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Sample records for memory prevents scopolamine-induced

  1. Decaffeinated coffee prevents scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Jin; Kim, Jiyoung; Shim, Jaesung; Kim, Chang-Yul; Jang, Jung-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-05-15

    Several human studies have reported that coffee consumption improves cognitive performance. In the present study, we investigated whether instant decaffeinated coffee also ameliorates cognitive performance and attenuates the detrimental effects of scopolamine on memory. Memory performance was evaluated in Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Instant decaffeinated coffee (p.o.) at 120 or 240 mg/kg in Sprague-Dawley rats, which is equivalent to approximately three or six cups of coffee, respectively, in a 60 kg human, was administered for two weeks. Oral gavage administration of instant decaffeinated coffee inhibited scopolamine-induced memory impairment, which was measured by Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Instant decaffeinated coffee suppressed scopolamine-mediated elevation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and stimulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway (i.e., phosphorylation of IκBα and p65) in the rat hippocampus. These findings suggest that caffeine-free decaffeinated coffee may prevent memory impairment in human through the inhibition of NF-κB activation and subsequent TNF-α production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quercetin and rutin prevent scopolamine-induced memory impairment in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Richetti, S K; Blank, M; Capiotti, K M; Piato, A L; Bogo, M R; Vianna, M R; Bonan, C D

    2011-02-02

    Demographic aging gives rise to a growing population with age-associated behavioral and cognitive deficits that may be associated at least partially to the increasing prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this disease, it has been observed a decrease in the cholinergic system, which is crucial to memory formation. Scopolamine-induced amnesic effect, through the disruption of the cholinergic neurotransmission, is one of the approaches used to investigate the mechanisms involved in cognitive impairment observed in AD. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential protective role of quercetin and rutin against scopolamine-induced inhibitory avoidance memory deficits in zebrafish. Scopolamine (200 μM dissolved in the tank water for 1h) given pre-training hindered memory formation while both quercetin and rutin pretreatments (50mg/kg, single injection, i.p.) prevented the scopolamine-induced amnesia. None of the compounds affected zebrafish general locomotor activity. Together, these results contribute to the increase of the knowledge about plant compounds applicability as medicines to prevent and treat neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Willughbeia cochinchinensis prevents scopolamine-induced deficits in memory, spatial learning, and object recognition in rodents.

    PubMed

    Van Can, Mao; Tran, Anh Hai; Pham, Dam Minh; Dinh, Bao Quoc; Van Le, Quan; Van Nguyen, Ba; Thi Nguyen, Mai Thanh; Nguyen, Hai Xuan; Nguyen, Nhan Trung; Nishijo, Hisao

    2017-06-23

    Willughbeia cochinchinensis (WC) has been used in Vietnamese traditional medicine for the treatment of dementia as well as diarrhea, heartburn, and cutaneous abscess and as a diuretic. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent diseases in elderly individuals. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors have been widely used to treat patients with AD. In the present study, we investigated anti-AChE and anti-BChE activities of a natural product, WC, for its potential applications in therapies to prevent/treat dementia. First, compounds extracted from WC were tested for their AChE and BChE inhibitory activities in vitro. Second, in vivo behavioral experiments were performed to investigate the effects of WC at doses of 100, 150, and 200mg/kg on scopolamine (1.5mg/kg)-induced memory and cognitive deficits in mice. The behavior of mice treated with and without WC and/or scopolamine was tested using the Y-maze, Morris water maze, and novel object recognition task. The results of the in vitro assay demonstrated anti-AChE and anti-BChE activities of the compounds extracted from WC. The results of behavioral experiments showed that the administration of WC prevented 1) scopolamine-induced decrease in spontaneous alternation (%) behavior in the Y-maze, 2) scopolamine-induced deficits in spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze, and 3) scopolamine-induced deficits in novel object recognition. These results indicate that WC prevents cognitive and memory deficits induced by scopolamine injection. Our findings suggest that WC may represent a novel candidate for the treatment of memory and cognitive deficits in humans with dementia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Prevention of scopolamine-induced memory deficits by schisandrin B, an antioxidant lignan from Schisandra chinensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Sato, Shinji; Ko, Kam Ming; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2011-08-01

    The preventive effect of schisandrin B (Sch B), an antioxidant ingredient of Schisandra chinensis, was studied on scopolamine-induced dementia in mouse. Scopolamine developed oxidative stress in the brain with the decreased levels of antioxidant enzymes and increased nitrite level. At the same time, a significant impairment of learning and memory occurred when evaluated by passive avoidance task (PAT) and Morris water maze (MWM) with concomitant increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and decreased acetylcholine levels. Pre-treatment by Sch B (10, 25, 50 mg/kg) effectively prevented scopolamine-induced oxidative stress and improved behavioural tasks. Further, the scopolamine-induced increase in AChE activity was significantly suppressed and the level of acetylcholine was maintained as normal by Sch B treatment. These results suggest that Sch B have protective function against cerebral functional defects such as dementia not only by antioxidant prevention but also exerting its potent cognitive-enhancing activity through modulation of acetylcholine level.

  5. Soyasaponins Ab and Bb prevent scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice without the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Woon; Yoo, Dae-Hyung; Woo, Jae-Yeon; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Yang, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2014-03-05

    Soy (Glycine max, family Leguminosae), which contains isoflavones and saponins as main constituents, is known to exhibit memory-enhancing effects. Therefore, to investigate the role of soyasaponins in memory impairments, we isolated soyasaponins Ab (SA) and Bb (SB) from soybean and measured their protective effects against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. SA and SB significantly prevented scopolamine-induced memory impairment in passive avoidance and Y-maze tasks. Compared to SA, SB rescued memory impairment more potently. Treatment with SB (10 mg/kg, p.o.) protected memory impairment in passive avoidance and Y-maze tasks to 97% (F = 68.10, P < 0.05) and 78% (F = 35.57, P < 0.05) of untreated normal control level, respectively. SA and SB (10 mg/kg) also rescued scopolamine-induced memory impairment in Morris water maze task (F = 14.51, P < 0.05). In addition, soyasaponins preserved brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) expression (F = 33.69, P < 0.05) and cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation (F = 91.62, P < 0.05) in the hippocampus of scopolamine-treated mice. However, SA and SB did not inhibit acetylcholinesterase in vitro and ex vivo. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that soybean, particularly soyasaponins, may protect memory impairment by increasing BDNF expression and CREB phosphorylation.

  6. Deer bone extract prevents against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Du, Chun Nan; Min, A Young; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Suk Kyung; Yu, Ha Ni; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Ahn, Chang-Won; Jung, Sung Ug; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-02-01

    Deer bone has been used as a health-enhancing food as well as an antiaging agent in traditional Oriental medicine. Recently, the water extract of deer bone (DBE) showed a neuroprotective action against glutamate or Aβ1-42-induced cell death of mouse hippocampal cells by exerting antioxidant activity through the suppression of MAP kinases. The present study is to examine whether DBE improves memory impairment induced by scopolamine. DBE (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) was administered orally to mice for 14 days, and then scopolamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered together with DBE for another 7 days. Memory performance was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test and passive avoidance test. Also, brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, biomarkers of oxidative stress and the loss of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, was evaluated by histological examinations. Administration of DBE significantly restored memory impairments induced by scopolamine in the MWM test (escape latency and number of crossing platform area), and in the passive avoidance test. Treatment with DBE inhibited the AChE activity and increased the ChAT activity in the brain of memory-impaired mice induced by scopolamine. Additionally, the administration of DBE significantly prevented the increase of lipid peroxidation and the decrease of glutathione level in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine. Also, the DBE treatment restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase to control the level. Furthermore, scopolamine-induced oxidative damage of neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions were prevented by DBE treatment. It is suggested that DBE may be useful for memory improvement through the regulation of cholinergic marker enzyme activities and the suppression of oxidative damage of neurons in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine.

  7. Deer Bone Extract Prevents Against Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chun Nan; Min, A Young; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Suk Kyung; Yu, Ha Ni; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Ahn, Chang-Won; Jung, Sung Ug; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Deer bone has been used as a health-enhancing food as well as an antiaging agent in traditional Oriental medicine. Recently, the water extract of deer bone (DBE) showed a neuroprotective action against glutamate or Aβ1–42-induced cell death of mouse hippocampal cells by exerting antioxidant activity through the suppression of MAP kinases. The present study is to examine whether DBE improves memory impairment induced by scopolamine. DBE (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) was administered orally to mice for 14 days, and then scopolamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered together with DBE for another 7 days. Memory performance was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test and passive avoidance test. Also, brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, biomarkers of oxidative stress and the loss of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, was evaluated by histological examinations. Administration of DBE significantly restored memory impairments induced by scopolamine in the MWM test (escape latency and number of crossing platform area), and in the passive avoidance test. Treatment with DBE inhibited the AChE activity and increased the ChAT activity in the brain of memory-impaired mice induced by scopolamine. Additionally, the administration of DBE significantly prevented the increase of lipid peroxidation and the decrease of glutathione level in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine. Also, the DBE treatment restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase to control the level. Furthermore, scopolamine-induced oxidative damage of neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions were prevented by DBE treatment. It is suggested that DBE may be useful for memory improvement through the regulation of cholinergic marker enzyme activities and the suppression of oxidative damage of neurons in the brain of mice treated with scopolamine. PMID:25546299

  8. Piracetam prevents scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities.

    PubMed

    Marisco, Patricia C; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Rosa, Michelle M; Girardi, Bruna A; Gutierres, Jessié M; Jaques, Jeandre A S; Salla, Ana P S; Pimentel, Víctor C; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R; Mello, Carlos F; Rubin, Maribel A

    2013-08-01

    Piracetam improves cognitive function in animals and in human beings, but its mechanism of action is still not completely known. In the present study, we investigated whether enzymes involved in extracellular adenine nucleotide metabolism, adenosine triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are affected by piracetam in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of animals subjected to scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Piracetam (0.02 μmol/5 μL, intracerebroventricular, 60 min pre-training) prevented memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, immediately post-training) in the inhibitory avoidance learning and in the object recognition task. Scopolamine reduced the activity of NTPDase in hippocampus (53 % for ATP and 53 % for ADP hydrolysis) and cerebral cortex (28 % for ATP hydrolysis). Scopolamine also decreased the activity of 5'-nucleotidase (43 %) and ADA (91 %) in hippocampus. The same effect was observed in the cerebral cortex for 5'-nucleotidase (38 %) and ADA (68 %) activities. Piracetam fully prevented scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro experiments show that piracetam and scopolamine did not alter enzymatic activity in cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Moreover, piracetam prevented scopolamine-induced increase of TBARS levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results suggest that piracetam-induced improvement of memory is associated with protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities, and suggest the purinergic system as a putative target of piracetam.

  9. Combretum mucronatum and Capparis thonningii prevent scopolamine-induced memory deficit in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishola, Ismail Ogunbayode; Adeyemi, Olufunmilayo Olaide; Agbaje, Esther Oluwatoyin; Tota, Santoshkumar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Roots of Combretum mucronatum Schumach. & Thonn. (Combretaceae) and Capparis thonningii Schum. (Capparaceae) are used in southwest Nigeria in the treatment of inflammatory disorders and mental illness. This study evaluated the antidementic effect of the methanol root extracts of C. mucronatum and C. thonningii on scopolamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) induced memory impairment in mice. The effect of C. mucronatum and C. thonningii (50-200 mg/kg) administered orally for 3 days on memory impairments induced in mice by scopolamine was assessed in the passive avoidance and Morris water maze test and compared with that of tacrine (5 mg/kg, i.p.). The activities of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and antioxidant enzymes were estimated in the brain after the completion of behavioral studies. C. mucronatum and C. thonningii root extracts (50-200 mg/kg) reversed scopolamine-induced memory deficit with significant (p < 0.05) increase in transfer latency in passive avoidance test. Similarly, the extracts (200 mg/kg) ameliorated memory deficit as a result of significant (p < 0.001) decrease in escape latency and path length in Morris water maze test. The increased AChE activity induced by scopolamine was significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited by C. mucronatum and C. thonningii (100 and 200 mg/kg) treatment which was similar to the effect of tacrine. Both extracts significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated scopolamine-induced increase in oxidative stress parameters as well as restoration of glutathione activity. C. mucronatum and C. thonningii extracts possess significant anticholinesterase, antioxidant and antidementic properties, which may be useful in the management of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Dipeptide preparation Noopept prevents scopolamine-induced deficit of spatial memory in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Belnik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-04-01

    The effect of original nootropic preparation Noopept on learning and long-term memory was studied with BALB/c mice. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg) impaired long-term memory trace, while Noopept (0.5 mg/kg) had no significant effect. Noopept completely prevented the development of cognitive disorders induced by scopolamine (blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors). Our results confirmed the presence of choline-positive effect in dipeptide piracetam analogue Noopept on retrieval of learned skill of finding a submerged platform (spatial memory). We conclude that the effectiveness of this drug should be evaluated in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Caffeine attenuates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in humans.

    PubMed

    Riedel, W; Hogervorst, E; Leboux, R; Verhey, F; van Praag, H; Jolles, J

    1995-11-01

    Caffeine consumption can be beneficial for cognitive functioning. Although caffeine is widely recognized as a mild CNS stimulant drug, the most important consequence of its adenosine antagonism is cholinergic stimulation, which might lead to improvement of higher cognitive functions, particularly memory. In this study, the scopolamine model of amnesia was used to test the cholinergic effects of caffeine, administered as three cups of coffee. Subjects were 16 healthy volunteers who received 250 mg caffeine and 2 mg nicotine separately, in a placebo-controlled double-blind cross-over design. Compared to placebo, nicotine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of storage in short-term memory and attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of speed of short-term memory scanning. Nicotine also attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of reaction time in a response competition task. Caffeine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of free recall from short- and long-term memory, quality and speed of retrieval from long-term memory in a word learning task, and other cognitive and non-cognitive measures, such as perceptual sensitivity in visual search, reading speed, and rate of finger-tapping. On the basis of these results it was concluded that caffeine possesses cholinergic cognition enhancing properties. Caffeine could be used as a control drug in studies using the scopolamine paradigm and possibly also in other experimental studies of cognitive enhancers, as the effects of a newly developed cognition enhancing drug should at least be superior to the effects of three cups of coffee.

  12. Sulforaphane alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siyoung; Kim, Jisung; Seo, Sang Gwon; Choi, Bo-Ryoung; Han, Jung-Soo; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-07-01

    Sulforaphane, an organosulfur compound present in cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects in experimental in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegeneration. To determine whether sulforaphane can preserve cognitive function, we examined its effects on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice using the Morris water maze test. Sulforaphane (10 or 50mg/kg) was administered to C57BL/6 mice by oral gavage for 14 days (days 1-14), and memory impairment was induced by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (1mg/kg) for 7 days (days 8-14). Mice that received scopolamine alone showed impaired learning and memory retention and considerably decreased cholinergic system reactivity in the hippocampus and frontal cortex, as indicated by a decreased acetylcholine (ACh) level and an increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Sulforaphane significantly attenuated the scopolamine-induced memory impairment and improved cholinergic system reactivity, as indicated by an increased ACh level, decreased AChE activity, and increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. These effects of sulforaphane on cholinergic system reactivity were confirmed in vitro. Sulforaphane (10 or 20μM) increased the ACh level, decreased the AChE activity, and increased ChAT expression in scopolamine-treated primary cortical neurons. These observations suggest that sulforaphane might exert a significant neuroprotective effect on cholinergic deficit and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Antiamnesic Effects of Walnuts Consumption on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Shaahin; Golchin, Leila; Ansari, Mehdi; Moradi, Alireza; Shabani, Mohammad; Sheibani, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease, which impairs memory and cognitive function. Walnuts are a dietary source of polyphenols, antioxidants and other compounds with health beneficial effects. These characteristic of walnuts make them perfect candidates for evaluation of their possible effects on neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore the present study was designed to investigate the effects of walnuts consumption (2%, 6% and 9% walnut diets) on memory enhancement and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of brain in scopolamine-induced amnesic rats. Methods: Learning, memory and locomotor activity parameters were evaluated using Morris water maze (MWM), passive avoidance and rotarod tests. Results: Our results showed that consumption of walnuts at doses of 6% and 9% significantly restored the scopolamine-induced memory impairments in the MWM and passive avoidance tests. Moreover, the potential of walnuts to prevent scopolamine neurotoxicity was also reflected by the decreased AChE activity in the whole brain in comparison with the scopolamine group. Discussion: These results suggest that walnuts may be useful against memory impairment and it may exert these anti-amnesic activities via inhibition of AChE activity in the brain. It would be worthwhile to explore the potential of this nut and its active components in the management of the AD. PMID:27307953

  14. Rubus coreanus Miquel ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairments in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Lee, Min Young; Hong, Ji Eun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Chun, Jang Woo; Shin, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Eun Ji

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the effect of Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) on scopolamine-induced memory impairments in ICR mice. Mice were orally administrated RCM for 4 weeks and scopolamine was intraperitoneally injected into mice to induce memory impairment. RCM improved the scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. The increase of acetylcholinesterase activity caused by scopolamine was significantly attenuated by RCM treatment. RCM increased the levels of acetylcholine in the brain and serum of mice. The expression of choline acetyltransferase, phospho-cyclic AMP response element-binding protein, and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase was significantly increased within the brain of mice treated with RCM. The brain antioxidant enzyme activity decreased by scopolamine was increased by RCM. These results demonstrate that RCM exerts a memory-enhancing effect via the improvement of cholinergic function and the potentiated antioxidant activity in memory-impaired mice. The results suggest that RCM may be a useful agent for improving memory impairment.

  15. The Ameliorating Effect of Myrrh on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Samrat; Cho, Du-Hyong; Pariyar, Ramesh; Yoon, Chi-Su; Chang, Bo-yoon; Kim, Dae-Sung; Cho, Hyoung-Kwon; Kim, Sung Yeon; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul; Kim, Jaehyo; Seo, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Myrrh has been used since ancient times for the treatment of various diseases such as inflammatory diseases, gynecological diseases, and hemiplegia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of aqueous extracts of myrrh resin (AEM) on scopolamine-induced memory impairments in mice. AEM was estimated with (2E,5E)-6-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylhepta-2,4-dienal as a representative constituent by HPLC. The oral administration of AEM for 7 days significantly reversed scopolamine-induced reduction of spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze test. In the passive avoidance task, AEM also restored the decreased latency time of the retention trial by scopolamine treatment. In addition, Western blot analysis and Immunohistochemistry revealed that AEM reversed scopolamine-decreased phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Our study demonstrates for the first time that AEM ameliorates the scopolamine-induced memory impairments in mice and increases the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK in the hippocampus of mice brain. These results suggest that AEM has the therapeutic potential in memory impairments. PMID:26635888

  16. The Effects of Inhaled Pimpinella peregrina Essential Oil on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment, Anxiety, and Depression in Laboratory Rats.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Emel; Hritcu, Lucian; Dogan, Gulden; Hayta, Sukru; Bagci, Eyup

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, we identified the effects of inhaled Pimpinella peregrina essential oil (1 and 3 %, for 21 continuous days) on scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety, and depression in laboratory rats. Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests were used for assessing memory processes. Also, the anxiety and depressive responses were studied by means of the elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests. The scopolamine alone-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the spontaneous alternation percentage in Y-maze test, increase of the number of working and reference memory errors in radial arm-maze test, along with decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. Inhalation of the P. peregrina essential oil significantly improved memory formation and exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in scopolamine-treated rats. Our results suggest that the P. peregrina essential oil inhalation ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, studies on the P. peregrina essential oil may open a new therapeutic window for the prevention of neurological abnormalities closely related to Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Modulation of adenosine signaling prevents scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Josiane Woutheres; Melo, Gabriela Madalena de; Cognato, Giana de Paula; Vianna, Mônica Ryff Moreira; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine, a purine ribonucleoside, exhibits neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects in the brain and is involved in memory formation and cognitive function. Adenosine signaling is mediated by adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3); in turn, nucleotide and nucleoside-metabolizing enzymes and adenosine transporters regulate its levels. Scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, has profound amnesic effects in a variety of learning paradigms and has been used to induce cognitive deficits in animal models. This study investigated the effects of acute exposure to caffeine (a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors A1 and A2A), ZM 241385 (adenosine receptor A2A antagonist), DPCPX (adenosine receptor A1 antagonist), dipyridamole (inhibitor of nucleoside transporters) and EHNA (inhibitor of adenosine deaminase) in a model of pharmacological cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine in adult zebrafish. Caffeine, ZM 241385, DPCPX, dipyridamole, and EHNA were acutely administered independently via i.p. in zebrafish, followed by exposure to scopolamine dissolved in tank water (200μM). These compounds prevented the scopolamine-induced amnesia without impacting locomotor activity or social interaction. Together, these data support the hypothesis that adenosine signaling may modulate memory processing, suggesting that these compounds present a potential preventive strategy against cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive enhancing effect of the fermented Gumiganghwal-tang on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Weon, Jin Bae; Lee, Jiwoo; Eom, Min Rye; Jung, Youn Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Gumiganghwal-tang (GT) is a traditional herbal medicine that is widely used for its anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic actions. Fermented GT has been reported to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and to exert a neuroprotective effect. In this study, we investigated the effect of fermented GT against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice using the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. The results of the Morris water maze test indicated that fermented GT significantly decreased escape latency, as compared with that observed in the scopolamine-treated group. In the prove test, fermented GT attenuated the decreased time spent in the target quadrant observed after scopolamine treatment. The results of the passive avoidance test indicated that the treatment with fermented GT increased latency time when compared with the scopolamine-treated group. Moreover, fermented GT inhibited AChE activity in the hippocampi of the treated mice. These results suggest that fermented GT reduced scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice through AChE inhibition. Therefore, we hypothesize that fermented GT may be a useful therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of polygalacic acid on scopolamine-induced memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changrun; Shen, Jinyang; Meng, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaolin; Li, Fei

    2016-02-15

    Polygala tenuifolia Willd is a Traditional Chinese Medicine used for the treatment of learning and memory deficits. Triterpenoid saponins, the main bioactive compounds of Polygala tenuifolia Willd, are easily hydrolyzed to polygalacic acid (PA). The present study was undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective effects of PA on scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction and to elucidate its underlying mechanisms of action. PA (3, 6, and 12 mg/kg) was administered orally to mice for fourteen days, and scopolamine (1 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally for fourteen days to induce memory impairment. Memory-related behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze. Cholinergic and neuroinflammatory activities were measured in brain tissue. Superoxide dismutase activities, malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione contents were also measured in the brains. Treatment with scopolamine significantly increased the escape latency time, decreased the number of crossings, and shortened the time spent in the target quadrant, while PA reversed these scopolamine-induced effects. PA significantly improved cholinergic system reactivity, as indicated by decreased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, and elevated levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. PA also significantly ameliorated neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in mice. These results suggest that PA might exert a significant neuroprotective effect on cognitive impairment, driven in part by the modulation of cholinergic activity and neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacopa monniera Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Impairment of Spatial Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Manish Kumar; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Khanduja, Krishan Lal; Anand, Akshay

    2011-01-01

    Scopolamine, an anticholinergic, is an attractive amnesic agent for discerning the action of candidate antiamnesic drugs. Bacopa monniera Linn (Syn. Brahmi) is one such antiamnesic agent that is frequently used in the ancient Indian medical system. We have earlier reported the reversal of diazepam-induced amnesia with B. monniera. In this study we wanted to test if scopolamine-induced impairment of spatial memory can also be ameliorated by B. monniera using water maze mouse model. The objective of study was to study the effect of B. monniera on scopolamine-induced amnesia. We employed Morris water maze scale to test the amnesic effect of scopolamine and its reversal by B. monniera. Rotarod test was conducted to screen muscle coordination activity of mice. Scopolamine significantly impaired the acquisition and retrieval of memory producing both anterograde and retrograde amnesia. Bacopa monniera extract was able to reverse both anterograde and retrograde amnesia. We propose that B. monniera's effects on cholinergic system may be helpful for developing alternative therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21607013

  1. Neuroprotective Effects of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase on Scopolamine Induced Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jun-Ho; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Song, Joo-Hyun; Ha, Joohun

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy metabolism, is activated in response to cellular stress when intracellular levels of AMP increase. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of AMPK against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in vivo and glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. An adenovirus expressing AMPK wild type alpha subunit (WT) or a dominant negative form (DN) was injected into the hippocampus of rats using a stereotaxic apparatus. The AMPK WT-injected rats showed significant reversal of the scopolamine induced cognitive deficit as evaluated by escape latency in the Morris water maze. In addition, they showed enhanced acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-reactive neurons in the hippocampus, implying increased cholinergic activity in response to AMPK. We also studied the cellular mechanism by which AMPK protects against glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrated that AMPK WT-infected cells increased cell viability and reduced Annexin V positive hippocampal neurons. Western blot analysis indicated that AMPK WT-infected cells reduced the expression of Bax and had no effects on Bcl-2, which resulted in a decreased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These data suggest that AMPK is a useful cognitive impairment treatment target, and that its beneficial effects are mediated via the protective capacity of hippocampal neurons. PMID:23946693

  2. Effects of scallop shell extract on scopolamine-induced memory impairment and MK801-induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasushi; Inoue, Tatsuro; Kawaminami, Satoshi; Fujita, Miho

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the neuroprotective effects of the organic components of scallop shells (scallop shell extract) on memory impairment and locomotor activity induced by scopolamine or 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo (a,d) cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK801). Effect of the scallop shell extract on memory impairment and locomotor activity was investigated using the Y-maze test, the Morris water maze test, and the open field test. Scallop shell extract significantly reduced scopolamine-induced short-term memory impairment and partially reduced scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment in the Morris water maze test. Scallop shell extract suppressed scopolamine-induced elevation of acetylcholine esterase activity in the cerebral cortex. Treatment with scallop shell extract reversed the increase in locomotor activity induced by scopolamine. Scallop shell extract also suppressed the increase in locomotor activity induced by MK801. Our results provide initial evidence that scallop shell extract reduces scopolamine-induced memory impairment and suppresses MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lithium attenuates scopolamine-induced memory deficits with inhibition of GSK-3β and preservation of postsynaptic components.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiong; Tan, Lu; Liu, Dan; Liu, Xing-Hua; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction plays a crucial role in the memory deterioration of Alzheimer's disease, but the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. By employing a widely recognized cholinergic dysfunction rat model that was produced by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine, we investigated the mechanisms underlying scopolamine-induced memory deficits. We found that scopolamine caused spatial learning and memory deficits that involved activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and impairments of dendrite arborization and spine formation/maturation associated with alterations of AMPAR, Homer1, and CREB. Pretreatment by intraperitoneal injection of lithium, an inhibitor of GSK-3, for one week prevented the synaptic changes and the learning and memory deficits induced by scopolamine. Lithium treatment also activated cholineacetyltransferase and inhibited acetylcholinesterase, which might have also contributed to the improved memory. Our findings suggest that GSK-3β may be a key molecular mediator of cholinergic synaptic dysfunction, and that inhibition of GSK-3β by lithium may be promising in protecting cholinergic synaptic functions.

  4. Beneficial effect of commercial Rhodiola extract in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment on active avoidance.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, Liliya V; Getova, Damianka P; Doncheva, Nina D; Marchev, Andrey S; Georgiev, Milen I

    2016-12-04

    Rhodiola rosea L., family Crassulaceae also known as Golden Root or Arctic root is one of the most widely used medicinal plants with effect on cognitive dysfunction, psychological stress and depression. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a standardized commercial Rhodiola extract on learning and memory processes in naive rats as well as its effects in rats with scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

  5. Effects of vitexin on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Esmail; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shafiee, Mahsa

    2013-06-30

    Various synthetic derivatives of natural flavonoids are known to have neuroactive properties. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of vitexin (5, 7, 4-trihydroxyflavone-8-glucoside), a flavonoid found in such plants as tartary buckwheat sprouts, wheat leaves phenolome, Mimosa pudica Linn and Passiflora spp, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats. To achieve this goal, we assessed the effects of vitexin on memory retrieval in the presence or absence of scopolamine using a step-through passive avoidance trial. In the first part of the study, vitexin (25, 50, and 100 microM) was administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) before acquisition trials. In the second part, vitexin, at the same doses, was administered before scopolamine (10 microg, i.c.v.) and before the acquisition trials. During retention tests, vitexin (100 microM) in the absence of scopolamine significantly increased the step-through latencies compared to scopolamine. In addition, vitexin (100 microM) significantly reversed the shorter step-through latencies induced by scopolamine (P < 0.05). These results indicate that vitexin has a potential role in enhancing memory retrieval. A possible mechanism is modulation of cholinergic receptors; however, other mechanisms may be involved in its effects in acute exposure.

  6. Secreted calmodulin-like skin protein ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaaki; Tajima, Hirohisa; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2014-06-18

    Humanin, a short bioactive peptide, inhibits cell death in a variety of cell-based death models through Humanin receptors in vitro. In vivo, Humanin ameliorates both muscarinic receptor antagonist-induced memory impairment in normal mice and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-relevant mouse models including aged transgenic mice expressing a familial AD-linked gene. Recently, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP) has been shown to be secreted from skin tissues, contain a region minimally similar to the core region of Humanin, and inhibit AD-related neuronal death through the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor on the cell surface in vitro. As CLSP is much more potent than Humanin and efficiently transported through blood circulation across the blood-brain barrier to the central nervous system, CLSP is considered as a physiological agonist that binds to the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor and triggers the Humanin-induced signals in central nervous system. However, it remains unknown whether CLSP ameliorates memory impairment in mouse dementia models as Humanin does. In this study, we show that recombinant CLSP, administered intracerebroventricularly or intraperitoneally, ameliorates scopolamine-induced dementia in mice.

  7. Gongjin-Dan Enhances Hippocampal Memory in a Mouse Model of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Hong, Sung-Shin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Sam-Keun; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of Gongjin-Dan (GJD) on the memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection. BALB/c mice were orally treated with GJD (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, daily) or tacrine (THA, 10 mg/kg) for 10 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. The radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests were performed to evaluate the animal’s learning and memory. Scopolamine increased the task completing time, the number of total errors (reference and working memory error) in the radial arm maze task, and the latency time in the passive avoidance test, which were significantly ameliorated by treatment with GJD. The GJD treatment also attenuated the scopolamine-induced hyperactivation of acetylcholinesterase activity, and suppression of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and their receptors in the hippocampus. These effects of GJD were supported by both the doublecortin (DCX)-positive staining and Nissl staining, which were used to measure hippocampal neurogenesis and atrophy, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that GJD exerts a potent anti-amnesic effect, and its underlying mechanism might involve the modulation of cholinergic activity. PMID:27483466

  8. Gongjin-Dan Enhances Hippocampal Memory in a Mouse Model of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Hong, Sung-Shin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Sam-Keun; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of Gongjin-Dan (GJD) on the memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection. BALB/c mice were orally treated with GJD (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, daily) or tacrine (THA, 10 mg/kg) for 10 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. The radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests were performed to evaluate the animal's learning and memory. Scopolamine increased the task completing time, the number of total errors (reference and working memory error) in the radial arm maze task, and the latency time in the passive avoidance test, which were significantly ameliorated by treatment with GJD. The GJD treatment also attenuated the scopolamine-induced hyperactivation of acetylcholinesterase activity, and suppression of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and their receptors in the hippocampus. These effects of GJD were supported by both the doublecortin (DCX)-positive staining and Nissl staining, which were used to measure hippocampal neurogenesis and atrophy, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that GJD exerts a potent anti-amnesic effect, and its underlying mechanism might involve the modulation of cholinergic activity.

  9. Antiamnesic activity of Syzygium cumini against scopolamine induced spatial memory impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Alikatte, Kanaka Latha; Akondi, Butchi Raju; Yerragunta, Venu Gopal; Veerareddy, Prabhakar Reddy; Palle, Suresh

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the Antiamnesic effects of methanolic extract of Syzygium cumini (MESC) on spatial memory impairments induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a muscarinic antagonist, using the Radial arm maze, Morris water maze, learned helpless ness tests. Effect of MESC was evaluated and compared to standard drug, piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p.). The MESC significantly (p<0.05) improved the impairment of short term or working memory induced by scopolamine in the Radial arm maze test, and significantly (p<0.05) reversed cognitive impairments in rats as measured by the learned helplessness test. In addition, MESC decreased escape latencies in the Morris water maze test. The activity of acetylcholinesterase in the brain was inhibited significantly (p<0.05) by treatment with MESC to a level similar to that observed in rats treated with piracetam. Moreover treatment with MESC (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) to scopolamine induced rats significantly (p<0.05) decreased TBARS levels which was accompanied by an increase in the activities of SOD and Catalase. MESC has dose dependent effect and 400 mg/kg dose shown more prominent results when compared to 200 mg/kg dose of MESC. These results indicate that MESC may exert anti-amnesic activity via inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant mechanisms in the brain. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ameliorative effect of rosmarinic acid on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Mahtaj, Azam Kazemian

    2015-01-12

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural phenol that exerts different biological activities, such as antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we hypothesized that administration of RA (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg, p.o.) for 7 days would effect on scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction as an extensively used model of cognitive impairment. The rats were divided into 10 groups. The acquisition trial was done 1h after the last administration of RA. Animals were divided into control, RA (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg) and donepezil (2 mg/kg) treated controls, scopolamine, RA (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg), and donepezil (2 mg/kg) treated scopolamine groups. Memory impairment was induced by scopolamine treatment (1 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min after the administration of RA, donepezil, or saline. Scopolamine administration caused cognition deficits in the PAL and memory paradigm. While orally RA administration (16 and 32 mg/kg) improved learning and memory in control rats, it reversed learning and memory deficits of scopolamine received groups. Administration of RA at the dose of 8 mg/kg did not alter cognitive function in control and scopolamine treated groups. The combination of anticholinesterase, neuroprotective, and antioxidant properties of RA may all be responsible for the observed effects. These results indicate the beneficial effects of subchronic RA administration in passive avoidance learning and memory in control rats as well as in a pharmacological model of cholinergic deficit which continue to expand the knowledge base in creating new treatment strategies for cognition deficits and dementia. Of course, further studies are warranted for clinical use of RA in the management of demented subjects.

  11. Scopolamine-induced deficits in social memory in mice: reversal by donepezil.

    PubMed

    Riedel, G; Kang, S H; Choi, D Y; Platt, B

    2009-12-01

    Deficits in social behaviour is a characteristic of numerous mental disorders including autism, schizophrenia, depression and Alzheimer's disease. For the assessment of pharmacological and genetic experimental disease models, conventional social interaction tasks bear the uncertainty that any drug-induced abnormality of the investigator may feed back to the drug-free companion modifying its reactions. A considerable technical improvement was recently reported by Moy et al. [Moy SS, Nadler JJ, Perez A, Barbaro RP, Johns JM, Magnuson T, et al. Sociability and preference for social novelty in five inbred strains: an approach to assess autistic-like behaviours in mice. Genes Brain Behav 2004;3:287-302] in which the drug free partner is confined to a small cage and social contacts of the investigator are recorded uncontaminated of any social reactions of the stranger. Using this novel behavioural paradigm, we here show in C57Bl/6 female mice that sociability (social interaction with a stranger mouse) is not impaired after administration of the anxiolytic diazepam (0.1-1 mg/kg) or the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine hydrobromide (0.1-1 mg/kg). However, social memory tested after a short time interval was impaired by both drugs in a dose-dependent manner (diazepam: > or = 0.5mg/kg; scopolamine: > or = 0.3mg/kg). The scopolamine-induced short-term memory deficit was reversed to normal by the choline esterase inhibitor donepezil (1 mg/kg). Given this dependence of social recognition on the cholinergic system, combined with the clinical observation of reduced social contacts in dementia patients, sociability may offer a novel endpoint biomarker with translational value in experimental models of cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts of Black Maca (Lepidium meyenii) improve scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Julio; Dang, Haixia; Gong, Mengjuan; Liu, Xinmin; Chen, Shi-Lin; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2007-10-01

    Lepidium meyenii Walp. (Brassicaceae), known as Maca, is a Peruvian hypocotyl growing exclusively between 4,000 and 4,500 m altitude in the central Peruvian Andes, particularly in Junin plateau. Previously, Black variety of Maca showed to be more beneficial than other varieties of Maca on learning and memory in ovariectomized mice on the water finding test. The present study aimed to test two different doses of aqueous (0.50 and 2.00 g/kg) and hydroalcoholic (0.25 and 1.00 g/kg) extracts of Black Maca administered for 35 days on memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1mg/kg body weight i.p.) in male mice. Memory and learning were evaluated using the water Morris maze and the step-down avoidance test. Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activities in brain were also determined. Both extracts of Black Maca significantly ameliorated the scopolamine-induced memory impairment as measured in both the water Morris maze and the step-down avoidance tests. Black Maca extracts inhibited AChE activity, whereas MAO activity was not affected. These results indicate that Black Maca improves scopolamine-induced memory deficits.

  13. Antiamnesic and Antioxidants Effects of Ferulago angulata Essential Oil Against Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Laboratory Rats.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Bagci, Eyup; Aydin, Emel; Mihasan, Marius

    2015-09-01

    Ferulago angulata (Apiaceae) is a shrub indigenous to western Iran, Turkey and Iraq. In traditional medicine, F. angulata is recommended for treating digestive pains, hemorrhoids, snake bite, ulcers and as sedative. In the present study, the effects of inhaled F. angulata essential oil (1 and 3%, daily, for 21 days) on spatial memory performance were assessed in scopolamine-treated rats. Scopolamine-induced memory impairments were observed, as measured by the Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks. Decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase along with increase of acetylcholinesterase activity and decrease of total content of reduced glutathione were observed in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control. Production of protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde significantly increased in the rat hippocampal homogenates of scopolamine-treated animals as compared with control, as a consequence of impaired antioxidant enzymes activities. Additionally, in scopolamine-treated rats exposure to F. angulata essential oil significantly improved memory formation and decreased oxidative stress, suggesting memory-enhancing and antioxidant effects. Therefore, our results suggest that multiple exposures to F. angulata essential oil ameliorate scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  14. The role of nicotinic receptors in the amelioration of cholinesterase inhibitors in scopolamine-induced memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2009-10-01

    Nicotine receptors in the brain are closely related with memory amelioration induced by cholinesterase inhibitors. The present study was undertaken to clarify the role of nicotinic receptors in the ameliorative effects of cholinesterase inhibitors on scopolamine-induced memory deficit. Drug effects were measured using an eight-arm radial maze with four arms baited. Hippocampal theta rhythm during the radial maze task was also recorded with a polygraph system using a telemetric technique. Scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a spatial memory deficit as well as an increase in hippocampal theta power during radial maze performance. Pilocarpine, nicotine, physostigmine, and donepezil antagonized the effects of scopolamine. The ameliorative effects of nicotine, physostigmine, and donepezil but not piocarpine on memory performance and hippocampal theta activity were reversed by mecamylamine. These results indicate that nicotinic receptors have an essential role in the ameliorative effects of cholinesterase inhibitors in both scopolamine-induced memory deficit and the increase in hippocampal theta activity.

  15. P7C3 Attenuates the Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Song, Lu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Memory impairment is the most common symptom in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the memory enhancing effects of P7C3, a recently identified compound with robust proneurogenic and neuroprotective effects, on the cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. Different behavior tests including the Y-maze, Morris water maze, and passive avoidance tests were performed to measure cognitive functions. Scopolamine significantly decreased the spontaneous alternation and step-through latency of C57BL/6J mice in Y-maze test and passive avoidance test, whereas increased the time of mice spent to find the hidden platform in Morris water maze test. Importantly, intraperitoneal administration of P7C3 effectively reversed those Scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, P7C3 treatment significantly enhanced the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway in the cortex and hippocampus, and the usage of selective BDNF signaling inhibitor fully blocked the anti-amnesic effects of P7C3. Therefore, these findings suggest that P7C3 could improve the scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment possibly through activation of BDNF signaling pathway, thereby exhibiting a cognition-enhancing potential.

  16. p-Coumaric acid enhances long-term potentiation and recovers scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Bum; Lee, Seok; Hwang, Eun-Sang; Maeng, Sungho; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-10-21

    Due to the improvement of medical level, life expectancy increased. But the increased incidence of cognitive disorders is an emerging social problem. Current drugs for dementia treatment can only delay the progress rather than cure. p-Coumaric acid is a phenylpropanoic acid derived from aromatic amino acids and known as a precursor for flavonoids such as resveratrol and naringenin. It was shown to reduce oxidative stress, inhibit genotoxicity and exert neuroprotection. Based on these findings, we evaluated whether p-coumaric acid can protect scopolamine induced learning and memory impairment by measuring LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice and cognitive behaviors in rats. p-Coumaric acid dose-dependently increased the total activity of fEPSP after high frequency stimulation and attenuated scopolamine-induced blockade of fEPSP in the hippocampal CA1 area. In addition, while scopolamine shortened the step-through latency in the passive avoidance test and prolonged the latency as well as reduced the latency in the target quadrant in the Morris water maze test, co-treatment of p-coumaric acid improved avoidance memory and long-term retention of spatial memory in behavioral tests. Since p-coumaric acid improved electrophysiological and cognitive functional deterioration by scopolamine, it may have regulatory effects on central cholinergic synapses and is expected to improve cognitive problems caused by abnormality of the cholinergic nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. N-palmitoyl serotonin alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment via regulation of cholinergic and antioxidant systems, and expression of BDNF and p-CREB in mice.

    PubMed

    Min, A Young; Doo, Choon Nan; Son, Eun Jung; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Kun Jong; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-12-05

    N-Palmitoyl-5-hydroxytryptamines (Pal-5HT), a cannabinoid, has recently been reported to express anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory actions in RBL-2H3 cells, and ameliorate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT-22 cells. In this study, we examined the effect of Pal-5HT on deficits of learning and memory induced by scopolamine in mice. Memory performance was evaluated using Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), level of oxidative stress markers, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) were determined. Loss of neuronal cells in hippocampus was evaluated by histological examinations. Pal-5HT significantly improved the amnesia in the behavioral assessment. Pal-5HT regulated cholinergic function by inhibiting scopolamine-induced elevation of AChE activity and decline of ChAT activity. Pal-5HT suppressed oxidative stress by increasing activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) or NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and lowering MDA level. Additionally, it prevented against scopolamine-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Moreover, Pal-5HT suppressed the death of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 regions, while it restored expression of p-CREB and BDNF in hippocampus. Taken together, Pal-5HT is suggested to ameliorate deficits of memory and learning through regulation of cholinergic function, activation of antioxidant systems as well as restoration of BDNF and p-CREB expression. From these, Pal-5HT may be a potential candidate to prevent against neurodegeneration related to the memory deficit.

  18. Agmatine, a metabolite of L-arginine, reverses scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Utkan, Tijen; Gocmez, Semil S; Regunathan, Soundararajan; Aricioglu, Feyza

    2012-10-01

    Agmatine (l-amino-4-guanidino-butane), a metabolite of L-arginine through the action of arginine decarboxylase, is a novel neurotransmitter. In the present study, effects of agmatine on cognitive functions have been evaluated by using one trial step-down passive avoidance and three panel runway task. Agmatine (20, 40, 80 mg/kg i.p.) was administered either in the presence or absence of a cholinergic antagonist, scopolamine (1 mg/kg i.p.). Scopolamine significantly impaired learning and memory in both passive avoidance and three panel runway test. Agmatine did not affect emotional learning, working and reference memory but significantly improved scopolamine-induced impairment of learning and memory in a dose dependent manner. Our results indicate that agmatine, as an endogenous substance, may have an important role in modulation of learning and memory functions.

  19. The Ameliorating Effect of Steamed and Fermented Codonopsis lanceolata on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Jin Bae; Yun, Bo-Ra; Lee, Jiwoo; Eom, Min Rye; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Hyeon Yong; Park, Dong-Sik; Chung, Hee-Chul; Chung, Jae Youn; Ma, Choong Je

    2013-01-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata (Campanulaceae) have been traditionally used to treat lung inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, tonsillitis, and pharyngitis. The present study was performed to evaluate the cognitive-enhancing effects of steamed and fermented C. lanceolata in scopolamine-induced memory impairments in mice. Cognitive abilities were determined by the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. Mice orally received fermented C. lanceolata extract at doses of 100, 300, or 500 mg/kg body weight. Fermented C. lanceolata extract (500 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) significantly shortened the escape latency times that were increased by scopolamine on the 4th day of trial sessions in the Morris water maze task. In addition, it exerted longer step-through latency times than those of the scopolamine-treated group in the passive avoidance test. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effects of fermented C. lanceolata extract on glutamate-induced neurocytotoxicity were investigated in HT22 cells. Fermented C. lanceolata extract showed a relative protection ratio of 59.62% at 500 μg/mL. In conclusion, fermented C. lanceolata extract ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairments, exerted neuroprotective effects, and improved activity compared to that found with original C. lanceolata. Further study will be required to investigate the mechanisms underlying this cognitive-enhancing activity. PMID:23935665

  20. Hippocampal chromatin-modifying enzymes are pivotal for scopolamine-induced synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Padmanabh; Konar, Arpita; Kumar, Ashish; Srivas, Sweta; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2015-08-01

    The amnesic potential of scopolamine is well manifested through synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and behavioral paradigms of memory impairment. However, the underlying mechanism remains obscure and consequently ideal therapeutic target is lacking. In this context, chromatin-modifying enzymes, which regulate memory gene expression changes, deserve major attention. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of chromatin-modifying enzymes and recovery potential of enzyme modulators in scopolamine-induced amnesia. Scopolamine administration drastically up-regulated DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1) and HDAC2 expression while CREB-binding protein (CBP), DNMT3a and DNMT3b remained unaffected. HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate and DNMT inhibitor Aza-2'deoxycytidine recovered scopolamine-impaired hippocampal-dependent memory consolidation with concomitant increase in the expression of synaptic plasticity genes Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Arc and level of histone H3K9 and H3K14 acetylation and decrease in DNA methylation level. Sodium butyrate showed more pronounced effect than Aza-2'deoxycytidine and their co-administration did not exhibit synergistic effect on gene expression. Taken together, we showed for the first time that scopolamine-induced up-regulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes, HDAC2 and DNMT1, leads to gene expression changes and consequent decline in memory consolidation. Our findings on the action of scopolamine as an epigenetic modulator can pave a path for ideal therapeutic targets. We propose the following putative pathway for scopolamine-mediated memory impairment; scopolamine up-regulates hippocampal DNMT1 and HDAC2 expression, induces methylation and deacetylation of BDNF and Arc promoter, represses gene expression and eventually impairs memory consolidation. On the other hand, Aza-2 and NaB inhibit DNMT1 and HDAC2 respectively, up-regulate BDNF and Arc expression and recover memory consolidation. We elucidate the action of

  1. Protective effects of aloe-emodin on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Xie, Jianmei; Wang, Yuting; Wang, Shi; Wu, Shuangchan; Wang, Qiman; Ding, Hong

    2014-12-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE) is one of the most important active components of Rheum officinale Baill. The present study aimed to investigate that AE could attenuate scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and modulating oxidative stress. Kunming (KM) mice were received intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (2 mg/kg) to induce cognitive impairment. Learning and memory performance were assessed in the Morris water maze (MWM). After behavioral testing, the mice were sacrificed and their hippocampi were removed for biochemical assays (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), AChE and acetylcholine (ACh)). In vitro, we also performed the AChE activity assay and H₂O₂-induced PC12 cells toxicity assay. After 2 h exposure to 200 μM H₂O₂ in PC12 cells, the cytotoxicity were evaluated by cell viability (MTT), nitric oxide (NO)/lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Our results confirmed that AE showed significant improvement in cognitive deficit in scopolamine-induced amnesia animal model. Besides, it increased SOD, GPx activities and ACh content, while decreased the level of MDA and AChE activity in AE treated mice. In addition, AE was found to inhibit AChE activity (IC₅₀ = 18.37 μg/ml) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, preincubation of PC12 cells with AE could prevent cytotoxicity induced by H₂O₂ and reduce significantly extracellular release of NO, LDH and intracellular accumulation of ROS. The study indicated that AE could have neuroprotective effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) via inhibiting the activity of AChE and modulating oxidative stress.

  2. The effects of Anethum graveolens essence on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mesripour, Azadeh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Since Anethum graveolens (Dill) has phytoestrogenic compounds and it is proven that estrogens exert beneficial effects on cognition; the aim of this study was to understand if this plant can improve memory performance. Male Balb/c mice weighing 25-30 g were used in this study and memory was assessed by the novel object recognition task. In this method, the difference in the exploration time between a familiar object and a novel object is taken as an index of memory performance (recognition index, RI). Scopolamine significantly reduced memory index (RI = -15.5% ± 3.0). Dill essence (100 mg/kg, ip) prevented the harmful effects of scopolamine on memory (RI = 40% ± 5.5), thus RI did not differ with control animals (RI = 50% ± 5.8). In addition, 17-β estradiol also prevented memory impairment in animals (0.2 mg/kg, ip; RI = 35.8% ± 6.5). Nevertheless, the beneficial effects of dill essence were antagonized by prior injection of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg, ip; RI = -30% ± 7.8). Although phytoesrogens are not steroids, the beneficial effect of dill on memory, at least in part, may have been achieved by estrogenic receptors present in the brain. Thus dill essence could be promising in improving memory and cognition, mainly in postmenopausal women. PMID:27168754

  3. The effects of Anethum graveolens essence on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Mesripour, Azadeh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Bahrami, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Since Anethum graveolens (Dill) has phytoestrogenic compounds and it is proven that estrogens exert beneficial effects on cognition; the aim of this study was to understand if this plant can improve memory performance. Male Balb/c mice weighing 25-30 g were used in this study and memory was assessed by the novel object recognition task. In this method, the difference in the exploration time between a familiar object and a novel object is taken as an index of memory performance (recognition index, RI). Scopolamine significantly reduced memory index (RI = -15.5% ± 3.0). Dill essence (100 mg/kg, ip) prevented the harmful effects of scopolamine on memory (RI = 40% ± 5.5), thus RI did not differ with control animals (RI = 50% ± 5.8). In addition, 17-β estradiol also prevented memory impairment in animals (0.2 mg/kg, ip; RI = 35.8% ± 6.5). Nevertheless, the beneficial effects of dill essence were antagonized by prior injection of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg, ip; RI = -30% ± 7.8). Although phytoesrogens are not steroids, the beneficial effect of dill on memory, at least in part, may have been achieved by estrogenic receptors present in the brain. Thus dill essence could be promising in improving memory and cognition, mainly in postmenopausal women.

  4. Inhibition of central angiotensin converting enzyme ameliorates scopolamine induced memory impairment in mice: role of cholinergic neurotransmission, cerebral blood flow and brain energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tota, Santoshkumar; Nath, Chandishwar; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Shukla, Rakesh; Hanif, Kashif

    2012-06-15

    Evidences indicate that inhibition of central Renin angiotensin system (RAS) ameliorates memory impairment in animals and humans. Earlier we have reported involvement of central angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in streptozotocin induced neurodegeneration and memory impairment. The present study investigated the role of central ACE in cholinergic neurotransmission, brain energy metabolism and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in model of memory impairment induced by injection of scopolamine in mice. Perindopril (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg, PO) was given orally for one week before administration of scopolamine (3mg/kg, IP). Then, memory function was evaluated by Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. CBF was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Biochemical and molecular parameters were estimated after the completion of behavioral studies. Scopolamine caused impairment in memory which was associated with reduced CBF, acetylcholine (ACh) level and elevated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Perindopril ameliorated scopolamine induced amnesia in both the behavioral paradigms. Further, perindopril prevented elevation of AChE and MDA level in mice brain. There was a significant increase in CBF and ACh level in perindopril treated mice. However, scopolamine had no significant effect on ATP level and mRNA expression of angiotensin receptors and ACE in cortex and hippocampus. But, perindopril significantly decreased ACE activity in brain without affecting its mRNA expression. The study clearly showed the interaction between ACE and cholinergic neurotransmission and beneficial effect of perindopril can be attributed to improvement in central cholinergic neurotransmission and CBF.

  5. Anti-amnesic activity of Citrus aurantium flowers extract against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Samira; Rabiei, Zahra; Alibabaei, Zahra; Mokhtari, Shiva; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Deris, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that mostly affects the elderly population. Learning and memory impairment as the most characteristic manifestation of dementia could be induced chemically by scopolamine, a cholinergic antagonist. Cholinergic neurotransmission mediated brain oxidative stress. Citrus aurantium (CA) has traditionally been used for the treatment of insomnia, anxiety and epilepsy. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Citrus aurantium on scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficit in rats. Forty-two Wistar rats were divided into six equal groups. (1) Control (received saline), (2) SCOP (scopolamine at a dose of 1 mg/kg for 15 days), (3) and (4) SCOP + CA (scopolamine and CA extract at doses of 300 and 600 mg/kg per day for 15 days), (5) and (6) intact groups (CA extract at 300 and 600 mg/kg per day for 15 days, respectively). Administration of CA flower extract significantly restored memory and learning impairments induced by scopolamine in the passive avoidance test and also reduced escape latency during trial sessions in the Morris water maze test. Citrus aurantium flower extract significantly decreased the serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Citrus aurantium flower extract has repairing effects on memory and behavioral disorders produced by scopolamine and may have beneficial effects in the treatment of AD.

  6. Melatonin attenuates scopolamine-induced memory/synaptic disorder by rescuing EPACs/miR-124/Egr1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Tang, Hui; Tan, Lu; Wang, Xiang; Gao, Xin-Ya; Xiong, Yan-Si; Liu, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent type of dementia in elderly people. There are decreased melatonin levels in the serum of AD patients, and melatonin supplements are able to reverse AD pathology and memory deficits in many animal experiments and clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanism regarding how melatonin rescues the AD-like memory/synaptic disorder remains unknown. Here, we use the Morris water maze, step-down inhibitory avoidance task, in vivo long-term potentiation recording, and Golgi staining and report that intraperitoneal injection of melatonin (1 mg/kg/day) for 14 days in rats effectively reverses the memory and synaptic impairment in scopolamine-induced amnesia, a well-recognized dementia animal model. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting experiments, we further determined that melatonin rescues the EPACs/miR-124/Egr1 signal pathway, which is important in learning and memory, as reported recently. Our studies provide a novel underlying epigenetic mechanism for melatonin to attenuate the synaptic disorder and could benefit drug discovery in neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5th day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  8. [Effect and mechanism of Coeloglossum viride var. bracteatum extract on scopolamine-induced deficits of learning and memory behavior of rodents].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Ya-fang; Ma, Bo; Liu, Geng-tao; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect and mechanism of Coeloglossum viride var. bracteatum extract (CE) on scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficits. Learning and memory deficits of mice were evaluated by step-down passive avoidance test. Long-term potentiation of rats was detected in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus. Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activities were also determined. The results showed that scopolamine impaired learning and memory performance and LTP induction in hippocampus. Oral administration of CE (5, 10, and 20 mg x kg(-1)) significantly alleviated scopolamine-induced memory deficits measured by step-down test (P < 0.05). CE (5 mg x kg(-1), ip) significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of scopolamine on LTP in rats. In addition, CE was found to increase the activity of ChAT in rat brain. These results suggested that CE could alleviate scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficits, which might be due to the LTP-improvement and ChAT activity enhancement.

