers of IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells found after splenectomy. To test this, we analyzed CD27+ memory B cell subsets, IgG, and IgM pneumococcal Ab responses in 26 vaccinated splenectomized subjects in comparison to memory B cell subsets and Ab responses in healthy controls. As shown previously, the splenectomized autoimmune subjects had fewer total, isotype switched, and IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells as compared with controls, but there was no difference in memory B cells subsets between controls and splenectomized subjects with spherocytosis. There was no difference between the geometric mean IgG Ab response between normal controls and splenectomized subjects (p = 0.51; p = 0.81). Control subjects produced more IgM Ab than splenectomized autoimmune subjects (p = 0.01) but the same levels as subjects with spherocytosis (p = 0.15.) There was no correlation between memory B cell subsets and IgG or IgM Ab responses for controls or splenectomized subjects. These data suggest that splenectomy alone may not be the sole reason for loss of memory B cells and reduced IgM antipneumococcal Ab. Because subjects with autoimmunity had splenectomy at a significantly older age than participants with spherocytosis, these data suggest that an age-related loss of extra splenic sites necessary for the maintenance or function of memory B cells may lead to impaired immunity in these subjects. PMID:18714044

  20. Shape memory characteristics of Ti-Ni alloys with several specimen sizes from micrometer to millimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shuichi; Kitamura, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Kuniaki; Fang, Dong; Tobushi, Hisaaki

    1996-02-01

    Ti-Ni shape memory alloys with nearly equiatomic compositions were made by three types of production methods, i.e., rolling, drawing and sputtering methods. These methods were used for making thin plates 0.1 mm thick, thick and thin wires 1.0 mm and 0.08 mm in diameter, and thin films 0.007 mm thick, respectively. These specimens were annealed at 673 K, 773 K, and 873 K in order to investigate the affect of annealing temperature on the shape memory characteristics in each specimen. The shape memory characteristics were compared among these specimens in order to investigate the effect of the production method.

  1. Using epigenetics to define vaccine-induced memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Ben; Hale, J Scott; Akondy, Rama

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cells generated from acute infection or vaccination have the potential to provide the host with life-long immunity against re-infection. Protection by memory T cells is achieved through their acquired ability to persist at anatomical sites of the primary infection as well as maintaining a heightened ability to recall effector functions. The maintenance of CD8 and CD4 T cell function in a state of readiness is key to life-long immunity and manifest through changes in transcriptional regulation. Yet, the ability to identify poised transcriptional programs at the maintenance stage of the response is lacking from most transcriptional profiling studies of memory T cells. Epigenetic profiling allows for the assessment of transcriptionally poised (promoters that are readily accessible for transcription) states of antigen-specific T cells without manipulation of the activation state of the cell. Here we review recent studies that have examined epigenetic programs of effector and memory T cell subsets. These reports demonstrate that acquisition of epigenetic programs during memory T cell differentiation to acute and chronic infections is coupled to, and potentially regulate, the cell’s recall response. We discuss the usefulness of epigenetic profiling in characterizing T cell differentiation state and function for preclinical evaluation of vaccines and the current methodologies for single locus versus genome-wide epigenetic profiling. PMID:23747121

  2. Longitudinal changes in CD4(+) T-cell memory responses induced by BCG vaccination of newborns.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andreia P; Kwong Chung, Cheong K C; Choice, Terry; Hughes, E Jane; Jacobs, Gail; van Rensburg, Esme Janse; Khomba, Gloria; de Kock, Marwou; Lerumo, Lesedi; Makhethe, Lebohang; Maneli, Mbulelo H; Pienaar, Bernadette; Smit, Erica; Tena-Coki, Nontobeko G; van Wyk, Leandre; Boom, W Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Scriba, Thomas J; Hanekom, Willem A

    2013-04-01

    Improved vaccination strategies against tuberculosis are needed, such as approaches to boost immunity induced by the current vaccine, BCG. Design of these strategies has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of the kinetics of the human host response induced by neonatal BCG vaccination. Furthermore, the functional and phenotypic attributes of BCG-induced long-lived memory T-cell responses remain unclear. We assessed the longitudinal CD4 T-cell response following BCG vaccination of human newborns. The kinetics, function, and phenotype of these cells were measured using flow cytometric whole-blood assays. We showed that the BCG-specific CD4 T-cell response peaked 6-10 weeks after vaccination and gradually waned over the first year of life. Highly activated T-helper 1 cells, predominantly expressing interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and/or interleukin 2, were present at the peak response. Following contraction, BCG-specific CD4 T cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and displayed a predominant CD45RACCR7 central memory phenotype. However, cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression by these cells was more characteristic of effector memory cells. Our findings suggest that boosting of BCG-primed CD4 T cells with heterologous tuberculosis vaccines may be best after 14 weeks of age, once an established memory response has developed.

  3. Longitudinal Changes in CD4+ T-Cell Memory Responses Induced by BCG Vaccination of Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Andreia P.; Kwong Chung, Cheong K. C.; Choice, Terry; Hughes, E. Jane; Jacobs, Gail; van Rensburg, Esme Janse; Khomba, Gloria; de Kock, Marwou; Lerumo, Lesedi; Makhethe, Lebohang; Maneli, Mbulelo H.; Pienaar, Bernadette; Smit, Erica; Tena-Coki, Nontobeko G.; van Wyk, Leandre; Boom, W. Henry; Kaplan, Gilla; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hanekom, Willem A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Improved vaccination strategies against tuberculosis are needed, such as approaches to boost immunity induced by the current vaccine, BCG. Design of these strategies has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of the kinetics of the human host response induced by neonatal BCG vaccination. Furthermore, the functional and phenotypic attributes of BCG-induced long-lived memory T-cell responses remain unclear. Methods. We assessed the longitudinal CD4+ T-cell response following BCG vaccination of human newborns. The kinetics, function, and phenotype of these cells were measured using flow cytometric whole-blood assays. Results. We showed that the BCG-specific CD4+ T-cell response peaked 6–10 weeks after vaccination and gradually waned over the first year of life. Highly activated T-helper 1 cells, predominantly expressing interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and/or interleukin 2, were present at the peak response. Following contraction, BCG-specific CD4+ T cells expressed high levels of Bcl-2 and displayed a predominant CD45RA–CCR7+ central memory phenotype. However, cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression by these cells was more characteristic of effector memory cells. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that boosting of BCG-primed CD4+ T cells with heterologous tuberculosis vaccines may be best after 14 weeks of age, once an established memory response has developed. PMID:23293360

  4. T inflammatory memory CD8 T cells participate to antiviral response and generate secondary memory cells with an advantage in XCL1 production.

    PubMed

    Jubin, Virginie; Ventre, Erwan; Leverrier, Yann; Djebali, Sophia; Mayol, Katia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Teixeira, Marie; Teoh, Denise Y-L; Lina, Bruno; Walzer, Thierry; Arpin, Christophe; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2012-06-01

    Besides the classically described subsets of memory CD8 T cells generated under infectious conditions, are T inflammatory memory cells generated under sterile priming conditions, such as sensitization to allergens. Although not fully differentiated as pathogen-induced memory cells, they display memory properties that distinguish them from naive CD8 T cells. Given these memory cells are generated in an antigen-specific context that is devoid of pathogen-derived danger signals and CD4 T cell help, we herein questioned whether they maintained their activation and differentiation potential, could be recruited in an immune response directed against a pathogen expressing their cognate antigen and further differentiate in fully competent secondary memory cells. We show that T inflammatory memory cells can indeed take part to the immune response triggered by a viral infection, differentiate into secondary effectors and further generate typical central memory CD8 T cells and effector memory CD8 T cells. Furthermore, the secondary memory cells they generate display a functional advantage over primary memory cells in their capacity to produce TNF-α and the XCL1 chemokine. These results suggest that cross-reactive stimulations and differentiation of cells directed against allergens or self into fully competent pathogen-induced memory cells might have incidences in inflammatory immuno-pathologies.

  5. Defective B-cell memory in patients with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, Ruud H J; Driessen, Gertjan J; Bartol, Sophinus J W; van Noesel, Carel J M; Boon, Louis; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J M; de Vries, Esther; van Zelm, Menno C

    2014-12-01

    Patients with Down syndrome carry immunologic defects, as evidenced by the increased risks for autoimmune diseases, hematologic malignancies, and respiratory tract infections. Moreover, the low numbers of circulating B cells suggest impaired humoral immunity. We sought to study how immunodeficiency in patients with Down syndrome results from immunologic defects in the B-cell compartment. We studied blood B-cell subset composition, replication history, somatic hypermutation status, and class-switch recombination in 17 children with Down syndrome. Germinal centers and plasma cells were studied in tonsils from 4 additional children with Down syndrome. Blood transitional B-cell numbers were normal, but naive mature and memory B-cell numbers were reduced despite slightly increased serum B cell-activating factor levels. Germinal centers and plasma cells in tonsils appeared normal, as were serum immunoglobulin levels. CD27(+)IgD(+)IgM(+) "natural effector" B cells showed reduced proliferation and somatic hypermutation levels, whereas these were normal in CD27(+)IgD(-) memory B cells. Furthermore, IgM(+) and IgA(+), but not IgG(+), memory B cells showed impaired molecular signs for antigen selection. The B-cell pattern was highly similar to that of patients with common variable immunodeficiency and a defect in B-cell activation and proliferation. Children with Down syndrome seem capable of normal germinal center and plasma cell formation. Still, blood memory B-cell numbers were reduced and showed impaired molecular maturation of IgA and IgM, which are important for mucosal immunity. The observed molecular defects in circulating IgA and IgM B-cell memory could reflect impaired local responses, which underlie the increased susceptibility to respiratory tract infections of patients with Down syndrome. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Memory improves precision of cell sensing in fluctuating environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Tweedy, Luke; Heinrich, Doris; Endres, Robert G.

    2014-07-01

    Biological cells are often found to sense their chemical environment near the single-molecule detection limit. Surprisingly, this precision is higher than simple estimates of the fundamental physical limit, hinting towards active sensing strategies. In this work, we analyse the effect of cell memory, e.g. from slow biochemical processes, on the precision of sensing by cell-surface receptors. We derive analytical formulas, which show that memory significantly improves sensing in weakly fluctuating environments. However, surprisingly when memory is adjusted dynamically, the precision is always improved, even in strongly fluctuating environments. In support of this prediction we quantify the directional biases in chemotactic Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a flow chamber with alternating chemical gradients. The strong similarities between cell sensing and control engineering suggest universal problem-solving strategies of living matter.

  7. Memory improves precision of cell sensing in fluctuating environments

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Gerardo; Tweedy, Luke; Heinrich, Doris; Endres, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Biological cells are often found to sense their chemical environment near the single-molecule detection limit. Surprisingly, this precision is higher than simple estimates of the fundamental physical limit, hinting towards active sensing strategies. In this work, we analyse the effect of cell memory, e.g. from slow biochemical processes, on the precision of sensing by cell-surface receptors. We derive analytical formulas, which show that memory significantly improves sensing in weakly fluctuating environments. However, surprisingly when memory is adjusted dynamically, the precision is always improved, even in strongly fluctuating environments. In support of this prediction we quantify the directional biases in chemotactic Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a flow chamber with alternating chemical gradients. The strong similarities between cell sensing and control engineering suggest universal problem-solving strategies of living matter. PMID:25023459

  8. PD-1 blockade expands intratumoral T memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse; Frederiksen, Juliet; Cornish, Andrew; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Kivork, Christine; Siebert, Janet; Kaplan-Lefko, Paula; Wang, Xiaoyan; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Glaspy, John A.; Tumeh, Paul C.; Chodon, Thinle; Pe’er, Dana; Comin-Anduix, Begoña

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to PD-1 blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated and single cell infiltrates were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry using two computational approaches to resolve the leukocyte phenotypes at the single cell level. There was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of T cells in patients who responded to therapy. The frequency of intratumoral B cells and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs) significantly increased in patients’ biopsies taken on treatment. The percentage of cells with a T regulatory phenotype, monocytes, and NK cells did not change while on PD-1 blockade therapy. CD8+ T memory cells were the most prominent phenotype that expanded intratumorally on therapy. However, the frequency of CD4+ T effector memory cells significantly decreased on treatment, whereas CD4+ T effector cells significantly increased in nonresponding tumors on therapy. In peripheral blood, an unusual population of blood cells expressing CD56 were detected in two patients with regressing melanoma. In conclusion, PD-1 blockade increases the frequency of T cells, B cells, and MDSCs in tumors, with the CD8+ T effector memory subset being the major T-cell phenotype expanded in patients with a response to therapy. PMID:26787823

  9. Tracing the development of single memory-lineage B cells in a highly defined immune response

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    To study the development of B lymphocyte memory, we identified and isolated splenic B cells expressing a highly defined antibody variable region that constitutes a reproducible and predominant component of the memory antibody response to p-azophenylarsonate (Ars). Isolation was achieved during the primary immune response by surface staining and flow cytometry using a specific anti-idiotypic antibody called E4, which recognizes this canonical V region, encoded by one set of V gene segments. The isolated E4+ cells displayed all of the phenotypic characteristics of germinal center centrocytes, including a low level of surface Ig, a lack of surface IgD, a high level of receptor for peanut agglutinin, and expression of mutated antibody V genes. E4+ B cells were first detected in the spleen 7-8 d after primary immunization, reached peak numbers from days 10-13, and waned by day 16. Surprisingly, at their peak, E4+ cells comprised only 40,000 of all splenocytes, and half of these failed to bind Ars. Using this number, we estimate the total number of Ars-specific memory-lineage cells in the spleen to be no more than 50,000 (0.1%) at any one time, and presumably far fewer that are committed to the memory pool. Chromosomal copies of rearranged V genes from single E4+ cells were amplified by nested PCR, and the amplified products were sequenced directly without cloning, using standardized conditions that disclose virtually no Taq polymerase errors. V gene sequence analyses of E4+ cells isolated from single mice confirmed their canonical nature and revealed that they were derived from few precursors. In the average mouse, the E4+ pool was derived from fewer than five canonical precursors. Somatic mutations were found within the V genes of almost all cell isolates. At day 13, a significant fraction of E4+ cells had mutations known to increase antibody affinity for Ars, suggesting they were products of at least one cycle of post-mutational antigen-driven selection. However, the

  10. Synthetic circuits integrating logic and memory in living cells.

    PubMed

    Siuti, Piro; Yazbek, John; Lu, Timothy K

    2013-05-01

    Logic and memory are essential functions of circuits that generate complex, state-dependent responses. Here we describe a strategy for efficiently assembling synthetic genetic circuits that use recombinases to implement Boolean logic functions with stable DNA-encoded memory of events. Application of this strategy allowed us to create all 16 two-input Boolean logic functions in living Escherichia coli cells without requiring cascades comprising multiple logic gates. We demonstrate long-term maintenance of memory for at least 90 cell generations and the ability to interrogate the states of these synthetic devices with fluorescent reporters and PCR. Using this approach we created two-bit digital-to-analog converters, which should be useful in biotechnology applications for encoding multiple stable gene expression outputs using transient inputs of inducers. We envision that this integrated logic and memory system will enable the implementation of complex cellular state machines, behaviors and pathways for therapeutic, diagnostic and basic science applications.

  11. Impacts of Co doping on ZnO transparent switching memory device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanjuntak, Firman Mangasa; Prasad, Om Kumar; Panda, Debashis; Lin, Chun-An; Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of indium tin oxide (ITO)/Zn1-xCoxO/ITO transparent resistive memory devices were investigated. An appropriate amount of cobalt dopant in ZnO resistive layer demonstrated sufficient memory window and switching stability. In contrast, pure ZnO devices demonstrated a poor memory window, and using an excessive dopant concentration led to switching instability. To achieve suitable memory performance, relying only on controlling defect concentrations is insufficient; the grain growth orientation of the resistive layer must also be considered. Stable endurance with an ON/OFF ratio of more than one order of magnitude during 5000 cycles confirmed that the Co-doped ZnO device is a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory application. Additionally, fully transparent devices with a high transmittance of up to 90% at wavelength of 550 nm have been fabricated.

  12. Impacts of Co doping on ZnO transparent switching memory device characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Simanjuntak, Firman Mangasa; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Prasad, Om Kumar; Panda, Debashis; Lin, Chun-An; Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2016-05-02

    The resistive switching characteristics of indium tin oxide (ITO)/Zn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O/ITO transparent resistive memory devices were investigated. An appropriate amount of cobalt dopant in ZnO resistive layer demonstrated sufficient memory window and switching stability. In contrast, pure ZnO devices demonstrated a poor memory window, and using an excessive dopant concentration led to switching instability. To achieve suitable memory performance, relying only on controlling defect concentrations is insufficient; the grain growth orientation of the resistive layer must also be considered. Stable endurance with an ON/OFF ratio of more than one order of magnitude during 5000 cycles confirmed that the Co-doped ZnO device is a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory application. Additionally, fully transparent devices with a high transmittance of up to 90% at wavelength of 550 nm have been fabricated.

  13. Granzyme B production distinguishes recently activated CD8+ memory cells from resting memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Tobias M.; Kuerten, Stefanie; Zhang, Wenji; Shive, Carey L.; Kreher, Christian R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Lehmann, Paul V.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    For immune diagnostic purposes it would be critical to be able to distinguish between ongoing immune processes, such as active infections, and long-term immune memory, for example imprinted by infections that have been cleared a long time ago or by vaccinations. We tested the hypothesis that the secretion of Granzyme B, as detected in ex vivo ELISPOT assays, permits this distinction. We studied EBV-, flu- and CMV-specific CD8+ cells in healthy individuals, Vaccinia virus-reactive CD8+ cells in the course of vaccination, and HIV-specific CD8+ cells in HIV-infected individuals. Antigen-specific ex vivo GzB production was detected only transiently after Vaccinia immunization, and in HIV-infected individuals. Our data suggest that ex vivo ELISPOT measurements of granzyme B permit the identification of actively ongoing CD8+ cell responses – a notion that is pertinent to the immune diagnostic of infections, transplantation, allergies, autoimmune diseases, tumors, and vaccine development. PMID:17825804

  14. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L.; Neuhaus, Isaac M.; Yu, Siegrid S.; Arron, Sarah T.; Harris, Hobart W.; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A.; Sverdrup, Francis M.; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C.; Johnson, David S.; Meyer, Everett H.; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G.; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C.; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y.; McGrath, Mary H.; Alvarado, Michael D.; Ludwig, Connor H.; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M.; Gratz, Iris K.; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease. PMID:24509084

  15. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Yu, Siegrid S; Arron, Sarah T; Harris, Hobart W; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A; Sverdrup, Francis M; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Johnson, David S; Meyer, Everett H; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y; McGrath, Mary H; Alvarado, Michael D; Ludwig, Connor H; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease.

  16. IL-10 restricts memory T cell inflation during cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morgan; Ladell, Kristin; Wynn, Katherine K; Stacey, Maria A; Quigley, Máire F; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Humphreys, Ian R

    2010-09-15

    The beta-herpesvirus CMV induces a substantial and progressive expansion of virus-specific memory CD8 T cells, which protect the host against viral reactivation from latency. In this paper, we report that this expansion, or "inflation," of memory T cells is amplified dramatically during mouse CMV infection of IL-10 knockout (IL-10(-/-)) mice. T cells from IL-10(-/-) mice were oligoclonal, exhibited a highly activated phenotype, expressed antiviral cytokines, and degranulated in response to cognate Ag encounter ex vivo. Moreover, latent viral load was reduced in IL-10(-/-) mice. Importantly, these results were recapitulated by IL-10R blockade during chronic/latent infection of wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that regulatory immune mechanisms can influence CMV-specific T cell memory and suggest a possible rationale for the acquisition of functional IL-10 orthologs by herpesviruses.

  17. Epigenetic memory and cell fate reprogramming in plants.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Kenneth D; Roudier, François

    2017-02-01

    Plants have a high intrinsic capacity to regenerate from adult tissues, with the ability to reprogram adult cell fates. In contrast, epigenetic mechanisms have the potential to stabilize cell identity and maintain tissue organization. The question is whether epigenetic memory creates a barrier to reprogramming that needs to be erased or circumvented in plant regeneration. Early evidence suggests that, while chromatin dynamics impact gene expression in the meristem, a lasting constraint on cell fate is not established until late stages of plant cell differentiation. It is not yet clear whether the plasticity of plant cells arises from the ability of cells to erase identity memory or to deploy cells that may exhibit cellular specialization but still lack an epigenetic restriction on cell fate alteration.

  18. Epigenomics of T cell activation, differentiation and memory

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Suresh; Barski, Artem; Zhao, Keji

    2010-01-01

    Activation of T cells is an essential step in the immunological response to infection. While activation of naïve T cells results in proliferation and slow differentiation into cytokine-producing effector cells, antigen engagement with memory cells leads to cytokine production immediately. Even though the cell surface signaling events are similar in both the cases, the outcome is different, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms may exist downstream of the activation signals. Recent advances in the understanding of global epigenetic patterns in T cells have resulted in the appreciation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in processes such as activation and differentiation. In this review we discuss recent data suggesting that naïve T cell activation, differentiation and lineage commitment results in epigenetic changes and a fine balance between different histone modifications is required. On the other hand, memory T cells are poised and do not require epigenetic changes for short-term activation. PMID:20226645

  19. Epigenetic memory and cell fate reprogramming in plants

    PubMed Central

    Roudier, François

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Plants have a high intrinsic capacity to regenerate from adult tissues, with the ability to reprogram adult cell fates. In contrast, epigenetic mechanisms have the potential to stabilize cell identity and maintain tissue organization. The question is whether epigenetic memory creates a barrier to reprogramming that needs to be erased or circumvented in plant regeneration. Early evidence suggests that, while chromatin dynamics impact gene expression in the meristem, a lasting constraint on cell fate is not established until late stages of plant cell differentiation. It is not yet clear whether the plasticity of plant cells arises from the ability of cells to erase identity memory or to deploy cells that may exhibit cellular specialization but still lack an epigenetic restriction on cell fate alteration. PMID:28316791

  20. Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  1. Dendritic cells drive memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis via IL-15 transpresentation.

    PubMed

    Stonier, Spencer W; Ma, Lisa J; Castillo, Eliseo F; Schluns, Kimberly S

    2008-12-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for the development of naive and memory CD8 T cells and is delivered through a mechanism called transpresentation. Previous studies showed that memory CD8 T cells require IL-15 transpresentation by an as yet unknown cell of hematopoietic origin. We hypothesized that dendritic cells (DCs) transpresent IL-15 to CD8 T cells, and we examined this by developing a transgenic model that limits IL-15 transpresentation to DCs. In this study, IL-15 transpresentation by DCs had little effect on restoring naive CD8 T cells but contributed to the development of memory-phenotype CD8 T cells. The generation of virus-specific, memory CD8 T cells was partially supported by IL-15Ralpha(+) DCs through the preferential enhancement of a subset of KLRG-1(+)CD27(-) CD8 T cells. In contrast, these DCs were largely sufficient in driving normal homeostatic proliferation of established memory CD8 T cells, suggesting that memory CD8 T cells grow more dependent on IL-15 transpresentation by DCs. Overall, our study clearly supports a role for DCs in memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis but also provides evidence that other hematopoietic cells are involved in this function. The identification of DCs fulfilling this role will enable future studies to better focus on mechanisms regulating T-cell homeostasis.

  2. Dendritic cells drive memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis via IL-15 transpresentation

    PubMed Central

    Stonier, Spencer W.; Ma, Lisa J.; Castillo, Eliseo F.

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for the development of naive and memory CD8 T cells and is delivered through a mechanism called transpresentation. Previous studies showed that memory CD8 T cells require IL-15 transpresentation by an as yet unknown cell of hematopoietic origin. We hypothesized that dendritic cells (DCs) transpresent IL-15 to CD8 T cells, and we examined this by developing a transgenic model that limits IL-15 transpresentation to DCs. In this study, IL-15 transpresentation by DCs had little effect on restoring naive CD8 T cells but contributed to the development of memory-phenotype CD8 T cells. The generation of virus-specific, memory CD8 T cells was partially supported by IL-15Rα+ DCs through the preferential enhancement of a subset of KLRG-1+CD27− CD8 T cells. In contrast, these DCs were largely sufficient in driving normal homeostatic proliferation of established memory CD8 T cells, suggesting that memory CD8 T cells grow more dependent on IL-15 transpresentation by DCs. Overall, our study clearly supports a role for DCs in memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis but also provides evidence that other hematopoietic cells are involved in this function. The identification of DCs fulfilling this role will enable future studies to better focus on mechanisms regulating T-cell homeostasis. PMID:18812469

  3. Transcriptional insights into the CD8(+) T cell response to infection and memory T cell formation.

    PubMed

    Best, J Adam; Blair, David A; Knell, Jamie; Yang, Edward; Mayya, Viveka; Doedens, Andrew; Dustin, Michael L; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2013-04-01

    After infection, many factors coordinate the population expansion and differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory T cells. Using data of unparalleled breadth from the Immunological Genome Project, we analyzed the CD8+ T cell transcriptome throughout infection to establish gene-expression signatures and identify putative transcriptional regulators. Notably, we found that the expression of key gene signatures can be used to predict the memory-precursor potential of CD8+ effector cells. Long-lived memory CD8+ cells ultimately expressed a small subset of genes shared by natural killer T and γδ T cells. Although distinct inflammatory milieu and T cell precursor frequencies influenced the differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory populations, core transcriptional signatures were regulated similarly, whether polyclonal or transgenic, and whether responding to bacterial or viral model pathogens. Our results provide insights into the transcriptional regulation that influence memory formation and CD8+ T cell immunity.

  4. Autoimmune melanocyte destruction is required for robust CD8+ memory T cell responses to mouse melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Katelyn T.; Côté, Anik L.; Zhang, Peisheng; Steinberg, Shannon M.; Guo, Yanxia; Allie, Rameeza; Zhang, Weijun; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Usherwood, Edward J.; Turk, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    A link between autoimmunity and improved antitumor immunity has long been recognized, although the exact mechanistic relationship between these two phenomena remains unclear. In the present study we have found that vitiligo, the autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, generates self antigen required for mounting persistent and protective memory CD8+ T cell responses to melanoma. Vitiligo developed in approximately 60% of mice that were depleted of regulatory CD4+ T cells and then subjected to surgical excision of large established B16 melanomas. Mice with vitiligo generated 10-fold larger populations of CD8+ memory T cells specific for shared melanoma/melanocyte antigens. CD8+ T cells in mice with vitiligo acquired phenotypic and functional characteristics of effector memory, suggesting that they were supported by ongoing antigen stimulation. Such responses were not generated in melanocyte-deficient mice, indicating a requirement for melanocyte destruction in maintaining CD8+ T cell immunity to melanoma. Vitiligo-associated memory CD8+ T cells provided durable tumor protection, were capable of mounting a rapid recall response to melanoma, and did not demonstrate phenotypic or functional signs of exhaustion even after many months of exposure to antigen. This work establishes melanocyte destruction as a key determinant of lasting melanoma-reactive immune responses, thus illustrating that immune-mediated destruction of normal tissues can perpetuate adaptive immune responses to cancer. PMID:21540555

  5. Characteristics of Reduced Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots for a Flexible Memory Thin Film Transistor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yo-Han; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Hyun Ho; Seo, Tae Seok

    2017-05-17

    Reduced graphene oxide quantum dot (rGOQD) devices in formats of capacitor and thin film transistor (TFT) were demonstrated and examined as the first trial to achieve nonambipolar channel property. In addition, through a gold nanoparticle (Au NP) layer embedded between the rGOQD active channel and dielectric layer, memory capacitor and TFT performances were realized by capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis and gate program, erase, and reprogram biases. First, capacitor structure of the rGOQD memory device was constructed to examine memory charging effect featured in hysteretic C-V behavior with a 30 nm dielectric layer of cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol). For the intervening Au NP charging layer, self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation of the Au NP was executed to utilize electrostatic interaction by a dip-coating process under ambient environments with a conformal fabrication uniformity. Second, the rGOQD memory TFT device was also constructed in the same format of the Au NPs SAMs on a flexible substrate. Characteristics of the rGOQD TFT output showed novel saturation curves unlike typical graphene-based TFTs. However, The rGOQD TFT device reveals relatively low on/off ratio of 10(1) and mobility of 5.005 cm(2)/V·s. For the memory capacitor, the flat-band voltage shift (ΔVFB) was measured as 3.74 V for ±10 V sweep, and for the memory TFT, the threshold voltage shift (ΔVth) by the Au NP charging was detected as 7.84 V. In summary, it was concluded that the rGOQD memory device could accomplish an ideal graphene-based memory performance, which could have provided a wide memory window and saturated output characteristics.

  6. Functional capacities of human IgM memory B cells in early inflammatory responses and secondary germinal center reactions.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Marc; Przekopowitz, Martina; Taudien, Sarah; Lollies, Anna; Ronge, Viola; Drees, Britta; Lindemann, Monika; Hillen, Uwe; Engler, Harald; Singer, Bernhard B; Küppers, Ralf

    2015-02-10

    The generation and functions of human peripheral blood (PB) IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B lymphocytes with somatically mutated IgV genes are controversially discussed. We determined their differential gene expression to naive B cells and to IgM-only and IgG(+) memory B cells. This analysis revealed a high similarity of IgM(+)(IgD(+))CD27(+) and IgG(+) memory B cells but also pointed at distinct functional capacities of both subsets. In vitro analyses revealed a tendency of activated IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells to migrate to B-cell follicles and undergo germinal center (GC) B-cell differentiation, whereas activated IgG(+) memory B cells preferentially showed a plasma cell (PC) fate. This observation was supported by reverse regulation of B-cell lymphoma 6 and PR domain containing 1 and differential BTB and CNC homology 1, basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 expression. Moreover, IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B lymphocytes preferentially responded to neutrophil-derived cytokines. Costimulation with catecholamines, carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 8 (CEACAM8), and IFN-γ caused differentiation of IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells into PCs, induced class switching to IgG2, and was reproducible in cocultures with neutrophils. In conclusion, this study substantiates memory B-cell characteristics of human IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells in that they share typical memory B-cell transcription patterns with IgG(+) post-GC B cells and show a faster and more vigorous restimulation potential, a hallmark of immune memory. Moreover, this work reveals a functional plasticity of human IgM memory B cells by showing their propensity to undergo secondary GC reactions upon reactivation, but also by their special role in early inflammation via interaction with immunomodulatory neutrophils.

  7. Functional capacities of human IgM memory B cells in early inflammatory responses and secondary germinal center reactions

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Marc; Przekopowitz, Martina; Taudien, Sarah; Lollies, Anna; Ronge, Viola; Drees, Britta; Lindemann, Monika; Hillen, Uwe; Engler, Harald; Singer, Bernhard B.; Küppers, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The generation and functions of human peripheral blood (PB) IgM+IgD+CD27+ B lymphocytes with somatically mutated IgV genes are controversially discussed. We determined their differential gene expression to naive B cells and to IgM-only and IgG+ memory B cells. This analysis revealed a high similarity of IgM+(IgD+)CD27+ and IgG+ memory B cells but also pointed at distinct functional capacities of both subsets. In vitro analyses revealed a tendency of activated IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells to migrate to B-cell follicles and undergo germinal center (GC) B-cell differentiation, whereas activated IgG+ memory B cells preferentially showed a plasma cell (PC) fate. This observation was supported by reverse regulation of B-cell lymphoma 6 and PR domain containing 1 and differential BTB and CNC homology 1, basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 expression. Moreover, IgM+IgD+CD27+ B lymphocytes preferentially responded to neutrophil-derived cytokines. Costimulation with catecholamines, carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 8 (CEACAM8), and IFN-γ caused differentiation of IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells into PCs, induced class switching to IgG2, and was reproducible in cocultures with neutrophils. In conclusion, this study substantiates memory B-cell characteristics of human IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells in that they share typical memory B-cell transcription patterns with IgG+ post-GC B cells and show a faster and more vigorous restimulation potential, a hallmark of immune memory. Moreover, this work reveals a functional plasticity of human IgM memory B cells by showing their propensity to undergo secondary GC reactions upon reactivation, but also by their special role in early inflammation via interaction with immunomodulatory neutrophils. PMID:25624468

  8. The Vast Universe of T Cell Diversity: Subsets of Memory Cells and Their Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jandus, Camilla; Usatorre, Amaia Martínez; Viganò, Selena; Zhang, Lianjun; Romero, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The T cell receptor confers specificity for antigen recognition to T cells. By the first encounter with the cognate antigen, reactive T cells initiate a program of expansion and differentiation that will define not only the ultimate quantity of specific cells that will be generated, but more importantly their quality and functional heterogeneity. Recent achievements using mouse model infection systems have helped to shed light into the complex network of factors that dictate and sustain memory T cell differentiation, ranging from antigen load, TCR signal strength, metabolic fitness, transcriptional programs, and proliferative potential. The different models of memory T cell differentiation are discussed in this chapter, and key phenotypic and functional attributes of memory T cell subsets are presented, both for mouse and human cells. Therapeutic manipulation of memory T cell generation is expected to provide novel unique ways to optimize current immunotherapies, both in infection and cancer.

  9. Synthetic memory circuits for tracking human cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Devin R.; Inniss, Mara C.; Boyle, Patrick M.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of biological phenomena, from disease progression to stem cell differentiation, are typified by a prolonged cellular response to a transient environmental cue. While biologically relevant, heterogeneity in these long-term responses is difficult to assess at the population level, necessitating the development of biological tools to track cell fate within subpopulations. Here we present a novel synthetic biology approach for identifying and tracking mammalian cell subpopulations. We constructed three genomically integrated circuits that use bistable autoregulatory transcriptional feedback to retain memory of exposure to brief stimuli. These “memory devices” are used to isolate and track the progeny of cells that responded differentially to doxycycline, hypoxia, or DNA-damaging agents. Following hypoxic or ultraviolet radiation exposure, strongly responding cells activate the memory device and exhibit changes in gene expression, growth rates, and viability for multiple generations after the initial stimulus. Taken together, these results indicate that a heritable memory of hypoxia and DNA damage exists in subpopulations that differ in long-term cell behavior. PMID:22751502

  10. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  11. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  12. Differential T cell receptor-mediated signaling in naive and memory CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Farber, D L; Acuto, O; Bottomly, K

    1997-08-01

    Naive and memory CD4 T cells differ in cell surface phenotype, function, activation requirements, and modes of regulation. To investigate the molecular bases for the dichotomies between naive and memory CD4 T cells and to understand how the T cell receptor (TCR) directs diverse functional outcomes, we investigated proximal signaling events triggered through the TCR/CD3 complex in naive and memory CD4 T cell subsets isolated on the basis of CD45 isoform expression. Naive CD4 T cells signal through TCR/CD3 similar to unseparated CD4 T cells, producing multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protein species overall and phosphorylating the T cell-specific ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase which is recruited to the CD3zeta subunit of the TCR. Memory CD4 T cells, however, exhibit a unique pattern of signaling through TCR/CD3. Following stimulation through TCR/CD3, memory CD4 T cells produce fewer species of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates and fail to phosphorylate ZAP-70, yet unphosphorylated ZAP-70 can associate with the TCR/CD3 complex. Moreover, a 26/28-kDa phosphorylated doublet is associated with CD3zeta in resting and activated memory but not in naive CD4 T cells. Despite these differences in the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3-associated proteins, the ZAP-70-related kinase, p72syk, exhibits similar phosphorylation in naive and memory T cell subsets, suggesting that this kinase could function in place of ZAP-70 in memory CD4 T cells. These results indicate that proximal signals are differentially coupled to the TCR in naive versus memory CD4 T cells, potentially leading to distinct downstream signaling events and ultimately to the diverse functions elicited by these two CD4 T cell subsets.

  13. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  14. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  15. Recollection is a continuous process: Evidence from plurality memory receiver operating characteristics.

    PubMed

    Slotnick, Scott D; Jeye, Brittany M; Dodson, Chad S

    2016-01-01

    Is recollection a continuous/graded process or a threshold/all-or-none process? Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis can answer this question as the continuous model and the threshold model predict curved and linear recollection ROCs, respectively. As memory for plurality, an item's previous singular or plural form, is assumed to rely on recollection, the nature of recollection can be investigated by evaluating plurality memory ROCs. The present study consisted of four experiments. During encoding, words (singular or plural) or objects (single/singular or duplicate/plural) were presented. During retrieval, old items with the same plurality or different plurality were presented. For each item, participants made a confidence rating ranging from "very sure old", which was correct for same plurality items, to "very sure new", which was correct for different plurality items. Each plurality memory ROC was the proportion of same versus different plurality items classified as "old" (i.e., hits versus false alarms). Chi-squared analysis revealed that all of the plurality memory ROCs were adequately fit by the continuous unequal variance model, whereas none of the ROCs were adequately fit by the two-high threshold model. These plurality memory ROC results indicate recollection is a continuous process, which complements previous source memory and associative memory ROC findings.

  16. Tunneling Electroresistance Effect with Diode Characteristic for Cross-Point Memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2016-06-22

    Cross-point memory architecture (CPMA) by using memristors has attracted considerable attention because of its high-density integration. However, a common and significant drawback of the CPMA is related to crosstalk issues between cells by sneak currents. This study demonstrated the sneak current free resistive switching characteristic of a ferroelectric tunnel diode (FTD) memristor for a CPMA by utilizing a novel concept of a ferroelectric quadrangle and triangle barrier switch. A FTD of Au/BaTiO3 (5 nm)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (100) was used to obtain a desirable memristive effect for the CPMA. The FTD could reversibly change the shape of the ferroelectric potential from a quadrangle to a triangle. The effect included high nonlinearity and diode characteristics. It was derived from utilizing different sequences of carrier transport mechanisms such as the direct tunneling current, Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, and thermionic emission. The FTD memristor demonstrated the feasibility of sneak current-free high-density CPMA.

  17. Three types of memory for childhood sexual abuse: relationships to characteristics of abuse and psychological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Crowley, M Sue

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Data from a clinical sample (N = 88) reporting childhood sexual abuse was compared by types of memory, abuse characteristics, and psychological symptoms. Three types of memory were identified from a questionnaire ("Always" n = 27 [31%], "Recovered" n = 41 [46%], and "Both" n = 20 [23%]). When compared with narrative reports from a subset (n = 30) of the sample, the lines between "Always," "Recovered," and "Both" types of memory were ambiguous. Consistency across reports, however, was 83%. Memories classified as either "Recovered" or "Both" were associated with earlier age-at-onset and more severe psychological symptoms compared to those who "Always" remembered CSA. No significant differences were found between the "Both" and "Recovered" groups.

  18. Every Breath You Take: The Impact of Environment on Resident Memory CD8 T Cells in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Shane, Hillary L.; Klonowski, Kimberly D.

    2014-01-01

    Resident memory T cells (TRM) are broadly defined as a population of T cells, which persist in non-lymphoid sites long-term, do not re-enter the circulation, and are distinct from central memory T cells (TCM) and circulating effector memory T cells (TEM). Recent studies have described populations of TRM cells in the skin, gut, lungs, and nervous tissue. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the specific environment in which the TRM reside can further refine their phenotypical and functional properties. Here, we focus on the TRM cells that develop following respiratory infection and reside in the lungs and the lung airways. Specifically, we will review recent studies that have described some of the requirements for establishment of TRM cells in these tissues, and the defining characteristics of TRM in the lungs and lung airways. With continual bombardment of the respiratory tract by both pathogenic and environmental antigens, dynamic fluctuations in the local milieu including homeostatic resources and niche restrictions can impact TRM longevity. Beyond a comprehensive characterization of lung TRM cells, special attention will be placed on studies, which have defined how the microenvironment of the lung influences memory T cell survival at this site. As memory T cell populations in the lung airways are requisite for protection yet wane numerically over time, developing a comprehensive picture of factors which may influence TRM development and persistence at these sites is important for improving T cell-based vaccine design. PMID:25071780

  19. Memory T-cell competition for bone marrow seeding

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Santoni, Angela

    2003-01-01

    The presence in the bone marrow of memory CD8 T cells is well recognized. However, it is still largely unclear how T-cell migration from the lymphoid periphery to the bone marrow is regulated. In the present report, we show that antigen-specific CD4 T cells, as well as antigen-specific CD8 T cells, localize to the bone marrow of immunized mice, and are sustained there over long periods of time. To investigate the rules governing T-cell migration to the bone marrow, we generated chimeric mice in which the lymphoid periphery contained two genetically or phenotypically distinct groups of T cells, one of which was identical to the host. We then examined whether a distinct type of T cell had an advantage over the others in the colonization of bone marrow. Our results show that whereas ICAM1 and CD18 molecules are both involved in homing to lymph nodes, neither is crucial for T-cell bone marrow colonization. We also observed that memory-phenotype CD44high T cells, but not virgin-type CD44−/low T cells, preferentially home to the bone marrow upon adoptive transfer to normal young mice, but not to thymectomized old recipients where an existing memory T-cell pool precludes their free access. Thus, T-cell colonization of the bone marrow uses distinct molecules from those implicated in lymph node homing, and is regulated both by the properties of the T cell and by the competitive efficacy of other T cells inhabiting the same, saturable niche. This implies that the homing potential of an individual lymphocyte is not merely an intrinsic property of the cell, but rather a property of the lymphoid system taken as a whole. PMID:12603595

  20. Regulation and Maintenance of an Adoptive T-Cell Dependent Memory B Cell Pool.

    PubMed

    Anson, Marie; Amado, Inês; Mailhé, Marie-Pierre; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Garcia, Sylvie; Huetz, François; Freitas, Antonio A

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monoclonal B cells to restore primary and secondary T-cell dependent antibody responses in adoptive immune-deficient hosts. Priming induced B cell activation and expansion, AID expression, antibody production and the generation of IgM+IgG- and IgM-IgG+ antigen-experienced B-cell subsets that persisted in the lymphopenic environment by cell division. Upon secondary transfer and recall the IgM-IgG+ cells responded by the production of antigen-specific IgG while the IgM+ memory cells secreted mainly IgM and little IgG, but generated new B cells expressing germinal center markers. The recall responses were more efficient if the antigenic boost was delayed suggesting that a period of adaptation is necessary before the transferred cells are able to respond. Overall these findings indicate that reconstitution of a functional and complete memory pool requires transfer of all different antigen-experienced B cell subsets. We also found that the size of the memory B cell pool did not rely on the number of the responding naïve B cells, suggesting autonomous homeostatic controls for naïve and memory B cells. By reconstituting a stable memory B cell pool in immune-deficient hosts using a monoclonal high-affinity B cell population we demonstrate the potential value of B cell adoptive immunotherapy.