  9. Effects of Fructus Akebiae on learning and memory impairment in a scopolamine-induced animal model of dementia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JINGHUA; WANG, XUAN; LV, BAOSHENG; YUAN, WEIXIU; FENG, ZEGUO; MI, WEIDONG; ZHANG, HONG

    2014-01-01

    Fructus Akebiae (FAE) is a component of traditional Chinese medicines used for the clinical treatment of amnesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of FAE extract on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment in mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. Treatment with FAE (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) was investigated in scopolamine-treated animals, and its effects on different types of memory were examined using the T-maze, the Morris water maze task, the novel object recognition test, the passive avoidance task and the step-down test. The results revealed that 5 and 10 mg/kg FAE attenuated scopolamine-mediated impairment of cognition, including spatial, episodic, aversive, and short- and long-term memory. Overall, these results suggest that FAE is an effective cognitive enhancer, and thus highlights the value of a multi-target strategy to address the complexity of cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25009638

  10. Neuroprotective and Antiamnesic Effects of Mitragyna inermis Willd (Rubiaceae) on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bum, Elisabeth Ngo; Taïwé, Germain Sotoing; Ngoupaye, Gwladys Temkou; Sidiki, Neteydji; Moto, Fleur Clarisse Okomolo; Kouemou, Nadège; Njapdounke, Stephanie Jacqueline Kameni; Nkantchoua, Gisele; Omam, Jean Pierre Omam; Mairaira, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To assess memory improvement and neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of Mitragyna inermis (M. inermis) leaf decoction on the central nervous system. Methodology. Leaf decoction of M. inermis was tested on learning and memory in normal and scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in mice using memory behavioral tests such as the Morris water maze, object recognition task, and elevated plus maze. Oxidative stress enzymes—catalase, superoxide dismutase, and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, a product of lipid peroxidation—were quantified. In each test, mice 18 to 25 g were divided into groups of 5. Results. The extract reversed the effects of scopolamine in mice. The extract significantly increased discrimination index in the object recognition task test and inflexion ratio in the elevated plus maze test. The times spent in target quadrant in MWM increased while the transfer latency decreased in mice treated by M. inermis at the dose of 196.5 mg/kg. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly increased, whereas the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance was significantly decreased after 8 consecutive days of treatment with M. inermis at the dose of 393 mg/kg. Conclusion. These results suggest that M. inermis leaf extract possess potential antiamnesic effects. PMID:28386162

  11. ESP-102, a standardized combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, significantly improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, So Young; Lee, Ki Yong; Koo, Kyung Ah; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lim, Song Won; Kim, Young Choong; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2005-02-25

    We assessed the effects of oral treatments of ESP-102, a standardized combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, on learning and memory deficit. The cognition-enhancing effect of ESP-102 was investigated in scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) amnesic mice with both passive avoidance and Morris water maze performance tests. Acute oral treatment (single administration prior to scopolamine treatment) of mice with ESP-102 (doses in the range of 10 to 100 mg/kg body weight) significantly reduced scopolamine-induced memory deficits in the passive avoidance performance test. Another noteworthy result included the fact that prolonged oral daily treatments of mice with much lower amounts of ESP-102 (1 and 10 mg/kg body weight) for ten days reversed scopolamine-induced memory deficits. In the Morris water maze performance test, both acute and prolonged oral treatments with ESP-102 (single administration of 100 mg/kg body weight or prolonged daily administration of 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight for ten days, respectively, significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory deficits as indicated by the formation of long-term and/or short-term spatial memory. In addition, we investigated the effects of ESP-102 on neurotoxicity induced by amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta25-35) or glutamate in primary cultured cortical neurons of rats. Pretreatment of cultures with ESP-102 (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 mug/ml) significantly protected neurons from neurotoxicity induced by either glutamate or Abeta25-35. These results suggest that ESP-102 may have some protective characteristics against neuronal cell death and cognitive impairments often observed in Alzheimer's disease, stroke, ischemic injury and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. The protective effect of fermented Curcuma longa L. on memory dysfunction in oxidative stress-induced C6 gliomal cells, proinflammatory-activated BV2 microglial cells, and scopolamine-induced amnesia model in mice.

    PubMed

    Eun, Cheong-Su; Lim, Jong-Soon; Lee, Jihye; Lee, Sam-Pin; Yang, Seun-Ah

    2017-07-17

    Curcuma longa L. is a well-known medicinal plant that has been used for its anti-cancer, neuroprotective, and hepatoprotective effects. However, the neuroprotective effect of fermented C. longa (FCL) has not been reported. Therefore, in this study, the effectiveness of FCL for the regulation of memory dysfunction was investigated in two brain cell lines (rat glioma C6 and murine microglia BV2) and scopolamine-treated mice. C. longa powder was fermented by 5% Lactobacillus plantarum K154 containing 2% (w/v) yeast extract at 30 °C for 72 h followed by sterilization at 121 °C for 15 min. The protective effects of fermented C. longa (FCL) on oxidative stress induced cell death were analyzed by MTT assay in C6 cells. The anti-inflammatory effects of FCL were investigated by measuring the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as well as the expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. The step-through passive avoidance test, Morris water maze test, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and expression of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) were employed to determine the effects of FCL on scopolamine-induced memory deficit in mice. The contents of curcuminoids were analyzed through LC/MS. Pretreatment with FCL effectively prevented the cell death induced by oxidative stress in C6 cells. Moreover, FCL inhibited the production NO and PGE2 via the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 expression in BV2 cells. FCL significantly attenuated scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and prevented scopolamine-induced AChE activity in the hippocampus. Additionally, FCL reversed the reduction of CREB and BDNF expression. The curcuminoids content in FCL was 1.44%. FCL pretreatment could alleviate scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice, as well as oxidative stress and inflammation in C6 and BV2 cells, respectively. Thus, FCL might be a

  13. Protective effect of fruits of Morinda citrifolia L. on scopolamine induced memory impairment in mice: a behavioral, biochemical and cerebral blood flow study.

    PubMed

    Pachauri, Shakti Deep; Tota, Santoshkumar; Khandelwal, Kiran; Verma, P R P; Nath, Chandishwar; Hanif, Kashif; Shukla, Rakesh; Saxena, J K; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar

    2012-01-06

    Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) is widely used for different illnesses including CNS disorders. Recently Noni has been reported to prevent amyloid beta induced memory impairment in mice. However, the influence of Noni on cholinergic system has not been explored so far. Therefore, present study was designed to investigate effect of Noni fruit on memory, cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in scopolamine induced amnesia model. Mice were orally treated with ethanolic extract of Noni fruit and chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol fractions of ethanolic extract for three days. Scopolamine was administered 5 min prior to acquisition trial and memory function was evaluated by passive avoidance test. CBF was measured by laser doppler flowmetry. AChE activity and oxidative stress parameters were estimated in mice brain at the end of behavioral studies. Further, effect of ethanolic extract and its fractions (5-400 μg/ml) on AChE activity was measured in vitro. Scopolamine caused memory impairment along with reduced CBF, increased AChE activity and oxidative stress in mice brain. Ethanolic extract of Noni fruits and its chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions significantly improved memory and CBF. However, butanol fraction had no effect. Further, increased oxidative stress and AChE activity following scopolamine was significantly attenuated by ethanolic extract of Noni and its fractions. Moreover ethanolic extract and its fractions showed dose dependent inhibition of AChE activity in vitro. These observations suggest that Noni may be useful in memory impairment due to its effect on CBF, AChE and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ESP-102, a Combined Herbal Extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, Changes Synaptic Plasticity and Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Rat Hippocampus Tissue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Bum; Hwang, Eun-Sang; Choi, Ga-Young; Lee, Seok; Park, Tae-Suk; Lee, Cheol-Won; Lee, Eun-Suk; Kim, Young-Choong; Kim, Sang Seong; Lee, Sung-Ok; Park, Ji-Ho

    2016-01-01

    ESP-102, an extract from Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, has been used as herbal medicine and dietary supplement in Korea. Despite the numerous bioactivities in vitro and in vivo studies, its effects on neuronal networks remain elusive. To address the neuronal effect, we examined synaptic plasticity in organotypic hippocampal slice culture with multielectrode array. Our results showed an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), indicating the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), in the presence of ESP-102. In addition, the neuroprotective effect of ESP-102 was also tested by application of scopolamine to the hippocampal slice. Interestingly, ESP-102 competitively antagonized the preventative LTP effect induced by scopolamine. The scopolamine-induced reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and GluR-2 expression was also rescued by ESP-102. In terms of mode of action, ESP-102 appears to act on the presynaptic region independent of AMPA/NMDA receptors. Based on these findings, ESP-102 can be suggested as a novel herbal ingredient with memory enhancing as well as neuroprotective effects.

  15. ESP-102, a Combined Herbal Extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, Changes Synaptic Plasticity and Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Rat Hippocampus Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Bum; Hwang, Eun-Sang; Choi, Ga-Young; Lee, Seok; Park, Tae-Suk; Lee, Cheol-Won; Lee, Eun-Suk; Kim, Young-Choong; Kim, Sang Seong; Lee, Sung-Ok; Park, Ji-Ho

    2016-01-01

    ESP-102, an extract from Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis, and Schisandra chinensis, has been used as herbal medicine and dietary supplement in Korea. Despite the numerous bioactivities in vitro and in vivo studies, its effects on neuronal networks remain elusive. To address the neuronal effect, we examined synaptic plasticity in organotypic hippocampal slice culture with multielectrode array. Our results showed an increase in excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), indicating the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), in the presence of ESP-102. In addition, the neuroprotective effect of ESP-102 was also tested by application of scopolamine to the hippocampal slice. Interestingly, ESP-102 competitively antagonized the preventative LTP effect induced by scopolamine. The scopolamine-induced reduction in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and GluR-2 expression was also rescued by ESP-102. In terms of mode of action, ESP-102 appears to act on the presynaptic region independent of AMPA/NMDA receptors. Based on these findings, ESP-102 can be suggested as a novel herbal ingredient with memory enhancing as well as neuroprotective effects. PMID:27298627

  16. Z-Guggulsterone Improves the Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairments Through Enhancement of the BDNF Signal in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Huang, Chao; Ding, Wenbin

    2016-12-01

    Memory impairment is a common symptom in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, and its suppression could be beneficial to improve the quality of life of those patients. Z-guggulsterone, a compound extracted from the resin of plant Commiphora whighitii, exhibits numerous pharmacological effects in clinical practice, such as treatment of inflammation, arthritis, obesity and lipid metabolism disorders. However, the role and possible mechanism of Z-guggulsterone on brain-associated memory impairments are largely unknown. This issue was addressed in the present study in a memory impairment model induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, using the passive avoidance, Y-maze and Morris water maze tests. Results showed that scopolamine significantly decreased the step-through latency and spontaneous alternation of C57BL/6J mice in passive avoidance and Y-maze test, whereas increased the mean escape latency and decreased the swimming time in target quadrant in Morris water maze test. Pretreatment of mice with Z-guggulsterone at doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg effectively reversed the scopolamine-induced memory impairments. Mechanistic studies revealed that Z-guggulsterone pretreatment reversed the scopolamine-induced increase in acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity, as well as decreases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation levels in the hippocampus and cortex. Inhibition of the BDNF signal, however, blocked the memory-enhancing effect of Z-guggulsterone. Therefore, these findings demonstrate that Z-guggulsterone attenuates the scopolamine-induced memory impairments mainly through activation of the CREB-BDNF signaling pathway, thereby exhibiting memory-improving effects.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of neuronal immediate early genes is associated with decline in their expression and memory consolidation in scopolamine-induced amnesic mice.

    PubMed

    Srivas, Sweta; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2017-09-01

    Recently, we reported a correlation of scopolamine mediated decline in memory consolidation with increase in the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the mouse hippocampus. Memory consolidation is a protein synthesis-dependent process which involves the expression of synaptic plasticity genes, particularly neuronal immediate early genes (IEGs). However, the mechanism of regulation of these genes during decline in memory is poorly understood. Therefore, we have studied the epigenetic regulation of expression of neuronal IEGs in scopolamine-induced amnesic mice. Scopolamine significantly impaired memory consolidation as tested by radial arm maze, and the expression of neuronal IEGs was downregulated in the hippocampus as revealed by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Further, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) analysis showed increase in DNA methylation, while chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed decrease in H3K9/14 acetylation at the promoter of neuronal IEGs. Taken together, the present study shows that increased DNA methylation and decreased histone acetylation at the promoter of neuronal IEGs are associated with decline in their expression and memory consolidation during scopolamine-induced amnesia. These findings suggest that the epigenetic regulation through altered DNA methylation and histone acetylation might be explored further to develop potential therapeutic interventions for amnesia.

  18. Effects of lavender oil inhalation on improving scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica

    2012-04-15

    Lavender is reported to be an effective medical plant in treating inflammation, depression, stress and mild anxiety in Europe and the USA. The present study investigated the effects of two different lavender essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia ssp. angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae) and Lavandula hybrida Rev. (Lamiaceae) on neurological capacity of male Wistar rats subjected to scopolamine (0.7mg/kg)-induced dementia rat model. Chronic exposures to lavender essential oils (daily, for 7 continuous days) significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior and inhibited depression in elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests, suggesting anxiolytic and antidepressant activity. Also, spatial memory performance in Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks was improved, suggesting positive effects on memory formation. Taken together, multiple exposures to lavender essential oils could effectively reverse spatial memory deficits induced by dysfunction of the cholinergic system in the rat brain and might provide an opportunity for management neurological abnormalities in dementia conditions.

  19. D-cycloserine in Prelimbic Cortex Reverses Scopolamine-Induced Deficits in Olfactory Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Portero-Tresserra, Marta; Cristóbal-Narváez, Paula; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Vale-Martínez, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A significant interaction between N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and muscarinic receptors has been suggested in the modulation of learning and memory processes. The present study further investigates this issue and explores whether d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptors that has been regarded as a cognitive enhancer, would reverse scopolamine (SCOP)-induced amnesia in two olfactory learning tasks when administered into the prelimbic cortex (PLC). Thus, in experiment 1, DCS (10 µg/site) was infused prior to acquisition of odor discrimination (ODT) and social transmission of food preference (STFP), which have been previously characterized as paradigms sensitive to PLC muscarinic blockade. Immediately after learning such tasks, SCOP was injected (20 µg/site) and the effects of both drugs (alone and combined) were tested in 24-h retention tests. To assess whether DCS effects may depend on the difficulty of the task, in the STFP the rats expressed their food preference either in a standard two-choice test (experiment 1) or a more challenging three-choice test (experiment 2). The results showed that bilateral intra-PLC infusions of SCOP markedly disrupted the ODT and STFP memory tests. Additionally, infusions of DCS alone into the PLC enhanced ODT but not STFP retention. However, the DCS treatment reversed SCOP-induced memory deficits in both tasks, and this effect seemed more apparent in ODT and 3-choice STFP. Such results support the interaction between the glutamatergic and the cholinergic systems in the PLC in such a way that positive modulation of the NMDA receptor/channel, through activation of the glycine binding site, may compensate dysfunction of muscarinic neurotransmission involved in stimulus-reward and relational learning tasks. PMID:23936452

  20. Brain Network Activation (BNA) reveals scopolamine-induced impairment of visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Reches, Amit; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Laufer, Ilan; Shani-Hershkovitch, Revital; Ziv, Keren; Kerem, Dani; Gal, Noga; Stern, Yaki; Cukierman, Guy; Romach, Myroslava K; Sellers, Edward M; Geva, Amir B

    2014-09-01

    The overarching goal of this event-related potential (ERP) study was to examine the effects of scopolamine on the dynamics of brain network activation using a novel ERP network analysis method known as Brain Network Activation (BNA). BNA was used for extracting group-common stimulus-activated network patterns elicited to matching probe stimuli in the context of a delayed matching-to-sample task following placebo and scopolamine treatments administered to healthy participants. The BNA extracted networks revealed the existence of two pathophysiological mechanisms following scopolamine, disconnection, and compensation. Specifically, weaker frontal theta and parietal alpha coupling was accompanied with enhanced fronto-centro-parietal theta activation relative to placebo. In addition, using the characteristic BNA network of each treatment as well as corresponding literature-guided selective subnetworks as combined biomarkers managed to differentiate between individual responses to each of the treatments. Behavioral effects associated with scopolamine included delayed response time and impaired response accuracy. These results indicate that the BNA method is sensitive to the effects of scopolamine on working memory and that it may potentially enable diagnosis and treatment assessment of dysfunctions associated with cholinergic deficiency.

  1. Pretreatment with 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde blocks scopolamine-induced learning deficit in contextual and spatial memory in male mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghwan; Gao, Qingtao; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Younghwa; Park, Se Jin; Lee, Hyung Eun; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-07-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (5-HMF) is a compound derived from the dehydration of certain sugars. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 5-HMF on the cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. To measure various cognitive functions, we conducted the step-through passive avoidance task, the Y-maze task and the Morris water maze task. A single administration of 5-HMF (5 or 10mg/kg, p.o.) significantly attenuates scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in these behavioral tasks without changes in locomotor activity, and the effect of 5-HMF on scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment was significantly reversed by a sub-effective dose of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist. In addition, a single administration of 5-HMF (10mg/kg, p.o.) enhanced the cognitive performance of normal naïve mice in the passive avoidance task. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-α (CaMKII) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) were significantly enhanced by the single administration of 5-HMF in the hippocampal tissues. Taken together, the present study suggests that 5-HMF may block scopolamine-induced learning deficit and enhance cognitive function via the activation of NMDA receptor signaling, including CaMKII and ERK, and would be an effective candidate against cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Lactobacillus casei-01 facilitates the ameliorative effects of proanthocyanidins extracted from lotus seedpod on learning and memory impairment in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Li, Shuyi; Sui, Yong; Wu, Qian; Li, Xiaopeng; Xie, Bijun; Zhang, Mingwei; Sun, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory abilities are associated with alterations in gut function. The two-way proanthocyanidins-microbiota interaction in vivo enhances the physiological activities of proanthocyanidins and promotes the regulation of gut function. Proanthocyanidins extracted from lotus seedpod (LSPC) have shown the memory-enhancing ability. However, there has been no literature about whether Lactobacillus casei-01 (LC) enhances the ameliorative effects of LSPC on learning and memory abilities. In this study, learning and memory abilities of scopolamine-induced amnesia mice were evaluated by Y-maze test after 20-day administration of LC (10(9) cfu/kg body weight (BW)), LSPC (low dose was 60 mg/kg BW (L-LSPC) and high dose was 90 mg/kg BW (H-LSPC)), or LSPC and LC combinations (L-LSPC+LC and H-LSPC+LC). Alterations in antioxidant defense ability and oxidative damage of brain, serum and colon, and brain cholinergic system were investigated as the possible mechanisms. As a result, the error times of H-LSPC+LC group were reduced by 41.59% and 68.75% relative to those of H-LSPC and LC groups respectively. LSPC and LC combinations ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment by improving total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) level, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activities of brain, serum and colon, suppressing malondialdehyde (MDA) level of brain, serum and colon, and inhibiting brain acetylcholinesterase (AchE), myeloperoxidase, total nitric oxide synthase and neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activities, and nNOS mRNA level. Moreover, LC facilitated the ameliorative effects of H-LSPC on GSH-Px activity of colon, TAOC level, GSH-Px activity and ratio of T-SOD to MDA of brain and serum, and the inhibitory effects of H-LSPC on serum MDA level, brain nNOS mRNA level and AchE activity. These results indicated that LC promoted the memory-enhancing effect of LSPC in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice.

  3. Lactobacillus casei-01 Facilitates the Ameliorative Effects of Proanthocyanidins Extracted from Lotus Seedpod on Learning and Memory Impairment in Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Juan; Li, Shuyi; Sui, Yong; Wu, Qian; Li, Xiaopeng; Xie, Bijun; Zhang, Mingwei; Sun, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory abilities are associated with alterations in gut function. The two-way proanthocyanidins-microbiota interaction in vivo enhances the physiological activities of proanthocyanidins and promotes the regulation of gut function. Proanthocyanidins extracted from lotus seedpod (LSPC) have shown the memory-enhancing ability. However, there has been no literature about whether Lactobacillus casei-01 (LC) enhances the ameliorative effects of LSPC on learning and memory abilities. In this study, learning and memory abilities of scopolamine-induced amnesia mice were evaluated by Y-maze test after 20-day administration of LC (109 cfu/kg body weight (BW)), LSPC (low dose was 60 mg/kg BW (L-LSPC) and high dose was 90 mg/kg BW (H-LSPC)), or LSPC and LC combinations (L-LSPC+LC and H-LSPC+LC). Alterations in antioxidant defense ability and oxidative damage of brain, serum and colon, and brain cholinergic system were investigated as the possible mechanisms. As a result, the error times of H-LSPC+LC group were reduced by 41.59% and 68.75% relative to those of H-LSPC and LC groups respectively. LSPC and LC combinations ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment by improving total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) level, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activities of brain, serum and colon, suppressing malondialdehyde (MDA) level of brain, serum and colon, and inhibiting brain acetylcholinesterase (AchE), myeloperoxidase, total nitric oxide synthase and neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activities, and nNOS mRNA level. Moreover, LC facilitated the ameliorative effects of H-LSPC on GSH-Px activity of colon, TAOC level, GSH-Px activity and ratio of T-SOD to MDA of brain and serum, and the inhibitory effects of H-LSPC on serum MDA level, brain nNOS mRNA level and AchE activity. These results indicated that LC promoted the memory-enhancing effect of LSPC in scopolamine-induced amnesia mice. PMID:25396737

  4. Myricetin ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase and down-regulating brain iron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beiyun; Zhong, Yuan; Gao, Chengjie; Li, Jingbo

    2017-08-19

    The aim of our study was to investigate to investigate the effect of myricetin on Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its underlying mechanisms. In our study, Myricetin effectively attenuated Fe(2+)-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells in vitro. In a mouse model of AD, myricetin treatment significantly reversed scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits deriving from a novel action of inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and down-regulating brain iron. Furthermore, Myricetin treatment reduced oxidative damage and increased antioxidant enzymes activity in mice. Interestingly, the effect of myricetin was largely abolished by high iron diet. Therefore we suggested that treatment with myricetin attenuated cognitive deficits in mice via inhibiting AChE and brain iron regulation. In addition, myricetin reduce iron contents may via inhibiting transferrin receptor 1 (TrR1) expression. In conclusion, accumulated data demonstrates that myricetin is a potential multifunctional drug for AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of harmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, on spatial learning and memory of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and scopolamine-induced memory impairment mice.

    PubMed

    He, Dandan; Wu, Hui; Wei, Yue; Liu, Wei; Huang, Fei; Shi, Hailian; Zhang, Beibei; Wu, Xiaojun; Wang, Changhong

    2015-12-05

    Harmine, a β-carboline alkaloid present in Peganum harmala with a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, has been shown to exert strong inhibition against acetylcholinesterase in vitro. However, whether it can rescue the impaired cognition has not been elucidated yet. In current study, we examined its effects on scopolamine-induced memory impairment mice and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, one of the models for Alzheimer's disease, using Morris Water Maze test. In addition, whether harmine could penetrate blood brain barrier, interact with and inhibit acetylcholinesterase, and activate downstream signaling network was also investigated. Our results showed that harmine (20mg/kg) administered by oral gavage for 2 weeks could effectively enhance the spatial cognition of C57BL/6 mice impaired by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (1mg/kg). Meanwhile, long-term consumption of harmine (20mg/kg) for 10 weeks also slightly benefited the impaired memory of APP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, harmine could pass through blood brain barrier, penetrate into the brain parenchyma shortly after oral administration, and modulate the expression of Egr-1, c-Jun and c-Fos. Molecular docking assay disclosed that harmine molecule could directly dock into the catalytic active site of acetylcholinesterase, which was partially confirmed by its in vivo inhibitory activity on acetylcholinesterase. Taken together, all these results suggested that harmine could ameliorate impaired memory by enhancement of cholinergic neurotransmission via inhibiting the activity of acetylcholinesterase, which may contribute to its clinical use in the therapy of neurological diseases characterized with acetylcholinesterase deficiency.

  6. Melandrii Herba Extract Attenuates H₂O₂-Induced Neurotoxicity in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells and Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Ae Sin; Choi, Inwook

    2017-09-30

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role in the etiology of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we found that Melandrii Herba extract (ME) attenuated oxidative-induced damage in cells. Mechanistically, ME exhibited protection from H₂O₂-induced neurotoxicity via caspase-3 inactivation, Bcl-2 downregulation, Bax upregulation, and MAPK activation (ERK 1/2, JNK 1/2, and p38 MAPK) in vitro. Moreover, our in vivo data showed that ME was able to attenuate scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment. These results provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that ME exhibits neuroprotective properties against oxidative stress, which suggests that ME is worthy of further investigation as a complementary, or even as an alternative, product for preventing and treating neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Protective effects of mangosteen extract on H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in SK-N-SH cells and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Sattayasai, Jintana; Chaonapan, Pongsatorn; Arkaravichie, Tarinee; Soi-Ampornkul, Rungtip; Junnu, Sarawut; Charoensilp, Patcharakajee; Samer, Jutima; Jantaravinid, Jiraporn; Masaratana, Patarabutr; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Manissorn, Juthatip; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Neungton, Neelobol; Moongkarndi, Primchanien

    2013-01-01

    Mangosteen extracts (ME) contain high levels of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Protective effects of ME against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), induced cytotoxicity have been reported. Here, we further studied the protective effects of ME against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and demonstrated the protection against memory impairment in mice. The cytoprotective effects of ME were measured as cell viability and the reduction in ROS activity. In SK-N-SH cell cultures, 200 μg/ml ME could partially antagonize the effects of 150 or 300 µM H2O2 on cell viability, ROS level and caspase-3 activity. At 200, 400 or 800 µg/ml, ME reduced AChE activity of SK-N-SH cells to about 60% of the control. In vivo study, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to assess the memory of the animals. ME, especially at 100 mg/kg body weight, could improve the animal's memory and also antagonize the effect of scopolamine on memory. The increase in ROS level and caspase-3 activity in the brain of scopolamine-treated mice were antagonized by the ME treatment. The study demonstrated cytoprotective effects of ME against H2O2 and PCB-52 toxicity and having AChE inhibitory effect in cell culture. ME treatment in mice could attenuate scopolamine-induced memory deficit and oxidative stress in brain.

  8. Protective Effects of Mangosteen Extract on H2O2-Induced Cytotoxicity in SK-N-SH Cells and Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sattayasai, Jintana; Chaonapan, Pongsatorn; Arkaravichie, Tarinee; Soi-ampornkul, Rungtip; Junnu, Sarawut; Charoensilp, Patcharakajee; Samer, Jutima; Jantaravinid, Jiraporn; Masaratana, Patarabutr; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Manissorn, Juthatip; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Neungton, Neelobol; Moongkarndi, Primchanien

    2013-01-01

    Mangosteen extracts (ME) contain high levels of polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Protective effects of ME against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), induced cytotoxicity have been reported. Here, we further studied the protective effects of ME against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and demonstrated the protection against memory impairment in mice. The cytoprotective effects of ME were measured as cell viability and the reduction in ROS activity. In SK-N-SH cell cultures, 200 μg/ml ME could partially antagonize the effects of 150 or 300 µM H2O2 on cell viability, ROS level and caspase-3 activity. At 200, 400 or 800 µg/ml, ME reduced AChE activity of SK-N-SH cells to about 60% of the control. In vivo study, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to assess the memory of the animals. ME, especially at 100 mg/kg body weight, could improve the animal’s memory and also antagonize the effect of scopolamine on memory. The increase in ROS level and caspase-3 activity in the brain of scopolamine-treated mice were antagonized by the ME treatment. The study demonstrated cytoprotective effects of ME against H2O2 and PCB-52 toxicity and having AChE inhibitory effect in cell culture. ME treatment in mice could attenuate scopolamine-induced memory deficit and oxidative stress in brain. PMID:24386444

  9. Attenuation of scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction by obovatol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Young; Lee, Young-Jung; Lee, Sun Young; Lee, Yoot Mo; Lee, Hyun Hee; Choi, Im Seop; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang Bae; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent cause of dementia in the elderly people. The disease is pathologically characterized by extracellular deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ), cholinergic neurodegeneration and elevation of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity in the affected regions. In this study, we investigated the effects of obovatol on memory dysfunction, which was caused by scopolamine. Obovatol (0.2, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg for 7 day) attenuated scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced amnesia in a dose-dependent manner, as revealed by the Morris water maze test and step-through passive avoidance test. Mechanism studies exhibited that obovatol dose-dependently alleviated scopolamine-induced increase in Aβ generation and β-secretase activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Obovatol also attenuated scopolamine-induced rise in AChE activity in the cortex and hippocampus. Obovatol might rescue scopolamine-mediated impaired learning and memory function by attenuating Aβ accumulation and stabilizing cholinergic neurotransmission, which suggests that the natural compound could be a useful agent for the prevention of the development or progression of AD neurodegeneration.

  10. Comparison of ginsenosides Rg1 and Rb1 for their effects on improving scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Sun, Li-Hua; Jia, William; Liu, Xin-Min; Dang, Hai-Xia; Mai, Wen-Li; Wang, Ning; Steinmetz, Andre; Wang, Yu-Qin; Xu, Chang-Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Rg1 and Rb1 are two major active compounds of ginseng that facilitate learning and memory. The present study aimed to compare the nootropic effects of Rg1 and Rb1 in a scopolamine induced dementia mice model. After 6 and 12 mg/kg of Rg1 and Rb1 intraperitoneal administration to mice for 7 days, their effects were assessed using the step-down passive avoidance (SD) and the Morris water maze (MWM) tests, the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, acetylcholine (ACh) content and serotonin (5-HT) level in the hippocampus were analysed after SD and MWM tests. The results showed that Rg1 and Rb1 ameliorated cognition-deficiency in mice with dementia. Rg1 showed stronger effects than Rb1 on escape acquisition in MWM. Both Rg1 and Rb1 increased ACh levels in the hippocampus, but Rg1 inhibited AChE activity while Rb1 had no effect on AChE activity. Both Rg1 and Rb1 inhibited the decrease of 5-HT induced by scopolamine, but Rb1 was more active than the same dose of Rg1. These results demonstrate that multiple administrations of Rg1 and Rb1 are effective in improving memory deficiency induced by scopolamine. Rg1 appears to be more potent than Rb1 in improving acquisition impairment, and the two ginsenosides may act through different mechanisms.

  11. The ameliorating effects of 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and its neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Weon, Jin Bae; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Ma, Choong Je

    2013-12-15

    We isolated 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone, a neuroprotective compound from Cynenchum paniculatum in our previous study. The present study was conducted to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone that has been previously isolated from Cynenchum paniculatum on hippocampal neuronal cell line, HT22 cells and its possible cognitive-enhancing effect on scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice. Neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Also, cognitive enhancing effect against scopolamine (1mg/kg, ip) induced learning and memory deficit was measured by Morris water maze test. Oral administered of 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone (1, 10, 20, 40 and 50mg/kg) to amnesic mice induced by scopolamine. In Morris water maze test, 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone (50mg/kg) improved the impairment of spatial memory induced by scopolamine. 2,3-Dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone protect HT22 cells on glutamate induced cell-death in a dose-dependent manner (EC50 value: 10.94μM). Furthermore, 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone was found to inhibit [Ca(2+)] accumulation in HT22 cells and had antioxidantive activity. The results showed that 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone exert neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing activities through its antioxidant activity. We suggest that 2,3-dihydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone improves cognitive function and may be helpful for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Anti-Amnesic Effect of Fermented Ganoderma lucidum Water Extracts by Lactic Acid Bacteria on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu Jin; Yang, Hee Sun; Jo, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Cheon; Park, Tae Young; Choi, Bong Suk; Seo, Kyoung Sun; Huh, Chang Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-amnesic effect of fermented Ganoderma lucidum water extracts (GW) on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats. GW were fermented by the lactic acid bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (FGWB), followed by Lactobacillus sakei LI033 (FGWBL). To induce amnesia, scopolamine (1 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected into rats 30 min before the behavioral tests. Step-through latencies of rats treated with primary fermented extracts (300 mg/kg, FGWB) and secondary fermented extracts (300 mg/kg, FGWBL) were significantly longer than those of rats treated with GW (300 mg/kg) in the retention trial of the multiple trial passive avoidance test. In the Morris water maze task, FGWBL significantly shortened escape latencies in training trials. Furthermore, swimming times within the target zone during the probe trial with FGWBL were significantly higher than the GW and FGWB treatments. In addition, acetylcholinesterase activities were lower in the brains of scopolamine-treated rats treated with FGWBL. These results suggest that FGWBL could be useful to enhance learning memory and cognitive function via cholinergic dysfunction. PMID:26176000

  13. The novel dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) derivative BNN27 counteracts delay-dependent and scopolamine-induced recognition memory deficits in rats.

    PubMed

    Pitsikas, Nikolaos; Gravanis, Achille

    2017-04-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the neurosteroids dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) are involved in cognition. BNN27 is a novel 17C spiroepoxy-DHEA derivative, which devoid of steroidogenic activity. The neuroprotective effects of BNN27 have been recently reported. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of BNN27 on recognition memory in rats. For this purpose, the novel object task (NOT), a procedure assessing non-spatial recognition memory and the novel location task (NLT), a procedure evaluating spatial recognition memory were used. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of BNN27 (3 and 10mg/kg) antagonized delay-dependent deficits in the NOT in the normal rat, suggesting that this DHEA derivative affected acquisition, storage and retrieval of information. In addition, BNN27 (3 and 10mg/kg, i.p.) counteracted the scopolamine [0.2mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)]-induced non-spatial and spatial recognition memory deficits. These findings suggest that BNN27 may modulate different aspects of recognition memory, potentially interacting with the cholinergic system, relevant to cognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine protects against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats by reversing the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Yu, Xiao; Luo, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Dong

    2013-09-15

    Tetramethylpyrazine is used in the treatment of many neurological diseases because of its neuroprotective effect. Here, we demonstrate that administration of tetramethylpyrazine effectively reverses memory deficits induced by scopolamine. Moreover, tetramethylpyrazine preserves postsynaptic protein synthesis and restores cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway signaling deficits. Our study not only explores the actions of tetramethylpyrazine on synapses, but also provides novel evidence for the possible therapeutic use of tetramethylpyrazine in dementia.

  15. Effects of rivastigmine and memantine alone and in combination on learning and memory in rats with scopolamine-induced amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Yanev, Peter Georgiev; Dimitrova, Darinka Slavcheva

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholinesterase inhibitors and glutamate blockers are commonly used for the treatment of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease. The aim was to evaluate the effects of rivastigmine and memantine alone or in combination in rats with scopolamine-impaired memory. Method 5 groups of rats were used: control, scopolamine (model), model with rivastigmine, model with memantine, and model with both drugs. Active avoidance test was performed and the number of conditioned responses, unconditioned responses and intertrial crossing were recorded. Passive avoidance tests step-through with criteria latency of reaction 180 s in the light chamber and step-down with criteria latency of reaction 60 s on the platform were done. Results Control rats learned the task and kept it on memory tests. Scopolamine treated rats failed to perform it. The rivastigmine, memantine and its combination groups showed increased CRs during learning and memory retention tests. In both passive avoidance tests an increased latency of reaction was observed in the drug treated groups. Conclusion The combination of both drugs rivastigmine and memantine is more effective than the use of the single drug in cognitive impaired rats. Cholinesterase inhibitors and NMDA blockers may be combined in the treatment of different kind of dementias.

  16. Phytochemical analysis, molecular docking and antiamnesic effects of methanolic extract of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn seeds in scopolamine induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Nausheen; Karim, Nasiara; Abdel-Halim, Heba; Khan, Imran; Wadood, Syed Fazal; Nisar, Muhammad

    2017-08-24

    Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn and its main component silymarin have been extensively studied and have been found effective in various neurological disorders. The aim of the current study is to identify phytoconstituents in the methanolic extract (Me. Ext) of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn seeds and to study in-vivo the anti-amnesic effects along with in vitro antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and buteryl cholinesterase (BChE) inhibition potential. Induced fir docking (IFD) results have confirmed that quercetin, morin and rutin showed good affinity when docked into AChE binding site. The present study investigates the in-vitro AChE and BChE inhibition potential of the Me-Ext of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn at various concentrations (31.25, 62.50, 125, 250, 500, 1000µg/mL) using Ellman's spectrophotometric analysis, while antioxidant potential against DPPH and ABTS were determined using Brand-Williams spectrophotometric method. Furthermore, the in-vivo anti-amnesic effects of Me. Ext at the dose level of 50, 100 and 200mg/kg were also evaluated using scopolamine -induced memory impairment in mice in the novel object recognition test (NORT) and Y-maze test. The Me. Ext showed a concentration dependent inhibition of AChE and BChE with IC50 values of 110 and 130µg/mL respectively and antioxidant activity against DPPH and ABTS with IC50 values 280 and 220µg/mL, respectively. In mice, Me. Ext reversed the amnesia induced by scopolamine as indicated by a dose-dependent increase in spontaneous alternation performance in the Y-maze task (p< 0.05 versus scopolamine) and increase in the discrimination index in the NORT comparable to the standard drug donepezil 2mg/kg. HPLC-UV analysis showed the presence of quercetin, rutin and morin. Induced fit docking (IFD) was performed using quercetin, rutin and morin, Glide Gscore and IFD score of all compounds were consistent with their experimental AChE inhibitory activities. The results indicate that Silybum marianum (L

  17. Hippocampal memory enhancing activity of pine needle extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Sam-Keun; Kim, Dong-Woon; Saravanakumar, Arthanari; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-05-14

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of 30% ethanolic pine needle extract (PNE) on memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection in mice hippocampus. Mice were orally pretreated with PNE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or tacrine (10 mg/kg) for 7 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally, 30 min before the Morris water maze task on first day. To evaluate memory function, the Morris water maze task was performed for 5 days consecutively. Scopolamine increased the escape latency and cumulative path-length but decreases the time spent in target quadrant, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with PNE. Oxidant-antioxidant balance, acetylcholinesterase activity, neurogenesis and their connecting pathway were abnormally altered by scopolamine in hippocampus and/or sera, while those alterations were recovered by pretreatment with PNE. As lipid peroxidation, 4HNE-positive stained cells were ameliorated in hippocampus pretreated with PNE. Pretreatment with PNE increased the proliferating cells and immature neurons against hippocampal neurogenesis suppressed by scopolamine, which was confirmed by ki67- and DCX-positive stained cells. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) in both protein and gene were facilitated by PNE pretreatment. These findings suggest that PNE could be a potent neuropharmacological drug against amnesia, and its possible mechanism might be modulating cholinergic activity via CREB-BDNF pathway.

  18. Hippocampal memory enhancing activity of pine needle extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Sam-Keun; Kim, Dong-Woon; Saravanakumar, Arthanari; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of 30% ethanolic pine needle extract (PNE) on memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection in mice hippocampus. Mice were orally pretreated with PNE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or tacrine (10 mg/kg) for 7 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally, 30 min before the Morris water maze task on first day. To evaluate memory function, the Morris water maze task was performed for 5 days consecutively. Scopolamine increased the escape latency and cumulative path-length but decreases the time spent in target quadrant, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with PNE. Oxidant-antioxidant balance, acetylcholinesterase activity, neurogenesis and their connecting pathway were abnormally altered by scopolamine in hippocampus and/or sera, while those alterations were recovered by pretreatment with PNE. As lipid peroxidation, 4HNE-positive stained cells were ameliorated in hippocampus pretreated with PNE. Pretreatment with PNE increased the proliferating cells and immature neurons against hippocampal neurogenesis suppressed by scopolamine, which was confirmed by ki67- and DCX-positive stained cells. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) in both protein and gene were facilitated by PNE pretreatment. These findings suggest that PNE could be a potent neuropharmacological drug against amnesia, and its possible mechanism might be modulating cholinergic activity via CREB-BDNF pathway. PMID:25974329

  19. The effects of daidzin and its aglycon, daidzein, on the scopolamine-induced memory impairment in male mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Jung, Hyun Ah; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Seungjoo; Choi, Jae Su; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ko, Kwang Ho; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the effect of daidzin or daidzein isolated from Pueraria lobata on the memory impairments induced by scopolamine was assessed in male mice using the passive avoidance and the Morris water maze tasks. Administration of daidzin (5 mg/kg) or daidzein (5 mg/kg) significantly reversed the scopolamine (1 mg/kg)-induced cognitive impairments in male mice as evidenced by the passive avoidance test (p < 0.05) and on the Morris water maze test (p < 0.05). Moreover, the ameliorating effects of daidzin or daidzein were antagonized by tamoxifen (1 mg/kg), the nonspecific estrogen receptor antagonist. These results indicate that daidzin or daidzein may be useful in cognitive impairment induced by cholinergic dysfunction, and this beneficial effect is mediated, in part, via estrogen receptor.

  20. Protection against brain tissues oxidative damage as a possible mechanism for improving effects of low doses of estradiol on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Hejazian, Seyed Hassan; Karimi, Sareh; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regarding the anti-oxidative effects on the central nervous system, the possible protection against brain tissues oxidative damage as a possible mechanism for improving effects of low doses of estradiol on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments was investigated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Materials and Methods: The OVX rats treated by (1) vehicle, (2) scopolamine, and (3–4) scopolamine plus estradiol (20 or 20 or 60 μg/kg). Estradiol was administered (20 or 60 μg/kg, intraperitoneally) daily for 6 weeks after ovariectomy. The rats were examined for learning and memory using passive avoidance test. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected 30 min after training in the test. The brains were then removed to determine malondialdehyde (MDA) and thiol contents. Results: Scopolamine shortened the time latency to enter the dark compartment in (P < 0.01). Compared to scopolamine, pretreatment by both doses of estradiol prolonged the latency to enter the dark compartment (P < 0.01). The brain tissues MDA concentration as an index of lipid peroxidation was decreased (P < 0.05). Pretreatment by estradiol lowered the concentration of MDA, while it increased thiol content compared to scopolamine (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). Conclusions: These results allow us to suggest a protection against brain tissues oxidative damage as a possible mechanism for improving effects of low doses of estradiol on scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairments in OVX rats. PMID:27563633

  1. Fermented Sipjeondaebo-tang Alleviates Memory Deficits and Loss of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Scopolamine-induced Amnesia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Heeeun; Park, Hwayong; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-03-04

    We investigated the anti-amnesic effects of SJ and fermented SJ (FSJ) on scopolamine (SCO)-induced amnesia mouse model. Mice were orally co-treated with SJ or FSJ (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) and SCO (1 mg/kg), which was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days. SCO decreased the step-through latency and prolonged latency time to find the hidden platform in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test, respectively, and both SCO effects were ameliorated by FSJ treatment. FSJ was discovered to promote hippocampal neurogenesis during SCO treatment by increasing proliferation and survival of BrdU-positive cells, immature/mature neurons. In the hippocampus of SCO, oxidative stress and the activity of acetylcholinesterase were elevated, whereas the levels of acetylcholine and choline acetyltransferase were diminished; however, all of these alterations were attenuated by FSJ-treatment. The alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein, and phosphorylated Akt that occurred following SCO treatment were protected by FSJ administration. Therefore, our findings are the first to suggest that FSJ may be a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of amnesia and aging-related or neurodegenerative disease-related memory impairment. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism by which FSJ exerts its effects may involve modulation of the cholinergic system and BDNF/CREB/Akt pathway.

  2. Fermented Sipjeondaebo-tang Alleviates Memory Deficits and Loss of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Scopolamine-induced Amnesia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Heeeun; Park, Hwayong; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the anti-amnesic effects of SJ and fermented SJ (FSJ) on scopolamine (SCO)-induced amnesia mouse model. Mice were orally co-treated with SJ or FSJ (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) and SCO (1 mg/kg), which was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days. SCO decreased the step-through latency and prolonged latency time to find the hidden platform in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test, respectively, and both SCO effects were ameliorated by FSJ treatment. FSJ was discovered to promote hippocampal neurogenesis during SCO treatment by increasing proliferation and survival of BrdU-positive cells, immature/mature neurons. In the hippocampus of SCO, oxidative stress and the activity of acetylcholinesterase were elevated, whereas the levels of acetylcholine and choline acetyltransferase were diminished; however, all of these alterations were attenuated by FSJ-treatment. The alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein, and phosphorylated Akt that occurred following SCO treatment were protected by FSJ administration. Therefore, our findings are the first to suggest that FSJ may be a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of amnesia and aging-related or neurodegenerative disease-related memory impairment. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism by which FSJ exerts its effects may involve modulation of the cholinergic system and BDNF/CREB/Akt pathway. PMID:26939918

  3. A Special Extract of Bacopa monnieri (CDRI-08) Restores Learning and Memory by Upregulating Expression of the NMDA Receptor Subunit GluN2B in the Brain of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Singh, Hemant K.; Prasad, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present communication, we have investigated effects of the CDRI-08, a well characterized extract of Bacopa monnieri, on expression of the GluN2B subunit of NMDAR in various brain regions of the scopolamine-induced amnesic mice. Our behavioral data reveal that scopolamine-treated amnesic mice exhibit significant decline in the spatial memory compared to the normal control mice. Our RT-PCR and immunoblotting data revealed that the scopolamine treatment resulted in a significant downregulation of the NMDAR GluN2B subunit expression in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Our enzyme assay data revealed that scopolamine caused a significant increase in the acetylcholinesterase activity in both the brain regions. Further, oral administration of the CDRI-08 to scopolamine-treated amnesic mice restored the spatial memory which was found to be associated with significant upregulation of the GluN2B subunit expression and decline in the acetylcholinesterase activity in prefrontal cortex as well as hippocampus towards their levels in the normal control mice. Our study provides the evidence for the mechanism underlying role of the Bacopa monnieri extract (CDRI-08) in restoring spatial memory in amnesic mice, which may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26413117

  4. Attenuating effect of bioactive coumarins from Convolvulus pluricaulis on scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Malik, Jai; Karan, Maninder; Vasisht, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois. (Convolvulaceae) has been used in Ayurveda as Medhya Rasyana (nervine tonic) to treat various mental disorders. This study was designed to isolate the bioactive compound(s) of this plant and to evaluate their effect against scopolamine-induced amnesia. Column chromatography of the chloroform and ethyl-acetate fractions led to the isolation of three coumarins identified as scopoletin, ayapanin and scopolin. All the three compounds at 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg, p.o. were evaluated for memory-enhancing activity against scopolamine-induced amnesia using elevated plus maze and step down paradigms. Effect on acetylcholinesterase activity in mice brain was also evaluated. Scopoletin and scopolin, in both the paradigms, significantly and dose dependently attenuated the scopolamine-induced amnesic effect. Furthermore, these compounds at 10 and 15 mg/kg exhibited activity comparable to that of standard drug, donepezil. The compounds also exhibited significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  5. Total isoflavones from soybean and tempeh reversed scopolamine-induced amnesia, improved cholinergic activities and reduced neuroinflammation in brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aliya; Ramasamy, Kalavathy; Jaafar, Siti Murnirah; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Mani, Vasudevan

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the neuroprotective effects between total isoflavones from soybean and tempeh against scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction. Total isoflavones (10, 20 and 40mg/kg) from soybean (SI) and tempeh (TI) were administered orally to different groups of rats (n=6) for 15days. Piracetam (400mg/kg, p.o.) was used as a standard drug while scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in the animals. Radial arm and elevated plus mazes served as exteroceptive behavioural models to measure memory. Brain cholinergic activities (acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase) and neuroinflammatory activities (COX-1, COX-2, IL-1β and IL10) were also assessed. Treatment with SI and TI significantly reversed the scopolamine effect and improved memory with TI group at 40mg/kg, p.o. exhibiting the best improvement (p<0.001) in rats. The TI (10, 20 and 40mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased (p<0.001) acetylcholine and reduced acetylcholinesterase levels. Meanwhile, only a high dose (40mg/kg, p.o.) of SI showed significant improvement (p<0.05) in the cholinergic activities. Neuroinflammation study also showed that TI (40mg/kg, p.o.) was able to reduce inflammation better than SI. The TI ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory in rats through the cholinergic neuronal pathway and by prevention of neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Galantamine reverses scopolamine-induced behavioral alterations in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Amatya, Christina; DeSaer, Cassie J; Dalhoff, Zachary; Eggerichs, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    In planaria (Dugesia tigrina), scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist, induced distinct behaviors of attenuated motility and C-like hyperactivity. Planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) displayed a dose-dependent negative correlation with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mM, and a further increase in scopolamine concentration to 2.25 mM did not further decrease pLMV. Planarian hyperactivity counts was dose-dependently increased following pretreatment with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 0.5 mM and then decreased for scopolamine concentrations ≥ 1 mM. Planarian learning and memory investigated using classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments demonstrated that scopolamine (1 mM) negatively influenced associative learning indicated by a significant decrease in % positive behaviors from 86 % (control) to 14 % (1 mM scopolamine) and similarly altered memory retention, which is indicated by a decrease in % positive behaviors from 69 % (control) to 27 % (1 mM scopolamine). Galantamine demonstrated a complex behavior in planarian motility experiments since co-application of low concentrations of galantamine (0.001 and 0.01 mM) protected planaria against 1 mM scopolamine-induced motility impairments; however, pLMV was significantly decreased when planaria were tested in the presence of 0.1 mM galantamine alone. Effects of co-treatment of scopolamine and galantamine on memory retention in planaria via classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments showed that galantamine (0.01 mM) partially reversed scopolamine (1 mM)-induced memory deficits in planaria as the % positive behaviors increased from 27 to 63 %. The results demonstrate, for the first time in planaria, scopolamine's effects in causing learning and memory impairments and galantamine's ability in reversing scopolamine-induced memory impairments.

  7. Acetyl-L-carnitine rescues scopolamine-induced memory deficits by restoring insulin-like growth factor II via decreasing p53 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Liang-Ping; Tang, Hui; Shan, Wan-Ying; Wang, Xiong; Liu, Dan; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cholinergic neurons loss and impairments of learning and memory. Scopolamine is common used to imitate AD pathological features and also causes an obvious oxidative stress. In this study, we found that intraperitoneal administration of supplementary acetyl-L-carnitine partially reverses the learning and memory defects induced by scopolamine. We also found that acetyl-L-carnitine reverses the impairment of long-term potentiation, dendritic abnormalities, and the impaired recruitment of synaptic protein. The beneficial effects of acetyl-L-carnitine may occur through amelioration of oxidative stress because it effectively decreases the levels of oxidative products and increases the activity of superoxide dismutase; this leads to a recovery in the suppressed activity of p53 caused oxidative stimuli, which in turn restores levels of insulin-like growth factor II, an important hormone for learning and memory. Our study provides the first evidence of the potential utility of acetyl-L-carnitine in treating the synaptic disorders prevalent in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'.

  8. Agmatine protects against scopolamine-induced water maze performance impairment and hippocampal ERK and Akt inactivation.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Maryam; Khales, Golnaz Yadollahi; Abbasi, Leila; Zarifkar, Asadollah; Rastegar, Karim

    2012-04-01

    Cholinergic brain activity plays a significant role in memory. Scopolamine a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist is known to induce impairment in Morris water maze performance, the task which is mainly dependent on the hippocampus. It is suggested that hippocampal ERK and Akt activation play roles in synaptic plasticity and some types of learning and memory. Agmatine, a polyamine derived from l-arginine decarboxylation, is recently shown to exert some neuroprotective effects. This study was aimed to investigate if agmatine could reverse scopolamine-induced memory impairment and possible hippocampal ERK and Akt activity alteration. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly assigned into 5 groups. The animals were trained for 3 days in Morris water maze and in day 4 their memory retention was assessed in probe trial which was consisted of a 60 s trial with no platform. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg/ip) or saline were injected 30 min and agmatine (20 or 40 mg/kg/ip) was administered 60 min before each session. The hippocampi were isolated after behavioral studies and western blotting studies on hippocampal lysates were done to determine the levels of activated ERK and Akt. Scopolamine treatment not only impaired water maze learning and memory, but also decreased the amount of phosphorylated (activated) ERK and Akt. Agmatine pre-treatment prevented both the learning impairment and hippocampal ERK and Akt inactivation induced by scopolamine. It seems that agmatine may act as a candidate substance against amnesia.

  9. Aqueous extracts from asparagus stems prevent memory impairments in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zifang; Qi, Ce; Huang, Yunxiang; Ma, Shufeng; Wang, Xinguo; Le, Guowei; Sun, Jin

    2017-03-09

    Aqueous extracts from Asparagus officinalis L. stems (AEAS) are rich in polysaccharides, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), and steroidal saponin. This study was designed to investigate the effects of AEAS on learning, memory, and acetylcholinesterase-related activity in a scopolamine-induced model of amnesia. Sixty ICR mice were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 10) including the control group (CT), scopolamine group (SC), donepezil group (DON), low, medium, and high dose groups of AEAS (LS, MS, HS; 1.6 mL kg(-1), 8 mL kg(-1), 16 mL kg(-1)). The results showed that 8 mL kg(-1) of AEAS used in this study significantly reversed scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in mice in the novel object recognition test (P < 0.05) and the Y-maze test (P < 0.05), and also improved the latency to escape in the Morris water maze test (P < 0.05). Moreover, it significantly increased acetylcholine and inhibited acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus, which was directly related to the reduction in learning and memory impairments. It also reversed scopolamine-induced reduction in the hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) mRNA expression. AEAS protected against scopolamine-induced memory deficits. In conclusion, AEAS protected learning and memory function in mice by enhancing the activity of the cholinergic nervous system, and increasing BDNF and CREB expression. This suggests that AEAS has the potential to prevent cognitive impairments in age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  10. The Protective Role of Selenium on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Aged Rats: The Involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Hasan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Demirci, Kadir; Övey, İshak Suat

    2017-05-01

    Inhibition of Ca(2+) entry into the hippocampus and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) through inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist drugs is the current standard of care in neuronal diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and peripheral pain. Oxidative stress activates Ca(2+)-permeable TRPM2 and TRPV1, and recent studies indicate that selenium (Se) is a potent TRPM2 and TRPV1 channel antagonist in the hippocampus and DRG. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective properties of Se in primary hippocampal and DRG neuron cultures of aged rats when given alone or in combination with scopolamine (SCOP). Thirty-two aged (18-24 months old) rats were divided into four groups. The first and second groups received a placebo and SCOP (1 mg/kg/day), respectively. The third and fourth groups received intraperitoneal Se (1.5 mg/kg/ over day) and SCOP + Se, respectively. The hippocampal and DRG neurons also were stimulated in vitro with a TRPV1 channel agonist (capsaicin) and a TRPM2 channel agonist (cumene hydroperoxide). We found that Se was fully effective in reversing SCOP-induced TRPM2 and TRPV1 current densities as well as errors in working memory and reference memory. In addition, Se completely reduced SCOP-induced oxidative toxicity by modulating lipid peroxidation, reducing glutathione and glutathione peroxidase. The Se and SCOP + Se treatments also decreased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, intracellular free Ca(2+) concentrations, apoptosis, and caspase 3, caspase 9, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization values in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the current study reports on the cellular level for SCOP and Se on the different endocytotoxic cascades for the first time. Notably, the research indicates that Se can result in remarkable neuroprotective and memory impairment effects in the hippocampal neurons of rats. Graphical abstract Possible molecular pathways of involvement of selenium (Se) in scopolamine (SCOP) induced

  11. Ameliorative effect of betulin from Betula platyphylla bark on scopolamine-induced amnesic mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Namki; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Jeon, Byung Ju; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease induced by cholinergic neuron damage or amyloid-beta aggregation in the basal forebrain region and resulting in cognitive disorder. We previously reported on the neuroprotective effects of Betula platyphylla bark (BPB) in an amyloid-beta-induced amnesic mouse model. In this study, we obtained a cognitive-enhancing compound by assessing results using a scopolamine-induced amnesic mouse model. Our results show that oral treatment of mice with BPB and betulin significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory deficits in both passive avoidance and Y-maze tests. In the Morris water maze test, administration of BPB and betulin significantly improved memory and cognitive function indicating the formation of working and reference memories in treated mice. Moreover, betulin significantly increased glutathione content in mouse hippocampus, and the increase was greater than that from betulinic acid treatment. We conclude that BPB and its active component betulin have potential as therapeutic, cognitive enhancer in AD.

  12. Protective role of Ashwagandha leaf extract and its component withanone on scopolamine-induced changes in the brain and brain-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arpita; Shah, Navjot; Singh, Rumani; Saxena, Nishant; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2011-01-01

    Scopolamine is a well-known cholinergic antagonist that causes amnesia in human and animal models. Scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodent models has been widely used to understand the molecular, biochemical, behavioral changes, and to delineate therapeutic targets of memory impairment. Although this has been linked to the decrease in central cholinergic neuronal activity following the blockade of muscarinic receptors, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanism(s) particularly the effect on neuroplasticity remains elusive. In the present study, we have investigated (i) the effects of scopolamine on the molecules involved in neuronal and glial plasticity both in vivo and in vitro and (ii) their recovery by alcoholic extract of Ashwagandha leaves (i-Extract). As a drug model, scopolamine hydrobromide was administered intraperitoneally to mice and its effect on the brain function was determined by molecular analyses. The results showed that the scopolamine caused downregulation of the expression of BDNF and GFAP in dose and time dependent manner, and these effects were markedly attenuated in response to i-Extract treatment. Similar to our observations in animal model system, we found that the scopolamine induced cytotoxicity in IMR32 neuronal and C6 glioma cells. It was associated with downregulation of neuronal cell markers NF-H, MAP2, PSD-95, GAP-43 and glial cell marker GFAP and with upregulation of DNA damage--γH2AX and oxidative stress--ROS markers. Furthermore, these molecules showed recovery when cells were treated with i-Extract or its purified component, withanone. Our study suggested that besides cholinergic blockade, scopolamine-induced memory loss may be associated with oxidative stress and Ashwagandha i-Extract, and withanone may serve as potential preventive and therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders and hence warrant further molecular analyses.

  13. Protective Role of Ashwagandha Leaf Extract and Its Component Withanone on Scopolamine-Induced Changes in the Brain and Brain-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rumani; Saxena, Nishant; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu; Thakur, Mahendra K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Scopolamine is a well-known cholinergic antagonist that causes amnesia in human and animal models. Scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodent models has been widely used to understand the molecular, biochemical, behavioral changes, and to delineate therapeutic targets of memory impairment. Although this has been linked to the decrease in central cholinergic neuronal activity following the blockade of muscarinic receptors, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanism(s) particularly the effect on neuroplasticity remains elusive. In the present study, we have investigated (i) the effects of scopolamine on the molecules involved in neuronal and glial plasticity both in vivo and in vitro and (ii) their recovery by alcoholic extract of Ashwagandha leaves (i-Extract). Methodology/Principal Findings As a drug model, scopolamine hydrobromide was administered intraperitoneally to mice and its effect on the brain function was determined by molecular analyses. The results showed that the scopolamine caused downregulation of the expression of BDNF and GFAP in dose and time dependent manner, and these effects were markedly attenuated in response to i-Extract treatment. Similar to our observations in animal model system, we found that the scopolamine induced cytotoxicity in IMR32 neuronal and C6 glioma cells. It was associated with downregulation of neuronal cell markers NF-H, MAP2, PSD-95, GAP-43 and glial cell marker GFAP and with upregulation of DNA damage- γH2AX and oxidative stress- ROS markers. Furthermore, these molecules showed recovery when cells were treated with i-Extract or its purified component, withanone. Conclusion Our study suggested that besides cholinergic blockade, scopolamine-induced memory loss may be associated with oxidative stress and Ashwagandha i-Extract, and withanone may serve as potential preventive and therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders and hence warrant further molecular analyses. PMID:22096544

  14. Blockade of the dorsal hippocampal dopamine D1 receptors inhibits the scopolamine-induced state-dependent learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Piri, M; Rostampour, M; Nasehi, M; Zarrindast, M R

    2013-11-12

    In the present study, we investigated the possible role of the dorsal hippocampal (CA1) dopamine D1 receptors on scopolamine-induced amnesia as well as scopolamine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats. Animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus, trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training for their step-through latency. Results indicated that pre-training or pre-test intra-CA1 administration of scopolamine (1.5 and 3 μg/rat) dose-dependently reduced the step-through latency, showing an amnestic response. The pre-training scopolamine-induced amnesia (3 μg/rat) was reversed by the pre-test administration of scopolamine, indicating a state-dependent effect. Similarly, the pre-test administration of dopamine D1 receptor agonist, 1-phenyl-7,8-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SKF38393; 1, 2 and 4 μg/rat, intra-CA1), could significantly reverse the scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, administration of an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.25 μg/rat, intra-CA1) before different doses of SKF38393, blocked the reversal effect of SKF38393 on the pre-training scopolamine-induced amnesia. Moreover, while the pre-test intra-CA1 injection of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH23390; 0.1 and 0.5 μg/rat, intra-CA1), resulted in apparent memory impairment, microinjection of the same doses of this agent inhibited the scopolamine-induced state-dependent memory. These results indicate that the CA1 dopamine D1 receptors may potentially play an important role in scopolamine-induced amnesia as well as the scopolamine state-dependent memory. Furthermore, our results propose that dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 reverses the scopolamine-induced amnesia via acetylcholine release and possibly through the activation of muscarinic

  15. Estrogen levels modify scopolamine-induced amnesia in gonadally intact rats.

    PubMed

    de Macêdo Medeiros, André; Izídio, Geison Souza; Sousa, Diego Silveira; Macedo, Priscila Tavares; Silva, Anatildes Feitosa; Shiramizu, Victor Kenji Medeiros; Cabral, Alicia; Ribeiro, Alessandra Mussi; Silva, Regina Helena

    2014-08-04

    Previous studies suggested that estrogen plays a role in cognitive function by modulating the cholinergic transmission. However, most of the studies dealing with this subject have been conducted using ovariectomized rats. In the present study we evaluated the effects of physiological and supra-physiological variation of estrogen levels on scopolamine-induced amnesia in gonadally intact female rats. We used the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PMDAT) in order to evaluate anxiety levels and motor activity concomitantly to the memory performance. In experiment 1, female Wistar rats in each estrous cycle phase received scopolamine (1 mg/kg) or saline i.p. 20 min before the training session in the PMDAT. In experiment 2, rats in diestrus received estradiol valerate (1 mg/kg) or sesame oil i.m., and scopolamine (1 mg/kg) or saline i.p., 45 min and 20 min before the training, respectively. In experiment 3, rats in diestrus received scopolamine (1 mg/kg) or saline i.p. 20 min before the training, and estradiol valerate (1 mg/kg) or sesame oil i.m. immediately after the training session. In all experiments, a test session was performed 24 h later. The main results showed that: (1) scopolamine impaired retrieval and induced anxiolytic and hyperlocomotor effects in all experiments; (2) this cholinergic antagonist impaired acquisition only in animals in diestrus; (3) acute administration of estradiol valerate prevented the learning impairment induced by scopolamine and (4) interfered with memory consolidation process. The results suggest that endogenous variations in estrogen levels across the estrous cycle modulate some aspects of memory mediated by the cholinergic system. Indeed, specifically in diestrus, a stage with low estrogen levels, the impairment produced by scopolamine on the acquisition was counteracted by exogenous administration of the hormone, whereas the posttraining treatment potentiated the negative effects of scopolamine during the consolidation phase

  16. Scopolamine induced amnesia is reversed by Bacopa monniera through participation of kinase-CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Manish Kumar; Anand, Akshay; Prabhakar, Sudesh

    2010-02-01

    Scopolamine, an anticholinergic drug, is reported to produce amnesia by interference of long term potentiation and has been used for discerning the efficacy of various antiamnesic drugs. The intoxication with anticholinergics and benzodiazepines tend to produce neurodegeneration which cause memory deficits. Our earlier reports have shown the antiamnesic drug, B. monniera to be capable of alleviating diazepam induced memory deficits. We have now tested how scopolamine affects downstream signaling molecules of long term potentiation and if B. monniera can also modulate the scopolamine induced amnesia. We used Morris water maze scale to test the amnesic effect of scopolamine and its reversal by B. monniera. Rota-rod test was used to screen muscle coordination activity of mice before water maze investigations were carried out. The results showed that scopolamine downregulated protein kinase C and iNOS without affecting cAMP, protein kinase A, calmodulin, MAP kinase, nitrite, CREB and pCREB. B. monniera reversed the scopolamine induced amnesia by significantly improving calmodulin and by partially attenuating protein kinase C and pCREB. These observations suggest involvement of calmodulin in evoking antiamnesic effects of B. monniera.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of Citrus reticulata in scopolamine-induced dementia oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Khadragy, Manal F; Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential effects of Citrus reticulate (mandarin) peel methanolic extract (MPME) on memory dysfunction in rats. Memory impairment was produced by scopolamine (1.4 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected). Brain acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity was measured to assess the central cholinergic activity. This study also investigated the effect of scopolamine on norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin content in rat hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. In addition, the levels of brain lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO) and glutathione (GSH) were estimated to assess the degree of oxidative stress. Scopolamine administration induced a significant impairment of central cholinergic activity in rats, as indicated by a marked increase in AChE activity. The impairment of the cholinergic system was associated with a significant alternation in brain monoamines. Scopolamine administration also caused oxidant damage (elevation in LPO and NO and reduction in GSH levels). Pretreatment of MPME (250 mg/kg, orally administered) significantly reduced scopolamine-induced alternation in brain monoamines with an attenuation of scopolamine-induced rise in brain AChE activity and brain oxidative stress. It is concluded that administration of mandarin peel extract, demonstrating antioxidant activity, may be of value for dementia exhibiting elevated brain oxidative status.

  18. Cognitive enhancing of pineapple extract and juice in scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Momtazi-borojeni, Amir Abbas; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Rabbani, Mohammed; Ghannadi, Alireza; Abdollahi, Elham

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive enhancing of pineapple juice and ethanolic extract in scopolamine-induced cognitive deficit mice. The ethanolic extract of pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) was prepared by maceration method and its juice was obtained by a homogenizer. Object recognition task was used to evaluate the mice memory. Exploration time in the first and second trial was recorded. The differences in exploration time between a familiar and a novel object in the second trial were taken as a memory index. Animals were randomly assigned into 15 groups of 6 each including: control group (normal saline + vehicle), positive control group (scopolamine + rivastigmine), seven experimental groups (received scopolamine alone or scopolamine + ethanolic extract of pineapple in different doses), six other experimental groups were treated by ethanolic extract or juice of pineapple in different doses. Scopolamine (100 μL, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and pineapple juice or extract (50, 75 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered 40 and 30 min before starting the second trial in the experimental groups. Object discrimination was impaired after scopolamine administration. Results showed that juice and ethanolic extract of pineapple significantly restored object recognition ability in mice treated with scopolamine. These finding suggested that pineapple had a protective role against scopolamine-induced amnesia, indicating its ability in management of cognitive disorders. PMID:28626484

  19. Ameliorating effect of lyophilized extract of Butea frondosa leaves on scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Malik, Jai; Kumar, Munish; Deshmukh, Rahul; Kumar, Puneet

    2013-02-01

    Butea frondosa (BF) Roxb. & Koen. (syn. B. monosperma Lam.) (Fabaceae) leaves have been used in folklore medicine for the treatment of diabetes, conjunctivitis, gastrointestinal tract, and central nervous system disorders such as anxiety, amnesia, etc. To evaluate the effect of lyophilized hydroalcoholic extract of BF leaves (BFLE) at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., for its memory enhancing activity against scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats. Antiamnesic effect of the BFLE was evaluated using Morris water maze and object recognition test models. The effect of BFLE on acetylcholinesterase activity and malondialdehyde and glutathione levels were also evaluated in brain homogenate. BFLE ameliorates scopolamine-induced amnesia in both the models with maximum effect at 400 mg/kg. BFLE (400 mg/kg) decreased escape latency and increased time spent in target quadrant (24.2 and 42.5 s, respectively) in comparison to scopolamine (82 and 18.2 s, respectively) in the Morris water maze task. In the object recognition test, BFLE produced significant increase in ability to discriminate between novel and familiar objects. The highest investigated dose of BFLE (400 mg/kg), produced a significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity and malondialdehyde levels, and improves glutathione levels in comparison to scopolamine. Moreover, this effect of BFLE at 400 mg/kg was comparable to that of standard, donepezil. BFLE exhibited significant antiamnesic activity in rats thereby validating its folklore use.

  20. Lactucopicrin ameliorates oxidative stress mediated by scopolamine-induced neurotoxicity through activation of the NRF2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Ramu; Subedi, Lalita; Yeo, Eui-Ju; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2016-10-01

    Cholinergic activity plays a vital role in cognitive function, and is reduced in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases. Scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, has been employed in many studies to understand, identify, and characterize therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Scopolamine-induced dementia is associated with impairments in memory and cognitive function, as seen in patients with AD. The current study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying scopolamine-induced cholinergic neuronal dysfunction and the neuroprotective effect of lactucopicrin, an inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE). We investigated apoptotic cell death, caspase activation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction, and the expression levels of anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins in scopolamine-treated C6 cells. We also analyzed the expression levels of antioxidant enzymes and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) in C6 cells and neurite outgrowth in N2a neuroblastoma cells. Our results revealed that 1 h scopolamine pre-treatment induced cytotoxicity by increasing apoptotic cell death via oxidative stress-mediated caspase 3 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Scopolamine also downregulated the expression the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, and the transcription factor NRF2. Lactucopicrin treatment protected C6 cells from scopolamine-induced toxicity by reversing the effects of scopolamine on those markers of toxicity. In addition, scopolamine attenuated the secretion of neurotrophic nerve growth factor (NGF) in C6 cells and neurite outgrowth in N2a cells. As expected, lactucopicrin treatment enhanced NGF secretion and neurite outgrowth. Our study is the first to show that lactucopicrin, a potential neuroprotective agent, ameliorates scopolamine-induced cholinergic dysfunction via NRF2 activation and subsequent expression of antioxidant enzymes.

  1. Nootropic activity of Crataeva nurvala Buch-Ham against scopolamine induced cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Shashidhara, Shastry Chakrakodi; Saha, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Loss of cognition is one of the age related mental problems and a characteristic symptom of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s. Crataeva nurvala Buch-Ham, a well explored traditional Indian medicinal plant of Westernghats, is routinely used as folkloric medicine to treat various ailments in particular urolithiasis and neurological disorders associated with cognitive dysfunction. The objective of the study was to evaluate the nootropic activity of Crataeva nurvala Buch-Ham stem bark in different learning and memory paradigm viz. Elevated plus maze and Y-maze against scopolamine induced cognitive impairment. Moreover, to elucidate possible mechanism, we studied the influence of Crataeva nurvala ethanolic extract on central cholinergic activity via estimating the whole brain acetyl cholinesterase enzyme. Ethanolic extracts of Crataeva nurvala (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) were administered to adult Wistar rats for successive seven days and the acquisition, retention and retrieval of spatial recognition memory was determined against scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia through exteroceptive behavioral models viz. Elevated plus maze and Y-maze models. Further, whole brain acetyl cholinesterase enzyme was estimated through Ellman’s method. Pretreatment with Crataeva nurvala ethanolic extract significantly improved spatial learning and memory against scopolamine induced amnesia. Moreover, Crataeva nurvala extract decreased rat brain acetyl cholinesterase activity in a dose dependent manner and comparable to the standard drug Piracetam. The results indicate that ethanolic extract of Crataeva nurvala might be a useful as nootropic agent to delay the onset and reduce the severity of symptoms associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The underlying mechanism of action of its nootropic potentiality might be attributed to its anticholinesterase property. PMID:27065767

  2. Standardized extract of Lactuca sativa Linn. and its fractions abrogates scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice: A possible cholinergic and antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Malik, Jai; Kaur, Jagpreet; Choudhary, Sunayna

    2017-02-28

    The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of Lactuca sativa (LS) Linn. (Asteraceae) against scopolamine- induced amnesia and to validate its traditional claim as memory enhancer. Ethanol extract of fresh LS leaves (LSEE), standardized on the basis of quercetin content, was successively partitioned using various solvents viz., hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol in increasing order of polarity. LSEE (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) and its various fractions (at a dose equivalent to dose of LSEE exhibiting maximum activity), administered orally for 14 days, were evaluated for their memory enhancing effect against scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg, i.p.) amnesia in 3-4 months old male Laca mice (n = 6 in each group). The memory enhancing effect was evaluated using behavioural (elevated plus maze, novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests) and biochemical parameters (acetylcholinesterase activity, malonaldehyde, superoxide dismutase, nitrite, catalase, and reduced gultathione content). The results of the test substances were compared with both scopolamine and donepezil that was used as a standard memory enhancer and acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. Scopolamine elicit marked deterioration of memory and alteration in biochemical parameters in comparison to the control group. LSEE and its n-butanol and aqueous fractions significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the scopolamine- induced amnesia that was evident in all the behavioural and biochemical test parameters. LSEE (200 mg/kg) and n-butanol fraction (15 mg/kg) exhibited maximum anti-amnesic effect among various tested dose levels. The results exhibited that LS prophylaxis attenuated scopolamine- induced memory impairment through its acetylcholinesterase inhibitory and antioxidant activity validating its traditional claim.

  3. Task- and Treatment Length–Dependent Effects of Vortioxetine on Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Extracellular Acetylcholine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pehrson, Alan L.; Hillhouse, Todd M.; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Porter, Joseph H.; Mørk, Arne; Smagin, Gennady; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Cajina, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that often features impairments in cognitive function, and these cognitive symptoms can be important determinants of functional ability. Vortioxetine is a multimodal antidepressant that may improve some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MDD, including attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory. However, the cause of these effects is unclear, and there are several competing theories on the underlying mechanism, notably including regionally-selective downstream enhancement of glutamate neurotransmission and increased acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission. The current work sought to evaluate the ACh hypothesis by examining vortioxetine’s ability to reverse scopolamine-induced impairments in rodent tests of memory and attention. Additionally, vortioxetine’s effects on hippocampal extracellular ACh levels were examined alongside studies of vortioxetine’s pharmacokinetic profile. We found that acute vortioxetine reversed scopolamine-induced impairments in social and object recognition memory, but did not alter scopolamine-induced impairments in attention. Acute vortioxetine also induced a modest and short-lived increase in hippocampal ACh levels. However, this short-term effect is at variance with vortioxetine’s moderately long brain half life (5.1 hours). Interestingly, subchronic vortioxetine treatment failed to reverse scopolamine-induced social recognition memory deficits and had no effects on basal hippocampal ACh levels. These data suggest that vortioxetine has some effects on memory that could be mediated through cholinergic neurotransmission, however these effects are modest and only seen under acute dosing conditions. These limitations may argue against cholinergic mechanisms being the primary mediator of vortioxetine′s cognitive effects, which are observed under chronic dosing conditions in patients with MDD. PMID:27402279

  4. Task- and Treatment Length-Dependent Effects of Vortioxetine on Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Extracellular Acetylcholine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Alan L; Hillhouse, Todd M; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Porter, Joseph H; Mørk, Arne; Smagin, Gennady; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Cajina, Manuel; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that often features impairments in cognitive function, and these cognitive symptoms can be important determinants of functional ability. Vortioxetine is a multimodal antidepressant that may improve some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MDD, including attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory. However, the cause of these effects is unclear, and there are several competing theories on the underlying mechanism, notably including regionally-selective downstream enhancement of glutamate neurotransmission and increased acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmission. The current work sought to evaluate the ACh hypothesis by examining vortioxetine's ability to reverse scopolamine-induced impairments in rodent tests of memory and attention. Additionally, vortioxetine's effects on hippocampal extracellular ACh levels were examined alongside studies of vortioxetine's pharmacokinetic profile. We found that acute vortioxetine reversed scopolamine-induced impairments in social and object recognition memory, but did not alter scopolamine-induced impairments in attention. Acute vortioxetine also induced a modest and short-lived increase in hippocampal ACh levels. However, this short-term effect is at variance with vortioxetine's moderately long brain half life (5.1 hours). Interestingly, subchronic vortioxetine treatment failed to reverse scopolamine-induced social recognition memory deficits and had no effects on basal hippocampal ACh levels. These data suggest that vortioxetine has some effects on memory that could be mediated through cholinergic neurotransmission, however these effects are modest and only seen under acute dosing conditions. These limitations may argue against cholinergic mechanisms being the primary mediator of vortioxetine's cognitive effects, which are observed under chronic dosing conditions in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Amelioration of scopolamine induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative stress by Inonotus obliquus - a medicinal mushroom.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Vijayasree Vayalanellore; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2011-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the cognitive enhancing and anti-oxidant activities of Inonotus obliquus (Chaga) against scopolamine-induced experimental amnesia. Methanolic extract of Chaga (MEC) at 50 and 100 mg kg (-1)doses were administered orally for 7 days to amnesic mice. Learning and memory was assessed by passive avoidance task (PAT) and Morris water maze (MWM) test. Tacrine (THA, 10 mg kg (-1), orally (p.o)) used as a reference drug. To elucidate the mechanism of the cognitive enhancing activity of MEC, the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), anti-oxidant enzymes, the levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and nitrite of mice brain homogenates were evaluated. MEC treatment for 7 days significantly improved the learning and memory as measured by PAT and MWM paradigms. Further, MEC significantly reduced the oxidative-nitritive stress, as evidenced by a decrease in malondialdehyde and nitrite levels and restored the glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels in a dose dependent manner. In addition, MEC treatment significantly decreased the AChE activity in both the salt and detergent-soluble fraction of brain homogenates. Further, treatment with MEC restored the levels of ACh as did THA. Thus, the significant cognitive enhancement observed in mice after MEC administration is closely related to higher brain anti-oxidant properties and inhibition of AChE activity. These findings stress the critical impact of Chaga, a medicinal mushroom, on the higher brain functions like learning and memory.

  6. Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil inhalation prevents memory impairment, anxiety and depression in scopolamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Eyup; Aydin, Emel; Ungureanu, Eugen; Hritcu, Lucian

    2016-12-01

    Anthriscus nemorosa (Bieb.) Sprengel is used for medicinal purposes in traditional medicine around the world, including Turkey. Ethnobotanical studies suggest that Anthriscus essential oil could improve memory in Alzheimer's disease. The current study was hypothesized to investigate the beneficial effects of inhaled Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil on memory, anxiety and depression in scopolamine-treated rats. Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil was administered by inhalation in the doses of 1% and 3% for 21 continuous days and scopolamine (0.7mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 30min before the behavioral testing. Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests were used for assessing memory processes. Also, the anxiety and depressive responses were studied by elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests. As expected, the scopolamine alone-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease the percentage of the spontaneous alternation in Y-maze test, increase the number of working and reference memory errors in radial arm-maze test, decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. However, dual scopolamine and Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil-treated rats showed significant improvement of memory formation and exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in scopolamine-treated rats. These results suggest that Anthriscus nemorosa essential oil inhalation can prevent scopolamine-induced memory impairment, anxiety and depression.

  7. Cognition Enhancing Activity of Sulforaphane Against Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Impairment in Zebra Fish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Venugopalan; Ilanthalir, Sakthivel

    2016-10-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that consumption of large quantities of vegetables especially cruciferous vegetables (Broccoli and Brussels sprouts) can protect against chronic diseases. Sulforaphane, an isothiocynate found in cruciferous vegetables has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective effects in several experimental paradigms. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of sulforaphane on cognitive impairment in zebra fish model using a novel method of fear conditioning. Initially, the normal behaviour of zebra fishes was studied in light-dark tank for 10 min daily for 10 days. Fishes were then divided into seven groups of twelve in each. Group I served as normal, group II served as fear conditioned control, group III and group IV were sulforaphane (25 µM/L) and piracetam (200 mg/L) treated respectively. Group V served as scopolamine (400 µM/L) induced memory impairment fishes. Group VI and VII were sulforaphane (25 µM/L) and piracetam (200 mg/L) treated scopolamine induced memory impairment groups respectively. In normal behavioural analysis, fishes preferred to stay in dark compartment. The average number of entries into the dark and time spent in dark were significantly more. Fishes in group II to VII were individually subjected to fear conditioning passive avoidance task and evaluated for learned task memory. It was observed that the average number of entries into dark and time spent in dark were significantly decreased. After exposure to respective treatment fishes in group III to VII were subjected to cognitive evaluation. There was no significant difference in cognition of group III and IV fishes exposed to sulforaphane and piracetam alone respectively. Fishes exposed to scopolamine showed a significant cognitive impairment. Sulforaphane exposure prior to scopolamine significantly retained the memory of learned task. These findings suggest that sulforaphane might be a promising therapeutic agent for cognitive enhancement in

  8. Repeated administration of almonds increases brain acetylcholine levels and enhances memory function in healthy rats while attenuates memory deficits in animal model of amnesia.

    PubMed

    Batool, Zehra; Sadir, Sadia; Liaquat, Laraib; Tabassum, Saiqa; Madiha, Syeda; Rafiq, Sahar; Tariq, Sumayya; Batool, Tuba Sharf; Saleem, Sadia; Naqvi, Fizza; Perveen, Tahira; Haider, Saida

    2016-01-01

    Dietary nutrients may play a vital role in protecting the brain from age-related memory dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases. Tree nuts including almonds have shown potential to combat age-associated brain dysfunction. These nuts are an important source of essential nutrients, such as tocopherol, folate, mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. These components have shown promise as possible dietary supplements to prevent or delay the onset of age-associated cognitive dysfunction. This study investigated possible protective potential of almond against scopolamine induced amnesia in rats. The present study also investigated a role of acetylcholine in almond induced memory enhancement. Rats in test group were orally administrated with almond suspension (400 mg/kg/day) for four weeks. Both control and almond-treated rats were then divided into saline and scopolamine injected groups. Rats in the scopolamine group were injected with scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) five minutes before the start of each memory test. Memory was assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM), Morris water maze (MWM) and novel object recognition (NOR) task. Cholinergic function was determined in terms of hippocampal and frontal cortical acetylcholine content and acetylcholinesterase activity. Results of the present study suggest that almond administration for 28 days significantly improved memory retention. This memory enhancing effect of almond was also observed in scopolamine induced amnesia model. Present study also suggests a role of acetylcholine in the attenuation of scopolamine induced amnesia by almond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of Hibiscus rosa sinensis in scopolamine-induced amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Nade, Vandana S.; Kanhere, Sampat V.; Kawale, Laxman A.; Yadav, Adhikrao V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus rosa sinensis. Materials and Methods: The learning and memory was impaired by administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice which is associated with altered brain oxidative status. The object recognition test (ORT) and passive avoidance test (PAT) were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity. Animals were treated with an ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o). Results: The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (EASF) attenuated amnesia induced by scopolamine and aging. The discrimination index (DI) was significantly decreased in the aged and scopolamine group in ORT. Pretreatment with EASF significantly increased the DI. In PAT, scopolamine-treated mice exhibited significantly shorter step-down latencies (SDL). EASF treatment showed a significant increase in SDL in young, aged as well as in scopolamine-treated animals. The biochemical analysis of brain revealed that scopolamine treatment increased lipid peroxidation and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GSH). Administration of extract significantly reduced LPO and reversed the decrease in brain SOD and GSH levels. The administration of H. sinensis improved memory in amnesic mice and prevented the oxidative stress associated with scopolamine. The mechanism of such protection of H. sinensis may be due to augmentation of cellular antioxidants. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggested that H. sinensis had a protective role against age and scopolamine-induced amnesia, indicating its utility in management of cognitive disorders. PMID:21572646

  10. Influence of benzodiazepine tranquilizers on scopolamine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Sansone, M

    1980-01-01

    Four benzodiazepine tranquilizers have been tested, alone or in combination with scopolamine, on the spontaneous locomotor activity of BALB/c mice. Scopolamine-induced locomotor stimulation was enhanced by chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, and medazepam, but not by bromazepam. These effects are similar to those exerted by the four benzodiazepines on amphetamine-induced locomotor stimulation and allow the same differentiation between the four derivatives.

  11. Nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of phloretin in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghumatkar, Priya J; Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Tambe, Rufi M; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Phloretin (PHL), a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in the roots and leaves of apple tree. In vitro study on GT1-7 immortalized hypothalamic neurons exposed to amyloid beta (25-35), demonstrated that PHL significantly influenced membrane fluidity and potential. PHL also significantly decreased excitotoxicity by restoring the calcium homeostasis in the same. Thus, PHL proves to be a promising therapeutic moiety which should be further screened in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic roles of PHL in the subacute scopolamine induced amnesia in mice. In this study, mice were pretreated with PHL 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and Donepezil (DON) 1mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p) for 14days. The last 7days of treatment regimen included daily injection of SCP 1.5mg/kg to induce cognitive deficits. Mice were subjected to behavioral analysis. Biochemical estimation of the brain homogenates for acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was carried out particularly in the hippocampus. PHL was found to significantly improve the performance of mice in Morris water maze test (P<0.001) and significantly decreased the acetylcholinesterase activity (P<0.001) at all doses compared to SCP treated mice. Also, PHL significantly elevated the activity of antioxidant enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione levels (P<0.001) and decreased malonaldehyde levels (P<0.001) in comparison with the SCP group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that PHL treatment dose dependently improved BDNF levels in the hippocampus which were found to be significantly depleted (P<0.001) in the SCP group. Additionally, PHL (10mg/kg) significantly enhanced the spatial memory formation (P<0.05) and neurotrophicity (P<0.001) compared to DON (1mg/kg). The aforementioned research

  12. Bone Marrow-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells Protect Against Scopolamine-Induced Alzheimer-Like Pathological Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Safar, Marwa M; Arab, Hany H; Rizk, Sherine M; El-Maraghy, Shohda A

    2016-04-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with AD have displayed decreased circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) which repair and maintain the endothelial function. Transplantation of EPCs has emerged as a promising approach for the management of cerebrovascular diseases including ischemic stroke, however, its impact on AD has been poorly described. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the effects of bone marrow-derived (BM) EPCs transplantation in repeated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, an experimental model that replicates biomarkers of AD. Intravenously transplanted BM-EPCs migrated into the brain of rats and improved the learning and memory deficits. Meanwhile, they mitigated the deposition of amyloid plaques and associated histopathological alterations. At the molecular levels, BM-EPCs blunted the increase of hippocampal amyloid beta protein (Aβ), amyloid precursor protein (APP) and reinstated the Aβ-degrading neprilysin together with downregulation of p-tau and its upstream glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). They also corrected the perturbations of neurotransmitter levels including restoration of acetylcholine and associated esterase along with dopamine, GABA, and the neuroexitatory glutamate. Furthermore, BM-EPCs induced behavioral recovery via boosting of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream cAMP response element binding (CREB), suppression of the proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and upregulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10). BM-EPCs also augmented Nrf2 and seladin-1. Generally, these actions were analogous to those exerted by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) and the reference anti-Alzheimer donepezil. For the first time, these findings highlight the beneficial actions of BM-EPCs against the memory

  13. Determination of the effectiveness of components of the herbal medicine Toki-Shakuyaku-San and fractions of Angelica acutiloba in improving the scopolamine-induced impairment of rat's spatial cognition in eight-armed radial maze test.

    PubMed

    Hatip-Al-Khatib, Izzettin; Egashira, Nobuaki; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Iwasaki, Kiyo; Kurauchi, Kouji; Inui, Keiichiro; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2004-09-01

    The improving effects of various components of Toki-Shakuyaku-San (TSS) and fractions isolated from Angelica acutiloba Radix (Toki) on scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment were investigated in eight-armed radial maze. The scopolamine-induced memory impairment was characterized by prominent increase of error choices in addition to decreased correct choices. Toki, Cnidium officinale Rhizoma (Senkyu), Poria cocos Hoelen (Bukuryo), Alisma orientale Rhizoma (Takusha), and Atractylodes lancea Rhizoma (Sojutsu) increased the correct choices, while only the Toki, Sojutsu, and Takusha decreased the error choices. No effect was produced by Paeonia lactiflora Radix (Shakuyaku). Investigation of effects of fractions isolated from Toki revealed that its activity mainly resided in the butanol layer and its contents of N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide and amines. Moreover, the alkaloid, internal and external solutions (containing poly-, di-, and monosaccharides) obtained by dialysis with Visking cellophane tubing also improved the memory. However, no improving properties were detected for methanol and hexanol layers, L-(-)-tryptophan, L-arginine, L-(-)-lysine, and choline chloride. The results showed that the TSS components could improve the reference and working memory impaired by scopolamine. The improving effect of TSS is produced greatly by the Toki component, the activity of which was greatly produced by the fraction extracted by butanol.

  14. Reversal of scopolamine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition by clozapine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Philipp; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2012-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex refers to the reduction of the startle response to an intense acoustic pulse stimulus when it is shortly preceded by a weak non-startling prepulse stimulus and provides a cross-species measure of sensory-motor gating. PPI is typically impaired in schizophrenia patients, and a similar impairment can be induced in rats by systemic scopolamine, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist that can evoke a range of cognitive and psychotic symptoms in healthy humans that are commonly referred to as the “anti-muscarinic syndrome” resembling some clinical features of schizophrenia. Scopolamine-induced PPI disruption has therefore been proposed as an anti-muscarinic animal model of schizophrenia, but parallel investigations in the mouse remain scant and the outcomes are mixed and often confounded by an elevation of startle reactivity. Here, we distinguished the PPI-disruptive and the confounding startle-enhancing effects of scopolamine (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) in C57BL/6 wild-type mice by showing that the latter partly stemmed from a shift in spontaneous baseline reactivity. With appropriate correction for between-group differences in startle reactivity, we went on to confirm that the PPI-disruptive effect of scopolamine could be nullified by clozapine pre-treatment (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) in a dose-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration that scopolamine-induced PPI disruption is sensitive to atypical antipsychotic drugs. In concert with previous data showing its sensitivity to haloperidol the present finding supports the predictive validity of the anti-muscarinic PPI disruption model for both typical and atypical antipsychotic drug action. PMID:22210488

  15. Ameliorative effects of amide derivatives of 1,3,4-thiadiazoles on scopolamine induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Akanksha; Piplani, Poonam

    2016-10-21

    The present study reports the effect of amide derivatives of 1,3,4-thiadizoles on scopolamine induced deficit cholinergic neurotransmission and oxidative stress serving as promising leads for the therapeutics of cognitive dysfunction. Fourteen compounds (2c-8d) have been synthesised and evaluated against behavioural alterations using step down passive avoidance protocol and morris water maze and at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg with reference to the standard, Rivastigmine. All the synthesised compounds were evaluated for their in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition at five different concentrations using mice brain homogenate as the source of the enzyme. Biochemical estimation of markers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, plasma nitrite, catalase) has also been carried out to assess the role of synthesised molecules on the oxidative damage induced by scopolamine. The compounds 5c, 6c and 8c displayed appreciable activity with an IC50 value of 3 μM, 3.033 μM and 2.743 μM, respectively towards acetylcholinesterase inhibition. These compounds also decreased scopolamine induced oxidative stress, thus serving as promising leads for the amelioration of oxidative stress induced cognitive decline. The molecular docking study performed to predict the binding mode of the compounds also suggested that these compounds bind appreciably with the amino acids present in the active site of recombinant human acetylcholinesterase (rhAChE). The results indicated that these compounds could be further traversed as inhibitors of AChE and oxidative stress for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction.

  16. Asparagus adscendens root extract enhances cognition and protects against scopolamine induced amnesia: An in-silico and in-vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Priyanka; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-12-25

    Asparagus adscendens Roxb. commonly known as safed musli and belonging to the Liliaceae family is cultivated mainly in Asian countries. In traditional medicine, safed musli is recommended as nerve tonic and remedy for memory impairment. The present study was aimed to evaluate nootropic and antiamnesic activities of Asparagus adscendens extract (AAE) using in silico and in vivo approach. Phytoconstituents of A. adscendens root reported in literature were subjected to in silico prediction using PASS and Pharmaexpert. The radial arm maze and passive shock avoidance paradigm were employed to evaluate nootropic activity. Subsequently, the anti-amnesic activity was evaluated in scopolamine induced amnesia model. To elucidate the mechanism of nootropic activity, the effect of AAE on the activities of acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant enzymes in the cortex and hippocampus of mice were also evaluated. In silico activity spectrum for all of A. adscendens phytoconstituents exhibited excellent prediction score for nootropic activity. Pretreatment with AAE (50, 100 & 200 mg/kg, i.p.) for 15 days showed significant decrease in working memory error, reference memory error and retrieval latency in radial arm maze and decrease in step down latency in passive shock avoidance paradigm were observed. Further, AAE significantly reduced acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress parameters in cortex and hippocampus of mice. Thus, in silico and in vivo results suggest that A. adscendens root may exert its nootropic activity through both anti-acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant activities.

  17. Learning and memory promoting effects of crude garlic extract.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Sugato

    2013-12-01

    Chronic administration of aged garlic extract has been shown to prevent memory impairment in mice. Acute and chronic (21 days) effects of marketed formulation of crude garlic extract (Lasuna) were evaluated on learning and memory in mice using step down latency (SDL) by passive avoidance response and transfer latency (TL) using elevated plus maze. Scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg, ip) was used to induce amnesia in mice and piracetam (200 mg/kg, ip) served as positive control. In the acute study, Lasuna (65 mg/kg, po) partially reversed the scopolamine-induced amnesia but failed to improve learning and memory in untreated animals. Chronic administration of Lasuna (40 mg/kg/day for 21 days) significantly improved learning both in control and scopolamine induced amnesic animals. Influence of Lasuna on central cholinergic activity and its antioxidant properties were also studied by estimating the cortical acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels respectively. Chronic administration of Lasuna inhibited AchE, while increasing GSH levels. Thus the results indicate that long-term administration of crude garlic extract may improve learning and memory in mice while the underlying mechanism of action may be attributed to the anti-AchE activity and anti-oxidant property of garlic.

  18. Lactobacillus helveticus-fermented milk improves learning and memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Kazuhito; Uchida, Naoto; Ohki, Kohji; Nakamura, Yasunori; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effects of Calpis sour milk whey, a Lactobacillus helveticus-fermented milk product, on learning and memory. We evaluated improvement in scopolamine-induced memory impairment using the spontaneous alternation behaviour test, a measure of short-term memory. We also evaluated learning and working memory in mice using the novel object recognition test, which does not involve primary reinforcement (food or electric shocks). A total of 195 male ddY mice were used in the spontaneous alternation behaviour test and 60 in the novel object recognition test. Forced orally administered Calpis sour milk whey powder (200 and 2000 mg/kg) significantly improved scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) and object recognition memory (2000 mg/kg; P < 0.05). These results suggest that Calpis sour milk whey may be useful for the prevention of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, and enhancing learning and memory in healthy human subjects; however, human clinical studies are necessary.

  19. Towards an animal model of an antipsychotic drug-resistant cognitive impairment in schizophrenia: scopolamine induces abnormally persistent latent inhibition, which can be reversed by cognitive enhancers but not by antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Barak, Segev; Weiner, Ina

    2009-03-01

    Schizophrenia symptoms segregate into positive, negative and cognitive, which exhibit differential sensitivity to drugs. Recent efforts to identify treatments targeting cognitive impairments in schizophrenia have directed attention to the cholinergic system for its well documented role in cognition. Relatedly, muscarinic antagonists (e.g. scopolamine) produce an 'antimuscarinic syndrome', characterized by psychosis and cognitive impairments. Latent inhibition (LI) is the poorer conditioning to a stimulus resulting from its non-reinforced pre-exposure. LI indexes the ability to ignore irrelevant stimuli and aberrations of this capacity produced by pro-psychotic agents (e.g. amphetamine, MK-801) are used extensively to model attentional impairments in schizophrenia. We recently showed that LI was disrupted by scopolamine at low doses, and this was reversed by typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. Here, at a higher dose (1.5 mg/kg), scopolamine produced an opposite pole of attentional impairment, namely, attentional perseveration, whereby scopolamine-treated rats persisted in expressing LI under strong conditioning that prevented LI expression in controls. Scopolamine-induced persistent LI was reversed by cholinergic and glycinergic cognitive enhancers (physostigmine and glycine) but was resistant to both typical and atypical APDs (haloperidol and clozapine). The latter sets scopolamine-induced persistent LI apart from scopolamine- and amphetamine-induced disrupted LI, which are reversed by both typical and atypical APDs, as well as from other cases of abnormally persistent LI including MK-801-induced persistent LI, which is reversed by atypical APDs. Thus, scopolamine-induced persistent LI may provide a pharmacological LI model for screening cognitive enhancers that are efficient for the treatment of APD-resistant cognitive impairments in schizophrenia.

  20. Effect of pregabalin on fear-based conditioned avoidance learning and spatial learning in a mouse model of scopolamine-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Sałat, Kinga; Podkowa, Adrian; Malikowska, Natalia; Trajer, Jędrzej

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive deficits are one of the frequent symptoms accompanying epilepsy or its treatment. In this study, the effect on cognition of intraperitoneally administered antiepileptic drug, pregabalin (10 mg/kg), was investigated in scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice in the passive avoidance task and Morris water maze task. The effect of scopolamine and pregabalin on animals' locomotor activity was also studied. In the retention phase of the passive avoidance task, pregabalin reversed memory deficits induced by scopolamine (p < 0.05). During the acquisition phase of the Morris water maze pregabalin-treated memory-impaired mice performed the test with longer escape latencies than the vehicle-treated mice (significant at p < 0.05 on Day 5, and at p < 0.001 on Day 6). There were no differences in this parameter between the scopolamine-treated control group and pregabalin-treated memory-impaired mice, which indicated that pregabalin had no influence on spatial learning in this task. During the probe trial a significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed in terms of the mean number of target crossings between vehicle-treated mice and pregabalin-treated memory-impaired mice but there was no difference between the scopolamine-treated control group and mice treated with pregabalin + scopolamine. Pregabalin did not influence locomotor activity increased by scopolamine. In passive avoidance task, pregabalin reversed learning deficits induced by scopolamine. In the Morris water maze, pregabalin did not influence spatial learning deficits induced by scopolamine. These results are relevant for epileptic patients treated with pregabalin and those who use it for other therapeutic indications (anxiety, pain).

  1. Ascorbic acid attenuates scopolamine-induced spatial learning deficits in the water maze.

    PubMed

    Harrison, F E; Hosseini, A H; Dawes, S M; Weaver, S; May, J M

    2009-12-28

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) has important antioxidant functions that can help protect against oxidative stress in the brain and damage associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. When administered parenterally ascorbate can bypass saturable uptake mechanisms in the gut and thus higher tissue concentrations can be achieved than by oral administration. In the present study we show that ascorbate (125 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 1-h before testing, partially attenuated scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg i.p.) cognitive deficits in Morris water maze performance in young mice. Cumulative search error, but not escape latency nor path length, was significantly improved during acquisition in ascorbate plus scopolamine-treated mice although performance did not equal that of control mice. During the probe trial, scopolamine led to increased search error and chance level of time spent in the platform quadrant, whereas mice pre-treated with ascorbate prior to scopolamine did not differ from control mice on these measures. Ascorbate had no effect on unimpaired, control mice and neither did it reduce the peripheral, activity-increasing effects of scopolamine. Ascorbate alone increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the medial forebrain area but had no effect in cortex or striatum. This change, and its action against the amnestic effects of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, suggest that ascorbate may be acting in part via altered cholinergic signaling. However, further investigation is necessary to isolate the cognition-enhancing effects of ascorbate.

  2. Methyllycaconitine- and scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction: differential reversal effect by cognition-enhancing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Andriambeloson, Emile; Huyard, Bertrand; Poiraud, Etienne; Wagner, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence pointing to the pivotal role of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) dysfunction in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease or schizophrenia. This study was undertaken to establish and characterize an in vivo model for cognitive disorder secondary to the blockade of α7 nAChR by its specific antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA). The results show that MLA elicited cognitive dysfunction as assessed by reduced spontaneous alternation of mice in the T-maze. The maximal effect of MLA produced 25–30% reduction in the spontaneous alternation of mice, a level comparable with that induced by the muscarinic antagonism of scopolamine. Donepezil and galantamine fully reversed both MLA and scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction. However, the ED50 of donepezil and galantamine was significantly shifted to the left in the MLA- compared to scopolamine-treated mice (0.0005 and 0.002 mg/kg for donepezil; 0.0003 and 0.7 mg/kg for galantamine). Moreover, memantine elicited marked reversion of cognitive dysfunction (up to 70%) in MLA-treated mice while only a weak reversal effect at high dose of memantine (less than 20%) was observed in scopolamine-treated mice. The above findings indicate that MLA-induced cognitive dysfunction in the mouse is highly sensitive and more responsive to the current procognitive drugs than the traditional scopolamine-based assay. Thus, it can be of value for the preclinical screening and profiling of cognition-enhancing drugs. PMID:25505596

  3. CDP-choline attenuates scopolamine induced disruption of prepulse inhibition in rats: involvement of central nicotinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Gulsah; Savci, Vahide; Buyukuysal, Levent R; Goktalay, Gokhan

    2014-05-21

    It has been shown that cholinergic system plays an important role in schizophrenia-associated cognitive deficits, therefore cholinergic drugs are novel targets for the treatment of cognitive deficits seen in schizophrenia. We aimed to test the effects of CDP-choline on sensorimotor gating functioning, which is an important function for the integration of sensory and cognitive information processing and the execution of appropriate motor responses. In this study, prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex was used to test the sensorimotor gating functioning, and the effects of CDP-choline on scopolamine induced PPI disruption were evaluated in rats. Furthermore, the contribution of the cholinergic mechanism in these effects was determined. CDP-choline (75, 250, 500mg/kg) by itself had no effect on the PPI in naïve animals. Scopolamine (0.4mg/kg; s.c.) significantly decreased the PPI levels and intraperitoneal administration of CDP-choline (250mg/kg) attenuated the effects of scopolamine. A non-specific nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine and an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor (α7-nAChR) antagonist, methyllycaconitine were used to investigate the mechanism underlying the effects of CDP-choline. Mecamylamine (3mg/kg; s.c.), and methyllycaconitine (10μg; i.c.v.) completely blocked the reversal effects of CDP-choline on scopolamine induced disruption of PPI. These results demonstrate that exogenous administration of CDP-choline attenuates scopolamine induced PPI disruption and show that the activation of central α7-nAChR may play a critical role in this effect.

  4. Cognition Enhancing and Neuromodulatory Propensity of Bacopa monniera Extract Against Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Impairments in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-05-01

    Cognition-enhancing activity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was evaluated against scopolamine-induced amnesic rats by novel object recognition test (NOR), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in rats. Piracetam (200 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used as positive control. BME at three different dosages (i.e., 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body wt.) improved the impairment induced by scopolamine by increasing the discrimination index of NOR and by decreasing the transfer latency of EPM and escape latency of MWM tests. Our results further elucidate that BME administration has normalized the neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, glutamate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, norepinephrine) levels that were altered by scopolamine administration in hippocampus of rat brain. BME administration also ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating AChE and up-regulating BDNF, muscarinic M1 receptor and CREB expression in brain hippocampus confirms the potent neuroprotective role and these results are in corroboration with the earlier in vitro studies. BME administration showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate that, cognition-enhancing and neuromodulatory propensity of BME is through modulating the expression of AChE, BDNF, MUS-1, CREB and also by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in hippocampus of rat brain.

  5. Fucoxanthin, a Marine Carotenoid, Reverses Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Impairments in Mice and Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiajia; Huang, Ling; Yu, Jie; Xiang, Siying; Wang, Jialing; Zhang, Jinrong; Yan, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; He, Shan; Wang, Qinwen

    2016-03-25

    Fucoxanthin, a natural carotenoid abundant in edible brown seaweeds, has been shown to possess anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. In this study, we report for the first time that fucoxanthin effectively protects against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in mice. In addition, fucoxanthin significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and decreased both choline acetyltransferase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Using an in vitro AChE activity assay, we discovered that fucoxanthin directly inhibits AChE with an IC50 value of 81.2 μM. Molecular docking analysis suggests that fucoxanthin likely interacts with the peripheral anionic site within AChE, which is in accordance with enzymatic activity results showing that fucoxanthin inhibits AChE in a non-competitive manner. Based on our current findings, we anticipate that fucoxanthin might exhibit great therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by acting on multiple targets, including inhibiting AChE and increasing BDNF expression.

  6. Fucoxanthin, a Marine Carotenoid, Reverses Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Impairments in Mice and Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiajia; Huang, Ling; Yu, Jie; Xiang, Siying; Wang, Jialing; Zhang, Jinrong; Yan, Xiaojun; Cui, Wei; He, Shan; Wang, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Fucoxanthin, a natural carotenoid abundant in edible brown seaweeds, has been shown to possess anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. In this study, we report for the first time that fucoxanthin effectively protects against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in mice. In addition, fucoxanthin significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced increase of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and decreased both choline acetyltransferase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Using an in vitro AChE activity assay, we discovered that fucoxanthin directly inhibits AChE with an IC50 value of 81.2 μM. Molecular docking analysis suggests that fucoxanthin likely interacts with the peripheral anionic site within AChE, which is in accordance with enzymatic activity results showing that fucoxanthin inhibits AChE in a non-competitive manner. Based on our current findings, we anticipate that fucoxanthin might exhibit great therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease by acting on multiple targets, including inhibiting AChE and increasing BDNF expression. PMID:27023569

  7. Neuroprotective effects of inhaled lavender oil on scopolamine-induced dementia via anti-oxidative activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Hancianu, Monica; Cioanca, Oana; Mihasan, Marius; Hritcu, Lucian

    2013-03-15

    Lavender is used in traditional medicines in Asia, Europe, ancient Greece and Rome, and was mentioned in the Bible and in ancient Jewish texts. Also, lavender is reported to be an effective medical plant in treating inflammation, depression, stress and headache. The present study was undertaken in order to investigate the antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities of the lavender essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia ssp. angustifolia Mill. and Lavandula hybrida Rev. using superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) specific activities, total content of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) level (lipid peroxidation) and DNA fragmentation assays in male Wistar rats subjected to scopolamine-induced dementia rat model. In scopolamine-treated rats, lavender essential oils showed potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities. Subacute exposures (daily, for 7 continuous days) to lavender oils significantly increased antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, GPX and CAT), total content of reduced GSH and reduced lipid peroxidation (MDA level) in rat temporal lobe homogenates, suggesting antioxidant potential. Also, DNA cleavage patterns were absent in the lavender groups, suggesting antiapoptotic activity. Taken together, our results suggest that antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities of the lavender essential oils are the major mechanisms for their potent neuroprotective effects against scopolamine-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain.

  8. Scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted mice after food intake: effects of glucose intake, antimuscarinic activity and anticonvulsant drugs.

    PubMed

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye; Celik, Pinar Yamantürk; Açikmeşe, Bariş

    2005-09-01

    The present study was performed to further evaluate the contribution of antimuscarinic activity and hypoglycaemia to the development of scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted mice after food intake. The effects of anticonvulsant drugs on convulsions were also evaluated. Antimuscarinic drugs atropine (3 mg/kg) and biperiden (10 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p) to animals fasted for 48 h. Like scopolamine, both drugs induced convulsions after animals were allowed to eat ad libitum. Another group of animals was given glucose (5%) in drinking water during fasting. These animals, although they had normoglycaemic blood levels after fasting, also developed convulsions after treated with scopolamine i.p. (3 mg/kg), atropine (3 mg/kg) or biperiden (10 mg/kg) and allowed to eat ad libitum. Among the drugs studied, only valproate (340 mg/kg), gabapentin (50 mg/kg) and diazepam (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) markedly reduced the incidence of scopolamine-induced convulsions. The present results indicate that antimuscarinic activity, but not hypoglycaemia, underlies these convulsions which do not respond to most of the conventional anticonvulsant drugs.

  9. Bis(9)-(-)-nor-meptazinol as a novel dual-binding AChEI potently ameliorates scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Xia, Zheng; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jian-rong; Ge, Xin-Xing; Li, Juan; Cui, Yongyao; Qiu, Zhui-Bai; Xu, Jun; Xie, Qiong; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifaceted neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by the progressive deterioration of cognition and the emergence of behavioral and psychological symptoms in aging patients. Given that the clinical effectiveness of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) has still been questioned due to dubious disease-modifying effects, the multi-target directed ligand (MTDL) design has become an emerging strategy for developing new drugs for AD treatment. Bis(9)-(-)-nor-meptazinol (Bis-Mep) was firstly reported by us as a novel MTDL for both potent cholinesterase and amyloid-β aggregation inhibition. In this study, we further explored its AChE inhibition kinetic features and cognitive amelioration. Bis-Mep was found to be a mixed-type inhibitor on electric eel AChE by enzyme kinetic study. Molecular docking revealed that two "water bridges" located at the two wings of Bis-Mep stabilized its interaction with both catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, subcutaneous administration of Bis-Mep (10, 100 or 1000 ng/kg) significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced memory deficits in a typical bell-shaped dose-response manner. The maximal cognitive amelioration of Bis-Mep was achieved at 100 ng/kg, comparable with the effect of a reference drug Huperzine A at 1 mg/kg and also the relevant AChE inhibition in brain. These findings suggested that Bis-Mep might be a promising dual-binding AChE inhibitor for potential AD therapeutics.

  10. Prevention Education Effects on Fundamental Memory Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Susan L.; Krank, Marvin; Grenard, Jerry L.; Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of a key session from a nationally recognized drug abuse prevention program on basic memory processes in 211 high-risk youth in Southern California. In a randomized, between-subject design, the authors manipulated assignment to a Myth and Denial program session and the time of assessment (immediate vs. one-week delay). The authors examined program decay effects on memory accessibility and judgment errors. Those participants exposed to the program session generated more myths and facts from the program than those in the control group, suggesting that even a single program session influenced students’ memory for program information and this was retained at least one week and detectable with indirect tests of memory accessibility. However, consistent with basic research perspectives, participants in the program delayed assessment group erroneously generated more fact-related information from the session to the prompt “It is a myth that_____” than the participants in the program immediate assessment group; that is, they retained more facts as myths. These types of program effects, anticipated by basic memory theory, were not detected with a traditional judgment task in the present sample. The results suggest that basic science approaches offer a novel way of conceptually recasting prevention effects to more completely understand how these effects may operate. Implications for program evaluation and conceptualization are discussed. PMID:22544598

  11. Neuroprotective effects of HTR1A antagonist WAY-100635 on scopolamine-induced delirium in rats and underlying molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yimin; Chen, Dongmei; Huang, Xiaojing; Huang, Lina; Tang, Liang; Jiang, Jihong; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2016-10-19

    Limited surveys have assessed the performance of 5-hydroxytreptamine receptor 1A and its antagonist WAY-100635 in pharmacological manipulations targeting delirium therapies. The purpose of this paper was to assess the central pharmacological activity of WAY-100635 in a rat model of scopolamine-induced delirium and its underlying mechanism. A delirium rat model was established by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine and behavioral changes evaluated through open field and elevated plus maze experiments. Concentrations of monoamines in the hippocampus and amygdalae were detected by high performance liquid chromatography. The effect of WAY-100635 on the recovery of rats from delirium was assessed by stereotactic injection of WAY-100635 and its mechanism of action determined by measuring mRNA and protein expression via real time PCR and western blotting methods. The total distance and the number of crossing and rearing in the elevated plus maze test and the time spent in the light compartment in the dark/light test of scopolamine-treated rats were significantly increased while the percentage of time spent in the open arms was decreased, showing the validity of the established delirium rat model. The measurement of the concentrations of noradrenaline, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, the homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid and serotonin concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of scopolamine-induced delirium rats were significantly increased. The intra-hippocampus and intra-BLA injections of WAY-100635 improved the delirium-like behavior of rats by significantly reducing the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and the release of IL1-β and IL8 into CSF. Taken together, these findings indicate that WAY-100635 may exert a therapeutic effect on post-operative delirium by controlling neurotransmission as well as suppressing neuroinflammation in the central nervous system.