  1. Regulation and Maintenance of an Adoptive T-Cell Dependent Memory B Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Marie; Amado, Inês; Mailhé, Marie-Pierre; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Garcia, Sylvie; Huetz, François; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monoclonal B cells to restore primary and secondary T-cell dependent antibody responses in adoptive immune-deficient hosts. Priming induced B cell activation and expansion, AID expression, antibody production and the generation of IgM+IgG- and IgM-IgG+ antigen-experienced B-cell subsets that persisted in the lymphopenic environment by cell division. Upon secondary transfer and recall the IgM-IgG+ cells responded by the production of antigen-specific IgG while the IgM+ memory cells secreted mainly IgM and little IgG, but generated new B cells expressing germinal center markers. The recall responses were more efficient if the antigenic boost was delayed suggesting that a period of adaptation is necessary before the transferred cells are able to respond. Overall these findings indicate that reconstitution of a functional and complete memory pool requires transfer of all different antigen-experienced B cell subsets. We also found that the size of the memory B cell pool did not rely on the number of the responding naïve B cells, suggesting autonomous homeostatic controls for naïve and memory B cells. By reconstituting a stable memory B cell pool in immune-deficient hosts using a monoclonal high-affinity B cell population we demonstrate the potential value of B cell adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27880797

  2. Memory Antitumor T-Cells Resist Inhibition by Immune Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhua; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Bergman, Ira

    2015-09-01

    Cancer immune therapy is difficult partly because several classes of suppressor cells, including regulatory T-cells and macrophage-derived suppressor cells, inhibit the antitumor T-cell response. We used treatment studies of implanted tumors in mice to demonstrate that the same inhibitory cells that abrogated an acute therapeutic T-cell response to established tumor did not inhibit the therapeutic response produced by memory T-cells. Generating antitumor memory T-cells may be a highly potent strategy against cancer with late developing metastases. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Memory CD8 T-cell compartment grows in size with immunological experience.

    PubMed

    Vezys, Vaiva; Yates, Andrew; Casey, Kerry A; Lanier, Gibson; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom; Masopust, David

    2009-01-08

    Memory CD8 T cells, generated by natural pathogen exposure or intentional vaccination, protect the host against specific viral infections. It has long been proposed that the number of memory CD8 T cells in the host is inflexible, and that individual cells are constantly competing for limited space. Consequently, vaccines that introduce over-abundant quantities of memory CD8 T cells specific for an agent of interest could have catastrophic consequences for the host by displacing memory CD8 T cells specific for all previous infections. To test this paradigm, we developed a vaccination regimen in mice that introduced as many new long-lived memory CD8 T cells specific for a single vaccine antigen as there were memory CD8 T cells in the host before vaccination. Here we show that, in contrast to expectations, the size of the memory CD8 T-cell compartment doubled to accommodate these new cells, a change due solely to the addition of effector memory CD8 T cells. This increase did not affect the number of CD4 T cells, B cells or naive CD8 T cells, and pre-existing memory CD8 T cells specific for a previously encountered infection were largely preserved. Thus, the number of effector memory CD8 T cells in the mammalian host adapts according to immunological experience. Developing vaccines that abundantly introduce new memory CD8 T cells should not necessarily ablate pre-existing immunity to other infections.

  4. Transitional Information in Spatial Serial Memory: Path Characteristics Affect Recall Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Elford, Greg; Mayberry, Murray

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the role of stimulus characteristics in a visuospatial order reconstruction task in which participants were required to recall the order of sequences of spatial locations. The complexity of the to-be-remembered sequences, as measured by path crossing, path length, and angles, was found to affect serial memory, in terms of both…

  5. Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis of Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Scores in Epilepsy Surgery Candidates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) scores were analyzed for 82 epilepsy surgery candidates and used in combination with receiver operating characteristic curves to classify patients with left (LTL) and right (RTL) temporal lobe seizure onset. Results indicate that WMS-R scores used alone or in combination provide relatively poor discrimination…

  6. Scalable Wordline Shielding Scheme using Dummy Cell beyond 40 nm NAND Flash Memory for Eliminating Abnormal Disturb of Edge Memory Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, SeungChul; Sel, Jong-Sun; Choi, Jungdal; Kim, Kinam

    2007-04-01

    A scalable wordline shielding scheme using dummy cell in NAND flash memory is presented to eliminate abnormal disturb of edge memory cell which causes to degradation of NAND flash performance. The proposed NAND flash is also able to improve more NAND scaling compared to conventional NAND string beyond sub-40 nm technology node. By using a proposed program scheme which includes an optimized bias voltage and adjusted Vth of dummy cell, almost abnormal disturbance of edge memory cell is removed and over 58% capacitive coupling noise between select transistor and edge memory cell can be reduced from both simulation and experimental results which used 63 nm NAND flash technology. The proposed NAND flash also improves Vth distribution of memory cell by providing almost equal operation conditions for all memory cells in NAND string.

  7. Thermoelectric Effects in Simulations of Phase Change Memory Mushroom Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraclas, Azer; Bakan, Gokhan; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2012-02-01

    Phase change memory is a potential candidate for the future of high-speed non-volatile memory, however significant improvements in cell design is crucial for its success in the mainstream market. Due to the asymmetric geometry of phase change mushroom cells and the high temperature gradients generated, thermoelectric effects play a key role in determining energy consumption, cell performance, and reliability. In this study, rotationally symmetric 2D finite element simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics are implemented for GeSbTe (GST). Temperature dependent material parameters (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and Seebeck coefficient) are included in the model for accuracy. Switching the direction of current shows a large change in peak molten volume within the cell, as well as current and power consumption.

  8. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis.

  9. [Short-term memory characteristics of vibration intensity tactile perception on human wrist].

    PubMed

    Hao, Fei; Chen, Li-Juan; Lu, Wei; Song, Ai-Guo

    2014-12-25

    In this study, a recall experiment and a recognition experiment were designed to assess the human wrist's short-term memory characteristics of tactile perception on vibration intensity, by using a novel homemade vibrotactile display device based on the spatiotemporal combination vibration of multiple micro vibration motors as a test device. Based on the obtained experimental data, the short-term memory span, recognition accuracy and reaction time of vibration intensity were analyzed. From the experimental results, some important conclusions can be made: (1) The average short-term memory span of tactile perception on vibration intensity is 3 ± 1 items; (2) The greater difference between two adjacent discrete intensities of vibrotactile stimulation is defined, the better average short-term memory span human wrist gets; (3) There is an obvious difference of the average short-term memory span on vibration intensity between the male and female; (4) The mechanism of information extraction in short-term memory of vibrotactile display is to traverse the scanning process by comparison; (5) The recognition accuracy and reaction time performance of vibrotactile display compares unfavourably with that of visual and auditory. The results from this study are important for designing vibrotactile display coding scheme.

  10. Redefining Memory: Building the Case for Adaptive NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Paust, Silke; Blish, Catherine A; Reeves, R Keith

    2017-10-15

    Classically, natural killer (NK) cells have been defined by nonspecific innate killing of virus-infected and tumor cells. However, burgeoning evidence suggests that the functional repertoire of NK cells is far more diverse than has been previously appreciated, thus raising the possibility that there may be unexpected functional specialization and even adaptive capabilities among NK cell subpopulations. Some of the first evidence that NK cells respond in an antigen-specific fashion came from experiments revealing that subpopulations of murine NK cells were able to respond to a specific murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) protein and that in the absence of T and B cells, murine NK cells also mediated adaptive immune responses to a secondary challenge with specific haptens. These data have been followed by demonstrations of NK cell memory of viruses and viral antigens in mice and primates. Herein, we discuss different forms of NK cell antigen specificity and how these responses may be tuned to specific viral pathogens, and we provide assessment of the current literature that may explain molecular mechanisms of the novel phenomenon of NK cell memory. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  12. Transforming growth factor-β signaling is constantly shaping memory T-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chaoyu; Zhang, Nu

    2015-01-01

    The long-term maintenance of memory T cells is essential for successful vaccines. Both the quantity and the quality of the memory T-cell population must be maintained. The signals that control the maintenance of memory T cells remain incompletely identified. Here we used two genetic models to show that continuous transforming growth factor-β signaling to antigen-specific T cells is required for the differentiation and maintenance of memory CD8+ T cells. In addition, both infection-induced and microbiota-induced inflammation impact the phenotypic and functional identity of memory CD8+ T cells. PMID:26283373

  13. Reduced non-switched memory B cell subsets cause imbalance in B cell repertoire in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Diána; Balogh, Péter; Bognár, András; Kellermayer, Zoltán; Engelmann, Péter; Németh, Péter; Farkas, Nelli; Minier, Tünde; Lóránd, Veronika; Czirják, László; Berki, Tímea

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of peripheral blood B lymphocytes in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) has provided evidence for specific alterations in naive and memory B cell balance. However, memory B cell subsets in SSc have not been thoroughly investigated. This study sought to identify phenotypic abnormalities and activation markers in peripheral blood memory B cells in SSc subtypes. Blood samples were obtained from 28 SSc patients with early form of disease (9 limited (lcSSc), 19 diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc)) and 15 healthy controls. After magnetic bead separation of CD19+ B cells, multiparametric flow cytometry was performed and CD19+CD27- IgD+ naive, CD19+CD27+ memory, CD19+CD27+IgD+ non-switched memory CD19+CD27+IgD- switched memory, CD19+CD27-IgD- double negative (DN) memory, CD80+ or CD95+ activated cells were identified. The proportion of naive B cells was higher (p=0.046) in SSc than in controls, with a decreased percentage of memory (p=0.018), especially non-switched memory B cells (p=0.015). The dcSSc patients had a significantly higher frequency of switched memory and DN memory B cells compared to lcSSc patients (p=0.025 and p=0.031). Percentage of CD95+CD27+ memory and CD95+ DN memory B cells was also significantly elevated in dcSSc compared to lcSSc patients (p=0.038 and p=0.045). We conclude that the decreased proportion of memory B cells in SSc is due to reduction of non- switched memory B cells, resulting in an imbalance between the tolerogenic and activated memory B cell types. Elevated switched and activated CD95+ DN memory B cells may serve as a biomarker for dcSSc and can have a pathogenic potential by cytokine and autoantibody production.

  14. Improved memory characteristics of charge trap memory by employing double layered ZrO2 nanocrystals and inserted Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. J.; Li, R.; Zhang, X. W.; Hu, D.; Zhao, Y. G.

    2016-07-01

    The charge trap memory capacitors incorporating a stacked charge trapping layer consisting of double layered ZrO2 nanocrystals (NCs) and inserted Al2O3 have been fabricated and investigated. It is observed that the memory capacitor with stacked trapping layer exhibits a hysteresis window as large as 14.3 V for ±10 V sweeping gate voltage range, faster program/erase speed, improved endurance performance, and good data retention characteristics with smaller extrapolated ten years charge loss at room temperature and 125 °C compared to single layered NCs. The special energy band alignment and the introduced additional traps of double layered ZrO2 NCs and inserted Al2O3 change the trapping and loss behavior of charges, and jointly contribute to the remarkable memory characteristics. Therefore, the memory capacitor with a stacked charge trapping layer is a promising candidate in future nonvolatile charge trap memory device design and application.

  15. Proportions of circulating follicular helper T cells are reduced and correlate with memory B cells in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Olusola, Babatunde A; Hassan, Amin S; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Urban, Britta C; Nduati, Eunice W

    2017-01-01

    HIV causes defects in memory B cells in children, but the mechanisms of those defects have not been fully elucidated. One possible mechanism is the lack of T-cell help to B cells during immune reactions. However, few studies have assessed the effect of HIV on follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) in children. In this study, follicular-homing CD4 T cells and memory B cells were assessed in HIV-infected children and compared with children from the community. CXCR5 and CD45RO were used as markers of follicular-homing T cells and memory T cells, respectively. Memory TFH cells were identified as CD3+CD8-CD4+CXCR5+CD45RO+PD1+. Central memory T cells were identified based on CCR7 expression. Relationship between the proportions of follicular-homing CD4 T cells and memory B cells were determined in multivariable regression models. Highly viremic HIV-infected children had lower proportions of memory TFH cells when compared with community control children. In multivariable analyses, high proportions of memory TFH cells were associated with increased percentages of resting memory B cells after adjusting for other covariates. The impact of HIV on follicular helper T cells could influence the accumulation of memory B cells in HIV-infected children.

  16. Proportions of circulating follicular helper T cells are reduced and correlate with memory B cells in HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Macharia, Gladys N.; Olusola, Babatunde A.; Hassan, Amin S.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.; Nduati, Eunice W.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction HIV causes defects in memory B cells in children, but the mechanisms of those defects have not been fully elucidated. One possible mechanism is the lack of T-cell help to B cells during immune reactions. However, few studies have assessed the effect of HIV on follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) in children. Methods In this study, follicular-homing CD4 T cells and memory B cells were assessed in HIV-infected children and compared with children from the community. CXCR5 and CD45RO were used as markers of follicular-homing T cells and memory T cells, respectively. Memory TFH cells were identified as CD3+CD8-CD4+CXCR5+CD45RO+PD1+. Central memory T cells were identified based on CCR7 expression. Relationship between the proportions of follicular-homing CD4 T cells and memory B cells were determined in multivariable regression models. Results Highly viremic HIV-infected children had lower proportions of memory TFH cells when compared with community control children. In multivariable analyses, high proportions of memory TFH cells were associated with increased percentages of resting memory B cells after adjusting for other covariates. Conclusion The impact of HIV on follicular helper T cells could influence the accumulation of memory B cells in HIV-infected children. PMID:28445512

  17. Switched-memory B cells remodel B cell receptors within secondary germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Okitsu, Shinji L.; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective vaccines induce high-affinity memory B cells and durable antibody responses through accelerated mechanisms of natural selection. Secondary changes in antibody repertoires after vaccine boosts suggest progressive B cell receptor (BCR) re-diversification, but underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. Here integrated specificity and function of individual memory B cell progeny reveal ongoing evolution of polyclonal antibody specificities through germinal center (GC) specific transcriptional activity. At the clonal and sub-clonal levels, single cell expression of Cd83 and Pol□ segregates the secondary GC transcriptional program into 4 stages that regulate divergent mechanisms of memory BCR evolution. These studies demonstrate that vaccine boosts re-activate a cyclic program of GC function in switched-memory B cells to remodel existing antibody specificities and enhance durable immune protection. PMID:25642821

  18. Humans with chronic granulomatous disease maintain humoral immunologic memory despite low frequencies of circulating memory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Santich, Brian H.; Kim, Jin Young; Posada, Jacqueline G.; Ho, Jason; Buckner, Clarisa M.; Wang, Wei; Kardava, Lela; Garofalo, Mary; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R.; Khurana, Surender; Chun, Tae-Wook; Golding, Hana; Fauci, Anthony S.; Malech, Harry L.

    2012-01-01

    CD27+ memory B cells are reduced in the blood of patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) for reasons and consequences that remain unclear. Here we confirm not only decreased CD27+ but also IgG+ B cells in the blood of CGD patients compared with healthy donors (HDs). However, among IgG+ B cells, the ratio of CD27− to CD27+ was significantly higher in CGD patients compared with HDs. Similar to conventional memory B cells, CD27−IgG+ B cells of CGD patients expressed activation markers and had undergone somatic hypermutation, albeit at levels lower than their CD27+ counterparts. Functional analyses revealed slight reductions in frequencies of total IgG but not influenza-specific memory B-cell responses, as measured by Elispot in CGD patients compared with HDs. Serum IgG levels and influenza-specific antibodies were also normal in these CGD patients. Finally, we provide evidence that influenza-specific memory B cells can be present within the CD27−IgG+ B-cell compartment. Together, these findings show that, despite reduced circulating CD27+ memory B cells, CGD patients maintain an intact humoral immunologic memory, with potential contribution from CD27− B cells. PMID:23074274

  19. Humans with chronic granulomatous disease maintain humoral immunologic memory despite low frequencies of circulating memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Moir, Susan; De Ravin, Suk See; Santich, Brian H; Kim, Jin Young; Posada, Jacqueline G; Ho, Jason; Buckner, Clarisa M; Wang, Wei; Kardava, Lela; Garofalo, Mary; Marciano, Beatriz E; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Khurana, Surender; Chun, Tae-Wook; Golding, Hana; Fauci, Anthony S; Malech, Harry L

    2012-12-06

    CD27(+) memory B cells are reduced in the blood of patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) for reasons and consequences that remain unclear. Here we confirm not only decreased CD27(+) but also IgG(+) B cells in the blood of CGD patients compared with healthy donors (HDs). However, among IgG(+) B cells, the ratio of CD27(-) to CD27(+) was significantly higher in CGD patients compared with HDs. Similar to conventional memory B cells, CD27(-)IgG(+) B cells of CGD patients expressed activation markers and had undergone somatic hypermutation, albeit at levels lower than their CD27(+) counterparts. Functional analyses revealed slight reductions in frequencies of total IgG but not influenza-specific memory B-cell responses, as measured by Elispot in CGD patients compared with HDs. Serum IgG levels and influenza-specific antibodies were also normal in these CGD patients. Finally, we provide evidence that influenza-specific memory B cells can be present within the CD27(-)IgG(+) B-cell compartment. Together, these findings show that, despite reduced circulating CD27(+) memory B cells, CGD patients maintain an intact humoral immunologic memory, with potential contribution from CD27(-) B cells.

  20. FOXO3 regulates CD8 T cell memory by T cell-intrinsic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jeremy A; Kim, Eui Ho; Plisch, Erin H; Peng, Stanford L; Suresh, M

    2012-02-01

    CD8 T cell responses have three phases: expansion, contraction, and memory. Dynamic alterations in proliferation and apoptotic rates control CD8 T cell numbers at each phase, which in turn dictate the magnitude of CD8 T cell memory. Identification of signaling pathways that control CD8 T cell memory is incomplete. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway controls cell growth in many cell types by modulating the activity of FOXO transcription factors. But the role of FOXOs in regulating CD8 T cell memory remains unknown. We show that phosphorylation of Akt, FOXO and mTOR in CD8 T cells occurs in a dynamic fashion in vivo during an acute viral infection. To elucidate the potentially dynamic role for FOXO3 in regulating homeostasis of activated CD8 T cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, we infected global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV). We found that FOXO3 deficiency induced a marked increase in the expansion of effector CD8 T cells, preferentially in the spleen, by T cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Mechanistically, the enhanced accumulation of proliferating CD8 T cells in FOXO3-deficient mice was not attributed to an augmented rate of cell division, but instead was linked to a reduction in cellular apoptosis. These data suggested that FOXO3 might inhibit accumulation of growth factor-deprived proliferating CD8 T cells by reducing their viability. By virtue of greater accumulation of memory precursor effector cells during expansion, the numbers of memory CD8 T cells were strikingly increased in the spleens of both global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice. The augmented CD8 T cell memory was durable, and FOXO3 deficiency did not perturb any of the qualitative attributes of memory T cells. In summary, we have identified FOXO3 as a critical regulator of CD8 T cell memory, and therapeutic modulation of FOXO3 might enhance vaccine-induced protective immunity against intracellular pathogens.

  1. Target organ localization of memory CD4+ T cells in patients with chronic beryllium disease

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Andrew P.; Canavera, Scott J.; Gharavi, Laia; Newman, Lee S.; Kotzin, Brian L.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is caused by exposure to beryllium in the workplace, and it remains an important public health concern. Evidence suggests that CD4+ T cells play a critical role in the development of this disease. Using intracellular cytokine staining, we found that the frequency of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lungs (bronchoalveolar lavage) of 12 CBD patients ranged from 1.4% to 29% (mean 17.8%), and these T cells expressed a Th1-type phenotype in response to beryllium sulfate (BeSO4). Few, if any, beryllium-specific CD8+ T cells were identified. In contrast, the frequency of beryllium-responsive CD4+ T cells in the blood of these subjects ranged from undetectable to 1 in 500. No correlation was observed between the frequency of beryllium-responsive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) CD4+ T cells as detected by intracellular staining and lymphocyte proliferation in culture after BeSO4 exposure. Staining for surface marker expression showed that nearly all BAL T cells exhibit an effector memory cell phenotype. These results demonstrate a dramatically high frequency and compartmentalization of antigen-specific effector memory CD4+ cells in the lungs of CBD patients. These studies provide insight into the phenotypic and functional characteristics of antigen-specific T cells invading other inaccessible target organs in human disease. PMID:12438445

  2. On a model of pattern regeneration based on cell memory.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Nikolai; Levin, Michael; Morozova, Nadya; Reinberg, Natalia; Tosenberger, Alen; Volpert, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    We present here a new model of the cellular dynamics that enable regeneration of complex biological morphologies. Biological cell structures are considered as an ensemble of mathematical points on the plane. Each cell produces a signal which propagates in space and is received by other cells. The total signal received by each cell forms a signal distribution defined on the cell structure. This distribution characterizes the geometry of the cell structure. If a part of this structure is removed, the remaining cells have two signals. They keep the value of the signal which they had before the amputation (memory), and they receive a new signal produced after the amputation. Regeneration of the cell structure is stimulated by the difference between the old and the new signals. It is stopped when the two signals coincide. The algorithm of regeneration contains certain rules which are essential for its functioning, being the first quantitative model of cellular memory that implements regeneration of complex patterns to a specific target morphology. Correct regeneration depends on the form and the size of the cell structure, as well as on some parameters of regeneration.

  3. Dexamethasone effects on activation and proliferation of immune memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Gutsol, A A; Sokhonevich, N A; Seledtsov, V I; Litvinova, L S

    2013-08-01

    Dose-dependent effects of dexamethasone on activation and proliferation of donor immune memory T cells (CD45RO(+)) were studied. Activation of memory T cells associated with IL-2 production and membrane expression of CD25 molecule was resistant to dexamethasone. Proliferative activity of memory T cells associated with membrane expression of CD71 molecule was highly sensitive to dexamethasone. Hence, glucocorticoid hormones can maintain the clonal balance in the lymphoid tissue without preventing realization of the immune memory mechanism.

  4. Evaluation of Data Retention Characteristics for Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (FRAMs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Data retention and fatigue characteristics of 64 Kb lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (FRAMs) microcircuits manufactured by Ramtron were examined over temperature range from -85 C to +310 C for ceramic packaged parts and from -85 C to +175 C for plastic parts, during retention periods up to several thousand hours. Intrinsic failures, which were caused by a thermal degradation of the ferroelectric cells, occurred in ceramic parts after tens or hundreds hours of aging at temperatures above 200 C. The activation energy of the retention test failures was 1.05 eV and the extrapolated mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) at room temperature was estimated to be more than 280 years. Multiple write-read cycling (up to 3x10(exp 7)) during the fatigue testing of plastic and ceramic parts did not result in any parametric or functional failures. However, operational currents linearly decreased with the logarithm of number of cycles thus indicating fatigue process in PZT films. Plastic parts, that had more recent date code as compared to ceramic parts, appeared to be using die with improved process technology and showed significantly smaller changes in operational currents and data access times.

  5. Low voltage lead titanate/Si one-transistor ferroelectric memory with good device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C. L.; Chen, S. Y.; Liao, C. C.; Chin, Albert

    2004-11-01

    We have developed one-transistor ferroelectric memory using lead titanate (PTO) as a gate dielectric directly formed on Si without any buffer layer. The PTO/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor memory has shown a large threshold voltage shift of 1.6 V at only ±4V program/erase voltages. The corresponding good interface was achieved by lowering the anneal temperature to 450 °C. Besides the sharp capacitance change of 0.17μF/Vcm2, it was also evidenced by the high mobility of 169cm2/Vs close to high-κ HfO2. In addition, long retention >1000s and endurance >1011 stress cycles in the device suggested good memory characteristics.

  6. Bipolar tri-state resistive switching characteristics in Ti/CeOx/Pt memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; W. Abbas, M.; M. Rana, A.; Talib, I.; E., Ahmed; Y. Nadeem, M.; L. Tsai, T.; U., Chand; A. Shah, N.; Hussain, M.; Aziz, A.; T. Bhatti, M.

    2014-12-01

    Highly repeatable multilevel bipolar resistive switching in Ti/CeOx/Pt nonvolatile memory device has been demonstrated. X-ray diffraction studies of CeO2 films reveal the formation of weak polycrystalline structure. The observed good memory performance, including stable cycling endurance and long data retention times (> 104 s) with an acceptable resistance ratio (~102), enables the device for its applications in future non-volatile resistive random access memories (RRAMs). Based on the unique distribution characteristics of oxygen vacancies in CeOx films, the possible mechanism of multilevel resistive switching in CeOx RRAM devices has been discussed. The conduction mechanism in low resistance state is found to be Ohmic due to conductive filamentary paths, while that in the high resistance state was identified as Ohmic for low applied voltages and a space-charge-limited conduction dominated by Schottky emission at high applied voltages.

  7. Vaccination Expands Antigen-Specific CD4+ Memory T Cells and Mobilizes Bystander Central Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li Causi, Eleonora; Parikh, Suraj C.; Chudley, Lindsey; Layfield, David M.; Ottensmeier, Christian H.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Di Genova, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T helper memory (Thmem) cells influence both natural and vaccine-boosted immunity, but mechanisms for their maintenance remain unclear. Pro-survival signals from the common gamma-chain cytokines, in particular IL-7, appear important. Previously we showed in healthy volunteers that a booster vaccination with tetanus toxoid (TT) expanded peripheral blood TT-specific Thmem cells as expected, but was accompanied by parallel increase of Thmem cells specific for two unrelated and non cross-reactive common recall antigens. Here, in a new cohort of healthy human subjects, we compare blood vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells in terms of differentiation stage, function, activation and proliferative status. Both responses peaked 1 week post-vaccination. Vaccine-specific cytokine-producing Thmem cells were predominantly effector memory, whereas bystander cells were mainly of central memory phenotype. Importantly, TT-specific Thmem cells were activated (CD38High HLA-DR+), cycling or recently divided (Ki-67+), and apparently vulnerable to death (IL-7RαLow and Bcl-2 Low). In contrast, bystander Thmem cells were resting (CD38Low HLA-DR- Ki-67-) with high expression of IL-7Rα and Bcl-2. These findings allow a clear distinction between vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells, suggesting the latter do not derive from recent proliferation but from cells mobilized from as yet undefined reservoirs. Furthermore, they reveal the interdependent dynamics of specific and bystander T-cell responses which will inform assessments of responses to vaccines. PMID:26332995

  8. Antiferromagnetic CuMnAs multi-level memory cell with microelectronic compatibility.

    PubMed

    Olejník, K; Schuler, V; Marti, X; Novák, V; Kašpar, Z; Wadley, P; Campion, R P; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Garces, J; Baumgartner, M; Gambardella, P; Jungwirth, T

    2017-05-19

    Antiferromagnets offer a unique combination of properties including the radiation and magnetic field hardness, the absence of stray magnetic fields, and the spin-dynamics frequency scale in terahertz. Recent experiments have demonstrated that relativistic spin-orbit torques can provide the means for an efficient electric control of antiferromagnetic moments. Here we show that elementary-shape memory cells fabricated from a single-layer antiferromagnet CuMnAs deposited on a III-V or Si substrate have deterministic multi-level switching characteristics. They allow for counting and recording thousands of input pulses and responding to pulses of lengths downscaled to hundreds of picoseconds. To demonstrate the compatibility with common microelectronic circuitry, we implemented the antiferromagnetic bit cell in a standard printed circuit board managed and powered at ambient conditions by a computer via a USB interface. Our results open a path towards specialized embedded memory-logic applications and ultra-fast components based on antiferromagnets.

  9. Antiferromagnetic CuMnAs multi-level memory cell with microelectronic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejník, K.; Schuler, V.; Marti, X.; Novák, V.; Kašpar, Z.; Wadley, P.; Campion, R. P.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Garces, J.; Baumgartner, M.; Gambardella, P.; Jungwirth, T.

    2017-05-01

    Antiferromagnets offer a unique combination of properties including the radiation and magnetic field hardness, the absence of stray magnetic fields, and the spin-dynamics frequency scale in terahertz. Recent experiments have demonstrated that relativistic spin-orbit torques can provide the means for an efficient electric control of antiferromagnetic moments. Here we show that elementary-shape memory cells fabricated from a single-layer antiferromagnet CuMnAs deposited on a III-V or Si substrate have deterministic multi-level switching characteristics. They allow for counting and recording thousands of input pulses and responding to pulses of lengths downscaled to hundreds of picoseconds. To demonstrate the compatibility with common microelectronic circuitry, we implemented the antiferromagnetic bit cell in a standard printed circuit board managed and powered at ambient conditions by a computer via a USB interface. Our results open a path towards specialized embedded memory-logic applications and ultra-fast components based on antiferromagnets.

  10. Antiferromagnetic CuMnAs multi-level memory cell with microelectronic compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Olejník, K.; Schuler, V.; Marti, X.; Novák, V.; Kašpar, Z.; Wadley, P.; Campion, R. P.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Garces, J.; Baumgartner, M.; Gambardella, P.; Jungwirth, T.

    2017-01-01

    Antiferromagnets offer a unique combination of properties including the radiation and magnetic field hardness, the absence of stray magnetic fields, and the spin-dynamics frequency scale in terahertz. Recent experiments have demonstrated that relativistic spin-orbit torques can provide the means for an efficient electric control of antiferromagnetic moments. Here we show that elementary-shape memory cells fabricated from a single-layer antiferromagnet CuMnAs deposited on a III–V or Si substrate have deterministic multi-level switching characteristics. They allow for counting and recording thousands of input pulses and responding to pulses of lengths downscaled to hundreds of picoseconds. To demonstrate the compatibility with common microelectronic circuitry, we implemented the antiferromagnetic bit cell in a standard printed circuit board managed and powered at ambient conditions by a computer via a USB interface. Our results open a path towards specialized embedded memory-logic applications and ultra-fast components based on antiferromagnets. PMID:28524862

  11. Inflammasome-Dependent Induction of Adaptive NK Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    van den Boorn, Jasper G; Jakobs, Christopher; Hagen, Christian; Renn, Marcel; Luiten, Rosalie M; Melief, Cornelis J M; Tüting, Thomas; Garbi, Natalio; Hartmann, Gunther; Hornung, Veit

    2016-06-21

    Monobenzone is a pro-hapten that is exclusively metabolized by melanocytes, thereby haptenizing melanocyte-specific antigens, which results in cytotoxic autoimmunity specifically against pigmented cells. Studying monobenzone in a setting of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we observed that monobenzone induced a long-lasting, melanocyte-specific immune response that was dependent on NK cells, yet fully intact in the absence of T- and B cells. Consistent with the concept of "memory NK cells," monobenzone-induced NK cells resided in the liver and transfer of these cells conferred melanocyte-specific immunity to naive animals. Monobenzone-exposed skin displayed macrophage infiltration and cutaneous lymph nodes showed an inflammasome-dependent influx of macrophages with a tissue-resident phenotype, coinciding with local NK cell activation. Indeed, macrophage depletion or the absence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, the adaptor protein ASC or interleukin-18 (IL-18) abolished monobenzone CHS, thereby establishing a non-redundant role for the NLRP3 inflammasome as a critical proinflammatory checkpoint in the induction of hapten-dependent memory NK cells.

  12. T-cell identity and epigenetic memory

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Zhang, Jingli

    2013-01-01

    Summary T cell development endows cells with a flexible range of effector differentiation options, superimposed on a stable core of lineage-specific gene expression that is maintained while access to alternative hematopoietic lineages is permanently renounced. This combination of features could be explained by environmentally responsive transcription factor mobilization overlaying an epigenetically stabilized base gene expression state. For example, “poising” of promoters could offer preferential access to T-cell genes, while repressive histone modifications and DNA methylation of non-T regulatory genes could be responsible for keeping non-T developmental options closed. Here we critically review the evidence for the actual deployment of epigenetic marking to support the stable aspects of T-cell identity. Much of epigenetic marking is dynamically maintained or subject to rapid modification by local action of transcription factors. Repressive histone marks are used in gene-specific ways that do not fit a simple, developmental lineage-exclusion hierarchy. We argue that epigenetic analysis may achieve its greatest impact for illuminating regulatory biology when it is used to locate cis-regulatory elements by catching them in the act of mediating regulatory change. PMID:21833836

  13. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memorycells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies.

  14. Prolonged presence of effector-memory CD8 T cells in the central nervous system after dengue virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    van der Most, Robbert G; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Ahmed, Rafi

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus infection in the central nervous system (CNS) of immunized mice results in a strong influx of CD8 T cells into the brain. Whereas the kinetics of the splenic antiviral response are conventional, i.e. expansion followed by a rapid drop in the frequency of specific CD8 T cells, dengue virus-specific CD8 T cells are retained in the CNS at a high frequency. These CD8 T cells display a partially activated phenotype (CD69(high), Ly-6A/E(high), CD62L(low)), characteristic for effector-memory T cells. CD43 expression, visualized by staining with the 1B11 mAb, decreased in time, suggesting that these persisting CD8 T cells differentiated into memory cells. These data add to the growing evidence implicating the CNS as a non-lymphoid tissue capable of supporting prolonged T cell survival/maintenance.

  15. Memory T and memory B cells share a transcriptional program of self-renewal with long-term hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Luckey, Chance John; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Weissman, Irving L.; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2006-01-01

    The only cells of the hematopoietic system that undergo self-renewal for the lifetime of the organism are long-term hematopoietic stem cells and memory T and B cells. To determine whether there is a shared transcriptional program among these self-renewing populations, we first compared the gene-expression profiles of naïve, effector and memory CD8+ T cells with those of long-term hematopoietic stem cells, short-term hematopoietic stem cells, and lineage-committed progenitors. Transcripts augmented in memory CD8+ T cells relative to naïve and effector T cells were selectively enriched in long-term hematopoietic stem cells and were progressively lost in their short-term and lineage-committed counterparts. Furthermore, transcripts selectively decreased in memory CD8+ T cells were selectively down-regulated in long-term hematopoietic stem cells and progressively increased with differentiation. To confirm that this pattern was a general property of immunologic memory, we turned to independently generated gene expression profiles of memory, naïve, germinal center, and plasma B cells. Once again, memory-enriched and -depleted transcripts were also appropriately augmented and diminished in long-term hematopoietic stem cells, and their expression correlated with progressive loss of self-renewal function. Thus, there appears to be a common signature of both up- and down-regulated transcripts shared between memory T cells, memory B cells, and long-term hematopoietic stem cells. This signature was not consistently enriched in neural or embryonic stem cell populations and, therefore, appears to be restricted to the hematopoeitic system. These observations provide evidence that the shared phenotype of self-renewal in the hematopoietic system is linked at the molecular level. PMID:16492737

  16. In remembrance of things past: memory T cells and transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Valujskikh, Anna; Lakkis, Fadi G

    2003-12-01

    A cardinal feature of the adaptive immune response is its ability to generate long-lived populations of memory T lymphocytes. Memory T cells are specific to the antigen encountered during the primary immune response and react rapidly and vigorously upon re-encounter with the same antigen. Memory T cells that recognize microbial antigens provide the organism with long-lasting protection against potentially fatal infections. On the other hand, memory T cells that recognize donor alloantigens can jeopardize the survival of life-saving organ transplants. We review here the immunobiology of memory T cells and describe their role in the rejection of solid organ allografts.

  17. CD21(-/low) B cells in human blood are memory cells.

    PubMed

    Thorarinsdottir, K; Camponeschi, A; Cavallini, N; Grimsholm, O; Jacobsson, L; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2016-08-01

    The complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) is part of a complex (CD21/CD19/CD81) acting as a co-receptor to the B cell receptor (BCR). Simultaneous triggering of the BCR and CD21 lowers the threshold for B cell activation. Although CD21 is important, B cells that express low amounts or lack surface CD21 (CD21(-/low) ) are increased in conditions with chronic inflammation, e.g. autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the CD21(-/low) B cell subset in peripheral blood from healthy donors. Here, we show that CD21(-/low) cells represent approximately 5% of B cells in peripheral blood from adults but are barely detectable in cord blood, after excluding transitional B cells. The CD21(-/low) subset can be divided into CD38(-) 24(+) and CD38(-) 24(low) cells, where most of the CD38(-) 24(+) are CD27(+) immunoglobulin (Ig)M(+) IgD(+) and the CD38(-) 24(low) are switched CD27(-) . Expression levels of additional markers, e.g. CD95 and CD62L, are similar to those on classical memory B cells. In contrast to naive cells, the majority of CD21(-/low) cells lack expression of the ABCB1 transporter. Stimulation with a combination of BCR, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7/8 and interleukin (IL)-2 induces proliferation and differentiation of the CD21(-/low) B cells comparable to CD21(+) CD27(+) memory B cells. The response excluding BCR agonist is not on par with that of classical memory B cells, although clearly above that of naive B cells. This is ascribed to a weaker response by the CD38(-) 24(low) subset, implying that some memorycells require not only TLR but also BCR triggering. We conclude that the CD21(-/low) cells in healthy donors are memory B cells. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  18. [Memory characteristic in boys with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder comorbid learning disability].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaomin; Wang, Na; Qian, Qiujin; Yang, Li; Qian, Ying; Liu, Lu; Liu, Yuxin; Cheng, Jia; Sun, Li; Cao, Qingjiu; Wang, Yufeng

    2014-06-10

    To explore the memory characteristic in boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) plus learning disability (LD). A total of 97 ADHD boys with comorbid LD (ADHD+LD), 97 ADHD boys without comorbid LD (ADHD-LD) and 97 healthy controls (based on the criteria of DSM-IV) were recruited from the outpatient clinic of Peking University Sixth Hospital from December 2003 to September 2012. Individuals across three groups were matched by ages, intelligence quotient (IQ) and ADHD subtypes. The Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) was used to access the characteristics of several memory domains. ADHD +LD group performed the worst and control group the best in memory quotient (MQ) (90 ± 15 vs 98 ± 14 & 104 ± 14) and long-term memory domain ((36.0 ± 10.2) vs (42.1 ± 7.8) & (45.6 ± 6.7) score, all P < 0.05) . ADHD+LD group scored significantly lower than the control group in short-term memory ( (53.0 ± 9.2) vs (58.0 ± 9.7) score, P < 0.05) and immediate memory domains ((10.0 ± 3.3) vs (11.3 ± 3.5) score, P < 0.05). However, ADHD+LD group scored slightly but not significantly lower than the ADHD-LD group ((54.9 ± 10.7),(10.8 ± 3.2) score, P > 0.05). In most subscales of WMS, ADHD+LD group scored significantly lower than both ADHD-LD and control group in current information and orientation, mental control (1→100) , mental control (100→1) and associate learning subscales ( (8.8 ± 3.1) vs (10.0 ± 3.0) & (9.9 ± 2.3) score, (8.7 ± 4.1) vs (10.0 ± 3.9) & (11.1 ± 3.6) score, (10.7 ± 3.9) vs (12.9 ± 2.8) & (13.7 ± 2.2) score, (9.8 ± 3.1) vs (10.8 ± 2.6) & (11.1 ± 2.1) score, all P < 0.05) . In mental control (accumulation) subscale, all pairwise comparisons were statistically significant (all P < 0.05) . In subscales of figure memory, visual reproduction and digit span, ADHD+LD scored significantly lower than the control group (all P < 0.05), but not the ADHD-LD group (all P > 0.05). Boys with ADHD comorbid LD show deficits in overall memory function and

  19. On the shape memory of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) undergo remarkably large deformations when subjected to external forces but return to their biconcave discoid resting shape as the forces are withdrawn. In many experiments, such as when RBCs are subjected to a shear flow and undergo the tank-treading motion, the membrane elements are also displaced from their original (resting) locations along the cell surface with respect to the cell axis, in addition to the cell being deformed. A shape memory is said to exist if after the flow is stopped the RBC regains its biconcave shape and the membrane elements also return to their original locations. The shape memory of RBCs was demonstrated by Fischer ["Shape memory of human red blood cells," Biophys. J. 86, 3304-3313 (2004)] using shear flow go-and-stop experiments. Optical tweezer and micropipette based stretch-relaxation experiments do not reveal the complete shape memory because while the RBC may be deformed, the membrane elements are not significantly displaced from their original locations with respect to the cell axis. Here we present the first three-dimensional computational study predicting the complete shape memory of RBCs using shear flow go-and-stop simulations. The influence of different parameters, namely, membrane shear elasticity and bending rigidity, membrane viscosity, cytoplasmic and suspending fluid viscosity, as well as different stress-free states of the RBC is studied. For all cases, the RBCs always exhibit shape memory. The complete recovery of the RBC in shear flow go-and-stop simulations occurs over a time that is orders of magnitude longer than that for optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. The response is also observed to be more complex and composed of widely disparate time scales as opposed to only one time scale that characterizes the optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. We observe that the recovery occurs in three phases: a rapid compression of the RBC immediately after the flow is stopped

  20. CD25+ FoxP3+ Memory CD4 T Cells Are Frequent Targets of HIV Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pollakis, Georgios; Kuffour, Edmund Osei; Haase, Kerstin; Bauer, Asli; Nadai, Yuka; Podola, Lilli; Clowes, Petra; Schiemann, Matthias; Henkel, Lynette; Hoffmann, Dieter; Joseph, Sarah; Bhuju, Sabin; Maboko, Leonard; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Eberhardt, Kirsten; Hoelscher, Michael; Feldt, Torsten; Saathoff, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interleukin 2 (IL-2) signaling through the IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25) facilitates HIV replication in vitro and facilitates homeostatic proliferation of CD25+ FoxP3+ CD4+ T cells. CD25+ FoxP3+ CD4+ T cells may therefore constitute a suitable subset for HIV infection and plasma virion production. CD25+ FoxP3+ CD4+ T cell frequencies, absolute numbers, and the expression of CCR5 and cell cycle marker Ki67 were studied in peripheral blood from HIV+ and HIV− study volunteers. Different memory CD4+ T cell subsets were then sorted for quantification of cell-associated HIV DNA and phylogenetic analyses of the highly variable EnvV1V3 region in comparison to plasma-derived virus sequences. In HIV+ subjects, 51% (median) of CD25+ FoxP3+ CD4+ T cells expressed the HIV coreceptor CCR5. Very high frequencies of Ki67+ cells were detected in CD25+ FoxP3+ memory CD4+ T cells (median, 27.6%) in comparison to CD25− FoxP3− memory CD4+ T cells (median, 4.1%; P < 0.0001). HIV DNA content was 15-fold higher in CD25+ FoxP3+ memory CD4+ T cells than in CD25− FoxP3− T cells (P = 0.003). EnvV1V3 sequences derived from CD25+ FoxP3+ memory CD4+ T cells did not preferentially cluster with plasma-derived sequences. Quasi-identical cell-plasma sequence pairs were rare, and their proportion decreased with the estimated HIV infection duration. These data suggest that specific cellular characteristics of CD25+ FoxP3+ memory CD4+ T cells might facilitate efficient HIV infection in vivo and passage of HIV DNA to cell progeny in the absence of active viral replication. The contribution of this cell population to plasma virion production remains unclear. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the understanding of AIDS virus pathogenesis, which cell subsets support HIV infection and replication in vivo is incompletely understood. In vitro, the IL-2 signaling pathway and IL-2-dependent cell cycle induction are essential for HIV infection of stimulated T cells. CD25+ FoxP3+ memory

  1. CD25+ FoxP3+ Memory CD4 T Cells Are Frequent Targets of HIV Infection In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chachage, Mkunde; Pollakis, Georgios; Kuffour, Edmund Osei; Haase, Kerstin; Bauer, Asli; Nadai, Yuka; Podola, Lilli; Clowes, Petra; Schiemann, Matthias; Henkel, Lynette; Hoffmann, Dieter; Joseph, Sarah; Bhuju, Sabin; Maboko, Leonard; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Eberhardt, Kirsten; Hoelscher, Michael; Feldt, Torsten; Saathoff, Elmar; Geldmacher, Christof

    2016-10-15

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) signaling through the IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25) facilitates HIV replication in vitro and facilitates homeostatic proliferation of CD25(+) FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells. CD25(+) FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells may therefore constitute a suitable subset for HIV infection and plasma virion production. CD25(+) FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cell frequencies, absolute numbers, and the expression of CCR5 and cell cycle marker Ki67 were studied in peripheral blood from HIV(+) and HIV(-) study volunteers. Different memory CD4(+) T cell subsets were then sorted for quantification of cell-associated HIV DNA and phylogenetic analyses of the highly variable EnvV1V3 region in comparison to plasma-derived virus sequences. In HIV(+) subjects, 51% (median) of CD25(+) FoxP3(+) CD4(+) T cells expressed the HIV coreceptor CCR5. Very high frequencies of Ki67(+) cells were detected in CD25(+) FoxP3(+) memory CD4(+) T cells (median, 27.6%) in comparison to CD25(-) FoxP3(-) memory CD4(+) T cells (median, 4.1%; P < 0.0001). HIV DNA content was 15-fold higher in CD25(+) FoxP3(+) memory CD4(+) T cells than in CD25(-) FoxP3(-) T cells (P = 0.003). EnvV1V3 sequences derived from CD25(+) FoxP3(+) memory CD4(+) T cells did not preferentially cluster with plasma-derived sequences. Quasi-identical cell-plasma sequence pairs were rare, and their proportion decreased with the estimated HIV infection duration. These data suggest that specific cellular characteristics of CD25(+) FoxP3(+) memory CD4(+) T cells might facilitate efficient HIV infection in vivo and passage of HIV DNA to cell progeny in the absence of active viral replication. The contribution of this cell population to plasma virion production remains unclear. Despite recent advances in the understanding of AIDS virus pathogenesis, which cell subsets support HIV infection and replication in vivo is incompletely understood. In vitro, the IL-2 signaling pathway and IL-2-dependent cell cycle induction are essential for HIV infection of

  2. The Effects of Instruction on the Frequency and Characteristics of Involuntary Autobiographical Memories

    PubMed Central

    Niedźwieńska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of experimental instruction on the retrieval of involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs). In previous studies of IAMs, participants were either instructed to record only memories (henceforth, the restricted group) or any thoughts (henceforth, the unrestricted group). However, it is unknown whether these two different types of instructions influence the retrieval of IAMs. The most recent study by Vannucci and her colleagues directly addressed this question and demonstrated that the frequency and phenomenological characteristics of IAMs strongly depended on the type of instruction received. The goal of the present study was to replicate these results while addressing some limitations of the Vannucci et al. study and to test three possible mechanisms proposed to explain the effect of instructions on the retrieval of IAMs. Our results accord well with the data presented by Vannucci et al. When participants were instructed to record only IAMs (the restricted group), they reported more memories and rated them as being retrieved in a more goal-oriented fashion. Their memories also were less clear, vivid, detailed and were less frequently accompanied by physiological reactions, compared to memories reported by the participants in the unrestricted group. In addition, the events to which the memories referred were rated as more unusual and personal by the restricted group. These results are consistent with the assumption that retrieval of IAMs depends on the type of instructions used in a study. In addition, our results suggest that one of the main mechanisms underlying the higher frequency of IAMs in the restricted group may be participants’ ability to monitor the stream of consciousness and to extract autobiographical content from this flow. Further implications of the effect of instructions for IAMs research are discussed. PMID:27294408

  3. Learning and memory: an emergent property of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Michel; Bi, Xiaoning

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we develop the argument that the molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory are an adaptation of the mechanisms used by all cells to regulate cell motility. Neuronal plasticity and more specifically synaptic plasticity are widely recognized as the processes by which information is stored in neuronal networks engaged during the acquisition of information. Evidence accumulated over the last 25 years regarding the molecular events underlying synaptic plasticity at excitatory synapses has shown the remarkable convergence between those events and those taking place in cells undergoing migration in response to extracellular signals. We further develop the thesis that the calcium-dependent protease, calpain, which we postulated over 25 years ago to play a critical role in learning and memory, plays a central role in the regulation of both cell motility and synaptic plasticity. The findings discussed in this review illustrate the general principle that fundamental cell biological processes are used for a wide range of functions at the level of organisms.

  4. Evidence for grid cells in a human memory network.

    PubMed

    Doeller, Christian F; Barry, Caswell; Burgess, Neil

    2010-02-04

    Grid cells in the entorhinal cortex of freely moving rats provide a strikingly periodic representation of self-location which is indicative of very specific computational mechanisms. However, the existence of grid cells in humans and their distribution throughout the brain are unknown. Here we show that the preferred firing directions of directionally modulated grid cells in rat entorhinal cortex are aligned with the grids, and that the spatial organization of grid-cell firing is more strongly apparent at faster than slower running speeds. Because the grids are also aligned with each other, we predicted a macroscopic signal visible to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans. We then looked for this signal as participants explored a virtual reality environment, mimicking the rats' foraging task: fMRI activation and adaptation showing a speed-modulated six-fold rotational symmetry in running direction. The signal was found in a network of entorhinal/subicular, posterior and medial parietal, lateral temporal and medial prefrontal areas. The effect was strongest in right entorhinal cortex, and the coherence of the directional signal across entorhinal cortex correlated with spatial memory performance. Our study illustrates the potential power of combining single-unit electrophysiology with fMRI in systems neuroscience. Our results provide evidence for grid-cell-like representations in humans, and implicate a specific type of neural representation in a network of regions which supports spatial cognition and also autobiographical memory.

  5. Identification of Human Memory-Like NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Elena I; Streltsova, Maria A; Kanevskiy, Leonid M; Erokhina, Sophia A; Telford, William G

    2017-01-05

    Our understanding of NK biology is increased dramatically, a product of improved flow-cytometric techniques for analyzing these cells. NK cells undergo significant changes in repertoire during differentiation. A repeating stimulus, such as a cytomegalovirus infection, may result in accumulation of certain types of highly differentiated NK cells designated as memory-like, or adaptive NK cells. Adaptive NK cells are capable of rapid expansion and effective response to the recall stimulus. These cells differ significantly from conventional NK cells both functionally and phenotypically. Here we describe an approach for identification and analysis of adaptive NK cells in human peripheral blood. CD57-positive cells with high expression of activating-receptor NKG2C, increased expression of KIR receptors, lack of co-expression with inhibitory receptor NKG2A, and decreased expression of activating receptor NCR3 (NKp30) all characterize this cell type. The flow-cytometric method described below can identify this NK cell subset on a relatively simple flow cytometer. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Differential mechanisms of memory CD8 T cell maintenance by individual myeloid cell types

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Loredana; Stonier, Spencer W.; Overwijk, Willem W.; Schluns, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that individual myeloid subsets have a differential ability to maintain memory CD8 T cells via IL-15. Although DCs support IL-15-mediated homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells in vivo, whether various DC subsets and other myeloid cells similarly mediate homeostasis is unknown. Therefore, we studied the ability of different myeloid cells to maintain memory CD8 T cells in vitro. Using an in vitro cocoulture system that recapitulated known roles of DCs and IL-15 on memory CD8 T cells, all in vitro-derived or ex vivo-isolated DCs maintained CD8 T cells better than rIL-15 alone, and FLT-3L-DCs are the most efficient compared with GM-DCs, BM-derived macrophages, or freshly isolated DCs. Although FLT-3L-DCs were the least effective at inducing CD8 T cell proliferation, FLT-3L-DCs promoted better CD8 T cell survival and increased Bcl-2 and MCL-2 expression in CD8 T cells. T cell maintenance correlated only partially with DC expression of IL-15Rα and IL-15, suggesting that DCs provided additional support signals. Indeed, in the absence of IL-15 signals, CD70/CD27 further supported CD8 T cell maintenance. IFN-α enhanced CD70 expression by DCs, resulting in increased proliferation of CD8 T cells. Overall, this study supports our hypothesis by demonstrating that specific DC subtypes had a greater capacity to support memory CD8 T cell maintenance and did so through different mechanisms. Furthermore, this study shows that IL-15 trans-presentation can work in conjunction with other signals, such as CD70/CD27 interactions, to mediate CD8 T cell homeostasis efficiently. PMID:20354106

  8. Memory Stem T Cells in Autoimmune Disease: High Frequency of Circulating CD8+ Memory Stem Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Muranski, Pawel; Feng, Xingmin; Townsley, Danielle M.; Liu, Baoying; Knickelbein, Jared; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Ito, Sawa; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Taylor, James G.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Barrett, A. John; O’Shea, John; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Memory stem T cells (TSCMs) constitute a long-lived, self-renewing lymphocyte population essential for the maintenance of functional immunity. Hallmarks of autoimmune disease pathogenesis are abnormal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation. We investigated the TSCM subset in 55, 34, 43, and 5 patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), autoimmune uveitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sickle cell disease, respectively, as well as in 41 age-matched healthy controls. CD8+ TSCM frequency was significantly increased in AA compared with healthy controls. An increased CD8+ TSCM frequency at diagnosis was associated with responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy, and an elevated CD8+ TSCM population after immunosuppressive therapy correlated with treatment failure or relapse in AA patients. IFN-γ and IL-2 production was significantly increased in various CD8+ and CD4+ T cell subsets in AA patients, including CD8+ and CD4+ TSCMs. CD8+ TSCM frequency was also increased in patients with autoimmune uveitis or sickle cell disease. A positive correlation between CD4+ and CD8+ TSCM frequencies was found in AA, autoimmune uveitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Evaluation of PD-1, CD160, and CD244 expression revealed that TSCMs were less exhausted compared with other types of memory T cells. Our results suggest that the CD8+ TSCM subset is a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for AA. PMID:26764034

  9. Memory Stem T Cells in Autoimmune Disease: High Frequency of Circulating CD8+ Memory Stem Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Muranski, Pawel; Feng, Xingmin; Townsley, Danielle M; Liu, Baoying; Knickelbein, Jared; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Ito, Sawa; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Taylor, James G; Kaplan, Mariana J; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Barrett, A John; O'Shea, John; Young, Neal S

    2016-02-15

    Memory stem T cells (TSCMs) constitute a long-lived, self-renewing lymphocyte population essential for the maintenance of functional immunity. Hallmarks of autoimmune disease pathogenesis are abnormal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation. We investigated the TSCM subset in 55, 34, 43, and 5 patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), autoimmune uveitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sickle cell disease, respectively, as well as in 41 age-matched healthy controls. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was significantly increased in AA compared with healthy controls. An increased CD8(+) TSCM frequency at diagnosis was associated with responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy, and an elevated CD8(+) TSCM population after immunosuppressive therapy correlated with treatment failure or relapse in AA patients. IFN-γ and IL-2 production was significantly increased in various CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell subsets in AA patients, including CD8(+) and CD4(+) TSCMs. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was also increased in patients with autoimmune uveitis or sickle cell disease. A positive correlation between CD4(+) and CD8(+) TSCM frequencies was found in AA, autoimmune uveitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Evaluation of PD-1, CD160, and CD244 expression revealed that TSCMs were less exhausted compared with other types of memory T cells. Our results suggest that the CD8(+) TSCM subset is a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for AA.

  10. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Cíntia de Vasconcellos; Telles, Paloma Dias da Silva; Nascimento, Ivana Lucia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine. PMID:23580887

  11. Simultaneous Assessment of Rotavirus-Specific Memory B Cells and Serological Memory after B Cell Depletion Therapy with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Daniel; Rojas, Olga L.; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Ángel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of serological memory are still unclear. Rotavirus (RV) memory B cells (mBc) are enriched in IgM+ and CD27- subpopulations, which are associated with autoimmune diseases pathogenesis. In patients with autoimmune diseases treated with Rituximab (RTX), some autoantibodies (auto-Abs) decrease after treatment, but other auto-Abs and pathogen-specific IgG Abs remain unchanged. Thus, maintenance of autoimmune and pathogen-specific serological memory may depend on the type of antigen and/or Ab isotype evaluated. Antigen-specific mBc and antigen-specific Abs of different isotypes have not been simultaneously assessed in patients after RTX treatment. To study the relationship between mBc subpopulations and serological memory we characterized total, RV- and tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific mBc by flow cytometry in patients with autoimmune diseases before and after treatment with RTX. We also measured total, RV- and TT-Abs, and some auto-Abs by kinetic nephelometry, ELISA, and EliA tests, respectively. Minor differences were observed between the relative frequencies of RV-mBc in healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. After RTX treatment, naïve Bc and total, RV- and TT-specific mBc [IgM+, switched (IgA+/IgG+), IgM+ only, IgD+ only, and CD27- (IgA+/IgG+/IgM+)] were significantly diminished. An important decrease in total plasma IgM and minor decreases in total IgG and IgA levels were also observed. IgM rheumatoid factor, IgG anti-CCP, and IgG anti-dsDNA were significantly diminished. In contrast, RV-IgA, RV-IgG and RV-IgG1, and TT-IgG titers remained stable. In conclusion, in patients with autoimmunity, serological memory against RV and TT seem to be maintained by long-lived plasma cells, unaffected by RTX, and an important proportion of total IgM and serological memory against some auto-antigens seem to be maintained by short-lived plasma cells, dependent on mBc precursors depleted by RTX. PMID:24819618

  12. Simultaneous assessment of rotavirus-specific memory B cells and serological memory after B cell depletion therapy with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Daniel; Rojas, Olga L; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Mantilla, Rubén D; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of serological memory are still unclear. Rotavirus (RV) memory B cells (mBc) are enriched in IgM(+) and CD27- subpopulations, which are associated with autoimmune diseases pathogenesis. In patients with autoimmune diseases treated with Rituximab (RTX), some autoantibodies (auto-Abs) decrease after treatment, but other auto-Abs and pathogen-specific IgG Abs remain unchanged. Thus, maintenance of autoimmune and pathogen-specific serological memory may depend on the type of antigen and/or Ab isotype evaluated. Antigen-specific mBc and antigen-specific Abs of different isotypes have not been simultaneously assessed in patients after RTX treatment. To study the relationship between mBc subpopulations and serological memory we characterized total, RV- and tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific mBc by flow cytometry in patients with autoimmune diseases before and after treatment with RTX. We also measured total, RV- and TT-Abs, and some auto-Abs by kinetic nephelometry, ELISA, and EliA tests, respectively. Minor differences were observed between the relative frequencies of RV-mBc in healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. After RTX treatment, naïve Bc and total, RV- and TT-specific mBc [IgM(+), switched (IgA(+)/IgG(+)), IgM(+) only, IgD(+) only, and CD27- (IgA(+)/IgG(+)/IgM(+))] were significantly diminished. An important decrease in total plasma IgM and minor decreases in total IgG and IgA levels were also observed. IgM rheumatoid factor, IgG anti-CCP, and IgG anti-dsDNA were significantly diminished. In contrast, RV-IgA, RV-IgG and RV-IgG1, and TT-IgG titers remained stable. In conclusion, in patients with autoimmunity, serological memory against RV and TT seem to be maintained by long-lived plasma cells, unaffected by RTX, and an important proportion of total IgM and serological memory against some auto-antigens seem to be maintained by short-lived plasma cells, dependent on mBc precursors depleted by RTX.

  13. Memory characteristics of silicon nanowire transistors generated by weak impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Doohyeok; Kim, Minsuk; Kim, Yoonjoong; Kim, Sangsig

    2017-09-29

    In this study, we demonstrate the static random access memory (SRAM) characteristics generated by weak impact ionization in bendable field-effect transistors (FETs) with n(+)-p-n(+) silicon nanowire (SiNW) channels. Our bendable SiNW FETs show not only superior switching characteristics such as an on/off current ratio of ~10(5) and steep subthreshold swing (~5 mV/dec) but also reliable SRAM characteristics. The SRAM characteristics originate from the positive feedback loops in the SiNW FETs generated by weak impact ionization. This paper describes in detail the operating mechanism of our device and demonstrates the potential of bendable SiNW FETs for future SRAM applications.

  14. Strategic priming with multiple antigens can yield memory cell phenotypes optimized for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A computational study

    DOE PAGES

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. While many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likelymore » key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  15. Strategic Priming with Multiple Antigens can Yield Memory Cell Phenotypes Optimized for Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. Although many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likely key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  16. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection and circulating IgD+ memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Marianne C; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Fisher, Christopher; Sefe, Delali; Clapson, Margaret; Klein, Nigel; Baxendale, Helen E

    2008-08-15

    Levels of circulating naive and memory B cells were measured in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and control subjects to determine whether the irreversible depletion of memory B cells described in HIV-infected adults occurs in children with HIV infection. Depletion of circulating IgD+ memory B cells was seen in HIV-infected children despite control of the HIV load with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (P =. 04). IgD+ memory B cell percentages did not correlate with CD4+ cell percentages (P =. 027) or disease duration (P =. 026). Naive/transitional and IgD- memory B cell numbers were not affected. Pediatric HIV infection is associated with selective depletion of circulating IgD+ memory B cells despite control of the HIV load with HAART.

  17. The requirement of LAT in the primary and memory responses of CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ou-Yang, Chih-wen; Zhu, Minghua; Sullivan, Sarah A; Fuller, Deirdre M.; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that links T cell receptor (TCR) engagement to downstream signaling events. While it is clear that LAT is essential in thymocyte development and initiation of T cell activation, its function during T cell expansion, contraction, and memory formation remains unknown. To study the role of TCR-mediated signaling in CD8 T cells during the course of pathogen infection, we used an inducible mouse model to delete LAT in antigen-specific CD8 T cells at different stages of Listeria infection and analyzed the effect of deletion on T cell responses. Our data showed that LAT is important for maintaining CD8 T cell expansion during the priming phase; however, it is not required for CD8 T cell contraction and memory maintenance. Moreover, LAT deficiency accelerates memory differentiation during the effector-to-memory transition, leading to a higher frequency of KLRG1lowIL-7RhighCD62Lhigh memory T cells. Nonetheless, these LAT-deficient memory T cells were unable to proliferate or produce cytokines upon secondary infection. Our data demonstrated that, while it is dispensable for contraction and memory maintenance, TCR-mediated signaling regulates CD8 T cell memory differentiation and is essential for the memory response against pathogens. PMID:23401587

  18. Two-silicon-nanocrystal layer memory structure with improved retention characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nassiopoulou, A G; Salonidou, A

    2007-01-01

    It was demonstrated in the literature that the use of self-aligned doubly-stacked Si dots improves retention characteristics of a nanocrystal memory. In this paper, we show that a similar effect may be obtained by using two distinct layers of silicon nanocrystals within the gate dielectric of the MOS structure, if the nanocrystal density in each layer is high enough (above 10(12) dots/cm2) so as to get an average effect of at least one smaller dot underneath each larger one. The relative distance of the layers and their position from the silicon substrate and the gate metal are critical for optimum memory operation. Two different double-nanocrystal-layer structures were investigated. In the first structure the two nanocrystal layers were close together and they were composed of dots of different size (lower layer: 3 nm, upper layer: 5 nm), while in the second structure the dot layers were composed of dots of equal diameter (d = 3 nm) and their inter-distance was much larger. In both cases, the retention characteristics of the structure were improved compared with a single dot layer structure. In the second case this improvement was significantly larger than in the first case. Extrapolation of the data to ten years memory operation, showed that the charge loss after this time was only approximately 12%.

  19. Coordinated Changes in DNA Methylation in Antigen-Specific Memory CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogoshi, Katsumi; Sasaki, Atsushi; Abe, Jun; Qu, Wei; Nakatani, Yoichiro; Ahsan, Budrul; Oshima, Kenshiro; Shand, Francis H. W.; Ametani, Akio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi; Hattori, Masahira; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Matsushima, Kouji

    2013-01-01

    Memory CD4+ T cells are central regulators of both humoral and cellular immune responses. T cell differentiation results in specific changes in chromatin structure and DNA methylation of cytokine genes. Although the methylation status of a limited number of gene loci in T cells has been examined, the genome-wide DNA methylation status of memory CD4+ T cells remains unexplored. To further elucidate the molecular signature of memory T cells, we conducted methylome and transcriptome analyses of memory CD4+ T cells generated using T cells from TCR-transgenic mice. The resulting genome-wide DNA methylation profile revealed 1144 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) across the murine genome during the process of T cell differentiation, 552 of which were associated with gene loci. Interestingly, the majority of these DMRs were located in introns. These DMRs included genes such as CXCR6, Tbox21, Chsy1, and Cish, which are associated with cytokine production, homing to bone marrow, and immune responses. Methylation changes in memory T cells exposed to specific Ag appeared to regulate enhancer activity rather than promoter activity of immunologically relevant genes. In addition, methylation profiles differed between memory T cell subsets, demonstrating a link between T cell methylation status and T cell differentiation. By comparing DMRs between naive and Ag-specific memory T cells, this study provides new insights into the functional status of memory T cells. PMID:23509353

  20. The transcriptional regulator PLZF induces the development of CD44 high memory phenotype T cells.

    PubMed

    Raberger, Julia; Schebesta, Alexandra; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Boucheron, Nicole; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Berglöf, Anna; Kolbe, Thomas; Smith, C I Edvard; Rülicke, Thomas; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2008-11-18

    Transcriptional pathways controlling the development of CD44(hi) memory phenotype (MP) T cells with "innate-like" functions are not well understood. Here we show that the BTB (bric-a-brac, tramtrack, broad complex) domain-containing protein promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is expressed in CD44(hi), but not in CD44(lo), CD4(+) T cells. Transgenic expression of PLZF during T cell development and in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells induced a T cell intrinsic program leading to an increase in peripheral CD44(hi) MP CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and a corresponding decrease of naïve CD44(lo) T cells. The MP CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells produced IFNgamma upon PMA/ionomycin stimulation, thus showing innate-like function. Changes in the naïve versus memory-like subset distribution were already evident in single-positive thymocytes, indicating PLZF-induced T cell developmental alterations. In addition, CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells in PLZF transgenic mice showed impaired development and were severely reduced in the periphery. Finally, after anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation, CD4(+) transgenic T cells showed reduced IL-2 and IFNgamma production but increased IL-4 secretion as a result of enhanced IL-4 production of the CD44(hi)CD62L(+) subset. Our data indicate that PLZF is a novel regulator of the development of CD44(hi) MP T cells with a characteristic partial innate-like phenotype.

  1. Immune memory in CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, D; Chapman, M D; Sasama, J; Lee, T H; Kemeny, D M

    1997-01-01

    This study addresses the question of whether human peripheral CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells possess antigen-specific immune memory. CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells were isolated by a combination of positive and negative selection. Putative CD4+ CD45RA+ cells expressed CD45RA (98.9%) and contained < 0.1% CD4+ CD45RO+ and < 0.5% CD4+ CD45RA+ CD45RO+ cells. Putative CD45RO+ cells expressed CD45RO (90%) and contained 9% CD45RA+ CD45RO+ and < 0.1% CD4+ CD45RA+ cells. The responder frequency of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus-stimulated CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells was determined in two atopic donors and found to be 1:11,314 and 1:8031 for CD4+ CD45RA+ and 1:1463 and 1:1408 for CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells. The responder frequencies of CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells from two non-atopic, but exposed, donors were 1:78031 and 1:176,903 for CD4+ CD45RA+ and 1:9136 and 1:13,136 for CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells. T cells specific for D. pteronyssinus were cloned at limiting dilution following 10 days of bulk culture with D. pteronyssinus antigen. Sixty-eight clones were obtained from CD4+ CD45RO+ and 24 from CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells. All clones were CD3+ CD4+ CD45RO+ and proliferated in response to D. pteronyssinus antigens. Of 40 clones tested, none responded to Tubercule bacillus purified protein derivative (PPD). No difference was seen in the pattern of interleukin-4 (IL-4) or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) producing clones derived from CD4+ CD45RA+ and CD4+ CD45RO+ precursors, although freshly isolated and polyclonally activated CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells produced 20-30-fold lower levels of IL-4 and IFN-gamma than their CD4+ CD45RO+ counterparts. Sixty per cent of the clones used the same pool of V beta genes. These data support the hypothesis that immune memory resides in CD4+ CD45RA+ as well as CD4+ CD45RO+ T cells during the chronic immune response to inhaled antigen. PMID:9301520

  2. High-Speed Programming Not-OR Flash Memory Cells With Titanium Disilicide Drain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong-Rok; Dal Kwack, Kae; Kim, Tae Whan

    2008-08-01

    A Not-OR (NOR) flash memory cell using a titanium disilicide (TiSi2) drain was designed to increase programming speed and driving current. This NOR flash memory cell with a TiSi2 drain was proposed on the basis of the fundamental structure of conventional NOR flash memory cells with a length of 90 nm. The programming speed and driving current of the NOR flash memory cell with a TiSi2 drain were simulated using T-SUPREM4 and MEDICI. The simulation results showed that the heavily doped carriers existing in the TiSi2 drain can be used to increase the programming speed of the NOR flash memory cell and that a decrease in source/drain series resistance utilizing the silicide in the NOR flash memory cell with a TiSi2 drain helps increase driving current density.

  3. Enhanced memory characteristics in organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors through thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, Ryo; Tashiro, Tomoya; Sekine, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2015-11-15

    We report on the memory characteristics of organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) using spin-coated poly(vinylidene difluoride/trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF/TrFE)) as a gate insulating layer. By thermal annealing the P(VDF/TrFE) layer at temperatures above its melting point, we could significantly improve the on/off current ratio to over 10{sup 4}. Considerable changes in the surface morphology and x-ray diffraction patterns were also observed in the P(VDF/TrFE) layer as a result of the annealing process. The enhanced memory effect is attributed to large polarization effects caused by rearranged ferroelectric polymer chains and improved crystallinity in the organic semiconductor layer of the FeFET devices.

  4. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-05-18

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

  5. Viral particles drive rapid differentiation of memory B cells into secondary plasma cells producing increased levels of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Mohanan, Deepa; Bessa, Juliana; Link, Alexander; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Saudan, Philippe; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-06-15

    Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles (VLPs), which allows tracking of VLP-specific B cells by flow cytometry as well as histology. Using allotype markers, it is possible to adoptively transfer memory B cells into a naive mouse and track responses of naive and memory B cells in the same mouse under physiological conditions. We have observed that VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into plasma cells that drove the early onset of a strong humoral IgG response. However, neither IgM(+) nor IgG(+) memory B cells proliferated extensively or entered germinal centers. Remarkably, plasma cells derived from memory B cells preferentially homed to the bone marrow earlier and secreted increased levels of Abs when compared with primary plasma cells derived from naive B cells. Hence, memory B cells have the unique phenotype to differentiate into highly effective secondary plasma cells.

  6. Rapid Recall Ability of Memory T cells is Encoded in their Epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Barski, Artem; Cuddapah, Suresh; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Liu, Chong; Imamichi, Hiromi; Yang, Wenjing; Peng, Weiqun; Lane, H. Clifford; Zhao, Keji

    2017-01-01

    Even though T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation together with co-stimulation is sufficient for the activation of both naïve and memory T cells, the memory cells are capable of producing lineage specific cytokines much more rapidly than the naïve cells. The mechanisms behind this rapid recall response of the memory cells are still not completely understood. Here, we performed epigenetic profiling of human resting naïve, central and effector memory T cells using ChIP-Seq and found that unlike the naïve cells, the regulatory elements of the cytokine genes in the memory T cells are marked by activating histone modifications even in the resting state. Therefore, the ability to induce expression of rapid recall genes upon activation is associated with the deposition of positive histone modifications during memory T cell differentiation. We propose a model of T cell memory, in which immunological memory state is encoded epigenetically, through poising and transcriptional memory. PMID:28054639

  7. Quantitative assessment of the functional plasticity of memory CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Baz, Adriana; Groves, Penny; Buttigieg, Kathy; Apte, Simon H; Kienzle, Norbert; Kelso, Anne

    2016-04-01

    While the functional plasticity of memory CD4(+) T cells has been studied extensively, less is known about this property in memory CD8(+) T cells. Here, we report the direct measurement of plasticity by paired daughter analysis of effector and memory OT-I CD8(+) T cells primed in vivo with ovalbumin. Naïve, effector, and memory OT-I cells were isolated and activated in single-cell culture; then, after the first division, their daughter cells were transferred to new cultures with and without IL-4; expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNAs was measured 5 days later in the resultant subclones. Approximately 40% of clonogenic memory CD8(+) T cells were bipotential in this assay, giving rise to an IL-4(-) subclone in the absence of IL-4 and an IL-4(+) subclone in the presence of IL-4. The frequency of bipotential cells was lower among memory cells than naïve cells but markedly higher than among 8-day effectors. Separation based on high or low expression of CD62L, CD122, CD127, or Ly6C did not identify a phenotypic marker of the bipotential cells. Functional plasticity in memory CD8(+) T-cell populations can therefore reflect modulation at the level of a single memory cell and its progeny. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Cystic Fibrosis patients have inducible IL-17+IL-22+ memory cells in lung draining lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne R.; Chen, Kong; Duncan, Steven R.; Lathrop, Kira; Latoche, Joseph; Logar, Alison; Pociask, Derek A.; Wahlberg, Brendon; Ray, Prabir; Ray, Anuradha; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-17 is an important cytokine signature of a T helper differentiation pathway, Th17. This T cell subset is crucial in mediating autoimmune disease or antimicrobial immunity in animal models, but its presence and role in human disease remains to be completely characterized. Objective We set out to determine the frequency of Th17 cells in cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease in which there is recurrent infection with known pathogens. Methods Explanted lungs from patients undergoing transplant or organ donors (CF = 18, non-CF, non-bronchiectatic = 10) were collected. Hilar nodes and parenchymal lung tissue were processed. We examined them for Th17 signature by immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR. T cells were isolated and stimulated with antigens from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus. Cytokine profiles and staining by flow cytometry were used to assess the reactivity of these cells to antigen stimulation. Results We found a strong IL-17 phenotype in CF compared to non-CF controls. Within this tissue, we found pathogen-antigen-responsive CD4+IL17+ cells. There were double positive IL-17+IL-22+ cells and the IL-22+ population had higher proportions of memory characteristics. Antigen-specific Th17 responses were stronger in the draining lymph nodes compared to matched parenchymal lung. Conclusion Inducible proliferation of Th17(22) with memory cell characteristics is seen in CF lung. The function of these individual subpopulations will require further study regarding their development. T-cells are likely not the exclusive producers of IL-17 and IL-22 and this will require further characterization. PMID:22795370

  9. Germinal-center development of memory B cells driven by IL-9 from follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Shi, Jingwen; Yan, Jiacong; Xiao, Zhengtao; Hou, Xiaoxiao; Lu, Peiwen; Hou, Shiyue; Mao, Tianyang; Liu, Wanli; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Yang, Xuerui; Qi, Hai

    2017-08-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) support high-affinity, long-lived humoral immunity. How memory B cells develop in GCs is not clear. Through the use of a cell-cycle-reporting system, we identified GC-derived memory precursor cells (GC-MP cells) that had quit cycling and reached G0 phase while in the GC, exhibited memory-associated phenotypes with signs of affinity maturation and localized toward the GC border. After being transferred into adoptive hosts, GC-MP cells reconstituted a secondary response like genuine memory B cells. GC-MP cells expressed the interleukin 9 (IL-9) receptor and responded to IL-9. Acute treatment with IL-9 or antibody to IL-9 accelerated or retarded the positioning of GC-MP cells toward the GC edge and exit from the GC, and enhanced or inhibited the development of memory B cells, which required B cell-intrinsic responsiveness to IL-9. Follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) produced IL-9, and deletion of IL-9 from T cells or, more specifically, from GC TFH cells led to impaired memory formation of B cells. Therefore, the GC development of memory B cells is promoted by TFH cell-derived IL-9.

  10. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M.; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T.; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  11. Memory CD4+ T cells are suppressed by CD8+ regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xin; Cheng, Qi; Liang, Huifang; Zhao, Jianping; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Tomlinson, Stephen; Chen, Lin; Atkinson, Carl; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute graft rejection mediated by alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells is a major obstacle to transplantation tolerance. It has been reported that CD8+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have the ability to induce graft tolerance by restraining the function of activated CD4+ T cells, but not including memory T cells. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of CD8+ Tregs on alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells. Methods: We detected Qa-1 expression and performed proliferative assay on memory CD4+ T cells. All memory CD4+ T cells were purified from mice receiving skin allografts. We performed inhibitory and cytotoxic assays on CD8+ Tregs, which were isolated from a T cell vaccination mouse model, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured in co-culture supernatants by ELISA. To confirm CD8+ Tregs inhibition of memory CD4+ T cells in-vivo, we utilized a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Results: Memory CD4+ T cells mediated acute allograft rejection, and CD8+ Tregs suppressed the proliferation of memory CD4+ T cells. In vitro, memory CD4+ T cells were inhibited and lysed by CD8+ Tregs. There was a positive correlation between IFN-γ levels, and cell lysis rate induced by CD8+ Tregs. In-vivo studies demonstrated CD8+ Tregs prolonged graft survival times, by inhibiting CD4+ memory T cells, through a Qa-1-peptide-TCR pathway. Conclusions: CD8+ Tregs inhibit CD4+ memory T cell-mediated acute murine cardiac allograft rejection, and further prolong graft survival times. These results provide new insights into immune regulation of organ rejection. PMID:28123634

  12. Characterization of memory B cells from thymus and its impact for DLBCL classification.

    PubMed

    Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bøgsted, Martin; Schmitz, Alexander; Nyegaard, Mette; Gaihede, Michael; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Urup, Thomas; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Madsen, Jakob; Bødker, Julie Støve; Dybkær, Karen; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2016-10-01

    The rare memory B cells in thymus (Thy) are considered the cells of origin for primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the normal memory B-cell compartment in Thy and to support its association with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. Seven paired human tissue samples from Thy and sternum bone marrow (BM) were harvested during cardiac surgery. B-cell subsets were phenotyped by Euroflow standard and fluorescence-activated cell sorting for microarray analysis on the Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays platform. Differentially expressed genes between Thy and BM memorycells were identified and correlated with the molecular subclasses of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Within Thy, 4% (median; range 2%-14%) of the CD45(+) hematopoietic cells were CD19(+) B cells, with a major fraction being CD27(+)/CD38(-) memorycells (median 80%, range 76%-93%). The BM contained 14% (median; range 3%-27%), of which only a minor fraction (median 5%, range 2%-10%) were memorycells. Global gene expression analysis of the memory B-cell subsets from the two compartments identified 133 genes upregulated in Thy, including AICDA, REL, STAT1, TNF family, SLAMF1, CD80, and CD86. In addition, exons 4 and 5 in the 3' end of AICDA were more highly expressed in Thy than in BM. The Thy memory B-cell gene profile was overexpressed in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma compared with other diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subclasses. The present study describes a Thy memory B-cell subset and its gene profile correlated with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas, suggesting origin from Thy memorycells.

  13. Trauma memory characteristics and the development of acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder in youth.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, A; Brewer, N; Meiser-Stedman, R; Nixon, R D V

    2017-03-01

    The present study addresses gaps in knowledge regarding the association between trauma memory processes and posttraumatic stress responses in youth. Our primary goal was to explore the relative contribution of perceptions of trauma memory quality versus narrative trauma memory characteristics to explain overall adjustment. Children (N = 67) were interviewed within four weeks (T1) of an injury leading to hospital treatment and then again eight weeks later (T2). In each interview, the child told a trauma narrative (which were later coded), and answered the Trauma Memory Quality Questionnaire (Meiser-Stedman, Smith, Yule, & Dalgleish, 2007a), a self-report measure indexing the sensory, fragmented, and disorganised characteristics of trauma memory. They then completed measures of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) symptoms and associated psychopathology at T1 and measures of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) symptoms and associated psychopathology at T2. Self-reported trauma memory characteristics predicted ASD symptoms cross-sectionally at T1 and PTS symptoms prospectively over time. At both time points, self-reported trauma memory characteristics accounted for all of the unique variance in symptoms initially explained by narrative characteristics. A reduction in self-report ratings, but not the hypothesised narrative features (e.g., disorganised or lexical elements of the narrative), significantly predicted a reduction in PTS symptoms over time. The small sample size and the absence of a within-subjects narrative control were the main limitations of the study. These findings underscore the importance of self-reported trauma memory characteristics to the aetiology of PTSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P A; Fu, H H; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, Q M; Puddington, L; Khanna, K M; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, B S

    2017-03-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T-cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T-cell response after oral infection with an internalin A 'murinized' Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T-cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the 'gut-homing' integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of interleukin (IL)-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27(-) Ly6C(-) and CD69(+) CD103(-) while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69(-). LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens.

  15. Differentiation of distinct long-lived memory CD4 T cells in intestinal tissues after oral Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, PA; Fu, HH; Qiu, Z; Khairallah, C; Pham, QM; Puddington, L; Khanna, KM; Lefrançois, L; Sheridan, BS

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses to intestinal pathogens remain incompletely understood. Here we examined the CD4 T cell response after oral infection with an internalin A ‘murinized’ Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Oral Lm infection induced a robust endogenous listeriolysin O (LLO)-specific CD4 T cell response with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics in the intestine. Circulating LLO-specific CD4 T cells transiently expressed the ‘gut-homing’ integrin α4β7 and accumulated in the intestinal lamina propria and epithelium where they were maintained independent of IL-15. The majority of intestinal LLO-specific CD4 T cells were CD27− Ly6C− and CD69+ CD103− while the lymphoid LLO-specific CD4 T cells were heterogeneous based on CD27 and Ly6C expression and predominately CD69−. LLO-specific effector CD4 T cells transitioned into a long-lived memory population that phenotypically resembled their parent effectors and displayed hallmarks of residency. In addition, intestinal effector and memory CD4 T cells showed a predominant polyfunctional Th1 profile producing IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2 at high levels with minimal but detectable levels of IL-17A. Depletion of CD4 T cells in immunized mice led to elevated bacterial burden after challenge infection highlighting a critical role for memory CD4 T cells in controlling intestinal intracellular pathogens. PMID:27461178

  16. Tribological characteristics of ceramic conversion treated NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, X.; Dong, H.

    2007-09-01

    NiTi shape memory alloys are very attractive for medical implants and devices (such as orthopaedic and orthodontic implants) and various actuators. However, wear is a major concern for such applications and a novel surface engineering process, ceramic conversion treatment, has recently been developed to address this problem. In this study, the tribological characteristics of ceramic conversion treated NiTi alloy have been systematically investigated under dry unidirectional wear, reciprocating-corrosion wear and fretting-corrosion wear condition. Based on the experimental results, the wear behaviour under different conditions is compared and wear mechanisms involved are discussed.

  17. The role of OX40 (CD134) in T-cell memory generation.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    Memory T-cell generation is limited by activation-induced cell death during the effector T-cell stage. Cell surface proteins are known to transmit signals that either accentuate or limit T-cell death after activation. This chapter will focus on the TNF-receptor family member OX40, which is expressed on effector T cells and when engaged greatly enhances survival of T cells leading to increased memory T-cell generation. Targeting OX40 in vivo can alter the fate ofT-cell survival. Enhancing OX40 signaling during Ag priming through agonists increases memory T-cell development, while blocking OX40 signaling decreases the memory T-cell pool. These two opposing outcomes provide therapeutic tools for blocking inflammation in autoimmune conditions and enhancing immunity in hosts harboring cancer or chronic pathogens. OX40 agonists and antagonists are in the first stages of human clinical trials and their therapeutic potential will soon be realized.