  12. PASS assisted prediction and pharmacological evaluation of hesperidin against scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Habibyar, Ahmad Farid; Sharma, Neha; Khurana, Navneet

    2016-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory impairment. However, the exact etiology of AD is not clear but cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress are considered to play an important role in its pathogenesis. Because of this reason, antioxidant compounds are expected to play potential beneficial role in this disease. Among number of antioxidant compounds, hesperidin (HSD) was selected for this study on the basis of its reported antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. Moreover, it has shown higher probable activity value for scavenging free radical along with anti-dementia effects, predicted by PASS online computer program. Current study was designed to evaluate the nootropic and antioxidant effects of HSD. The different groups of animals received scopolamine (2mg/kg) along with co-treamtment of HSD (100, 200mg/kg) and donepezil HCl (3mg/kg) i.p. for consecutive 10 days. Behavioral tests were carried out, 30min after respective treatment on 2nd, 5th and 9th day for memory evaluation. On 10th day of treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the homogenates of brain hippocampus and cortex were used for biochemical estimation. Co-treatment with HSD at both doses significantly reversed the changes in memory and biochemical alterations, induced by scopolamine administration. It can be concluded that HSD has strong memory enhancing and anti-oxidant effects, therefore, it can be considered as a potential candidate for its further pharmacological evaluation for AD-induced dementia.

  13. Adenosine A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, N; Almeida, A S; Marques, D M; Nunes, F; Chenet, G C; Botton, P H S; Mioranzza, S; Loss, C M; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer’s disease, an effect mimicked by adenosine A2A receptor, but not A1 receptor, antagonists. Hence, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on memory performance and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. Experimental Approach We determined whether A2A receptors are necessary for the emergence of memory impairments induced by scopolamine and whether A2A receptor activation triggers memory deficits in naïve mice, using three tests to assess short-term memory, namely the object recognition task, inhibitory avoidance and modified Y-maze. Key Results Scopolamine (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) impaired short-term memory performance in all three tests and this scopolamine-induced amnesia was prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist (SCH 58261, 0.1–1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) and by the A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX, 0.2–5.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.), except in the modified Y-maze where only SCH58261 was effective. Both antagonists were devoid of effects on memory or locomotion in naïve rats. Notably, the activation of A2A receptors with CGS 21680 (0.1–0.5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) before the training session was sufficient to trigger memory impairment in the three tests in naïve mice, and this effect was prevented by SCH 58261 (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of CGS 21680 (50 nmol) also impaired recognition memory in the object recognition task. Conclusions and Implications These results show that A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment and further suggest that A1 receptors might also be selectively engaged to control the cholinergic-driven memory impairment. PMID:25939452

  14. α-Isocubebenol alleviates scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment by repressing acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung Hwa; Choi, Seong Mi; Kim, Ji Eun; Sung, Ji Eun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Choi, Yung Hyun; Bae, Chang Joon; Choi, Young Whan; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2017-01-18

    α-Isocubebenol (ICO) isolated from Schisandra chinensis fruit was recently shown to exert neuroprotective properties with significant anti-neuroinflammatory effects. Here, we present evidence of the novel effects of ICO on alleviation of cognitive impairment. To confirm these effects, ICR mice were pretreated with two different doses of ICO for 3 weeks and scopolamine (SP) to induce memory impairment for the last 7days of the period. A passive avoidance test showed that ICO pretreatment recovered memory impairment in SP treated mice, although there was no difference between the two doses. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was significantly decreased in the SP+ICO treated group compared with the SP+Vehicle treated group. Additionally, significant recovery of the number of apoptotic cells and the ratio of apoptosis proteins (Bcl-2/Bax) were detected in the SP+ICO treated group than the SP+Vehicle treated group. Moreover, ICO treatment attenuated the decrease of ERK phosphorylation by SP treatment. These results indicate that ICO from S. chinensis fruit could be applied as an active pharmaceutical ingredient for cognitive improvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate Attenuates Scopolamine-Induced Cognitive Dysfunctions via Improving Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Jun; Yang, Cong; Li, Lin; Hou, Bo-Nan; Chen, Hui-Fang; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Sodium Tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) is a derivative of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA). Tan IIA has been reported to possess neuroprotective effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether STS possesses effect on AD remains unclear. This study aims to estimate whether STS could protect against scopolamine- (SCOP-) induced learning and memory deficit in Kunming mice. Morris water maze results showed that oral administration of STS (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) and Donepezil shortened escape latency, increased crossing times of the original position of the platform, and increased the time spent in the target quadrant. STS decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and increased the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the hippocampus and cortex of SCOP-treated mice. Oxidative stress results showed that STS increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hippocampus and cortex. In addition, western blot was carried out to detect the expression of apoptosis related proteins (Bcl-2, Bax, and Caspase-3). STS upregulated the protein expression of Bcl-2 and downregulated the proteins expression of Bax and Caspase-3. These results indicated that STS might become a promising therapeutic candidate for attenuating AD-like pathological dysfunction. PMID:27556046

  16. Effect of Gingko biloba extract on scopolamine-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, M; Nickmahzar, E G; Babakordi, F

    2013-09-01

    Apoptosis, known as programmed cell death, plays a crucial role in normal development and tissue homeostasis. Apoptosis is also involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amnesia refers to the loss of memory and can also be a warning sign of neurodegenerative diseases. The antioxidant properties of Ginkgo biloba extract was known previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on the rat's hippocampal apoptotic neurons number after Scopolamine based amnesia. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats were used. Rats were randomly divided into control, sham, protective and treatment groups. The rats in the sham group received only scopolamine hydrobromide (3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. The rats in the protective and treatment groups received Ginkgo biloba extract (40, 80 mg/kg) for 7 days intraperitoneally before/after scopolamine injection. Then 48 h after the last injection, the brains of rats were withdrawn and fixed with paraformaldehyde, and then, after histological processing, the slices were stained with the TUNEL kit for apoptotic neurons. Data were compared by the ANOVA Post Hoc Tukey test; P < 0.05 was considered significant. Our results showed that Scopolamine (in the sham group) increased significantly the number of apoptotic neurons in all areas of the hippocampus compared with the control. Whereas, Ginkgo biloba extract reduce the neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus before and/or after encounter with scopolamine. We concluded that pretreatment and treatment injection of Ginkgo biloba extract can have a protective effect for neurons and it can limit apoptosis in all area of the hippocampus.

  17. Effect of Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Seema; Sangma, Tultul; Shukla, Santosh Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2015-07-01

    Cinnamomum zeylanicum (CZ) is commonly known as cinnamon in traditional system of medicine having antibacterial, antioxidant, antidiabetic, hypolipidemic, and other activities. The present study was designed to assess the effect of extract of CZ bark on cognitive performance of scopolamine (SCOP)-treated rats and on associated altered oxidative stress markers in the brain of rats. The extract was administered orally in three doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) for a period of 21 days. SCOP was administered in the dose of 1.0 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The Morris water maze and passive avoidance step-down tasks were performed to assess cognitive functions. At the end of the study, oxidative stress parameters namely, malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were also analyzed in the brain tissue of rats. SCOP-treated group showed significantly impaired acquisition and retention of memory as compared to the saline- and vehicle-treated groups. Pretreatment with CZ extract (200 and 400 mg/kg) for 21 days significantly reversed SCOP-induced amnesia as evidenced by increased step-down latency in passive avoidance and decreased latency in Morris water maze test compared to the SCOP-treated group. SCOP administration also caused the increase of MDA and reduction of GSH levels. Pretreatment with CZ extract (200 and 400 mg/kg) resulted in a significant decrease in MDA levels and increase in GSH levels as compared to the SCOP-treated animals. The results suggest that CZ can induce cognitive improvement in SCOP-treated rats and this effect can be attributed to a certain extent to decreased oxidative stress.

  18. Activation of dopamine D1 receptors in the medial septum improves scopolamine-induced amnesia in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Ardjmand, Abolfazl; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of intra-medial septum (intra-MS) injections of dopamine D1 receptor agents on amnesia induced by intra-CA1 injections of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, scopolamine. This study used a step-through inhibitory (passive) avoidance task to assess memory in adult male Wistar rats. The results showed that in the animals that received post-training intra-MS injections of saline, intra-CA1 administrations of scopolamine (0.75, 1, and 2 μg/rat) decreased inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory consolidation as evidenced by a decrease in step-through latency on the test day, which was suggestive of drug-induced amnesia. Post-training intra-MS injections of a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 at doses of 0.1, 0.15, and 0.3 μg/rat had no effect, but at dose of 0.5 μg/rat impaired IA memory consolidation. Interestingly, intra-MS injections of SKF38393 (0.15, 0.3 and 0.5 μg/rat) significantly prevented amnesia induced by intra-CA1 injections of scopolamine (1 μg/rat). Intra-MS injections of a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.75 μg/rat) by itself impaired IA memory consolidation, and also at dose of 0.75 μg/rat increased amnesia induced by intra-CA1 administrations of an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.5 μg/rat). Post-training intra-MS injections of ineffective doses of SCH23390 (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 μg/rat) prevented an effective dose of SKF38393 response to the impaired effect of scopolamine. These results suggest that dopamine D1 receptors in the MS via projection neurons to the hippocampus affect impairment of memory consolidation induced by intra-CA injections of scopolamine.

  19. The Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Suicide Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, David B.; Walrath, Christine M.; McKeon, Richard; Puddy, Richard W.; Lubell, Keri M.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Rodi, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In response to calls for greater efforts to reduce youth suicide, the Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Memorial Act has provided funding for 68 state, territory, and tribal community grants, and 74 college campus grants for suicide prevention efforts. Suicide prevention activities supported by GLS grantees have included education, training programs…

  20. Resveratrol exerts anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects to prevent memory deficits in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    PubMed

    Yazir, Yusufhan; Utkan, Tijen; Gacar, Nejat; Aricioglu, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have recently focused on the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol. In prior studies, we described its beneficial effects on scopolamine-induced learning deficits in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol on emotional and spatial cognitive functions, neurotropic factor expression, and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), which is known to induce cognitive deficits. Resveratrol (5 or 20mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally for 35 days. Rats in the CUMS group and in the 5mg/kg resveratrol+CUMS group performed poorly in tasks designed to assess emotional and spatial learning and memory. The 20mg/kg resveratrol+CUMS group showed improved performance compared to the CUMS group. In addition, the CUMS procedure induced lower expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and c-Fos in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and in the amygdala of stressed rats. These effects were reversed by chronic administration of resveratrol (20mg/kg). In addition, plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta were increased by CUMS, but were restored to normal by resveratrol. These results indicate that resveratrol significantly attenuates the deficits in emotional learning and spatial memory seen in chronically stressed rats. These effects may be related to resveratrol-mediated changes in neurotrophin factor expression in hippocampus and in levels of proinflammatory cytokines in circulation.

  1. Auraptene consolidates memory, reverses scopolamine-disrupted memory in passive avoidance task, and ameliorates retention deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Yaghoobi, Najmeh Sadat; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Shahraki, Jafar; Rezaee, Ramin; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Auraptene (7-geranyloxycoumarin) (AUR), from Citrus species has shown anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-secretase inhibitory effects. Scopolamine is a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist which causes short-term memory impairments and is used for inducing animal model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This research aimed to investigate the effect of AUR on scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention deficits in step-through task in mice. Materials and Methods: The effect of four-day pre-training injections of AUR (50, 75, and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneous (SC)) and scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP), and their co-administration on avoidance memory retention in step-through passive avoidance task, was investigated by measuring the latency to enter to the dark chamber. Results: Pre-training administration of AUR caused significant increase in step-through latency in comparison with control group, 48, 96, and 168 hr after training trial. The findings of this study showed that scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP, for four consecutive days) impaired passive avoidance memory retention compared to saline-treated animals. Step-through passive avoidance task results showed that AUR markedly reversed scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention impairments, 24 and 168 hr after training trial in step-through task. Conclusion: Results from co-administration of AUR and scopolamine showed that AUR reversed scopolamine-induced passive avoidance memory retention impairments. PMID:26730337

  2. Protective effect of lavender oil on scopolamine induced cognitive deficits in mice and H2O2 induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pan; Wang, Kezhu; Lu, Cong; Dong, Liming; Gao, Li; Yan, Ming; Aibai, Silafu; Liu, Xinmin

    2016-12-04

    Lavender essential oil (LO), an aromatic liquid extracted from Lavandula angustifolia Mill., has been traditionally used in the treatments of many nervous system diseases, and recently LO also reported to be effective for the Alzheimer's disease (AD). The improvement effect of lavender oil (LO) on the scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits in mice and H2O2 induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells have been evaluated. The relevant mechanism was also researched from the perspective of antioxidant effect and cholinergic system modulation. Cognitive deficits were induced in C57BL/6J mice treated with scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p.) and were assessed by Morris water maze (MWM) and step-through passive avoidance tests. Then their hippocampus were removed for biochemical assays (acetylcholinesterase (AChE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and malondialdehyde (MDA)). In vitro, the cytotoxicity were induced by 4h exposure to H2O2 in PC12 and evaluated by cell viability (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, nitric oxide (NO) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). The results demonstrated that LO (100mg/kg) could improve the cognitive performance of scopolamine induced mice in behavioral tests. Meanwhile, it significantly decreased the AChE activity, MDA level, and increase SOD and GPX activities of the model. Moreover, LO (12μg/mL) protected PC12 cells from H2O2 induced cytotoxicity by reducing LDH, NO release, intracellular ROS accumulation and MMP loss. It was suggested that LO could show neuroprotective effect in AD model in vivo (scopolamine-treated mice) and in vitro (H2O2 induced PC12 cells) via modulating oxidative stress and AChE activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Tempol prevents chronic sleep-deprivation induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Albawaana, Amal S; Alhashimi, Farah H; Athamneh, Rabaa Y

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with oxidative stress that causes learning and memory impairment. Tempol is a nitroxide compound that promotes the metabolism of many reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has antioxidant and neuroprotective effect. The current study investigated whether chronic administration of tempol can overcome oxidative stress and prevent learning and memory impairment induced by sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was induced in rats using multiple platform model. Tempol was administered to rats via oral gavages. Behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze. The hippocampus was dissected; antioxidant biomarkers (GSH, GSSG, GSH/GSSG ratio, GPx, SOD, and catalase) were assessed. The result of this project revealed that chronic sleep deprivation impaired both short and long term memory (P<0.05), while tempol treatment prevented such effect. Furthermore, tempol normalized chronic sleep deprivation induced reduction in the hippocampus activity of catalase, GPx, and SOD (P<0.05). Tempol also enhanced the ratio of GSH/GSSG in chronically sleep deprived rats treated with tempol as compared with only sleep deprived rats (P<0.05). In conclusion chronic sleep deprivation induced memory impairment, and treatment with tempol prevented this impairment probably through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus.

  4. The Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Suicide Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Goldston, David B.; Walrath, Christine M.; McKeon, Richard; Puddy, Richard W.; Lubell, Keri M.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Rodi, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Responding to calls for greater efforts to reduce youth suicide, the Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Memorial Act to date has provided funding for 68 state, territory, and tribal community grants, and 74 college campus grants for suicide prevention efforts. Suicide prevention activities supported by GLS grantees have included education, training programs including gatekeeper training, screening activities, infrastructure for improved linkages to services, crisis hotlines, and community partnerships. Through participation in both local- and cross-site evaluations, GLS grantees are generating data regarding the local context, proximal outcomes, and implementation of programs, as well as opportunities for improvement of suicide prevention efforts. PMID:20560746

  5. National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Dennis J.; Houghton, Brian K.; Powell, Ellen L.

    2004-09-01

    The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) in Oklahoma City is a living memorial to the victims, survivors, family members and rescue workers affected by the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building. The Institute conducts research into the development of technologies to counter biological, nuclear and chemical weapons of mass destruction and cyberterrorism, as well as research into the social and political causes and effects of terrorism. This paper describes MIPT funded research in areas of detection, decontamination, personal protective equipment, attack simulations, treatments, awareness, improved public communication during and after an incident, as well as lessons learned from terrorist incidents.

  6. National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Dennis J.; Houghton, Brian K.; Ellis, James O., III

    2003-09-01

    The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism in Oklahoma City is a living memorial to the victims, survivors, family members and rescue workers affected by the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building. The Institute conducts research into the development of technologies to counter biological, nuclear and chemical weapons of mass destruction and cyberterrorism, as well as research into the social and political causes and effects of terrorism. This paper describes MIPT funded research in areas of detection, decontamination, personal protective equipment, attack simulations, treatments, awareness, improved public communication during and after an incident, as well as lessons learned from terrorist incidents.

  7. Neuromodulatory propensity of Bacopa monniera against scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via down-regulation of AChE and up-regulation of BDNF and muscarnic-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T

    2013-10-01

    Scopolamine is a competitive antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and thus classified as an anti-muscarinic and anti-cholinergic drug. PC12 cell lines possess muscarinic receptors and mimic the neuronal cells. These cells were treated with different concentrations of scopolamine for 24 h and were protected from the cellular damage by pretreatment with Bacopa monniera extract (BME). In current study, we have explored the molecular mechanism of neuromodulatory and antioxidant propensity of (BME) to attenuate scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity using PC12 cells. Our results elucidate that pretreatment of PC12 cells with BME ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by 3 μg/ml scopolamine to 54.83 and 30.30 % as evidenced by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays respectively. BME (100 μg/ml) ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating acetylcholine esterase and up-regulating brain-derived neurotropic factor and muscarinic muscarinic-1 receptor expression. BME pretreated cells also showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation. This result indicates that the scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity and neuromodulatory changes were restored with the pretreatment of BME.

  8. Arctigenin isolated from the seeds of Arctium lappa ameliorates memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Ah; Joh, Eun-Ha; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2011-09-01

    The seeds of Arctium lappa L. (AL, family Asteraceae), the main constituents of which are arctiin and arctigenin, have been used as an herbal medicine or functional food to treat inflammatory diseases. These main constituents were shown to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Arctigenin more potently inhibited AChE activity than arctiin. Arctigenin at doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg (p. o.) potently reversed scopolamine-induced memory deficits by 62 % and 73 %, respectively, in a passive avoidance test. This finding is comparable with that of tacrine (10 mg/kg p. o.). Arctigenin also significantly reversed scopolamine-induced memory deficits in the Y-maze and Morris water maze tests. On the basis of these findings, arctigenin may ameliorate memory deficits by inhibiting AChE. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone ameliorates ocular surface dysfunctions and lesions in a scopolamine-induced dry eye model via PKA-CREB and MEK-Erk pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Yusha; Huang, Yue; Liu, Huijuan; Du, Juan; Meng, Zhu; Dou, Zexia; Liu, Xun; Wei, Rui Hua; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Shaozhen

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye is a highly prevalent, chronic, and multifactorial disease that compromises quality of life and generates socioeconomic burdens. The pathogenic factors of dry eye disease (DED) include tear secretion abnormalities, tear film instability, and ocular surface inflammation. An effective intervention targeting the pathogenic factors is needed to control this disease. Here we applied α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) twice a day to the ocular surface of a scopolamine-induced dry eye rat model. The results showed that α-MSH at different doses ameliorated tear secretion, tear film stability, and corneal integrity, and corrected overexpression of proinflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, in ocular surface of the dry eye rats. Moreover, α-MSH, at 10−4 μg/μl, maintained corneal morphology, inhibited apoptosis, and restored the number and size of conjunctival goblet cells in the dry eye rats. Mechanistically, α-MSH activated both PKA-CREB and MEK-Erk pathways in the dry eye corneas and conjunctivas; pharmacological blockade of either pathway abolished α-MSH’s protective effects, suggesting that both pathways are necessary for α-MSH’s protection under dry eye condition. The peliotropic protective functions and explicit signaling mechanism of α-MSH warrant translation of the α-MSH-containing eye drop into a novel and effective intervention to DED. PMID:26685899

  10. Scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted animals after food intake: sensitivity of C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye; Türkmen, Aslı Zengin; Çağla, Büyüklü

    2015-05-01

    Food intake triggers convulsions in fasted BALB/c mice and Wistar albino rats treated with antimuscarinic drugs, scopolamine or atropine. Inbred strain studies have yielded considerable information regarding genetic influences on seizure susceptibility and factors contribute to epileptogenesis in rodents. This study, therefore, investigated sensitivity to antimuscarinic-induced seizures in C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats. Food deprivation for 48h in mice and 52h in rats did not produce strain differences in body weight loss. Fasted animals treated i.p. with 3mg/kg scopolamine developed convulsions after food intake. The incidence of convulsions was indifferent in comparison to BALB/c mice and Wistar albino rats. Number of animals developing stage 5 was more and onset of convulsions was longer in C57BL/6J mice than in BALB/c mice. Strain-related differences in sensitivity to seizures in C57BL/6J mice may need further evaluation for investigating genetic influences on scopolamine-induced seizures.

  11. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone ameliorates ocular surface dysfunctions and lesions in a scopolamine-induced dry eye model via PKA-CREB and MEK-Erk pathways.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yusha; Huang, Yue; Liu, Huijuan; Du, Juan; Meng, Zhu; Dou, Zexia; Liu, Xun; Wei, Rui Hua; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Shaozhen

    2015-12-21

    Dry eye is a highly prevalent, chronic, and multifactorial disease that compromises quality of life and generates socioeconomic burdens. The pathogenic factors of dry eye disease (DED) include tear secretion abnormalities, tear film instability, and ocular surface inflammation. An effective intervention targeting the pathogenic factors is needed to control this disease. Here we applied α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) twice a day to the ocular surface of a scopolamine-induced dry eye rat model. The results showed that α-MSH at different doses ameliorated tear secretion, tear film stability, and corneal integrity, and corrected overexpression of proinflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, in ocular surface of the dry eye rats. Moreover, α-MSH, at 10(-4) μg/μl, maintained corneal morphology, inhibited apoptosis, and restored the number and size of conjunctival goblet cells in the dry eye rats. Mechanistically, α-MSH activated both PKA-CREB and MEK-Erk pathways in the dry eye corneas and conjunctivas; pharmacological blockade of either pathway abolished α-MSH's protective effects, suggesting that both pathways are necessary for α-MSH's protection under dry eye condition. The peliotropic protective functions and explicit signaling mechanism of α-MSH warrant translation of the α-MSH-containing eye drop into a novel and effective intervention to DED.

  12. Recovering and preventing loss of detailed memory: differential rates of forgetting for detail types in episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Kyra; St-Laurent, Marie; Pishdadian, Sara; Winocur, Gordon; Grady, Cheryl; Moscovitch, Morris

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memories undergo qualitative changes with time, but little is known about how different aspects of memory are affected. Different types of information in a memory, such as perceptual detail, and central themes, may be lost at different rates. In patients with medial temporal lobe damage, memory for perceptual details is severely impaired, while memory for central details is relatively spared. Given the sensitivity of memory to loss of details, the present study sought to investigate factors that mediate the forgetting of different types of information from naturalistic episodic memories in young healthy adults. The study investigated (1) time-dependent loss of “central” and “peripheral” details from episodic memories, (2) the effectiveness of cuing with reminders to reinstate memory details, and (3) the role of retrieval in preventing forgetting. Over the course of 7 d, memory for naturalistic events (film clips) underwent a time-dependent loss of peripheral details, while memory for central details (the core or gist of events) showed significantly less loss. Giving brief reminders of the clips just before retrieval reinstated memory for peripheral details, suggesting that loss of details is not always permanent, and may reflect both a storage and retrieval deficit. Furthermore, retrieving a memory shortly after it was encoded prevented loss of both central and peripheral details, thereby promoting retention over time. We consider the implications of these results for behavioral and neurobiological models of retention and forgetting. PMID:26773100

  13. Recovering and preventing loss of detailed memory: differential rates of forgetting for detail types in episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Sekeres, Melanie J; Bonasia, Kyra; St-Laurent, Marie; Pishdadian, Sara; Winocur, Gordon; Grady, Cheryl; Moscovitch, Morris

    2016-02-01

    Episodic memories undergo qualitative changes with time, but little is known about how different aspects of memory are affected. Different types of information in a memory, such as perceptual detail, and central themes, may be lost at different rates. In patients with medial temporal lobe damage, memory for perceptual details is severely impaired, while memory for central details is relatively spared. Given the sensitivity of memory to loss of details, the present study sought to investigate factors that mediate the forgetting of different types of information from naturalistic episodic memories in young healthy adults. The study investigated (1) time-dependent loss of "central" and "peripheral" details from episodic memories, (2) the effectiveness of cuing with reminders to reinstate memory details, and (3) the role of retrieval in preventing forgetting. Over the course of 7 d, memory for naturalistic events (film clips) underwent a time-dependent loss of peripheral details, while memory for central details (the core or gist of events) showed significantly less loss. Giving brief reminders of the clips just before retrieval reinstated memory for peripheral details, suggesting that loss of details is not always permanent, and may reflect both a storage and retrieval deficit. Furthermore, retrieving a memory shortly after it was encoded prevented loss of both central and peripheral details, thereby promoting retention over time. We consider the implications of these results for behavioral and neurobiological models of retention and forgetting. © 2016 Sekeres et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Evaluation of Cucurbita maxima extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats: implication of tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Talha; Shakya, Ashok K; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbita maxima (CM) seed oil is commonly used in Indian folk medicine to treat various ailments. We have investigated the effect of CM seed oil on memory impairment induced by scopolamine in rats. Male adult Wistar rats were administered scopolamine 1 mg/kg body weight, i.p. or 1.25 mg/kg body weight, s.c. to induce memory impairment. The nootropic agent piracetam 100 mg/kg body weight, i.p. and CM seed oil 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight, p.o. were administered daily for five consecutive days. The memory function was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test, the social recognition test (SRT), the elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and the pole climbing test (PCT). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and oxidative stress parameters were estimated in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the brains after completion of the behavioural studies. The effects of scopolamine on the levels of the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) transcript were also investigated. Scopolamine caused memory impairment in all the behavioural paradigms along with a significant increase in the AChE activity and oxidative stress in the brain. Scopolamine also caused a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α in the hippocampus. CM seed oil exhibited antiamnesic activity as indicated by a significant reduction in the latency time in the MWM test and decreased social interaction during trial 2 in the SRT. Further, treatment with CM seed oil significantly decreased the AChE activity and malondialdehyde levels and increased the glutathione level in brain regions. CM seed oil also significantly decreased the expression of TNF-α in the hippocampus. The effect of CM seed oil on behavioural and biochemical parameters was comparable to that observed in rats treated with piracetam. These results indicate that CM seed oil may exert antiamnesic activity which may be attributed to the inhibition of AChE and inflammation as well as its antioxidant activity in the brain.

  15. Studies on effects of Emblica officinalis (Amla) on oxidative stress and cholinergic function in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Golechha, Mahaveer; Bhatia, Jagriti; Arya, Dharmveer Singh

    2012-01-01

    Emblica officinalis, commonly known as amla, is an important medicinal plant of India. Its fruits have potent antioxidant activity due to the presence of tannoids, tannins, vitamin C and flavonoids. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of the fruits of Emblica officinalis (EO) on memory impairment in Swiss albino mice. Scopolamine (1 mg kg(-1), i.p)was administered to induce amnesia and the memory was evaluated by using elevated plus-maze and passive avoidance tests. Piracetam (200 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was used as a standard nootropic agent. The EO extract was administered intraperitoneally in four graded doses (150, 300, 450 and 600 mg kg(-1)) for 7 consecutive days to different groups of mice. The mice were sacrificed on the 8th day following assessment of memory. The brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) as well as acetylcholinesterase (AchE)) activity was determined. It was observed that EO extract reversed the amnesia induced by scopolamine. The mean transfer latency and retention latency in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group vs the vehicle treated scopolamine group was 13.46 sec (p<0.001) and 134.4 sec (p<0.001) vs 23.99 sec and 44.55 sec, respectively. EO extract treatment also significantly (p<0.001) ameliorated the oxidative stress induced by scopolamine administration. The mice brain MDA and GSH levels in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group vs the scopolamine group were 29.95 nmol g(-1) of wet tissue and 51.87 microg g(-1) tissue vs 55.22 nmol g(-1) of wet tissue and 28.33 microg g(-1) tissue, respectively. Further, EO extract (300, 450 and 600 mg kg(-1), i.p) significantly (p<0.001) reversed the rise in brain acetyl cholinesterase (AchE) level induced by scopolamine. The mice brain Ach E levels in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group as compared to the scopolamine group was 70.23 vs 151.49 U mg(-1) protein(-1), respectively. These results suggestthat EO possesses memory enhancing, antioxidant

  16. Effects of intra-hippocampal microinjection of vitamin B12 on the orofacial pain and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and orofacial pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Erfanparast, Amir; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Nemati, Shaghayegh

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of microinjection of vitamin B12 into the hippocampus on the orofacial pain and memory impairments induced by scopolamine and orofacial pain. In ketamine-xylazine anesthetized rats, the right and left sides of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) were implanted with two guide cannulas. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin (1.5%, 50μl) into the right vibrissa pad, and the durations of face rubbing were recorded at 3-min blocks for 45min. Morris water maze (MWM) was used for evaluation of learning and memory. Finally, locomotor activity was assessed using an open-field test. Vitamin B12 attenuated both phases of formalin-induced orofacial pain. Prior administration of naloxone and naloxonazine, but not naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, prevented this effect. Vitamin B12 and physostigmine decreased latency time as well as traveled distance in Morris water maze. In addition, these chemicals improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment. The memory impairment induced by orofacial pain was improved by vitamin B12 and physostigmine used alone. Naloxone prevented, whereas physostigmine enhanced the memory improving effect of vitamin B12 in the pain-induced memory impairment. All the above-mentioned chemicals did not alter locomotor activity. The results of the present study showed that at the level of the dorsal hippocampus, vitamin B12 modulated orofacial pain through a mu-opioid receptor mechanism. In addition, vitamin B12 contributed to hippocampal cholinergic system in processing of memory. Moreover, cholinergic and opioid systems may be involved in improving effect of vitamin B12 on pain-induced memory impairment.

  17. Prevention of Drug-induced Memory Impairment by Immunopharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Treweek, Jennifer B.; Sun, Chengzao; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Qi, Longwu; Levy, Coree L.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Dickerson, Tobin J.; Janda, Kim D.

    2009-01-01

    One approach to treating drug abuse uses anti-drug antibodies to immunize subjects against the illicit substance rather than administering therapeutics that target the specific CNS site of action. At present, passive vaccination has recognized efficacy in treating certain gross symptoms of drug misuse, namely motor activation, self-administration, and overdose. However, the potential for antibodies to prevent drug-induced changes involving finer cognitive processes, such as benzodiazepine-associated amnesia, remains unexplored. To address this concept, a flunitrazepam hapten was synthesized and employed in the generation of a panel of high affinity monoclonal antibodies. Anti-flunitrazepam mAb RCA3A3 (Kd,app= 200 nM) was tested in a mouse model of passive immunization and subsequent mole-equivalent challenge with flunitrazepam. Not only was flunitrazepam-induced sedation prevented, but immunization also conferred protection to memory consolidation as assessed through contextual and cued fear conditioning paradigms. These results provide evidence that immunopharmacotherapeutic blockade of drug intoxication also preserves complex cognitive function. PMID:18921991

  18. Effect of olanzapine on scopolamine induced deficits in differential reinforcement of low rate 72s (DRL-72s) schedule in rats: involvement of the serotonergic receptors in restoring the deficits.

    PubMed

    Jayarajan, Pradeep; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil

    2013-11-15

    Scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist has widespread central nervous system effects. Muscarinic receptors located in the central nervous system play a vital role in the modulation of impulsivity. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on impulsivity using differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate 72-s schedule (DRL-72s) and to demonstrate the involvement of serotonergic receptors in mediating the effect of olanzapine (atypical antipsychotic) on scopolamine induced impulsivity. Scopolamine impaired the performance of the rats trained under DRL-72s schedule. Olanzapine reversed the deficits induced by scopolamine. We evaluated the effect of donepezil (cholinesterase inhibitor), SB-742457 (5-HT6 and 5-HT2a antagonist), and haloperidol (typical antipsychotic) in rats challenged with scopolamine in the DRL-72s schedule to identify the receptor(s) involved in reversing the deficits. SB-742457 partially reversed the deficits, but donepezil and haloperidol did not show any effects on the deficits induced by scopolamine. Olanzapine and SB-742457 shifted the peak location (PkL) towards longer IRT duration, indicating a decrease in motor impulsivity. Modulation of scopolamine-induced impulsivity by olanzapine could be partly due to its antagonistic action at 5-HT2a and 5-HT6 receptors, respectively. Superior effects of olanzapine on impulsivity in schizophrenic patients may be mediated through the antagonism of 5-HT2a and 5-HT6 receptors.

  19. Liquiritigenin ameliorates memory and cognitive impairment through cholinergic and BDNF pathways in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yong-Hyun; Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2017-09-22

    Liquiritigenin (LQ), a flavonoid extracted from the radix of Glycyrrhiza, has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. In this study, we evaluated the cognitive enhancing effects of LQ on learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a muscarinic antagonist, using the Y-maze, passive avoidance, and novel object recognition tests. A single administration of LQ significantly improved scopolamine-induced cognitive impairments in these behavioral tests. In addition, LQ dramatically inhibited acetylcholinesterase and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance activities in the hippocampus of scopolamine-induced mice in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, LQ markedly increased the protein level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element binding (CREB) in the hippocampus of scopolamine-induced mice. Taken together, our results indicate that LQ may be useful for the treatment of learning and memory impairments, and that the beneficial effects of LQ are mediated, in part, by cholinergic and BDNF/ERK/CREB signaling enhancement and/or protection.

  20. Performance- and task-dependent effects of the dopamine D1/D5 receptor agonist SKF 38393 on learning and memory in the rat.

    PubMed

    Amico, Francesco; Spowart-Manning, Laura; Anwyl, Roger; Rowan, Michael J

    2007-12-22

    Dopamine D(1)/D(5) receptor agonists may enhance cognition by mimicking dopamine's neurophysiological actions on the processes underlying learning and memory. The present study examined the task- and performance- dependence of the cognitive effects of a partial agonist at dopamine D(1)/D(5) receptors, SKF 38393 [(+/-)-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8-diol hydrobromide], in rats. Spatial working memory was assessed in a T-maze, spatial reference memory in a water maze and habituation learning in a novel environment, a hole board. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was used to cause an impairment of performance of these learning tasks. Administration of SKF 38393 (6 mg/kg, i.p.) alone had no significant effect on spontaneous alternation in the T-maze, latency to escape to a hidden platform in the water maze or the habituation of spontaneous behaviour in the hole board. In contrast, in scopolamine-treated rats, whereas SKF 38393 prevented the scopolamine-induced deficit in the T-maze, it exacerbated the impairment in the water maze and did not significantly alter the disruption of habituation. These results suggest that dopamine D(1)/D(5) receptor activation has performance- and task-dependent effects on cognitive function.

  1. Anti-amnesic effect of alkaloid fraction from Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Nguyen Ngoc; Trung, Bui Huu; Luan, Tran Cong; Hung, Tran Manh; Dang, Nguyen Hai; Dat, Nguyen Tien

    2014-07-11

    Lycopodiella cernua (L.) Pic. Serm. (Licopodiaceae) has been used in Vietnamese folk medicine for treating central nervous system conditions. In this study, the alkaloid fraction from the methanol extract of this plant (VLC) was evaluated for in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in cognition-relevant brain areas of mice. In in vivo study, the cognitive-enhancing effect of VLC on amnesic mice induced by scopolamine was investigated by assessing a passive avoidance and a Morris water maze test. VLC inhibited AChE activity in mouse frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum with IC50 values of 26.7, 32.2 and 25.7μg/mL, respectively. Administration of VLC (10, 20, 50 and 100mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reversed cognitive impairments in mice by passive avoidance test. Treating with VLC (50mg/kg) reduced escape latencies in training trials and prolonged swimming times in the target quadrant during the probe trial in the water maze task (P<0.05). These results indicated that L. cernua originated from Vietnam has anti-cholinesterase activity and might be useful for the treatment of cognitive impairment.

  2. Exploring the Effect of Ginsenoside Rh1 in a Sleep Deprivation-Induced Mouse Memory Impairment Model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; Shi, Zhe; Dong, Liming; Lv, Jingwei; Xu, Pan; Li, Yinghui; Qu, Lina; Liu, Xinmin

    2017-05-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae) has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for enhancing cognition for thousands of years. Ginsenoside Rh1, a constituent of ginseng root, as with other constituents, has memory-improving effects in normal mice and scopolamine-induced amnesic mice. Sleep deprivation (SD) is associated with memory impairment through induction of oxidative stress. The present study investigated the effect of Rh1 against SD-induced cognitive impairment and attempted to define the possible mechanisms involved. Ginsenoside Rh1 (20 μmol/kg; 40 μmol/kg) and modafinil (0.42 g/kg) were administered to the mice intraperitoneally for 23 days. After 14-day SD, locomotor activity was examined using the open field test, and the object location recognition and Morris water maze tests were used to evaluate cognitive ability. The cortex and hippocampus were then dissected and homogenized, and levels and activities of antioxidant defense biomarkers were evaluated to determine the level of oxidative stress. The results revealed that Rh1 prevented cognitive impairment induced by SD, and its ability to reduce oxidative stress in cortex and hippocampus may contribute to the mechanism of action. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf extract improves memory impairment and affects acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Bogacz, Anna; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Piasecka, Anna; Napieczynska, Hanna; Szulc, Michał; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Cichocka, Joanna; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, Teresa; Czerny, Boguslaw; Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M

    2013-12-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaf as part of a diet and medication can be a valuable proposal for the prevention and treatment of dementia. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a plant extract (RE) (200 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses of rats linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activity and their mRNA expression level in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The passive avoidance test results showed that RE improved long-term memory in scopolamine-induced rats. The extract inhibited the AChE activity and showed a stimulatory effect on BuChE in both parts of rat brain. Moreover, RE produced a lower mRNA BuChE expression in the cortex and simultaneously an increase in the hippocampus. The study suggests that RE led to improved long-term memory in rats, which can be partially explained by its inhibition of AChE activity in rat brain. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Memory-improving activity of Melissa officinalis extract in naïve and scopolamine-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Soodi, M.; Naghdi, N.; Hajimehdipoor, H.; Choopani, S.; Sahraei, E.

    2014-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae) traditionally used in treating neurological disorders has also been identified as a memory-enhancing herb. The extract of M. officinalis has a cholinergic property. The role of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, the neurons that are destroyed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), in learning and memory, is also well known. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of cholinergic system on the memory improving activity of M. officinalis extract. The leaves of M. officinalis were extracted with ethanol 80% using the maceration method. Rats received intra-peritoneal injections of M. officinalis extract in different doses (50–400 mg/kg) alone or in combination with scopolamine (1 mg/kg) before being trained in a Morris water maze (MWM) in a single-day training protocol. After training, the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity was measured in the hippocampus. Administration of M. officinalis extract (200 mg/kg) could significantly enhance learning and memory of naïve rats (p<0.001) and significantly ameliorate scopolamine-induced learning deficit, but the effect of the extract was not dose dependent, and doses above 200 mg/kg could neither enhance memory in naïve rats nor reverse scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Also, inhibition of AChE activity was observed in both naïve and scopolamine-induced memory-impaired rats. These results suggest that M. officinalis can improve memory and that the cholinergic property of the extract may contribute to the memory-improving effects observed in this study. Then M. officinalis extract has potential therapeutic value in alleviating certain memory impairment observed in AD. PMID:25657779

  5. Melatonin prevents memory impairment induced by high-fat diet: Role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Mayyas, Fadia A; Mahafzah, Rania; Khabour, Omar F

    2018-01-15

    Consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) induces oxidative stress in the hippocampus that leads to memory impairment. Melatonin has antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we hypothesized that chronic administration of melatonin can prevent memory impairment induced by consumption of HFD. Melatonin was administered to rats via oral gavage (100mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. HFD was also instituted for the same duration. Behavioral studies were conducted to test spatial memory using the radial arm water maze. Additionally, oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed in the hippocampus. Results showed that HFD impaired both short- and long- term memory (P<0.05), while melatonin treatment prevented such effects. Furthermore, melatonin prevented HFD-induced reduction in levels of GSH, and ratio of GSH/GSSG, and increase in GSSG in the hippocampus. Melatonin also prevented reduction in the catalase activity in hippocampus of animals on HFD. In conclusion, HFD induced memory impairment and melatonin prevented this impairment probably by preventing alteration of oxidative stress in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preventive and therapeutic effect of treadmill running on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats.

    PubMed

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-04-01

    Previous results indicated that stress impairs learning and memory. In this research, the effects of preventive, therapeutic and regular continually running activity on chronic stress-induced memory deficit in rats were investigated. 70 male rats were randomly divided into seven groups as follows: Control, Sham, Stress-Rest, Rest-Stress, Stress-Exercise, Exercise-Stress and Exercise-Stress & Exercise groups. Chronic restraint stress was applied 6 h/day for 21days and treadmill running 1 h/day. Memory function was evaluated by the passive avoidance test. The results revealed that running activities had therapeutic effect on mid and long-term memory deficit and preventive effects on short and mid-term memory deficit in stressed rats. Regular continually running activity improved mid and long-term memory compared to Exercise-Stress group. The beneficial effects of exercise were time-dependent in stress conditions. Finally, data corresponded to the possibility that treadmill running had a more important role on treatment rather than on prevention on memory impairment induced by stress.

  7. Targeting memory processes with drugs to prevent or cure PTSD.

    PubMed

    Cain, Christopher K; Maynard, George D; Kehne, John H

    2012-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic debilitating psychiatric disorder resulting from exposure to a severe traumatic stressor and an area of great unmet medical need. Advances in pharmacological treatments beyond the currently approved SSRIs are needed. Background on PTSD, as well as the neurobiology of stress responding and fear conditioning, is provided. Clinical and preclinical data for investigational agents with diverse pharmacological mechanisms are summarized. Advances in the understanding of stress biology and mechanisms of fear conditioning plasticity provide a rationale for treatment approaches that may reduce hyperarousal and dysfunctional aversive memories in PTSD. One challenge is to determine if these components are independent or reflect a common underlying neurobiological alteration. Numerous agents reviewed have potential for reducing PTSD core symptoms or targeted symptoms in chronic PTSD. Promising early data support drug approaches that seek to disrupt dysfunctional aversive memories by interfering with consolidation soon after trauma exposure, or in chronic PTSD, by blocking reconsolidation and/or enhancing extinction. Challenges remain for achieving selectivity when attempting to alter aversive memories. Targeting the underlying traumatic memory with a combination of pharmacological therapies applied with appropriate chronicity, and in combination with psychotherapy, is expected to substantially improve PTSD treatment.

  8. Targeting memory processes with drugs to prevent or cure PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Christopher K.; Maynard, George D.; Kehne, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic debilitating psychiatric disorder resulting from exposure to a severe traumatic stressor and an area of great unmet medical need. Advances in pharmacological treatments beyond the currently approved SSRIs are needed. Areas covered Background on PTSD, as well as the neurobiology of stress responding and fear conditioning, is provided. Clinical and preclinical data for investigational agents with diverse pharmacological mechanisms are summarized. Expert opinion Advances in the understanding of stress biology and mechanisms of fear conditioning plasticity provide a rationale for treatment approaches that may reduce hyperarousal and dysfunctional aversive memories in PTSD. One challenge is to determine if these components are independent or reflect a common underlying neurobiological alteration. Numerous agents reviewed have potential for reducing PTSD core symptoms or targeted symptoms in chronic PTSD. Promising early data support drug approaches that seek to disrupt dysfunctional aversive memories by interfering with consolidation soon after trauma exposure, or in chronic PTSD, by blocking reconsolidation and/or enhancing extinction. Challenges remain for achieving selectivity when attempting to alter aversive memories. Targeting the underlying traumatic memory with a combination of pharmacological therapies applied with appropriate chronicity, and in combination with psychotherapy, is expected to substantially improve PTSD treatment. PMID:22834476

  9. AC-3933, a benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist, improves memory performance in MK-801-induced amnesia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Iwamura, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    AC-3933, a novel benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, is a drug candidate for cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We have previously reported that AC-3933 enhances acetylcholine release in the rat hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment and age-related cognitive decline in both rats and mice. In this study, we further evaluated the procognitive effect of AC-3933 on memory impairment induced by MK-801, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, in mice. Unlike the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist FG-7142, oral administration of AC-3933 significantly ameliorated MK-801-induced memory impairment in the Y-maze test and in the object location test. Interestingly, the procognitive effects of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment were not affected by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil, although this was not the case for the beneficial effects of AC-3933 on scopolamine-induced memory deficit. Moreover, the onset of AC-3933 ameliorating effect on scopolamine- or MK-801-induced memory impairment was different in the Y-maze test. Taken together, these results indicate that AC-3933 improves memory deficits caused by both cholinergic and glutamatergic hypofunction and suggest that the ameliorating effect of AC-3933 on MK-801-induced memory impairment is mediated by a mechanism other than inverse activation of the benzodiazepine receptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Memory Inhibition as a Critical Factor Preventing Creative Problem Solving.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ariza, Carlos J; Del Prete, Francesco; Prieto Del Val, Laura; Valle, Tania; Bajo, M Teresa; Fernandez, Angel

    2016-12-12

    The hypothesis that reduced accessibility to relevant information can negatively affect problem solving in a remote associate test (RAT) was tested by using, immediately before the RAT, a retrieval practice procedure to hinder access to target solutions. The results of 2 experiments clearly showed that, relative to baseline, target words that had been competitors during selective retrieval were much less likely to be provided as solutions in the RAT, demonstrating that performance in the problem-solving task was strongly influenced by the predetermined accessibility status of the solutions in memory. Importantly, this was so even when participants were unaware of the relationship between the memory and the problem-solving procedures in the experiments. This finding is consistent with an inhibitory account of retrieval-induced forgetting effects and, more generally, constitutes support for the idea that the activation status of mental representations originating in a given task (e.g., episodic memory) can unwittingly have significant consequences for a different, unrelated task (e.g., problem solving). (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Blockade of 5-HT2 Receptor Selectively Prevents MDMA-Induced Verbal Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    van Wel, J H P; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Bosker, W M; Bakker, K; Ramaekers, J G

    2011-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or ‘ecstasy' has been associated with memory deficits during abstinence and intoxication. The human neuropharmacology of MDMA-induced memory impairment is unknown. This study investigated the role of 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A receptors in MDMA-induced memory impairment. Ketanserin is a 5-HT2A receptor blocker and pindolol a 5-HT1A receptor blocker. It was hypothesized that pretreatment with ketanserin and pindolol would protect against MDMA-induced memory impairment. Subjects (N=17) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject design involving six experimental conditions consisting of pretreatment (T1) and treatment (T2). T1 preceded T2 by 30 min. T1–T2 combinations were: placebo–placebo, pindolol 20 mg–placebo, ketanserin 50 mg–placebo, placebo–MDMA 75 mg, pindolol 20 mg–MDMA 75 mg, and ketanserin 50 mg–MDMA 75 mg. Memory function was assessed at Tmax of MDMA by means of a word-learning task (WLT), a spatial memory task and a prospective memory task. MDMA significantly impaired performance in all memory tasks. Pretreatment with a 5-HT2A receptor blocker selectively interacted with subsequent MDMA treatment and prevented MDMA-induced impairment in the WLT, but not in the spatial and prospective memory task. Pretreatment with a 5-HT1A blocker did not affect MDMA-induced memory impairment in any of the tasks. Together, the results demonstrate that MDMA-induced impairment of verbal memory as measured in the WLT is mediated by 5-HT2A receptor stimulation. PMID:21562484

  12. Influence of the Melissa officinalis Leaf Extract on Long-Term Memory in Scopolamine Animal Model with Assessment of Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Piasecka, Anna; Kachlicki, Piotr; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Opala, Bogna; Lowicki, Zdzislaw; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Czerny, Boguslaw

    2016-01-01

    Melissa officinalis (MO, English: lemon balm, Lamiaceae), one of the oldest and still most popular aromatic medicinal plants, is used in phytomedicine for the prevention and treatment of nervous disturbances. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a 50% ethanol extract of MO leaves (200 mg/kg, p.o.) compared with rosmarinic acid (RA, 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and huperzine A (HU, 0.5 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses in scopolamine-induced rats. The results were linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and beta-secretase (BACE-1) mRNA levels and AChE and BuChE activities in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats. In our study, MO and HU, but not RA, showed an improvement in long-term memory. The results were in line with mRNA levels, since MO produced a decrease of AChE mRNA level by 52% in the cortex and caused a strong significant inhibition of BACE1 mRNA transcription (64% in the frontal cortex; 50% in the hippocampus). However, the extract produced only an insignificant inhibition of AChE activity in the frontal cortex. The mechanisms of MO action are probably more complicated, since its role as a modulator of beta-secretase activity should be taken into consideration.

  13. Influence of the Melissa officinalis Leaf Extract on Long-Term Memory in Scopolamine Animal Model with Assessment of Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.; Piasecka, Anna; Kachlicki, Piotr; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Gryszczynska, Agnieszka; Opala, Bogna; Lowicki, Zdzislaw; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Czerny, Boguslaw

    2016-01-01

    Melissa officinalis (MO, English: lemon balm, Lamiaceae), one of the oldest and still most popular aromatic medicinal plants, is used in phytomedicine for the prevention and treatment of nervous disturbances. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a 50% ethanol extract of MO leaves (200 mg/kg, p.o.) compared with rosmarinic acid (RA, 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and huperzine A (HU, 0.5 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses in scopolamine-induced rats. The results were linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and beta-secretase (BACE-1) mRNA levels and AChE and BuChE activities in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats. In our study, MO and HU, but not RA, showed an improvement in long-term memory. The results were in line with mRNA levels, since MO produced a decrease of AChE mRNA level by 52% in the cortex and caused a strong significant inhibition of BACE1 mRNA transcription (64% in the frontal cortex; 50% in the hippocampus). However, the extract produced only an insignificant inhibition of AChE activity in the frontal cortex. The mechanisms of MO action are probably more complicated, since its role as a modulator of beta-secretase activity should be taken into consideration. PMID:27239217

  14. Piracetam prevents memory deficit induced by postnatal propofol exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Lin; Li, Feng; Chen, Xin

    2016-05-15

    Postnatal propofol exposure impairs hippocampal synaptic development and memory. However, the effective agent to alleviate the impairments was not verified. In this study, piracetam, a positive allosteric modulator of AMPA receptor was administered following a seven-day propofol regime. Two months after propofol administration, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term memory decreased, while intraperitoneal injection of piracetam at doses of 100mg/kg and 50mg/kg following last propofol exposure reversed the impairments of memory and LTP. Mechanically, piracetam reversed propofol exposure-induced decrease of BDNF and phosphorylation of mTor. Similar as piracetam, BDNF supplementary also ameliorated propofol-induced abnormalities of synaptic plasticity-related protein expressions, hippocampal LTP and long-term memory. These results suggest that piracetam prevents detrimental effects of propofol, likely via activating BDNF synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effect of Preventive, Therapeutic and Protective Exercises on Hippocampal Memory Mediators in Stressed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Hosseini, Nasrin; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise plays a significant role in learning and memory. The present study focuses on the hippocampal corticosterone (CORT), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), glucose, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in preventive, therapeutic, and protective exercises in stressful conditions. Methods Forty male rats were randomly divided into four groups: the control group and the preventive, therapeutic, and protective exercise groups. The treadmill running was applied at a speed of 20–21m/min and a chronic stress of 6 hours/day for 21 days. Subsequently, the variables were measured in the hippocampus. Results The findings revealed that the hippocampal CORT levels in the preventive exercise group had a significant enhancement compared to the control group. In the protective and particularly the therapeutic exercise groups, the hippocampal CORT levels declined. Furthermore, the hippocampal BDNF levels in the preventive and the therapeutic exercise groups indicated significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in comparison with the control group. In the preventive exercise group, however, the hippocampal glucose level turned out to be substantially higher than that in the control group. Conclusion It appears that the therapeutic exercise group had the best exercise protocols for improving the hippocampal memory mediators in the stress conditions. By contrast, the preventive exercise group could not improve these mediators that had been altered by stress. It is suggested that exercise time, compared to stress, can be considered as a crucial factor in the responsiveness of memory mediators. PMID:27904422

  16. Inhibition of MDMA-induced increase in cortisol does not prevent acute impairment of verbal memory

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, KPC; Torre, R; Farre, M; Pujadas, M; Ramaekers, JG

    2013-01-01

    Background Ecstasy use is commonly linked with memory deficits in abstinent ecstasy users. Similar impairments are being found during ecstasy intoxication after single doses of ± 3,4 metylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The concordance of memory impairments during intoxication and abstinence suggests a similar neuropharmacological mechanism underlying acute and chronic memory impairments. The mechanism underlying this impairment is to date not known. We hypothesized that cortisol might play an important role in this mechanism as cortisol, implicated in the regulation of memory performance, can be brought out of balance by stressors like MDMA. Methods In the present study, we aimed to block the MDMA-induced acute memory defect by giving participants a cortisol synthesis inhibitor (metyrapone) together with a single dose of MDMA. Seventeen polydrug MDMA users entered this placebo-controlled within subject study with four treatment conditions. The treatments consisted of MDMA (75 mg) and metyrapone (750 mg), alone and in combination, and double placebo. Pre-treatment with metyrapone or Placebo occurred 1 h prior to MDMA or Placebo administration. Memory performance was tested at peak drug concentrations by means of several memory tests. Cortisol levels were determined in blood and oral fluid; this served as a control measure to see whether manipulations were effective. Results Main findings indicated that whereas treatment with metyrapone blocked the expected MDMA-induced increase in cortisol levels in blood, it did not prevent the MDMA-induced memory deficit from happening. Conclusion We therefore conclude that MDMA-induced increments in cortisol concentrations are not related to MDMA-induced memory impairments. PMID:22946487

  17. Acute nicotine treatment prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced learning and memory impairment in rat.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, A M; Helal, G; Alhaider, I A; Alzoubi, K H; Srivareerat, M; Tran, T T; Al-Rejaie, S S; Alkadhi, K A

    2011-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (SD) is implicated in impairment of spatial learning and memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). An increase in nicotine consumption among habitual smokers and initiation of tobacco use by nonsmokers was observed during SD. Although nicotine treatment was reported to attenuate the impairment of learning and memory and LTP associated with several mental disorders, the effect of nicotine on SD-induced learning and memory impairment has not been studied. Modified multiple platform paradigm was used to induce SD for 24 or 48 h during which rats were injected with saline or nicotine (1 mg kg(-1) s.c.) twice a day. In the radial arm water maze (RAWM) task, 24- or 48-h SD significantly impaired learning and short-term memory. In addition, extracellular recordings from CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus in urethane anesthetized rats showed a significant impairment of LTP after 24- and 48-h SD. Treatment of normal rats with nicotine for 24 or 48 h did not enhance spatial learning and memory or affect magnitude of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. However, concurrent, acute treatment of rats with nicotine significantly attenuated SD-induced impairment of learning and STM and prevented SD-induced impairment of LTP in the CA1 and DG regions. These results show that acute nicotine treatment prevented the deleterious effect of sleep loss on cognitive abilities and synaptic plasticity.