  18. Peripheral tissue homing receptors enable T cell entry into lymph nodes and affect the anatomical distribution of memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Rouhani, Sherin J.; Srinivasan, Nithya; Engelhard, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral tissue homing receptors enable T cells to access inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. Here we show that two such molecules, E-selectin ligand and α4β1 integrin, enable activated and memory T cells to enter lymph nodes as well. This affects the quantitative and qualitative distribution of these cells among regional lymph node beds. CD8 memory T cells in lymph nodes that express these molecules were mostly CD62Llo, and would normally be classified as effector memory cells. However, similar to central memory cells, they expanded upon antigen re-encounter. This led to differences in the magnitude of the recall response that depended on the route of immunization. These novel cells share properties of both central and effector memory cells, and reside in lymph nodes based on previously undescribed mechanisms of entry. PMID:23926324

  19. CXCR5+ CCR7- CD8 T cells are early effector memory cells that infiltrate tonsil B cell follicles.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Máire F; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Granath, Anna; Andersson, Jan; Sandberg, Johan K

    2007-12-01

    Naive and central memory CD8 T cells use CCR7 to recirculate through T cell zones of secondary lymphoid organs where they can encounter antigen. Here we describe a subset of human CD8 T cells expressing CXCR5 which enables homing in response to CXCL13 produced within B cell follicles. CXCR5+ CD8 T cells were found in tonsil B cell follicles, and isolated cells migrated towards CXCL13 in vitro. They expressed CD27, CD28, CD45RO, CD69, and were CD7low, and produced IFN-gamma and granzyme A but lacked perforin, a functional profile suggesting that these cells are early effector memory cells in the context of contemporary T cell differentiation models. Receptors important in the interaction with B cells, including CD70, OX40 and ICOS, were induced upon activation, and CXCR5+ CD8 T cells could to some extent support survival and IgG production in tonsil B cells. Furthermore, CXCR5+ CD8 T cells expressed CCR5 but no CCR7, suggesting a migration pattern distinct from that of follicular CD4 T cells. The finding that a subset of early effector memory CD8 T cells use CXCR5 to locate to B cell follicles indicates that MHC class I-restricted CD8 T cells are part of the follicular T cell population.

  20. Epigenomic analysis of primary human T cells reveals enhancers associated with TH2 memory cell differentiation and asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Seumois, Grégory; Chavez, Lukas; Gerasimova, Anna; Lienhard, Matthias; Omran, Nada; Kalinke, Lukas; Vedanayagam, Maria; Ganesan, Asha Purnima V; Chawla, Ashu; Djukanović, Ratko; Ansel, K Mark; Peters, Bjoern; Rao, Anjana; Vijayanand, Pandurangan

    2014-01-01

    A characteristic feature of asthma is the aberrant accumulation, differentiation or function of memory CD4+ T cells that produce type 2 cytokines (TH2 cells). By mapping genome-wide histone modification profiles for subsets of T cells isolated from peripheral blood of healthy and asthmatic individuals, we identified enhancers with known and potential roles in the normal differentiation of human TH1 cells and TH2 cells. We discovered disease-specific enhancers in T cells that differ between healthy and asthmatic individuals. Enhancers that gained the histone H3 Lys4 dimethyl (H3K4me2) mark during TH2 cell development showed the highest enrichment for asthma-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which supported a pathogenic role for TH2 cells in asthma. In silico analysis of cell-specific enhancers revealed transcription factors, microRNAs and genes potentially linked to human TH2 cell differentiation. Our results establish the feasibility and utility of enhancer profiling in well-defined populations of specialized cell types involved in disease pathogenesis. PMID:24997565

  1. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  2. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  3. Human memory CD8 T cell effector potential is epigenetically preserved during in vivo homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Moustaki, Ardiana; Fan, Yiping; Dogra, Pranay; Ghoneim, Hazem E; Zebley, Caitlin C; Triplett, Brandon M; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Youngblood, Ben

    2017-06-05

    Antigen-independent homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells is vital for sustaining long-lived T cell-mediated immunity. In this study, we report that maintenance of human memory CD8 T cell effector potential during in vitro and in vivo homeostatic proliferation is coupled to preservation of acquired DNA methylation programs. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of primary human naive, short-lived effector memory (TEM), and longer-lived central memory (TCM) and stem cell memory (TSCM) CD8 T cells identified effector molecules with demethylated promoters and poised for expression. Effector-loci demethylation was heritably preserved during IL-7- and IL-15-mediated in vitro cell proliferation. Conversely, cytokine-driven proliferation of TCM and TSCM memory cells resulted in phenotypic conversion into TEM cells and was coupled to increased methylation of the CCR7 and Tcf7 loci. Furthermore, haploidentical donor memory CD8 T cells undergoing in vivo proliferation in lymphodepleted recipients also maintained their effector-associated demethylated status but acquired TEM-associated programs. These data demonstrate that effector-associated epigenetic programs are preserved during cytokine-driven subset interconversion of human memory CD8 T cells. © 2017 Abdelsamed et al.

  4. Memory in the B-cell compartment: antibody affinity maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, M S; Ehrenstein, M R; Rada, C; Sale, J; Batista, F D; Williams, G; Milstein, C

    2000-01-01

    In the humoral arm of the immune system, the memory response is not only more quickly elicited and of greater magnitude than the primary response, but it is also different in quality. In the recall response to antigen, the antibodies produced are of higher affinity and of different isotype (typically immunoglobulin G rather than immunoglobulin M). This maturation rests on the antigen dependence of B-cell maturation and is effected by programmed genetic modifications of the immunoglobulin gene loci. Here we consider how the B-cell response to antigen depends on the affinity of the antigen receptor interaction. We also compare and draw parallels between the two processes, which underpin the generation of secondary-response antibodies: V gene somatic hypermutation and immunoglobulin heavy-chain class switching. PMID:10794054

  5. Influenza and Memory T Cells: How to Awake the Force

    PubMed Central

    Spitaels, Jan; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is an effective way to prevent human influenza. Current vaccines are mainly focused on eliciting a strain-matched humoral immune response, requiring yearly updates, and do not provide protection for all vaccinated individuals. The past few years, the importance of cellular immunity, and especially memory T cells, in long-lived protection against influenza virus has become clear. To overcome the shortcomings of current influenza vaccines, eliciting both humoral and cellular immunity is imperative. Today, several new vaccines such as infection-permissive and recombinant T cell inducing vaccines, are being developed and show promising results. These vaccines will allow us to stay several steps ahead of the constantly evolving influenza virus. PMID:27754364

  6. Theoretical study of SET operation in carbon nanotube memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Michael; Rueckes, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present results of self-consistent electronic structure calculations for an electromechanical memory cell consisting of a carbon nanotube (CNT) fabric between titanium leads to elucidate the mechanism whereby the applied bias works to close the current gaps in the CNT fabric. We demonstrate that the asymmetry in the bias conditions required to achieve the “SET” operation of the cell (changing it from a high resistivity to low resistivity) results from the nature of a voltage drop in a compensated semiconducting material and depends sensitively on the background charge as well as on the position of the layer where the conducting gaps occur. The calculations provide insight into the behavior of the material and suggest possible fabrication strategies to modify the functionality.

  7. Gut memories do not fade: epigenetic regulation of lasting gut homing receptor expression in CD4(+) memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, B A; Triebus, J; Kressler, C; de Almeida, M; Tierling, S; Durek, P; Mardahl, M; Szilagyi, A; Floess, S; Huehn, J; Syrbe, U; Walter, J; Polansky, J K; Hamann, A

    2017-02-15

    The concept of a "topographical memory" in lymphocytes implies a stable expression of homing receptors mediating trafficking of lymphocytes back to the tissue of initial activation. However, a significant plasticity of the gut-homing receptor α4β7 was found in CD8(+) T cells, questioning the concept. We now demonstrate that α4β7 expression in murine CD4(+) memory T cells is, in contrast, imprinted and remains stable in the absence of the inducing factor retinoic acid (RA) or other stimuli from mucosal environments. Repetitive rounds of RA treatment enhanced the stability of de novo induced α4β7. A novel enhancer element in the murine Itga4 locus was identified that showed, correlating to stability, selective DNA demethylation in mucosa-seeking memory cells and methylation-dependent transcriptional activity in a reporter gene assay. This implies that epigenetic mechanisms contribute to the stabilization of α4β7 expression. Analogous DNA methylation patterns could be observed in the human ITGA4 locus, suggesting that its epigenetic regulation is conserved between mice and men. These data prove that mucosa-specific homing mediated by α4β7 is imprinted in CD4(+) memory T cells, reinstating the validity of the concept of "topographical memory" for mucosal tissues, and imply a critical role of epigenetic mechanisms.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 15 February 2017. doi:10.1038/mi.2017.7.

  8. Circulating T follicular regulatory and helper cells have memory-like properties

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Peter T.; Alvarez, David; Godec, Jernej; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2014-01-01

    Follicular Tregs (Tfr cells) inhibit antibody production, whereas follicular Th cells (Tfh cells) stimulate it. Tfr cells are found in blood; however, relatively little is known about the developmental signals for these cells or their functions. Here we demonstrated that circulating Tfr and Tfh cells share properties of memory cells and are distinct from effector Tfr and Tfh cells found within lymph nodes (LNs). Circulating memory-like Tfh cells were potently reactivated by DCs, homed to germinal centers, and produced more cytokines than did effector LN Tfh cells. Circulating memory-like Tfr cells persisted for long periods of time in vivo and homed to germinal centers after reactivation. Effector LN Tfr cells suppressed Tfh cell activation and production of cytokines, including IL-21, and inhibited class switch recombination and B cell activation. The suppressive function of this population was not dependent on specific antigen. Similar to LN effector Tfr cells, circulating Tfr cells also suppressed B and Tfh cells, but with a much lower capacity. Our data indicate that circulating memory-like Tfr cells are less suppressive than LN Tfr cells and circulating memory-like Tfh cells are more potent than LN effector Tfh cells; therefore, these circulating populations can provide rapid and robust systemic B cell help during secondary antigen exposure. PMID:25347469

  9. Mcl-1 regulates effector and memory CD8 T-cell differentiation during acute viral infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui Ho; Neldner, Brandon; Gui, Jingang; Craig, Ruth W; Suresh, M

    2016-03-01

    Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family maintains cell viability during clonal expansion of CD8 T cells, but the cell intrinsic role of Mcl-1 in contraction of effectors or the number of memory CD8 T cells is unknown. Mcl-1 levels decline during the contraction phase but rebound to high levels in memory CD8 T cells. Therefore, by overexpressing Mcl-1 in CD8 T cells we asked whether limiting levels of Mcl-1 promote contraction of effectors and constrain CD8 T-cell memory. Mcl-1 overexpression failed to affect CD8 T-cell expansion, contraction or the magnitude of CD8 T-cell memory. Strikingly, high Mcl-1 levels enhanced mTOR phosphorylation and augmented the differentiation of terminal effector cells and effector memory CD8 T cells to the detriment of poly-cytokine-producing central memory CD8 T cells. Taken together, these findings provided unexpected insights into the role of Mcl-1 in the differentiation of effector and memory CD8 T cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dheeraj S.; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I.; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions1. Memory decline in early stages of Alzheimer’s is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus (HPC) plays a crucial role2. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in early stages of Alzheimer’s is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early Alzheimer’s, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are utilized, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Prior to amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent3–5, which correlates with a progressive reduction of spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) at perforant path (PP) synapses of DG engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of DG engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26982728

  11. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dheeraj S; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-03-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions. Memory decline in the early stages of AD is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus has a crucial role. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in the early stages of AD is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early AD, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are used, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Before amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent, which correlates with a progressive reduction in spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation at perforant path synapses of dentate gyrus engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of dentate gyrus engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in the early stages of AD.

  12. Characteristics of immune memory 10-15 years after primary hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Brunskole Hummel, Irena; Zitzmann, Anita; Erl, Monika; Wenzel, Jürgen J; Jilg, Wolfgang

    2016-01-27

    The definition of immune memory after hepatitis B vaccination is still under debate. Therefore, we analysed hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific memory in more detail by investigating the kinetics of humoral and cellular responses after hepatitis B booster vaccination. The anti-HBs kinetics of 23 individuals with anti-HBs titres below 10 IU/l, who had been vaccinated 10-15 years ago, was monitored at day 0, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after booster vaccination. HBsAg-specific IFNγ- and IL5-secreting cells in enriched CD4(+) fraction were measured at day 0, 7 and 28 post-booster by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISpot). 22 of 23 subjects showed similar anti-HBs kinetic curves, including 3 of 4 subjects who did not reach anti-HBs titres of 10 IU/l. The steep anti-HBs increase started between day 3 and 7 and peaked around day 14. A plateau or only minimal changes were visible between day 14 and 28. 17.4% of subjects showed pre-booster cellular responses, and this rate had increased to 47.8% and 56.5% after 7 and 28 days, respectively. The kinetic patterns of T cell responses differed considerably among subjects. A dominance of Th2 responses (IL5 secretion) over Th1 responses (IFNγ secretion) could be observed. The presence of B cell memory could be shown by a typical anamnestic anti-HBs response curve after a booster dose in all but one individual. In contrast, T cell responses to booster vaccination, which occurred in approximately 50% of participants, were rather heterogeneous. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The developmental pathway for CD103(+)CD8+ tissue-resident memory T cells of skin.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Laura K; Rahimpour, Azad; Ma, Joel Z; Collins, Nicholas; Stock, Angus T; Hafon, Ming-Li; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Lauzurica, Pilar; Mueller, Scott N; Stefanovic, Tijana; Tscharke, David C; Heath, William R; Inouye, Michael; Carbone, Francis R; Gebhardt, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (T(RM) cells) provide superior protection against infection in extralymphoid tissues. Here we found that CD103(+)CD8(+) T(RM) cells developed in the skin from epithelium-infiltrating precursor cells that lacked expression of the effector-cell marker KLRG1. A combination of entry into the epithelium plus local signaling by interleukin 15 (IL-15) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was required for the formation of these long-lived memory cells. Notably, differentiation into T(RM) cells resulted in the progressive acquisition of a unique transcriptional profile that differed from that of circulating memory cells and other types of T cells that permanently reside in skin epithelium. We provide a comprehensive molecular framework for the local differentiation of a distinct peripheral population of memory cells that forms a first-line immunological defense system in barrier tissues.

  14. Changes of memory B- and T-cell subsets in lupus nephritis patients.

    PubMed

    Kosalka, Joanna; Jakiela, Bogdan; Musial, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with production of antibodies to double stranded DNA, deposition of immune complexes and organ damage. These processes have been linked with abnormalities in B- and T-cell memory compartments. The aim of the study was to analyze subsets of peripheral memory B-cells and T-cells in lupus nephritis (LN) patients. We used multicolor flow cytometry to analyze major memory subsets of peripheral blood B-cells (defined by CD27, IgD and CD21) and T-cells (CD45RA, CD45RO, CCR7) in 32 patients with active or inactive LN, and 23 control subjects. Lupus nephritis patients were characterized by increased percentage of immature/early-transitional B-cells (CD27-IgD+CD21-), higher frequency of activated switched memory (SM, CD27+IgD-CD21-) and exhausted memory B-cells (CD27-IgD-), and decrease in non-switched memory (NSM, CD27+IgD+) B-cells. CD21low subsets (immature and activated B-cells) were particularly expanded in patients with active disease. In both groups of LN patients we observed decline in the absolute count of NSM B-cells. It was paralleled by lymphopenia in naïve CD4+ T-cell compartment and increase in the frequency of effector memory T-cells, and these changes were more pronounced in active LN. B-cell memory compartment in LN is deficient in NSM cells and during active disease it is further skewed towards SM and exhausted memory phenotypes, most likely as a cause of chronic antigenic stimulation. Parallel changes in T-helper cell subsets suggest a similar mechanism of SLE-related lymphopenia for both B-cell and T-cell compartment.

  15. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Kim, Marie T.; Shan, Qiang; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability), and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo) and central memory (CD62Lhi) cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit protective memory

  16. Interleukin-21 Drives Proliferation and Differentiation of Porcine Memory B Cells into Antibody Secreting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Immunological prevention of infectious disease, especially viral, is based on antigen-specific long-lived memory B cells. To test for cellular proliferation and differentiation factors in swine, an outbred model for humans, CD21+ B cells were activated in vitro with CD40L and stimulated with purported stimulatory cytokines to characterize functional responses. IL-21 induced a 3-fold expansion in total cell numbers with roughly 15% of all B cells differentiating to IgM or IgG antibody secreting cells (ASCs.) However, even with robust proliferation, cellular viability rapidly deteriorated. Therefore, a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) and B cell activating factor (BAFF) were evaluated as survival and maintenance factors. BAFF was effective at enhancing the viability of mature B cells as well as ASCs, while APRIL was only effective for ASCs. Both cytokines increased approximately two-fold the amount of IgM and IgG which was secreted by IL-21 differentiated ASCs. Mature B cells from porcine reproductive and respiratory virus (PRRSV) immune and naïve age-matched pigs were activated and treated with IL-21 and then tested for memory cell differentiation using a PRRSV non-structural protein 7 ELISPOT and ELISA. PRRSV immune pigs were positive on both ELISPOT and ELISA while naïve animals were negative on both assays. These results highlight the IL-21-driven expansion and differentiation of memory B cells in vitro without stimulation of the surface immunoglobulin receptor complex, as well as the establishment of a defined memory B cell culture system for characterization of vaccine responses in outbred animals. PMID:28125737

  17. Scarcity of autoreactive human blood IgA+ memory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Julie; Lorin, Valérie; Kök, Ayrin; Hieu, Thierry; Bourgeau, Salomé

    2016-01-01

    Class‐switched memory B cells are key components of the “reactive” humoral immunity, which ensures a fast and massive secretion of high‐affinity antigen‐specific antibodies upon antigenic challenge. In humans, IgA class‐switched (IgA+) memory B cells and IgA antibodies are abundant in the blood. Although circulating IgA+ memory B cells and their corresponding secreted immunoglobulins likely possess major protective and/or regulatory immune roles, little is known about their specificity and function. Here, we show that IgA+ and IgG+ memory B‐cell antibodies cloned from the same healthy humans share common immunoglobulin gene features. IgA and IgG memory antibodies have comparable lack of reactivity to vaccines, common mucosa‐tropic viruses and commensal bacteria. However, the IgA+ memory B‐cell compartment contains fewer polyreactive clones and importantly, only rare self‐reactive clones compared to IgG+ memory B cells. Self‐reactivity of IgAs is acquired following B‐cell affinity maturation but not antibody class switching. Together, our data suggest the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for removing autoreactive clones from the IgG+ and IgA+ memory B‐cell repertoires, and/or different maturation pathways potentially reflecting the distinct nature and localization of the cognate antigens recognized by individual B‐cell populations. PMID:27469325

  18. IL-15 regulates memory CD8+ T cell O-glycan synthesis and affects trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Nolz, Jeffrey C.; Harty, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Memory and naive CD8+ T cells exhibit distinct trafficking patterns. Specifically, memory but not naive CD8+ T cells are recruited to inflamed tissues in an antigen-independent manner. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate memory CD8+ T cell trafficking are largely unknown. Here, using murine models of infection and T cell transfer, we found that memory but not naive CD8+ T cells dynamically regulate expression of core 2 O-glycans, which interact with P- and E-selectins to modulate trafficking to inflamed tissues. Following infection, antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells strongly expressed core 2 O-glycans, but this glycosylation pattern was lost by most memory CD8+ T cells. After unrelated infection or inflammatory challenge, memory CD8+ T cells synthesized core 2 O-glycans independently of antigen restimulation. The presence of core 2 O-glycans subsequently directed these cells to inflamed tissue. Memory and naive CD8+ T cells exhibited the opposite pattern of epigenetic modifications at the Gcnt1 locus, which encodes the enzyme that initiates core 2 O-glycan synthesis. The open chromatin configuration in memory CD8+ T cells permitted de novo generation of core 2 O-glycans in a TCR-independent, but IL-15–dependent, manner. Thus, IL-15 stimulation promotes antigen-experienced memory CD8+ T cells to generate core 2 O-glycans, which subsequently localize them to inflamed tissues. These findings suggest that CD8+ memory T cell trafficking potentially can be manipulated to improve host defense and immunotherapy. PMID:24509081

  19. Characteristics and mechanism study of cerium oxide based random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Chang, Yao-Feng; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-04-27

    In this work, low operating voltage and high resistance ratio of different resistance states of binary transition metal oxide based resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are demonstrated. Binary transition metal oxides with high dielectric constant have been explored for RRAM application for years. However, CeO{sub x} is considered as a relatively new material to other dielectrics. Since research on CeO{sub x} based RRAM is still at preliminary stage, fundamental characteristics of RRAM such as scalability and mechanism studies need to be done before moving further. Here, we show very high operation window and low switching voltage of CeO{sub x} RRAMs and also compare electrical performance of Al/CeO{sub x}/Au system between different thin film deposition methods and discuss characteristics and resistive switching mechanism.

  20. IgG-Immune Complexes Promote B Cell Memory by Inducing BAFF.

    PubMed

    Kang, SunAh; Keener, Amanda B; Jones, Shannon Z; Benschop, Robert J; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Clarke, Stephen H; Matsushima, Glenn K; Whitmire, Jason K; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Memory B cell responses are vital for protection against infections but must also be regulated to prevent autoimmunity. Cognate T cell help, somatic hypermutation, and affinity maturation within germinal centers (GCs) are required for high-affinity memory B cell formation; however, the signals that commit GC B cells to the memory pool remain unclear. In this study, we identify a role for IgG-immune complexes (ICs), FcγRs, and BAFF during the formation of memory B cells in mice. We found that early secretion of IgG in response to immunization with a T-dependent Ag leads to IC-FcγR interactions that induce dendritic cells to secrete BAFF, which acts at or upstream of Bcl-6 in activated B cells. Loss of CD16, hematopoietic cell-derived BAFF, or blocking IC:FcγR regions in vivo diminished the expression of Bcl-6, the frequency of GC and memory B cells, and secondary Ab responses. BAFF also contributed to the maintenance and/or expansion of the follicular helper T cell population, although it was dispensable for their formation. Thus, early Ab responses contribute to the optimal formation of B cell memory through IgG-ICs and BAFF. Our work defines a new role for FcγRs in GC and memory B cell responses. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Shape memory alloy-based active chiral composite cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Maulik; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2014-04-01

    Wing morphing is one of the emerging methodology towards improving aerodynamic efficiency of flight vehicle structures. In this paper a morphing structural element is designed and studied which has its origin in the well known chiral structures. The new aspect of design and functionality explored in this paper is that the chiral cell is actuated using thermal Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator wires to provide directional motion. Such structure utilizes the potential of different actuations concepts based on actuator embedded in the chiral structure skin. This paper describes a new class of chiral cell structure with integrated SMA wire for actuation. Chiral topological constructs are obtained by considering passive and active load path decoupling and sub-optimal shape changes. Single cell of chiral honeycomb with actuators are analyzed using finite element simulation results and experiments. To this end, a multi-cell plan-form is characterized showing interesting possibilities in structural morphing applications. The applicability of the developed chiral cell to flexible wing skin, variable stiffness based design and controlling longitudinal-to-transverse stiffness ratio are discussed.

  2. Additional Electrochemical Treatment Effects on the Switching Characteristics of Anodic Porous Alumina Resistive Switching Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Shintaro; Takeda, Ryouta; Furuya, Saeko; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shouso; Iwata, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tadataka; Takano, Yoshiki; Takase, Kouichi

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics of a resistive switching memory (ReRAM), especially the reproducibility of the switching voltage between an insulating state and a metallic state. The poor reproducibility hinders the practical use of this memory. According to a filament model, the variation of the switching voltage may be understood in terms of the random choice of filaments with different conductivities and lengths at each switching. A limitation of the number of conductive paths is expected to lead to the suppression of the variation of switching voltage. In this study, two strategies for the limitation have been proposed using an anodic porous alumina (APA). The first is the reduction of the number of conductive paths by restriction of the contact area between the top electrodes and the insulator. The second is the lowering of the resistivity of the insulator, which makes it possible to grow filaments with the same characteristics by electrochemical treatments using a pulse-electroplating technique.

  3. Influence of ultraviolet irradiation on data retention characteristics in resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, K.; Ohmi, K.; Kishida, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    2016-03-21

    With increasing density of memory devices, the issue of generating soft errors by cosmic rays is becoming more and more serious. Therefore, the irradiation resistance of resistance random access memory (ReRAM) to cosmic radiation has to be elucidated for practical use. In this paper, we investigated the data retention characteristics of ReRAM against ultraviolet irradiation with a Pt/NiO/ITO structure. Soft errors were confirmed to be caused by ultraviolet irradiation in both low- and high-resistance states. An analysis of the wavelength dependence of light irradiation on data retention characteristics suggested that electronic excitation from the valence to the conduction band and to the energy level generated due to the introduction of oxygen vacancies caused the errors. Based on a statistically estimated soft error rates, the errors were suggested to be caused by the cohesion and dispersion of oxygen vacancies owing to the generation of electron-hole pairs and valence changes by the ultraviolet irradiation.

  4. Accessibility of observable and unobservable characteristics in autobiographical memories of recent and distant past.

    PubMed

    Karylowski, Jerzy J; Mrozinski, Blazej

    2017-02-01

    Self-reports regarding how people visualise themselves during events that occurred in the past show that for events from the distant past individuals report assuming a more external perspective than for events from the recent past [Nigro, G., & Neisser, U. (1983). Point of view in personal memories. Cognitive Psychology, 15, 467-482; Pronin, E., & Ross, L. (2006). Temporal differences in trait self-ascription. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 90, 197-209]. Thus it appears that, with the passage of time, representations of self embodied in memories of past events lose their position of an insider and assume a more ordinary position of self as an object seen from the perspective of an outside observer. The purpose of the present experiment was to examine this shift using a performance-based measure of accessibility. Results showed that self-judgements regarding unobservable, covert characteristics were faster for recent-compared to more distant-autobiographical events. However, self-judgements regarding observable, overt characteristics were faster for more distant events. This suggests an accessibility-based mechanism underlying the shift from internal to the relatively more external perspective in forming self-images related to the distant past.

  5. Therapeutic limitations in tumor-specific CD8+ memory T cell engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Bathe, Oliver F; Dalyot-Herman, Nava; Malek, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    Background Adoptive immunotherapy with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) represents an alternative approach to treating solid tumors. Ideally, this would confer long-term protection against tumor. We previously demonstrated that in vitro-generated tumor-specific CTL from the ovalbumin (OVA)-specific OT-I T cell receptor transgenic mouse persisted long after adoptive transfer as memory T cells. When recipient mice were challenged with the OVA-expressing E.G7 thymoma, tumor growth was delayed and sometimes prevented. The reasons for therapeutic failures were not clear. Methods OT-I CTL were adoptively transferred to C57BL/6 mice 21 – 28 days prior to tumor challenge. At this time, the donor cells had the phenotypical and functional characteristics of memory CD8+ T cells. Recipients which developed tumor despite adoptive immunotherapy were analyzed to evaluate the reason(s) for therapeutic failure. Results Dose-response studies demonstrated that the degree of tumor protection was directly proportional to the number of OT-I CTL adoptively transferred. At a low dose of OT-I CTL, therapeutic failure was attributed to insufficient numbers of OT-I T cells that persisted in vivo, rather than mechanisms that actively suppressed or anergized the OT-I T cells. In recipients of high numbers of OT-I CTL, the E.G7 tumor that developed was shown to be resistant to fresh OT-I CTL when examined ex vivo. Furthermore, these same tumor cells no longer secreted a detectable level of OVA. In this case, resistance to immunotherapy was secondary to selection of clones of E.G7 that expressed a lower level of tumor antigen. Conclusions Memory engraftment with tumor-specific CTL provides long-term protection against tumor. However, there are several limitations to this immunotherapeutic strategy, especially when targeting a single antigen. This study illustrates the importance of administering large numbers of effectors to engraft sufficiently efficacious immunologic memory. It also

  6. Bone Marrow T Cells and the Integrated Functions of Recirculating and Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Gebhardt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Changes in T cell trafficking accompany the naive to memory T cell antigen-driven differentiation, which remains an incompletely defined developmental step. Upon priming, each naive T cell encounters essential signals – i.e., antigen, co-stimuli and cytokines – in a secondary lymphoid organ; nevertheless, its daughter effector and memory T cells recirculate and receive further signals during their migration through various lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. These additional signals from tissue microenvironments have an impact on immune response features, including T cell effector function, expansion and contraction, memory differentiation, long-term maintenance, and recruitment upon antigenic rechallenge into local and/or systemic responses. The critical role of T cell trafficking in providing efficient T cell memory has long been a focus of interest. It is now well recognized that naive and memory T cells have different migratory pathways, and that memory T cells are heterogeneous with respect to their trafficking. We and others have observed that, long time after priming, memory T cells are preferentially found in certain niches such as the bone marrow (BM) or at the skin/mucosal site of pathogen entry, even in the absence of residual antigen. The different underlying mechanisms and peculiarities of resulting immunity are currently under study. In this review, we summarize key findings on BM and tissue-resident memory (TRM) T cells and revisit some issues in memory T cell maintenance within such niches. Moreover, we discuss BM seeding by memory T cells in the context of migration patterns and protective functions of either recirculating or TRM T cells. PMID:26909081

  7. Memory γδ T Cells-Newly Appreciated Protagonists in Infection and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Stephen J; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2016-10-01

    Despite the potential for diversity in their T cell receptor, γδ T cells are primarily considered to be innate immune cells. Recently, memory-like γδ T cell responses have been identified in murine models of infection and autoimmunity. Similar memory responses have also been described in human and non-human primate γδ T cells. It has thus become clear that subpopulations of γδ T cells can develop long-lasting memory akin to conventional αβ T cells, with protective and pathogenic consequences. Hence, a re-evaluation of their true capabilities and role in infection and immunity is required. This review discusses recent reports of memory-type responses attributed to γδ T cells and assesses this underappreciated facet of these enigmatic cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular events leading to the establishment of cancer initiating cells and how these mechanisms relate to cellular transitions during tumourigenesis. We use an in vitro system to recapitulate changes in CRC cells at the invasive front (mesenchymal-like cells) and central mass (epithelial-like cells) of tumours. We show that the mesoderm inducer BRACHYURY is expressed in a subpopulation of CRC cells that resemble invasive front mesenchymal-like cells, where it acts to impose characteristics of CSCs in a fully reversible manner, suggesting reversible formation and modulation of such cells. BRACHYURY, itself regulated by the oncogene β-catenin, influences NANOG and other 'stemness' markers including a panel of markers defining CRC-CSC whose presence has been linked to poor patient prognosis. Similar regulation of NANOG through BRACHYURY was observed in other cells lines, suggesting this might be a pathway common to cancer cells undergoing mesenchymal transition. We suggest that BRACHYURY may regulate NANOG in mesenchymal-like CRC cells to impose a 'plastic-state', allowing competence of cells to respond to signals prompting invasion or metastasis.

  9. Memory T Cells Expressing an NKG2D-CAR Efficiently Target Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía; Metais, Jean-Yves; Escudero, Adela; Vela, María; Valentín, Jaime; Vallcorba, Isabel; Leivas, Alejandra; Torres, Juan; Valeri, Antonio; Patiño-García, Ana; Martínez, Joaquín; Leung, Wing; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Purpose: NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) are expressed on various tumor types and immunosuppressive cells within tumor microenvironments, providing suitable targets for cancer therapy. Various immune cells express NKG2D receptors, including natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells. Interactions between NKG2DL and NKG2D receptors are essential for NK-cell elimination of osteosarcoma tumor-initiating cells. In this report, we used NKG2D-NKG2DL interactions to optimize an immunotherapeutic strategy against osteosarcoma. We evaluated in vitro and in vivo the safety and cytotoxic capacity against osteosarcoma cells of CD45RA(-) memory T cells expressing an NKG2D-4-1BB-CD3z chimeric antigen receptor (CAR).Experimental Design: CD45RA(-) cells from healthy donors were transduced with NKG2D CARs containing 4-1BB and CD3z signaling domains. NKG2D CAR expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vitro cytotoxicity of NKG2D-CAR(+) CD45RA(-) T cells against osteosarcoma was evaluated by performing conventional 4-hour europium-TDA release assays. For the in vivo orthotopic model, 531MII YFP-luc osteosarcoma cells were used as targets in NOD-scid IL2Rg(null) mice.Results: Lentiviral transduction of NKG2D-4-1BB-CD3z markedly increased NKG2D surface expression in CD45RA(-) cells. Genetic stability was preserved in transduced cells. In vitro, NKG2D-CAR(+) memory T cells showed significantly increased cytolytic activity than untransduced cells against osteosarcoma cell lines, while preserving the integrity of healthy cells. NKG2D-CAR(+) memory T cells had considerable antitumor activity in a mouse model of osteosarcoma, whereas untransduced T cells were ineffective.Conclusions: Our results demonstrate NKG2D-4-1BB-CD3z CAR-redirected memory T cells target NKG2DL-expressing osteosarcoma cells in vivo and in vitro and could be a promising immunotherapeutic approach for patients with osteosarcoma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(19); 5824-35. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells: characteristics and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bobis, Sylwia; Jarocha, Danuta; Majka, Marcin

    2006-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are bone marrow populating cells, different from hematopoietic stem cells, which possess an extensive proliferative potential and ability to differentiate into various cell types, including: osteocytes, adipocytes, chondrocytes, myocytes, cardiomyocytes and neurons. MSCs play a key role in the maintenance of bone marrow homeostasis and regulate the maturation of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. The cells are characterized by the expression of numerous surface antigens, but none of them appears to be exclusively expressed on MSCs. Apart from bone marrow, MSCs are located in other tissues, like: adipose tissue, peripheral blood, cord blood, liver and fetal tissues. MSCs have been shown to be powerful tools in gene therapies, and can be effectively transduced with viral vectors containing a therapeutic gene, as well as with cDNA for specific proteins, expression of which is desired in a patient. Due to such characteristics, the number of clinical trials based on the use of MSCs increase. These cells have been successfully employed in graft versus host disease (GvHD) treatment, heart regeneration after infarct, cartilage and bone repair, skin wounds healing, neuronal regeneration and many others. Of special importance is their use in the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), which appeared to be the only reasonable therapeutic strategy. MSCs seem to represent a future powerful tool in regenerative medicine, therefore they are particularly important in medical research.

  11. Polymicrobial sepsis alters Ag-dependent and -independent memory CD8 T cell functions1

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Sean; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Rai, Deepa; Martin, Matthew D.; Griffith, Thomas S.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Mortality from sepsis frequently results from secondary infections, and the extent to which sepsis affects pathogen-specific memory CD8 T cell responses remains unknown. Using the cecal-ligation and puncture (CLP) model of polymicrobial sepsis, we observed rapid apoptosis of pre-existing memory CD8 T cells after sepsis induction that led to a loss in CD8 T cell-mediated protection. Ag-sensitivity (functional avidity) and Ag-driven secondary expansion of memory CD8 T cells were decreased after sepsis, further contributing to the observed loss in CD8 T cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, Ag-independent bystander activation of memory CD8 T cells in response to heterologous infection was also significantly impaired early after sepsis induction. The reduced sensitivity of pre-existing memory CD8 T cells to sense inflammation and respond to heterologous infection by IFN-γ production was observed in inbred and outbred hosts and controlled by extrinsic (but not cell intrinsic) factors suggesting that sepsis-induced changes in the environment regulates innate functions of memory CD8 T cells. Taken together, the data in this study revealed a previously unappreciated role of sepsis in shaping the quantity and functionality of infection- or vaccine-induced memory CD8 T cells and will help further define the decline in T cell-mediated immunity during the sepsis-induced phase of immunosuppression. PMID:24646738

  12. Control of memory B cell responses by extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-10-01

    Following primary activation, B lymphocytes generate a long-lived memory compartment to harness the organism for future reinfections by the same pathogen species. Only recently the composition and signaling signature of the scarce memory B cell pool could be explored in more detail. This review highlights current concepts of how B cells preserve their antigen experience at the cellular and molecular level.

  13. Characteristics of a lithium-thionyl chloride battery as a memory back-up power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamaru, T.; Uetani, Y.

    An Li/SOCl 2 battery of R6 size (ER6C) has been evaluated as a memory back-up power source for CMOS RAM. The working voltage is 3.6 V and the discharge capacity is 1900 mA h on a 1OK-ohm load. The cell exhibits satisfactory working voltage and discharge capacity over the temperature range -40 °C to 85 °C. The discharge reaction mechanism has been elucidated. Cumulative self discharge during 10 years discharge at 20 μA is estimated to be 3.5%. No serious problems have been observed during abuse tests.

  14. Parallel programmable nonvolatile memory using ordinary static random access memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Saraya, Takuya; Shinohara, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2017-04-01

    A technique of using an ordinary static random access memory (SRAM) array for a programmable nonvolatile (NV) memory is proposed. The parallel NV writing of the entire array is achieved by simply applying high-voltage stress to the power supply terminal, after storing inverted desired data in the static random access memory (SRAM) array. Successful 2 kbit NV writing is demonstrated using a device-matrix-array (DMA) test element group (TEG) fabricated by 0.18 µm technology.

  15. CD4 memory T cells develop and acquire functional competence by sequential cognate interactions and stepwise gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Atsushi; Ishige, Akiko; Kitami, Toshimori; Watanabe, Takashi; Ohara, Osamu; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Okada, Mariko; Shimoda, Michiko; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD4+ T cells promote protective humoral immunity; however, how memory T cells acquire this activity remains unclear. This study demonstrates that CD4+ T cells develop into antigen-specific memory T cells that can promote the terminal differentiation of memory B cells far more effectively than their naive T-cell counterparts. Memory T cell development requires the transcription factor B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), which is known to direct T-follicular helper (Tfh) cell differentiation. However, unlike Tfh cells, memory T cell development did not require germinal center B cells. Curiously, memory T cells that develop in the absence of cognate B cells cannot promote memory B-cell recall responses and this defect was accompanied by down-regulation of genes associated with homeostasis and activation and up-regulation of genes inhibitory for T-cell responses. Although memory T cells display phenotypic and genetic signatures distinct from Tfh cells, both had in common the expression of a group of genes associated with metabolic pathways. This gene expression profile was not shared to any great extent with naive T cells and was not influenced by the absence of cognate B cells during memory T cell development. These results suggest that memory T cell development is programmed by stepwise expression of gatekeeper genes through serial interactions with different types of antigen-presenting cells, first licensing the memory lineage pathway and subsequently facilitating the functional development of memory T cells. Finally, we identified Gdpd3 as a candidate genetic marker for memory T cells. PMID:26714588

  16. Strategies and implications for prime-boost vaccination to generate memory CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Nolz, Jeffrey C; Harty, John T

    2011-01-01

    Generating a large population of memory CD8 T cells is an appealing goal for vaccine design against a variety of human diseases. Indeed, experimental models have demonstrated that the overall number of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection correlates strongly with the ability to confer host protection against a range of different pathogens. Currently, the most conceivable approach to rapidly generate a large population of memory CD8 T cells is through the use of prime-boost vaccination. In addition, recent experimental findings have uncovered important principles that govern both the rate and magnitude of memory CD8 T cell formation. Thus, this has resulted in novel prime-boost vaccination strategies that could potentially be used in humans to generate protective populations of memory CD8 T cells.

  17. Generation of cellular immune memory and B-cell immunity is impaired by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Rydyznski, Carolyn; Daniels, Keith A; Karmele, Erik P; Brooks, Taylor R; Mahl, Sarah E; Moran, Michael T; Li, Caimei; Sutiwisesak, Rujapak; Welsh, Raymond M; Waggoner, Stephen N

    2015-02-27

    The goal of most vaccines is the induction of long-lived memory T and B cells capable of protecting the host from infection by cytotoxic mechanisms, cytokines and high-affinity antibodies. However, efforts to develop vaccines against major human pathogens such as HIV and HCV have not been successful, thereby highlighting the need for novel approaches to circumvent immunoregulatory mechanisms that limit the induction of protective immunity. Here, we show that mouse natural killer (NK) cells inhibit generation of long-lived virus-specific memory T- and B cells as well as virus-specific antibody production after acute infection. Mechanistically, NK cells suppressed CD4 T cells and follicular helper T cells (T(FH)) in a perforin-dependent manner during the first few days of infection, resulting in a weaker germinal centre (GC) response and diminished immune memory. We anticipate that innovative strategies to relieve NK cell-mediated suppression of immunity should facilitate development of efficacious new vaccines targeting difficult-to-prevent infections.

  18. Defining CD4 T cell memory by the epigenetic landscape of CpG DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Komori, H Kiyomi; Hart, Traver; LaMere, Sarah A; Chew, Pamela V; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-02-15

    Memory T cells are primed for rapid responses to Ag; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for priming remain incompletely defined. CpG methylation in promoters is an epigenetic modification, which regulates gene transcription. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we examined methylation of 2100 genes (56,000 CpGs) mapped by deep sequencing of T cell activation in human naive and memory CD4 T cells. Four hundred sixty-six CpGs (132 genes) displayed differential methylation between naive and memory cells. Twenty-one genes exhibited both differential methylation and gene expression before activation, linking promoter DNA methylation states to gene regulation; 6 of 21 genes encode proteins closely studied in T cells, whereas 15 genes represent novel targets for further study. Eighty-four genes demonstrated differential methylation between memory and naive cells that correlated to differential gene expression following activation, of which 39 exhibited reduced methylation in memory cells coupled with increased gene expression upon activation compared with naive cells. These reveal a class of primed genes more rapidly expressed in memory compared with naive cells and putatively regulated by DNA methylation. These findings define a DNA methylation signature unique to memory CD4 T cells that correlates with activation-induced gene expression. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Mechanistic insights into the impairment of memory B cells and antibody production in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Aberle, Judith H; Stiasny, Karin; Kundi, Michael; Heinz, Franz X

    2013-04-01

    It is well established that immunologic memory generated early in life can be maintained into old age and mediate robust anamnestic antibody responses. Little is known, however, about the initiation of memory B cells in the elderly. We have conducted a prospective analysis of the quantities and functionalities of antigen-specific B cell responses and its association with the functional helper CD4(+)T cell responses. The ability of naïve B cells from old (60-80 years) and young (20-31 years) humans to establish functional memory was examined following primary and booster vaccination with an inactivated-virus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis. Our data show that the number of antigen-specific memory B cells generated during primary vaccination was ~3-fold lower in old than in young individuals. The maintenance and booster responsiveness of these memory B cells were not compromised, as evidenced by similar increases in specific memory B cell frequencies upon revaccination in old and young adults. In contrast, the Ab response mediated per memory B cell after revaccination was dramatically diminished in the elderly. Also, antigen-specific IL-2-positive CD4(+)T cell responses were strongly reduced in the elderly and displayed an excellent correlation with Ab titres. The data suggest that the dramatically lower antibody response in the elderly could only partially be accounted for by the reduced B cell numbers and was strongly correlated with profound functional defects in CD4 help.

  20. Defining CD4 T Cell Memory by the Epigenetic Landscape of CpG DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Komori, H. Kiyomi; Hart, Traver; LaMere, Sarah A.; Chew, Pamela V.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are primed for rapid responses to antigen; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for priming remain incompletely defined. CpG methylation in promoters is an epigenetic modification, which regulates gene transcription. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we examined methylation of 2100 genes (56,000 CpG) mapped by deep sequencing of T cell activation in human naïve and memory CD4 T cells. 466 CpGs (132 genes) displayed differential methylation between naïve and memory cells. 21 genes exhibited both differential methylation and gene expression before activation, linking promoter DNA methylation states to gene regulation; 6 of 21 genes encode proteins closely studied in T cells, while 15 genes represent novel targets for further study. 84 genes demonstrated differential methylation between memory and naïve cells that correlated to differential gene expression following activation, of which 39 exhibited reduced methylation in memory cells coupled with increased gene expression upon activation compared to naïve cells. These reveal a class of primed genes more rapidly expressed in memory compared to naïve cells and putatively regulated by DNA methylation. These findings define a DNA methylation signature unique to memory CD4 T cells that correlates with activation-induced gene expression. PMID:25576597

  1. Induction of Postsurgical Tumor Immunity and T-Cell Memory by a Poorly Immunogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisheng; Côté, Anik L.; de Vries, Victor C.; Usherwood, Edward J.; Turk, Mary Jo

    2008-01-01

    The generation of protective CD8 T-cell memory against tumor-expressed self-antigens is an important but elusive goal of cancer immunotherapy. The possibility that a progressive, poorly immunogenic tumor can induce T-cell memory against self-antigens has not previously been studied. Herein, we report that growth of the poorly immunogenic B16 melanoma in the absence of regulatory T cells (Treg) generates CD8 T-cell responses that develop into functional memory after the tumor has been surgically excised. Tumor-primed memory T cells recognized melanocyte differentiation antigens TRP-2/DCT and gp100 and persisted for as long as 5 months following surgical tumor excision. Phenotypic analysis showed that these cells develop into both central and effector memory T-cell subsets, which produce IFN-γ and interleukin-2 on reencounter with antigen. Most importantly, tumor-primed memory T cells mediated the rejection of intradermal and systemically disseminated challenge tumors given 30 to 60 days following surgery. Tumor-excised mice also developed autoimmune vitiligo, showing that Treg cells prevent tissue-specific autoimmunity in tumor-bearing hosts. This study establishes that Treg depletion in tumor-bearing hosts drives the natural development of protective T-cell memory. Generating such responses may aid in the clinical management of tumor recurrence and metastasis following surgery. PMID:17616708

  2. The Transcription Factor Foxo1 Controls Central Memory CD8+ T Cell Responses to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Memory T cells protect hosts from pathogen reinfection, but how these cells emerge from a pool of antigen-experienced T cells is unclear. Here we show that mice lacking the transcription factor Foxo1 in activated CD8+ T cells had defective secondary, but not primary, responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection. Compared to short-lived effector T cells, memory precursor T cells expressed higher amounts of Foxo1, which promoted their generation and maintenance. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing experiments revealed the transcription factor Tcf7 and the chemokine receptor Ccr7 as Foxo1-bound target genes, which have critical functions in central memory T cell differentiation and trafficking. These findings demonstrate that Foxo1 is selectively incorporated into the genetic program that regulates memory CD8+ T cell responses to infection. PMID:23932570

  3. Id2-Mediated Inhibition of E2A Represses Memory CD8+ T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Frederick; Minnich, Martina; Olshansky, Moshe; Bilic, Ivan; Mount, Adele M.; Kallies, Axel; Speed, Terence P.; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor inhibitor of DNA binding (Id)2 modulates T cell fate decisions, but the molecular mechanism underpinning this regulation is unclear. In this study we show that loss of Id2 cripples effector differentiation and instead programs CD8+ T cells to adopt a memory fate with increased Eomesodermin and Tcf7 expression. We demonstrate that Id2 restrains CD8+ T cell memory differentiation by inhibiting E2A-mediated direct activation of Tcf7 and that Id2 expression level mirrors T cell memory recall capacity. As a result of the defective effector differentiation, Id2-deficient CD8+ T cells fail to induce sufficient Tbx21 expression to generate short-lived effector CD8+ T cells. Our findings reveal that the Id2/E2A axis orchestrates T cell differentiation through the induction or repression of downstream transcription factors essential for effector and memory T cell differentiation. PMID:23536629

  4. Identification of Nascent Memory CD8 T Cells and Modeling of Their Ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Crauste, Fabien; Mafille, Julien; Boucinha, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Gandrillon, Olivier; Marvel, Jacqueline; Arpin, Christophe

    2017-03-22

    Primary immune responses generate short-term effectors and long-term protective memory cells. The delineation of the genealogy linking naive, effector, and memory cells has been complicated by the lack of phenotypes discriminating effector from memory differentiation stages. Using transcriptomics and phenotypic analyses, we identify Bcl2 and Mki67 as a marker combination that enables the tracking of nascent memory cells within the effector phase. We then use a formal approach based on mathematical models describing the dynamics of population size evolution to test potential progeny links and demonstrate that most cells follow a linear naive→early effector→late effector→memory pathway. Moreover, our mathematical model allows long-term prediction of memory cell numbers from a few early experimental measurements. Our work thus provides a phenotypic means to identify effector and memory cells, as well as a mathematical framework to investigate their genealogy and to predict the outcome of immunization regimens in terms of memory cell numbers generated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Constitutive Glycolytic Metabolism Supports CD8(+) T Cell Effector Memory Differentiation during Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Phan, Anthony T; Doedens, Andrew L; Palazon, Asis; Tyrakis, Petros A; Cheung, Kitty P; Johnson, Randall S; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2016-11-15

    Extensive metabolic changes accompany T cell activation, including a switch to glycolytic energy production and increased biosynthesis. Recent studies suggest that subsequent return to reliance on oxidative phosphorylation and increasing spare respiratory capacity are essential for the differentiation of memory CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, we found that constitutive glycolytic metabolism and suppression of oxidative phosphorylation in CD8(+) T cells, achieved by conditional deletion of hypoxia-inducible factor regulator Vhl, accelerated CD8(+) memory cell differentiation during viral infection. Despite sustained glycolysis, CD8(+) memory cells emerged that upregulated key memory-associated cytokine receptors and transcription factors and showed a heightened response to secondary challenge. In addition, increased glycolysis not only permitted memory formation, but it also favored the formation of long-lived effector-memory CD8(+) T cells. These data redefine the role of cellular metabolism in memory cell differentiation, showing that reliance on glycolytic metabolism does not hinder formation of a protective memory population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal growth within a phase change memory cell.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abu; Le Gallo, Manuel; Krebs, Daniel

    2014-07-07

    In spite of the prominent role played by phase change materials in information technology, a detailed understanding of the central property of such materials, namely the phase change mechanism, is still lacking mostly because of difficulties associated with experimental measurements. Here, we measure the crystal growth velocity of a phase change material at both the nanometre length and the nanosecond timescale using phase-change memory cells. The material is studied in the technologically relevant melt-quenched phase and directly in the environment in which the phase change material is going to be used in the application. We present a consistent description of the temperature dependence of the crystal growth velocity in the glass and the super-cooled liquid up to the melting temperature.

  7. The investigation on sensitive mapping of memory cell in microprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunqing, Yu; Long, Fan; Suge, Yue; Maoxin, Chen; Shougang, Du; Hongchao, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    The single event effects of the sensitivity of a circuit are investigated on a 32-bit microprocessor with a five-stage instruction pipeline by pulsed laser test. The investigation on sensitive mapping of the memory cell is illustrated and then the comparison between the sensitive mapping and the layout of the circuit is made. A comparison result indicates that the area of the sensitive node in sensitive mapping is just the location of the drain in the layout. Therefore, SEE sensitivity in sensitive mapping fits well with that in the physical layout of functional units, which can directly and objectively indicate the size and distribution of sensitive areas. The investigation of sensitive mapping is a meaningful way to verify the hardened effect and provide a reference for improving hardened design by combining with the physical layout.

  8. Respiratory Influenza Virus Infection Induces Memory-like Liver NK Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yanshi; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    Although NK cells are classified as innate immune cells, recent studies have demonstrated the transformation of NK cells into long-lived memory cells that contribute to secondary immune responses in certain mouse models. However, whether NK cells mount an Ag-specific memory response to acute influenza virus infection has not yet been examined. Here, we show that, consistent with previous studies, lung NK cells play an important role in controlling viral proliferation after primary influenza virus infection. However, although lung NK cells display a memory phenotype at the late stage of infection, these cells do not protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Interestingly, liver NK cells from influenza virus-infected mice possess a memory phenotype and protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Memory-like liver NK cells display a CD49a(+)DX5(-) phenotype, and the adoptive transfer of purified liver CD49a(+)DX5(-) NK cells into naive mice followed by viral infection results in protective immunity and decreased viral titer. Moreover, we demonstrate that primary inactivated influenza virus induces memory NK cells residing in the liver of Rag1(-/-) mice. Collectively, these data suggest that liver CD49a(+)DX5(-) NK cells remember encountered Ag from influenza virus after primary infection and are more protective upon subsequent infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Simulation study on heat conduction of a nanoscale phase-change random access memory cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junho; Song, Ki-Bong

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated heat transfer characteristics of a nano-scale phase-change random access memory (PRAM) cell using finite element method (FEM) simulation. Our PRAM cell is based on ternary chalcogenide alloy, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), which is used as a recording layer. For contact area of 100 x 100 nm2, simulations of crystallization and amorphization processes were carried out. Physical quantities such as electric conductivity, thermal conductivity, and specific heat were treated as temperature-dependent parameters. Through many simulations, it is concluded that one can reduce set current by decreasing both electric conductivities of amorphous GST and crystalline GST, and in addition to these conditions by decreasing electric conductivity of molten GST one can also reduce reset current significantly.

  10. Direct ex vivo analysis of human CD4(+) memory T cell activation requirements at the single clonotype level.

    PubMed

    Bitmansour, Arlene D; Douek, Daniel C; Maino, Vernon C; Picker, Louis J

    2002-08-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells continuously integrate signals transmitted through the TCR and costimulatory molecules, only responding when the intensity of such signals exceeds an intrinsic activation threshold. Recent data suggest that these activation thresholds can be regulated independently of TCR specificity, and that threshold tuning may constitute a major mechanism for controlling T cell effector activity. In this work we take advantage of the profound clonotypic hierarchies of the large human CD4(+) T cell response to CMV to study activation thresholds of fresh (unexpanded) memory T cells at the clonotypic level. We identified dominant responses to CMV matrix determinants mediated by single TCRB sequences within particular TCR-Vbeta families. The specific response characteristics of these single, Ag-specific, TCRB-defined clonotypes could be unequivocally determined in fresh PBMC preparations by cytokine flow cytometry with gating on the appropriate Vbeta family. These analyses revealed 1) optimal peptides capable of eliciting specific responses by themselves at doses as low as 2 pg/ml, with each log increase in dose eliciting ever-increasing frequencies of responding cells over a 4- to 5-log range; 2) significant augmentation of response frequencies at all submaximal peptide doses by CD28- and CD49d-mediated costimulation; 3) differential dose response and costimulatory characteristics for IFN-gamma and IL-2 responses; and 4) no association of activation requirements with the CD27-defined CD4(+) T cell memory differentiation pathway. Taken together these data confirm that triggering heterogeneity exists within individual CD4(+) memory T cell clonotypes in vivo and demonstrate that such single clonotypes can manifest qualitatively different functional responses depending on epitope dose and relative levels of costimulation.

  11. Increased CD8+ T cell memory to concurrent infection at the expense of increased erosion of pre-existing memory: the paradoxical role of IL-15.

    PubMed

    Chapdelaine, Yvan; Smith, Dean K; Pedras-Vasconcelos, Joao A; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Sad, Subash

    2003-11-15

    The use of cytokines during vaccination, particularly IL-15, is being considered due to the unique ability of IL-15 to enhance the proliferation of memory CD8(+) T cells. However, as homeostatic mechanisms limit excessive lymphocyte expansion, we addressed the consequences of this enhancement of T cell memory by IL-15. Infection of mice with either recombinant Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) expressing IL-15 (BCG-IL-15) or BCG and purified IL-15 resulted in an increased CD44, IL-2Rbeta expression and increased frequency of IFN-gamma-secreting CD8(+) T cells. Surprisingly, the enhancement of memory to concurrent infection by IL-15 exacerbated the attrition of pre-existing memory. Infection of mice with Listeria monocytogenes expressing OVA resulted in potent OVA(257-264)-specific CD8(+) T cell memory, and a challenge of these mice with either BCG-IL-15 or BCG and purified IL-15 resulted in an increased erosion of OVA(257-264)-specific CD8(+) T cell memory, relative to BCG. Enhancement in the erosion of OVA-specific CD8(+) T cell memory by BCG-IL-15 resulted in a consequently greater impairment in protection against a challenge with OVA-expressing tumor cells. We thus raise important questions regarding vaccinations that are aimed at maximizing T cell memory without considering the impact on pre-existing T cell memory.

  12. Early derivation of IgM memory cells and bone marrow plasmablasts.

    PubMed

    Papillion, Amber M; Kenderes, Kevin J; Yates, Jennifer L; Winslow, Gary M

    2017-01-01

    IgM memory cells are recognized as an important component of B cell memory in mice and humans. Our studies of B cells elicited in response to ehrlichial infection identified a population of CD11c-positive IgM memory cells, and an IgM bone marrow antibody-secreting cell population. The origin of these cells was unknown, although an early T-independent spleen CD11c- and T-bet-positive IgM plasmablast population precedes both, suggesting a linear relationship. A majority of the IgM memory cells detected after day 30 post-infection, also T-bet-positive, had undergone somatic hypermutation, indicating they expressed activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Therefore, to identify early AID-expressing precursor B cells, we infected an AID-regulated tamoxifen-inducible Cre-recombinase-EYFP reporter strain. Tamoxifen administration led to the labeling of both IgM memory cells and bone marrow ASCs on day 30 and later post-infection. High frequencies of labeled cells were identified on day 30 post-infection, following tamoxifen administration on day 10 post-infection, although IgM memory cells were marked when tamoxifen was administered as early as day 4 post-infection. Transcription of Aicda in the early plasmablasts was not detected in the absence of CD4 T cells, but occurred independently of TLR signaling. Unlike the IgM memory cells, the bone marrow IgM ASCs were elicited independent of T cell help. Moreover, Aicda was constitutively expressed in IgM memory cells, but not in bone marrow ASCs. These studies demonstrate that two distinct long-term IgM-positive B cell populations are generated early in response to infection, but are maintained via separate mechanisms.

  13. Interleukin-7 and -15 maintain pathogenic memory Th17 cells in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yihe; Chauhan, Sunil K; Tan, Xuhua; Dana, Reza

    2017-02-01

    Th17 cells are principal mediators of many autoimmune conditions. Recently, memory Th17 cells have been revealed as crucial in mediating the chronicity of various refractory autoimmune disorders; however, the underlying mechanisms maintaining memory Th17 cells have remained elusive. Here, using a preclinical model of ocular autoimmune disease we show that both IL-7 and IL-15 are critical for maintaining pathogenic memory Th17 cells. Neutralization of these cytokines leads to substantial reduction of memory Th17 cells; both IL-7 and IL-15 provide survival signals via activating STAT5, and IL-15 provides additional proliferation signals via activating both STAT5 and Akt. Topical neutralization of ocular IL-7 or IL-15 effectively reduces memory Th17 cells at the inflammatory site and draining lymphoid tissues, while topical neutralization of IL-17 alone, the major pathogenic cytokine secreted by Th17 cells, does not diminish memory Th17 cells at the draining lymphoid tissues. Our results suggest that the effective removal of pathogenic memory Th17 cells via abolishing environmental IL-7 or IL-15 is likely to be a novel strategy in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Endogenous Memory CD8 T Cells Directly Mediate Cardiac Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Su, C. A.; Iida, S.; Abe, T.; Fairchild, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in levels of environmentally induced memory T cells that cross-react with donor MHC molecules are postulated to account for the efficacy of allograft tolerance inducing strategies in rodents versus their failure in nonhuman primates and human transplant patients. Strategies to study the impact of donor-reactive memory T cells on allografts in rodents have relied on the pre-transplant induction of memory T cells cross-reactive with donor allogeneic MHC molecules through recipient viral infection, priming directly with donor antigen, or adoptive transfer of donor-antigen primed memory T cells. Each approach accelerates allograft rejection and confers resistance to tolerance induction, but also biases the T cell repertoire to strong donor-reactivity. The ability of endogenous memory T cells within unprimed mice to directly reject an allograft is unknown. Here we show a direct association between increased duration of cold ischemic allograft storage and numbers and enhanced functions of early graft infiltrating endogenous CD8 memory T cells. These T cells directly mediate rejection of allografts subjected to prolonged ischemia and this rejection is resistant to costimulatory blockade. These findings recapitulate the clinically significant impact of endogenous memory T cells with donor reactivity in a mouse transplant model in the absence of prior recipient priming. PMID:24502272

  15. Myelomatous plasma cells display an aberrant gene expression pattern similar to that observed in normal memory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Báez, Alicia; Piruat, José I; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Sánchez-Abarca, Luís I; Álvarez-Laderas, Isabel; Barbado, M Victoria; García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Millán-Uclés, África; Martín-Sánchez, Jesús; Medrano, Mayte; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Memory B cells (MBCs) remain in a quiescent state for years, expressing pro-survival and anti-apoptotic factors while repressing cell proliferation and activation genes. During their differentiation into plasma cells (PCs), their expression pattern is reversed, with a higher expression of genes related to cell proliferation and activation, and a lower expression of pro-survival genes. To determine whether myelomatous PCs (mPCs) share characteristics with normal PCs and MBCs and to identify genes involved in the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma (MM), we compared gene expression patterns in these three cell sub-types. We observed that mPCs had features intermediate between those of MBCs and normal PCs, and identified 3455 genes differentially expressed in mPCs relative to normal PCs but with a similar expression pattern to that in MBCs. Most of these genes are involved in cell death and survival, cell growth and proliferation and protein synthesis. According to our findings, mPCs have a gene expression pattern closer to a MBC than a PC with a high expression of genes involved in cell survival. These genes should be physiologically inactivated in the transit from MBC to PC, but remain overexpressed in mPCs and thus may play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:25628947

  16. A transcriptome-based model of central memory CD4 T cell death in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Olvera-García, Gustavo; Aguilar-García, Tania; Gutiérrez-Jasso, Fany; Imaz-Rosshandler, Iván; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Orozco, Lorena; Aguilar-Delfín, Irma; Vázquez-Pérez, Joel A; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Pérez-Patrigeon, Santiago; Espinosa, Enrique

    2016-11-22

    Human central memory CD4 T cells are characterized by their capacity of proliferation and differentiation into effector memory CD4 T cells. Homeostasis of central memory CD4 T cells is considered a key factor sustaining the asymptomatic stage of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, while progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is imputed to central memory CD4 T cells homeostatic failure. We investigated if central memory CD4 T cells from patients with HIV-1 infection have a gene expression profile impeding proliferation and survival, despite their activated state. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed mRNA expression patterns in naive, central memory, and effector memory CD4 T cells from healthy controls, and naive and central memory CD4 T cells from patients with HIV-1 infection. Differentially expressed genes, defined by Log2 Fold Change (FC) ≥ |0.5| and Log (odds) > 0, were used in pathway enrichment analyses. Central memory CD4 T cells from patients and controls showed comparable expression of differentiation-related genes, ruling out an effector-like differentiation of central memory CD4 T cells in HIV infection. However, 210 genes were differentially expressed in central memory CD4 T cells from patients compared with those from controls. Expression of 75 of these genes was validated by semi quantitative RT-PCR, and independently reproduced enrichment results from this gene expression signature. The results of functional enrichment analysis indicated movement to cell cycle phases G1 and S (increased CCNE1, MKI67, IL12RB2, ADAM9, decreased FGF9, etc.), but also arrest in G2/M (increased CHK1, RBBP8, KIF11, etc.). Unexpectedly, the results also suggested decreased apoptosis (increased CSTA, NFKBIA, decreased RNASEL, etc.). Results also suggested increased IL-1β, IFN-γ, TNF, and RANTES (CCR5) activity upstream of the central memory CD4 T cells signature, consistent with the demonstrated milieu in HIV infection. Our

  17. Nanovesicle-targeted Kv1.3 knockdown in memory T cells suppresses CD40L expression and memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chimote, Ameet A; Hajdu, Peter; Kottyan, Leah C; Harley, John B; Yun, Yeoheung; Conforti, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Ca(2+) signaling controls activation and effector functions of T lymphocytes. Ca(2+) levels also regulate NFAT activation and CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in T cells. CD40L in activated memory T cells binds to its cognate receptor, CD40, on other cell types resulting in the production of antibodies and pro-inflammatory mediators. The CD40L/CD40 interaction is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and CD40L is widely recognized as a therapeutic target. Ca(2+) signaling in T cells is regulated by Kv1.3 channels. We have developed lipid nanoparticles that deliver Kv1.3 siRNAs (Kv1.3-NPs) selectively to CD45RO(+) memory T cells and reduce the activation-induced Ca(2+) influx. Herein we report that Kv1.3-NPs reduced NFAT activation and CD40L expression exclusively in CD45RO(+) T cells. Furthermore, Kv1.3-NPs suppressed cytokine release and induced a phenotype switch of T cells from predominantly memory to naïve. These findings indicate that Kv1.3-NPs operate as targeted immune suppressive agents with promising therapeutic potentials.

  18. A Dual-Gate Memory Cell with Two Inter-Poly Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raguet, Jean-René; Calenzo, Patrick; Laffont, Romain; Deleruyelle, Damien; Bouchakour, Rachid; Bidal, Virginie; Regnier, Arnaud; Niel, Stephan; Fornara, Pascal; Mirabel, Jean-Michel

    2009-04-01

    A new dual-gate memory cell with two different inter-poly oxides is presented in this paper. This cell allows high density memory application and a cell programming only with the dual-gate without high bias on drain or source compared to standard electrical erasable and programmable read-only memory (EEPROM). Concept has been validated in an EEPROM standard technology from STMicroelectronics and allows a cell area reduction of above 48%. The specificity is to use a dual-gate to program the cell with two different ways of charge injection and perform the memory operations without high bias on drain and also without select transistor. Thus this cell can be shrunk more easily and its lifetime can be improved because the band to band tunneling stress due to high drain potential is eliminated. Moreover, this dual-gate cell can become an adjustable threshold voltage transistor.

  19. Pharmacologic Induction of CD8+ T Cell Memory: Better Living Through Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gattinoni, Luca; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of a robust population of memory T cells is critical for effective vaccine and cell-based therapies to prevent and treat infectious diseases and cancer. A series of recent papers have established a new, cell-intrinsic approach in which small molecules target key metabolic and developmental pathways to enhance the formation and maintenance of highly functional CD8+ memory T cells. These findings raise the exciting new possibility of using small molecules, many of which are already approved for human use, for the pharmacologic induction of immunologic memory. PMID:20371454

  20. Manufacture of gene-modified human T-cells with a memory stem/central memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Heemskerk, Bianca; van Rooij, Nienke; van den Berg, Joost H; Beijnen, Jos H; Uckert, Wolfgang; Kvistborg, Pia; Schumacher, Ton N; Haanen, John B A G; Jorritsma, Annelies

    2014-10-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cell products that carry desired functionalities, such as the ability to recognize cancer cells. The currently used strategies for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products lead to highly differentiated cells within the infusion product, and on the basis of data obtained in preclinical models, this is likely to impact the efficacy of these products. We set out to develop a good manufacturing practice (GMP) protocol that yields T-cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T-cells with more favorable properties for clinical application. Here, we show the robust clinical-scale production of human peripheral blood T-cells with an early memory phenotype that express a MART-1-specific TCR. By combining selection and stimulation using anti-CD3/CD28 beads for retroviral transduction, followed by expansion in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15, production of a well-defined clinical-scale TCR gene-modified T-cell product could be achieved. A major fraction of the T-cells generated in this fashion were shown to coexpress CD62L and CD45RA, and express CD27 and CD28, indicating a central memory or memory stemlike phenotype. Furthermore, these cells produced IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 and displayed cytolytic activity against target cells expressing the relevant antigen. The T-cell products manufactured by this robust and validated GMP production process are now undergoing testing in a phase I/IIa clinical trial in HLA-A*02:01 MART-1-positive advanced stage melanoma patients. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial protocol in which the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 has been applied for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products.

  1. Manufacture of Gene-Modified Human T-Cells with a Memory Stem/Central Memory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Heemskerk, Bianca; van Rooij, Nienke; van den Berg, Joost H.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Uckert, Wolfgang; Kvistborg, Pia; Schumacher, Ton N.; Jorritsma, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cell products that carry desired functionalities, such as the ability to recognize cancer cells. The currently used strategies for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products lead to highly differentiated cells within the infusion product, and on the basis of data obtained in preclinical models, this is likely to impact the efficacy of these products. We set out to develop a good manufacturing practice (GMP) protocol that yields T-cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T-cells with more favorable properties for clinical application. Here, we show the robust clinical-scale production of human peripheral blood T-cells with an early memory phenotype that express a MART-1-specific TCR. By combining selection and stimulation using anti-CD3/CD28 beads for retroviral transduction, followed by expansion in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15, production of a well-defined clinical-scale TCR gene-modified T-cell product could be achieved. A major fraction of the T-cells generated in this fashion were shown to coexpress CD62L and CD45RA, and express CD27 and CD28, indicating a central memory or memory stemlike phenotype. Furthermore, these cells produced IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 and displayed cytolytic activity against target cells expressing the relevant antigen. The T-cell products manufactured by this robust and validated GMP production process are now undergoing testing in a phase I/IIa clinical trial in HLA-A*02:01 MART-1-positive advanced stage melanoma patients. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial protocol in which the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 has been applied for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products. PMID:25143008

  2. Effects of abnormal cell-to-cell interference on p-type floating gate and control gate NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Jun; Kang, Jun Geun; Lee, Byungin; Cho, Gyu-Seog; Park, Sung-Kye; Choi, Woo Young

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal cell-to-cell interference occurring in NAND flash memory has been investigated. In the case of extremely downscaled NAND flash memory, cell-to-cell interference increases abnormally. The abnormal cell-to-cell interference has been observed in a p-type floating gate (FG)/control gate (CG) cells for the first time. It has been found that the depletion region variation leads to the abnormal cell-to-cell interference. The depletion region variation of FG and CG is determined by state of neighbor cells. The depletion region variation affects CG-to-FG coupling capacitance and threshold voltage variation (ΔVT). Finally, it is observed that there is a symmetrical relationship between n- and p-type FG/CG NAND flash memory in terms of cell-to-cell interference.

  3. Antigen availability determines CD8+ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P.; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mazo, Irina B.; Haining, William N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary T cells are activated by antigen (Ag) bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in 3 phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8+ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, while higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation, but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12h and 24h. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  4. Time and Antigen-Stimulation History Influence Memory CD8 T Cell Bystander Responses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew D; Shan, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Badovinac, Vladimir P

    2017-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells can be activated and induced to produce cytokines and increase stores of cytolytic proteins not only in response to cognate antigen (Ag) but also in response to inflammatory cytokines (bystander responses). Importantly, bystander memory CD8 T cell functions have been shown to be dependent upon memory CD8 T cell fitness, since exhausted CD8 T cells have diminished capacity to respond to inflammatory cues. While it is known that memory CD8 T cell functional abilities, including ability to produce cytokines in response to cognate Ag, change with time after initial Ag encounter and upon multiple Ag stimulations (e.g., primary vs. tertiary CD8 T cell responses), it is unknown if bystander memory CD8 T cell responses are influenced by time or by Ag-exposure history. Here, we examined time and Ag-stimulation history-dependent alterations in virus-specific memory CD8 T cell bystander functions in response to inflammatory cytokines and unrelated bacterial infection. We found that expression of cytokine receptors and ability to produce IFN-γ following heterologous infection or incubation with inflammatory cytokines decreases with time following initial Ag encounter and increases with additional Ag encounters, suggesting that the ability to sense inflammation and respond with bystander cytokine production is dependent on age and Ag-stimulation history of memory CD8 T cells. These data shed further light on the regulation of memory CD8 T cell effector functions and have important implications for the development of vaccines designed to elicit protective memory CD8 T cells.

  5. Time and Antigen-Stimulation History Influence Memory CD8 T Cell Bystander Responses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Shan, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2017-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells can be activated and induced to produce cytokines and increase stores of cytolytic proteins not only in response to cognate antigen (Ag) but also in response to inflammatory cytokines (bystander responses). Importantly, bystander memory CD8 T cell functions have been shown to be dependent upon memory CD8 T cell fitness, since exhausted CD8 T cells have diminished capacity to respond to inflammatory cues. While it is known that memory CD8 T cell functional abilities, including ability to produce cytokines in response to cognate Ag, change with time after initial Ag encounter and upon multiple Ag stimulations (e.g., primary vs. tertiary CD8 T cell responses), it is unknown if bystander memory CD8 T cell responses are influenced by time or by Ag-exposure history. Here, we examined time and Ag-stimulation history-dependent alterations in virus-specific memory CD8 T cell bystander functions in response to inflammatory cytokines and unrelated bacterial infection. We found that expression of cytokine receptors and ability to produce IFN-γ following heterologous infection or incubation with inflammatory cytokines decreases with time following initial Ag encounter and increases with additional Ag encounters, suggesting that the ability to sense inflammation and respond with bystander cytokine production is dependent on age and Ag-stimulation history of memory CD8 T cells. These data shed further light on the regulation of memory CD8 T cell effector functions and have important implications for the development of vaccines designed to elicit protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:28642758

  6. The possible role of virus-specific CD8(+) memory T cells in decidual tissue.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, A; van der Keur, C; Swings, G M J S; Scherjon, S A; Claas, F H J

    2016-02-01

    The most abundant lymphocyte present in decidual tissue is the CD8(+) T cell. It has been shown that most decidual CD8(+) T cells have an effector-memory phenotype, but expressed reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B compared with the peripheral CD8(+) effector-memory T cells. The specificity of these CD8(+) memory T cells has yet to be determined. One hypothesis is that the decidual memory T cells are virus-specific T cells that should protect the fetus against incoming pathogens. As virus-specific CD8(+) memory T cells can cross-react with human leukocyte alloantigens, an alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypothesis is that these CD8(+) T cells are fetus-specific. Using virus-specific tetramers, we found increased percentages of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in decidual tissue compared with peripheral blood after uncomplicated pregnancy. So far, no evidence has been obtained for a cross-reactive response of these virus-specific T cells to fetal human leukocyte antigens. These results suggest that the virus-specific memory T cells accumulate in the placenta to protect the fetus from a harmful infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of J-V characteristic in diode array for phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heng; Liu, Yan; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Chao; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, current density-voltage (J-V) characteristic of dual trench diode array have been investigated by both TCAD model and experimental method. It is shown that the arsenic concentration in buried N+ layer (BNL), epitaxial (EPI) layer thickness, and the dosage of P region in PN junction are expected to be the prominent factors responsible for both of the leakage and drive current performance according to TCAD simulation. By introducing the optimal siliconbased results, the 4×4 diode arrays were successfully manufactured by 40nm CMOS technology. The median values of drive and reverse leakage current densities are 7.30×10-2 A/μm2 and 5.61×10-9 A/μm2, respectively. The breakdown voltages (BVDs) of diode array are exceeding 6V, and the Jon/Joff ratios of 109, which can satisfy the requirements of phase change memory (PCM) applications.

  8. Observation of nonvolatile resistive memory switching characteristics in Ag/graphene-oxide/Ag devices.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Gunasekaran; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report highly stable and bipolar resistive switching effects of Ag/Graphene oxide thinfilm/Ag devices. The graphene-oxide (GO) thinfilms were prepared on Ag/SiO2/Si substrates by spin-coating technique. The Ag/GO/Ag devices showed a steady and bipolar resistive switching characteristic. The resistance switching from low resistance state (LRS) and high resistance state (HRS) with the resistance ratio of HRS to LRS of about 10 which was attained at a voltage bias of 0.1 V. Based on the filamentary conduction model, the dominant conduction mechanism of switching effect was well explained. Our results show GO can be a promising candidate for future development of nonvolatile memory devices.

  9. GeTe sequences in superlattice phase change memories and their electrical characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ohyanagi, T. Kitamura, M.; Takaura, N.; Araidai, M.; Kato, S.; Shiraishi, K.

    2014-06-23

    We studied GeTe structures in superlattice phase change memories (superlattice PCMs) with a [GeTe/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}] stacked structure by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. We examined the electrical characteristics of superlattice PCMs with films deposited at different temperatures. It was found that XRD spectra differed between the films deposited at 200 °C and 240 °C; the differences corresponded to the differences in the GeTe sequences in the films. We applied first-principles calculations to calculate the total energy of three different GeTe sequences. The results showed the Ge-Te-Ge-Te sequence had the lowest total energy of the three and it was found that with this sequence the superlattice PCMs did not run.

  10. Generation of human memory stem T cells after haploidentical T-replete hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cieri, Nicoletta; Oliveira, Giacomo; Greco, Raffaella; Forcato, Mattia; Taccioli, Cristian; Cianciotti, Beatrice; Valtolina, Veronica; Noviello, Maddalena; Vago, Luca; Bondanza, Attilio; Lunghi, Francesca; Marktel, Sarah; Bellio, Laura; Bordignon, Claudio; Bicciato, Silvio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2015-04-30

    Memory stem T cells (TSCM) have been proposed as key determinants of immunologic memory. However, their exact contribution to a mounting immune response, as well as the mechanisms and timing of their in vivo generation, are poorly understood. We longitudinally tracked TSCM dynamics in patients undergoing haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), thereby providing novel hints on the contribution of this subset to posttransplant immune reconstitution in humans. We found that donor-derived TSCM are highly enriched early after HSCT. We showed at the antigen-specific and clonal level that TSCM lymphocytes can differentiate directly from naive precursors infused within the graft and that the extent of TSCM generation might correlate with interleukin 7 serum levels. In vivo fate mapping through T-cell receptor sequencing allowed defining the in vivo differentiation landscapes of human naive T cells, supporting the notion that progenies of single naive cells embrace disparate fates in vivo and highlighting TSCM as relevant novel players in the diversification of immunological memory after allogeneic HSCT.

  11. Inability of memory T cells to induce graft-versus-host disease is a result of an abortive alloresponse

    PubMed Central

    Deoliveira, Divino; Cui, Xiuyu; Le, Ngocdiep T.; Son, Jessica; Whitesides, John F.; Chao, Nelson J.

    2007-01-01

    Several groups, including our own, have independently demonstrated that effector memory T cells from non–alloantigen-primed donors do not cause graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the current study, we further investigated whether this approach could be extended to all memory T cells, and we studied the underlying mechanisms. Neither total memory T cells nor purified central memory T cells were able to induce GVHD. Memory T cells were at least 3-log less potent than bulk T cells in mediating GVHD. As expected, memory T cells failed to elicit cytotoxicity and proliferated poorly against alloantigens in standard 5-day mixed-lymphocyte cultures. However, the proliferative responses of memory T cells were more comparable with those of bulk and naive T cells when the culture time was shortened. Moreover, the frequencies of IL-2–secreting cells measured by 42-hour enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay were similar among naive, memory, and bulk T cells. These data indicated that memory T cells are able to respond to alloantigens initially but fail to develop to full potential. The abortive immune response, which was mediated by non–alloantigen-specific memory T cells in response to alloantigens, may explain why memory T cells from unprimed and non–alloantigen-primed donors could not induce GVHD. PMID:17148592

  12. Memory type 2 helper T cells induce long-lasting antitumor immunity by activating natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Ito, Toshihiro; Tumes, Damon J; Endo, Yusuke; Onodera, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kahoko; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Masakatsu; Nishimura, Takashi; Ziegler, Steven F; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2011-07-15

    Functionally polarized helper T cells (Th cells) play crucial roles in the induction of tumor immunity. There is considerable knowledge about the contributions of IFN-producing Th1 cells that supports the role of cytotoxic cluster of differentiation (CD8) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, but much less is known about how IL-4-producing Th2 cells contribute to tumor immunity. In this study, we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms employed by memory Th2 cells in sustaining tumor immunity by using a mouse model system wherein ovalbumin (OVA) is used as a specific tumor antigen. In this model, we found that OVA-specific memory Th2 cells exerted potent and long-lasting antitumor effects against NK-sensitive OVA-expressing tumor cells, wherein antitumor effects were mediated by NK cells. Specifically, NK cell cytotoxic activity and expression of perforin and granzyme B were dramatically enhanced by the activation of memory Th2 cells. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) produced by memory Th2 cells in vivo was critical for the antitumor effects of the NK cells, which IL-4 directly stimulated to induce their perforin- and granzyme-B-dependent cytotoxic activity. Our findings show that memory Th2 cells can induce potent antitumor immunity through IL-4-induced activation of NK cells, suggesting potential applications in cellular therapy for cancer patients. ©2011 AACR.

  13. 1Protein Energy Malnutrition Impairs Homeostatic Proliferation of Memory CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Smita S.; Chatraw, Janel Hart; Tan, Wendy G.; Wherry, E. John; Becker, Todd C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Kapasi, Zoher F.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is a critical but poorly understood determinant of immunity. There is abundant epidemiological evidence linking protein malnutrition to impaired vaccine efficacy and increased susceptibility to infections; yet, the role of dietary protein in immune memory homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here we show that protein energy malnutrition (PEM) induced in mice by low-protein (LP) feeding has a detrimental impact on CD8 memory. Relative to adequate-protein (AP) fed controls, LP feeding in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) immune mice resulted in a 2-fold decrease in LCMV-specific CD8 memory T cells. Adoptive transfer of memory cells, labeled with a division tracking dye, from AP mice into naive LP or AP mice demonstrated that PEM caused profound defects in homeostatic proliferation. Remarkably, this defect occurred despite the lymphopenic environment in LP hosts. While antigen-specific memory cells in LP and AP hosts were phenotypically similar, memory cells in LP hosts were markedly less-responsive to poly(I:C)-induced acute proliferative signals. Furthermore, upon recall, memory cells in LP hosts displayed reduced proliferation and protection from challenge with LCMV-clone 13 resulting in impaired viral clearance in the liver. The findings show a metabolic requirement of dietary protein in sustaining functional CD8 memory and suggest that interventions to optimize dietary protein intake may improve vaccine efficacy in malnourished individuals. PMID:22116826

  14. Tissue Distribution of Memory T and B Cells in Rhesus Monkeys following Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Boonnak, Kobporn; Thitithayanont, Arunee; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Wiboon-ut, Suwimon; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Spring, Michele; Chuang, Ilin; Mason, Carl J.; Saunders, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of influenza-specific immune responses in humans have largely assessed systemic responses involving serum Ab and peripheral blood T cell responses. However, recent evidence indicates that tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells play an important role in local murine intrapulmonary immunity. Rhesus monkeys were pulmonary exposed to 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus at days 0 and 28 and immune responses in different tissue compartments were measured. All animals were asymptomatic postinfection. Although only minimal memory immune responses were detected in peripheral blood, a high frequency of influenza nucleoprotein–specific memory T cells was detected in the lung at the “contraction phase,” 49–58 d after second virus inoculation. A substantial proportion of lung nucleoprotein-specific memory CD8+ T cells expressed CD103 and CD69, phenotypic markers of TRM cells. Lung CD103+ and CD103- memory CD8+ T cells expressed similar levels of IFN-γ and IL-2. Unlike memory T cells, spontaneous Ab secreting cells and memory B cells specific to influenza hemagglutinin were primarily observed in the mediastinal lymph nodes. Little difference in systemic and local immune responses against influenza was observed between young adult (6–8 y) and old animals (18–28 y). Using a nonhuman primate model, we revealed substantial induction of local T and B cell responses following 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection. Our study identified a subset of influenza-specific lung memory T cells characterized as TRM cells in rhesus monkeys. The rhesus monkey model may be useful to explore the role of TRM cells in local tissue protective immunity after rechallenge and vaccination. PMID:26408671

  15. Storage Characteristics of Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Smart, M. C.; Blosiu, J. O.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithium ion cells are being developed under the NASA/Air Force Consortium for the upcoming aerospace missions. First among these missions are the Mars 2001 Lander and Mars 2003 Lander and Rover missions. Apart from the usual needs of high specific energy, energy density and long cycle life, a critical performance characteristic for the Mars missions is low temperature performance. The batteries need to perform well at -20 C, with at least 70% of the rated capacity realizable at moderate discharge rates (C/5). Several modifications have been made to the lithium ion chemistry, mainly with respect to the electrolyte, both at JPL' and elsewhere to achieve this. Another key requirement for the battery is its storageability during pre-cruise and cruise periods. For the Mars programs, the cruise period is relatively short, about 12 months, compared to the Outer Planets missions (3-8 years). Yet, the initial results of our storage studies reveal that the cells do sustain noticeable permanent degradation under certain storage conditions, typically of 10% over two months duration at ambient temperatures, attributed to impedance buildup. The build up of the cell impedance or the decay in the cell capacity is affected by various storage parameters, i.e., storage temperature, storage duration, storage mode (open circuit, on buss or cycling at low rates) and state of charge. Our preliminary studies indicate that low storage temperatures and states of charge are preferable. In some cases, we have observed permanent capacity losses of approx. 10% over eight-week storage at 40 C, compared to approx. 0-2% at O C. Also, we are attempting to determine the impact of cell chemistry and design upon the storageability of Li ion cells.