  18. Dietary CDP-choline supplementation prevents memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Teather, Lisa A; Wurtman, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    We previously showed that dietary cytidine (5')-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) supplementation could protect against the development of memory deficits in aging rats. In the present study, younger rats exposed to impoverished environmental conditions and manifesting hippocampal-dependent memory impairments similar to those observed in the aging rodents were given CDP-choline, and its effects on this cognitive deficit were assessed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats reared for 3 mo in impoverished (IC) or enriched environmental (EC) conditions concurrently received either a control diet or a diet supplemented with CDP-choline (approximately 500 mg/kg/d). After 3 mo, rats were trained to perform spatial and cued versions of the Morris water maze, and their rates of acquisition and retention were compared. Impoverished rats exhibited a selective deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory which could be ameliorated by feeding them CDP-choline. The CDP-choline had no memory-enhancing effect in enriched rats, nor did it prevent the memory impairment of impoverished rats if the animals consumed it for the initial or final months instead of for the entire 3-mo period. These findings indicate that long-term dietary CDP-choline supplementation can ameliorate the hippocampal-dependent memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats, and suggest that its actions result, in part, from a long-term effect such as enhanced membrane phosphatide synthesis, an effect shown to require long-term dietary supplementation with CDP-choline.

  19. Dietary CDP-choline supplementation prevents memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Teather, Lisa A.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    We previously showed that dietary cytidine (5′)-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) supplementation could protect against the development of memory deficits in aging rats. In the present study, younger rats exposed to impoverished environmental conditions and manifesting hippocampal-dependent memory impairments similar to those observed in the aging rodents were given CDP-choline, and its effects on this cognitive deficit were assessed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats reared for 3 mo in impoverished (IC) or enriched environmental (EC) conditions concurrently received either a control diet or a diet supplemented with CDP-choline (∼500 mg/kg/d). After 3 mo, rats were trained to perform spatial and cued versions of the Morris water maze, and their rates of acquisition and retention were compared. Impoverished rats exhibited a selective deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory which could be ameliorated by feeding them CDP-choline. The CDP-choline had no memory-enhancing effect in enriched rats, nor did it prevent the memory impairment of impoverished rats if the animals consumed it for the initial or final months instead of for the entire 3-mo period. These findings indicate that long-term dietary CDP-choline supplementation can ameliorate the hippocampal-dependent memory impairment caused by impoverished environmental conditions in rats, and suggest that its actions result, in part, from a long-term effect such as enhanced membrane phosphatide synthesis, an effect shown to require long-term dietary supplementation with CDP-choline. PMID:15647594

  20. High energy diets prevent the enhancing effects of emotional arousal on memory.

    PubMed

    Ross, Amy P; Darling, Jenna N; Parent, Marise B

    2013-10-01

    Over the past five decades, per capita caloric intake has increased by approximately 28% in the United States. Excessive intake of calories from fats and sugars (high energy diets; HEDs) negatively impacts hippocampal-dependent memory. These deleterious effects of HEDs on hippocampal function involve HED-induced decreases in neuronal growth factors, neurogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Given that HEDs also alter responses to emotional arousal, the present experiment determined whether the effects of HEDs on memory depend on the emotional arousal produced by the memory task during encoding. Rats were fed a high fat/sugar cafeteria-style diet for 4 weeks and then tested in a low or high emotional arousal version of a spatial object place recognition task. The results demonstrated that the HED prevented the memory-enhancing effects of emotional arousal. Thus, altered responses to emotional arousal likely contribute to HED-induced memory impairments, particularly in stressful memory tasks such as the spatial water maze. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  2. Can improving working memory prevent academic difficulties? A school based randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gehan; Quach, Jon; Gold, Lisa; Anderson, Peter; Rickards, Field; Mensah, Fiona; Ainley, John; Gathercole, Susan; Wake, Melissa

    2011-06-20

    Low academic achievement is common and is associated with adverse outcomes such as grade repetition, behavioural disorders and unemployment. The ability to accurately identify these children and intervene before they experience academic failure would be a major advance over the current 'wait to fail' model. Recent research suggests that a possible modifiable factor for low academic achievement is working memory, the ability to temporarily store and manipulate information in a 'mental workspace'. Children with working memory difficulties are at high risk of academic failure. It has recently been demonstrated that working memory can be improved with adaptive training tasks that encourage improvements in working memory capacity. Our trial will determine whether the intervention is efficacious as a selective prevention strategy for young children at risk of academic difficulties and is cost-effective. This randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 440 children with low working memory after a school-based screening of 2880 children in Grade one. We will approach caregivers of all children from 48 participating primary schools in metropolitan Melbourne for consent. Children with low working memory will be randomised to usual care or the intervention. The intervention will consist of 25 computerised working memory training sessions, which take approximately 35 minutes each to complete. Follow-up of children will be conducted at 6, 12 and 24 months post-randomisation through child face-to-face assessment, parent and teacher surveys and data from government authorities. The primary outcome is academic achievement at 12 and 24 months, and other outcomes include child behaviour, attention, health-related quality of life, working memory, and health and educational service utilisation. A successful start to formal learning in school sets the stage for future academic, psychological and economic well-being. If this preventive intervention can be shown to be efficacious, then

  3. Bushen-Yizhi formula ameliorates cognition deficits and attenuates oxidative stress-related neuronal apoptosis in scopolamine-induced senescence in mice

    PubMed Central

    HOU, XUE-QIN; WU, DIAN-WEI; ZHANG, CHUN-XIA; YAN, RONG; YANG, CONG; RONG, CUI-PING; ZHANG, LEI; CHANG, XIANG; SU, RU-YU; ZHANG, SHI-JIE; HE, WEN-QING; QU, ZHAO; LI, SHI; SU, ZI-REN; CHEN, YUN-BO; WANG, QI; FANG, SHU-HUAN

    2014-01-01

    Bushen-Yizhi formula (BSYZ), a traditional Chinese medicine formula consisting of six herbs has been reported to possess a neuroprotective effect. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of BSYZ on learning and memory abilities, as well as oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus of scopolamine (SCOP)-induced senescence in mice, in order to reveal whether BSYZ is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint was applied to provide a chemical profile of BSYZ. Extracts of BSYZ were orally administered to mice with SCOP-induced memory impairment for two weeks. The learning and memory abilities were determined by the Morris water maze test. The oxidant stress-related indices, such as activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined in hippocampus of SCOP-treated mice. The cell death ratio was assessed by TUNEL staining, while apoptotic-related proteins including Bcl-2 and Bax were determined by immunofluorescent staining and western blot analysis. Caspase-3 was determined by western blot analysis. Consequently, a chromatographic condition, which was conducted at 35°C with a flow rate of 0.8 ml/min on the Gemini C18 column with mobile phase of acetonitrile and water-phosphoric acid (100:0.1, v/v), was established to yield common fingerprint chromatography under 203 nm with a similarity index of 0.986 within 10 batches of BSYZ samples. BSYZ at a dose of 2.92 g/kg significantly improved the cognitive ability, restored the abnormal activity of SOD and increased the levels of MDA and GSH induced by SCOP. Moreover, the neural apoptosis in the hippocampus of SCOP-treated mice was reversed by BSYZ by regulating the expression of Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3. The results demonstrated that BSYZ had neuroprotective effects in SCOP-induced senescence in mice by ameliorating oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis in the

  4. Betaine prevents homocysteine-induced memory impairment via matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, K; Nakashima, N; Nagao, M; Nomura, T; Kinoshita, S; Hiramatsu, M

    2015-10-01

    Betaine plays important roles that include acting as a methyl donor and converting homocysteine (Hcy) to methionine. Elevated plasma Hcy levels are known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and contribute to impairments of learning and memory. Although it is commonly known that betaine plays an important role in Hcy metabolism, the effects of betaine on Hcy-induced memory impairment have not been investigated. Previously, we demonstrated the beneficial effects of betaine on acute stress and lipopolysaccharide-induced memory impairment. In the present study, we investigated whether betaine ameliorates Hcy-induced memory impairment and the underlying mechanisms of this putative effect. Mice were treated with Hcy (0.162mg/kg, s.c.) twice a day for nine days, and betaine (25mg/kg, s.c.) was administered 30min before the Hcy injections. The memory functions were evaluated using a spontaneous alternation performance test (Y-maze) at seven days and a step-down type passive avoidance test (SD) at nine and ten days after Hcy injection. We found that betaine suppressed the memory impairment induced by repeated Hcy injections. However, the blood concentrations of Hcy were significantly increased in the Hcy-treated mice immediately after the passive avoidance test, and betaine did not prevent this increase. Furthermore, Hcy induces redox stress in part by activating matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which leads to BBB dysfunction. Therefore, we tested whether betaine affected MMP-9 activity. Interestingly, treatment with betaine significantly inhibited Hcy-induced MMP-9 activity in the frontal cortex but not in the hippocampus after acute Hcy injection. These results suggest that the changes in MMP-9 activity after betaine treatment might have been partially responsible for the amelioration of the memory deficits and that MMP-9 might be a candidate therapeutic target for HHcy.

  5. L-carnitine prevents memory impairment induced by chronic REM-sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Rababa'h, Abeer M; Owaisi, Amani; Khabour, Omar F

    2017-05-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) negatively impacts memory, which was related to oxidative stress induced damage. L-carnitine is a naturally occurring compound, synthesized endogenously in mammalian species and known to possess antioxidant properties. In this study, the effect of L-carnitine on learning and memory impairment induced by rapid eye movement sleep (REM-sleep) deprivation was investigated. REM-sleep deprivation was induced using modified multiple platform model (8h/day, for 6 weeks). Simultaneously, L-carnitine was administered (300mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally for 6 weeks. Thereafter, the radial arm water maze (RAWM) was used to assess spatial learning and memory. Additionally, the hippocampus levels of antioxidant biomarkers/enzymes: reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) were assessed. The results showed that chronic REM-sleep deprivation impaired both short- and long-term memory (P<0.05), whereas L-carnitine treatment protected against this effect. Furthermore, L-carnitine normalized chronic REM-sleep deprivation induced reduction in the hippocampus ratio of GSH/GSSG, activity of catalase, GPx, and SOD. No change was observed in TBARS among tested groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, chronic REM-sleep deprivation induced memory impairment, and treatment with L-carnitine prevented this impairment through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  7. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  8. Recovering and Preventing Loss of Detailed Memory: Differential Rates of Forgetting for Detail Types in Episodic Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Bonasia, Kyra; St-Laurent, Marie; Pishdadian, Sara; Winocur, Gordon; Grady, Cheryl; Moscovitch, Morris

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memories undergo qualitative changes with time, but little is known about how different aspects of memory are affected. Different types of information in a memory, such as perceptual detail, and central themes, may be lost at different rates. In patients with medial temporal lobe damage, memory for perceptual details is severely impaired,…

  9. Recovering and Preventing Loss of Detailed Memory: Differential Rates of Forgetting for Detail Types in Episodic Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Bonasia, Kyra; St-Laurent, Marie; Pishdadian, Sara; Winocur, Gordon; Grady, Cheryl; Moscovitch, Morris

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memories undergo qualitative changes with time, but little is known about how different aspects of memory are affected. Different types of information in a memory, such as perceptual detail, and central themes, may be lost at different rates. In patients with medial temporal lobe damage, memory for perceptual details is severely impaired,…

  10. Chronic administration of quercetin prevent spatial learning and memory deficits provoked by chronic stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadis Said; Goudarzi, Iran; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Abrari, Kataneh; Elahdadi Salmani, Mahmoud

    2014-08-15

    There are several reports that cognitive impairment is observed in stress related disorders and chronic stress impairs learning and memory. However, very few studies have looked into the possible ways of preventing this stress-induced deficit. This research study was conducted to evaluate the effects of quercetin, a natural flavonoid, with strong antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties, on chronic stress induced learning and memory deficits and oxidative stress in hippocampus. For chronic stress, rats were restrained daily for 6h/day (from 9:00 to 15:00) for 21 days in well-ventilated plexiglass tubes without access to food and water. The animals were injected with quercetin or vehicle 60 min before restraint stress over a period of 21 days. Then, rats trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 28, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. In addition, oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were evaluated. Results of this study demonstrated that chronic stress exposure rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency and average proximity in probe trial test. Quercetin (50mg/kg) treatment during restraint stress (21 days) markedly decreased escape latency and increased time spent in target quadrant during Morris water maze task. In comparison to vehicle treated group, chronic-stress group had significantly higher malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, significantly higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and significantly lower glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the hippocampus. Quercetin treatment caused a significant decrease in the hippocampus MDA levels and improves SOD and GPx activities in stressed animals. Finally, quercetin significantly decreased plasma corticosterone levels in stressed animals. Based on results of this study, chronic stress has detrimental effects on learning and memory and quercetin treatment

  11. Lithium prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced impairments on memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ota, Simone M; Moreira, Karin Di Monteiro; Suchecki, Deborah; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela M; Tiba, Paula A

    2013-11-01

    Pre-training rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) deprivation affects memory acquisition and/or consolidation. It also produces major REMS rebound at the cost of waking and slow wave sleep (SWS). Given that both SWS and REMS appear to be important for memory processes, REMS rebound after training may disrupt the organization of sleep cycles, i.e., excessive amount of REMS and/or little SWS after training could be harmful for memory formation. To examine whether lithium, a drug known to increase SWS and reduce REMS, could prevent the memory impairment induced by pre-training sleep deprivation. Animals were divided in 2 groups: cage control (CC) and REMS-deprived (REMSDep), and then subdivided into 4 subgroups, treated either with vehicle or 1 of 3 doses of lithium (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg) 2 h before training on the multiple trial inhibitory avoidance task. Animals were tested 48 h later to make sure that the drug had been already metabolized and eliminated. Another set of animals was implanted with electrodes and submitted to the same experimental protocol for assessment of drug-induced sleep-wake changes. Wistar male rats weighing 300-400 g. Sleep deprived rats required more trials to learn the task and still showed a performance deficit during test, except from those treated with 150 mg/kg of lithium, which also reduced the time spent in REM sleep during sleep recovery. Lithium reduced rapid eye movement sleep and prevented memory impairment induced by sleep deprivation. These results indicate that these phenomena may be related, but cause-effect relationship cannot be ascertained.

  12. Blocking Synaptic Removal of GluA2-Containing AMPA Receptors Prevents the Natural Forgetting of Long-Term Memories.

    PubMed

    Migues, Paola Virginia; Liu, Lidong; Archbold, Georgina E B; Einarsson, Einar Ö; Wong, Jacinda; Bonasia, Kyra; Ko, Seung Hyun; Wang, Yu Tian; Hardt, Oliver

    2016-03-23

    The neurobiological processes underpinning the natural forgetting of long-term memories are poorly understood. Based on the critical role of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (GluA2/AMPARs) in long-term memory persistence, we tested in rats whether their synaptic removal underpins time-dependent memory loss. We found that blocking GluA2/AMPAR removal with the interference peptides GluA23Y or G2CT in the dorsal hippocampus during a memory retention interval prevented the normal forgetting of established, long-term object location memories, but did not affect their acquisition. The same intervention also preserved associative memories of food-reward conditioned place preference that would otherwise be lost over time. We then explored whether this forgetting process could play a part in behavioral phenomena involving time-dependent memory change. We found that infusing GluA23Y into the dorsal hippocampus during a 2 week retention interval blocked generalization of contextual fear expression, whereas infusing it into the infralimbic cortex after extinction of auditory fear prevented spontaneous recovery of the conditioned response. Exploring possible physiological mechanisms that could be involved in this form of memory decay, we found that bath application of GluA23Y prevented depotentiation, but not induction of long-term potentiation, in a hippocampal slice preparation. Together, these findings suggest that a decay-like forgetting process that involves the synaptic removal of GluA2/AMPARs erases consolidated long-term memories in the hippocampus and other brain structures over time. This well regulated forgetting process may critically contribute to establishing adaptive behavior, whereas its dysregulation could promote the decline of memory and cognition in neuropathological disorders. The neurobiological mechanisms involved in the natural forgetting of long-term memory and its possible functions are not fully understood. Based on our previous work describing the

  13. Memantine prevents memory consolidation failure induced by soluble beta amyloid in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paolo; Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria Grazia; Colaianna, Marilena; Zotti, Margherita; Schiavone, Stefania; Cicerale, Maria; Trezza, Viviana; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Trabace, Luigia

    2014-01-01

    It has been well documented that β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide accumulation and aggregation in the brain plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, a new orientation of the amyloid cascade hypothesis has evidenced that soluble forms of the peptide (sAβ) are involved in Aβ-induced cognitive impairment and cause rapid disruption of the synaptic mechanisms underlying memory. The primary aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of sAβ, acutely injected intracerebrally (i.c.v., 4 μM), on the short term and long term memory of young adult male rats, by using the novel object recognition task. Glutamatergic receptors have been proposed as mediating the effect of Aβ on synaptic plasticity and memory. Thus, we also investigated the effects of sAβ on prefrontal cortex (PFC) glutamate release and the specific contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor modulation to the effects of sAβ administration on the cognitive parameters evaluated. We found that a single i.c.v. injection of sAβ 2 h before testing did not alter the ability of rats to differentiate between a familiar and a novel object, in a short term memory test, while it was able to negatively affect consolidation/retrieval of long term memory. Moreover, a significant increase of glutamate levels was found in PFC of rats treated with the peptide 2 h earlier. Interestingly, memory deficit induced by sAβ was reversed by a NMDA-receptor antagonist, memantine (5 mg/kg i.p), administered immediately after the familiarization trial (T1). On the contrary, memantine administered 30 min before T1 trial, was not able to rescue long term memory impairment. Taken together, our results suggest that an acute i.c.v. injection of sAβ peptide interferes with the consolidation/retrieval of long term memory. Moreover, such sAβ-induced effect indicates the involvement of glutamatergic system, proposing that NMDA receptor inhibition might prevent or lead to the recovery of early

  14. Facilitatory effects of chronically administered citicoline on learning and memory processes in the dog.

    PubMed

    Bruhwyler, J; Liégeois, J F; Géczy, J

    1998-01-01

    1. Citicoline (cytidine (5') diphosphocholine) has been shown to reverse aging-induced memory deficits, scopolamine-induced amnesia and nucleus basalis magnocellularis lesion-induced learning impairment. 2. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of citicoline on learning and retrieval processes in a complex differential reinforcement of response duration schedule in normal dogs. 3. The effects of citicoline on a stabilized performance were also measured in order to be able to differentiate specific memory effects from non specific influences on the motor, neuro-vegetative and motivational systems. 4. The results demonstrate that citicoline can exert facilitatory effects on learning and memory but also on retrieval processes. The complete absence of effects on the stabilized performance and on the motor, neuro-vegetative and motivational systems constitutes arguments in favour of a selectivity of action on the memory processes.

  15. Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides Prevent Memory and Neurogenesis Impairments in Scopolamine-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinzhong; Yi, Xin; Nie, Dekang; Sun, Xiaohui; Qin, Jianbing; Tian, Meiling; Jin, Guohua; Zhang, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is used both as a food additive and as a medicinal herb in many countries, and L. barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs), a major cell component, are reported to have a wide range of beneficial effects including neuroprotection, anti-aging and anticancer properties, and immune modulation. The effects of LBPs on neuronal function, neurogenesis, and drug-induced learning and memory deficits have not been assessed. We report the therapeutic effects of LBPs on learning and memory and neurogenesis in scopolamine (SCO)-treated rats. LBPs were administered via gastric perfusion for 2 weeks before the onset of subcutaneous SCO treatment for a further 4 weeks. As expected, SCO impaired performance in novel object and object location recognition tasks, and Morris water maze. However, dual SCO- and LBP-treated rats spent significantly more time exploring the novel object or location in the recognition tasks and had significant shorter escape latency in the water maze. SCO administration led to a decrease in Ki67- or DCX-immunoreactive cells in the dentate gyrus and damage of dendritic development of the new neurons; LBP prevented these SCO-induced reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. LBP also protected SCO-induced loss of neuronal processes in DCX-immunoreactive neurons. Biochemical investigation indicated that LBP decreased the SCO-induced oxidative stress in hippocampus and reversed the ratio Bax/Bcl-2 that exhibited increase after SCO treatment. However, decrease of BDNF and increase of AChE induced by SCO showed no response to LBP administration. These results suggest that LBPs can prevent SCO-induced cognitive and memory deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. Suppression of oxidative stress and apoptosis may be involved in the above effects of LBPs that may be a promising candidate to restore memory functions and neurogenesis. PMID:24505383

  16. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides prevent memory and neurogenesis impairments in scopolamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiang; Chen, Jinzhong; Yi, Xin; Nie, Dekang; Sun, Xiaohui; Qin, Jianbing; Tian, Meiling; Jin, Guohua; Zhang, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum is used both as a food additive and as a medicinal herb in many countries, and L. barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs), a major cell component, are reported to have a wide range of beneficial effects including neuroprotection, anti-aging and anticancer properties, and immune modulation. The effects of LBPs on neuronal function, neurogenesis, and drug-induced learning and memory deficits have not been assessed. We report the therapeutic effects of LBPs on learning and memory and neurogenesis in scopolamine (SCO)-treated rats. LBPs were administered via gastric perfusion for 2 weeks before the onset of subcutaneous SCO treatment for a further 4 weeks. As expected, SCO impaired performance in novel object and object location recognition tasks, and Morris water maze. However, dual SCO- and LBP-treated rats spent significantly more time exploring the novel object or location in the recognition tasks and had significant shorter escape latency in the water maze. SCO administration led to a decrease in Ki67- or DCX-immunoreactive cells in the dentate gyrus and damage of dendritic development of the new neurons; LBP prevented these SCO-induced reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. LBP also protected SCO-induced loss of neuronal processes in DCX-immunoreactive neurons. Biochemical investigation indicated that LBP decreased the SCO-induced oxidative stress in hippocampus and reversed the ratio Bax/Bcl-2 that exhibited increase after SCO treatment. However, decrease of BDNF and increase of AChE induced by SCO showed no response to LBP administration. These results suggest that LBPs can prevent SCO-induced cognitive and memory deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. Suppression of oxidative stress and apoptosis may be involved in the above effects of LBPs that may be a promising candidate to restore memory functions and neurogenesis.

  17. Prevention of long-term memory loss after retrieval by an endogenous CaMKII inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Fabio Antonio; Mizuno, Keiko; Lucchesi, Walter; Valls-Comamala, Victoria; Giese, Karl Peter

    2017-06-22

    CaMK2N1 and CaMK2N2 are endogenous inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a key synaptic signaling molecule for learning and memory. Here, we investigated the learning and memory function of CaMK2N1 by knocking-down its expression in dorsal hippocampus of mice. We found that reduced CaMK2N1 expression does not affect contextual fear long-term memory (LTM) formation. However, we show that it impairs maintenance of established LTM, but only if retrieval occurs. CaMK2N1 knockdown prevents a decrease of threonine-286 (T286) autophosphorylation of αCaMKII and increases GluA1 levels in hippocampal synapses after retrieval of contextual fear LTM. CaMK2N1 knockdown can also increase CaMK2N2 expression, but we show that such increased expression does not affect LTM after retrieval. We also found that substantial overexpression of CaMK2N2 in dorsal hippocampus impairs LTM formation, but not LTM maintenance, suggesting that CaMKII activity is not required for LTM storage. Taken together, we propose a specific function for CaMK2N1; enabling LTM maintenance after retrieval by inhibiting T286 autophosphorylation of αCaMKII.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-induced memory impairment in rats is preventable using 7-nitroindazole.

    PubMed

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Beheshti, Farimah; Mohebbati, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress have important roles in memory impairment. The effect of 7-nitroindazole (7NI) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory impairment was investigated. Rats were used, divided into four groups that were treated as follows: (1) control (saline); (2) LPS; (3) 7NI-LPS; and (4) 7NI before passive avoidance (PA). In the LPS group, the latency for entering the dark compartment was shorter than in the controls (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001); while in the 7NI-LPS group, it was longer than in the LPS group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001). Malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) metabolite concentrations in the brain tissues of the LPS group were higher than in the controls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05); while in the 7NI-LPS group, they were lower than in the LPS group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). The thiol content in the brain of the LPS group was lower than in the controls (p < 0.001); while in the 7NI-LPS group, it was higher than in the LPS group (p < 0.001). It is suggested that brain tissue oxidative damage and NO elevation have a role in the deleterious effects of LPS on memory retention that are preventable using 7NI.

  19. Erasure of fear memories is prevented by Nogo Receptor 1 in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, S M; Butler, S S; Taylor, J R; McEwen, B S; Strittmatter, S M

    2016-09-01

    Critical periods are temporary windows of heightened neural plasticity early in development. For example, fear memories in juvenile rodents are subject to erasure following extinction training, while after closure of this critical period, extinction training only temporarily and weakly suppresses fear memories. Persistence of fear memories is important for survival, but the inability to effectively adapt to the trauma is a characteristic of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We examined whether Nogo Receptor 1 (NgR1) regulates the plasticity associated with fear extinction. The loss of NgR1 function in adulthood eliminates spontaneous fear recovery and fear renewal, with a restoration of fear reacquisition rate equal to that of naive mice; thus, mimicking the phenotype observed in juvenile rodents. Regional gene disruption demonstrates that NgR1 expression is required in both the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and infralimbic (IL) cortex to prevent fear erasure. NgR1 expression by parvalbumin expressing interneurons is essential for limiting extinction-dependent plasticity. NgR1 gene deletion enhances anatomical changes of inhibitory synapse markers after extinction training. Thus, NgR1 robustly inhibits elimination of fear expression in the adult brain and could serve as a therapeutic target for anxiety disorders, such as PTSD.

  20. Interaction between two cholesterol metabolism genes influences memory: findings from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Corinne D; Koscik, Rebecca L; Jonaitis, Erin M; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Hermann, Bruce P; La Rue, Asenath; Sager, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The strongest genetic factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is APOE; nine additional susceptibility genes have recently been identified. The effect of these genes is often assumed to be additive and polygenic scores are formed as a summary measure of risk. However, interactions between these genes are likely to be important. We sought to examine the role of interactions between the nine recently identified AD susceptibility genes and APOE in cognitive function and decline in 1,153 participants from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention, a longitudinal study of middle-aged adults enriched for a parental history of AD. Participants underwent extensive cognitive testing at baseline and up to two additional visits approximately 4 and 6 years later. The influence of the interaction between APOE and each of 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the nine recently identified genes on three cognitive factor scores (Verbal Learning and Memory, Working Memory, and Immediate Memory) was examined using linear mixed models adjusting for age, gender, and ancestry. Interactions between the APOE ε4 allele and both of the genotyped ABCA7 SNPs, rs3764650 and rs3752246, were associated with all three cognitive factor scores (p-values ≤ 0.01). Both of these genes are in the cholesterol metabolism pathway leading to AD. This research supports the importance of considering non-additive effects of AD susceptibility genes.

  1. Intranasal Insulin Prevents Anesthesia-Induced Spatial Learning and Memory Deficit in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongli; Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Yanxing; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of cognitive decline after anesthesia. General anesthesia is believed to be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). At present, there is no treatment that can prevent anesthesia-induced postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Here, we treated mice with daily intranasal administration of insulin (1.75 U/day) for one week before anesthesia induced by intraperitoneal injection of propofol and maintained by inhalation of sevoflurane for 1 hr. We found that the insulin treatment prevented anesthesia-induced deficit in spatial learning and memory, as measured by Morris water maze task during 1–5 days after exposure to anesthesia. The insulin treatment also attenuated anesthesia-induced hyperphosphorylation of tau and promoted the expression of synaptic proteins and insulin signaling in the brain. These findings show a therapeutic potential of intranasal administration of insulin before surgery to reduce the risk of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline and AD. PMID:26879001

  2. Dehydroevodiamine·HCl enhances cognitive function in memory-impaired rat models

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ki Young

    2017-01-01

    Progressive memory impairment such as that associated with depression, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) can interfere with daily life. In particular, AD, which is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, prominently features a memory and learning impairment that is related to changes in acetylcholine and abnormal β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dehydroevodiamine·HCl (DHED) on cognitive improvement and the related mechanism in memory-impaired rat models, namely, a scopolamine-induced amnesia model and a Aβ1-42-infused model. The cognitive effects of DHED were measured using a water maze test and a passive avoidance test in the memory-impaired rat models. The results demonstrate that DHED (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and Donepezil (1 mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated the spatial memory impairment in the scopolamine-induced amnestic rats. Moreover, DHED significantly improved learning and memory in the Aβ1-42-infused rat model. Furthermore, the mechanism of these behavioral effects of DHED was investigated using a cell viability assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement, and intracellular calcium measurement in primary cortical neurons. DHED reduced neurotoxicity and the production of Aβ-induced ROS in primary cortical neurons. In addition, similar to the effect of MK801, DHED decreased intracellular calcium levels in primary cortical neurons. Our results suggest that DHED has strong protective effects against cognitive impairments through its antioxidant activity and inhibition of neurotoxicity and intracellular calcium. Thus, DHED may be an important therapeutic agent for memory-impaired symptoms. PMID:28066141

  3. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  4. Pine needle extract prevents hippocampal memory impairment in acute restraint stress mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Ahn, Yo-Chan; Son, Chang-Gue

    2017-07-31

    The Pinus densiflora leaf has been traditionally used to treat mental health disorders as a traditional Chinese medicine. Here we examined the ethnopharmacological relevance of pine needle on memory impairment caused by stress. To elucidate the possible modulatory actions of 30% ethanolic pine needle extract (PNE) on stress-induced hippocampal excitotoxicity, we adopted an acute restraint stress mouse model. Mice were orally administered with PNE (25, 50, or 100mg/kg) or ascorbic acid (100mg/kg) for 9 days, and were then subjected to restraint stress (6h/day) for 3 days (from experimental day 7-9). To evaluate spatial cognitive and memory function, the Morris water maze was performed during experimental days 5-9. Restraint stress induced the memory impairment (the prolonged escape latency and cumulative path-length, and reduced time spent in the target quadrant), and these effects were significantly prevented by PNE treatment. The levels of corticosterone and its receptor in the sera/hippocampus were increased by restraint stress, which was normalized by PNE treatment. Restraint stress elicited the hippocampal excitotoxicity, the inflammatory response and oxidative injury as demonstrated by the increased glutamate levels, altered levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and imbalanced oxidant-antioxidant balance biomarkers. Two immunohistochemistry activities against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes and neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-positive neurons supported the finding of excitotoxicity especially in the cornu ammonis (CA)3 region of the hippocampus. Those alterations were notably attenuated by administration of PNE. The above findings showed that PNE has pharmacological properties that modulate the hippocampal excitotoxicity-derived memory impairment under severe stress conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacological Modulation of Acute Trauma Memories to Prevent PTSD: Considerations from a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Bryce; Cullen, Patrick K.; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of the lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in American adults range from 6.4–6.8%. PTSD is associated with increased risk for comorbid major depression, substance use disorder, suicide, and a variety of other mental and physical health conditions. Given the negative sequelae of trauma/PTSD, research has focused on identifying efficacious interventions that could be administered soon after a traumatic event to prevent or reduce the subsequent incidence of PTSD. While early psychosocial interventions have been shown to be relatively ineffective, early (secondary) pharmacological interventions have shown promise. These pharmacological approaches are largely based on the hypothesis that disruption of altered stress hormone levels and the consequent formation of trauma memories could protect against the development of PTSD. The present manuscript reviews the literature regarding the role of peri-traumatic stress hormones as risk factors for the development of PTSD and reviews evidence for the efficacy of exogenously modulating stress hormone levels to prevent/buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. Whereas prior literature has focused primarily on either child or adult studies, the present review incorporates both child and adult studies in a developmental approach to understanding risk for PTSD and how pharmacological modulation of acute memories may buffer the development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:24513176

  6. [Adequacy of amputation analgesia as a factor preventing the triggering of pain memory in the genesis of phantom pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ovechkin, A M; Kukushkin, M L; Gnezdilov, A V; Reshetniak, V K

    1995-01-01

    Examinations of 72 patients with a history of amputation of the lower limb showed that preamputation pain may be transformed into phantom pain via "pain memory" mechanisms. This fact is confirmed by similarity of the verbal structure of preamputation pain and phantom pain syndrome, which are particularly expressed in the patients operated on under total anesthesia. At the same time, the share of patients considering phantom pain identical to preamputation pain is much lower among those operated on under prolonged perioperative epidural anesthesia, and no "pain memory" phenomena are observed in this group 6 months after surgery. Prolonged epidural anesthesia provides a pain-free period before surgery by disrupting the time relationship between nociceptive impulsation entry in the CNS structures and amputation, thus preventing fixation of 'pain experience' survived in the memory. The adequacy of intraoperative analgesia attained by prolonged epidural anesthesia plays the crucial role in prevention of realization of the "pain memory" effect.

  7. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:26368803

  8. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Fei; Wang, Qing-Qing; Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus.

  9. Methylphenidate prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced learning/memory impairment in juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M.; Machaj, Agnieszka S.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Gainey, Stephen J.; York, Jason M.; Meling, Daryl D.; Martin, Stephen A.; Kwakwa, Kristen A.; Newman, Andrew F.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Kelley, Keith W.; Wang, Yanyan; Miller, Michael J.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has risen dramatically and coincident with this upsurge is a growth in adverse childhood psychological conditions including impulsivity, depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Due to confounds that exist when determining causality of childhood behavioral perturbations, controversy remains as to whether overnutrition and/or childhood obesity is important. Therefore, we examined juvenile mice to determine if biobehaviors were impacted by a short-term feeding (1–3 wks) of a high-fat diet (HFD). After 1 wk of a HFD feeding, mouse burrowing and spontaneous wheel running were increased while mouse exploration of the open quadrants of a zero maze, perfect alternations in a Y-maze and recognition of a novel object were impaired. Examination of mouse cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus for dopamine and its metabolites demonstrated increased homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in the hippocampus and cortex that were associated with decreased cortical BDNF gene expression. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts and serum IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were unaffected by the short-term HFD feeding. Administration to mice of the psychostimulant methylphenidate prevented HFD-dependent impairment of learning/memory. HFD learning/memory impairment was not inhibited by the anti-depressants desipramine or reboxetine nor was it blocked in IDO or IL-1R1 knockout mice. In sum, a HFD rapidly impacts dopamine metabolism in the brain appearing to trigger anxiety-like behaviors and learning/memory impairments prior to the onset of weight gain and/or pre-diabetes. Thus, overnutrition due to fats may be central to childhood psychological perturbations such as anxiety and ADHD. PMID:23411461

  10. Methylphenidate prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced learning/memory impairment in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M; Machaj, Agnieszka S; Chiu, Gabriel S; Lawson, Marcus A; Gainey, Stephen J; York, Jason M; Meling, Daryl D; Martin, Stephen A; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Newman, Andrew F; Woods, Jeffrey A; Kelley, Keith W; Wang, Yanyan; Miller, Michael J; Freund, Gregory G

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has risen dramatically and coincident with this upsurge is a growth in adverse childhood psychological conditions including impulsivity, depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Due to confounds that exist when determining causality of childhood behavioral perturbations, controversy remains as to whether overnutrition and/or childhood obesity is important. Therefore, we examined juvenile mice to determine if biobehaviors were impacted by a short-term feeding (1-3wks) of a high-fat diet (HFD). After 1wk of a HFD feeding, mouse burrowing and spontaneous wheel running were increased while mouse exploration of the open quadrants of a zero maze, perfect alternations in a Y-maze and recognition of a novel object were impaired. Examination of mouse cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus for dopamine and its metabolites demonstrated increased homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in the hippocampus and cortex that were associated with decreased cortical BDNF gene expression. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts and serum IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were unaffected by the short-term HFD feeding. Administration to mice of the psychostimulant methylphenidate prevented HFD-dependent impairment of learning/memory. HFD learning/memory impairment was not inhibited by the anti-depressants desipramine or reboxetine nor was it blocked in IDO or IL-1R1 knockout mice. In sum, a HFD rapidly impacts dopamine metabolism in the brain appearing to trigger anxiety-like behaviors and learning/memory impairments prior to the onset of weight gain and/or pre-diabetes. Thus, overnutrition due to fats may be central to childhood psychological perturbations such as anxiety and ADHD.

  11. Comparative studies on the effects of the nootropic drugs adafenoxate, meclofenoxate and piracetam, and of citicholine on scopolamine-impaired memory, exploratory behavior and physical capabilities (experiments on rats and mice).

    PubMed

    Petkov, V D; Mosharrof, A H; Petkov, V V

    1988-01-01

    The effects of adafenoxate (Adf), meclofenoxate (Mf), piracetam (Pc), and citicholine (CCh) on scopolamine (Scop)--impaired memory and exploratory behavior (experiments on rats) and on physical capabilities (experiments on mice) were studied. In the experiments with scopolamine (2 mg/kg i.p.) we used the step-through passive avoidance method to determine the memory changes. In the case of single treatment with the drugs tested scopolamine was injected immediately after training and Adf, Mf, and CCh at doses of 20 and 100 mg/kg and Pc at a dose of 100 mg/kg were administered immediately after scopolamine. In the case of multiple administration the drugs were applied at the same doses for 7 days before training. Scopolamine was injected immediately after training. Retention tests were given 3 and 24 hours later. All the four drugs tested prevented to a large extent or completely the scopolamine-induced retrograde amnesia. However, significant quantitative differences in the antiamnestic effects of the drugs tested were observed. The effects of the four drugs on exploratory behavior were tested in the Opto Varimex apparatus. After 7-day treatment with the drugs at the doses utilized, the behavior of experimental animals was observed for 10 min, checking out the changes in the frequency of rearing, ambulation, and rotation. Only Adf at a dose of 50 mg/kg significantly decreased rearing and ambulation frequencies; this effect was considered to be an expression of accelerated habituation. The physical capabilities of mice were studied, using the method of treadmill (revolving drum activity cage) training. Before the experiment the mice received orally Adf, Mf, and Pc at a dose of 100 mg/kg or were injected intraperitoneally with CCh at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg once daily for 7 days. The number of revolutions of the drum cages was counted for 4 hours. Only Pc significantly increased the physical capabilities of mice and much delayed the occurrence of fatigue.

  12. Propofol Prevents Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Memory Impairment in Cerebral Ischemia Injury Through Promoting PTEN Degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Du, Ye-Mu; Xu, Feng; Liu, Dai; Wang, Yuan-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprotective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was widely investigated. However, its mechanisms remain unclear. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway is supposed as a cell survival pathway, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a negative regulator of AKT phosphorylation. Whether PTEN was involved in the protective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was not elucidated. In this study, the function of PTEN in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury was investigated. Our data showed that propofol promoted the PTEN degradation in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury and concurrently activated AKT phosphorylation. The increase of ubiquitinated PTEN caused by cerebral ischemia injury were degraded in propofol-pretreated rats. Moreover, we evidenced that proteasome activity was stimulated in propofol-treated rats. These data pointed that PTEN degradation was facilitated in the acute phase after propofol treatment possibly through activating ubiquitin-proteasome system. Therefore, we applied PTEN inhibitor-bpV before cerebral ischemia injury. Like propofol, bpV pretreatment also mitigated cerebral ischemia injury-induced cell loss in CA1 region and memory impairment. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN degradation is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia injury and propofol facilitates PTEN degradation to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss and memory deficit in cerebral ischemia injury.

  13. Physical exercise prevents short and long-term deficits on aversive and recognition memory and attenuates brain oxidative damage induced by maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ben-Hur; Menezes, Jefferson; Souza, Mauren Assis; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2015-12-01

    It is known from previous research that physical exercise prevents long-term memory deficits induced by maternal deprivation in rats. But we could not assume similar effects of physical exercise on short-term memory, as short- and long-term memories are known to result from some different memory consolidation processes. Here we demonstrated that, in addition to long-term memory deficit, the short-term memory deficit resultant from maternal deprivation in object recognition and aversive memory tasks is also prevented by physical exercise. Additionally, one of the mechanisms by which the physical exercise influences the memory processes involves its effects attenuating the oxidative damage in the maternal deprived rats' hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  14. Effects and mechanism of cerebroprotein hydrolysate on learning and memory ability in mice.

    PubMed

    An, L; Han, X; Li, H; Ma, Y; Shi, L; Xu, G; Yuan, G; Sun, J; Zhao, N; Sheng, Y; Wang, M; Du, P

    2016-07-25

    Cerebroprotein hydrolysate is an extract from porcine brain tissue that acts on the central nervous system in various ways to protect neurons and improve memory, attention, and vigilance. This study examined the effect and mechanism of cerebroprotein hydrolysate on learning and memory in mice with scopolamine-induced impairment. Mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine hydrobromide to establish a murine model of learning and memory impairment. After 35 successive days of cerebroprotein hydrolysate treatment, their behaviors were observed in the Morris water maze and step-down test. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamic acid (Glu) levels in the brain tissue of the mice were determined, and pathological changes in the hippocampus were examined. The results of the water-maze test showed that cerebroprotein hydrolysate shortened the escape latency and increased the number of platform crossings. In the step-down test, cerebroprotein hydrolysate treatment prolonged the step-down latency and reduced the number of errors; cerebroprotein hydrolysate increased the activity of SOD, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, and AChE, reduced the levels of MDA, decreased the Glu/GABA ratio in brain tissue, and reduced pathological changes in the hippocampus. The results indicate that cerebroprotein hydrolysate can improve learning and memory in mice with scopolamine-induced impairment. This effect may be associated with its ability to reduce injury caused by free radicals, improve acetylcholine function, and modulate the Glu/GABA learning and memory regulation system, reducing excitotoxicity caused by Glu.

  15. Supplementation with different teas from Camellia sinensis prevents memory deficits and hippocampus oxidative stress in ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Martins, Alexandre; Schimidt, Helen L; Garcia, Alexandre; Colletta Altermann, Caroline Dalla; Santos, Francielli W; Carpes, Felipe P; da Silva, Weber Cláudio; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2017-09-01

    Memory and cognition impairments resultant of ischemic stroke could be minimized or avoided by antioxidant supplementation. In this regard, the neuroprotective potential of Green tea from Camellia sinensis has been investigated. However, there is a lack of information regarding the neuroprotective potential of others teas processed from the Camellia sinensis. Here we investigate the neuroprotective role of green, red, white and black tea on memory deficits and brain oxidative stress in a model of ischemic stroke in rats. Our findings show that green and red teas prevent deficits in object and social recognition memories, but only green tea protects against deficits in spatial memory and avoids hippocampal oxidative status and intense necrosis and others alterations in the brain tissue. In summary, green tea shows better neuroprotection in ischemic stroke than the others teas from Camellia sinensis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Vitamin E prevents high-fat high-carbohydrates diet-induced memory impairment: the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar F; Salah, Heba A; Hasan, Zuheir

    2013-07-02

    Memory and learning are impaired by imbalanced diet consumption. High-fat high-carbohydrate diet (HFCD) induces oxidative stress, which results in neuronal damage and interference with synaptic transmission; hence, a decline in cognitive function. Vitamin E is a fat soluble antioxidant that is believed to have positive effects on learning and memory. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic administration of vitamin E prevents learning and memory impairment induced by HFCD. In addition, possible molecular targets for HFCD, and vitamin E that lead to cognitive effects were examined. Vitamin E and/or HFCD were concurrently administered to animals for 6 weeks. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze (RAWM). Additionally, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level and antioxidant markers were assessed in the hippocampus. The results of this project revealed that HFCD impairs both short-term and long-term memories (p<0.05). The administration of vitamin E prevented the memory impairment induced by HFCD consumption (p<0.05). The consumption of HFCD reduced activities of hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (p<0.05); whereas the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were elevated (p<0.05). The administration of vitamin E normalized the effect of HFCD on the oxidative stress markers. None of the treatments induced changes in the levels of BDNF or glutathione peroxidase (GPx). In conclusion, HFCD induces memory impairment, and the administration of vitamin E prevented this impairment probably through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus.

  17. Short-term blueberry-enriched antioxidant diet prevents and reverses object recognition memory loss in aged rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective Previously, four months of a blueberry-enriched (BB) antioxidant diet prevented impaired object recognition memory in aged rats. Experiment 1 determined whether one and two-month BB diets would have a similar effect and whether the benefits would disappear promptly after terminating the d...

  18. S-Adenosylmethionine Prevents Mallory Denk Body Formation in Drug-Primed Mice by Inhibiting the Epigenetic Memory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Dedes, Jennifer; French, Barbara Alan; Amidi, Fataneh; Oliva, Joan; French, Samuel William

    2010-01-01

    In previous studies, microarray analysis of livers from mice fed diethyl-1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-pyridine decarboxylate (DDC) for 10 weeks followed by 1 month of drug withdrawal (drug-primed mice) and then 7 days of drug refeeding showed an increase in the expression of numerous genes referred to here as the molecular cellular memory. This memory predisposes the liver to Mallory Denk body formation in response to drug refeeding. In the current study, drug-primed mice were refed DDC with or without a daily dose of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe; 4 g/kg of body weight). The livers were studied for evidence of oxidative stress and changes in gene expression with microarray analysis. SAMe prevented Mallory Denk body formation in vivo. The molecular cellular memory induced by DDC refeeding lasted for 4 months after drug withdrawal and was not manifest when SAMe was added to the diet in the in vivo experiment. Liver cells from drug-primed mice spontaneously formed Mallory Denk bodies in primary tissue cultures. SAMe prevented Mallory Denk bodies when it was added to the culture medium. Conclusion SAMe treatment prevented Mallory Denk body formation in vivo and in vitro by preventing the expression of a molecular cellular memory induced by prior DDC feeding. No evidence for the involvement of oxidative stress in induction of the memory was found. The molecular memory included the up-regulation of the expression of genes associated with the development of liver cell preneoplasia. PMID:18098314

  19. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  20. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  1. The context counts: congruent learning and testing environments prevent memory retrieval impairment following stress.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Wolf, Oliver T

    2009-09-01

    Stress before retention testing impairs memory, whereas memory performance is enhanced when the learning context is reinstated at retrieval. In the present study, we examined whether the negative impact of stress before memory retrieval can be attenuated when memory is tested in the same environmental context as that in which learning took place. Subjects learned a 2-D object location task in a room scented with vanilla. Twenty-four hours later, they were exposed to stress or a control condition before memory for the object location task was assessed in a cued-recall test, either in the learning context or in a different context (unfamiliar room without the odor). Stress impaired memory when assessed in the unfamiliar context, but not when assessed in the learning context. These results suggest that the detrimental effects of stress on memory retrieval can be abolished when a distinct learning context is reinstated at test.

  2. Effects of preventive surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms on attention, executive function, learning and memory: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joonho; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Min A; Kim, Yong Bae; Joo, Jin-Yang; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the effects of preventive surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms on attention, executive function, learning and memory. Between March 2012 and June 2013, 56 patients were recruited for this study. Fifty-one patients met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) age ≤65 years and (2) planned microsurgery or endovascular surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Exclusion criteria were as follows: (1) preoperative intelligence quotient <80 (n = 3); (2) initial modified Rankin scale ≥1 (n = 1); (3) loss to follow-up (n = 1). An auditory controlled continuous performance test (ACCPT), word-color test (WCT) and verbal learning test (VLT) were performed before and after (6 months) preventive surgery. ACCPT (attention), WCT (executive function) and VLT (learning and memory) scores did not change significantly between the pre- and postoperative evaluations. The ACCPT, WCT, total VLT scores (verbal learning) and delayed VLT scores (memory) did not differ significantly between patients undergoing microsurgery and those undergoing endovascular surgery. However, ACCPT, WCT and delayed VLT scores decreased postoperatively in patients with leukoaraiosis on preoperative FLAIR images (OR 9.899, p = 0.041; OR 11.421, p = 0.006; OR 2.952, p = 0.024, respectively). Preventive surgery for unruptured intracranial aneurysms did not affect attention, executive function, learning or memory. However, patients with leukoaraiosis on FLAIR images might be prone to deficits in attention, executive function and memory postoperatively, whereas learning might not be affected.

  3. In vitro and ex-vivo cellular antioxidant protection and cognitive enhancing effects of an extract of Polygonum minus Huds (Lineminus™) demonstrated in a Barnes Maze animal model for memory and learning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polygonum minus Huds.is a culinary flavouring that is common in South East Asian cuisine and as a remedy for diverse maladies ranging from indigestion to poor eyesight. The leaves of this herb have been reported to be high in antioxidants. Flavonoids which have been associated with memory, cognition and protection against neurodegeneration were found in P. minus. Method This study examined a P. minus aqueous extract (Lineminus™) for its antioxidant activity using the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay, the ex vivo Cellular Antioxidant Protection of erythrocytes (CAP-e) assays and for potential anticholinesterase activity in vitro. Cognitive function and learning of Lineminus™ was evaluated using scopolamine induced cognition deficits in a Barnes maze, rodent model of cognition. Results The extract displayed in vitro antioxidant activity with a total ORAC value of 16,964 μmole TE/gram. Cellular antioxidant protection from free radical damage using the CAP-e assay, with an IC50 of 0.58 g/L for inhibition of cellular oxidative damage, was observed. The extract inhibited cholinesterase activity with an IC50 of 0.04 mg/ml with a maximum inhibition of 68%. In a rodent model of cognition using scopolamine induced cognition deficits in the Barnes maze, the extract attenuated scopolamine induced disruptions in learning at the higher dose of 100 mg/kg. Conclusion These data shows that P. minus possesses antioxidant and anticholinesterase activity and demonstrated enhanced cognition in vivo. The data suggest neuroprotective properties of the extract. PMID:24886679

  4. Central noradrenergic depletion by DSP-4 prevents stress-induced memory impairments in the object recognition task.

    PubMed

    Scullion, G A; Kendall, D A; Sunter, D; Marsden, C A; Pardon, M-C

    2009-12-01

    Environmental stress produces adverse affects on memory in humans and rodents. Increased noradrenergic neurotransmission is a major component of the response to stress and noradrenaline (NA) plays an important role in modulating processes involved in learning and memory. The present study investigated the effect of NA depletion on stress-induced changes on memory performance in the mouse. Central NA depletion was induced using the selective neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2 bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) and verified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A novel cage stress procedure involving exposure to a new clean cage for 1 h per day, 4 days per week for 4 weeks, was used to produce stress-induced memory deficits measured using the object recognition task. 50 mg/kg DSP-4 produced large and sustained reductions in NA levels in the frontal cortex and hippocampus measured 24 h, 1 week and 5 weeks after treatment. Four weeks of exposure to novel cage stress induced a memory deficit in the object recognition task which was prevented by DSP-4 pre-treatment (50 mg/kg 1 week before the commencement of stress).These findings indicate that chronic environmental stress adversely affects recognition memory and that this effect is, in part, mediated by the noradrenergic stress response. The implication of these findings is that drugs targeting the noradrenergic system to reduce over-activity may be beneficial in the treatment of stress-related mental disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety in which memory is affected.

  5. Inactivation of basolateral amygdala prevents chronic immobilization stress-induced memory impairment and associated changes in corticosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sunil Jamuna; Chakraborty, Suwarna; Srikumar, B N; Raju, T R; Shankaranarayana Rao, B S

    2017-07-01

    Chronic stress causes detrimental effects on various forms of learning and memory. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) not only plays a crucial role in mediating certain forms of memory, but also in the modulation of the effects of stress. Chronic immobilization stress (CIS) results in hypertrophy of the BLA, which is believed to be one of the underlying causes for stress' effects on learning. Thus, it is plausible that preventing the effects of CIS on amygdala would preclude its deleterious cognitive effects. Accordingly, in the first part, we evaluated the effect of excitotoxic lesion of the BLA on chronic stress-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial learning using a partially baited radial arm maze task. The BLA was ablated bilaterally using ibotenic acid prior to CIS. Chronically stressed rats showed impairment in spatial learning with decreased percentage correct choice and increased reference memory errors. Excitotoxic lesion of the BLA prevented the impairment in spatial learning and reference memory. In the retention test, lesion of the BLA was able to rescue the chronic stress-induced impairment. Interestingly, stress-induced enhanced plasma corticosterone levels were partially prevented by the lesion of BLA. These results motivated us to evaluate if the same effects can be observed with temporary inactivation of BLA, only during stress. We found that chronic stress-induced spatial learning deficits were also prevented by temporary inactivation of the BLA. Additionally, temporary inactivation of BLA partially precluded the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone levels. Thus, inactivation of BLA precludes stress-induced spatial learning deficits, and enhanced plasma corticosterone levels. It is speculated that BLA inactivation-induced reduction in corticosterone levels during stress, might be crucial in restoring spatial learning impairments. Our study provides evidence that amygdalar modulation during stress might be beneficial for strategic

  6. Naringin and Rutin Alleviates Episodic Memory Deficits in Two Differentially Challenged Object Recognition Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingayya, Grandhi Venkata; Nampoothiri, Madhavan; Nayak, Pawan G.; Kishore, Anoop; Shenoy, Rekha R.; Mallikarjuna Rao, Chamallamudi; Nandakumar, Krishnadas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive decline or dementia is a debilitating problem of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, including special conditions like chemobrain. Dietary flavonoids proved to be efficacious in delaying the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases. Two such flavonoids, naringin (NAR) and rutin (RUT) were reported to have neuroprotective potential with beneficial effects on spatial and emotional memories in particular. However, the efficacy of these flavonoids is poorly understood on episodic memory, which comprises an important form of autobiographical memory. Objective: This study objective is to evaluate NAR and RUT to reverse time-delay-induced long-term and scopolamine-induced short-term episodic memory deficits in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: We have evaluated both short-term and long-term episodic memory forms using novel object recognition task. Open field paradigm was used to assess locomotor activity for any confounding influence on memory assessment. Donepezil was used as positive control and was effective in both models at 1 mg/kg, i.p. Results: Animals treated with NAR and RUT at 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o. spent significantly more time exploring novel object compared to familiar one, whereas control animals spent almost equal time with both objects in choice trial. NAR and RUT dose-dependently increased recognition and discriminative indices in time-induced long-term as well as scopolamine-induced short-term episodic memory deficit models without interfering with the locomotor activity. Conclusion: We conclude that, NAR and RUT averted both short- and long-term episodic memory deficits in Wistar rats, which may be potential interventions for neurodegenerative diseases as well as chemobrain condition. SUMMARY Incidence of Alzheimer's disease is increasing globally and the current therapy is only symptomatic. Curative treatment is a major lacuna. NAR and RUT are natural flavonoids proven for their pleiotropic

  7. Dietary CDP-Choline Supplementation Prevents Memory Impairment Caused by Impoverished Environmental Conditions in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teather, Lisa A.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The authors previously showed that dietary cytidine (5')-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) supplementation could protect against the development of memory deficits in aging rats. In the present study, younger rats exposed to impoverished environmental conditions and manifesting hippocampal-dependent memory impairments similar to those observed in the…

  8. Voluntary Running Prevents Progressive Memory Decline and Increases Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Growth Factor Expression After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J.E.; Pfau, Madeline L.; Flores, Catherine T.; Fraser, Jennifer A.; Williams, Christina L.; Jones, Lee W.