  16. Pediatric common variable immunodeficiency: immunologic and phenotypic associations with switched memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Pierre L; Orange, Jordan S; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and low numbers of switched memory B cells have lower IgG levels and higher rates of autoimmune disease, splenomegaly, and granulomatous disease; however, no prior literature has focused exclusively on pediatric cases. We examined the relationship between switched memory B cells and clinical and immunologic manifestations of CVID in a pediatric population. Forty-five patients were evaluated. Patients were categorized as Group I (<5 switched memory B cells/ml, n = 24) or Group II (> or =5 switched memory B cells/mL, n = 21). CD3(+) T-cell counts and CD19(+) B-cell levels were lower among Group I patients. Only those in Group I had meningitis, sepsis, bronchiectasis, granulomatous lung disease, autoimmune cytopenias, or hematologic malignancies. Segregation of pediatric patients into high risk (Group I) and average risk (Group II) may assist in targeting surveillance appropriately.

  17. Immunologic considerations for generating memory CD8 T cells through vaccination.

    PubMed

    Butler, Noah S; Nolz, Jeffrey C; Harty, John T

    2011-07-01

    Following infection or vaccination, naïve CD8 T cells that receive the appropriate integration of antigenic, co-stimulatory and inflammatory signals undergo a programmed series of biological changes that ultimately results in the generation of memory cells. Memory CD8 T cells, in contrast to naïve cells, more effectively limit or prevent pathogen re-infection because of both qualitative and quantitative changes that occur following their induction. Unlike vaccination strategies aimed at generating antibody production, the ability to generate protective memory CD8 T cells has proven more complicated and problematic. However, recent experimental results have revealed important principles regarding the molecular and genetic basis for memory CD8 T cell formation, as well as identified ways to manipulate their development through vaccination, resulting in potential new avenues to enhance protective immunity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Development and Function of Protective and Pathologic Memory CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaigirdar, Shafqat Ahrar; MacLeod, Megan K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is one of the defining features of the adaptive immune system. As key orchestrators and mediators of immunity, CD4 T cells are central to the vast majority of adaptive immune responses. Generated following an immune response, memory CD4 T cells retain pertinent information about their activation environment enabling them to make rapid effector responses upon reactivation. These responses can either benefit the host by hastening the control of pathogens or cause damaging immunopathology. Here, we will discuss the diversity of the memory CD4 T cell pool, the signals that influence the transition of activated T cells into that pool, and highlight how activation requirements differ between naïve and memory CD4 T cells. A greater understanding of these factors has the potential to aid the design of more effective vaccines and to improve regulation of pathologic CD4 T cells, such as in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. PMID:26441961

  19. Generating long-lived CD8(+) T-cell memory: Insights from epigenetic programs.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Pranay; Ghoneim, Hazem E; Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Youngblood, Ben

    2016-07-01

    T-cell-based immunological memory has the potential to provide the host with life-long protection against pathogen reexposure and thus offers tremendous promise for the design of vaccines targeting chronic infections or cancer. In order to exploit this potential in the design of new vaccines, it is necessary to understand how and when memory T cells acquire their poised effector potential, and moreover, how they maintain these properties during homeostatic proliferation. To gain insight into the persistent nature of memory T-cell functions, investigators have turned their attention to epigenetic mechanisms. Recent efforts have revealed that many of the properties acquired among memory T cells are coupled to stable changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications. Furthermore, it has recently been reported that the delineating features among memory T cells subsets are also linked to distinct epigenetic events, such as permissive and repressive histone modifications and DNA methylation programs, providing exciting new hypotheses regarding their cellular ancestry. Here, we review recent studies focused on epigenetic programs acquired during effector and memory T-cell differentiation and discuss how these data may shed new light on the developmental path for generating long-lived CD8(+) T-cell memory. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Cell-autonomous CCL5 transcription by memory CD8 T cells is regulated by IL-4.

    PubMed

    Marçais, Antoine; Coupet, Charles-Antoine; Walzer, Thierry; Tomkowiak, Martine; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2006-10-01

    Immunological memory is associated with the display of improved effector functions. The maintenance by CD8 memory cells of high levels of untranslated CCL5 mRNA allows these cells to immediately secrete this chemokine upon Ag stimulation. Untranslated mRNA storage is a newly described process supporting the immediate display of an effector function by memory lymphocytes. We have tested the capacity of different cytokines to regulate the memorization of CCL5 by memory CD8 T cells. We found that IL-4 treatment of murine CD8 T cells impairs immediate CCL5 secretion capacity by inhibiting CCL5 mRNA transcription through a STAT6-dependent pathway. The inhibition by IL-4 is reversible, as memory CD8 T cells reconstitute their CCL5 mRNA stores and reacquire their immediate CCL5 secretion capacity when IL-4 is withdrawn. This recovery is cell autonomous because it proceeds in culture medium in the absence of exogenous growth factors, suggesting that CCL5 expression by memory CD8 T cells is a default process. Overall, these results indicate that the expression of CCL5 is an intrinsic property acquired by memory CD8 T cells that is regulated by environmental factors.

  1. Bcl-2 Allows Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells To Tolerate Higher Expression of Bim

    PubMed Central

    Kurtulus, Sema; Tripathi, Pulak; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Sholl, Allyson; Katz, Jonathan D.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Hildeman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    As acute infections resolve, most effector CD8+ T cells die, whereas some persist and become memory T cells. Recent work showed that subsets of effector CD8+ T cells, identified by reciprocal expression of killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) and CD127, have different lifespans. Similar to previous reports, we found that effector CD8+ T cells reported to have a longer lifespan (i.e., KLRG1lowCD127high) have increased levels of Bcl-2 compared with their shorter-lived KLRG1highCD127low counterparts. Surprisingly, we found that these effector KLRG1lowCD127high CD8+ T cells also had increased levels of Bim compared with KLRG1highCD127low cells. Similar effects were observed in memory cells, in which CD8+ central memory T cells expressed higher levels of Bim and Bcl-2 than did CD8+ effector memory T cells. Using both pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we found that survival of both subsets of effector and memory CD8+ T cells required Bcl-2 to combat the proapoptotic activity of Bim. Interestingly, inhibition or absence of Bcl-2 led to significantly decreased expression of Bim in surviving effector and memory T cells. In addition, manipulation of Bcl-2 levels by IL-7 or IL-15 also affected expression of Bim in effector CD8+ T cells. Finally, we found that Bim levels were significantly increased in effector CD8+ T cells lacking Bax and Bak. Together, these data indicate that cells having the highest levels of Bim are selected against during contraction of the response and that Bcl-2 determines the level of Bim that effector and memory T cells can tolerate. PMID:21451108

  2. Extracting the temperature distribution on a phase-change memory cell during crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Gerislioglu, Burak; Dirisaglik, Faruk; Jurado, Zoila; Sullivan, Lindsay; Dana, Aykutlu; Lam, Chung; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2016-10-01

    Phase-change memory (PCM) devices are enabled by amorphization- and crystallization-induced changes in the devices' electrical resistances. Amorphization is achieved by melting and quenching the active volume using short duration electrical pulses (˜ns). The crystallization (set) pulse duration, however, is much longer and depends on the cell temperature reached during the pulse. Hence, the temperature-dependent crystallization process of the phase-change materials at the device level has to be well characterized to achieve fast PCM operations. A main challenge is determining the cell temperature during crystallization. Here, we report extraction of the temperature distribution on a lateral PCM cell during a set pulse using measured voltage-current characteristics and thermal modelling. The effect of the thermal properties of materials on the extracted cell temperature is also studied, and a better cell design is proposed for more accurate temperature extraction. The demonstrated study provides promising results for characterization of the temperature-dependent crystallization process within a cell.

  3. Modulation of Memory T Cells to Control Acquired Bone Marrow Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    when immunosuppressive therapy is withdrawn.2,3 Furthermore, GVHD remains a major barrier to the success of allogeneic BMT.4,5 Memory T cells may...present a significant barrier to the success of controlling various inflammatory conditions. Memory T cells, derived from proliferating T cells during...patients when immunosuppressive therapy is withdrawn.2,3 Furthermore, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major barrier to the success of allogeneic

  4. Explicit memory creation during sleep demonstrates a causal role of place cells in navigation.

    PubMed

    de Lavilléon, Gaetan; Lacroix, Marie Masako; Rondi-Reig, Laure; Benchenane, Karim

    2015-04-01

    Hippocampal place cells assemblies are believed to support the cognitive map, and their reactivations during sleep are thought to be involved in spatial memory consolidation. By triggering intracranial rewarding stimulations by place cell spikes during sleep, we induced an explicit memory trace, leading to a goal-directed behavior toward the place field. This demonstrates that place cells' activity during sleep still conveys relevant spatial information and that this activity is functionally significant for navigation.

  5. Bystander chronic infection negatively impacts development of CD8+ T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Stelekati, Erietta; Shin, Haina; Doering, Travis A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Ziegler, Carly G.; Beiting, Daniel P.; Dawson, Lucas; Liboon, Jennifer; Wolski, David; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Katsikis, Peter D.; Shen, Hao; Roos, David S.; Haining, W. Nicholas; Lauer, Georg M.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological evidence suggests that chronic infections impair immune responses to unrelated pathogens and vaccines. The underlying mechanisms, however, are unclear and distinguishing effects on priming versus development of immunological memory has been challenging. We investigated whether bystander chronic infections impact differentiation of memory CD8+ T cells, the hallmark of protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. Chronic bystander infections impaired development of memory CD8+ T cells in several mouse models and humans. These effects were independent of initial priming and were associated with chronic inflammatory signatures. Chronic inflammation negatively impacted the number of bystander CD8+ T cells and their memory development. Distinct underlying mechanisms of altered survival and differentiation were revealed with the latter regulated by the transcription factors T-bet and Blimp-1. Thus, exposure to prolonged bystander inflammation impairs the effector to memory transition. These data have relevance for immunity and vaccination during persisting infections and chronic inflammation. PMID:24837104

  6. Temporal dynamics of the primary human T cell response to yellow fever virus 17D as it matures from an effector- to a memory-type response.

    PubMed

    Blom, Kim; Braun, Monika; Ivarsson, Martin A; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Falconer, Karolin; Moll, Markus; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Sandberg, Johan K

    2013-03-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) 17D vaccine provides a good model to study immune responses to an acute viral infection in humans. We studied the temporal dynamics, composition, and character of the primary human T cell response to YFV. The acute YFV-specific effector CD8 T cell response was broad and complex; it was composed of dominant responses that persisted into the memory population, as well as of transient subdominant responses that were not detected at the memory stage. Furthermore, HLA-A2- and HLA-B7-restricted YFV epitope-specific effector cells predominantly displayed a CD45RA(-)CCR7(-)PD-1(+)CD27(high) phenotype, which transitioned into a CD45RA(+)CCR7(-)PD-1(-)CD27(low) memory population phenotype. The functional profile of the YFV-specific CD8 T cell response changed in composition as it matured from an effector- to a memory-type response, and it tended to become less polyfunctional during the course of this transition. Interestingly, activation of CD4 T cells, as well as FOXP3(+) T regulatory cells, in response to YFV vaccination preceded the kinetics of the CD8 T cell response. The present results contribute to our understanding of how immunodominance patterns develop, as well as the phenotypic and functional characteristics of the primary human T cell response to a viral infection as it evolves and matures into memory.

  7. Directional memory arises from long-lived cytoskeletal asymmetries in polarized chemotactic cells.

    PubMed

    Prentice-Mott, Harrison V; Meroz, Yasmine; Carlson, Andreas; Levine, Michael A; Davidson, Michael W; Irimia, Daniel; Charras, Guillaume T; Mahadevan, L; Shah, Jagesh V

    2016-02-02

    Chemotaxis, the directional migration of cells in a chemical gradient, is robust to fluctuations associated with low chemical concentrations and dynamically changing gradients as well as high saturating chemical concentrations. Although a number of reports have identified cellular behavior consistent with a directional memory that could account for behavior in these complex environments, the quantitative and molecular details of such a memory process remain unknown. Using microfluidics to confine cellular motion to a 1D channel and control chemoattractant exposure, we observed directional memory in chemotactic neutrophil-like cells. We modeled this directional memory as a long-lived intracellular asymmetry that decays slower than observed membrane phospholipid signaling. Measurements of intracellular dynamics revealed that moesin at the cell rear is a long-lived element that when inhibited, results in a reduction of memory. Inhibition of ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase), downstream of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), stabilized moesin and directional memory while depolymerization of microtubules (MTs) disoriented moesin deposition and also reduced directional memory. Our study reveals that long-lived polarized cytoskeletal structures, specifically moesin, actomyosin, and MTs, provide a directional memory in neutrophil-like cells even as they respond on short time scales to external chemical cues.

  8. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  9. Type I interferons regulate eomesodermin expression and the development of unconventional memory CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Valérie; Tonon, Sandrine; Torres, David; Azouz, Abdulkader; Nguyen, Muriel; Kohler, Arnaud; Flamand, Véronique; Mao, Chai-An; Klein, William H; Leo, Oberdan; Goriely, Stanislas

    2015-05-08

    CD8(+) T-cell memory phenotype and function are acquired after antigen-driven activation. Memory-like cells may also arise in absence of antigenic exposure in the thymus or in the periphery. Eomesodermin (Eomes) is a key transcription factor for the development of these unconventional memory cells. Herein, we show that type I interferon signalling in CD8(+) T cells directly activates Eomes gene expression. Consistent with this observation, the phenotype, function and age-dependent expansion of 'virtual memory' CD8(+) T cells are strongly affected in absence of type I interferon signalling. In addition, type I interferons induce a sustained expansion of 'virtual memory' CD8(+) T cells in an Eomes-dependent fashion. We further show that the development of 'innate thymic' CD8(+) T cells is dependent on the same pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that type I interferon signalling in CD8(+) T cells drives Eomes expression and thereby regulates the function and homeostasis of memory-like CD8(+) T cells.

  10. γδ T cells come to stay: Innate skin memory in the Aldara model.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Immo; Sandrock, Inga

    2015-11-01

    The term immunological memory has long been a trademark restricted to adaptive lymphocytes such as memory B cells and plasma cells as well as memory CD8(+) αβ T cells. In recent years, innate lymphocytes such as NK cells have also been shown to adapt to their environment by antigen-specific expansion and selective survival. However, whether γδ T cells mount comparable memory responses to pathogenic stimuli is less well understood. In this issue of European Journal of Immunology, Hartwig et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 3022-3033] identify a subset of IL-17-producing γδ T cells that are capable of establishing long-lived memory in the skin of mice exposed to imiquimod in the Aldara psoriasis model. These γδ T cells uniformly express a Vγ4(+) Vδ4(+) TCR. They produce IL-17A/F and persist in the dermis for long periods of time, also at untreated distal sites. Upon secondary challenge, experienced Vγ4(+) Vδ4(+) cells show enhanced effector functions and mediate exacerbated secondary inflammation. These findings showcase innate γδ T-cell memory that uses a single conserved public TCR combination. Furthermore, they provide mechanistic insight to the observed psoriatic relapses in patients in response to topical treatment with imiquimod. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Distribution and compartmentalization of human circulating and tissue-resident memory T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Kubota, Masaru; Yudanin, Naomi; Turner, Damian; Camp, Philip; Thome, Joseph J. C.; Bickham, Kara L.; Lerner, Harvey; Goldstein, Michael; Sykes, Megan; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Knowledge of human T cells derives chiefly from studies of peripheral blood, whereas their distribution and function in tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we present a unique analysis of human T cells in lymphoid and mucosal tissues obtained from individual organ donors, revealing tissue-intrinsic compartmentalization of naive, effector and memory subsets conserved between diverse individuals. Effector-memory CD4+ T cells producing IL-2 predominated in mucosal tissues and accumulated as central-memory subsets in lymphoid tissue, whereas CD8+ T cells were maintained as naïve subsets in lymphoid tissues and IFN-γ-producing effector-memory CD8+ T cells in mucosal sites. The T cell activation marker, CD69, was constitutively expressed by memory T cells in all tissues, distinguishing them from circulating subsets, with mucosal memory T cells exhibiting additional distinct phenotypic and functional properties. Our results provide an assessment of human T cell compartmentalization as a new baseline for understanding human adaptive immunity. PMID:23260195

  12. Proportions of CD4+ memory T cells are altered in individuals chronically infected with Schistosoma haematobium

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Norman; Bourke, Claire D.; Appleby, Laura J.; Rujeni, Nadine; Lantz, Olivier; Trottein, François; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Mutapi, Francisca

    2012-01-01

    Characterisation of protective helminth acquired immunity in humans or experimental models has focused on effector responses with little work conducted on memory responses. Here we show for the first time, that human helminth infection is associated with altered proportions of the CD4+ memory T cells, with an associated alteration of TH1 responses. The reduced CD4+ memory T cell proportions are associated with a significantly lower ratio of schistosome-specific IgE/IgG4 (marker for resistance to infection/re-infection) in uninfected older people. Helminth infection does not affect the CD8+ memory T cell pool. Furthermore, we show for the first time in a helminth infection that the CD4+ memory T cell proportions decline following curative anti-helminthic treatment despite increased CD4+ memory cell replication. Reduced accumulation of the CD4+ memory T cells in schistosome-infected people has implications for the development of natural or vaccine induced schistosome-specific protective immunity as well as for unrelated pathogens. PMID:22737405

  13. The agonists of TLR4 and 9 are sufficient to activate memory B cells to differentiate into plasma cells in vitro but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Richard, Katharina; Pierce, Susan K; Song, Wenxia

    2008-08-01

    Memory B cells can persist for a lifetime and be reactivated to yield high affinity, isotype switched plasma cells. The generation of memory B cells by Ag immunization requires adjuvants that generally contain TLR agonists. However, requirements for memory B cell activation and the role of TLRs in this activation are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the response of memory B cells from immunized mice to TLR9 and 4 agonists CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) and LPS. Mouse memory B cells express both TLR9 and 4, and respond to both CpG ODN and LPS in vitro by differentiating into high affinity IgG secreting plasma cells. In contrast, neither CpG ODN nor LPS alone is sufficient to activate memory B cells in vivo. Ag is required for the clonal expansion of Ag-specific memory B cells, the differentiation of memory B cells to high affinity IgG secreting plasma cells, and the recall of high affinity Ab responses. The Ag-specific B cells that have not yet undergone isotype switching showed a relatively higher expression of TLR4 than memory B cells, which was reflected in a heightened response to LPS, but in both cases yielded mostly low affinity IgM secreting plasma cells. Thus, although memory B cells are sensitive to TLR agonists in vitro, TLR agonists alone appear to have little affect on B cell memory in vivo.

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Adults Reporting Repressed, Recovered, or Continuous Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Richard J.; Perlman, Carol A.; Ristuccia, Carel S.; Clancy, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors assessed women and men who either reported continuous memories of their childhood sexual abuse (CSA, n = 92), reported recovering memories of CSA (n = 38), reported believing they harbored repressed memories of CSA (n = 42), or reported never having been sexually abused (n = 36). Men and women were indistinguishable on all clinical and…

  15. Clinical Characteristics of Adults Reporting Repressed, Recovered, or Continuous Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Richard J.; Perlman, Carol A.; Ristuccia, Carel S.; Clancy, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors assessed women and men who either reported continuous memories of their childhood sexual abuse (CSA, n = 92), reported recovering memories of CSA (n = 38), reported believing they harbored repressed memories of CSA (n = 42), or reported never having been sexually abused (n = 36). Men and women were indistinguishable on all clinical and…

  16. Entorhinal Cortical Ocean Cells Encode Specific Contexts and Drive Context-Specific Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takashi; Sun, Chen; Martin, Jared; Kitch, Lacey J; Schnitzer, Mark J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-09-23

    Forming distinct representations and memories of multiple contexts and episodes is thought to be a crucial function of the hippocampal-entorhinal cortical network. The hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 are known to contribute to these functions, but the role of the entorhinal cortex (EC) is poorly understood. Here, we show that Ocean cells, excitatory stellate neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into DG and CA3, rapidly form a distinct representation of a novel context and drive context-specific activation of downstream CA3 cells as well as context-specific fear memory. In contrast, Island cells, excitatory pyramidal neurons in the medial EC layer II projecting into CA1, are indifferent to context-specific encoding or memory. On the other hand, Ocean cells are dispensable for temporal association learning, for which Island cells are crucial. Together, the two excitatory medial EC layer II inputs to the hippocampus have complementary roles in episodic memory.

  17. Characteristics and specificity of acquired immunologic memory to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.

    1988-05-15

    The results herein show that mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then exposed to a protracted course of isoniazid chemotherapy possess a heightened state of acquired resistance to subsequent challenge with the homologous organism. Our results provide the first evidence, moreover, that this resistance is mediated by a long-lived, cyclophosphamide- and irradiation-resistant L3T4+ Lyt-2- lymphocyte capable of giving rise to an accelerated re-emergence of resistance in the animal upon rechallenge. Evidence is also provided to show that triggering of this memory-immune T cell population in the re-challenged host was associated with the rapid emergence of non-specific resistance to secondary bacterial infection; however, the accelerated emergence of this population was only observed if the challenge inoculum consisted of the living organism. The relevance of this latter finding to strategies for vaccine development is discussed.

  18. ICAM-1-dependent tuning of memory CD8 T-cell responses following acute infection.

    PubMed

    Cox, Maureen A; Barnum, Scott R; Bullard, Daniel C; Zajac, Allan J

    2013-01-22

    CD8 T-cell responses are critical for protection against intracellular pathogens and tumors. The induction and properties of these responses are governed by a series of integrated processes that rely heavily on cell-cell interactions. Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 functions to enhance the strength of antigenic stimulation, extend the duration of contact with antigen-presenting cells, and augment cytokine signals, which are all factors that influence peripheral CD8 T-cell differentiation. Although previous studies suggest that ICAM-1 is essential for establishing memory T-cell populations following peptide immunization, the roles of ICAM-1 in antiviral cellular immunity are less well understood. Here we show that, following a prototypic acute viral infection, the formation and maintenance of memory-phenotype CD127(hi), KLRG-1(lo) CD8 T cells does not require ICAM-1. Nevertheless, ICAM-1 expression on nonlymphocytes dictates the phenotypic and functional attributes of the antiviral CD8 T-cell populations that develop and promotes the gradual attrition of residual effector-like CD127(lo), KLRG-1(hi) CD8 T cells during the memory phase of the response. Although memory T cells do emerge and are maintained if ICAM-1 expression is abolished, the secondary proliferative capacity of these T cells is severely curtailed. Collectively, these studies reveal potential dual roles for ICAM-1 in both promoting the decay of effector responses and programming the sensitivity of memory CD8 T cells to secondary stimuli.

  19. Differential localization of T-bet and Eomes in CD8 T-cell memory populations

    PubMed Central

    McLane, Laura M.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Cosma, Gabriela L.; Makedonas, George; Wherry, E. John; Orange, Jordan S.; Betts, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    In mice, two T-box transcription factors, T-bet and Eomes, drive the differentiation of CD8 T-cell lineages; however, little is known regarding their role in human CD8 T-cell differentiation. Here, we characterized T-bet and Eomes expression and localization within human CD8 memory T-cell populations. We find T-bet and Eomes are broadly expressed in human memory CD8 T cells, with increasing levels of T-bet and Eomes strongly correlating with differentiation from central memory to effector memory and effector subpopulations. In resting T-cells, T-bet levels directly correlate to subcellular localization, with a higher propensity for nuclear expression of T-bet within T-bethi cells and predominately cytoplasmic expression in T-betlo cells. Additionally, Eomes is also localized to either the nucleus or cytoplasm. Upon T-cell receptor stimulation, the percentage of T-cells that express T-bet dramatically increases, while the percentage of cells expressing Eomes remains largely unchanged across all memory populations. Interestingly, T-bet, but not Eomes, relocalizes to the nucleus in the majority of cells across all populations within 24 hours post-stimulation. These data indicate that T-bet and Eomes are likely regulated at the level of subcellular localization, potentially via different mechanisms. Together, these findings suggest a novel model for CD8 T-cell differentiation in humans based on the localization of T-bet and Eomes. PMID:23455505

  20. Switching characteristics in TiO2/ZnO double layer resistive switching memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Praveen K.; Salim, Mohammad; Chand, Umesh; Periasamy, C.

    2017-06-01

    The uniform and reliable resistive switching characteristics of a ZnO based resistive random access memory device with a thin TiO2 layer are successfully investigated. In this study, the effect of thickness of the TiO2 layer on switching characteristics has been investigated. Compared with different thicknesses of the thin TiO2 layer, the remarkably improved resistive switching parameters such as lower forming voltage and the narrower variation of endurance are achieved for a TiO2 layer of thickness 2 nm. The forming voltages are dependent on the TiO2 thickness which supports the idea that forming process is governed by a dielectric breakdown-like phenomenon. The Ti/TiO2/ZnO/Pt device with the 2 nm TiO2 layer exhibits good DC endurance up to 103 cycles. The non-volatility of data storage is further confirmed by retention test measured at room temperature. It has been observed that both low resistance state and high resistance state do not exhibit any degradation for more than 104 s.

  1. Mechanical and Vibration Characteristics of Laminated Composite Plates Embedding Shape Memory Alloy Superelastic Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappadà, Silvio; Gren, Per; Tatar, Kourosh; Gustafson, Tord; Rametta, Rocco; Rossini, Ettore; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2009-08-01

    Currently, there is a great interest in the study of shape memory alloy (SMA) composites, since SMA wires with a small diameter have become commercially available. Many potential uses have been found for SMA composites in shape control, vibration control, and for the realization of structures with improved damage tolerance. In this work, two types of SMA-hybridized composites are presented for investigating the mechanical and vibration characteristics. The first one contains unidirectional superelastic SMA wires, while the other has been realized with embedded knitted SMA layers. The samples from these laminates have been tested according to “Charpy method” (ASTM D256) and static flexural test method (ASTM D790) to evaluate the influence of the integration of thin superelastic SMA wires on the impact behavior and the mechanical properties of the hybrid composites. Moreover, since the SMA wires are expected to give damping capacity, by measuring the vibration mode of a clamped cantilever using laser vibrometry, the influence of both SMA arrangements on the vibration characteristics has been investigated. Finally, further tests have been carried out on composite panels realized by embedding unidirectional steel wires to distinguish the influence of the martensitic transformation from the pure introduction of a metallic wire into the polymeric matrix.

  2. Non-hematopoietic cells in lymph nodes drive memory CD8 T cell inflation during murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Torti, Nicole; Walton, Senta M; Brocker, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2011-10-01

    During human and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection an exceptionally large virus-specific CD8 T cell pool is maintained in the periphery lifelong. This anomalous response is only seen for specific subsets of MCMV-specific CD8 T cells which are referred to as 'inflationary T cells'. How memory CD8 T cell inflation is induced and maintained is unclear, though their activated phenotype strongly suggests an involvement of persistent antigen encounter during MCMV latency. To dissect the cellular and molecular requirements for memory CD8 T cell inflation, we have generated a transgenic mouse expressing an MHC class I-restricted T cell receptor specific for an immunodominant inflationary epitope of MCMV. Through a series of adoptive transfer experiments we found that memory inflation was completely dependent on antigen presentation by non-hematopoietic cells, which are also the predominant site of MCMV latency. In particular, non-hematopoietic cells selectively induced robust proliferation of inflationary CD8 T cells in lymph nodes, where a majority of the inflationary CD8 T cells exhibit a central-memory phenotype, but not in peripheral tissues, where terminally differentiated inflationary T cells accumulate. These results indicate that continuous restimulation of central memory CD8 T cells in the lymph nodes by infected non-hematopoietic cells ensures the maintenance of a functional effector CD8 T pool in the periphery, providing protection against viral reactivation events.

  3. Priming of CD4+ T cells and development of CD4+ T cell memory; lessons for malaria.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R; Langhorne, J

    2006-01-01

    CD4 T cells play a central role in the immune response to malaria. They are required to help B cells produce the antibody that is essential for parasite clearance. They also produce cytokines that amplify the phagocytic and parasitocidal response of the innate immune system, as well as dampening this response later on to limit immunopathology. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which T helper cells are activated and the requirements for development of specific, and effective, T cell memory and immunity is essential in the quest for a malaria vaccine. In this paper on the CD4 session of the Immunology of Malaria Infections meeting, we summarize discussions of CD4 cell priming and memory in malaria and in vaccination and outline critical future lines of investigation. B. Stockinger and M.K. Jenkins proposed cutting edge experimental systems to study basic T cell biology in malaria. Critical parameters in T cell activation include the cell types involved, the route of infection and the timing and location and cell types involved in antigen presentation. A new generation of vaccines that induce CD4 T cell activation and memory are being developed with new adjuvants. Studies of T cell memory focus on differentiation and factors involved in maintenance of antigen specific T cells and control of the size of that population. To improve detection of T cell memory in the field, efforts will have to be made to distinguish antigen-specific responses from cytokine driven responses.

  4. The boundary vector cell model of place cell firing and spatial memory

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Caswell; Lever, Colin; Hayman, Robin; Hartley, Tom; Burton, Stephen; O'Keefe, John; Jeffery, Kate; Burgess, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We review evidence for the boundary vector cell model of the environmental determinants of the firing of hippocampal place cells. Preliminary experimental results are presented concerning the effects of addition or removal of environmental boundaries on place cell firing and evidence that boundary vector cells may exist in the subiculum. We review and update computational simulations predicting the location of human search within a virtual environment of variable geometry, assuming that boundary vector cells provide one of the input representations of location used in mammalian spatial memory. Finally, we extend the model to include experience-dependent modification of connection strengths through a BCM-like learning rule, and compare the effects to experimental data on the firing of place cells under geometrical manipulations to their environment. The relationship between neurophysiological results in rats and spatial behaviour in humans is discussed. PMID:16703944

  5. TLR7 and TLR9 responsive human B cells share phenotypic and genetic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Simchoni, Noa; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    B cells activated by nucleic-acid sensing Toll-like receptor 7 and TLR9 proliferate and secrete immune globulins. Memory B cells are presumably more responsive due to higher TLR expression levels, but selectivity and differential outcomes remain largely unknown. In this study, peripheral blood human B cells were stimulated by TLR7 or TLR9 ligands, with or without IFNα, and compared to activators CD40L plus IL-21, to identify differentially responsive cell populations, defined phenotypically and by BCR characteristics. While all activators induced differentiation and antibody secretion, TLR stimulation expanded IgM+ memory and plasma cell lineage committed populations and favored secretion of IgM, unlike CD40L/IL-21 which drove IgM and IgG more evenly. Patterns of proliferation similarly differed, with CD40L/IL-21 inducing proliferation of most memory and naïve B cells, in contrast to TLRs which induced robust proliferation in a subset of these cells. On deep sequencing of the IgH locus, TLR responsive B cells shared patterns of IgHV and IgHJ usage, clustering apart from CD40L/IL-21 and control conditions. TLR activators, but not CD40L/IL-21, similarly promoted increased sharing of CDR3 sequences. TLR responsive B cells were characterized by more somatic hypermutation, shorter CDR3 segments, and less negative charges. TLR activation also induced long positively charged CDR3 segments, suggestive of autoreactive antibodies. Testing this, culture supernatants from TLR stimulated B cells were found to bind HEp-2 cells, while those from CD40L/IL-21 stimulated cells did not. Human B cells possess selective sensitivity to TLR stimulation, with distinctive phenotypic and genetic signatures. PMID:25740945

  6. Early Decision: Effector and Effector Memory T Cell Differentiation in Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Opata, Michael M.; Stephens, Robin

    2013-01-01

    As effector memory T cells (Tem) are the predominant population elicited by chronic parasitic infections, increasing our knowledge of their function, survival and derivation, as phenotypically and functionally distinct from central memory and effector T cells will be critical to vaccine development for these diseases. In some infections, memory T cells maintain increased effector functions, however; this may require the presence of continued antigen, which can also lead to T cell exhaustion. Alternatively, in the absence of antigen, only the increase in the number of memory cells remains, without enhanced functionality as central memory. In order to understand the requirement for antigen and the potential for longevity or protection, the derivation of each type of memory must be understood. A thorough review of the data establishes the existence of both memory (Tmem) precursors and effector T cells (Teff) from the first hours of an immune response. This suggests a new paradigm of Tmem differentiation distinct from the proposition that Tmem only appear after the contraction of Teff. Several signals have been shown to be important in the generation of memory T cells, such as the integrated strength of “signals 1-3” of antigen presentation (antigen receptor, co-stimulation, cytokines) as perceived by each T cell clone. Given that these signals integrated at antigen presentation cells have been shown to determine the outcome of Teff and Tmem phenotypes and numbers, this decision must be made at a very early stage. It would appear that the overwhelming expansion of effector T cells and the inability to phenotypically distinguish memory T cells at early time points has masked this important decision point. This does not rule out an effect of repeated stimulation or chronic inflammatory milieu on populations generated in these early stages. Recent studies suggest that Tmem are derived from early Teff, and we suggest that this includes Tem as well as Tcm. Therefore, we

  7. Memory CD4 T Cells Induce Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts.

    PubMed

    Gorbacheva, Victoria; Fan, Ran; Fairchild, Robert L; Baldwin, William M; Valujskikh, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression, antibody-mediated rejection is a serious threat to allograft survival. Alloreactive memory helper T cells can induce potent alloantibody responses and often associate with poor graft outcome. Nevertheless, the ability of memory T cells to elicit well characterized manifestations of antibody-mediated rejection has not been tested. We investigated helper functions of memory CD4 T cells in a mouse model of renal transplantation. Whereas the majority of unsensitized C57Bl/6 recipients spontaneously accepted fully MHC-mismatched A/J renal allografts, recipients containing donor-reactive memory CD4 T cells rapidly lost allograft function. Increased serum creatinine levels, high serum titers of donor-specific alloantibody, minimal T cell infiltration, and intense C4d deposition in the grafts of sensitized recipients fulfilled all diagnostic criteria for acute renal antibody-mediated rejection in humans. IFNγ neutralization did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells, and CD8 T cell depletion at the time of transplantation or depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells also did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells starting at day 4 after transplantation. However, B cell depletion inhibited alloantibody generation and significantly extended allograft survival, indicating that donor-specific alloantibodies (not T cells) were the critical effector mechanism of renal allograft rejection induced by memory CD4 T cells. Our studies provide direct evidence that recipient T cell sensitization may result in antibody-mediated rejection of renal allografts and introduce a physiologically relevant animal model with which to investigate mechanisms of antibody-mediated rejection and novel therapeutic approaches for its prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. The taming of the cell: shape-memory nanopatterns direct cell orientation

    PubMed Central

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Idota, Naokazu; Hoffman, John M; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    We report here that the direction of aligned cells on nanopatterns can be tuned to a perpendicular direction without use of any biochemical reagents. This was enabled by shape-memory activation of nanopatterns that transition from a memorized temporal pattern to the original permanent pattern by heating. The thermally induced shape-memory nanopatterns were prepared by chemically crosslinking semi-crystalline poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) in a mold to show shape-memory effects over its melting temperature (Tm = 33°C). Permanent surface patterns were first generated by crosslinking the PCL macromonomers in a mold, and temporary surface patterns were then embossed onto the permanent patterns. The temporary surface patterns could be easily triggered to transition quickly to the permanent surface patterns by a 37°C heat treatment, while surface wettability was independent of temperature. To investigate the role of dynamic and reversible surface nanopatterns on cell alignment on the PCL films before and after a topographic transition, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded on fibronectin-coated PCL films with a temporary grooved topography (grooves with a height of 300 nm and width of 2 μm were spaced 9 μm apart). Interestingly, cells did not change their direction immediately after the surface transition. However, cell alignment was gradually lost with time, and finally cells realigned parallel to the permanent grooves that emerged. The addition of a cytoskeletal inhibitor prevented realignment. These results clearly indicate that cells can sense dynamic changes in the surrounding environments and spontaneously adapt to a new environment by remodeling their cytoskeleton. These findings will serve as the basis for new development of spatiotemporal tunable materials to direct cell fate. PMID:24872707

  9. Induced Sézary syndrome PBMCs poorly express immune response genes up-regulated in stimulated memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Chong, Benjamin F; Dantzer, Patrick; Germeroth, Thomas; Hafner, Mikehl; Wilson, Adam J; Xiao, Guanghua; Wong, Henry K

    2010-10-01

    Dysfunctions in memory T cells contribute to various inflammatory autoimmune diseases and neoplasms. We hypothesize that investigating the differences of genetic profiles between resting and activated naïve and memory T cells may provide insight into the characterization of abnormal memory T cells in diseases, such as Sézary syndrome (SS), a neoplasm composed of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) cells. We determined genes distinctively expressed between resting and activated naive and memory cells. Levels of up-regulated genes in resting and activated memory cells were measured in SS PBMCs, which were largely comprised of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) cells, to quantitatively assess how different Sézary cells were from memory cells. We compared gene expression profiles using high-density oligo-microarrays between resting and activated naïve and memory CD4(+) T cells. Differentially expressed genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Levels of genes up-regulated in activated and resting memory T cells were determined in SS PBMCs by qRT-PCR. Activated memory cells expressed greater numbers of immune-mediated genes involved in effector function compared to naïve cells in our microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. Nine out of 14 genes with enhanced levels in activated memory cells had reduced levels in SS PBMCs (p<0.05). Activation of memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells revealed a diverging gap in gene expression between these subsets, with memory cells expressing immune-related genes important for effector function. Many of these genes were markedly depressed in SS patients, implying Sézary cells are markedly impaired in mounting immune responses compared to memory cells. Copyright © 2010 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Copper pillar and memory characteristics using Al2O3 switching material for 3D architecture.

    PubMed

    Maikap, Siddheswar; Panja, Rajeswar; Jana, Debanjan

    2014-01-01

    A novel idea by using copper (Cu) pillar is proposed in this study, which can replace the through-silicon-vias (TSV) technique in future three-dimensional (3D) architecture. The Cu pillar formation under external bias in an Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN structure is simple and low cost. The Cu pillar is formed in the Al2O3 film under a small operation voltage of <5 V and a high-current-carrying conductor of >70 mA is obtained. More than 100 devices have shown tight distribution of the Cu pillars in Al2O3 film for high current compliance (CC) of 70 mA. Robust read pulse endurances of >10(6) cycles are observed with read voltages of -1, 1, and 4 V. However, read endurance is failed with read voltages of -1.5, -2, and -4 V. By decreasing negative read voltage, the read endurance is getting worst, which is owing to ruptured Cu pillar. Surface roughness and TiO x N y on TiN bottom electrode are observed by atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN memory device shows good bipolar resistive switching behavior at a CC of 500 μA under small operating voltage of ±1 V and good data retention characteristics of >10(3) s with acceptable resistance ratio of >10 is also obtained. This suggests that high-current operation will help to form Cu pillar and lower-current operation will have bipolar resistive switching memory. Therefore, this new Cu/Al2O3/TiN structure will be benefited for 3D architecture in the future.

  11. Copper pillar and memory characteristics using Al2O3 switching material for 3D architecture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel idea by using copper (Cu) pillar is proposed in this study, which can replace the through-silicon-vias (TSV) technique in future three-dimensional (3D) architecture. The Cu pillar formation under external bias in an Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN structure is simple and low cost. The Cu pillar is formed in the Al2O3 film under a small operation voltage of <5 V and a high-current-carrying conductor of >70 mA is obtained. More than 100 devices have shown tight distribution of the Cu pillars in Al2O3 film for high current compliance (CC) of 70 mA. Robust read pulse endurances of >106 cycles are observed with read voltages of −1, 1, and 4 V. However, read endurance is failed with read voltages of −1.5, −2, and −4 V. By decreasing negative read voltage, the read endurance is getting worst, which is owing to ruptured Cu pillar. Surface roughness and TiO x N y on TiN bottom electrode are observed by atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The Al/Cu/Al2O3/TiN memory device shows good bipolar resistive switching behavior at a CC of 500 μA under small operating voltage of ±1 V and good data retention characteristics of >103 s with acceptable resistance ratio of >10 is also obtained. This suggests that high-current operation will help to form Cu pillar and lower-current operation will have bipolar resistive switching memory. Therefore, this new Cu/Al2O3/TiN structure will be benefited for 3D architecture in the future. PMID:25136279

  12. Cross-dressed dendritic cells drive memory CD8+ T-cell activation after viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wakim, Linda M; Bevan, Michael J

    2011-03-31

    After an infection, cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors proliferate and become effector cells by recognizing foreign peptides in the groove of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules expressed by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Professional APCs specialized for T-cell activation acquire viral antigen either by becoming infected themselves (direct presentation) or by phagocytosis of infected cells, followed by transfer of antigen to the cytosol, processing and MHC class I loading in a process referred to as cross-presentation. An alternative way, referred to as 'cross-dressing', by which an uninfected APC could present antigen was postulated to be by the transfer of preformed peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of an infected cell to the APC without the need of further processing. Here we show that this mechanism exists and boosts the antiviral response of mouse memory CD8(+) T cells. A number of publications have demonstrated sharing of peptide-loaded MHC molecules in vitro. Our in vitro experiments demonstrate that cross-dressing APCs do not acquire peptide-MHC complexes in the form of exosomes released by donor cells. Rather, the APCs and donor cells have to contact each other for the transfer to occur. After a viral infection, we could isolate cross-dressed APCs able to present viral antigen in vitro. Furthermore, using the diphtheria toxin system to selectively eliminate APCs that could only acquire viral peptide-MHC complexes by cross-dressing, we show that such presentation can promote the expansion of resting memory T cells. Notably, naive T cells were excluded from taking part in the response. Cross-dressing is a mechanism of antigen presentation used by dendritic cells that may have a significant role in activating previously primed CD8(+) T cells.