    2010-01-01

    Whole-brain irradiation (WBI) therapy produces progressive learning and memory deficits in patients with primary or secondary brain tumors. Exercise enhances memory and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the intact brain, so we hypothesized that exercise may be an effective treatment to alleviate consequences of WBI. Previous studies using animal models to address this issue have yielded mixed results and have not examined potential molecular mechanisms. We investigated the short- and long-term effects of WBI on spatial learning and memory retention, and determined whether voluntary running after WBI aids recovery of brain and cognitive function. Forty adult female C57Bl/6 mice given a single dose of 5 Gy or sham WBI were trained 2.5 weeks and up to four months after WBI in a Barnes maze. Half of the mice received daily voluntary wheel access starting one month after sham- or WBI. Daily running following WBI prevented the marked decline in spatial memory retention observed months after irradiation. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) immunolabeling and ELISA indicated that this behavioral rescue was accompanied by a partial restoration of newborn BrdU+/NeuN+ neurons in the dentate gyrus and increased hippocampal expression of brain-derived vascular endothelial growth factor and insulin-like growth factor, and occurred despite irradiation-induced elevations in hippocampal pro-inflammatory cytokines. WBI in adult mice produced a progressive memory decline consistent with what has been reported in cancer patients receiving WBI therapy. Our findings show that running can abrogate this memory decline and aid recovery of adult hippocampal plasticity, thus highlighting exercise as a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:20884629

  9. Voluntary running prevents progressive memory decline and increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and growth factor expression after whole-brain irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J E; Pfau, Madeline L; Flores, Catherine T; Fraser, Jennifer A; Williams, Christina L; Jones, Lee W

    2010-11-15

    Whole-brain irradiation (WBI) therapy produces progressive learning and memory deficits in patients with primary or secondary brain tumors. Exercise enhances memory and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the intact brain, so we hypothesized that exercise may be an effective treatment to alleviate consequences of WBI. Previous studies using animal models to address this issue have yielded mixed results and have not examined potential molecular mechanisms. We investigated the short- and long-term effects of WBI on spatial learning and memory retention and determined whether voluntary running after WBI aids recovery of brain and cognitive function. Forty adult female C57Bl/6 mice given a single dose of 5 Gy or sham WBI were trained 2.5 weeks and up to 4 months after WBI in a Barnes maze. Half of the mice received daily voluntary wheel access starting 1 month after sham or WBI. Daily running following WBI prevented the marked decline in spatial memory retention observed months after irradiation. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) immunolabeling and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that this behavioral rescue was accompanied by a partial restoration of newborn BrdUrd+/NeuN+ neurons in the dentate gyrus and increased hippocampal expression of brain-derived vascular endothelial growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-1, and occurred despite irradiation-induced elevations in hippocampal proinflammatory cytokines. WBI in adult mice produced a progressive memory decline consistent with what has been reported in cancer patients receiving WBI therapy. Our findings show that running can abrogate this memory decline and aid recovery of adult hippocampal plasticity, thus highlighting exercise as a potential therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  10. Propofol prevents electroconvulsive-shock-induced memory impairment through regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a rat model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Min, Su; Wei, Ke; Cao, Jun; Wang, Bin; Li, Ping; Dong, Jun; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a rapid and efficient psychiatric treatment, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces memory impairment. Modified ECT requires anesthesia for safety purposes. Although traditionally found to exert amnesic effects in general anesthesia, which is an inherent part of modified ECT, some anesthetics have been found to protect against ECT-induced cognitive impairment. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the effects of propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) on memory in depressed rats undergoing electroconvulsive shock (ECS), the analog of ECT in animals, under anesthesia as well as its mechanisms. Methods Chronic unpredictable mild stresses were adopted to reproduce depression in a rodent model. Rats underwent ECS (or sham ECS) with anesthesia with propofol or normal saline. Behavior was assessed in sucrose preference, open field and Morris water maze tests. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was measured using electrophysiological techniques. PSD-95, CREB, and p-CREB protein expression was assayed with Western blotting. Results Depression induced memory damage, and downregulated LTP, PSD-95, CREB, and p-CREB; these effects were exacerbated in depressed rats by ECS; propofol did not reverse the depression-induced changes, but when administered in modified ECS, propofol improved memory and reversed the downregulation of LTP and the proteins. Conclusion These findings suggest that propofol prevents ECS-induced memory impairment, and modified ECS under anesthesia with propofol improves memory in depressed rats, possibly by reversing the excessive changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. These observations provide a novel insight into potential targets for optimizing the clinical use of ECT for psychiatric disorders. PMID:25285008

  11. Caffeine consumption prevents diabetes-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity in the hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ mice.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João M N; Agostinho, Paula M; Carvalho, Rui A; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors) emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different noxious stimuli. Thus, we took advantage of a novel animal model of type 2 diabetes to investigate the behavioural, neurochemical and morphological modifications present in the hippocampus and tested if caffeine consumption might prevent these changes. We used a model closely mimicking the human type 2 diabetes condition, NONcNZO10/LtJ mice, which become diabetic at 7-11 months when kept under an 11% fat diet. Caffeine (1 g/l) was applied in the drinking water from 7 months onwards. Diabetic mice displayed a decreased spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze accompanied by a decreased density of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP25), mainly glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters), and increased astrogliosis (GFAP immunoreactivity) compared to their wild type littermates kept under the same diet. Furthermore, diabetic mice displayed up-regulated A(2A) receptors and down-regulated A(1) receptors in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption restored memory performance and abrogated the diabetes-induced loss of nerve terminals and astrogliosis. These results provide the first evidence that type 2 diabetic mice display a loss of nerve terminal markers and astrogliosis, which is associated with memory impairment; furthermore, caffeine consumption prevents synaptic dysfunction and astrogliosis as well as memory impairment in type 2 diabetes.

  12. Caffeine Consumption Prevents Diabetes-Induced Memory Impairment and Synaptotoxicity in the Hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Agostinho, Paula M.; Carvalho, Rui A.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors) emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different noxious stimuli. Thus, we took advantage of a novel animal model of type 2 diabetes to investigate the behavioural, neurochemical and morphological modifications present in the hippocampus and tested if caffeine consumption might prevent these changes. We used a model closely mimicking the human type 2 diabetes condition, NONcNZO10/LtJ mice, which become diabetic at 7–11 months when kept under an 11% fat diet. Caffeine (1 g/l) was applied in the drinking water from 7 months onwards. Diabetic mice displayed a decreased spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze accompanied by a decreased density of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP25), mainly glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters), and increased astrogliosis (GFAP immunoreactivity) compared to their wild type littermates kept under the same diet. Furthermore, diabetic mice displayed up-regulated A2A receptors and down-regulated A1 receptors in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption restored memory performance and abrogated the diabetes-induced loss of nerve terminals and astrogliosis. These results provide the first evidence that type 2 diabetic mice display a loss of nerve terminal markers and astrogliosis, which is associated with memory impairment; furthermore, caffeine consumption prevents synaptic dysfunction and astrogliosis as well as memory impairment in type 2 diabetes. PMID:22514596

  13. Maternal administration of melatonin prevents spatial learning and memory deficits induced by developmental ethanol and lead co-exposure.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Elham; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is a radical scavenger with the ability to remove reactive oxidant species. There is report that co-exposure to lead and ethanol during developmental stages induces learning and memory deficits and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effect of melatonin, with strong antioxidant properties, on memory deficits induced by lead and ethanol co-exposure and oxidative stress in hippocampus. Pregnant rats in lead and ethanol co-exposure group received lead acetate of 0.2% in distilled drinking water and ethanol (4g/kg) by oral gavages once daily from the 5th day of gestation until weaning. Rats received 10mg/kg melatonin by oral gavages. On postnatal days (PD) 30, rats trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 37, a probe test was done and oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were evaluated. Results demonstrated lead and ethanol co-exposed rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency in probe trial test and had significantly higher malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, significantly lower superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in the hippocampus. Melatonin treatment could improve memory deficits, antioxidants activity and reduced MDA levels in the hippocampus. We conclude, co-exposure to lead and ethanol impair memory and melatonin can prevent from it by oxidative stress modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. (-)Epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents the reserpine-induced impairment of short-term social memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsiang-Chien; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Soung, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Yi; Chang, Kuo-Chi

    2015-12-01

    Reserpine has been confirmed to induce cognitive dysfunction and increase brain neural oxidative stress. Green tea catechins, particularly (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), have strong antioxidative properties and can protect against numerous oxidative damages. In this study, we examined the possible protective effects of EGCG on reserpine-induced impairment of short-term memory in rats. Reserpine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal)-induced memory impairment was assessed using the social recognition task method; locomotor activity and the olfactory discrimination ability were not altered as measured by an open-field test and an olfactory discrimination test, respectively. EGCG treatment (100 and 300 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, for 7 days, starting 6 days before the reserpine injection) could improve the worsened social memory of reserpine-treated rats. Also, EGCG treatment reduced reserpine-induced lipid peroxidation and enhanced the antioxidation power in the hippocampi of reserpine-treated rats. These results suggest a protective effect of EGCG in treating reserpine-induced impairment of memory, most probably through its powerful antioxidative activities. Accordingly, EGCG may hold a clinically relevant value in preventing reserpine-induced cognitive dysfunction.

  15. Estradiol prevents ozone-induced increases in brain lipid peroxidation and impaired social recognition memory in female rats.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Guzmán, R; Arriaga, V; Kendrick, K M; Bernal, C; Vega, X; Mercado-Gómez, O F; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2009-03-31

    There is increasing concern about the neurodegenerative and behavioral consequences of ozone pollution in industrialized urban centers throughout the world and that women may be more susceptible to brain neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study we have investigated the effects of chronic (30 or 60 days) exposure to ozone on olfactory perception and memory and on levels of lipid peroxidation, alpha and beta estrogen receptors and dopamine beta-hydroxylase in the olfactory bulb in ovariectomized female rats. The ability of 17beta-estradiol to prevent these effects was then assessed. Results showed that ozone exposure for 30 or 60 days impaired formation/retention of a selective olfactory recognition memory 120 min after exposure to a juvenile stimulus animal with the effect at 60 days being significantly greater than at 30 days. They also showed impaired speed in locating a buried chocolate reward after 60 days of ozone exposure indicating some loss of olfactory perception. These functional impairments could all be prevented by coincident estradiol treatment. In the olfactory bulb, levels of lipid peroxidation were increased at both 30- and 60-day time-points and numbers of cells with immunohistochemical staining for alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and dopamine beta-hydroxylase were reduced as were alpha and beta estrogen receptor protein levels. These effects were prevented by estradiol treatment. Oxidative stress damage caused by chronic exposure to ozone does therefore impair olfactory perception and social recognition memory and may do so by reducing noradrenergic and estrogen receptor activity in the olfactory bulb. That these effects can be prevented by estradiol treatment suggests increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders in aging women may be contributed to by reduced estrogen levels post-menopause.

  16. Wnt-5a prevents Aβ-induced deficits in long-term potentiation and spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Li; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shao-Feng; Lei, Liu; Xie, Hong-Yan; Deng, Fang; Feng, Jia-Chun; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2015-10-01

    Although the neurotoxicity of amyloid β (Aβ) protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been reported widely, the exact molecular mechanism underlying the Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction and memory impairment remains largely unclear. Growing evidence indicates that wingless-type (Wnt) signaling plays an important role in neuronal development, synapse formation and synaptic plasticity. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective action of Wnt-5a against the synaptic damage and memory deficit induced by Aβ25-35 by using in vivo electrophysiological recording and Morris water maze (MWM) test. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ25-35 alone did not affect the baseline field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and the paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) in the hippocampal CA1 region of rats, but significantly suppressed high frequency stimulation (HFS) induced long-term potentiation (LTP); pretreatment with Wnt-5a prevented the Aβ25-35-induced suppression of hippocampal LTP in a dose-dependent manner; soluble Frizzled-related protein (sFRP), a specific Wnt antagonist, effectively attenuated the protective effects of Wnt-5a. In MWM test, Aβ25-35 alone significantly disrupted spatial learning and memory ability of rats, while pretreatment with Wnt-5a effectively prevented the impairments induced by Aβ25-35. These results in the present study demonstrated for the first time the neuroprotective effects of Wnt-5a against Aβ-induced in vivo synaptic plasticity impairment and memory disorder, suggesting that Wnt signaling pathway is one of the important targets of Aβ neurotoxicity and Wnt-5a might be used as one of the putative candidates for the therapeutic intervention of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ilex latifolia Prevents Amyloid β Protein (25-35)-Induced Memory Impairment by Inhibiting Apoptosis and Tau Phosphorylation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Youn; Lee, Hong Kyu; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yoo, Jae Kuk; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2015-12-01

    Ilex latifolia Thunb. (Aquifoliaceae), a Chinese bitter tea called "kudingcha," has been widely consumed as a health beverage and found to possess antioxidant, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ischemic activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of an ethanol extract of I. latifolia against amyloid β protein (Aβ)-induced memory impairment in mice and neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons. Memory impairment in mice was induced by intracerebroventricular injection of 15 nmol Aβ (25-35) and measured by the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test. Chronic administration of I. latifolia (25-100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly prevented Aβ (25-35)-induced memory loss. I. latifolia also prevented the decrease of glutathione concentrations, increased lipid peroxidation, expression of phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and changes in apoptosis-associated proteins in the memory-impaired mouse brain. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to 10 μM Aβ (25-35) for 36 h induced neuronal apoptotic death. The neuronal cell death, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, generation of reactive oxygen species, and expression of proapoptotic proteins caused by Aβ (25-35) in the cultured neurons were inhibited by treatment with I. latifolia (1-50 μg/mL). These results suggest that I. latifolia may have a possible therapeutic role in managing cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanism might involve the antiapoptotic effects mediated by antioxidant activity and inhibition of p-tau formation.

  18. Long- and short-term CDK5 knockdown prevents spatial memory dysfunction and tau pathology of triple transgenic Alzheimer's mice.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alvarez, John F; Uribe-Arias, S Alejandro; Kosik, Kenneth S; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P

    2014-01-01

    CDK5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family with diverse functions in both the developing and mature nervous system. The inappropriate activation of CDK5 due to the proteolytic release of the activator fragment p25 from the membrane contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles and chronic neurodegeneration. At 18 months of age 3xTg-AD mice were sacrificed after 1 year (long term) or 3 weeks (short term) of CDK5 knockdown. In long-term animals CDK5 knockdown prevented insoluble Tau formation in the hippocampi and prevented spatial memory impairment. In short-term animals, CDK5 knockdown showed reduction of CDK5, reversed Tau aggregation, and improved spatial memory compared to scrambled treated old 3xTg-AD mice. Neither long-term nor short-term CDK5 knock-down had an effect on old littermates. These findings further validate CDK5 as a target for Alzheimer's disease both as a preventive measure and after the onset of symptoms.

  19. Memory-strengthening activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra in exteroceptive and interoceptive behavioral models.

    PubMed

    Parle, Milind; Dhingra, Dinesh; Kulkarni, S K

    2004-01-01

    In the traditional system of medicine, the roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra have been employed clinically for centuries for their anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer, expectorant, antimicrobial, and anxiolytic activities. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of G. glabra, popularly known as liquorice (Mulathi), on learning and memory. The elevated plus-maze and passive avoidance paradigm were employed to evaluate learning and memory parameters. Three doses (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg p.o.) of aqueous extract of G. glabra were administered for 7 successive days in separate groups of mice. The dose of 150 mg/kg of the aqueous extract of liquorice significantly improved learning and memory of mice. Furthermore, this dose reversed the amnesia induced by diazepam (1 mg/kg i.p.), scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg i.p.), and ethanol (1 g/kg i.p.). Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of liquorice may be contributing favorably to the memory enhancement effect. Since scopolamine-induced amnesia was reversed by liquorice, it is possible that the beneficial effect on learning and memory may be because of facilitation of cholinergic transmission in brain. However, further studies are necessitated to identify the exact mechanism of action. In the present investigation, G. glabra has shown promise as a memory enhancer in both exteroceptive and interoceptive behavioral models of memory.

  20. Chicoric acid supplementation prevents systemic inflammation-induced memory impairment and amyloidogenesis via inhibition of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Yuwei; Shen, Chun; Xiao, Yating; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Xuebo

    2016-12-21

    Chicoric acid (CA), a natural phenolic acid extracted from chicory and the echinacea (purple coneflower) plant (Echinacea purpurea), has been regarded as a nutraceutical that has powerful antioxidant and antiobesity activities. We investigated the inhibitory effects of CA on systemic inflammation-induced neuroinflammation, amyloidogenesis, and cognitive impairment. C57BL/6J mice were treated with 0.05% CA in the drinking water for 45 d. The mice were then treated by intraperitoneal injection of LPS (lipopolysaccharide). It was found that CA prevented LPS-induced memory impairment and neuronal loss through behavioral tests and histological examination. Furthermore, amyloidogenesis in the CNS was detected. The results showed that CA prevented LPS-induced increases in β-amyloid (1-42 specific) (Aβ1-42) accumulation, levels of amyloid precursor protein, and neuronal β-secretase 1 (BACE1), as well as the equilibrium cholinergic system in mouse brain. Moreover, CA down-regulated LPS-induced glial overactivation by inhibiting the MAPK and NF-κB pathway. Consequently, CA reduced the levels of NF-κB transcriptionally regulated inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and TNF-α in both mouse brain and BV2 microglial cells. These results demonstrated that CA alleviated memory impairment and amyloidogenesis triggered by LPS through suppressing NF-κB transcriptional pathway, suggesting that CA might be a plausible therapeutic intervention for neuroinflammation-related diseases such as Alzheimer disease.-Liu, Q., Chen, Y., Shen, C., Xiao, Y., Wang, Y., Liu, Z., Liu, X. Chicoric acid supplementation prevents systemic inflammation-induced memory impairment and amyloidogenesis via inhibition of NF-κB.

  1. Preventive effect of theanine intake on stress-induced impairments of hippocamapal long-term potentiation and recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Haruna; Fukura, Kotaro; Suzuki, Miki; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Takeda, Atsushi

    2013-06-01

    Theanine, γ-glutamylethylamide, is one of the major amino acid components in green tea. On the basis of the preventive effect of theanine intake after birth on mild stress-induced attenuation of hippocamapal CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP), the present study evaluated the effect of theanine intake after weaning on stress-induced impairments of LTP and recognition memory. Young rats were fed water containing 0.3% theanine for 3 weeks after weaning and subjected to water immersion stress for 30min, which was more severe than tail suspension stress for 30s used previously. Serum corticosterone levels were lower in theanine-administered rats than in the control rats even after exposure to stress. CA1 LTP induced by a 100-Hz tetanus for 1s was inhibited in the presence of 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, in hippocampal slices from the control rats and was attenuated by water immersion stress. In contrast, CA1 LTP was not significantly inhibited in the presence of APV in hippocampal slices from theanine-administered rats and was not attenuated by the stress. Furthermore, object recognition memory was impaired in the control rats, but not in theanine-administered rats. The present study indicates the preventive effect of theanine intake after weaning on stress-induced impairments of hippocampal LTP and recognition memory. It is likely that the modification of corticosterone secretion after theanine intake is involved in the preventive effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intensification of long-term memory deficit by chronic stress and prevention by nicotine in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Srivareerat, Marisa; Tran, Trinh T

    2010-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cholinergic dysfunction and deposition of beta-amyloid (Aβ) in regions of the brain associated with learning and memory. The sporadic nature and late onset of most AD cases suggests that aside from biological determinants, environmental factors such as stress may also play a role in the progression of the disease. Behavioral and molecular studies were utilized to evaluate the effects of chronic nicotine treatment in the prevention of impairment of long-term memory. The rat model of AD was induced by i.c.v. osmotic pump infusion of Aβ peptides. Chronic psychosocial stress and chronic nicotine treatment were instituted for 6weeks. Spatial memory testing in the Radial Arm Water Maze revealed that, although stress, by itself, did not affect long-term memory, the combination of chronic stress and Aβ infusion impaired long-term memory significantly more than Aβ peptides infusion alone. Chronic nicotine treatment completely prevented Aβ- and stress/Aβ combination-induced memory impairment. Furthermore, molecular findings in hippocampal CA1 region of stress/Aβ rats indicated marked reduction in the protein levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding (p-CREB) and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), with significant increases in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These disturbances in signaling pathways, which may be the underlying mechanisms of impairment of long-term memory in these rats, were totally prevented by chronic nicotine treatment.

  3. Intranasal MSC-derived A1-exosomes ease inflammation, and prevent abnormal neurogenesis and memory dysfunction after status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Long, Qianfa; Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Kim, Dong-Ki; An, Su Yeon; Shuai, Bing; Prockop, Darwin J; Shetty, Ashok K

    2017-04-10

    Status epilepticus (SE), a medical emergency that is typically terminated through antiepileptic drug treatment, leads to hippocampus dysfunction typified by neurodegeneration, inflammation, altered neurogenesis, as well as cognitive and memory deficits. Here, we examined the effects of intranasal (IN) administration of extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on SE-induced adverse changes. The EVs used in this study are referred to as A1-exosomes because of their robust antiinflammatory properties. We subjected young mice to pilocarpine-induced SE for 2 h and then administered A1-exosomes or vehicle IN twice over 24 h. The A1-exosomes reached the hippocampus within 6 h of administration, and animals receiving them exhibited diminished loss of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and greatly reduced inflammation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective and antiinflammatory effects of A1-exosomes were coupled with long-term preservation of normal hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive and memory function, in contrast to waned and abnormal neurogenesis, persistent inflammation, and functional deficits in animals receiving vehicle. These results provide evidence that IN administration of A1-exosomes is efficient for minimizing the adverse effects of SE in the hippocampus and preventing SE-induced cognitive and memory impairments.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Spatial Memory and Synaptic Plasticity Impairment Is Preventable by Captopril

    PubMed Central

    Abareshi, Azam; Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Norouzi, Fatemeh; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Khazaei, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Renin-angiotensin system has a role in inflammation and also is involved in many brain functions such as learning, memory, and emotion. Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as the contributors to the pathogenesis of memory impairments. In the present study, the effect of captopril on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity impairments induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Methods. The rats were divided and treated into control (saline), LPS (1 mg/kg), LPS-captopril (LPS-Capto; 50 mg/kg captopril before LPS), and captopril groups (50 mg/kg) before saline. Morris water maze was done. Long-term potentiation (LTP) from CA1 area of hippocampus was assessed by 100 Hz stimulation in the ipsilateral Schaffer collateral pathway. Results. In the LPS group, the spent time and traveled path to reach the platform were longer than those in the control, while, in the LPS-Capto group, they were shorter than those in the LPS group. Moreover, the slope and amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) decreased in the LPS group, as compared to the control group, whereas, in the LPS-Capto group, they increased compared to the LPS group. Conclusion. The results of the present study showed that captopril improved the LPS-induced memory and LTP impairments induced by LPS in rats. Further investigations are required in order to better understand the exact responsible mechanism(s). PMID:27830176

  5. Original nootropic drug noopept prevents memory deficit in rats with muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Radionova, K S; Belnik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U

    2008-07-01

    Antiamnesic activity of Noopept was studied on the original three-way model of conditioned passive avoidance response, which allows studying spatial component of memory. Cholinoceptor antagonists of both types (scopolamine and mecamylamine) decreased entry latency and reduced the probability for selection of the safe compartment. Noopept abolished the antiamnesic effect of cholinoceptor antagonists and improved spatial preference.

  6. Throwing Away the Key: The Ethics of Risk Assessment for Preventive Detention Schemes: R.G. Myers Memorial Lecture 2013.

    PubMed

    McSherry, B

    2014-09-03

    Preventive detention schemes that aim to protect the community from certain 'dangerous' individuals have long existed. While risk assessment is now pervasive in the management and treatment of many individuals, it raises particular issues when a person's liberty is at stake on the basis of what that person might do. This R.G. Myers Memorial Lecture addresses the ethical issues raised by mental health practitioners providing risk assessments for legislative schemes that involve the deprivation of liberty. It will focus in particular on Australian post-sentence preventive detention schemes for sex offenders that have been held by the United Nations Human Rights Committee to breach fundamental human rights. However, the ethical issues discussed also have repercussions for civil commitment laws that enable the detention of those with severe mental or intellectual impairments.

  7. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... May Be a Signal for Physical Decline and Memory Loss in Older Adults, Researchers Conclude Friday, February ... will periodically do a short test of your memory and thinking to see if any further testing ...

  8. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marielza Andrade; Schöwe, Natalia Mendes; Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (0.25mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively [corrected]. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained.

  9. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy.

  10. Chronic Microdose Lithium Treatment Prevented Memory Loss and Neurohistopathological Changes in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Silva, Karla Cristina; Baraldi-Tornisielo, Ticiana; Souza, Suzzanna Ingryd Gonçalves; Balthazar, Janaina; Albuquerque, Marilia Silva; Caetano, Ariadiny Lima; Viel, Tania Araujo; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lithium is well established in bipolar disorders and the benefits are being demonstrated in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, our group showed that treatment with microdose lithium stabilized the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. In order to verify the lithium microdose potential in preventing the disease development, the aim of this work was to verify the effects of chronic treatment with microdose lithium given before and after the appearance of symptoms in a mouse model of a disease similar to AD. Transgenic mice (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J) and their non-transgenic litter mate genetic controls were treated with lithium carbonate (1.2 mg/Kg/day in drinking water) for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively. Similar groups were treated with water. At the end of treatments, both lithium treated transgenic groups and non-transgenic mice showed no memory disruption, different from what was observed in the water treated transgenic group. Transgenic mice treated with lithium since two months of age showed decreased number of senile plaques, no neuronal loss in cortex and hippocampus and increased BDNF density in cortex, when compared to non-treated transgenic mice. It is suitable to conclude that these data support the use of microdose lithium in the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, once the neurohistopathological characteristics of the disease were modified and the memory of transgenic animals was maintained. PMID:26605788

  11. 2-Phenylethynyl-butyltellurium enhances learning and memory impaired by scopolamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Cristina G; Bruning, César A; Acker, Carmine I; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2013-08-01

    Taking into account the memory-enhancing properties of 2-phenylethynyl-butyltellurium (PEBT) and the constant search for drugs that improve cognitive performance, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of PEBT on cognitive impairment induced by scopolamine in mice. PEBT (10 mg/kg, gavage) was administered to mice 1 h before the probe trial in the Morris water maze task. Memory impairment was induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 30 min before the probe trial. PEBT significantly ameliorated the scopolamine-induced impairment of long-term memory, as indicated by a decrease in escape latency and an increase in the number of crossings of the platform location when compared with the amnesic mice. To evaluate the effect of PEBT on different phases of memory (acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval) impaired by scopolamine, the step-down inhibitory avoidance task was used. Scopolamine was administered 30 min before training (acquisition), test (retrieval), or immediately after training (consolidation). PEBT, administered 30 min before scopolamine, increased step-down latency in memory-impaired mice, improving the consolidation and retrieval stages, but not acquisition. No significant alterations in locomotor or exploratory behaviors were found in animals treated with PEBT and/or scopolamine. PEBT improved memory deficits during consolidation and retrieval induced by scopolamine.

  12. Enriched dairy fat matrix diet prevents early life lipopolysaccharide-induced spatial memory impairment at adulthood.

    PubMed

    Dinel, A L; Rey, C; Baudry, C; Fressange-Mazda, C; Le Ruyet, P; Nadjar, A; Pallet, P; Joffre, C; Layé, S

    2016-10-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are essential fatty acids, which are critical for brain development and later life cognitive functions. The main brain PUFAs are docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for the n-3 family and arachidonic acid (ARA) for the n-6 family, which are provided to the post-natal brain by breast milk or infant formula. Recently, the use of dairy lipids (DL) in replacement of vegetable lipids (VL) was revealed to potently promote the accretion of DHA in the developing brain. Brain DHA, in addition to be a key component of brain development, display potent anti-inflammatory activities, which protect the brain from adverse inflammatory events. In this work, we evaluated the protective effect of partial replacement of VL by DL, supplemented or not with DHA and ARA, on post-natal inflammation and its consequence on memory. Mice were fed with diets poor in vegetal n-3 PUFA (Def VL), balanced in vegetal n-3/n-6 PUFA (Bal VL), balanced in dairy lipids (Bal DL) or enriched in DHA and ARA (Supp VL; Supp DL) from the first day of gestation until adulthood. At post-natal day 14 (PND14), pups received a single administration of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and brain cytokine expression, microglia phenotype and neurogenesis were measured. In a second set of experiments, memory and neurogenesis were measured at adulthood. Overall, our data showed that lipid quality of the diet modulates early life LPS effect on microglia phenotype, brain cytokine expression and neurogenesis at PND14 and memory at adulthood. In particular, Bal DL diet protects from the adverse effect of early life LPS exposure on PND14 neurogenesis and adult spatial memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevention of vision loss protects against age-related impairment in learning and memory performance in DBA/2J mice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Aimée A.; Brown, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    The DBA/2J mouse is a model of pigmentary glaucoma in humans as it shows age-related increases in intraocular pressure (IOP), retinal ganglion cell death and visual impairment. Previously, we showed that visual ability declines from 9 to 12 months of age and visual impairment is correlated with poor learning and memory performance in visuo-spatial tasks but not in tasks that do not depend on visual cues. To test the “sensory impairment” hypothesis of aging, which postulates that sensory impaired individuals are disadvantaged in their performance on psychometric tests as a direct result of difficulties in sensory perception, we treated DBA/2J mice with a conventional glaucoma medication used in humans (Timoptic-XE, 0.00, 0.25, or 0.50%) daily from 9 weeks to 12 months of age to determine whether prevention of vision loss prevented the decline in visuo-spatial learning and memory performance. At all ages tested (3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age), mice treated with Timoptic-XE (0.25 and 0.50%) maintained a high level of performance, while 12 month old control mice (0.00%) exhibited impaired performance in visually-dependent, but not non-visual tasks. These results demonstrate that when sensory function is preserved, cognitive performance is normalized. Thus, as in many aging humans, DBA/2J mice show age-related decrements in performance on visually presented cognitive tests, not because of cognitive impairment but as a direct consequence of poor visual ability. Our results demonstrate that age-related impairment in performance in visuo-spatial tasks in DBA/2J mice can be prevented by the preservation of visual ability. PMID:24065919

  14. Grape powder supplementation prevents oxidative stress-induced anxiety-like behavior, memory impairment, and high blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Allam, Farida; Dao, An T; Chugh, Gaurav; Bohat, Ritu; Jafri, Faizan; Patki, Gaurav; Mowrey, Christopher; Asghar, Mohammad; Alkadhi, Karim A; Salim, Samina

    2013-06-01

    We examined whether or not grape powder treatment ameliorates oxidative stress-induced anxiety-like behavior, memory impairment, and hypertension in rats. Oxidative stress in Sprague-Dawley rats was produced by using L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO). Four groups of rats were used: 1) control (C; injected with vehicle and provided with tap water), 2) grape powder-treated (GP; injected with vehicle and provided for 3 wk with 15 g/L grape powder dissolved in tap water), 3) BSO-treated [injected with BSO (300 mg/kg body weight), i.p. for 7 d and provided with tap water], and 4) BSO plus grape powder-treated (GP+BSO; injected with BSO and provided with grape powder-treated tap water). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in BSO rats compared with C or GP rats (P < 0.05). Grape powder attenuated BSO-induced anxiety-like behavior in GP+BSO rats. BSO rats made significantly more errors in both short- and long-term memory tests compared with C or GP rats (P < 0.05), which was prevented in GP+BSO rats. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was significantly greater in BSO rats compared with C or GP rats (P < 0.05), whereas grape powder prevented high blood pressure in GP+BSO rats. Furthermore, brain extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2) was activated (P < 0.05), whereas levels of glyoxalase-1 (GLO-1), glutathione reductase-1 (GSR-1), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CAMK-IV), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were significantly less (P < 0.05) in BSO but not in GP+BSO rats compared with C or GP rats. We suggest that by regulating brain ERK-1/2, GLO-1, GSR-1, CAMK-IV, CREB, and BDNF levels, grape powder prevents oxidative stress-induced anxiety, memory impairment, and hypertension in rats.

  15. Amitriptyline and phenytoin prevents memory deficit in sciatic nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Abdulmajeed, Wahab Imam; Ibrahim, Ridwan Babatunde; Ishola, Azeez Olakunle; Balogun, Wasiu Gbolahan; Cobham, Ansa Emmanuel; Amin, Abdulbasit

    2016-03-01

    Phenytoin and amitriptyline are often reported to attenuate pain in chronic conditions. Information on their ability to ameliorate cognitive impairment associated with neuropathic pain remains unclear due to mixed results from studies. This study investigated the effects of phenytoin and amitriptyline on memory deficit associated with neuropathic pain. Twenty-eight adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: A, B, C, and D (n=7). Groups A, B, C, and D served as sham control, sciatic nerve ligated untreated, sciatic nerve ligated receiving amitriptyline (5 mg/kg), and sciatic nerve ligated receiving phenytoin (10 mg/kg) respectively. Treatments lasted for 14 days, after which both 'Y' maze and novel object recognition test (NOR) were performed. On the last day of treatment, the animals were anesthetized and their brain excised, and the prefrontal cortices and sciatic nerve were processed histologically using hematoxylin and eosin. There was memory impairment in the sciatic nerve ligated untreated group which was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to the phenytoin-treated, amitriptyline-treated, and sham control groups using the 'Y' maze and NOR tests. Histological quantification showed that the prefrontal cortices of the ligated animals showed increased neural population in comparison to normal control. These increases were significantly marked in the untreated ligated group. Sciatic nerve of untreated ligated group showed high demyelination and axonal degeneration which was ameliorated in the treated animals. The administration of amitriptyline and phenytoin can ameliorate neuronal injury, demyelination, and memory impairment associated with neuropathic pain in Wistar rats.

  16. Stachys sieboldii (Labiatae, Chorogi) Protects against Learning and Memory Dysfunction Associated with Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Tsujita, Tsukasa; Ono, Akiko; Miyagi, Kei; Mori, Takaharu; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Stachys sieboldii (Labiatae; Chinese artichoke, a tuber), "chorogi" in Japanese, has been extensively used in folk medicine, and has a number of pharmacological properties, including antioxidative activity. However, few studies have examined the neuroprotective effects of S. sieboldii tuber extract (chorogi extract), and it remains unknown whether the extract can alleviate learning and memory dysfunction associated with vascular dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of chorogi extract, and examined its protection against learning and memory dysfunction using Ginkgo biloba leaf extract (ginkgo extract) as a positive control. Mice were subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) for 30 min. Oral administration of chorogi extract or ginkgo extract significantly reduced post-ischemic glucose intolerance on day 1 and neuronal damage including memory impairment on day 3 after BCAO, compared with the vehicle-treated group. Neither herbal medicine affected locomotor activity. Furthermore, neither significantly alleviated scopolamine-induced learning and memory impairment. In primary neurons, neuronal survival rate was significantly reduced by hydrogen peroxide treatment. This hydrogen peroxide-induced neurotoxicity was significantly suppressed by chorogi extract and ginkgo extract. Taken together, our findings suggest that chorogi extract as well as ginkgo extract can protect against learning and memory dysfunction associated with ischemic brain injury through an antioxidative mechanism.

  17. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function.

  18. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Kaster, Manuella P.; Machado, Nuno J.; Silva, Henrique B.; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S.; Porciúncula, Lisiane O.; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R.; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function. PMID:26056314

  19. Prevention of meningococcal serogroup B infections in children: a protein-based vaccine induces immunologic memory.

    PubMed

    de Kleijn, E D; de Groot, R; Lafeber, A B; Labadie, J; van Limpt, C J; Visser, J; Berbers, G A; van Alphen, L; Rümke, H C

    2001-07-01

    Immunologic memory against meningococci was studied in 177 children (100 children were 10-11 years old and 77 were 5-6 years old) 2.5 years after vaccination with hexavalent meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine or hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine. Children were revaccinated with monovalent P1.7(h),4 meningococcal OMV vaccine. Serum bactericidal antibodies (SBAs) were measured before revaccination and after 4-6 weeks. A minimum 4-fold increase in SBAs against serosubtype P1.7(h),4 was detected in 48.5% of the children after hexavalent meningococcal vaccine and in 8.9% after HepB vaccine. Of the initial responders given hexavalent meningococcal vaccine, 78% had > or =4-fold increase in SBAs against strain P1.4. Thus, immunologic memory is present in toddlers and school-aged children previously given 3 hexavalent meningococcal vaccinations. Booster vaccination with monovalent P1.7(h),4 meningococcal OMV vaccine induces a significant increase in SBAs against serosubtype P1.7(h),4 and cross-reactivity against other serosubtypes in the hexavalent vaccine.

  20. Spirulina prevents memory dysfunction, reduces oxidative stress damage and augments antioxidant activity in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Lee, I-Te; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Wang, Ming-Fu; Hou, Rolis Chien-Wei; Wu, Su-Mei; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina has proven to be effective in treating certain cancers, hyperlipidemia, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of Spirulina on memory dysfunction, oxidative stress damage and antioxidant enzyme activity. Three-month-old male senescence-accelerated prone-8 (SAMP8) mice were randomly assigned to either a control group or to one of two experimental groups (one receiving daily dietary supplementation with 50 mg/kg BW and one with 200 mg/kg BW of Spirulina platensis water extract). Senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAMR1) mice were used as the external control. Results showed that the Spirulina-treated groups had better passive and avoidance scores than the control group. The amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition was significantly reduced at the hippocampus and whole brain in both Spirulina groups. The levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly reduced at the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex in both Spirulina groups, while catalase activity was significantly higher only in the 200 mg/kg BW Spirulina group than in the control group. Glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher only in the cortex of the 200 mg/kg group than in that of the SAMP8 control group. However, superoxide dismutase activity in all parts of the brain did not significantly differ among all groups. In conclusion, Spirulina platensis may prevent the loss of memory possibly by lessening Aβ protein accumulation, reducing oxidative damage and mainly augmenting the catalase activity.

  1. Prophylactic liraglutide treatment prevents amyloid plaque deposition, chronic inflammation and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    McClean, Paula L; Jalewa, Jaishree; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we have shown that the diabetes drug liraglutide is protective in middle aged and in old APP/PS1 mice. Here, we show that liraglutide has prophylactic properties. When injecting liraglutide once-daily ip. in two months old mice for 8 months, the main hallmarks of AD were much reduced. Memory formation in object recognition and Morris water maze were normalised and synapse loss and the loss of synaptic plasticity was prevented. In addition, amyloid plaque load, including dense core congophilic plaques, was much reduced. Chronic inflammation (activated microglia) was also reduced in the cortex, and neurogenesis was enhanced in the dentate gyrus. The results demonstrate that liraglutide may protect from progressive neurodegeneration that develops in AD. The drug is currently in clinical trials in patients with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Control of an innovative super-capacitor-powered shape-memory-alloy actuated accumulator for blowout preventer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Li, Peng; Song, Gangbing; Ren, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    The design of a super-capacitor-powered shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuated accumulator for blowout preventer (BOP) presented in this paper featured several advantages over conventional hydraulic accumulators including instant large current drive, quick system response and elimination of need for the pressure conduits. However, the mechanical design introduced two challenges, the nonlinear nature of SMA actuators and the varying voltage provided by a super capacitor, for control system design. A cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) feedforward plus PID controller was developed with the aim of compensation for these adverse effects. Experiments were conducted on a scaled down model and experimental results show that precision control can be achieved with the proposed configurations and algorithms.

  3. High intelligence prevents the negative impact of anxiety on working memory.

    PubMed

    Chuderski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Using a large sample and the confirmatory factor analysis, the study investigated the relationships between anxiety, working memory (WM) and (fluid) intelligence. The study showed that the negative impact of anxiety on WM functioning diminishes with increasing intelligence, and that anxiety can significantly affect WM only in people below average intelligence. This effect could not be fully explained by the sheer differences in WM capacity (WMC), suggesting the importance of higher-level cognition in coping with anxiety. Although intelligence moderated the impact of anxiety on WM, it was only weakly related to anxiety. In contrast to previous studies, anxiety explained the substantial amount of WMC variance (17.8%) in less intelligent participants, but none of the variance in more intelligent ones. These results can be explained in terms of either increased motivation of intelligent but anxious people to cope with a WM task, or their ability to compensate decrements in WM.

  4. Maternal separation enhances object location memory and prevents exercise-induced MAPK/ERK signalling in adult Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Bugarith, Kishor; Russell, Vivienne A

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress increases the risk of developing psychopathology accompanied by reduced cognitive function in later life. Maternal separation induces anxiety-like behaviours and is associated with impaired memory. On the other hand, exercise has been shown to diminish anxiety-like behaviours and improve cognitive function. The effects of maternal separation and exercise on anxiety, memory and hippocampal proteins were investigated in male Sprague–Dawley rats. Maternal separation produced anxiety-like behaviours which were reversed by exercise. Maternal separation also enhanced object location memory which was not affected by exercise. Exercise did, however, increase synaptophysin and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the hippocampus of non-separated rats and this effect was not observed in maternally separated rats. These findings show that maternal separation selectively enhanced n memory and prevented activation of the MAPK/ERK signalling pathway in the adult rat hippocampus. PMID:22476924

  5. Maternal separation enhances object location memory and prevents exercise-induced MAPK/ERK signalling in adult Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Makena, Nokuthula; Bugarith, Kishor; Russell, Vivienne A

    2012-09-01

    Early life stress increases the risk of developing psychopathology accompanied by reduced cognitive function in later life. Maternal separation induces anxiety-like behaviours and is associated with impaired memory. On the other hand, exercise has been shown to diminish anxiety-like behaviours and improve cognitive function. The effects of maternal separation and exercise on anxiety, memory and hippocampal proteins were investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Maternal separation produced anxiety-like behaviours which were reversed by exercise. Maternal separation also enhanced object location memory which was not affected by exercise. Exercise did, however, increase synaptophysin and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the hippocampus of non-separated rats and this effect was not observed in maternally separated rats. These findings show that maternal separation selectively enhanced n memory and prevented activation of the MAPK/ERK signalling pathway in the adult rat hippocampus.

  6. Nardostachys jatamansi improves learning and memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hanumanthachar; Parle, Milind

    2006-01-01

    Cure of cognitive disorders such as amnesia, attention deficit, and Alzheimer's disease is still far from being realized in the field of medicine. Nootropic agents such as piracetam, aniracetam, and choline esterase inhibitors like donepezil are being used for improving memory, mood, and behavior, but the resulting side effects associated with these agents have made their applicability limited. In Ayurveda, the roots of Nardostachys jatamansi have been clinically employed for their anti-ischemic, antioxidant, anticonvulsant, and neuroprotective activities. The present study was undertaken to assess the potential of N. jatmansi as a memory enhancer. The elevated plus maze and the passive avoidance paradigm were employed to evaluate learning and memory parameters. Three doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) of an ethanolic extract of N. jatamansi were administered for 8 successive days to both young and aged mice. The 200 mg/kg dose of N. jatmansi ethanolic extract significantly improved learning and memory in young mice and also reversed the amnesia induced by diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) and scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.). Furthermore, it also reversed aging-induced amnesia due to natural aging of mice. As scopolamine-induced amnesia was reversed, it is possible that the memory improvement may be because of facilitation of cholinergic transmission in the brain. Hence, N. jatmansi might prove to be a useful memory restorative agent in the treatment of dementia seen in elderly persons. The underlying mechanism of action can be attributed to its antioxidant property.

  7. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone Prevents Synaptic Loss and Memory Deficits in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Liu, Xia; Schroeder, Jason P; Chan, Chi-Bun; Song, Mingke; Yu, Shan Ping; Weinshenker, David; Ye, Keqiang

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic loss in the brain correlates well with disease severity in Alzheimer disease (AD). Deficits in brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-receptor-kinase B (TrkB) signaling contribute to the synaptic dysfunction of AD. We have recently identified 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) as a potent TrkB agonist that displays therapeutic efficacy toward various neurological diseases. Here we tested the effect of 7,8-DHF on synaptic function in an AD model both in vitro and in vivo. 7,8-DHF protected primary neurons from Aβ-induced toxicity and promoted dendrite branching and synaptogenesis. Chronic oral administration of 7,8-DHF activated TrkB signaling and prevented Aβ deposition in transgenic mice that coexpress five familial Alzheimer's disease mutations (5XFAD mice). Moreover, 7,8-DHF inhibited the loss of hippocampal synapses, restored synapse number and synaptic plasticity, and prevented memory deficits. These results suggest that 7,8-DHF represents a novel oral bioactive therapeutic agent for treating AD. PMID:24022672

  8. Cognitive-Enhancing Effect of Aronia melanocarpa Extract against Memory Impairment Induced by Scopolamine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon Yong; Weon, Jin Bae; Jung, Youn Sik; Kim, Nam Young; Kim, Myong Ki; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Aronia melanocarpa (A. melanocarpa) berries are a fruit with a marked antioxidant effect. The objective of this study was to confirm the effect of A. melanocarpa berries extract against scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice using the Morris water maze and passive avoidance test. Moreover, we determined a possible mechanism of the cognitive-enhancing effect involving AChE activity and BDNF and p-CREB expression in the hippocampus of mice. A. melanocarpa berries extract attenuated the learning and memory impairment induced by scopolamine in the Morris water maze (79.3 ± 0.8 s of 200 mg/kg and 64.4 ± 10.7 s of 400 mg/kg on day 4) and passive avoidance tests (46.0 ± 41.1 s of 200 mg/kg and 25.6 ± 18.7 s of 400 mg/kg). A. melanocarpa berries extract reduced the acetylcholinesterase level in the hippocampus of scopolamine-injected mice and increased BDNF and p-CREB expression in the hippocampus. The major compound, cyanidin-3-O-galactoside, also reversed memory impairment. These results showed that A. melanocarpa berries extract improved memory impairment by inhibiting AChE and increasing BDNF and p-CREB expression, and cyanidin-3-O-galactoside may be responsible for the effect of A. melanocarpa berries extract. PMID:27239211

  9. Lacosamide reduces HDAC levels in the brain and improves memory: Potential for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bang, Shraddha R; Ambavade, Shirishkumar D; Jagdale, Priti G; Adkar, Prafulla P; Waghmare, Arun B; Ambavade, Prashant D

    2015-07-01

    Lacosamide, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, has been approved for the treatment of epilepsy. Some HDAC inhibitors have been proven effective for the treatment of memory disorders. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effect of lacosamide on memory and brain HDAC levels. The effect on memory was evaluated in animals with scopolamine-induced amnesia using the elevated plus maze, object recognition test, and radial arm maze. The levels of acetylcholinesterase and HDAC in the cerebral cortex were evaluated. Lacosamide at doses of 10 and 30mg/kg significantly reduced the transfer latency in the elevated plus maze. Lacosamide at a dose of 30mg/kg significantly increased the time spent with a familiar object in the object recognition test at the 24h interval and decreased the time spent in the baited arm. Moreover, at this dose, the number of errors in the radial arm maze at 3 and 24h intervals was minimized and a reduction in the level of HDAC1, but not acetylcholinesterase, was observed in the cerebral cortex. These effects of lacosamide are equivalent to those of piracetam at a dose of 300mg/kg. These results suggest that lacosamide at a 30mg/kg dose improves disrupted memory, possibly by inhibiting HDAC, and could be used to treat amnesic symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. GLP-1 analogue CJC-1131 prevents amyloid β protein-induced impirments of spatial memory and synaptic plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Xiao; Cai, Hong-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Wen; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Li, Yu-Feng; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2017-03-15

    Although amyloid β protein (Aβ) has been recognized as one of the main pathological characteristics in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the effective strategies against Aβ neurotoxicity are still deficient up to now. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a natural gut hormone, was found to be effective in modulating insulin signaling and neural protection, but short half-life limited its clinical application in AD treatment. CJC-1131, a newly designed GLP-1 analogue with very longer half-life, has shown good effectiveness in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is unclear whether CJC-1131 could alleviate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in cognitive behavior and electrophysiological property. The present study investigated the effects of CJC-1131 on the Aβ-induced impairments in spatial memory and synaptic plasticity of rats by using Morris water maze test and in vivo field potential recording. The results showed that Aβ1-42-induced increase in the escape latency of rats in hidden platform test and decrease in swimming time percent in target quadrant were effectively reversed by CJC-1131 pretreatment. Further, CJC-1131 prevented against Aβ1-42-induced suppression of hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP). In addition, Aβ1-42 injection resulted in a significant decrease of p-PKA in the hippocampus, which was effectively prevented by CJC-1131 treatment. These results indicated that CJC-1131 protected the cognitive function and synaptic plasticity of rats against Aβ-induced impairments, suggesting that GLP-1 analogue CJC-1131 might be potentially beneficial to the prevention and treatment of AD, especially those with T2DM or blood glucose abnormality.

  11. Nicotine-prevented learning and memory impairment in REM sleep-deprived rat is modulated by DREAM protein in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Abd Rashid, Norlinda; Hapidin, Hermizi; Abdullah, Hasmah; Ismail, Zalina; Long, Idris

    2017-06-01

    REM sleep deprivation is associated with impairment in learning and memory, and nicotine treatment has been shown to attenuate this effect. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of DREAM protein in learning and memory processes. This study investigates the association of DREAM protein in REM sleep-deprived rats hippocampus upon nicotine treatment. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to normal condition, REM sleep deprivation and control wide platform condition for 72 hr. During this procedure, saline or nicotine (1 mg/kg) was given subcutaneously twice a day. Then, Morris water maze (MWM) test was used to assess learning and memory performance of the rats. The rats were sacrificed and the brain was harvested for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. MWM test found that REM sleep deprivation significantly impaired learning and memory performance without defect in locomotor function associated with a significant increase in hippocampus DREAM protein expression in CA1, CA2, CA3, and DG regions and the mean relative level of DREAM protein compared to other experimental groups. Treatment with acute nicotine significantly prevented these effects and decreased expression of DREAM protein in all the hippocampus regions but only slightly reduce the mean relative level of DREAM protein. This study suggests that changes in DREAM protein expression in CA1, CA2, CA3, and DG regions of rat's hippocampus and mean relative level of DREAM protein may involve in the mechanism of nicotine treatment-prevented REM sleep deprivation-induced learning and memory impairment in rats.

  12. Transiently increasing cAMP levels selectively in hippocampal excitatory neurons during sleep deprivation prevents memory deficits caused by sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Havekes, Robbert; Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; Tudor, Jennifer C; Ferri, Sarah L; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2014-11-19

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object-location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object-location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation.

  13. Transiently Increasing cAMP Levels Selectively in Hippocampal Excitatory Neurons during Sleep Deprivation Prevents Memory Deficits Caused by Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; Tudor, Jennifer C.; Ferri, Sarah L.; Baumann, Arnd; Meerlo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to sleep loss. Although previous work has indicated that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP signaling, it remains to be determined whether the cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation are caused by attenuated cAMP signaling in the hippocampus. Further, it is unclear which cell types are responsible for the memory impairments associated with sleep deprivation. Transgenic approaches lack the spatial resolution to manipulate specific signaling pathways selectively in the hippocampus, while pharmacological strategies are limited in terms of cell-type specificity. Therefore, we used a pharmacogenetic approach based on a virus-mediated expression of a Gαs-coupled Drosophila octopamine receptor selectively in mouse hippocampal excitatory neurons in vivo. With this approach, a systemic injection with the receptor ligand octopamine leads to increased cAMP levels in this specific set of hippocampal neurons. We assessed whether transiently increasing cAMP levels during sleep deprivation prevents memory consolidation deficits associated with sleep loss in an object–location task. Five hours of total sleep deprivation directly following training impaired the formation of object–location memories. Transiently increasing cAMP levels in hippocampal neurons during the course of sleep deprivation prevented these memory consolidation deficits. These findings demonstrate that attenuated cAMP signaling in hippocampal excitatory neurons is a critical component underlying the memory deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks associated with sleep deprivation. PMID:25411499

  14. Forced Treadmill Exercise Prevents Spatial Memory Deficits in Aged Rats Probably Through the Activation of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vanzella, Cláudia; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Odorcyk, Felipe Kawa; Nicola, Fabrício; Kolling, Janaína; Longoni, Aline; Dos Santos, Tiago Marcon; Wyse, Angela Terezinha de Souza; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-02-16

    Regular physical activity has shown to improve the quality of life and to prevent age-related memory deficits. Memory processing requires proper regulation of several enzymes such as sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which have a pivotal role in neuronal transmission. The present study investigated the effects of a treadmill running protocol in young (3 months), mature (6 months) and aged (22 months) Wistar rats, on: (a) cognitive function, as assessed in the Water maze spatial tasks; (b) Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities in the hippocampus following cognitive training alone or treadmill running combined with cognitive training. Animals of all ages were assigned to naïve (with no behavioral or exercise training), sedentary (non-exercised, with cognitive training) and exercised (20 min of daily running sessions, 3 times per week for 4 weeks and with cognitive training) groups. Cognition was assessed by reference and working memory tasks run in the Morris Water maze; 24 h after last session of behavioral testing, hippocampi were collected for biochemical analysis. Results demonstrated that: (a) a moderate treadmill running exercise prevented spatial learning and memory deficits in aged rats; (b) training in the Water maze increased both Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities in the hippocampus of mature and aged rats; (c) aged exercised rats displayed an even further increase of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in the hippocampus, (d) enzyme activity correlated with memory performance in aged rats. It is suggested that exercise prevents spatial memory deficits in aged rats probably through the activation of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the hippocampus.

  15. Chronic Treatment with Naltrexone Prevents Memory Retention Deficits in Rats Poisoned with the Sarin Analog Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and Treated with Atropine and Pralidoxime.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Kori L; Tran, Tuan; Meggs, William J

    2015-12-01

    Humans and rats poisoned with sarin develop chronic neurological disabilities that are not prevented with standardized antidotal therapy. We hypothesized that rats poisoned with the sarin analogue diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and resuscitated with atropine and pralidoxime would have long-term memory deficits that were preventable with naltrexone treatment. Long Evans rats (250-275 g) were randomized to: DFP (N = 8): single subcutaneous (SC) injection of DFP (5 mg/kg). Treatment (N = 9): DFP (5 mg/kg) followed by chronic naltrexone (5 mg/kg/day × 12 weeks). Control (N = 12): single SC injection of isopropyl alcohol, (DFP vehicle) followed by chronic naltrexone (5 mg/kg/day). If toxicity developed after injection, antidotal therapy was initiated with atropine (2 mg/kg) and pralidoxime (25 mg/kg) and repeated as needed. After 12 weeks, rats underwent testing for place learning (acquisition) across 5 days of training using the Morris Water Maze. On day 6 a memory retention test was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics. Rats receiving DFP rapidly developed toxicity requiring antidotal rescue. No differences in acquisition were seen between the DFP vs. DFP + naltrexone rats. During memory testing, DFP-poisoned rats spent significantly less time (29.4 ± 2.11 versus 38.5 ± 2.5 s, p < 0.05) and traveled less distance (267 ± 24.6 versus 370 ± 27.5 cm, p < 0.05) in the target quadrant compared to the treatment group. Treatment rats performed as well as control rats (p > 0.05) on the test for memory retention. Poisoning with DFP induced impaired memory retention. Deficits were not prevented by acute rescue with atropine and pralidoxime. Chronic naltrexone treatment led to preserved memory after DFP poisoning.

  16. A mid-life vitamin A supplementation prevents age-related spatial memory deficits and hippocampal neurogenesis alterations through CRABP-I.

    PubMed

    Touyarot, Katia; Bonhomme, Damien; Roux, Pascale; Alfos, Serge; Lafenêtre, Pauline; Richard, Emmanuel; Higueret, Paul; Pallet, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Age-related memory decline including spatial reference memory is considered to begin at middle-age and coincides with reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, a dysfunction of vitamin A hippocampal signalling pathway has been involved in the appearance of age-related memory deficits but also in adult hippocampal neurogenesis alterations. The present study aims at testing the hypothesis that a mid-life vitamin A supplementation would be a successful strategy to prevent age-related memory deficits. Thus, middle-aged Wistar rats were submitted to a vitamin A enriched diet and were tested 4 months later in a spatial memory task. In order to better understand the potential mechanisms mediating the effects of vitamin A supplementation on hippocampal functions, we studied different aspects of hippocampal adult neurogenesis and evaluated hippocampal CRABP-I expression, known to modulate differentiation processes. Here, we show that vitamin A supplementation from middle-age enhances spatial memory and improves the dendritic arborisation of newborn immature neurons probably resulting in a better survival and neuronal differentiation in aged rats. Moreover, our results suggest that hippocampal CRABP-I expression which controls the intracellular availability of retinoic acid (RA), may be an important regulator of neuronal differentiation processes in the aged hippocampus. Thus, vitamin A supplementation from middle-age could be a good strategy to maintain hippocampal plasticity and functions.