  13. Effects of drying temperature and ethanol concentration on bipolar switching characteristics of natural Aloe vera-based memory devices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Zhe Xi; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2015-10-28

    Extracted, formulated, and processed natural Aloe vera has been used as an active layer for memory applications. The functional memory device is realized by a bottom-up structure of ITO/Aloe vera/Al in which the Aloe vera is spin-coated after mixing with different concentrations of ethanol (0-80 wt%) and subsequently dried at different temperatures (50-120 °C). From the current density-voltage measurements, the device can exhibit a reproducible bipolar switching characteristic with pure Aloe vera dried at 50 °C. It is proposed that charges are transported across the Aloe vera layer via space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC), and clusters of interstitial space formed by the functional groups of acemannans and de-esterified pectins in the dried Aloe vera contribute to the memory effect. The formation of charge traps in the Aloe vera layer is dependent on the drying temperature. The drying temperature of a memory-switching Aloe vera layer can be extended to 120 °C with the addition of appropriate amounts of ethanol. The concept of using natural Aloe vera as an active material for memory applications has been demonstrated, and the read memory window, ON/OFF ratio, and retention time are approximately 5.0 V, 10(3), and >10(4) s, respectively.

  14. Memristive behavior in a junctionless flash memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orak, Ikram; Ürel, Mustafa; Bakan, Gokhan; Dana, Aykutlu

    2015-06-01

    We report charge storage based memristive operation of a junctionless thin film flash memory cell when it is operated as a two terminal device by grounding the gate. Unlike memristors based on nanoionics, the presented device mode, which we refer to as the flashristor mode, potentially allows greater control over the memristive properties, allowing rational design. The mode is demonstrated using a depletion type n-channel ZnO transistor grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), with HfO2 as the tunnel dielectric, Al2O3 as the control dielectric, and non-stoichiometric silicon nitride as the charge storage layer. The device exhibits the pinched hysteresis of a memristor and in the unoptimized device, Roff/Ron ratios of about 3 are presented with low operating voltages below 5 V. A simplified model predicts Roff/Ron ratios can be improved significantly by adjusting the native threshold voltage of the devices. The repeatability of the resistive switching is excellent and devices exhibit 106 s retention time, which can, in principle, be improved by engineering the gate stack and storage layer properties. The flashristor mode can find use in analog information processing applications, such as neuromorphic computing, where well-behaving and highly repeatable memristive properties are desirable.

  15. Memristive behavior in a junctionless flash memory cell

    SciTech Connect

    Orak, Ikram; Ürel, Mustafa; Dana, Aykutlu; Bakan, Gokhan

    2015-06-08

    We report charge storage based memristive operation of a junctionless thin film flash memory cell when it is operated as a two terminal device by grounding the gate. Unlike memristors based on nanoionics, the presented device mode, which we refer to as the flashristor mode, potentially allows greater control over the memristive properties, allowing rational design. The mode is demonstrated using a depletion type n-channel ZnO transistor grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), with HfO{sub 2} as the tunnel dielectric, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the control dielectric, and non-stoichiometric silicon nitride as the charge storage layer. The device exhibits the pinched hysteresis of a memristor and in the unoptimized device, R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratios of about 3 are presented with low operating voltages below 5 V. A simplified model predicts R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratios can be improved significantly by adjusting the native threshold voltage of the devices. The repeatability of the resistive switching is excellent and devices exhibit 10{sup 6 }s retention time, which can, in principle, be improved by engineering the gate stack and storage layer properties. The flashristor mode can find use in analog information processing applications, such as neuromorphic computing, where well-behaving and highly repeatable memristive properties are desirable.

  16. Organic electrical bistable devices and rewritable memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. P.; Liu, J.; Yang, Y.

    2002-04-01

    Electrical bistability is a phenomenon in which a device exhibits two states of different conductivities, at the same applied voltage. We report an organic electrical bistable device (OBD) comprising of a thin metal layer embedded within the organic material, as the active medium [L. P. Ma, J. Liu, and Y. Yang, US Patent Pending, (2001)]. The performance of this device makes it attractive for memory-cell type of applications. The two states of the OBD differ in their conductivity by several orders in magnitude and show remarkable stability, i.e., once the device reaches either state, it tends to remain in that state for a prolonged period of time. More importantly, the high and low conductivity states of an OBD can be precisely controlled by the application of a positive voltage pulse (to write) or a negative voltage pulse (to erase), respectively. One million writing-erasing cycles for the OBD have been tested in ambient conditions without significant device degradation. These discoveries pave the way for newer applications, such as low-cost, large-area, flexible, high-density, electrically addressable data storage devices.

  17. Scarcity of autoreactive human blood IgA(+) memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Prigent, Julie; Lorin, Valérie; Kök, Ayrin; Hieu, Thierry; Bourgeau, Salomé; Mouquet, Hugo

    2016-10-01

    Class-switched memory B cells are key components of the "reactive" humoral immunity, which ensures a fast and massive secretion of high-affinity antigen-specific antibodies upon antigenic challenge. In humans, IgA class-switched (IgA(+) ) memory B cells and IgA antibodies are abundant in the blood. Although circulating IgA(+) memory B cells and their corresponding secreted immunoglobulins likely possess major protective and/or regulatory immune roles, little is known about their specificity and function. Here, we show that IgA(+) and IgG(+) memory B-cell antibodies cloned from the same healthy humans share common immunoglobulin gene features. IgA and IgG memory antibodies have comparable lack of reactivity to vaccines, common mucosa-tropic viruses and commensal bacteria. However, the IgA(+) memory B-cell compartment contains fewer polyreactive clones and importantly, only rare self-reactive clones compared to IgG(+) memory B cells. Self-reactivity of IgAs is acquired following B-cell affinity maturation but not antibody class switching. Together, our data suggest the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for removing autoreactive clones from the IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B-cell repertoires, and/or different maturation pathways potentially reflecting the distinct nature and localization of the cognate antigens recognized by individual B-cell populations. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Telomere length dynamics in human memory T cells specific for viruses causing acute or latent infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Declining telomere length (TL) is associated with T cell senescence. While TL in naïve and memory T cells declines with increasing age, there is limited data on TL dynamics in virus-specific memory CD4+ T cells in healthy adults. We combined BrdU-labeling of virus-stimulated T cells followed with flow cytometry-fluorescent in situ hybridization for TL determination. We analyzed TL in T cells specific for several virus infections: non-recurring acute (vaccinia virus, VACV), recurring-acute (influenza A virus, IAV), and reactivating viruses (varicella-zoster virus, VZV, and cytomegalovirus, CMV) in 10 healthy subjects. Additionally, five subjects provided multiple blood samples separated by up to 10 years. Results VACV- and CMV-specific T cells had longer average TL than IAV-specific CD4+ T cells. Although most virus-specific cells were CD45RA-, we observed a minor population of BrdU+ CD45RA+ T cells characterized by long telomeres. Longitudinal analysis demonstrated a slow decline in average TL in virus-specific T cells. However, in one subject, VZV reactivation led to an increase in average TL in VZV-specific memory T cells, suggesting a conversion of longer TL cells from the naïve T cell repertoire. Conclusions TLs in memory CD4+ T cells in otherwise healthy adults are heterogeneous and follow distinct virus-specific kinetics. These findings suggests that the distribution of TL and the creation and maintenance of long TL memory T cells could be important for the persistence of long-lived T cell memory. PMID:23971624

  19. Tracking genetically engineered lymphocytes long-term reveals the dynamics of T cell immunological memory.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Giacomo; Ruggiero, Eliana; Stanghellini, Maria Teresa Lupo; Cieri, Nicoletta; D'Agostino, Mattia; D'Agostino, Mattio; Fronza, Raffaele; Lulay, Christina; Dionisio, Francesca; Mastaglio, Sara; Greco, Raffaella; Peccatori, Jacopo; Aiuti, Alessandro; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Biasco, Luca; Bondanza, Attilio; Lambiase, Antonio; Traversari, Catia; Vago, Luca; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2015-12-09

    Long-lasting immune protection from pathogens and cancer requires the generation of memory T cells able to survive long-term. To unravel the immunological requirements for long-term persistence of human memory T cells, we characterized and traced, over several years, T lymphocytes genetically modified to express the thymidine kinase (TK) suicide gene that were infused in 10 patients after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At 2 to 14 years after infusion and in the presence of a broad and resting immune system, we could still detect effectors/effector memory (TEM/EFF), central memory (TCM), and stem memory (TSCM) TK(+) cells, circulating at low but stable levels in all patients. Longitudinal analysis of cytomegalovirus (CMV)- and Flu-specific TK(+) cells indicated that antigen recognition was dominant in driving in vivo expansion and persistence at detectable levels. The amount of infused TSCM cells positively correlated with early expansion and with the absolute counts of long-term persisting gene-marked cells. By combining T cell sorting with sequencing of integration (IS), TCRα and TCRβ clonal markers, we showed that T cells retrieved long-term were enriched in clones originally shared in different memory T cell subsets, whereas dominant long-term clonotypes appeared to preferentially originate from infused TSCM and TCM clones. Together, these results indicate that long-term persistence of gene-modified memory T cells after haploidentical HSCT is influenced by antigen exposure and by the original phenotype of infused cells. Cancer adoptive immunotherapy might thus benefit from cellular products enriched in lymphocytes with an early-differentiated phenotype.

  20. Memory CD4+ T cells induce innate responses independently of pathogen.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Tara M; McKinstry, K Kai; Dibble, John P; Winchell, Caylin; Kuang, Yi; Curtis, Jonathan D; Huston, Gail; Dutton, Richard W; Swain, Susan L

    2010-05-01

    Inflammation induced by recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns markedly affects subsequent adaptive responses. We asked whether the adaptive immune system can also affect the character and magnitude of innate inflammatory responses. We found that the response of memory, but not naive, CD4(+) T cells enhances production of multiple innate inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IICs) in the lung and that, during influenza infection, this leads to early control of virus. Memory CD4(+) T cell-induced IICs and viral control require cognate antigen recognition and are optimal when memory cells are either T helper type 1 (T(H)1) or T(H)17 polarized but are independent of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and do not require activation of conserved pathogen recognition pathways. This represents a previously undescribed mechanism by which memory CD4(+) T cells induce an early innate response that enhances immune protection against pathogens.

  1. Memory CD4 T cell subsets are kinetically heterogeneous and replenished from naive T cells at high levels

    PubMed Central

    Gossel, Graeme; Hogan, Thea; Cownden, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Characterising the longevity of immunological memory requires establishing the rules underlying the renewal and death of peripheral T cells. However, we lack knowledge of the population structure and how self-renewal and de novo influx contribute to the maintenance of memory compartments. Here, we characterise the kinetics and structure of murine CD4 T cell memory subsets by measuring the rates of influx of new cells and using detailed timecourses of DNA labelling that also distinguish the behaviour of recently divided and quiescent cells. We find that both effector and central memory CD4 T cells comprise subpopulations with highly divergent rates of turnover, and show that inflows of new cells sourced from the naive pool strongly impact estimates of memory cell lifetimes and division rates. We also demonstrate that the maintenance of CD4 T cell memory subsets in healthy mice is unexpectedly and strikingly reliant on this replenishment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23013.001 PMID:28282024

  2. ECM components guide IL-10 producing regulatory T-cell (TR1) induction from effector memory T-cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Bollyky, Paul L; Wu, Rebecca P; Falk, Ben A; Lord, James D; Long, S Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Teng, Brandon; Holt, Gregory E; Standifer, Nathan E; Braun, Kathleen R; Xie, Cindy Fang; Samuels, Peter L; Vernon, Robert B; Gebe, John A; Wight, Thomas N; Nepom, Gerald T

    2011-05-10

    We describe a role for ECM as a biosensor for inflammatory microenvironments that plays a critical role in peripheral immune tolerance. We show that hyaluronan (HA) promotes induction of Foxp3- IL-10-producing regulatory T cells (TR1) from conventional T-cell precursors in both murine and human systems. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ECM component inducing regulatory T cells. Intact HA, characteristic of healing tissues, promotes induction of TR1 capable of abrogating disease in an IL-10-dependent mouse colitis model whereas fragmentary HA, typical of inflamed tissues, does not, indicating a decisive role for tissue integrity in this system. The TR1 precursor cells in this system are CD4(+)CD62L(-)FoxP3(-), suggesting that effector memory cells assume a regulatory phenotype when they encounter their cognate antigen in the context of intact HA. Matrix integrity cues might thereby play a central role in maintaining peripheral tolerance. This TR1 induction is mediated by CD44 cross-linking and signaling through p38 and ERK1/2. This induction is suppressed, also in a CD44-dependent manner, by osteopontin, a component of chronically inflamed ECM, indicating that CD44 signaling serves as a nexus for fate decisions regarding TR1 induction. Finally, we demonstrate that TR1 induction signals can be recapitulated using synthetic matrices. These results reveal important roles for the matrix microenvironment in immune regulation and suggest unique strategies for immunomodulation.

  3. Interleukin-2-Dependent Allergen-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory Cells Drive Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; An, Dowon; Schenkel, Jason M; Kim, Karen S; Steach, Holly R; Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Keitany, Gladys J; Garza, Esteban N; Fraser, Kathryn A; Moon, James J; Altemeier, William A; Masopust, David; Pepper, Marion

    2016-01-19

    Exposure to inhaled allergens generates T helper 2 (Th2) CD4(+) T cells that contribute to episodes of inflammation associated with asthma. Little is known about allergen-specific Th2 memory cells and their contribution to airway inflammation. We generated reagents to understand how endogenous CD4(+) T cells specific for a house dust mite (HDM) allergen form and function. After allergen exposure, HDM-specific memory cells persisted as central memory cells in the lymphoid organs and tissue-resident memory cells in the lung. Experimental blockade of lymphocyte migration demonstrated that lung-resident cells were sufficient to induce airway hyper-responsiveness, which depended upon CD4(+) T cells. Investigation into the differentiation of pathogenic Trm cells revealed that interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling was required for residency and directed a program of tissue homing migrational cues. These studies thus identify IL-2-dependent resident Th2 memory cells as drivers of lung allergic responses.

  4. Differences in Mouse and Human Non-Memory B Cell Pools1

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Abigail; Weldon, Abby J.; Tatosyan, Lynnette; Velkuru, Vani; Lee, Steve; Milford, Terry-Ann; Francis, Olivia L.; Hsu, Sheri; Nazeri, Kavoos; Casiano, Carlos M.; Schneider, Rebekah; Gonzalez, Jennifer; Su, Rui-Jun; Baez, Ineavely; Colburn, Keith; Moldovan, Ioana; Payne, Kimberly J.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying cross-species similarities and differences in immune development and function is critical for maximizing the translational potential of animal models. Co-expression of CD21 and CD24 distinguishes transitional and mature B cell subsets in mice. Here, we validate these markers for identifying analogous subsets in humans and use them to compare the non-memory B cell pools in mice and humans, across tissues, during fetal/neonatal and adult life. Among human CD19+IgM+ B cells, the CD21/CD24 schema identifies distinct populations that correspond to T1 (transitional 1), T2 (transitional 2), FM (follicular mature), and MZ (marginal zone) subsets identified in mice. Markers specific to human B cell development validate the identity of MZ cells and the maturation status of human CD21/CD24 non-memory B cell subsets. A comparison of the non-memory B cell pools in bone marrow (BM), blood, and spleen in mice and humans shows that transitional B cells comprise a much smaller fraction in adult humans than mice. T1 cells are a major contributor to the non-memory B cell pool in mouse BM where their frequency is more than twice that in humans. Conversely, in spleen the T1:T2 ratio shows that T2 cells are proportionally ∼8 fold higher in humans than mouse. Despite the relatively small contribution of transitional B cells to the human non-memory pool, the number of naïve FM cells produced per transitional B cell is 3-6 fold higher across tissues than in mouse. These data suggest differing dynamics or mechanisms produce the non-memory B cell compartments in mice and humans. PMID:24719464

  5. Targeting HIV latency: resting memory T cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Nadia T.; Collins, Kathleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Current therapy for HIV effectively suppresses viral replication and prolongs life, but the infection persists due, at least in part, to latent infection of long-lived cells. One favored strategy towards a cure targets latent virus in resting memory CD4+ T cells by stimulating viral production. However, the existence of an additional reservoir in bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells has been detected in some treated HIV-infected people. This review describes approaches investigators have used to reactivate latent proviral genomes in resting CD4+ T cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, we review approaches for clearance of these reservoirs along with other important topics related to HIV eradication. PMID:25189526

  6. A radiation-hardened two transistor memory cell for monolithic active pixel sensors in STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.; Gao, D.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation tolerance of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) is dramatically decreased when intellectual property (IP) memories are integrated for fast readout application. This paper presents a new solution to improve radiation hardness and avoid latch-up for memory cell design. The tradeoffs among radiation tolerance, area and speed are significantly considered and analyzed. The cell designed in 0.35 μm process satisfies the radiation tolerance requirements of STAR experiment. The cell size is 4.55 × 5.45 μm2. This cell is smaller than the IP memory cell based on the same process and is only 26% of a radiation tolerant 6T SRAM cell used in previous contribution. The write access time of the cell is less than 2 ns, while the read access time is 80 ns.

  7. Distinct Effects of Saracatinib on Memory CD8+ T-cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Shinji; Sabzevari, Helen; Farsaci, Benedetto; Schlom, Jeffrey; Greiner, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Immunologic memory involving CD8+ T-cells is a hallmark of an adaptive antigen-specific immune response and comprises a critical component of protective immunity. Designing approaches that enhance long-term T-cell memory would, for the most part, fortify vaccines and enhance host protection against infectious diseases and, perhaps, cancer immunotherapy. A better understanding of the cellular programs involved in the antigen-specific T-cell response has led to new approaches that target the magnitude and quality of the memory T-cell response. Here we show that T-cells from T-cell receptor transgenic mice for the nucleoprotein of influenza virus NP68 exhibit the distinct phases priming, expansion, contraction, memory - of an antigen-specific T-cell response when exposed in vitro to the cognate peptide. Saracatinib, a specific inhibitor of Src family kinases, administered at low doses during the expansion or contraction phases, increased CD62Lhigh/CD44high central memory CD8+ T-cells and IFN-γ production, while suppressing immunity when added during the priming phase. These effects by saracatinib were not accompanied by the expected decline of Src family kinases, but were accompanied by Akt-mTOR suppression and/or mediated via another pathway. Increased central memory cells by saracatinib were recapitulated in mice using a poxvirus-based influenza vaccine, thus underscoring the importance of dose and timing of the inhibitor in the context of memory T-cell differentiation. Finally, vaccine plus saracatinib treatment showed better protection against tumor challenge. The immune-potentiating effects on CD8+ T-cells by a low dose of saracatinib might afford better protection from pathogen or cancer when combined with vaccine. PMID:22450814

  8. Effect of electrode material on characteristics of non-volatile resistive memory consisting of Ag2S nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Ag2S nanoparticles are synthesized and used as the active material for two-terminal resistance switching memory devices. Sintered Ag2S films are successfully crystallized on plastic substrates with synthesized Ag2S nanoparticles, after a relatively low-temperature sintering process (200 °C). After the sintering process, the crystallite size is increased from 6.8 nm to 80.3 nm. The high ratio of surface atoms to inner atoms of nanoparticles reduces the melting point temperature, deciding the sintering process temperature. In order to investigate the resistance switching characteristics, metal/Ag2S/metal structures are fabricated and tested. The effect of the electrode material on the non-volatile resistive memory characteristics is studied. The bottom electrochemically inert materials, such as Au and Pt, were critical for maintaining stable memory characteristics. By using Au and Pt inert bottom electrodes, we are able to significantly improve the memory endurance and retention to more than 103 cycles and 104 sec, respectively.

  9. Effect of electrode material on characteristics of non-volatile resistive memory consisting of Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-07-15

    In this study, Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles are synthesized and used as the active material for two-terminal resistance switching memory devices. Sintered Ag{sub 2}S films are successfully crystallized on plastic substrates with synthesized Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles, after a relatively low-temperature sintering process (200 °C). After the sintering process, the crystallite size is increased from 6.8 nm to 80.3 nm. The high ratio of surface atoms to inner atoms of nanoparticles reduces the melting point temperature, deciding the sintering process temperature. In order to investigate the resistance switching characteristics, metal/Ag{sub 2}S/metal structures are fabricated and tested. The effect of the electrode material on the non-volatile resistive memory characteristics is studied. The bottom electrochemically inert materials, such as Au and Pt, were critical for maintaining stable memory characteristics. By using Au and Pt inert bottom electrodes, we are able to significantly improve the memory endurance and retention to more than 10{sup 3} cycles and 10{sup 4} sec, respectively.

  10. A 2-bit/Cell Gate-All-Around Flash Memory of Self-Assembled Silicon Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hung-Bin; Chang, Chun-Yen; Hung, Min-Feng; Tang, Zih-Yun; Cheng, Ya-Chi; Wu, Yung-Chun

    2013-02-01

    This work presents gate-all-around (GAA) polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) nanowires (NWs) channel poly-Si/SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2/poly-Si (SONOS) nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a self-assembled Si nanocrystal (Si-NC) embedded charge trapping (CT) layer. Fabrication of the Si-NCs is simple and compatible with the current flash process. The 2-bit operations based on channel hot electrons injection for programming and channel hot holes injection for erasing are clearly achieved by the localized discrete trap. In the programming and erasing characteristics studies, the GAA structure can effectively reduce operation voltage and shorten pulse time. One-bit programming or erasing does not affect the other bit. In the high-temperature retention characteristics studies, the cell embedded with Si-NCs shows excellent electrons confinement vertically and laterally. With respect to endurance characteristics, the memory window does not undergo closure after 104 program/erase (P/E) cycle stress. The 2-bit operation for GAA Si-NCs NVM provides scalability, reliability and flexibility in three-dimensional (3D) high-density flash memory applications.

  11. A stochastic model of chromatin modification: cell population coding of winter memory in plants.

    PubMed

    Satake, Akiko; Iwasa, Yoh

    2012-06-07

    Biological memory, a sustained cellular response to a transient stimulus, has been found in many natural systems. The best example in plants is the winter memory by which plants can flower in favorable conditions in spring. For this winter memory, epigenetic regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), which acts as a floral repressor, plays a key role. Exposure to prolonged periods of cold results in the gradual suppression of FLC, which allows plants to measure the length of cold and to flower only after a sufficiently long winter. Although many genes involved in histone modifications have been isolated, molecular mechanisms of winter memory are not well understood. Here, we develop a model for chromatin modification, in which the dynamics of a single nucleosome are aggregated to on/off behavior of FLC expression at the cellular level and further integrated to a change of FLC expression at the whole-plant level. We propose cell-population coding of winter memory: each cell is described as a bistable system that shows heterogeneous timing of the transition from on to off in FLC expression under cold and measures the length of cold as the proportion of cells in the off state. This mechanism well explains robust FLC regulation and stable inheritance of winter memory after cell division in response to noisy signals. Winter memory lasts longer if deposition of the repressive histone mark occurs faster. A difference in deposition speed would discriminate between stable maintenance of FLC repression in annuals and transient expression in perennials.

  12. Aging promotes acquisition of naive-like CD8+ memory T cell traits and enhanced functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Bennett; Nguyen, Tom; Victorino, Francisco; Haist, Kelsey; Jhun, Kevin; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Hunter, Lawrence; Kedl, Ross; Clambey, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Protective T cell memory is an acquired trait that is contingent upon the preservation of its constituents and therefore vulnerable to the potentially deleterious effects of organismal aging. Here, however, we have found that long-term T cell memory in a natural murine host-pathogen system can substantially improve over time. Comprehensive molecular, phenotypic, and functional profiling of aging antiviral CD8+ memory T cells (CD8+ TM) revealed a pervasive remodeling process that promotes the gradual acquisition of distinct molecular signatures, of increasingly homogeneous phenotypes, and of diversified functionalities that combine to confer a CD8+ TM–autonomous capacity for enhanced recall responses and immune protection. Notably, the process of CD8+ TM aging is characterized by a progressive harmonization of memory and naive T cell traits, is broadly amenable to experimental acceleration or retardation, and serves as a constitutional component for the “rebound model” of memory T cell maturation. By casting CD8+ TM populations within the temporal framework of their slowly evolving properties, this model establishes a simple ontogenetic perspective on the principal organization of CD8+ T cell memory that may directly inform the development of improved diagnostic, prophylactic, and therapeutic modalities. PMID:27617858

  13. Atypical and classical memory B cells produce Plasmodium falciparum neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Muellenbeck, Matthias F.; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Amulic, Borko; Epp, Alexandra; Fenyo, David; Busse, Christian E.; Esen, Meral; Theisen, Michael; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies can protect from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection and clinical malaria disease. However, in the absence of constant reexposure, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels rapidly decline and full protection from clinical symptoms is lost, suggesting that B cell memory is functionally impaired. We show at the single cell level that natural Pf infection induces the development of classical memory B cells (CM) and atypical memory B cells (AtM) that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies against blood stage Pf parasites. CM and AtM contribute to anti-Pf serum IgG production, but only AtM show signs of active antibody secretion. AtM and CM were also different in their IgG gene repertoire, suggesting that they develop from different precursors. The findings provide direct evidence that natural Pf infection leads to the development of protective memory B cell antibody responses and suggest that constant immune activation rather than impaired memory function leads to the accumulation of AtM in malaria. Understanding the memory B cell response to natural Pf infection may be key to the development of a malaria vaccine that induces long-lived protection. PMID:23319701

  14. Inhibition of TGF-β1 Signaling Promotes Central Memory T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Shinji; Schlom, Jeffrey; Tucker, Joanne; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Greiner, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study affirmed that isolated CD8+ T cells express mRNA and produce TGF-β following cognate peptide recognition. Blockage of endogenous TGF-β with either a TGF-β-blocking antibody or a small molecule inhibitor of TGF-βRI enhances the generation of CD62Lhigh/CD44high central memory CD8+ T cells accompanied with a robust recall response. Interestingly, the augmentation within the central memory T cell pool occurs in lieu of cellular proliferation or activation, but with the expected increase in the ratio of the Eomes/T-bet transcriptional factors. Yet, the signal transduction pathway(s) seems to be non-canonical, independent of SMAD or mTOR signaling. Enhancement of central memory generation by TGF-β blockade is also confirmed in human PBMCs. The findings underscore the role(s) that autocrine TGF-β plays in T cell homeostasis and, in particular, the balance of effector/memory and central/memory T cells. These results may provide a rationale to targeting TGF-β signaling to enhance antigen-specific CD8+ T cell memory against a lethal infection or cancer. PMID:23904158

  15. Aging promotes acquisition of naive-like CD8+ memory T cell traits and enhanced functionalities.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Jens; Davenport, Bennett; Nguyen, Tom; Victorino, Francisco; Haist, Kelsey; Jhun, Kevin; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Hunter, Lawrence; Kedl, Ross; Clambey, Eric T; Homann, Dirk

    2016-10-03

    Protective T cell memory is an acquired trait that is contingent upon the preservation of its constituents and therefore vulnerable to the potentially deleterious effects of organismal aging. Here, however, we have found that long-term T cell memory in a natural murine host-pathogen system can substantially improve over time. Comprehensive molecular, phenotypic, and functional profiling of aging antiviral CD8+ memory T cells (CD8+ TM) revealed a pervasive remodeling process that promotes the gradual acquisition of distinct molecular signatures, of increasingly homogeneous phenotypes, and of diversified functionalities that combine to confer a CD8+ TM-autonomous capacity for enhanced recall responses and immune protection. Notably, the process of CD8+ TM aging is characterized by a progressive harmonization of memory and naive T cell traits, is broadly amenable to experimental acceleration or retardation, and serves as a constitutional component for the "rebound model" of memory T cell maturation. By casting CD8+ TM populations within the temporal framework of their slowly evolving properties, this model establishes a simple ontogenetic perspective on the principal organization of CD8+ T cell memory that may directly inform the development of improved diagnostic, prophylactic, and therapeutic modalities.

  16. Functional classification of memory CD8(+) T cells by CX3CR1 expression.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Jan P; Beyer, Marc; Meissner, Felix; Abdullah, Zeinab; Sander, Jil; Höchst, Bastian; Eickhoff, Sarah; Rieckmann, Jan C; Russo, Caroline; Bauer, Tanja; Flecken, Tobias; Giesen, Dominik; Engel, Daniel; Jung, Steffen; Busch, Dirk H; Protzer, Ulrike; Thimme, Robert; Mann, Matthias; Kurts, Christian; Schultze, Joachim L; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Knolle, Percy A

    2015-09-25

    Localization of memory CD8(+) T cells to lymphoid or peripheral tissues is believed to correlate with proliferative capacity or effector function. Here we demonstrate that the fractalkine-receptor/CX3CR1 distinguishes memory CD8(+) T cells with cytotoxic effector function from those with proliferative capacity, independent of tissue-homing properties. CX3CR1-based transcriptome and proteome-profiling defines a core signature of memory CD8(+) T cells with effector function. We find CD62L(hi)CX3CR1(+) memory T cells that reside within lymph nodes. This population shows distinct migration patterns and positioning in proximity to pathogen entry sites. Virus-specific CX3CR1(+) memory CD8(+) T cells are scarce during chronic infection in humans and mice but increase when infection is controlled spontaneously or by therapeutic intervention. This CX3CR1-based functional classification will help to resolve the principles of protective CD8(+) T-cell memory.

  17. Functional classification of memory CD8+ T cells by CX3CR1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Jan P.; Beyer, Marc; Meissner, Felix; Abdullah, Zeinab; Sander, Jil; Höchst, Bastian; Eickhoff, Sarah; Rieckmann, Jan C.; Russo, Caroline; Bauer, Tanja; Flecken, Tobias; Giesen, Dominik; Engel, Daniel; Jung, Steffen; Busch, Dirk H.; Protzer, Ulrike; Thimme, Robert; Mann, Matthias; Kurts, Christian; Schultze, Joachim L.; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Knolle, Percy A.

    2015-01-01

    Localization of memory CD8+ T cells to lymphoid or peripheral tissues is believed to correlate with proliferative capacity or effector function. Here we demonstrate that the fractalkine-receptor/CX3CR1 distinguishes memory CD8+ T cells with cytotoxic effector function from those with proliferative capacity, independent of tissue-homing properties. CX3CR1-based transcriptome and proteome-profiling defines a core signature of memory CD8+ T cells with effector function. We find CD62LhiCX3CR1+ memory T cells that reside within lymph nodes. This population shows distinct migration patterns and positioning in proximity to pathogen entry sites. Virus-specific CX3CR1+ memory CD8+ T cells are scarce during chronic infection in humans and mice but increase when infection is controlled spontaneously or by therapeutic intervention. This CX3CR1-based functional classification will help to resolve the principles of protective CD8+ T-cell memory. PMID:26404698

  18. Limited clonal relatedness between gut IgA plasma cells and memory B cells after oral immunization

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, Mats; Hazanov, Helena; Strömberg, Anneli; Komban, Rathan; Holmqvist, Joel; Köster, Sofia; Mattsson, Johan; Sikora, Per; Mehr, Ramit; Lycke, Nils Y.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how memory B cells are induced and relate to long-lived plasma cells is important for vaccine development. Immunity to oral vaccines has been considered short-lived because of a poor ability to develop IgA B-cell memory. Here we demonstrate that long-lived mucosal IgA memory is readily achieved by oral but not systemic immunization in mouse models with NP hapten conjugated with cholera toxin and transfer of B1-8high/GFP+ NP-specific B cells. Unexpectedly, memory B cells are poorly related to long-lived plasma cells and less affinity-matured. They are α4β7-integrin+CD73+PD-L2+CD80+ and at systemic sites mostly IgM+, while 80% are IgA+ in Peyer's patches. On reactivation, most memory B cells in Peyer's patches are GL7−, but expand in germinal centres and acquire higher affinity and more mutations, demonstrating strong clonal selection. CCR9 expression is found only in Peyer's patches and appears critical for gut homing. Thus, gut mucosal memory possesses unique features not seen after systemic immunization. PMID:27596266

  19. γδ T cells exhibit multifunctional and protective memory in intestinal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Brian S.; Romagnoli, Pablo A.; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Fu, Han-Hsuan; Alonzo, Francis; Schubert, Wolf-Dieter; Freitag, Nancy E.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Summary The study of T cell memory and the target of vaccine design has focused on memory subsumed by T cells bearing the αβ T cell receptor. Alternatively, γδ T cells are thought to provide rapid immunity particularly at mucosal borders. Here we have shown that a distinct subset of mucosal γδ T cells mounts an immune response to oral Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) infection leading to the development of multifunctional memory T cells in the murine intestinal mucosa that is capable of simultaneously producing interferon-γ and interleukin-17A. Challenge infection with oral Lm, but not oral Salmonella or intravenous Lm, induced rapid expansion of memory γδ T cells suggesting contextual specificity to the priming pathogen. Importantly, memory γδ T cells were able to provide enhanced protection against infection. These findings illustrate a previously unrecognized role for γδ T cells with hallmarks of adaptive immunity in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23890071

  20. Target morphology and cell memory: a model of regenerative pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Bessonov, Nikolai; Levin, Michael; Morozova, Nadya; Reinberg, Natalia; Tosenberger, Alen; Volpert, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of work on molecular components required for regenerative repair, we still lack a deep understanding of the ability of some animal species to regenerate their appropriate complex anatomical structure following damage. A key question is how regenerating systems know when to stop growth and remodeling – what mechanisms implement recognition of correct morphology that signals a stop condition? In this work, we review two conceptual models of pattern regeneration that implement a kind of pattern memory. In the first one, all cells communicate with each other and keep the value of the total signal received from the other cells. If a part of the pattern is amputated, the signal distribution changes. The difference fromthe original signal distribution stimulates cell proliferation and leads to pattern regeneration, in effect implementing an error minimization process that uses signaling memory to achieve pattern correction. In the second model, we consider a more complex pattern organization with different cell types. Each tissue contains a central (coordinator) cell that controls the tissue and communicates with the other central cells. Each of them keeps memory about the signals received from other central cells. The values of these signals depend on the mutual cell location, and the memory allows regeneration of the structure when it is modified. The purpose of these models is to suggest possible mechanisms of pattern regeneration operating on the basis of cell memory which are compatible with diverse molecular implementation mechanisms within specific organisms. PMID:26889161

  1. Frequency of beryllium-specific, central memory CD4+ T cells in blood determines proliferative response

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Andrew P.; Palmer, Brent E.; Sullivan, Andrew K.; Joslin, Fenneke G.; Wilson, Cara C.; Maier, Lisa A.; Newman, Lee S.; Kotzin, Brian L.

    2005-01-01

    Beryllium exposure can lead to the development of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells and chronic beryllium disease (CBD), which is characterized by the presence of lung granulomas and a CD4+ T cell alveolitis. Studies have documented the presence of proliferating and cytokine-secreting CD4+ T cells in blood of CBD patients after beryllium stimulation. However, some patients were noted to have cytokine-secreting CD4+ T cells in blood in the absence of beryllium-induced proliferation, and overall, the correlation between the 2 types of responses was poor. We hypothesized that the relative proportion of memory T cell subsets determined antigen-specific proliferation. In most CBD patients, the majority of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in blood expressed an effector memory T cell maturation phenotype. However, the ability of blood cells to proliferate in the presence of beryllium strongly correlated with the fraction expressing a central memory T cell phenotype. In addition, we found a direct correlation between the percentage of beryllium-specific CD4+ TEM cells in blood and T cell lymphocytosis in the lung. Together, these findings indicate that the functional capability of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is determined by the relative proportion of memory T cell subsets, which may reflect internal organ involvement. PMID:16151531

  2. Distinct effects of saracatinib on memory CD8+ T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shinji; Sabzevari, Helen; Farsaci, Benedetto; Schlom, Jeffrey; Greiner, John W

    2012-05-01

    Immunologic memory involving CD8(+) T cells is a hallmark of an adaptive Ag-specific immune response and constitutes a critical component of protective immunity. Designing approaches that enhance long-term T cell memory would, for the most part, fortify vaccines and enhance host protection against infectious diseases and, perhaps, cancer immunotherapy. A better understanding of the cellular programs involved in the Ag-specific T cell response has led to new approaches that target the magnitude and quality of the memory T cell response. In this article, we show that T cells from TCR transgenic mice for the nucleoprotein of influenza virus NP68 exhibit the distinct phases--priming, expansion, contraction, and memory--of an Ag-specific T cell response when exposed in vitro to the cognate peptide. Saracatinib, a specific inhibitor of Src family kinases, administered at low doses during the expansion or contraction phases, increased CD62L(high)/CD44(high) central memory CD8(+) T cells and IFN-γ production but suppressed immunity when added during the priming phase. These effects by saracatinib were not accompanied by the expected decline of Src family kinases but were accompanied by Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin suppression and/or mediated via another pathway. Increased central memory cells by saracatinib were recapitulated in mice using a poxvirus-based influenza vaccine, thus underscoring the importance of dose and timing of the inhibitor in the context of memory T cell differentiation. Finally, vaccine plus saracatinib treatment showed better protection against tumor challenge. The immune-potentiating effects on CD8(+) T cells by a low dose of saracatinib might afford better protection from pathogens or cancer when combined with vaccine.

  3. Clinical characteristics of adults reporting repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Perlman, Carol A; Ristuccia, Carel S; Clancy, Susan A

    2006-04-01

    The authors assessed women and men who either reported continuous memories of their childhood sexual abuse (CSA, n = 92), reported recovering memories of CSA (n = 38), reported believing they harbored repressed memories of CSA (n = 42), or reported never having been sexually abused (n = 36). Men and women were indistinguishable on all clinical and psychometric measures. The 3 groups that reported abuse scored similarly on measures of anxiety, depression, dissociation, and absorption. These groups also scored higher than the control group. Inconsistent with betrayal trauma theory, recovered memory participants were not more likely to report abuse by a parent or stepparent than were continuous memory participants. Rates of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder did not differ between the continuous and recovered memory groups. Copyright 2006 APA

  4. Adaptive Memory of Human NK-like CD8(+) T-Cells to Aging, and Viral and Tumor Antigens.

    PubMed

    Pita-López, María Luisa; Pera, Alejandra; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK)-like CD8(+) T-cells are singular T-cells that express both T and NK cell markers such as CD56; their frequencies depend on their differentiation and activation during their lifetime. There is evidence of the presence of these innate CD8(+) T-cells in the human umbilical cord, highlighting the necessity of investigating whether the NK-like CD8(+) T-cells arise in the early stages of life (gestation). Based on the presence of cell surface markers, these cells have also been referred to as CD8(+)KIR(+) T-cells, innate CD8(+) T-cells, CD8(+)CD28(-)KIR(+) T-cells or NKT-like CD8(+)CD56(+) cells. However, the functional and co-signaling significance of these NK cell receptors on NK-like CD8(+) T-cells is less clear. Also, the diverse array of costimulatory and co-inhibitory receptors are spatially and temporally regulated and may have distinct overlapping functions on NK-like CD8(+) T-cell priming, activation, differentiation, and memory responses associated with different cell phenotypes. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the functional properties and phenotypic characterization of human NK-like CD8(+) T-cells. Environmental factors, such as aging, autoimmunity, inflammation, viral antigen re-exposure, or the presence of persistent tumor antigens have been shown to allow differentiation ("adaptation") of the NK-like CD8(+) T-cells; the elucidation of this differentiation process and a greater understanding of the characteristics of these cells could be important for their eventual in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity. This review will attempt to elucidate an understanding of the characteristics of these cells with the goal toward their eventual use in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity.

  5. Adaptive Memory of Human NK-like CD8+ T-Cells to Aging, and Viral and Tumor Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pita-López, María Luisa; Pera, Alejandra; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK)-like CD8+ T-cells are singular T-cells that express both T and NK cell markers such as CD56; their frequencies depend on their differentiation and activation during their lifetime. There is evidence of the presence of these innate CD8+ T-cells in the human umbilical cord, highlighting the necessity of investigating whether the NK-like CD8+ T-cells arise in the early stages of life (gestation). Based on the presence of cell surface markers, these cells have also been referred to as CD8+KIR+ T-cells, innate CD8+ T-cells, CD8+CD28−KIR+ T-cells or NKT-like CD8+CD56+ cells. However, the functional and co-signaling significance of these NK cell receptors on NK-like CD8+ T-cells is less clear. Also, the diverse array of costimulatory and co-inhibitory receptors are spatially and temporally regulated and may have distinct overlapping functions on NK-like CD8+ T-cell priming, activation, differentiation, and memory responses associated with different cell phenotypes. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the functional properties and phenotypic characterization of human NK-like CD8+ T-cells. Environmental factors, such as aging, autoimmunity, inflammation, viral antigen re-exposure, or the presence of persistent tumor antigens have been shown to allow differentiation (“adaptation”) of the NK-like CD8+ T-cells; the elucidation of this differentiation process and a greater understanding of the characteristics of these cells could be important for their eventual in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity. This review will attempt to elucidate an understanding of the characteristics of these cells with the goal toward their eventual use in potential therapeutic applications aimed at improving protective immunity. PMID:28066426

  6. Quantum Dot Channel (QDC) Field Effect Transistors (FETs) and Floating Gate Nonvolatile Memory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, J.; Lingalugari, M.; Chan, P.-Y.; Heller, E.; Jain, F.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents silicon quantum dot channel (QDC) field effect transistors (FETs) and floating gate nonvolatile memory structures. The QDC-FET operation is explained by carrier transport in narrow mini-energy bands which are manifested in an array of SiO x -cladded silicon quantum dot layers. For nonvolatile memory structures, simulations of electron charge densities in the floating quantum dot layers are presented. Experimental threshold voltage shift in I D- V G characteristics is presented after the `Write' cycle. The QDC-FETs and nonvolatile memory due to improved threshold voltage variations by incorporating the lattice-matched II-VI layer as the gate insulator.