  17. Exercise prevents high-fat diet-induced impairment of flexible memory expression in the water maze and modulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Jonas, W; Iggena, D; Empl, L; Rivalan, M; Wiedmer, P; Spranger, J; Hellweg, R; Winter, Y; Steiner, B

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is currently one of the most serious threats to human health in the western civilization. A growing body of evidence suggests that obesity is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Physical exercise not only improves fitness but it has also been shown in human and animal studies to increase hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and physical exercise both modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis has been demonstrated to play a role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, particularly flexible memory expression. Here, we investigated the effects of twelve weeks of HFD vs. control diet (CD) and voluntary physical activity (wheel running; -R) vs. inactivity (sedentary; -S) on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and flexible memory function in female C57Bl/6 mice assessed in the Morris water maze. HFD was initiated either in adolescent mice combined with long-term concurrent exercise (preventive approach) or in young adult mice with 14days of subsequent exercise (therapeutic approach). HFD resulted in impaired flexible memory expression only when initiated in adolescent (HFD-S) but not in young adult mice, which was successfully prevented by concurrent exercise (HFD-R). Histological analysis revealed a reduction of immature neurons in the hippocampus of the memory-impaired HFD-S mice of the preventive approach. Long-term physical exercise also led to accelerated spatial learning during the acquisition period, which was accompanied by increased numbers of newborn mature neurons (HFD-R and CD-R). Short-term exercise of 14days in the therapeutic group was not effective in improving spatial learning or memory. We show that (1) alterations in learning and flexible memory expression are accompanied by changes in the number of neuronal cells at different maturation stages; (2) these neuronal cells are in turn differently affected by HFD; (3) adolescent mice are specifically susceptible to the

  18. Chronic nicotine restores normal Aβ levels and prevents short-term memory and E-LTP impairment in Aβ rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Srivareerat, Marisa; Tran, Trinh T; Salim, Samina; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2011-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by increased deposition of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides and progressive cholinergic dysfunction in regions of the brain involved in learning and memory processing. In AD, progressive accumulation of Aβ peptide impairs nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function by an unknown mechanism believed to involve α(7)- and α(4)β(2)-nAChR blockade. The three approaches of the current study evaluated the effects of chronic nicotine treatment in the prevention of Aβ-induced impairment of learning and short-term memory. Rat AD model was induced by 14-day i.c.v. osmotic pump infusion of a 1:1 mixture of 300 pmol/day Aβ(1-40)/Aβ(1-42) or Aβ(40-1) (inactive peptide, control). The effect of nicotine (2 mg/(kg day)) on Aβ-induced spatial learning and memory impairments was assessed by evaluation of performance in the radial arm water maze (RAWM), in vivo electrophysiological recordings of early-phase long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in urethane-anesthetized rats, and immunoblot analysis to determine changes in the levels of beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme (BACE), Aβ and memory-related proteins. The results indicate that 6 weeks of nicotine treatment reduced the levels of Aβ(1-40) and BACE1 peptides in hippocampal area CA1 and prevented Aβ-induced impairment of learning and short-term memory. Chronic nicotine also prevented the Aβ-induced inhibition of basal synaptic transmission and LTP in hippocampal area CA1. Furthermore, chronic nicotine treatment prevented the Aβ-induced reduction of α(7)- and α(4)-nAChR. These effects of nicotine may be due, at least in part, to upregulation of brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF).

  19. Verbal Fluency and Early Memory Decline: Results from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Kimberly Diggle; Koscik, Rebecca L.; LaRue, Asenath; Clark, Lindsay R.; Hermann, Bruce; Johnson, Sterling C.; Sager, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between phonemic and semantic (category) verbal fluency and cognitive status in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer’s Prevention (WRAP), a longitudinal cohort enriched for family history of Alzheimer’s disease. Participants were 283 WRAP subjects (age 53.1[6.5] years at baseline); who had completed three waves of assessment, over ∼6 years and met psychometric criteria either for “cognitively healthy” (CH) or for psychometric amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using an approach that did not consider fluency scores. CH and aMCI groups differed significantly on phonemic total scores, category total scores, phonemic switching, and category mean cluster size. These results suggest that measures of both phonemic and semantic fluency yield lower scores in persons with evidence of psychometric aMCI compared with those who are CH. Differences have not previously been reported in a group this young, and provide evidence for the importance of including multiple verbal fluency tests targeting preclinical Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26025231

  20. Verbal Fluency and Early Memory Decline: Results from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kimberly Diggle; Koscik, Rebecca L; LaRue, Asenath; Clark, Lindsay R; Hermann, Bruce; Johnson, Sterling C; Sager, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the relationship between phonemic and semantic (category) verbal fluency and cognitive status in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (WRAP), a longitudinal cohort enriched for family history of Alzheimer's disease. Participants were 283 WRAP subjects (age 53.1[6.5] years at baseline); who had completed three waves of assessment, over ∼6 years and met psychometric criteria either for "cognitively healthy" (CH) or for psychometric amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using an approach that did not consider fluency scores. CH and aMCI groups differed significantly on phonemic total scores, category total scores, phonemic switching, and category mean cluster size. These results suggest that measures of both phonemic and semantic fluency yield lower scores in persons with evidence of psychometric aMCI compared with those who are CH. Differences have not previously been reported in a group this young, and provide evidence for the importance of including multiple verbal fluency tests targeting preclinical Alzheimer's disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Prazosin, an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, prevents memory deterioration in the APP23 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Katsouri, Loukia; Vizcaychipi, Marcela P; McArthur, Simon; Harrison, Ian; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Lleo, Alberto; Lloyd, Dafydd G; Ma, Daqing; Sastre, Magdalena

    2013-04-01

    Noradrenergic deficits have been described in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of Alzheimer's disease brains, which are secondary to locus coeruleus degeneration. Locus coeruleus is the brain stem nucleus responsible for synthesis of noradrenaline and from where all noradrenergic neurons project. In addition, it has been suggested that noradrenaline might play a role in modulating inflammatory responses in Alzheimer's disease. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of various agonists and antagonists for adrenergic receptors on amyloid precursor protein processing. Among them, we found that prazosin, an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, was able to reduce the generation of amyloid β in N2a cells. Treatment of transgenic APP23 mice with prazosin prevented memory deficits over time. Although prazosin did not influence amyloid plaque load, it induced astrocytic proliferation and increased the release of apolipoprotein E and anti-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that chronic treatment with prazosin leads to an anti-inflammatory response with potential beneficial effects on cognitive performance.

  2. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  3. Scopolamine disrupts hippocampal activity during allocentric spatial memory in humans: an fMRI study using a virtual reality analogue of the Morris Water Maze.

    PubMed

    Antonova, Elena; Parslow, David; Brammer, Michael; Simmons, Andrew; Williams, Steven; Dawson, Gerard R; Morris, Robin

    2011-09-01

    The role of the septohippocampal cholinergic system in memory disorders is well established. The effects of cholinergic challenge in animals have been extensively studied using the Morris Water Maze (MWM) which engages allocentric spatial memory. The present study investigated the effect of the centrally active muscarinic antagonist scopolamine on allocentric spatial memory in humans using a virtual reality analogue of the MWM task, the Arena task. Twenty right-handed healthy male adults with a mean age of 28 years (range 23-35 years) were studied using functional MRI in a randomized double-blind cross-over design with scopolamine bromide (0.4 mg i.m.) or placebo (saline) administered 70-90 min before the beginning of the functional scan. Scopolamine induced a significant reduction in the activation of the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus compared with placebo. Furthermore, there was dissociation between hippocampus-based and striatal-based memory systems, which were significantly more activated in the placebo and scopolamine conditions, respectively. The activation of the striatal system under scopolamine challenge was accompanied by the activation of the amygdala. In conclusion, the study extends the well-documented finding in animals of the attenuating effect of scopolamine on hippocampal activity during allocentric spatial memory to humans. Furthermore, the results call for further investigation of the dissociation between the hippocampal and neostriatal memory systems during allocentric spatial processing under cholinergic blockade in humans.

  4. Intact learning and memory in rats following treatment with the dual orexin receptor antagonist almorexant

    PubMed Central

    Jenck, François

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Orexins play a key role in the maintenance of alertness and are implicated in the modulation of diverse physiological processes, including cognitive function. Almorexant, a dual orexin receptor antagonist, transiently and reversibly blocks the action of orexin peptides at both OX1 and OX2 receptors and increases time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM sleep. Objectives We explored the direct effects on learning and memory of single and repeated administration of almorexant in rats. Methods Following administration of high doses of almorexant (300 mg/kg, p.o.), scopolamine (0.8 mg/kg, i.p.), combination almorexant-scopolamine, or vehicle alone, rats were trained on a Morris water maze spatial navigation task, or on a passive avoidance task. Results Rats treated with almorexant learned the spatial navigation task with similar efficacy as vehicle-treated animals. After 4 days, almorexant—but not vehicle-treated rats had established spatial memory; after 8 days, spatial memory had been established in both vehicle—and almorexant-treated rats. Scopolamine-treated rats failed to learn the spatial task. Both vehicle—and almorexant—but not scopolamine-treated rats demonstrated passive avoidance learning. Almorexant did not ameliorate scopolamine-induced impairment of learning in either task. Conclusions Rats treated with almorexant are fully capable of spatial and avoidance learning. PMID:20631993

  5. Enriched environment prevents hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration: role of BDNF/PI3K/GSK3β pathway coupled with CREB activation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal; Baitharu, Iswar; Prasad, Dipti; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2013-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions such as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) cause memory impairment by affecting cellular machinery leading to neurodegeneration. Providing enriched environment (EE) is found to be beneficial for curing several neurodegenerative disorders. The protective role of EE in preventing HH induced neuronal death has been reported previously but the involved mechanism is still not clearly understood. The present study is an attempt to verify the impact of EE on spatial memory during HH and also to explore the possible role of neurotrophin in EE mediated neuroprotection. Signaling mechanism involved in neuroprotection was also explored. Male Sprague Dawley rats were simulated to HH condition in an Animal Decompression Chamber at an altitude of 25000 feet in standard and enriched cages for 7 days. Spatial memory was assessed through Morris Water Maze. Role of different neurotrophins was explored by gene silencing and inhibitors for their respective receptors. Further, using different blockers signaling pathway was also explored. Finding of the present study suggested that EE prevents HH mediated memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Also brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a major role in EE mediated neuroprotection and it effectively prevented neurodegeneration by activating PI3K/AKT pathway resulting in GSK3β inactivation which further inhibits apoptosis. Moreover GSK3β phosphorylation and hence its inactivation upregulates CREB phosphorylation which may also accounts for activation of survival machinery in cells and provides neuroprotection. From these observations it can be postulated that EE has a therapeutic potential in amelioration of HH induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Hence it may be used as a non invasive and non pharmacological intervention against various neurological disorders.

  6. Multifunctional liposomes delay phenotype progression and prevent memory impairment in a presymptomatic stage mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Simona; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Tolomeo, Daniele; Forloni, Gianluigi; Masserini, Massimo; Re, Francesca

    2017-07-28

    The failure of clinical trials largely focused on mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease has suggested to the scientific community that the effectiveness of Amyloid-β (Aβ)-centered treatments should be evaluated starting as early as possible, well before irreversible brain damage has occurred. Accordingly, also the preclinical development of new therapies should be carried out taking into account this suggestion. In the present investigation we evaluated the efficacy of a treatment with liposomes multifunctionalized for crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting Aβ, carried out on young APP/PS1 Tg mice, taken as a model of pre-symptomatic disease stage. Liposomes were administered once a week to Tg mice for 7months, starting at the age of 5months and up to the age of 12 when they display AD-like cognitive and brain biochemical/anatomical features. The treatment prevented the onset of the long-term memory impairment and slowed down the deposition of brain Aβ; at anatomical level, prevented both ventricle enlargement and entorhinal cortex thickness reduction, otherwise occurring in untreated mice. Strikingly, these effects were maintained 3months after treatment discontinuation. An increase of Aβ levels in the liver was detected at the end of the treatment, then followed also by reduction of brain Amyloid Precursor Protein and increase of Aβ-degrading enzymes. These results suggest that the treatment promotes brain Aβ clearance by a peripheral 'sink' effect and ultimately affects Aβ turnover in the brain. Worth of note, the treatment was apparently not toxic for all the organs analyzed, in particular for brain, as suggested by the lower brain TNF-α and MDA levels, and by higher level of SOD activity in treated mice. Together, these findings promote a very early treatment with multi-functional liposomes as a well-tolerated nanomedicine-based approach, potentially suitable for a disease-modifying therapy of AD, able to delay or prevent relevant

  7. Caffeine consumption prevents memory impairment, neuronal damage, and adenosine A2A receptors upregulation in the hippocampus of a rat model of sporadic dementia.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Janaína; Rocha, Andreia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Schein, Vanessa; Kazlauckas, Vanessa; Kalinine, Eduardo; Souza, Diogo O; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) streptozotocin (STZ) administration induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thus considered an experimental model of sporadic AD. Since caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors modify the course of memory impairment in different amyloid-β-based experimental models of AD, we now tested the impact of caffeine on STZ-induced dementia and associated neurodegeneration in the hippocampus as well as on the expression and density of adenosine receptors. Adult male rats received a bilateral infusion of saline or STZ (3 mg/kg, icv), which triggered memory deficits after four weeks, as gauged by impaired object recognition memory. This was accompanied by a reduced NeuN immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region and an increased expression and density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), but not A1R, in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption (1 g/L in the drinking water starting 2 weeks before the STZ challenge) prevented the STZ-induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration as well as the upregulation of A2AR. These findings provide the first demonstration that caffeine prevents sporadic dementia and implicate the control of central A2AR as its likely mechanism of action.

  8. Treadmill running prevents age-related memory deficit and alters neurotrophic factors and oxidative damage in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Vanzella, Cláudia; Neves, Juliana Dalibor; Vizuete, Adriana Fernanda; Aristimunha, Dirceu; Kolling, Janaína; Longoni, Aline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; Wyse, Angela T S; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-09-15

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies indicate that exercise is beneficial to many aspects of brain function especially during aging. The present study investigated the effects of a treadmill running protocol in young (3month-old) and aged (22month-old) male Wistar rats, on: I) cognitive function, as assessed by spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) oxidative stress parameters and the expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, IGF-1 and VEGF in the hippocampus. Animals of both ages were assigned to sedentary (non-exercised) and exercised (20min of daily running sessions, 3 times per week for 4weeks) groups. Cognition was assessed by a reference memory task run in the Morris water maze; twenty four hours after last session of behavioral testing hippocampi were collected for biochemical analysis. Results demonstrate that the moderate treadmill running exercise: I) prevented age-related deficits in reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) prevented the age-related increase of reactive oxygen species levels and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus; III) caused an increase of BDNF, NT-3 and IGF-1 expression in the hippocampus of aged rats. Taken together, results suggest that both exercise molecular effects, namely the reduction of oxidative stress and the increase of neurotrophic factors expression in the hippocampus, might be related to its positive effect on memory performance in aged rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) extract prevents and improves D-galactose and NaNO2 induced memory impairment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dashti-r, M.H.; Zeinali, F.; Anvari, M.; Hosseini, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of saffron extract on preventing D-galactose and NaNO2 induced memory impairment and improving learning and memory deficits in amnestic mice. In this study, the learning and memory functions in ovariectomized mice were examined by the one way passive and active avoidance tests. In active avoidance test, training in amnestic treated (AT) and amnestic prophylaxis (AP) groups, was improved so that there was a significant difference between them and the amnestic control (AC) group. In passive avoidance test, animal's step through latency, as an index for learning, in all test groups was significantly greater than control group. Total time spent in dark room (DS), which opposes the memory retention ability, in AC was significantly greater than AT group at 1 and 2 hours after full training, while there was not any significant difference between this index in AP and AT as compared with normal control (NC) group. Our findings indicate that saffron hydro-alcoholic extract prevents and improves amnesia induced by D-galactose and NaNO2 in mice. PMID:27418908

  10. Acute treatment with bis selenide, an organic compound containing the trace element selenium, prevents memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Cristiani Folharini; Guerra Souza, Ana Cristina; Wilhelm, Ethel Antunes; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account the promising pharmacological actions of (Z)-2,3-bis(4-chlorophenylselanyl) prop-2-en-1-ol) (bis selenide), an organic compound containing the trace element selenium, and the constant search for drugs that improve the cognitive performance, the objective of the present study was to investigate whether bis selenide treatment ameliorates memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats. For this aim, male adult rats received a single subcutaneous injection of reserpine (1 mg/kg), a biogenic amine-depleting agent used to induce memory deficit. After 24 h, bis selenide at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg was administered to rats by intragastric route, and 1 h later, the animals were submitted to behavior tasks. The effects of acute administration of bis selenide on memory were evaluated by social recognition, step-down passive avoidance, and object recognition paradigms. Exploratory and locomotor activities of rats were determined using the open-field test. Analysis of data revealed that the social memory disruption caused by reserpine was reversed by bis selenide at both doses. In addition, bis selenide, at the highest dose, prevented the memory deficit resulting from reserpine administration to rats in step-down passive avoidance and object recognition tasks. No significant alterations in locomotor and exploratory behaviors were found in animals treated with reserpine and/or bis selenide. Results obtained from distinct memory behavioral paradigms revealed that an acute treatment with bis selenide attenuated memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats.

  11. Administration of the TrkB receptor agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone prevents traumatic stress-induced spatial memory deficits and changes in synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sanz-García, Ancor; Knafo, Shira; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Esteban, José A; Venero, César; Armario, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs after exposure to traumatic situations and it is characterized by cognitive deficits that include impaired explicit memory. The neurobiological bases of such PTSD-associated memory alterations are yet to be elucidated and no satisfactory treatment for them exists. To address this issue, we first studied whether a single exposure of young adult rats (60 days) to immobilization on boards (IMO), a putative model of PTSD, produces long-term behavioral effects (2-8 days) similar to those found in PTSD patients. Subsequently, we investigated whether the administration of the TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (DHF) 8 h after stress (therapeutic window) ameliorated the PTSD-like effect of IMO and the associated changes in synaptic plasticity. A single IMO exposure induced a spatial memory impairment similar to that found in other animal models of PTSD or in PTSD patients. IMO also increased spine density and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA3-CA1 pathway. Significantly, DHF reverted both spatial memory impairment and the increase in LTP, while it produced no effect in the controls. These data provide novel insights into the possible neurobiological substrate for explicit memory impairment in PTSD patients, supporting the idea that the activation of the BDNF/TrkB pathway fulfils a protective role after severe stress. Administration of DHF in the aftermath of a traumatic experience might be relevant to prevent its long-term consequences. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Preventive effects of Salvia officinalis L. against learning and memory deficit induced by diabetes in rats: Possible hypoglycaemic and antioxidant mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Felehgari, Zhila; Emamjomeh, Abbasali

    2016-05-27

    Learning and memory impairment occurs in diabetes. Salvia officinalis L. (SO) has been used in Iranian traditional medicine as a remedy against diabetes. We hypothesized that chronic administration of SO (400, 600 and 800mg/kg, p.o.) and its principal constituent, rosmarinic acid, would affect on passive avoidance learning (PAL) and memory in streptozocin-induced diabetic and non-diabetic rats. We also explored hypoglycemic and antioxidant activities of SO as the possible mechanisms. Treatments were begun at the onset of hyperglycemia. PAL was assessed 30days later. Retention test was done 24h after training. At the end, animals were weighed and blood samples were drawn for further analyzing of glucose and oxidant/antioxidant markers. Diabetes induced deficits in acquisition and retrieval processes. SO (600 and 800mg/kg) and rosmarinic acid reversed learning and memory deficits induced by diabetes and improved cognition of healthy rats. While the dose of 400mg/kg had no effect, the higher doses and rosmarinic acid inhibited hyperglycemia and lipid peroxidation as well as enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. SO prevented diabetes-induced acquisition and memory deficits through inhibiting hyperglycemia, lipid peroxidation as well as enhancing antioxidant defense systems. Therefore, SO and its principal constituent rosmarinic acid represent a potential therapeutic option against diabetic memory impairment which deserves consideration and further examination.

  13. Cannabinoids prevent the differential long-term effects of exposure to severe stress on hippocampal- and amygdala-dependent memory and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Noa; Segev, Amir; Abush, Hila; Mizrachi Zer-Aviv, Tomer; Akirav, Irit

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to excessive or uncontrolled stress is a major factor associated with various diseases including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The consequences of exposure to trauma are affected not only by aspects of the event itself, but also by the frequency and severity of trauma reminders. It was suggested that in PTSD, hippocampal-dependent memory is compromised while amygdala-dependent memory is strengthened. Several lines of evidence support the role of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system as a modulator of the stress response. In this study we aimed to examine cannabinoids modulation of the long-term effects (i.e., 1 month) of exposure to a traumatic event on memory and plasticity in the hippocampus and amygdala. Following exposure to the shock and reminders model of PTSD in an inhibitory avoidance light-dark apparatus rats demonstrated: (i) enhanced fear retrieval and impaired inhibitory extinction (Ext), (ii) no long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1, (iii) impaired hippocampal-dependent short-term memory in the object location task, (iv) enhanced LTP in the amygdala, and (v) enhanced amygdala-dependent conditioned taste aversion memory. The cannabinoid CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55-212,2 (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) and the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597 (0.3mg/kg, i.p.), administered 2 hr after shock exposure prevented these opposing effects on hippocampal- and amygdala-dependent processes. Moreover, the effects of WIN55-212,2 and URB597 on Ext and acoustic startle were prevented by co-administration of a low dose of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (0.5mg/kg, i.p.), suggesting that the preventing effects of both drugs are mediated by CB1 receptors. Exposure to shock and reminders increased CB1 receptor levels in the CA1 and basolateral amygdala 1 month after shock exposure and this increase was also prevented by administering WIN55-212,2 or URB597. Taken together, these findings suggest the involvement of the eCB system, and specifically CB1

  14. Spermidine Suppresses Age-Associated Memory Impairment by Preventing Adverse Increase of Presynaptic Active Zone Size and Release

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun K.; Pech, Ulrike; Fulterer, Andreas; Ender, Anatoli; Mauermann, Stephan F.; Andlauer, Till F. M.; Beuschel, Christine; Thriene, Kerstin; Quentin, Christine; Schwärzel, Martin; Mielke, Thorsten; Madeo, Frank; Dengjel, Joern; Fiala, André; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2016-01-01

    Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ), increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age. These age-induced AZ changes, however, were fully suppressed by spermidine feeding. A genetically enforced enlargement of AZ scaffolds (four gene-copies of BRP) impaired memory formation in young animals. Thus, in the Drosophila nervous system, aging AZs seem to steer towards the upper limit of their operational range, limiting synaptic plasticity and contributing to impairment of memory formation. Spermidine feeding suppresses age-dependent memory impairment by counteracting these age-dependent changes directly at the synapse. PMID:27684064

  15. Propranolol and the prevention of post-traumatic stress disorder: is it wrong to erase the "sting" of bad memories?

    PubMed

    Henry, Michael; Fishman, Jennifer R; Youngner, Stuart J

    2007-09-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health (Bethesda, MD) reports that approximately 5.2 million Americans experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) each year. PTSD can be severely debilitating and diminish quality of life for patients and those who care for them. Studies have indicated that propranolol, a beta-blocker, reduces consolidation of emotional memory. When administered immediately after a psychic trauma, it is efficacious as a prophylactic for PTSD. Use of such memory-altering drugs raises important ethical concerns, including some futuristic dystopias put forth by the President's Council on Bioethics. We think that adequate informed consent should facilitate ethical research using propranolol and, if it proves efficacious, routine treatment. Clinical evidence from studies should certainly continue to evaluate realistic concerns about possible ill effects of diminishing memory. If memory-attenuating drugs prove effective, we believe that the most immediate social concern is the over-medicalization of bad memories, and its subsequent exploitation by the pharmaceutical industry.

  16. Prevention

    Treesearch

    Kerry Britton; Barbara Illman; Gary Man

    2010-01-01

    Prevention is considered the most cost-effective element of the Forest Service Invasive Species Strategy (USDA Forest Service 2004). What makes prevention difficult is the desire to maximize free trade and the resulting benefits to society while, at the same time, protecting natural resources. The role of science is to first identify which commodities pose an...

  17. Chronic and acute adenosine A2A receptor blockade prevents long-term episodic memory disruption caused by acute cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Mouro, Francisco M; Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Lopes, Luísa V; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2017-05-01

    Cannabinoid-mediated memory impairment is a concern in cannabinoid-based therapies. Caffeine exacerbates cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R)-induced memory deficits through an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated mechanism. We now evaluated how chronic or acute blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) affects long-term episodic memory deficits induced by a single injection of a selective CB1R agonist. Long-term episodic memory was assessed by the novel object recognition (NOR) test. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (1 mg/kg) immediately after the NOR training, being tested for novelty recognition 24 h later. Anxiety levels were assessed by the Elevated Plus Maze test, immediately after the NOR. Mice were also tested for exploratory behaviour at the Open Field. For chronic A2AR blockade, KW-6002 (istradefylline) (3 mg/kg/day) was administered orally for 30 days; acute blockade of A2ARs was assessed by i.p. injection of SCH 58261 (1 mg/kg) administered either together with WIN 55,212-2 or only 30 min before the NOR test phase. The involvement of CB1Rs was assessed by using the CB1R antagonist, AM251 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). WIN 55,212-2 caused a disruption in NOR, an action absent in mice also receiving AM251, KW-6002 or SCH 58261 during the encoding/consolidation phase; SCH 58251 was ineffective if present during retrieval only. No effects were detected in the Elevated Plus maze or Open Field Test. The finding that CB1R-mediated memory disruption is prevented by antagonism of adenosine A2ARs, highlights a possibility to prevent cognitive side effects when therapeutic application of CB1R drugs is desired.

  18. Long-term ginsenoside consumption prevents memory loss in aged SAMP8 mice by decreasing oxidative stress and up-regulating the plasticity-related proteins in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haifeng; Li, Qiong; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Pei, Xinrong; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2009-02-23

    Ginsenoside, the effective component of ginseng, has been reported to have a neuron protective effect, but the preventive effect on Alzheimer's disease (AD) related memory loss and the underlying mechanisms have not been well determined. The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is a useful model of AD-related memory impairment. In the present study, SAMP8 mice aged 4 months were chronically treated with ginsenoside (3 dose groups were given ginsenoside in drinking water for 7 months). The three groups were treated with ginsenoside 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg per day, respectively. Placebo-treated aged mice and young ones (4 months old) were used as controls. In addition, SAMR1 mice were used as "normal aging" control. The beneficial role of ginsenoside was manifested in the prevention of memory loss in aged SAMP8 mice. The optimal dose of ginsenoside is 100 or 200 mg/kg per day. In ginsenoside treated groups, the Abeta level markedly decreased in hippocampus and antioxidase level significantly increased in serum. In addition, the plasticity-related proteins in hippocampus significantly increased in the two ginsenoside treated groups. The plasticity-related proteins were checked in the present study including postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), phosphor-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 (p-NMDAR1), phospho-calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase II (p-CaMKII), phospho-protein kinase A Catalyticbeta subunit (p-PKA Cbeta) and protein kinase Cgamma subunit (PKCgamma), phospho-CREB (p-CREB) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) etc. These findings suggest that the increase of antioxidation and up-regulation of plasticity-related proteins in hippocampus may be one of the mechanisms of ginsenoside on the memory loss prevention in aged SAMP8 mice.

  19. Targeting the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B for treating or preventing age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deheng; Jacobs, Stephanie A; Tsien, Joe Z

    2014-10-01

    Age-related memory loss is believed to be a result of reduced synaptic plasticity, including changes in the NR2 subunit composition of the NMDA receptor. It is known that endogenous NR2B subunits decrease as the brain ages, whereas transgenic upregulation of NR2B enhances synaptic plasticity and learning and memory in several animal species. Accumulating evidence suggests that elevated brain magnesium levels, via dietary supplementation, can boost NR2B in the brain, consequently reversing memory deficits and enhancing cognitive abilities. This review highlights the convergent molecular mechanisms via the NR2B pathway as a useful strategy for treating age-related memory loss. A dietary approach, via oral intake of a novel compound, magnesium L-threonate (MgT), to boost NR2B expression in the brain is highlighted. Direct upregulation of the NR2B subunit expression can enhance synaptic plasticity and memory functions in a broad range of behavioral tasks in rodents. Other upregulation approaches, such as targeting the NR2B transporter or surface recycling pathway via cyclin-dependent kinase 5, are highly effective in improving memory functions. A dietary supplemental approach by optimally elevating the [Mg²⁺] in the brain is surprisingly effective in upregulating NR2B expression and improving memories in preclinical studies. MgT is currently under clinical trials.

  20. Single fluoxetine treatment before but not after stress prevents stress-induced hippocampal long-term depression and spatial memory retrieval impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Huili; Dai, Chunfang; Dong, Zhifang

    2015-07-28

    A growing body of evidence has shown that chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a widely prescribed medication for treatment of depression, can affect synaptic plasticity in the adult central nervous system. However, it is not well understood whether acute fluoxetine influences synaptic plasticity, especially on hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD), and if so, whether it subsequently impacts hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Here, we reported that LTD facilitated by elevated-platform stress in hippocampal slices was completely prevented by fluoxetine administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before stress. The LTD was not, however, significantly inhibited by fluoxetine administration immediately after stress. Similarly, fluoxetine incubation (10 μM) during electrophysiological recordings also displayed no influence on the stress-facilitated LTD. In addition, behavioral results showed that a single fluoxetine treatment 30 min before but not after acute stress fully reversed the impairment of spatial memory retrieval in the Morris water maze paradigm. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fluoxetine treatment only before, but not after stress, can prevent hippocampal CA1 LTD and spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by behavioral stress in adult animals.

  1. Acute low dose of MK-801 prevents memory deficits without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels in sepsis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Cassol-Jr, Omar J; Comim, Clarissa M; Constantino, Larissa S; Rosa, Daniela V F; Mango, Luiz Alexandre V; Stertz, Laura; Kapczinski, Flávio; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction with potential neurotoxic effects in the central nervous system and damage to memory and learning ability. We assessed the effects of acute low dose of MK-801 on the memory impairment, hippocampal BDNF levels and DARPP-32 expression ten days after sepsis. Under anesthesia, male Wistar rats underwent either cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) or sham. Then, the animals received either a single systemic injection of MK-801 (0.025 mg/kg) or saline solution. Ten days after CLP, the animals were submitted to the step-down inhibitory avoidance and object recognition tests. Also, the hippocampal BDNF protein levels and DARPP-32 expression were evaluated. MK-801 prevented cognitive impairment, but did not affect the hippocampal BDNF levels. DARPP-32 expression was significantly different only in the animals submitted to sepsis that received MK-801 treatment. Thus, we demonstrated that a single low dose of MK-801 prevented memory impairment without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels.

  2. Efficacy of Memoral Herbal on Prevention of Electroconvulsive Therapy-Induced Memory Impairment in Mood Disorder Patients (Isfahan – Iran 2011)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Mohsen, Ghasemi; Reza, Maracy M; Amrollah, Ebrahimi; Majid, Barekatain; Fariba, Noori

    2012-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most efficacious treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), it is also used as a rapid and efficacious treatment for other psychiatric disorders, especially treatment resistant ones. The cognitive impairment is one of the most important side effects of ECT. This study examined the Memoral herbal efficacy in prevention of ECT-induced memory impairment. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 70 patients with mood disorders who were candidates for ECT enrolled in either Memoral or Control group, and received either Memoral or placebo. The memory was assessed by Addenbrook Cognitive Examination (ACE), and the findings were analyzed by ANOVA under SPSS18. Results: The Memoral group patients showed significantly higher total ACE scores than placebo group (P < 0.001). The scores of attention and orientation, verbal fluency and memory subscales not only never decreased during the study in Memoral group, but also increased. There was no significant difference between these scores of Memoral and placebo groups for the subscales of language and visuospacial ability. Conclusion: The Memoral herbal is an efficacious and safe choice in prevention of ECT- induced cognitive impairment. PMID:22891152

  3. Prevention of progression to dementia in the elderly: rationale and proposal for a health-promoting memory consultation (an IANA Task Force).

    PubMed

    Gillette Guyonnet, S; Abellan Van Kan, G; Andrieu, S; Aquino, J P; Arbus, C; Becq, J P; Berr, C; Bismuth, S; Chamontin, B; Dantoine, T; Dartigues, J F; Dubois, B; Fraysse, B; Hergueta, T; Hanaire, H; Jeandel, C; Lagleyre, S; Lala, F; Nourhashemi, F; Ousset, P J; Portet, F; Ritz, P; Robert, P; Rolland, Y; Sanz, C; Soto, M; Touchon, J; Vellas, B

    2008-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequent form of dementia and according to the most recent estimation it affects nearly 27 million people in the world. The onset of the disease is generally insidious. It is becoming increasingly evident that the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are active long before the appearance of the clinical symptoms of the disease. In the current context, it is important to develop strategies to delay the onset of cognitive decline. Delaying the onset by 5 years would reduce the prevalence by half at term, and a delay of 10 years would reduce it by three-quarters. The effectiveness of currently suggested preventive approaches remains to be confirmed, but certain strategies could be applied straight away to at-risk subjects. We propose that a health-promoting memory consultation should be set up for elderly persons who have attended a specialized memory consultation and in whom the diagnosis of dementia and of AD in particular, has not been established by standardized tools. Through this consultation, they would be offered full multidimensional investigation of all aspects of their health status, follow-up could be organized, general practitioners in private practice could be made more conscious of this population and the elderly could be made more aware of the risk factors to which they are exposed. The development of an information policy for the elderly would meet a present need. In our reflection, we must take into account the question of how to give this preventive consultation its due place in the healthcare pathway of the elderly person in order to ensure coordinated follow-up with all the other health professionals involved. The principle of the health-promoting memory consultation is undergoing validation in a large French multicentre preventive trial in 1200 frail elderly persons aged 70 years followed for three years, the Multidomain Alzheimer Preventive Trial (MAPT).

  4. Using cholinergic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulators to improve memory via enhancement of brain cholinergic communication.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Caroline; Jatzke, Claudia; Wegener, Nico; Gravius, Andreas; Danysz, Wojciech

    2012-12-15

    Benzylquinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is a recently described cholinergic muscarinic M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator having potential as cognitive enhancer in dementia. The present study focused on the characterisation of BQCA's mode of action in relation to positive effects on memory and side-effects in an animal model. To get insight into this mode of action, in vitro receptor potency/left shift experiments in cells stably expressing the rat's M(1) receptor were performed. They revealed an inflection point value of BQCA corresponding to 306nM, and potentiation of the agonist response up to 47-fold in presence of 10μM of BQCA. In vivo, brain microdialysis showed a maximal brain level of 270nM, 40min after i.p. administration at 10mg/kg. Based on in vitro data obtained with this dose, it can be concluded that BQCA reaches brain levels which should potentiate the agonist response about 4-fold. Behavioural data confirmed that BQCA used at 10mg/kg attenuated scopolamine-induced memory deficit in a spontaneous alternation task. Moreover, BQCA showed no side effect at 10mg/kg and above in spontaneous locomotion and salivation tests. The profile of BQCA observed in the present study displays a clear advantage over the M(1)-M(3) agonist cevimeline. The present data show the therapeutic potential of the M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator BQCA for the treatment of memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Behavioral effects of deep brain stimulation of different areas of the Papez circuit on memory- and anxiety-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hescham, Sarah; Jahanshahi, Ali; Meriaux, Céline; Lim, Lee Wei; Blokland, Arjan; Temel, Yasin

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has gained interest as a potential therapy for advanced treatment-resistant dementia. However, possible targets for DBS and the optimal stimulation parameters are not yet clear. Here, we compared the effects of DBS of the CA1 sub-region of the hippocampus, mammillothalamic tract, anterior thalamic nucleus, and entorhinal cortex in an experimental rat model of dementia. Rats with scopolamine-induced amnesia were assessed in the object location task with different DBS parameters. Moreover, anxiety-related side effects were evaluated in the elevated zero maze and open field. After sacrifice, we applied c-Fos immunohistochemistry to assess which memory-related regions were affected by DBS. When comparing all structures, DBS of the entorhinal cortex and CA1 sub-region was able to restore memory loss when a specific set of stimulation parameters was used. No anxiety-related side effects were found following DBS. The beneficial behavioral performance of CA1 DBS rats was accompanied with an activation of cells in the anterior cingulate gyrus. Therefore, we conclude that acute CA1 DBS restores memory loss possibly through improved attentional and cognitive processes in the limbic cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preventing academic difficulties in preterm children: a randomised controlled trial of an adaptive working memory training intervention – IMPRINT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Very preterm children exhibit difficulties in working memory, a key cognitive ability vital to learning information and the development of academic skills. Previous research suggests that an adaptive working memory training intervention (Cogmed) may improve working memory and other cognitive and behavioural domains, although further randomised controlled trials employing long-term outcomes are needed, and with populations at risk for working memory deficits, such as children born preterm. In a cohort of extremely preterm (<28 weeks’ gestation)/extremely low birthweight (<1000 g) 7-year-olds, we will assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving academic functioning 2 years’ post-intervention. Secondary objectives are to assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving working memory and attention 2 weeks’, 12 months’ and 24 months’ post-intervention, and to investigate training related neuroplasticity in working memory neural networks 2 weeks’ post-intervention. Methods/Design This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 126 extremely preterm/extremely low birthweight 7-year-old children. Children attending mainstream school without major intellectual, sensory or physical impairments will be eligible. Participating children will undergo an extensive baseline cognitive assessment before being randomised to either an adaptive or placebo (non-adaptive) version of Cogmed. Cogmed is a computerised working memory training program consisting of 25 sessions completed over a 5 to 7 week period. Each training session takes approximately 35 minutes and will be completed in the child’s home. Structural, diffusion and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which is optional for participants, will be completed prior to and 2 weeks following the training period. Follow-up assessments focusing on academic skills (primary outcome), working memory and attention (secondary outcomes) will be conducted at 2 weeks’, 12

  7. Preventing academic difficulties in preterm children: a randomised controlled trial of an adaptive working memory training intervention - IMPRINT study.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Leona; Roberts, Gehan; Doyle, Lex W; Lee, Katherine J; Thompson, Deanne K; Seal, Marc L; Josev, Elisha K; Nosarti, Chiara; Gathercole, Susan; Anderson, Peter J

    2013-09-16

    Very preterm children exhibit difficulties in working memory, a key cognitive ability vital to learning information and the development of academic skills. Previous research suggests that an adaptive working memory training intervention (Cogmed) may improve working memory and other cognitive and behavioural domains, although further randomised controlled trials employing long-term outcomes are needed, and with populations at risk for working memory deficits, such as children born preterm.In a cohort of extremely preterm (<28 weeks' gestation)/extremely low birthweight (<1000 g) 7-year-olds, we will assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving academic functioning 2 years' post-intervention. Secondary objectives are to assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving working memory and attention 2 weeks', 12 months' and 24 months' post-intervention, and to investigate training related neuroplasticity in working memory neural networks 2 weeks' post-intervention. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 126 extremely preterm/extremely low birthweight 7-year-old children. Children attending mainstream school without major intellectual, sensory or physical impairments will be eligible. Participating children will undergo an extensive baseline cognitive assessment before being randomised to either an adaptive or placebo (non-adaptive) version of Cogmed. Cogmed is a computerised working memory training program consisting of 25 sessions completed over a 5 to 7 week period. Each training session takes approximately 35 minutes and will be completed in the child's home. Structural, diffusion and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which is optional for participants, will be completed prior to and 2 weeks following the training period. Follow-up assessments focusing on academic skills (primary outcome), working memory and attention (secondary outcomes) will be conducted at 2 weeks', 12 months' and 24 months' post-intervention. To

  8. Gugulipid, an extract of Commiphora whighitii with lipid-lowering properties, has protective effects against streptozotocin-induced memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Gunjan; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Pal, Raghvendra; Singh, Stayawan; Pratap, Ram; Nath, Chandishwar

    2007-04-01

    Gugulipid, an ethyl acetate extract of the resin of plant Commiphora whighitii is an established hypolipidemic agent in clinical practice. The major constituent of gugulipid is guggulsterone [4, 17 (20)-pregnadiene-3, 16-dione]. It has been observed recently that patients receiving lipid-lowering drugs like statins have a reduced risk of dementia. Therefore, the present study was planned to explore the potential of gugulipid as cognitive enhancer. Gugulipid (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) showed dose dependent improvement in scopolamine-induced deficits in passive avoidance test. The maximal effective dose of gugulipid i.e. 50 mg/kg, p.o. was used for further studies on streptozotocin (STZ) model of dementia in mice. Gugulipid was investigated for its effect on learning and memory, parameters of oxidative stress (GSH and MDA) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the STZ (ic)-treated mice. Intracerebral (ic) injections of STZ (0.5 mg/kg) on 1st and 3rd day caused significant deficit in memory in passive avoidance and Morris water maze test after the 14th day of first dose. In passive avoidance, transfer latency time (TLT) was not increased on retention trials in STZ (ic) group while gugulipid treatment resulted in significant increase in TLT on retention trials in STZ (ic)-treated mice. In Morris water maze test the latency time to reach platform in STZ (ic)-treated mice was significantly higher than control and vehicle (artificial CSF). Pre-treatment of gugulipid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) daily for 14 days started with the first dose of STZ (ic), significantly prevented STZ (ic)-induced memory deficit. Post-treatment i.e. after 14 days of first dose of STZ (ic) of gugulipid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly decreased the latency time indicating anti-dementia activity. Effect of gugulipid and STZ in visible platform test was similar to those seen with hidden platform. Gugulipid and STZ-treated mice did not cause significant change in locomotor activity. Furthermore, STZ

  9. Resveratrol Prevents Age-Related Memory and Mood Dysfunction with Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Microvasculature, and Reduced Glial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol. PMID:25627672

  10. Chronic caffeine prevents changes in inhibitory avoidance memory and hippocampal BDNF immunocontent in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sallaberry, Cássia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Ardais, Ana Paula; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Klaudat, Bruno; Forte, Thomás; Souza, Diogo O; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Beneficial effects of caffeine on memory processes have been observed in animal models relevant to neurodegenerative diseases and aging, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with memory formation and BDNF's actions are modulated by adenosine receptors, the molecular targets for the psychostimulant actions of caffeine, we here compare the effects of chronic caffeine (1 mg/mL drinking solution for 30 days) on short- and long term memory and on levels of hippocampal proBDNF, mature BDNF, TrkB and CREB in young (3 month old) and middle-aged (12 month old) rats. Caffeine treatment substantially reduced i) age-related impairments in the two types of memory in an inhibitory avoidance paradigm, and ii) parallel increases in hippocampal BDNF levels. In addition, chronic caffeine increased proBDNF and CREB concentrations, and decreased TrkB levels, in hippocampus regardless of age. These data provide new evidence in favor of the hypothesis that modifications in BDNF and related proteins in the hippocampus contribute to the pro-cognitive effects of caffeine on age-associated losses in memory encoding. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  11. Resveratrol prevents age-related memory and mood dysfunction with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and microvasculature, and reduced glial activation.

    PubMed

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2015-01-28

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for easing these age-related changes. Hence, we examined the efficacy of resveratrol for counteracting age-related memory and mood impairments and the associated detrimental changes in the hippocampus. Two groups of male F344 rats in late middle-age having similar learning and memory abilities were chosen and treated with resveratrol or vehicle for four weeks. Analyses at ~25 months of age uncovered improved learning, memory and mood function in resveratrol-treated animals but impairments in vehicle-treated animals. Resveratrol-treated animals also displayed increased net neurogenesis and microvasculature, and diminished astrocyte hypertrophy and microglial activation in the hippocampus. These results provide novel evidence that resveratrol treatment in late middle age is efficacious for improving memory and mood function in old age. Modulation of the hippocampus plasticity and suppression of chronic low-level inflammation appear to underlie the functional benefits mediated by resveratrol.

  12. The selective positive allosteric M1 muscarinic receptor modulator PQCA attenuates learning and memory deficits in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Puri, Vanita; Wang, Xiaohai; Vardigan, Joshua D; Kuduk, Scott D; Uslaner, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the M1 muscarinic receptor positive allosteric modulator, PQCA, improves cognitive performance in rodents and non-human primates administered the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine. The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize the effects of PQCA in a model more relevant to the disease pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Tg2576 transgenic mice that have elevated Aβ were tested in the novel object recognition task to characterize recognition memory as a function of age and treatment with the PQCA. The effects of PQCA were compared to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, the standard of care for Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the effect of co-administering PQCA and donepezil was evaluated. Aged Tg2576 mice demonstrated a deficit in recognition memory that was significantly attenuated by PQCA. The positive control donepezil also reversed the deficit. Furthermore, doses of PQCA and donepezil that were inactive on their own were found to improve recognition memory when given together. These studies suggest that M1 muscarinic receptor positive allosteric modulation can ameliorate memory deficits in disease relevant models of Alzheimer's disease. These data, combined with our previous findings demonstrating PQCA improves scopolamine-induced cognitive deficits in both rodents and non-human primates, suggest that M1 positive allosteric modulators have therapeutic potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Exercise is more effective than diet control in preventing high fat diet-induced β-amyloid deposition and memory deficit in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maesako, Masato; Uemura, Kengo; Kubota, Masakazu; Kuzuya, Akira; Sasaki, Kazuki; Hayashida, Naoko; Asada-Utsugi, Megumi; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Uemura, Maiko; Kihara, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Shimohama, Shun; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2012-06-29

    Accumulating evidence suggests that some dietary patterns, specifically high fat diet (HFD), increase the risk of developing sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Thus, interventions targeting HFD-induced metabolic dysfunctions may be effective in preventing the development of AD. We previously demonstrated that amyloid precursor protein (APP)-overexpressing transgenic mice fed HFD showed worsening of cognitive function when compared with control APP mice on normal diet. Moreover, we reported that voluntary exercise ameliorates HFD-induced memory impairment and β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition. In the present study, we conducted diet control to ameliorate the metabolic abnormality caused by HFD on APP transgenic mice and compared the effect of diet control on cognitive function with that of voluntary exercise as well as that of combined (diet control plus exercise) treatment. Surprisingly, we found that exercise was more effective than diet control, although both exercise and diet control ameliorated HFD-induced memory deficit and Aβ deposition. The production of Aβ was not different between the exercise- and the diet control-treated mice. On the other hand, exercise specifically strengthened the activity of neprilysin, the Aβ-degrading enzyme, the level of which was significantly correlated with that of deposited Aβ in our mice. Notably, the effect of the combination treatment (exercise and diet control) on memory and amyloid pathology was not significantly different from that of exercise alone. These studies provide solid evidence that exercise is a useful intervention to rescue HFD-induced aggravation of cognitive decline in transgenic model mice of AD.

  14. Cocaine causes memory and learning impairments in rats: involvement of nuclear factor kappa B and oxidative stress, and prevention by topiramate.

    PubMed

    Muriach, María; López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Barcia, Jorge M; Sanchez-Villarejo, María V; Almansa, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco J

    2010-08-01

    Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine toxicity including an increase in oxidative stress but the association between oxidative status in the brain and cocaine induced-behaviour is poorly understood. Nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) is a sensor of oxidative stress and participates in memory formation that could be involved in drug toxicity and addiction mechanisms. Therefore NFkappaB activity, oxidative stress, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity, spatial learning and memory as well as the effect of topiramate, a previously proposed therapy for cocaine addiction, were evaluated in an experimental model of cocaine administration in rats. NFkappaB activity was decreased in the frontal cortex of cocaine treated rats, as well as GSH concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the hippocampus, whereas nNOS activity in the hippocampus was increased. Memory retrieval of experiences acquired prior to cocaine administration was impaired and negatively correlated with NFkappaB activity in the frontal cortex. In contrast, learning of new tasks was enhanced and correlated with the increase of nNOS activity and the decrease of glutathione peroxidase. These results provide evidence for a possible mechanistic role of oxidative and nitrosative stress and NFkappaB in the alterations induced by cocaine. Topiramate prevented all the alterations observed, showing novel neuroprotective properties.

  15. Single dose of l-dopa makes extinction memories context-independent and prevents the return of fear

    PubMed Central

    Haaker, Jan; Gaburro, Stefano; Sah, Anupam; Gartmann, Nina; Lonsdorf, Tina B.; Meier, Kolja; Singewald, Nicolas; Pape, Hans-Christian; Morellini, Fabio; Kalisch, Raffael

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic events can engender persistent excessive fear responses to trauma reminders that may return even after successful treatment. Extinction, the laboratory analog of behavior therapy, does not erase conditioned fear memories but generates competing, fear-inhibitory “extinction memories” that, however, are tied to the context in which extinction occurred. Accordingly, a dominance of fear over extinction memory expression—and, thus, return of fear—is often observed if extinguished fear stimuli are encountered outside the extinction (therapy) context. We show that postextinction administration of the dopamine precursor l-dopa makes extinction memories context-independent, thus strongly reducing the return of fear in both mice and humans. Reduced fear is accompanied by decreased amygdala and enhanced ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation in both species. In humans, ventromedial prefrontal cortex activity is predicted by enhanced resting-state functional coupling of the area with the dopaminergic midbrain during the postextinction consolidation phase. Our data suggest that dopamine-dependent boosting of extinction memory consolidation is a promising avenue to improving anxiety therapy. PMID:23754384

  16. Role of 5-HT6 receptors in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    2001-09-01

    Mice lacking the 5-HT(6) receptor presented neither gross anatomical or behavioral abnormalities nor obvious changes in microscopic brain morphology, and their performance in rotarod, open field and novel object testing paradigms revealed no differences compared with wild-type animals. Nevertheless, an association between the 5-HT(6) receptor polymorphism C267T and Alzheimer's disease has been reported. Interestingly, the 5-HT(6) antisense oligonucleotide decreased 5-HT(6) gene expression and enhanced spatial learning acquisition in the water maze. Similarly, injection of the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist Ro-04-6790 improved learning consolidation in an autoshaping task, while mCPP, scopolamine and dizocilpine decreased performance. The effect induced by scopolamine or dizocilpine, but not that induced by mCPP, was completely or partially reversed by Ro-04-6790. Ro-04-6790 did not modify the 8-OH-DPAT facilitatory effects on learning consolidation. Since Ro-04-6790 facilitatory effect was unaffected by 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A/2B/2C), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4) or 5-HT(7) receptor blockade, the facilitatory effect induced by Ro-04-6790 involved specifically 5-HT6 receptors. Similarly, the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-271046 improved retention in the water maze and produced a significant performance improvement in aged rats in an operant-delayed alternation task. A series of Ro-04-6790 analogues that penetrate the brain and specifically bind to 5-HT(6) receptors reversed scopolamine-induced retention deficit in a passive avoidance learning test. Collectively, these data provide further support to the notion that 5-HT systems, via 5-HT(6) receptors, also play a significant role in memory formation under normal and dysfunctional memory conditions.

  17. Examining reward-seeking, negative self-beliefs and over-general autobiographical memory as mechanisms of change in classroom prevention programs for adolescent depression

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Frances; Rawal, Adhip; Riglin, Lucy; Lewis, Gemma; Lewis, Glyn; Dunsmuir, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective methods to prevent adolescent depressive symptoms could reduce suffering and burden across the lifespan. However, psychological interventions delivered to adolescents show efficacy only in symptomatic or high-risk youth. Targeting causal risk factors and assessing mechanistic change can help devise efficacious universal or classroom based prevention programs. Methods A non-randomized longitudinal design was used to compare three classroom-based prevention programs for adolescent depression (Behavioral Activation with Reward Processing, “Thinking about Reward in Young People” (TRY); Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)), and determine cognitive mechanisms of change in these programs. Cognitive mechanisms examined were reward-seeking, negative self-beliefs (assessed with behavioral tasks) and over-general autobiographical memory. 256 healthy adolescents aged 13–14 participated with 236 (92%) and 227 (89%) completing the pre- and post-assessments. Results TRY was the only intervention associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up. Reward-seeking increased following TRY. In the other programs there were non-significant changes in cognitive mechanisms, with more reflective negative self-beliefs in CBT and fewer over-general autobiographical memories in MBCT In the TRY program, which focused on increasing sensitivity to rewarding activities, reward seeking increased and this was associated with decreased depressive symptoms. Limitations Due to the infeasibility of a cluster randomized controlled trial, a non-randomized design was used. Conclusions Increased reward-seeking was associated with decreased depressive symptoms and may be a mechanism of depressive symptom change in the intervention with a focus on enhancing sensitivity and awareness of reward. This study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that incorporating activities to enhance reward sensitivity may be fruitful in

  18. Examining reward-seeking, negative self-beliefs and over-general autobiographical memory as mechanisms of change in classroom prevention programs for adolescent depression.

    PubMed

    Rice, Frances; Rawal, Adhip; Riglin, Lucy; Lewis, Gemma; Lewis, Glyn; Dunsmuir, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Effective methods to prevent adolescent depressive symptoms could reduce suffering and burden across the lifespan. However, psychological interventions delivered to adolescents show efficacy only in symptomatic or high-risk youth. Targeting causal risk factors and assessing mechanistic change can help devise efficacious universal or classroom based prevention programs. A non-randomized longitudinal design was used to compare three classroom-based prevention programs for adolescent depression (Behavioral Activation with Reward Processing, "Thinking about Reward in Young People" (TRY); Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)), and determine cognitive mechanisms of change in these programs. Cognitive mechanisms examined were reward-seeking, negative self-beliefs (assessed with behavioral tasks) and over-general autobiographical memory. 256 healthy adolescents aged 13-14 participated with 236 (92%) and 227 (89%) completing the pre- and post-assessments. TRY was the only intervention associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up. Reward-seeking increased following TRY. In the other programs there were non-significant changes in cognitive mechanisms, with more reflective negative self-beliefs in CBT and fewer over-general autobiographical memories in MBCT In the TRY program, which focused on increasing sensitivity to rewarding activities, reward seeking increased and this was associated with decreased depressive symptoms. Due to the infeasibility of a cluster randomized controlled trial, a non-randomized design was used. Increased reward-seeking was associated with decreased depressive symptoms and may be a mechanism of depressive symptom change in the intervention with a focus on enhancing sensitivity and awareness of reward. This study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that incorporating activities to enhance reward sensitivity may be fruitful in randomized controlled trials of universal prevention

  19. Interleukin-10/Ceftriaxone prevents E. coli-induced delays in sensorimotor task learning and spatial memory in neonatal and adult Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, K.L.; Lopez, J.; Shaffery, J.P.; Wells, A.; Paul, I.A.; Bennett, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine infection during pregnancy is associated with early activation of the fetal immune system and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Immune activation can lead to alterations in sensorimotor skills, changes in learning and memory and neural plasticity. Both interleukin-10 (IL-10) and Ceftriaxone have been shown to decrease immune system activation and increase memory capacity, respectively. Using a rodent model of intrauterine infection, we examined sensorimotor development in pups, learning and memory, via the Morris water maze, and long-term potentiation in adult rats. Pregnant rats at gestational day 17 were inoculated with 1 × 105 colony forming units of Escherichia coli (E. coli) or saline. Animals in the treatment group received IL-10/Ceftriaxone for 3 days following E. coli administration. Intrauterine infection delayed surface righting, negative geotaxis, startle response and eye opening. Treatment with IL-10/Ceftriaxone reduced the delay in these tests. Intrauterine infection impaired performance in the probe trial in the Morris water maze (saline 25.13 ± 1.01; E. coli 20.75 ± 1.01; E. coli + IL-10/Ceftriaxone 20.2 ± 1.62) and reduced the induction of long-term potentiation (saline 141.5 ± 4.3; E. coli 128.7 ± 3.9; E. coli + IL-10/Ceftriaxone 140.0 ± 10). In summary, the results of this study indicate that E. coli induced intrauterine infection delays sensorimotor and learning and memory, while IL-10/Ceftriaxone rescues some of these behaviors. These delays were also accompanied by an increase in interleukin-1β levels, which indicates immune activation. IL-10/Ceftriaxone prevents these delays as well as decreases E. coli-induced interleukin-1β activation and may offer a window of time in which suitable treatment could be administered. PMID:19883741

  20. Sucrose and naltrexone prevent increased pain sensitivity and impaired long-term memory induced by repetitive neonatal noxious stimulation: Role of BDNF and β-endorphin.