  7. Do Negative Affect Characteristics and Subjective Memory Concerns Increase Risk for Late Life Anxiety?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Chelsey M.; Wilson, Helen W.; Woodard, John L.; Calamari, John E.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the development and exacerbation of late-life anxiety, we tested a risk model positing that trait negative affect (NA) characteristics would interact with cognitive functioning, thereby increasing some older adults’ risk for increased anxiety symptoms. The moderator-mediator model consisted of measures of NA, cognitive functioning, and their interaction, as predictors of later Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale scores (HARS) via a mediational process, subjective memory concerns (SMCs). Older adults (aged 65-years and over; Mage = 76.7 years, SD = 6.90 years) completed evaluations four times over approximately 18 months. A latent growth curve model including Anxiety Sensitivity Index total score (ASI), Mattis Dementia Rating Scale-2 (DRS) total raw score, the ASI x DRS interaction, a SMC measure as mediator, HARS intercept (scores at times 3 and 4), and HARS slope provided good fit The ASI x DRS-2 interaction at Time 1 predicted HARS slope score (β = −.34, p <.05). When ASI score was high, stronger cognitive functioning was associated with fewer anxiety symptoms. The indirect effect of ASI score predicting HARS score 18-months later through the SMC mediator was statistically significant (β = .08, p < .05). Results suggest that the cognitive functioning changes associated with aging might contribute to the development of anxiety symptoms in older adults with specific NA traits. Implications for predicting and preventing late life anxiety disorders are discussed. PMID:23623610

  8. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E

    2015-06-11

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures.

  9. Evaluating the ductility characteristics of self-centering buckling-restrained shape memory alloy braces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Elfath, Hamdy

    2017-05-01

    Recently, self-centering earthquake resistant systems have attracted attention because of their promising potential in controlling the residual drifts and reducing repair costs after earthquake events. Considerable portion of self-centering research is based on using short-segment superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) braces as strengthening technique because of the lower modulus of elasticity of SMA in comparison with that of steel. The goal of this study is to investigate the ductility characteristics of these newly proposed short-segment SMA braces to evaluate their safety levels against fracture failures under earthquake loading. This goal has been achieved by selecting an appropriate seismic performance criterion for steel frames equipped with SMA braces, defining the level of strain capacity of SMA and calculating the strain demands in the SMA braces by conducting a series of pushover and earthquake time history analyzes on typical frame structure. The results obtained in this study indicated the inability of short-segment SMA designs to provide adequate ductility to the lateral resistant systems. An alternative approach is introduced by using hybrid steel-SMA braces that are capable of controlling the residual drifts and providing the structure with adequate lateral stiffness.

  10. Characteristics of spaceborne cooler passive vibration isolator by using a compressed shape memory alloy mesh washer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyun-Ung; Kwon, Seong-Cheol; Youn, Se-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic coolers produce undesirable micro-vibrations during on-orbit operation, which may seriously affect the image quality of high-resolution observation satellites. Micro-vibrations can be easily isolated by mounting the cooler on a vibration isolator with low stiffness to attenuate the vibration transmitted to the satellite structure. However, the structural safety of a cooler supported by an isolator with low stiffness cannot be guaranteed under the much more severe vibration condition of a launch environment. In this study, to guarantee vibration isolation performance in a launch environment while effectively isolating the micro-vibrations from the cooler on-orbit, a new type of passive vibration isolation system by using a compressed shape memory alloy mesh washer was proposed and investigated. The basic characteristics of the isolator were measured in static and free vibration tests of the isolator, and a simple equivalent model of the isolator was proposed. The effectiveness of the isolator design in a launch environment was demonstrated through sine vibration, random vibration, and shock tests.

  11. Neem leaf glycoprotein generates superior tumor specific central memory CD8(+) T cells than cyclophosphamide that averts post-surgery solid sarcoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2017-08-03

    The success of cancer vaccines is limited as most of them induce corrupted CD8(+) T cell memory populations. We reported earlier that a natural immunomodulator, neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP), therapeutically restricts tumor growth in a CD8(+) T cell-dependent manner. Here, our objective is to study whether memory CD8(+) T cell population is generated in sarcoma hosts after therapeutic NLGP treatment and their role in prevention of post-surgery tumor recurrence, in comparison to the immunostimulatory metronomic cyclophosphamide (CTX) treatment. We found that therapeutic NLGP and CTX treatment generates central memory CD8(+) T (TCM) cells with characteristic CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high)IL-2(high) phenotypes. But these TCM cells are functionally impaired to prevent re-appearance of tumors along with compromised proliferative, IL-2 secretive and cytotoxic status. This might be due to the presence of tumor load, even a small one in the host, which serves as a persistent source of tumor antigens thereby corrupting the TCM cells so generated. Surgical removal of the persisting tumors from the host restored the functional characteristics of memory CD8(+) T cells, preventing tumor recurrence after surgery till end of the experiment. Moreover, we observed that generation of superior TCM cells in NLGP treated surgically removed tumor hosts is related to the activation of Wnt signalling in memory CD8(+) T cells with concomitant inhibition of GSK-3β and stabilisation of β-catenin, which ultimately activates transcription of Wnt target genes, like, eomesodermin, a signature molecule of CD8(+) TCM cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Peripheral CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells are differentiated effector memory cells with antiviral functions.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Michelina; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Chiriboga, Luis; Kleiner, David E; Rehermann, Barbara

    2004-07-15

    Although an increased frequency of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells has been observed in the peripheral blood during viral infections, their role, function, and biologic significance are still poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the circulating CD4(+)CD8(+) T-cell population contains mature effector memory lymphocytes specific for antigens of multiple past, latent, and high-level persistent viral infections. Upon in vitro antigenic challenge, a higher frequency of CD4(+)CD8(+) than single-positive cells displayed a T helper 1/T cytotoxic 1 (Th1/Tc1) cytokine profile and proliferated. Ex vivo, more double-positive than single-positive cells exhibited a differentiated phenotype. Accordingly, their lower T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC) content and shorter telomeres proved they had divided more frequently than single-positive cells. Consistent with expression of the tissue-homing marker CXCR3, CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells were demonstrated in situ at the site of persistent viral infection (ie, in the liver during chronic hepatitis C). Finally, a prospective analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in a chimpanzee, the only animal model for HCV infection, showed a close correlation between the frequency of activated CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells and viral kinetics. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that peripheral CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells take part in the adaptive immune response against infectious pathogens and broaden the perception of the T-cell populations involved in antiviral immune responses.

  13. Nature of "memory" in T-cell-mediated antibacterial immunity: anamnestic production of mediator T cells.

    PubMed Central

    North, R J

    1975-01-01

    Mice that survived an immunizing infection with Listeria monocytogenes remained specifically resistant to lethal secondary infection for several months. This acquired, long-lived state of resistance was not dependent on activated macrophages that remained after the primary response. It depended, instead, on an acquired long-lived capacity on the part of immunized mice for generating mediator T cells faster and in larger numbers than normal mice. The number of mediator T cells generated in response to secondary infection was proportional to the level of infection. The results suggest that the accelerated production of mediator T cells that occurs in response to secondary infection represents the expression of a state of immunological T-cell memory. PMID:811558

  14. Negative regulation of NKG2D expression by IL-4 in memory CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Ventre, Erwan; Brinza, Lilia; Schicklin, Stephane; Mafille, Julien; Coupet, Charles-Antoine; Marçais, Antoine; Djebali, Sophia; Jubin, Virginie; Walzer, Thierry; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2012-10-01

    IL-4 is one of the main cytokines produced during Th2-inducing pathologies. This cytokine has been shown to affect a number of immune processes such as Th differentiation and innate immune responses. However, the impact of IL-4 on CD8 T cell responses remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IL-4 on global gene expression profiles of Ag-induced memory CD8 T cells in the mouse. Gene ontology analysis of this signature revealed that IL-4 regulated most importantly genes associated with immune responses. Moreover, this IL-4 signature overlapped with the set of genes preferentially expressed by memory CD8 T cells over naive CD8 T cells. In particular, IL-4 downregulated in vitro and in vivo in a STAT6-dependent manner the memory-specific expression of NKG2D, thereby increasing the activation threshold of memory CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IL-4 impaired activation of memory cells as well as their differentiation into effector cells. This phenomenon could have an important clinical relevance as patients affected by Th2 pathologies such as parasitic infections or atopic dermatitis often suffer from viral-induced complications possibly linked to inefficient CD8 T cell responses.

  15. Additional Reversal Characteristics of Sealed Nickel Cadmium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritterman, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The reversal characteristics of nickel cadmium cells are discussed. The evolution of hydrogen from the positive electrode is described when the nickel cadmium cell is completely discharged. Results indicate that one ampere hour of overdischarge in reversal can generate enough hydrogen to increase the cell pressure of an average size cell, 20- to 50-ampere hour cell, by 120 psi.

  16. Distinct germinal center selection at local sites shapes memory B cell response to viral escape

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Yu; Onodera, Taishi; Yamada, Yuki; Daio, Rina; Tsuiji, Makoto; Inoue, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Ato, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory influenza virus infection induces cross-reactive memory B cells targeting invariant regions of viral escape mutants. However, cellular events dictating the cross-reactive memory B cell responses remain to be fully defined. Here, we demonstrated that lung-resident memory compartments at the site of infection, rather than those in secondary lymphoid organs, harbor elevated frequencies of cross-reactive B cells that mediate neutralizing antibody responses to viral escape. The elevated cross-reactivity in the lung memory compartments was correlated with high numbers of VH mutations and was dependent on a developmental pathway involving persistent germinal center (GC) responses. The persistent GC responses were focused in the infected lungs in association with prolonged persistence of the viral antigens. Moreover, the persistent lung GCs supported the exaggerated B cell proliferation and clonal selection for cross-reactive repertoires, which served as the predominant sites for the generation of cross-reactive memory progenitors. Thus, we identified the distinct GC selection at local sites as a key cellular event for cross-reactive memory B cell response to viral escape, a finding with important implications for developing broadly protective influenza vaccines. PMID:26324444

  17. A comparison of T cell memory against the same antigen induced by virus versus intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenbein, Adrian F.; Karrer, Urs; Klenerman, Paul; Althage, Alana; Ciurea, Adrian; Shen, Hao; Miller, Jeff F.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1999-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cell (CTL) memory was analyzed after infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (rLM) expressing the complete nucleoprotein of LCMV (rLM-NPactA) or only the immunodominant epitope of H-2d mice (rLM-NP118–126). Immunization with LCMV and rLM induced a long-lived increased CTL precursor (CTLp) frequency specific for the viral (NP118–126) and for the bacterial (LLO91–99) epitope, respectively. However, after infection with rLM memory, CTLs were less protective against an intravenous LCMV challenge infection than a comparable number of LCMV-induced memory T cells. LCMV, but not recombinant Listeria-induced memory T cells were able to protect against lethal choriomeningitis by LCMV or a subsequent peripheral infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing LCMV-NP. The protective memory after viral and after rLM immunization was paralleled by evidence of LCMV but not rLM antigen persistence on day 15 and 30 after vaccination. These results document a striking difference in protective T cell memory between viral and bacterial vaccines and indicate that rapid T cell-dependent immune protection correlates with antigen persistence. PMID:10430936

  18. CD22 is required for formation of memory B cell precursors within germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Craig P.; Draves, Kevin E.

    2017-01-01

    CD22 is a BCR co-receptor that regulates B cell signaling, proliferation and survival and is required for T cell-independent Ab responses. To investigate the role of CD22 during T cell-dependent (TD) Ab responses and memory B cell formation, we analyzed Ag-specific B cell responses generated by wild-type (WT) or CD22-/- B cells following immunization with a TD Ag. CD22-/- B cells mounted normal early Ab responses yet failed to generate either memory B cells or long-lived plasma cells, whereas WT B cells formed both populations. Surprisingly, B cell expansion and germinal center (GC) differentiation were comparable between WT and CD22-/- B cells. CD22-/- B cells, however, were significantly less capable of generating a population of CXCR4hiCD38hi GC B cells, which we propose represent memory B cell precursors within GCs. These results demonstrate a novel role for CD22 during TD humoral responses evident during primary GC formation and underscore that CD22 functions not only during B cell maturation but also during responses to both TD and T cell-independent antigens. PMID:28346517

  19. Single-Cell Analysis of the Plasmablast Response to Vibrio cholerae Demonstrates Expansion of Cross-Reactive Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Robert C.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R.; Nakajima, Rie; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M.; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Rahman, Atiqur; Bhaumik, Siddhartha K.; Harris, Levelle; O'Neal, Justin T.; Trost, Jessica F.; Alam, Nur Haq; Jasinskas, Algis; Dotsey, Emmanuel; Kelly, Meagan; Charles, Richelle C.; Xu, Peng; Kováč, Pavol; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Felgner, Phillip L.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We characterized the acute B cell response in adults with cholera by analyzing the repertoire, specificity, and functional characteristics of 138 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated from single-cell-sorted plasmablasts. We found that the cholera-induced responses were characterized by high levels of somatic hypermutation and large clonal expansions. A majority of the expansions targeted cholera toxin (CT) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using a novel proteomics approach, we were able to identify sialidase as another major antigen targeted by the antibody response to Vibrio cholerae infection. Antitoxin MAbs targeted both the A and B subunits, and most were also potent neutralizers of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin. LPS-specific MAbs uniformly targeted the O-specific polysaccharide, with no detectable responses to either the core or the lipid moiety of LPS. Interestingly, the LPS-specific antibodies varied widely in serotype specificity and functional characteristics. One participant infected with the Ogawa serotype produced highly mutated LPS-specific antibodies that preferentially bound the previously circulating Inaba serotype. This demonstrates durable memory against a polysaccharide antigen presented at the mucosal surface and provides a mechanism for the long-term, partial heterotypic immunity seen following cholera. PMID:27999163

  20. Strategic priming with multiple antigens can yield memory cell phenotypes optimized for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-06

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. While many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likely key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  1. The transcriptional regulators Id2 and Id3 control the formation of distinct memory CD8+ T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cliff Y.; Best, J. Adam; Knell, Jamie; Yang, Edward; Sheridan, Alison D.; Jesionek, Adam K.; Li, Haiyan S.; Rivera, Richard R.; Lind, Kristin Camfield; D’Cruz, Louise M.; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Murre, Cornelis; Goldrath, Ananda W.

    2013-01-01

    During infection, naive CD8+ T cells differentiate into effector cells, which are armed to eliminate pathogens, and memory cells, which are poised to protect against reinfection. The transcriptional program that regulates terminal differentiation into short-lived effector-memory versus long-lived memory cells is not clearly defined. Through the use of mice expressing reporters for the DNA-binding inhibitors Id2 and Id3, we identified Id3hi precursors of long-lived memory cells before the peak of T cell population expansion or upregulation of cell-surface receptors that indicate memory potential. Deficiency in Id2 or Id3 resulted in loss of distinct CD8+ effector and memory populations, which demonstrated unique roles for these inhibitors of E-protein transcription factors. Furthermore, cytokines altered the expression of Id2 and Id3 differently, which provides insight into how external cues influence gene expression. PMID:22057289

  2. The transcriptional regulators Id2 and Id3 control the formation of distinct memory CD8+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cliff Y; Best, J Adam; Knell, Jamie; Yang, Edward; Sheridan, Alison D; Jesionek, Adam K; Li, Haiyan S; Rivera, Richard R; Lind, Kristin Camfield; D'Cruz, Louise M; Watowich, Stephanie S; Murre, Cornelis; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2011-11-06

    During infection, naive CD8(+) T cells differentiate into effector cells, which are armed to eliminate pathogens, and memory cells, which are poised to protect against reinfection. The transcriptional program that regulates terminal differentiation into short-lived effector-memory versus long-lived memory cells is not clearly defined. Through the use of mice expressing reporters for the DNA-binding inhibitors Id2 and Id3, we identified Id3(hi) precursors of long-lived memory cells before the peak of T cell population expansion or upregulation of cell-surface receptors that indicate memory potential. Deficiency in Id2 or Id3 resulted in loss of distinct CD8(+) effector and memory populations, which demonstrated unique roles for these inhibitors of E-protein transcription factors. Furthermore, cytokines altered the expression of Id2 and Id3 differently, which provides insight into how external cues influence gene expression.

  3. Mucosal CD8 Memory T Cells are selected in the periphery by an MHC Class I Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujun; Park, Yunji; Wang-Zhu, Yiran; Larange, Alexandre; Arens, Ramon; Bernardo, Iván; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Herndler-Brandstetter, Dietmar; Abraham, Ninan; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Schoenberger, Stephen P.; Van Kaer, Luc; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Teitell, Michael A.; Cheroutre, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    The presence of immune memory at pathogen entry sites is a prerequisite for protection. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that warrant immunity at peripheral interfaces are not understood. Here we show that the non-classical MHC class I molecule, the thymus leukemia antigen (TL), induced on dendritic cells interacting with CD8αα on activated CD8αβ+T cells, mediated affinity-based selection of memory precursor cells. Furthermore, constitutive expression of TL on epithelial cells led to continued selection of mature CD8αβ memory T cells. The TL-CD8αα-driven memory process was essential for the generation of memory CD8αβ T cells in the intestine and accumulation of highly antigen sensitive CD8αβ memory T cells that form the first line of defense at the largest entry port for pathogens. PMID:21964609

  4. Comparison of resistive switching characteristics using copper and aluminum electrodes on GeOx/W cross-point memories

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Comparison of resistive switching memory characteristics using copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) electrodes on GeOx/W cross-points has been reported under low current compliances (CCs) of 1 nA to 50 μA. The cross-point memory devices are observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Improved memory characteristics are observed for the Cu/GeOx/W structures as compared to the Al/GeOx/W cross-points owing to AlOx formation at the Al/GeOx interface. The RESET current increases with the increase of the CCs varying from 1 nA to 50 μA for the Cu electrode devices, while the RESET current is high (>1 mA) and independent of CCs varying from 1 nA to 500 μA for the Al electrode devices. An extra formation voltage is needed for the Al/GeOx/W devices, while a low operation voltage of ±2 V is needed for the Cu/GeOx/W cross-point devices. Repeatable bipolar resistive switching characteristics of the Cu/GeOx/W cross-point memory devices are observed with CC varying from 1 nA to 50 μA, and unipolar resistive switching is observed with CC >100 μA. High resistance ratios of 102 to 104 for the bipolar mode (CCs of 1 nA to 50 μA) and approximately 108 for the unipolar mode are obtained for the Cu/GeOx/W cross-points. In addition, repeatable switching cycles and data retention of 103 s are observed under a low current of 1 nA for future low-power, high-density, nonvolatile, nanoscale memory applications. PMID:24305116

  5. Retention of Ag-specific memory CD4(+) T cells in the draining lymph node indicates lymphoid tissue resident memory populations.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Clare L; Dutton, Emma E; Tomura, Michio; Withers, David R

    2017-05-01

    Several different memory T-cell populations have now been described based upon surface receptor expression and migratory capabilities. Here we have assessed murine endogenous memory CD4(+) T cells generated within a draining lymph node and their subsequent migration to other secondary lymphoid tissues. Having established a model response targeting a specific peripheral lymph node, we temporally labelled all the cells within draining lymph node using photoconversion. Tracking of photoconverted and non-photoconverted Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells revealed the rapid establishment of a circulating memory population in all lymph nodes within days of immunisation. Strikingly, a resident memory CD4(+) T cell population became established in the draining lymph node and persisted for several months in the absence of detectable migration to other lymphoid tissue. These cells most closely resembled effector memory T cells, usually associated with circulation through non-lymphoid tissue, but here, these cells were retained in the draining lymph node. These data indicate that lymphoid tissue resident memory CD4(+) T-cell populations are generated in peripheral lymph nodes following immunisation. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Chromaffin cell grafts to rat cerebral cortex reverse lesion-induced memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Welner, S A; Koty, Z C; Boksa, P

    1990-09-10

    Adrenal chromaffin cells were isolated from donor adult rats and transplanted to the cerebral cortex of bilaterally nucleus basalis magnocellularis-lesioned rats. Chromaffin cell grafts to lesioned animals completely reversed the spatial memory deficit seen in lesioned alone animals on a T-maze alternation task. Although chromaffin cell grafts have been used previously to reverse motor abnormalities arising from defective nigro-striatal aminergic transmission, the present report is the first evidence that chromaffin cell transplants can reverse deficits in memory function. Grafts also enhanced cortical acetylcholinesterase staining.

  7. A New Differential Logic-Compatible Multiple-Time Programmable Memory Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Hung; Yang, Hsiao-Lan; Lin, Wun-Jie; Lin, Chrong Jung; King, Ya-Chin

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a novel differential n-channel logic-compatible multiple-time programmable (MTP) memory cell. This cell features double sensing window by a differential pair of floating gates, and therefore increases the retention lifetime of the nonvolatile memory effectively. Also, a self-selective programming (SSP) method is innovated in writing one pair differential data by a single cell without increasing any design or process complexity in peripheral circuit. The differential cell is a promising MTP solution to challenge thin floating gate oxide below 70 Å for 90 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) node and beyond.

  8. Time cells in the hippocampus: a new dimension for mapping memories

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the existence of hippocampal neurons that fire at successive moments in temporally structured experiences. Several studies have shown that such temporal coding is not attributable to external events, specific behaviours or spatial dimensions of an experience. Instead, these cells represent the flow of time in specific memories and have therefore been dubbed ‘time cells’. The firing properties of time cells parallel those of hippocampal place cells; time cells thus provide an additional dimension that is integrated with spatial mapping. The robust representation of both time and space in the hippocampus suggests a fundamental mechanism for organizing the elements of experience into coherent memories. PMID:25269553

  9. Proinflammatory cytokine signaling required for the generation of natural killer cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Joseph C.; Madera, Sharline; Bezman, Natalie A.; Beilke, Joshua N.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells are classified as innate immune cells, recent studies demonstrate that NK cells can become long-lived memory cells and contribute to secondary immune responses. The precise signals that promote generation of long-lived memory NK cells are unknown. Using cytokine receptor-deficient mice, we show that interleukin-12 (IL-12) is indispensible for mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-specific NK cell expansion and generation of memory NK cells. In contrast to wild-type NK cells that proliferated robustly and resided in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues for months after MCMV infection, IL-12 receptor–deficient NK cells failed to expand and were unable to mediate protection after MCMV challenge. We further demonstrate that a STAT4-dependent IFN-γ–independent mechanism contributes toward the generation of memory NK cells during MCMV infection. Understanding the full contribution of inflammatory cytokine signaling to the NK cell response against viral infection will be of interest for the development of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:22493516

  10. Proinflammatory cytokine signaling required for the generation of natural killer cell memory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Joseph C; Madera, Sharline; Bezman, Natalie A; Beilke, Joshua N; Kaplan, Mark H; Lanier, Lewis L

    2012-05-07

    Although natural killer (NK) cells are classified as innate immune cells, recent studies demonstrate that NK cells can become long-lived memory cells and contribute to secondary immune responses. The precise signals that promote generation of long-lived memory NK cells are unknown. Using cytokine receptor-deficient mice, we show that interleukin-12 (IL-12) is indispensible for mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-specific NK cell expansion and generation of memory NK cells. In contrast to wild-type NK cells that proliferated robustly and resided in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues for months after MCMV infection, IL-12 receptor-deficient NK cells failed to expand and were unable to mediate protection after MCMV challenge. We further demonstrate that a STAT4-dependent IFN-γ-independent mechanism contributes toward the generation of memory NK cells during MCMV infection. Understanding the full contribution of inflammatory cytokine signaling to the NK cell response against viral infection will be of interest for the development of vaccines and therapeutics.

  11. Pathogen induced inflammatory environment controls effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation1

    PubMed Central

    Obar, Joshua J.; Jellison, Evan R.; Sheridan, Brian S.; Blair, David A.; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Zickovich, Julianne M.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2011-01-01

    In response to infection CD8+ T cells integrate multiple signals and undergo an exponential increase in cell numbers. Simultaneously, a dynamic differentiation process occurs, resulting in the formation of short-lived (SLEC; CD127lowKLRG1high) and memory-precursor (MPEC; CD127highKLRG1low) effector cells from an early-effector cell (EEC) that is CD127lowKLRG1low in phenotype. CD8+ T cell differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection differed significantly than during Listeria monocytogenes infection with a substantial reduction in EEC differentiation into SLECs. SLEC generationwas dependent on Ebi3 expression. Furthermore, SLEC differentiation during VSV infection wasenhanced by administration ofCpG-DNA, through an IL-12 dependent mechanism. Moreover, CpG-DNAtreatment enhanced effector CD8+ T cell functionality and memory subset distribution, but in an IL-12 independent manner. Population dynamics were dramatically different during secondary CD8+ T cell responses, with a much greater accumulation of SLECs and the appearance of a significant number of CD127highKLRG1highmemory cells, both of which were intrinsic to the memory CD8+ T cell. These subsets persisted for several months, but were less effective in recall than MPECs. Thus, our data shed light on how varying the context of T cell priming alters downstream effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation. PMID:21987662

  12. Memory T cell–driven differentiation of naive cells impairs adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Scott, Christopher D.; Leonardi, Anthony J.; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Ouyang, Claudia; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Ji, Yun; Eil, Robert L.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Crompton, Joseph G.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Borman, Zachary A.; Clever, David; Thomas, Stacy K.; Patel, Shashankkumar; Yu, Zhiya; Muranski, Pawel; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gros, Alena; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Siegel, Richard M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of purified naive, stem cell memory, and central memory T cell subsets results in superior persistence and antitumor immunity compared with ACT of populations containing more-differentiated effector memory and effector T cells. Despite a clear advantage of the less-differentiated populations, the majority of ACT trials utilize unfractionated T cell subsets. Here, we have challenged the notion that the mere presence of less-differentiated T cells in starting populations used to generate therapeutic T cells is sufficient to convey their desirable attributes. Using both mouse and human cells, we identified a T cell–T cell interaction whereby antigen-experienced subsets directly promote the phenotypic, functional, and metabolic differentiation of naive T cells. This process led to the loss of less-differentiated T cell subsets and resulted in impaired cellular persistence and tumor regression in mouse models following ACT. The T memory–induced conversion of naive T cells was mediated by a nonapoptotic Fas signal, resulting in Akt-driven cellular differentiation. Thus, induction of Fas signaling enhanced T cell differentiation and impaired antitumor immunity, while Fas signaling blockade preserved the antitumor efficacy of naive cells within mixed populations. These findings reveal that T cell subsets can synchronize their differentiation state in a process similar to quorum sensing in unicellular organisms and suggest that disruption of this quorum-like behavior among T cells has potential to enhance T cell–based immunotherapies. PMID:26657860

  13. Qualitative Characteristics of Memories for Real, Imagined, and Media-Based Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ruthanna; Gerrig, Richard J.; Franklin, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    People's memories must be able to represent experiences with multiple types of origins--including the real world and our own imaginations, but also printed texts (prose-based media), movies, and television (screen-based media). This study was intended to identify cues that distinguish prose- and screen-based media memories from each other, as well…

  14. Qualitative Characteristics of Memories for Real, Imagined, and Media-Based Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ruthanna; Gerrig, Richard J.; Franklin, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    People's memories must be able to represent experiences with multiple types of origins--including the real world and our own imaginations, but also printed texts (prose-based media), movies, and television (screen-based media). This study was intended to identify cues that distinguish prose- and screen-based media memories from each other, as well…

  15. The Cognitive and Behavioral Characteristics of Children with Low Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, Tracy Packiam; Gathercole, Susan Elizabeth; Kirkwood, Hannah; Elliott, Julian

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the cognitive and behavioral profiles of children with working memory impairments. In an initial screening of 3,189 five- to eleven-year-olds, 308 were identified as having very low working memory scores. Cognitive skills (IQ, vocabulary, reading, and math), classroom behavior, and self-esteem were assessed. The majority of the…

  16. Characteristics of Disorder-Related Autobiographical Memory in Acute Anorexia Nervosa Patients.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julia; Salatsch, Carmen; Ingenerf, Katrin; Schmid, Carolin; Maatouk, Imad; Weisbrod, Matthias; Herzog, Wolfgang; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Nikendei, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    First studies revealed overgeneral autobiographical memories in anorexia nervosa (AN) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate frequency, generalization and valence of autobiographical memories in AN patients in response to eating disorder-related cue words. Autobiographical memory was examined in 21 AN patients and 21 healthy controls (HC) using a modified version of the Autobiographical Memory Test, incorporating body-related, food-related, perfectionism-related, depression-related and neutral cues. Anorexia nervosa patients recalled fewer and more general autobiographical memories compared with HC. For eating disorder-related cues as against neutral ones, AN patients compared with HC showed fewer memories for food-related and body-related cues, an elevated overgeneralization for food-related cues, while the valence of the retrieved memories was more negative in response to body-related cues. This study detects disorder-related autobiographical memory alterations in AN, which are intensified in response to symptom-related cues. The findings are discussed with regard to their maladaptive function in emotion regulation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  17. The retention characteristics of nonvolatile SNOS memory transistors in a radiation environment: Experiment and model

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, P.J.; Miller, S.L.; Dellin, T.A.; Axness, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data and a model to accurately and quantitatively predict the data are presented for retention of SNOS memory devices over a wide range of dose rates. A wide range of SNOS stack geometries are examined. The model is designed to aid in screening nonvolatile memories for use in a radiation environment.

  18. Apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells induce immune tolerance by specifically inhibiting development of CD4⁺ effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells play an important role in induction of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory responses; however, regulatory mechanisms of CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. Here we show that apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells inhibit development and differentiation of CD4(+) effector memory T cells in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, intravenous transfer of apoptotic T cell-induced tolerogenic dendritic cells can block development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in C57 BL/6J mouse. Our results imply that it is effector memory CD4(+) T cells, not central memory CD4(+) T cells, which play a major role in chronic inflammatory responses in mice with EAE. Intravenous transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells induced by apoptotic T cells leads to immune tolerance by specifically blocking development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells compared with results of EAE control mice. These results reveal a new mechanism of apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cell-mediated immune tolerance in vivo.

  19. Altered Memory Circulating T Follicular Helper-B Cell Interaction in Early Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Roshell; Metcalf, Talibah; Tardif, Virginie; Takata, Hiroshi; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Kroon, Eugene; Colby, Donn J.; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Valcour, Victor; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Trautmann, Lydie; Haddad, Elias K.

    2016-01-01

    The RV254 cohort of HIV-infected very early acute (4thG stage 1 and 2) (stage 1/2) and late acute (4thG stage 3) (stage 3) individuals was used to study T helper- B cell responses in acute HIV infection and the impact of early antiretroviral treatment (ART) on T and B cell function. To investigate this, the function of circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh) from this cohort was examined, and cTfh and memory B cell populations were phenotyped. Impaired cTfh cell function was observed in individuals treated in stage 3 when compared to stage 1/2. The cTfh/B cell cocultures showed lower B cell survival and IgG secretion at stage 3 compared to stage 1/2. This coincided with lower IL-10 and increased RANTES and TNF-α suggesting a role for inflammation in altering cTfh and B cell responses. Elevated plasma viral load in stage 3 was found to correlate with decreased cTfh-mediated B cell IgG production indicating a role for increased viremia in cTfh impairment and dysfunctional humoral response. Phenotypic perturbations were also evident in the mature B cell compartment, most notably a decrease in resting memory B cells in stage 3 compared to stage 1/2, coinciding with higher viremia. Our coculture assay also suggested that intrinsic memory B cell defects could contribute to the impaired response despite at a lower level. Overall, cTfh-mediated B cell responses are significantly altered in stage 3 compared to stage 1/2, coinciding with increased inflammation and a reduction in memory B cells. These data suggest that early ART for acutely HIV infected individuals could prevent immune dysregulation while preserving cTfh function and B cell memory. PMID:27463374

  20. Regulation of Antigen-Experienced T Cells: Lessons from the Quintessential Memory Marker CD44

    PubMed Central

    Baaten, Bas J. G.; Tinoco, Roberto; Chen, Alex T.; Bradley, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of the cell-surface receptor CD44 as a marker for antigen (Ag)-experienced, effector and memory T cells, surprisingly little is known regarding its function on these cells. The best-established function of CD44 is the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. As such, the interactions of CD44, primarily with its major ligand, the extracellular matrix (ECM) component hyaluronic acid (HA), can be crucial for the recruitment and function of effector and memory T cells into/within inflamed tissues. However, little is known about the signaling events following engagement of CD44 on T cells and how cooperative interactions of CD44 with other surface receptors affect T cell responses. Recent evidence suggests that the CD44 signaling pathway(s) may be shared with those of other adhesion receptors, and that these provide contextual signals at different anatomical sites to ensure the correct T cell effector responses. Furthermore, CD44 ligation may augment T cell activation after Ag encounter and promote T cell survival, as well as contribute to regulation of the contraction phase of an immune response and the maintenance of tolerance. Once the memory phase is established, CD44 may have a role in ensuring the functional fitness of memory T cells. Thus, the summation of potential signals after CD44 ligation on T cells highlights that migration and adhesion to the ECM can critically impact the development and homeostasis of memory T cells, and may differentially affect subsets of T cells. These aspects of CD44 biology on T cells and how they might be modulated for translational purposes are discussed. PMID:22566907

  1. Sustained CD8+ T cell memory inflation after infection with a single-cycle cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Christopher M; Cho, Kathy S; Bonnett, Elizabeth L; Allan, Jane E; Hill, Ann B

    2011-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a β-herpesvirus that establishes a lifelong latent or persistent infection. A hallmark of chronic CMV infection is the lifelong persistence of large numbers of virus-specific CD8+ effector/effector memory T cells, a phenomenon called "memory inflation". How the virus continuously stimulates these T cells without being eradicated remains an enigma. The prevailing view is that CMV establishes a low grade "smoldering" infection characterized by tiny bursts of productive infection which are rapidly extinguished, leaving no detectable virus but replenishing the latent pool and leaving the immune system in a highly charged state. However, since abortive reactivation with limited viral gene expression is known to occur commonly, we investigated the necessity for virus reproduction in maintaining the inflationary T cell pool. We inhibited viral replication or spread in vivo using two different mutants of murine CMV (MCMV). First, famcyclovir blocked the replication of MCMV encoding the HSV Thymidine Kinase gene, but had no impact on the CD8+ T cell memory inflation once the infection was established. Second, MCMV that lacks the essential glycoprotein L, and thus is completely unable to spread from cell to cell, also drove memory inflation if the virus was administered systemically. Our data suggest that CMV which cannot spread from the cells it initially infects can repeatedly generate viral antigens to drive memory inflation without suffering eradication of the latent genome pool.

  2. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurton, Lenka V.; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M.; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR+ T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19+ leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45ROnegCCR7+CD95+, phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR+ T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:27849617

  3. Tethered IL-15 augments antitumor activity and promotes a stem-cell memory subset in tumor-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Hurton, Lenka V; Singh, Harjeet; Najjar, Amer M; Switzer, Kirsten C; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian; Huls, Helen; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Datar, Vrushali; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-11-29

    Adoptive immunotherapy retargeting T cells to CD19 via a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is an investigational treatment capable of inducing complete tumor regression of B-cell malignancies when there is sustained survival of infused cells. T-memory stem cells (TSCM) retain superior potential for long-lived persistence, but challenges exist in manufacturing this T-cell subset because they are rare among circulating lymphocytes. We report a clinically relevant approach to generating CAR(+) T cells with preserved TSCM potential using the Sleeping Beauty platform. Because IL-15 is fundamental to T-cell memory, we incorporated its costimulatory properties by coexpressing CAR with a membrane-bound chimeric IL-15 (mbIL15). The mbIL15-CAR T cells signaled through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 to yield improved T-cell persistence independent of CAR signaling, without apparent autonomous growth or transformation, and achieved potent rejection of CD19(+) leukemia. Long-lived T cells were CD45RO(neg)CCR7(+)CD95(+), phenotypically most similar to TSCM, and possessed a memory-like transcriptional profile. Overall, these results demonstrate that CAR(+) T cells can develop long-term persistence with a memory stem-cell phenotype sustained by signaling through mbIL15. This observation warrants evaluation in clinical trials.

  4. Dynamic T cell migration program provides resident memory within intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Daniel; Vezys, Vaiva; Wherry, E. John; Duraiswamy, Jaikumar; Akondy, Rama; Wang, Jun; Casey, Kerry A.; Barber, Daniel L.; Kawamura, Kim S.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Webby, Richard J.; Brinkmann, Volker; Butcher, Eugene C.; Newell, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Migration to intestinal mucosa putatively depends on local activation because gastrointestinal lymphoid tissue induces expression of intestinal homing molecules, whereas skin-draining lymph nodes do not. This paradigm is difficult to reconcile with reports of intestinal T cell responses after alternative routes of immunization. We reconcile this discrepancy by demonstrating that activation within spleen results in intermediate induction of homing potential to the intestinal mucosa. We further demonstrate that memory T cells within small intestine epithelium do not routinely recirculate with memory T cells in other tissues, and we provide evidence that homing is similarly dynamic in humans after subcutaneous live yellow fever vaccine immunization. These data explain why systemic immunization routes induce local cell-mediated immunity within the intestine and indicate that this tissue must be seeded with memory T cell precursors shortly after activation. PMID:20156972

  5. Brain-resident memory T cells represent an autonomous cytotoxic barrier to viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Vincenti, Ilena; Wagner, Ingrid; Pinschewer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) persist at sites of prior infection and have been shown to enhance pathogen clearance by recruiting circulating immune cells and providing bystander activation. Here, we characterize the functioning of brain-resident memory T cells (bTRM) in an animal model of viral infection. bTRM were subject to spontaneous homeostatic proliferation and were largely refractory to systemic immune cell depletion. After viral reinfection in mice, bTRM rapidly acquired cytotoxic effector function and prevented fatal brain infection, even in the absence of circulating CD8+ memory T cells. Presentation of cognate antigen on MHC-I was essential for bTRM-mediated protective immunity, which involved perforin- and IFN-γ–dependent effector mechanisms. These findings identify bTRM as an organ-autonomous defense system serving as a paradigm for TRM functioning as a self-sufficient first line of adaptive immunity. PMID:27377586

  6. Tissue-resident memory T cells: local specialists in immune defence.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Scott N; Mackay, Laura K

    2016-02-01

    T cells have crucial roles in protection against infection and cancer. Although the trafficking of memory T cells around the body is integral to their capacity to provide immune protection, studies have shown that specialization of some memory T cells into unique tissue-resident subsets gives the host enhanced regional immunity. In recent years, there has been considerable progress in our understanding of tissue-resident T cell development and function, revealing mechanisms for enhanced protective immunity that have the potential to influence rational vaccine design. This Review discusses the major advances and the emerging concepts in this field, summarizes what is known about the differentiation and the protective functions of tissue-resident memory T cells in different tissues in the body and highlights key unanswered questions.

  7. Epidermal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (E-FABP) Is Not Required for the Generation or Maintenance of Effector and Memory T Cells following Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Schmidt, Nathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Following activation of naïve T cells there are dynamic changes in the metabolic pathways used by T cells to support both the energetic needs of the cell and the macromolecules required for growth and proliferation. Among other changes, lipid metabolism undergoes dynamic transitions between fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid synthesis as cells progress from naïve to effector and effector to memory T cells. The hydrophobic nature of lipids requires that they be bound to protein chaperones within a cell. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) represent a large class of lipid chaperones, with epidermal FABP (E-FABP) expressed in T cells. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of E-FABP in antigen-specific T cell responses. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, we observed similar clonal expansion, contraction and formation of memory CD8 T cells in WT and E-FABP-/- mice, which also exhibited similar phenotypic and functional characteristics. Analysis of Listeria-specific CD4 T cells also revealed no defect in the expansion, contraction, and formation of memory CD4 T cells in E-FABP-/- mice. These data demonstrate that E-FABP is dispensable for antigen-specific T cell responses following a bacterial infection. PMID:27588422

  8. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C; Regev, Aviv; Williams, Matthew A; Tantin, Dean

    2015-11-16

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4(+) memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4(+) T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4(+) T cell memory. © 2015 Shakya et al.

  9. Memory B lymphocytes determine repertoire oligoclonality early after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    OMAZIC, B; LUNDKVIST, I; MATTSSON, J; PERMERT, J; NÄSMAN-BJÖRK, I

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if oligoclonality of the Ig repertoire post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is restricted to memory B lymphocytes or if it is a general property among B lymphocytes. As a measure of B lymphocyte repertoire diversity, we have analysed size distribution of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified Ig H complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) in naive and memory B lymphocytes isolated from patients before HSCT and at 3, 6 and 12 months after HSCT as well as from healthy controls. We demonstrate a limited variation of the IgH CDR3 repertoire in the memory B lymphocyte population compared to the naive B cell population. This difference was significant at 3 and 6 months post-HSCT. Compared to healthy controls there is a significant restriction of the memory B lymphocyte repertoire at 3 months after HSCT, but not of the naive B lymphocyte repertoire. Twelve months after HSCT, the IgH CDR3 repertoire in both memory and naive B lymphocytes are as diverse as in healthy controls. Thus, our findings suggest a role for memory B cells in the restriction of the oligoclonal B cell repertoire observed early after HSCT, which may be of importance when considering reimmunization of transplanted patients. PMID:12974769

  10. Epigenetic Networks Regulate the Transcriptional Program in Memory and Terminally Differentiated CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramon M; Suarez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Lavín, José L; Mosén-Ansorena, David; Baragaño Raneros, Aroa; Márquez-Kisinousky, Leonardo; Aransay, Ana M; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos

    2017-01-15

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a critical role during differentiation of T cells by contributing to the formation of stable and heritable transcriptional patterns. To better understand the mechanisms of memory maintenance in CD8(+) T cells, we performed genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation, histone marking (acetylated lysine 9 in histone H3 and trimethylated lysine 9 in histone), and gene-expression profiles in naive, effector memory (EM), and terminally differentiated EM (TEMRA) cells. Our results indicate that DNA demethylation and histone acetylation are coordinated to generate the transcriptional program associated with memory cells. Conversely, EM and TEMRA cells share a very similar epigenetic landscape. Nonetheless, the TEMRA transcriptional program predicts an innate immunity phenotype associated with genes never reported in these cells, including several mediators of NK cell activation (VAV3 and LYN) and a large array of NK receptors (e.g., KIR2DL3, KIR2DL4, KIR2DL1, KIR3DL1, KIR2DS5). In addition, we identified up to 161 genes that encode transcriptional regulators, some of unknow