    PubMed

    Nuseir, Khawla Q; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alhusban, Ahmed; Bawaane, Areej; Al-Azzani, Mohammed; Khabour, Omar F

    2017-10-01

    Pain in neonates is associated with short and long-term adverse outcomes. Data demonstrated that long-term consequences of untreated pain are linked to the plasticity of the neonate's brain. Sucrose is effective and safe for reducing painful procedures from single events. However, the mechanism of sucrose-induced analgesia is not fully understood. The role of the opioid system in this analgesia using the opioid receptor antagonist Naltrexone was investigated, plus the long-term effects on learning and memory formation during adulthood. Pain was induced in rat pups via needle pricks of the paws. Sucrose solution and/or naltrexone were administered before the pricks. All treatments started on day one of birth and continued for two weeks. At the end of 8weeks, behavioral studies were conducted to test spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze (RAWM), and pain threshold via foot-withdrawal response to a hot plate. The hippocampus was dissected; levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and endorphins were assessed using ELISA. Acute repetitive neonatal pain increased pain sensitivity later in life, while naltrexone with sucrose decreased pain sensitivity. Naltrexone and/or sucrose prevented neonatal pain induced impairment of long-term memory, while neonatal pain decreased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus; this decrease was averted by sucrose and naltrexone. Sucrose with naltrexone significantly increased β-endorphin levels in noxiously stimulated rats. In conclusion, naltrexone and sucrose can reverse increased pain sensitivity and impaired long-term memory induced by acute repetitive neonatal pain probably by normalizing BDNF expression and increasing β-endorphin levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Short-term green tea supplementation prevents recognition memory deficits and ameliorates hippocampal oxidative stress induced by different stroke models in rats.

    PubMed

    Altermann, Caroline Dalla Colletta; Souza, Mauren Assis; Schimidt, Helen L; Izaguirry, Aryele Pinto; Martins, Alexandre; Garcia, Alexandre; Santos, Francielli W; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2017-03-19

    This study investigated the effect of green tea (GT) on short and long term declarative memory and oxidative damage induced by transient ischemia-reperfusion (IR) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 8 groups of 10 according the stroke type induced: Sham IR, Sham IR+GT, IR, IR+GT, Sham ICH, Sham ICH+GT, ICH, ICH+GT. Supplementation with GT was initiated 10days before stroke surgery and continuous for 6days after (GT dose 400mg/kg). Short (STM) and long term memory (LTM) we evaluated with object recognition task (OR) and hippocampus were used to evaluate parameters related to oxidative stress (ROS, lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity). The rats subjected to IR and ICH showed STM and LTM deficits and GT intervention prevented it in both stroke models. IR and ICH induced increase on ROS levels in hippocampus. ICH increased the lipid peroxidation in hippocampus and the GT supplementation avoided it. IR induced decrease on total antioxidant capacity and GT prevented it. These results reveal that GT supplementation presents a neuroprotective role, attenuates redox imbalance and might have a beneficial impact on cognitive function after stroke.

  2. Prevention of depression and sleep disturbances in elderly with memory-problems by activation of the biological clock with light - a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Depression frequently occurs in the elderly and in patients suffering from dementia. Its cause is largely unknown, but several studies point to a possible contribution of circadian rhythm disturbances. Post-mortem studies on aging, dementia and depression show impaired functioning of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) which is thought to be involved in the increased prevalence of day-night rhythm perturbations in these conditions. Bright light enhances neuronal activity in the SCN. Bright light therapy has beneficial effects on rhythms and mood in institutionalized moderate to advanced demented elderly. In spite of the fact that this is a potentially safe and inexpensive treatment option, no previous clinical trial evaluated the use of long-term daily light therapy to prevent worsening of sleep-wake rhythms and depressive symptoms in early to moderately demented home-dwelling elderly. Methods/Design This study investigates whether long-term daily bright light prevents worsening of sleep-wake rhythms and depressive symptoms in elderly people with memory complaints. Patients with early Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Subjective Memory Complaints (SMC), between the ages of 50 and 75, are included in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. For the duration of two years, patients are exposed to ~10,000 lux in the active condition or ~300 lux in the placebo condition, daily, for two half-hour sessions at fixed times in the morning and evening. Neuropsychological, behavioral, physiological and endocrine measures are assessed at baseline and follow-up every five to six months. Discussion If bright light therapy attenuates the worsening of sleep-wake rhythms and depressive symptoms, it will provide a measure that is easy to implement in the homes of elderly people with memory complaints, to complement treatments with cholinesterase inhibitors, sleep medication or anti-depressants or as a stand-alone treatment. Trial

  3. Time-course of 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression during memory consolidation and amnesia.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Rivas, A; Pérez-García, G; González-Espinosa, C; Meneses, A

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that antagonists of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor(6) (5-HT(6)) improve memory and reverse amnesia although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Hence, in this paper RT-PCR was used to evaluate changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in trained and untrained rats treated with the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine. Changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor were investigated at different times in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Data indicated that memory in the Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping task was a progressive process associated to reduced mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in the three structures examined. SB-399885 improved long-term memory at 48h, while the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine or the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine impaired it at 24h. Autoshaping training and treatment with SB-399885 increased 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in (maximum increase) prefrontal cortex and striatum, 24 or 48h. The scopolamine-induced amnesia suppressed 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression while the dizocilpine-induced amnesia did not modify 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. SB-399885 and scopolamine or dizocilpine were able to reestablish memory and 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. These data confirmed previous memory evidence and of more interest is the observation that training, SB-399885 and amnesic drugs modulated 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Further investigation in different memory tasks, times and amnesia models together with more complex control groups might provide further clues.

  4. Memory Loss: 7 Tips to Improve Your Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... re not alone. Everyone forgets things occasionally. Still, memory loss is nothing to take lightly. Although there are no guarantees when it comes to preventing memory loss or dementia, certain activities might help. Consider ...

  5. Effects of P2, a peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule on learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Rizhova, L; Klementiev, B; Cambon, K; Venero, C; Sandi, C; Vershinina, E; Vaudano, E; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2007-11-23

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, synaptic plasticity, and memory processes. P2 is a 12-amino-acid peptide derived from the second immunoglobulin-like (Ig) module of NCAM mediating cis-homophilic interactions between NCAM molecules present on the same cell. P2 is a potent NCAM agonist, capable of promoting neuronal differentiation and survival in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of P2 on learning and memory. Rats treated with P2 intracerebroventricularly (1 h prior to test) performed significantly better than controls in the reinforced T-maze, a test of spatial working memory. Further, rats treated with P2 exhibited decreased anxiety-like behavior while learning the T-maze task. In the social recognition test, both intracerebroventricular (1 h prior to test) and systemic (1 and 24 h prior to test) P2 treatment enhanced short-term social memory and counteracted (administration 24 h prior test) scopolamine-induced social memory impairment. In contrast, P2 (1 h prior to test) did not significantly improve long-term (24 h) retention of social memory, nor did it have any significant effects on long-term memory evaluated by the Morris water maze (administration between 2 days before training and 5.5 h posttraining). In the open field test, P2 (1 h prior to test) decreased general locomotion and rearing, but did not influence any other anxiety-related behaviors, indicating only a minimal influence on baseline anxiety levels. Taken together, these data indicate that in vivo P2 enhances short-term memory and protects against the amnestic effects of scopolamine, while modulating emotional behavior in a learning or novelty-related task.

  6. Enhancing GABA Signaling during Middle Adulthood Prevents Age-Dependent GABAergic Interneuron Decline and Learning and Memory Deficits in ApoE4 Mice.

    PubMed

    Tong, Leslie M; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Yang, Alyssa; Lin, Victoria; Lei, Hanci; Huang, Yadong

    2016-02-17

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. We previously reported that female apoE4 knock-in (KI) mice had an age-dependent decline in hilar GABAergic interneurons that correlated with the extent of learning and memory deficits, as determined by Morris water maze (MWM), in aged mice. Enhancing GABA signaling by treating aged apoE4-KI mice with the GABAA receptor potentiator pentobarbital (PB) for 4 weeks before and during MWM rescued the learning and memory deficits. Here, we report that withdrawal of PB treatment for 2 weeks before MWM abolished the rescue in aged apoE4-KI mice, suggesting the importance of continuously enhancing GABA signaling in the rescue. However, treating apoE4-KI mice during middle adulthood (9-11 months of age) with PB for 6 weeks prevented age-dependent hilar GABAergic interneuron decline and learning and memory deficits, when examined at 16 month of age. These data imply that increasing inhibitory tone after substantial GABAergic interneuron loss may be an effective symptomatic, but not a disease-modifying, treatment for AD related to apoE4, whereas a similar intervention before substantial interneuron loss could be a disease-modifying therapeutic. We previously reported that female apoE4-KI mice had an age-dependent decline in hilar GABAergic interneurons that correlated with the extent of cognitive deficits in aged mice. The current study demonstrates that enhancing GABA signaling by treating aged apoE4-KI mice with a GABAA receptor potentiator pentobarbital (PB) before and during behavioral tests rescued the cognitive deficits; but withdrawal of PB treatment for 2 weeks before the tests abolished the rescue, suggesting the importance of continuously enhancing GABA signaling. However, treating apoE4-KI mice during middle adulthood with PB for a short period of time prevented age-dependent hilar GABAergic interneuron decline and

  7. Aging Impairs Hippocampal- Dependent Recognition Memory and LTP and Prevents the Associated RyR Up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Arias-Cavieres, Alejandra; Adasme, Tatiana; Sánchez, Gina; Muñoz, Pablo; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Recognition memory comprises recollection judgment and familiarity, two different processes that engage the hippocampus and the perirhinal cortex, respectively. Previous studies have shown that aged rodents display defective recognition memory and alterations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. We report here that young rats efficiently performed at short-term (5 min) and long-term (24 h) hippocampus-associated object-location tasks and perirhinal cortex-related novel-object recognition tasks. In contrast, aged rats successfully performed the object-location and the novel-object recognition tasks only at short-term. In addition, aged rats displayed defective long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhanced long-term depression (LTD). Successful long-term performance of object-location but not of novel-object recognition tasks increased the protein levels of ryanodine receptor types-2/3 (RyR2/RyR3) and of IP3R1 in young rat hippocampus. Likewise, sustained LTP induction (1 h) significantly increased RyR2, RyR3 and IP3R1 protein levels in hippocampal slices from young rats. In contrast, LTD induction (1 h) did not modify the levels of these three proteins. Naïve (untrained) aged rats displayed higher RyR2/RyR3 hippocampal protein levels but similar IP3R1 protein content relative to young rats; these levels did not change following exposure to either memory recognition task or after LTP or LTD induction. The perirhinal cortex from young or aged rats did not display changes in the protein contents of RyR2, RyR3, and IP3R1 after exposure at long-term (24 h) to the object-location or the novel-object recognition tasks. Naïve aged rats displayed higher RyR2 channel oxidation levels in the hippocampus compared to naïve young rats. The RyR2/RyR3 up-regulation and the increased RyR2 oxidation levels exhibited by aged rat hippocampus are likely to generate anomalous calcium signals, which may contribute to the well-known impairments in hippocampal LTP and spatial memory that take

  8. Silibinin rescues learning and memory deficits by attenuating microglia activation and preventing neuroinflammatory reactions in SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ge; Bai, Dafeng; Yin, Shiliang; Yang, Zhihang; Zou, Dan; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Xiaoxiu; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Qiwen

    2016-08-26

    Silibinin was reported to be effective in reversing the learning and memory deficits of several AD animal models. These improvements are thought to be regulated by various factors, including antioxidative stress, inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity and Aβ aggregation. However, there are still no reports that demonstrate the effect of silibinin on microglia activation in vivo. Thus, in this study, we used the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8) strain to test the effects of silibinin on behavioral impairments and microglia activation-induced neuroinflammation. Silibinin treatment significantly rescued memory deficits in novel object recognition test and Morris water maze test. Silibinin treatment significantly attenuated microglial activation; down-regulated the level of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4, and inflammation-associated proteins, iNOS and COX-2; and further modulated MAPK to protect neural cells. These results suggest that silibinin could be a potential candidate for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C; Kuil, Laura E; Lucassen, Paul J; Harris, Anjanette P; Seckl, Jonathan R; Krugers, Harm; Joels, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity.

  10. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors Partially Prevents Chronic Stress-Induced Reductions in Hippocampal Memory and Structural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsou, Sofia; Fearey, Brenna C.; Kuil, Laura E.; Lucassen, Paul J.; Harris, Anjanette P.; Seckl, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is a risk factor for cognitive decline and psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. Preliminary evidence in humans suggests that mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) may confer resilience to these stress-related changes. We specifically tested this idea using a well-controlled mouse model for chronic stress in combination with transgenic MR overexpression in the forebrain. Exposure to unpredictable stressors for 21 days in adulthood reduced learning and memory formation in a low arousing hippocampus-dependent contextual learning task, but enhanced stressful contextual fear learning. We found support for a moderating effect of MR background on chronic stress only for contextual memory formation under low arousing conditions. In an attempt to understand potentially contributing factors, we studied structural plasticity. Chronic stress altered dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA3 area and reduced the total number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in the infrapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus. The latter reduction was absent in MR overexpressing mice. We therefore provide partial support for the idea that overexpression of MRs may confer resilience to the effects of chronic stress on hippocampus-dependent function and structural plasticity. PMID:26600250

  11. Mental space travel: damage to posterior parietal cortex prevents egocentric navigation and reexperiencing of remote spatial memories.

    PubMed

    Ciaramelli, Elisa; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; Solcz, Stephanie; Levine, Brian; Moscovitch, Morris

    2010-05-01

    The ability to navigate in a familiar environment depends on both an intact mental representation of allocentric spatial information and the integrity of systems supporting complementary egocentric representations. Although the hippocampus has been implicated in learning new allocentric spatial information, converging evidence suggests that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) might support egocentric representations. To date, however, few studies have examined long-standing egocentric representations of environments learned long ago. Here we tested 7 patients with focal lesions in PPC and 12 normal controls in remote spatial memory tasks, including 2 tasks reportedly reliant on allocentric representations (distance and proximity judgments) and 2 tasks reportedly reliant on egocentric representations (landmark sequencing and route navigation; see Rosenbaum, Ziegler, Winocur, Grady, & Moscovitch, 2004). Patients were unimpaired in distance and proximity judgments. In contrast, they all failed in route navigation, and left-lesioned patients also showed marginally impaired performance in landmark sequencing. Patients' subjective experience associated with navigation was impoverished and disembodied compared with that of the controls. These results suggest that PPC is crucial for accessing remote spatial memories within an egocentric reference frame that enables both navigation and reexperiencing. Additionally, PPC was found to be necessary to implement specific aspects of allocentric navigation with high demands on spontaneous retrieval.

  12. Nicotinamide prevents the long-term effects of perinatal asphyxia on apoptosis, non-spatial working memory and anxiety in rats.

    PubMed

    Morales, Paola; Simola, Nicola; Bustamante, Diego; Lisboa, Francisco; Fiedler, Jenny; Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J; Morelli, Micaela; Tasker, R Andrew; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario

    2010-04-01

    There is no established treatment for the long-term effects produced by perinatal asphyxia. Thus, we investigated the neuroprotection provided by nicotinamide against the effects elicited by perinatal asphyxia on hippocampus and behaviour observed at 30-90 days of age. Asphyxia was induced by immersing foetuses-containing uterine horns, removed from ready-to-deliver rats into a water bath at 37 degrees C for 20 min. Caesarean-delivered siblings were used as controls. Saline or nicotinamide (0.8 mmol/kg, i.p.) was administered to control and asphyxia-exposed animals 24, 48, and 72 h after birth. The animals were examined for morphological changes in hippocampus, focusing on delayed cell death and mossy fibre sprouting, and behaviour, focusing on cognitive behaviour and anxiety. At the age of 30-45 days, asphyxia-exposed rats displayed (1) increased apoptosis, assessed in whole hippocampus by nuclear Hoechst staining, and (2) increased mossy fibre sprouting, restricted to the stratum oriens of dorsal hippocampus, assessed by Timm's staining. Rats from the same cohorts displayed (3) deficits in non-spatial working memory, assessed by a novel object recognition task, and (4) increased anxiety, assessed by an elevated plus-maze test when examined at the age of 90 days. Nicotinamide prevented the effects elicited by perinatal asphyxia on apoptosis, working memory, and anxiety.

  13. Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) extract may prevent the deterioration of spatial memory and the deficit of estimated total number of hippocampal pyramidal cells of trimethyltin-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Yuliani, Sapto; Mustofa; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2017-04-25

    Protection of neurons from degeneration is an important preventive strategy for dementia. Much of the dementia pathology implicates oxidative stress pathways. Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) contains curcuminoids which has anti-oxidative and neuro-protective effects. These effects are considered to be similar to those of citicoline which has been regularly used as one of standard medications for dementia. This study aimed at investigating the effects of turmeric rhizome extract on the hippocampus of trimethyltin (TMT)-treated Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were divided randomly into six groups, i.e., a normal control group (N); Sn group, which was given TMT chloride; Sn-Cit group, which was treated with citicoline and TMT chloride; and three Sn-TE groups, which were treated with three different dosages of turmeric rhizome extract and TMT chloride. Morris water maze test was carried out to examine the spatial memory. The estimated total number of CA1 and CA2-CA3 pyramidal cells was calculated using a stereological method. The administration of turmeric extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg bw has been shown to prevent the deficits in the spatial memory performance and partially inhibit the reduction of the number of CA2-CA3 regions pyramidal neurons. TMT-induced neurotoxic damage seemed to be mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. Turmeric extract might act as anti inflammatory as well as anti-oxidant agent. The effects of turmeric extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg bw seem to be comparable to those of citicoline.

  14. Fourteenth Gaddum Memorial Lecture. A current view of tamoxifen for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, V. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tamoxifen has been found to be a safe and effective treatment for all stages of breast cancer. Long term tamoxifen therapy is associated with some rare, but potentially serious, side effects so patients should be carefully monitored. However, long term tamoxifen therapy is also associated with a number of physiological benefits over and above its tumouristatic action. These benefits include a decrease in the development of contralateral breast cancer, the maintenance of bone density in postmenopausal women and a decrease in cardiovascular disease. The successful application of tamoxifen to treat breast cancer has increased enthusiasm to test its worth to prevent breast cancer. Although there are individual requests by patients for tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer, individual treatment is inappropriate. Tamoxifen can only be adequately evaluated as a preventive in randomized, double-blind clinical trials. These trials are in place and physicians should encourage women to participate and establish a new therapeutic option as rapidly as possible. PMID:8242225

  15. Long-term cannabidiol treatment prevents the development of social recognition memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, David; Spiro, Adena S; Jenner, Andrew M; Garner, Brett; Karl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Impairments in cognitive ability and widespread pathophysiological changes caused by neurotoxicity, neuroinflammation, oxidative damage, and altered cholesterol homeostasis are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to reverse cognitive deficits of AD transgenic mice and to exert neuroprotective, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. Here we evaluate the preventative properties of long-term CBD treatment in male AβPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 (AβPP × PS1) mice, a transgenic model of AD. Control and AD transgenic mice were treated orally from 2.5 months of age with CBD (20 mg/kg) daily for 8 months. Mice were then assessed in the social preference test, elevated plus maze, and fear conditioning paradigms, before cortical and hippocampal tissues were analyzed for amyloid load, oxidative damage, cholesterol, phytosterols, and inflammation. We found that AβPP × PS1 mice developed a social recognition deficit, which was prevented by CBD treatment. CBD had no impact on anxiety or associative learning. The prevention of the social recognition deficit was not associated with any changes in amyloid load or oxidative damage. However, the study revealed a subtle impact of CBD on neuroinflammation, cholesterol, and dietary phytosterol retention, which deserves further investigation. This study is the first to demonstrate CBD's ability to prevent the development of a social recognition deficit in AD transgenic mice. Our findings provide the first evidence that CBD may have potential as a preventative treatment for AD with a particular relevance for symptoms of social withdrawal and facial recognition.

  16. Combination of N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid and α-tocopherol substantially prevents the brain synaptosomal alterations and memory and learning deficits of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Thakurta, Ishita Guha; Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Bagh, Maria Bindu; Ghosh, Arindam; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Chattopadhyay, Sita; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2014-02-01

    This study has compared several synaptosomal parameters in three groups of rats: young (46 months), aged (22-24 months) and antioxidant supplemented aged rats (antioxidant supplementation given with the diet as a combination of N-acetylcysteine, α-lipoic acid and α-tocopherol from 18 months onwards till 22-24 months). The synaptosomes from aged rat brain, in comparison to those of young animals, exhibit an increased membrane potential with altered contents of Na(+) and K(+) under basal incubation condition and in the presence of depolarizing agents. The intrasynaptosomal Ca(2+) is also higher in aged than in young rat. These age-dependent changes in synaptosomal parameters are prevented markedly in the antioxidant supplemented group. When examined on T-maze, the aged animals are noticeably impaired in learning and memory functions, but the deficit is remarkably prevented in the antioxidant supplemented aged animals. It is suggested that the synaptosomal alterations partly contribute to the cognitive deficits of aged animals, and both are rescued by long-term antioxidant supplementation.

  17. Lithium chloride administration prevents spatial learning and memory impairment in repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice by depressing apoptosis and increasing BDNF expression in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingyue; Jin, Wei; Zhao, Haifeng; Xiao, Yining; Jia, Yanqiu; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Xin; Xu, Jing; Meng, Nan; Lv, Peiyuan

    2015-09-15

    Lithium has been reported to have neuroprotective effects, but the preventive and treated role on cognition impairment and the underlying mechanisms have not been determined. In the present study, C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to repeated bilateral common carotid artery occlusion to induce the learning and memory deficits. 2 mmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg of lithium chloride (LiCl) was injected intraperitoneally per day before (for 7 days) or post (for 28 days) the operation. This repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR) induced dynamic overexpression of ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and BDNF in hippocampus of mice. LiCl pretreatment and treatment significantly decreased the escape latency and increased the percentage of time that the mice spent in the target quadrant in Morris water maze. 2 mmol/kg LiCl evidently reversed the morphologic changes, up-regulated the survival neuron count and increased the BDNF gene and protein expression. 5 mmol/kg pre-LiCl significantly increased IR-stimulated reduce of Bcl-2/Bax and p-CREB/CREB. These results described suggest that pre-Li and Li treatment may induce a pronounced prevention on cognitive impairment. These effects may relay on the inhibition of apoptosis and increasing BDNF and p-CREB expression.

  18. Angelica gigas Nakai and Soluplus-Based Solid Formulations Prepared by Hot-Melting Extrusion: Oral Absorption Enhancing and Memory Ameliorating Effects.

    PubMed

    Piao, Jingpei; Lee, Jae-Young; Weon, Jin Bae; Ma, Choong Je; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Dae-Duk; Kang, Wie-Soo; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Oral solid formulations based on Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) and Soluplus were prepared by the hot-melting extrusion (HME) method. AGN was pulverized into coarse and ultrafine particles, and their particle size and morphology were investigated. Ultrafine AGN particles were used in the HME process with high shear to produce AGN-based formulations. In simulated gastrointestinal fluids (pH 1.2 and pH 6.8) and water, significantly higher amounts of the major active components of AGN, decursin (D) and decursinol angelate (DA), were extracted from the HME-processed AGN/Soluplus (F8) group than the AGN EtOH extract (ext) group (p < 0.05). Based on an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats, the relative oral bioavailability of decursinol (DOH), a hepatic metabolite of D and DA, in F8-administered mice was 8.75-fold higher than in AGN EtOH ext-treated group. In scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice, F8 exhibited a more potent cognitive enhancing effect than AGN EtOH ext in both a Morris water maze test and a passive avoidance test. These findings suggest that HME-processed AGN/Soluplus formulation (F8) could be a promising therapeutic candidate for memory impairment.

  19. Angelica gigas Nakai and Soluplus-Based Solid Formulations Prepared by Hot-Melting Extrusion: Oral Absorption Enhancing and Memory Ameliorating Effects

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Jingpei; Lee, Jae-Young; Weon, Jin Bae; Ma, Choong Je; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Dae-Duk; Kang, Wie-Soo; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Oral solid formulations based on Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) and Soluplus were prepared by the hot-melting extrusion (HME) method. AGN was pulverized into coarse and ultrafine particles, and their particle size and morphology were investigated. Ultrafine AGN particles were used in the HME process with high shear to produce AGN-based formulations. In simulated gastrointestinal fluids (pH 1.2 and pH 6.8) and water, significantly higher amounts of the major active components of AGN, decursin (D) and decursinol angelate (DA), were extracted from the HME-processed AGN/Soluplus (F8) group than the AGN EtOH extract (ext) group (p < 0.05). Based on an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats, the relative oral bioavailability of decursinol (DOH), a hepatic metabolite of D and DA, in F8-administered mice was 8.75-fold higher than in AGN EtOH ext-treated group. In scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice, F8 exhibited a more potent cognitive enhancing effect than AGN EtOH ext in both a Morris water maze test and a passive avoidance test. These findings suggest that HME-processed AGN/Soluplus formulation (F8) could be a promising therapeutic candidate for memory impairment. PMID:25915423

  20. Improvement in Long-Term Memory following Chronic Administration of Eryngium planum Root Extract in Scopolamine Model: Behavioral and Molecular Study

    PubMed Central

    Ozarowski, Marcin; Thiem, Barbara; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.; Piasecka, Anna; Kachlicki, Piotr; Szulc, Michal; Kaminska, Ewa; Bogacz, Anna; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Kujawska, Malgorzata; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Budzianowski, Jaromir; Kędziora, Izabela; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Czerny, Boguslaw; Bobkiewicz-Kozłowska, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Eryngium planum L. (EP) is as a rare medicinal plant with a lot of potentials as pharmaceutical crops. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of subchronic (28-fold) administration of a 70% ethanol extract of EP roots (200 mg/kg, p.o.) on behavioral and cognitive responses in Wistar rats linked with acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and beta-secretase (BACE-1) mRNA levels and AChE and BuChE activities in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. On the last day of experiment, 30 min after the last dose of EP or Huperzine A (HU), scopolamine (SC) was given at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg b.w. intraperitoneally. The results of a passive avoidance test showed an improvement in long-term memory produced by the EP extract in both scopolamine-induced rats and control group. EP caused an insignificant inhibition of AChE and BuChE activities in the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. EP decreased mRNA AChE, BuChE, and BACE-1 levels, especially in the cortex. Our results suggest that the EP extract led to the improvement of the long-term memory in rats coupled with total saponin content. The mechanism of EP action is probably complicated, since HPLC-MS analysis showed 64 chemical compounds (phenolics, saponins) in the extract of EP roots. PMID:26483842

  1. Intranasal Delivery of NEMO-Binding Domain Peptide Prevents Memory Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Suresh B.; Corbett, Grant T.; Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K.; Bennett, David A.; Mufson, Elliott J.; Ghosh, Sankar; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is available to halt its progression. We found that NF-κB was activated within the hippocampus and cortex of AD subjects and that activated forms of NF-κB negatively correlated with cognitive function monitored by Mini-Mental State Examination and global cognitive z score. Accordingly, NF-κB activation was also observed in the hippocampus of a transgenic (5XFAD) mouse model of AD. It has been shown that peptides corresponding to the NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) of IκB kinase α (IKKα) or IκB kinase β (IKKβ) specifically inhibit the induction of NF-κB activation without inhibiting the basal NF-κB activity. Interestingly, after intranasal administration, wild-type NBD peptide entered into the hippocampus, reduced hippocampal activation of NF-κB, suppressed hippocampal microglial activation, lowered the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus, attenuated apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, protected plasticity-related molecules, and improved memory and learning in 5XFAD mice. Mutated NBD peptide had no such protective effect, indicating the specificity of our finding. These results suggest that selective targeting of NF-κB activation by intranasal administration of NBD peptide may be of therapeutic benefit for AD patients. PMID:26401561

  2. Lactobacillus pentosus var. plantarum C29 ameliorates memory impairment and inflammaging in a D-galactose-induced accelerated aging mouse model.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jae-Yeon; Gu, Wan; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Jang, Se-Eun; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    Aging is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), cardiovascular disease and cancer. Oxidative stress is considered as a major factor that accelerates the aging process. To understand the ability of lactic acid bacteria to ameliorate memory impairment caused by aging, we investigated the effect of Lactobacillus pentosus var. plantarum (C29), which is known to protect against scopolamine-induced memory impairment, on oxidative stress (D-galactose)-induced memory impairment in mice. D-Galactose was subcutaneously injected to 20-week old male C57BL/6J mice for 10 weeks, with oral administration of C29 for the final 5 weeks. Excessive intake of D-galactose not only impaired memory, which was indicated by passive avoidance, Y-maze, and Morris water-maze tasks, but also reduced the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and hippocampal doublecortin (DCX) and the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). C29 treatment ameliorated D-galactose-induced memory impairment and reversed the suppression of BDNF and DCX expression and CREB activation. Moreover, C29 decreased the expression of a senescence marker p16 and inflammation markers p-p65, p-FOXO3a, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS). C29 treatment inhibited D-galactose-induced expression of M1 polarization markers tumor necrosis factor-α and arginase II, and attenuated the d-galactose-suppressed expression of M2 markers IL-10, arginase I and CD206. Taken together, these findings suggest that C29 may ameliorate memory impairment and M1 macrophage-polarized inflammation caused by aging.

  3. [Effect of improving memory and inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity by invigorating-qi and warming-yang recipe].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Y; Yang, Y G; Zheng, B

    1993-11-01

    Invigorating-Qi and Warming-Yang (IQWY) had a good curative effect to some senile diseases such as senile dementia, senile hypomnesia etc. This experiment was designed for probing into the therapeutical mechanism of IQWY recipe. BALB/C pure bred mice were divided into five groups. Group I was taken per os of invigorating Qi (IQ), Group II warming Yang (WY), Group III IQWY drugs, Group IV was dysmnesia model, and Group V blank control group injected with normal saline only. All groups except Group V were injected scopolamine (5mg/kg) intraperitoneally to induce dysmnesia model after medication. IQ drug consisted of Codonopsis pilosula, Astragalus membranaceus, Poria cocos, and Glycyrrhiza uralensis, WY drug of Cynomorium songoricum, Epimedium brevicornum and Cuscuta chinensis, while IQWY recipe consisted of both IQ and WY drugs. The results showed that IQ, WY and IQWY had an evident antagonistic action to Scopolamine induced dysmnesia mice, and could improve their memory. The erroneous times of the animal's reaction in Group I, II and III were less than those in Group IV, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. Acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in the mice could be inhibited by IQ, WY and IQWY also. The activity in Group I, II and III was less than that in Group IV and V, P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. The therapeutic mechanism of IQWY was in connection with its effect to M-cholinergic transmitters of central nervous system.

  4. Cognitive enhancing effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Nade, V. S.; Kawale, L. A.; Valte, K. D.; Shendye, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate cognitive enhancing property of angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in rats. Materials and Methods: The elevated plus maze (EPM), passive avoidance test (PAT), and water maze test (WMT) were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity in young and aged rats. Ramipril (10 mg/kg, p.o.), perindopril (10 mg/kg, i.p), losartan (20 mg/kg, i.p), and valsartan (20 mg/kg, p.o) were administered to assess their effect on learning and memory. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p) was used to impair cognitive function. Piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p) was used as reference drug. Results: All the treatments significantly attenuated amnesia induced by aging and scopolamine. In EPM, aged and scopolamine-treated rats showed an increase in transfer latency (TL) whereas, ACEI and ARBs showed a significant decrease in TL. Treatment with ACEI and ARBs significantly increased step down latencies and decreased latency to reach the platform in target quadrant in young, aged and scopolamine-treated animals in PAT and WMT, respectively. The treatments inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme in the brain. Similarly, all the treatments attenuated scopolamine-induced lipid peroxidation and normalize antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion: The results suggest that the cognitive enhancing effect of ACEI and ARBs may be due to inhibition of AChE or by regulation of antioxidant system or increase in formation of angiotensin IV. PMID:26069362

  5. Fermented Citrus reticulata (ponkan) fruit squeezed draff that contains a large amount of 4'-demethylnobiletin prevents MK801-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Ichiro; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Rico, Evelyn Gutiérrez; Kusano, Shuichi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2017-05-09

    A previous study reported biotransformation of a citrus peel polymethoxyflavone, nobiletin, by Aspergillus enabling production of 4'-demethylnobiletin, and the product's antimutagenic activity. However, the effects of fermented citrus peel on the basal forebrain-hippocampal system remain unidentified. Citrus reticulata (ponkan) fruit squeezed draffs are generated as mass waste in beverage factories. In this study using PC12D cells and cultured central nervous system neurons, we therefore examined whether Aspergillus kawachii-fermented citrus fruit squeezed draff could affect cAMP response element (CRE)- and choline acetyltransferase gene (ChAT) promoter region-mediated transcriptional activities relevant to memory formation and cholinergic function. Our current fermentation yielded approximately 80% nobiletin bioconversion, and a sample of hot-water extract of the fermented fruit squeezed draff was stronger than that of the unfermented one in facilitating CRE-mediated transcription in cultured hippocampal neurons as well as in PC12D cells. A sample of 0-80% ethanol-eluted fraction of Diaion HP-20 column-adsorbed components of the preparation obtained by the fermentation concentration-dependently and more strongly facilitated CRE-mediated transcription than did the fraction of the unfermented one in both cell culture systems. In a separate study, this polymethoxyflavone-rich fraction of the fermented fruit squeezed draff showed a potent ability to facilitate CRE-mediated and ChAT transcription in a co-culture of hippocampal neurons and basal forebrain neurons. Repeated oral gavage of mice with the fermented fraction sample prevented MK801-impaired memory formation in mice. These findings suggest that the 4'-demethylnobiletin-rich fraction prepared from the Aspergillus-fermented ponkan squeezed draff has a potential anti-dementia effect.

  6. Interleukin-1β-induced memory reconsolidation impairment is mediated by a reduction in glutamate release and zif268 expression and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone prevented these effects.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ivana; Gonzalez, Patricia V; Vilcaes, Alejandro; Carniglia, Lila; Schiöth, Helgi B; Lasaga, Mercedes; Scimonelli, Teresa N

    2015-05-01

    The immune system is an important modulator of learning, memory and neural plasticity. Interleukin 1β (IL-1β), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, significantly affects several cognitive processes. Previous studies by our group have demonstrated that intrahippocampal administration of IL-1β impairs reconsolidation of contextual fear memory. This effect was reversed by the melanocortin alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH). The mechanisms underlying the effect of IL-1β on memory reconsolidation have not yet been established. Therefore, we examined the effect of IL-1β on glutamate release, ERK phosphorylation and the activation of the transcription factor zinc finger- 268 (zif268) during reconsolidation. Our results demonstrated that IL-1β induced a significant decrease of glutamate release after reactivation of the fear memory and this effect was related to calcium concentration in hippocampal synaptosomes. IL-1β also reduced ERK phosphorylation and zif268 expression in the hippocampus. Central administration of α-MSH prevented the decrease in glutamate release, ERK phosphorylation and zif268 expression induced by IL-1β. Our results establish possible mechanisms involved in the detrimental effect of IL-1β on memory reconsolidation and also indicate that α-MSH may exert a beneficial modulatory role in preventing IL-1β effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein kinase C inhibitors prevent induction and continued expression of cell memory in Hermissenda type B photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Farley, J; Schuman, E

    1991-01-01

    Injections of cAMP-dependent, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, or Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinases into Hermissenda crassicornis type B photoreceptors are sufficient to induce many of the changes in B-cell excitability produced by associative conditioning. We report that inhibitors of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinases, but not inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide- or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, prevent the induction as well as continued expression of learning-produced changes in type-B-cell excitability: reductions of voltage-dependent and Ca2(+)-activated K+ currents. Our results represent a direct demonstration of long-term (days) experientially induced modulation of ion-channel activity that is dependent upon persistent kinase activity. Images PMID:2000409

  8. Lidocaine Injections Targeting CA3 Hippocampus Impair Long-Term Spatial Memory and Prevent Learning-Induced Mossy Fiber Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Holahan, Matthew R.; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2010-01-01

    Learning a spatial location induces remodeling of the mossy fiber terminal field (MFTF) in the CA3 subfield of the dorsal hippocampus (Holahan et al., 2006; Ramirez-Amaya et al., 2001; Rekart et al., 2007a). These fibers appear to grow from the stratum lucidum (SL) into distal stratum oriens (dSO). Is this axonal growth dependent on ‘repeated and persistent’ neural activity in the CA3 region during training? To address this issue, we targeted local inactivation of the MFTF region in a post-training, consolidation paradigm. Male Wistar rats, bilaterally implanted with chronic indwelling cannulae aimed at the MFTF CA3 region, were trained on a hidden platform water maze task (10 trials per day for 5 days). Immediately after the 10th trial on each training day, rats were injected with lidocaine (4% w/V; 171 mM; n = 7) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; n = 7). Behavioral measures of latency, path length and thigmotaxis were recorded, as was directional heading. A retention test (probe trial) was given 7 days after the last training day and brains were subsequently processed for MFTF distribution (Timm’s stain) and cannula location. Lidocaine treatment was found to block the learning-associated structural remodeling of the MFTF that was reported previously and observed in the PBS-injected controls. During training, the lidocaine group showed elevated latencies and a misdirected heading to locate the platform on the first trial of each training day. On the 7-day retention probe trial, the lidocaine-injected group showed poor retention indicated by the absence of a search bias in the area where the platform had been located during training. These data suggest that reduction of neuronal activity in the CA3 region impairs long-term storage of spatial information. As this was associated with reduced MFTF structural remodeling, it provides initial anatomical and behavioral evidence for an activity – dependent, presynaptic growth model of memory. PMID:20865723

  9. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  10. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  11. A diet enriched with plant sterols prevents the memory impairment induced by cholesterol loss in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Sarroca, Sara; Melero-Jerez, Carolina; Porquet, David; Sansa, Joan; Knafo, Shira; Esteban, Jose A; Sanfeliu, Coral; Ledesma, Maria Dolores

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol reduction at the neuronal plasma membrane has been related to age-dependent cognitive decline. We have used senescent-accelerated mice strain 8 (SAMP8), an animal model for aging, to examine the association between cholesterol loss and cognitive impairment and to test strategies to revert this process. We show that the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice presents reduced cholesterol levels and enhanced amount of its degrading enzyme Cyp46A1 (Cyp46) already at 6 months of age. Cholesterol loss accounts for the impaired long-term potentiation in these mice. Plant sterol (PSE)-enriched diet prevents long-term potentiation impairment and cognitive deficits in SAMP8 mice without altering cholesterol levels. PSE diet also reduces the abnormally high amyloid peptide levels in SAMP8 mice brains and restores membrane compartmentalization of presenilin1, the catalytic component of the amyloidogenic γ-secretase. These results highlight the influence of cholesterol loss in age-related cognitive decline and provide with a noninvasive strategy to counteract it. Our results suggest that PSE overtake cholesterol functions in the brain contributing to reduce deleterious consequences of cholesterol loss during aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Deletion or inhibition of Fc gamma receptor 2B (CD32) prevents FVIII-specific activation of memory B cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Werwitzke, Sonja; Vollack, Nadine; von Hornung, Marcus; Kalippke, Katy; Kutzschbach, Julia; Trummer, Arne; Ganser, Arnold; Tiede, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    Development of inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII) is a severe complication of replacement therapy in haemophilia A. Patients with inhibitors are treated with high FVIII doses in the context of immune tolerance therapy (ITT). Data from haemophilia A mouse model suggest that high FVIII concentrations prevent the formation of antibody secreting cells (ASCs) from memory B cells (MBCs) by inducing apoptosis. Fc gamma receptor 2B (CD32) is an important regulator of B cell function, mediating inhibitory signals after cross-linking with the B cell receptor. Here, the role of CD32 in the regulation of FVIII-specific MBCs was investigated using F8-/- and F8-/-CD32-/- knockout mice and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The initial immune response was similar between F8-/- and F8-/-CD32-/- mice, including concentration of anti-FVIII antibodies and number of FVIII-specific ASCs in spleen and bone marrow. In contrast, formation of ASCs from MBCs upon rhFVIII re-stimulation in vitro was abolished in F8-/-CD32-/- mice, whereas FVIII/anti-FVIII immune complexes significantly enhanced ASC formation in F8-/- mice. Inhibition of CD32 by mAbs or F(ab)2 fragments prevented ASC formation in a dose-dependent manner. Transfer of B cell-depleted splenocytes using CD45R (B220) depletion from CD32-competent mice did not restore ASC formation in F8-/-CD32-/- cells confirming that CD32 is required on B cells. We conclude that CD32 is a crucial regulator of FVIII-specific B cells and is required for the differentiation of MBCs into ASCs. Inhibition of CD32 could potentially improve the efficacy of FVIII in the context of ITT.

  13. Cholinesterase Inhibitors Improve Both Memory and Complex Learning in Aged Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Joseph A.; Greig, Nigel H.; Ingram, Donald K.; Sandin, Johan; de Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W.

    2016-01-01

    Similar to patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), dogs exhibit age-dependent cognitive decline, amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology, and evidence of cholinergic hypofunction. The present study sought to further investigate the role of cholinergic hypofunction in the canine model by examining the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitors phenserine and donepezil on performance of two tasks, a delayed non-matching-to-position task (DNMP) designed to assess working memory, and an oddity discrimination learning task designed to assess complex learning, in aged dogs. Phenserine (0.5 mg/kg; PO) significantly improved performance on the DNMP at the longest delay compared to wash-out and partially attenuated scopolamine-induced deficits (15 μg/kg; SC). Phenserine also improved learning on a difficult version of an oddity discrimination task compared to placebo, but had no effect on an easier version. We also examined the effects of three doses of donepezil (0.75, 1.5, and 6 mg/kg; PO) on performance of the DNMP. Similar to the results with phenserine, 1.5 mg/kg of donepezil improved performance at the longest delay compared to baseline and wash-out, indicative of memory enhancement. These results further extend the findings of cholinergic hypofunction in aged dogs and provide pharmacological validation of the canine model with a cholinesterase inhibitor approved for use in AD. Collectively, these studies support utilizing the aged dog in future screening of therapeutics for AD, as well as for investigating the links among cholinergic function, Aβ pathology, and cognitive decline. PMID:21593569

  14. Cholinesterase inhibitors improve both memory and complex learning in aged beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Joseph A; Greig, Nigel H; Ingram, Donald K; Sandin, Johan; de Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W

    2011-01-01

    Similar to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), dogs exhibit age-dependent cognitive decline, amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology, and evidence of cholinergic hypofunction. The present study sought to further investigate the role of cholinergic hypofunction in the canine model by examining the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitors phenserine and donepezil on performance of two tasks, a delayed non-matching-to-position task (DNMP) designed to assess working memory, and an oddity discrimination learning task designed to assess complex learning, in aged dogs. Phenserine (0.5 mg/kg; PO) significantly improved performance on the DNMP at the longest delay compared to wash-out and partially attenuated scopolamine-induced deficits (15 μg/kg; SC). Phenserine also improved learning on a difficult version of an oddity discrimination task compared to placebo, but had no effect on an easier version. We also examined the effects of three doses of donepezil (0.75, 1.5, and 6 mg/kg; PO) on performance of the DNMP. Similar to the results with phenserine, 1.5 mg/kg of donepezil improved performance at the longest delay compared to baseline and wash-out, indicative of memory enhancement. These results further extend the findings of cholinergic hypofunction in aged dogs and provide pharmacological validation of the canine model with a cholinesterase inhibitor approved for use in AD. Collectively, these studies support utilizing the aged dog in future screening of therapeutics for AD, as well as for investigating the links among cholinergic function, Aβ pathology, and cognitive decline.

  15. Role of molecular isoforms of acetylcholinesterase in learning and memory functions.

    PubMed

    Das, Amitava; Dikshit, Madhu; Nath, Chandishwar

    2005-05-01

    In the present study, activity of salt soluble (SS) G1 and detergent soluble (DS) G4 molecular isoforms of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been investigated in rat brain areas in trained (learned), scopolamine (amnesic) and Tacrine (anti-dementic) treated rats to find out their role in learning and memory functions. AChE was estimated spectrophotometrically at 412 nm in rat brain areas. Isolation and partial purification of molecular isoforms G1 and G4 of AChE was done by gel filtration chromatography. Passive avoidance was used to test learning and memory functions. AChE activity was altered in both the fractions SS and DS of different brain areas following passive avoidance in control, scopolamine treated, tacrine treated and tacrine treatment in scopolamine pretreated rats. The peak AChE activity obtained in the DS (fraction 9) and the SS (fraction 13) fraction following gel filtration chromatography. On the basis of molecular weight fraction 9 (DS) and 13 (SS) represent the G4 and G1, respectively. The pattern of changes in the AChE activity of G1 isoform (fraction 13 of SS) and G4 isoform (fraction 9 of DS) in brain areas were similar to those of SS and DS fraction, respectively. In hippocampus, AChE activity in the fraction G1 isoform (fraction 13 of SS) was decreased only in tacrine treated rats but AChE activity in the G4 isoform (fraction 9 of DS) was decreased in both trained and tacrine treated rats. Changes in activity of G4 isoform of AChE in hippocampus could be correlated with passive avoidance learning, scopolamine induced deficit in passive avoidance and reversal of scopolamine deficit by tacrine.

  16. Memory-controlled diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimper, Steffen; Zabrocki, Knud; Schulz, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Memory effects require for their incorporation into random-walk models an extension of the conventional equations. The linear Fokker-Planck equation for the probability density p(r⃗,t) is generalized by including nonlinear and nonlocal spatial-temporal memory effects. The realization of the memory kernel is restricted due the conservation of the basic quantity p . A general criteria is given for the existence of stationary solutions. In case the memory kernel depends on p polynomially, transport may be prevented. Owing to the delay effects a finite amount of particles remains localized and the further transport is terminated. For diffusion with nonlinear memory effects we find an exact solution in the long-time limit. Although the mean square displacement exhibits diffusive behavior, higher order cumulants offer differences to diffusion and they depend on the memory strength.

  17. Psychopharmacology and memory

    PubMed Central

    Glannon, W

    2006-01-01

    Psychotropic and other drugs can alter brain mechanisms regulating the formation, storage, and retrieval of different types of memory. These include “off label” uses of existing drugs and new drugs designed specifically to target the neural bases of memory. This paper discusses the use of beta‐adrenergic antagonists to prevent or erase non‐conscious pathological emotional memories in the amygdala. It also discusses the use of novel psychopharmacological agents to enhance long term semantic and short term working memory by altering storage and retrieval mechanisms in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Although intervention in the brain to alter memory as therapy or enhancement holds considerable promise, the long term effects of experimental drugs on the brain and memory are not known. More studies are needed to adequately assess the potential benefits and risks of these interventions. PMID:16446410

  18. 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine ameliorates age-related spatial memory deterioration by preventing neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-09-13

    Accumulating evidence has pointed that a variety of lipids could exert their beneficial actions against dementia including Alzheimer disease and age-related cognitive decline via diverse signaling pathways. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced neuronal apoptosis, on the other hand, is a critical factor for pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease, senile dementia, and ischemic neuronal damage. The present study examined the effects of 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DLPhtEtn), a phospholipid, on ER stress-induced neuronal death and age-related cognitive disorders. PC-12 cell viability was assayed before and after treatment with amyloid-β(1-40) peptide or thapsigargin in the presence and absence of DLPhtEtn. A series of behavioral tests were performed for senescence-accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8) mice after 7-month oral administration with polyethylene glycol (PEG) or DLPhtEtn and then, the number of hippocampal neurons was counted. Amyloid-β(1-40) peptide or thapsigargin is capable of causing ER stress-induced apoptosis. DLPhtEtn (30 μM) significantly inhibited PC-12 cell death induced by amyloid-β(1-40) peptide or thapsigargin. In the water maze test, oral administration with DLPhtEtn (1 mg/kg) for 7 months (three times a week) significantly shortened the prolonged retention latency for SAMP8 mice. In contrast, DLPhtEtn had no effect on the acquisition and retention latencies in both the open field test and the passive avoidance test for SAMP8 mice. Oral administration with DLPhtEtn (1 mg/kg) for 7 months prevented a decrease in the number of hippocampal neurons for SAMP8 mice. The results of the present study show that DLPhtEtn ameliorates age-related spatial memory decline without affecting motor activities or fear memory, possibly by protecting hippocampal neuronal death. DLPhtEtn, thus, might exert its beneficial action against senile dementia and neurodegenerative diseases such as

  19. Rapamycin inhibits mTOR/p70S6K activation in CA3 region of the hippocampus of the rat and impairs long term memory.

    PubMed

    Lana, D; Di Russo, J; Mello, T; Wenk, G L; Giovannini, M G

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed at establishing whether the mTOR pathway and its downstream effector p70S6K in CA3 pyramidal neurons are under the modulation of the cholinergic input to trigger the formation of long term memories, similar to what we demonstrated in CA1 hippocampus. We performed in vivo behavioral experiments using the step down inhibitory avoidance test in adult Wistar rats to evaluate memory formation under different conditions. We examined the effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 formation, scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist or mecamylamine, a nicotinic receptor antagonist, on short and long term memory formation and on the functionality of the mTOR pathway. Acquisition was conducted 30min after i.c.v. injection of rapamycin. Recall testing was performed 1h, 4h or 24h after acquisition. We found that (1) mTOR and p70S6K activation in CA3 pyramidal neurons were involved in long term memory formation; (2) rapamycin significantly inhibited mTOR and of p70S6K activation at 4h, and long term memory impairment 24h after acquisition; (3) scopolamine impaired short but not long term memory, with an early increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1h followed by stabilization at longer times; (4) mecamylamine and scopolamine co-administration impaired short term memory at 1h and 4h and reduced the scopolamine-induced increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1h and 4h; (5) mecamylamine and scopolamine treatment did not impair long term memory formation; (6) unexpectedly, rapamycin increased mTORC2 activation in microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that in CA3 pyramidal neurons the mTOR/p70S6K pathway is under the modulation of the cholinergic system and is involved in long-term memory encoding, and are consistent with the hypothesis that the CA3 region of the hippocampus is involved in memory mechanisms based on rapid, one-trial object-place learning and recall. Furthermore, our results are in accordance with previous reports that selective

  20. Acetyl-L-Carnitine via Upegulating Dopamine D1 Receptor and Attenuating Microglial Activation Prevents Neuronal Loss and Improves Memory Functions in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonu; Mishra, Akanksha; Srivastava, Neha; Shukla, Rakesh; Shukla, Shubha

    2016-12-14

    Parkinson's disease is accompanied by nonmotor symptoms including cognitive impairment, which precede the onset of motor symptoms in patients and are regulated by dopamine (DA) receptors and the mesocorticolimbic pathway. The relative contribution of DA receptors and astrocytic glutamate transporter (GLT-1) in cognitive functions is largely unexplored. Similarly, whether microglia-derived increased immune response affects cognitive functions and neuronal survival is not yet understood. We have investigated the effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) on cognitive functions and its possible underlying mechanism of action in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemiparkinsonian rats. ALCAR treatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats improved memory functions as confirmed by decreased latency time and path length in the Morris water maze test. ALCAR further enhanced D1 receptor levels without altering D2 receptor levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions, suggesting that the D1 receptor is preferentially involved in the regulation of cognitive functions. ALCAR attenuated microglial activation and release of inflammatory mediators through balancing proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, which subsequently enhanced the survival of mature neurons in the CA1, CA3, and PFC regions and improved cognitive functions in hemiparkinsonian rats. ALCAR treatment also improved glutathione (GSH) content, while decreasing oxidative stress indices, inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS) levels, and astrogliosis resulting in the upregulation of GLT-1 levels. Additionally, ALCAR prevented the loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in ventral tagmental area (VTA)/substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) regions of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, thus maintaining the integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway. Together, these results demonstrate that ALCAR treatment in hemiparkinsonian rats ameliorates neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits, hence suggesting its therapeutic potential in

  1. MEMORY MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evidence from both animal and human research indicates that emotionally significant experiences activate hormonal and brain systems that regulate the consolidation of newly acquired memories. These effects are integrated through noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala which regulates memory consolidation via interactions with many other brain regions involved in consolidating memories of recent experiences. Modulatory systems not only influence neurobiological processes underlying the consolidation of new information, but also affect other mnemonic processes, including memory extinction, memory recall and working memory. In contrast to their enhancing effects on consolidation, adrenal stress hormones impair memory retrieval and working memory. Such effects, as with memory consolidation, require noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala and interactions with other brain regions. PMID:22122145

  2. Memory Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... different parts. Some of them are important for memory. The hippocampus (say: hih-puh-KAM-pus) is one of the more important parts of the brain that processes memories. Old information and new information, or memories, are ...

  3. Treadmill exercise prevents decline in spatial learning and memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice through improvement of hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-li; Zhao, Gang; Cai, Kui; Zhao, Hai-hua; Shi, Li-de

    2011-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized by learning and memory function deterioration. While it is well established that exercise can improve cognitive performance in AD, there have been few basic cellular and molecular mechanisms research performed to test the interaction between exercise and AD. In this study, we aimed at investigating whether treadmill exercise improves learning and memory function in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by enhancing long-term potentiation (LTP) and up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Our results show that, in comparison to wild type mice, transgenic mice were characterized by impaired learning and memory function, LTP deficits and increased BDNF mRNA levels. Treadmill exercise enhanced learning and memory function not only in wild type mice but also in APP/PS1 mice paralleled by LTP. However, BDNF has emerged as a crucial regulator of synaptic plasticity mechanisms underlying learning and memory in wild-type mice, but not in APP/PS1 mice. Hence, this investigation demonstrates that treadmill exercise is an effective therapeutic that alleviate learning and memory decline in APP/PS1 mouse model, and enhanced LTP maybe a cellular mechanism involved in neuropathological course of AD and cognitive improvement induced by exercise. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Memory Palaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a lesson called Memory Palaces. A memory palace is a memory tool used to remember information, usually as visual images, in a sequence that is logical to the person remembering it. In his book, "In the Palaces of Memory", George Johnson calls them "...structure(s) for arranging knowledge. Lots of connections to language arts,…

  5. Long-term ginsenoside administration prevents memory loss in aged female C57BL/6J mice by modulating the redox status and up-regulating the plasticity-related proteins in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H F; Li, Q; Li, Y

    2011-06-02

    Memory impairment is considered to be one of the most prominent consequences of aging. Deterioration of memory begins in advance of old age in animals, including humans. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or free radicals-induced oxidative stress which is the major age-related changes, can lead to hippocampus damage and increase vulnerability to impaired learning and memory. Ginsenoside, the effective ingredient of ginseng, has been reported to have a neuron beneficial effect. In the present study, C57BL/6J mice aged 12 months were chronically treated with ginsenoside (three dose groups were given ginsenoside in drinking water for 8 months, the concentration of ginsenoside in drinking water was 0.028%, 0.056%, and 0.112% (w/v), respectively). Placebo-treated aged mice and young ones (4 months old) were used as controls. The efficacious effect of ginsenoside was manifested in the amelioration of memory impairment in aged mice by Morris water maze and step-down tests. Total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) have been used as the biomarkers of oxidative stress. In ginsenoside treated groups, the activities of T-SOD and GSH-Px markedly increased, and the levels of TBARS and the content of protein carbonyl decreased significantly in serum and in hippocampus. The activation of lipofuscin formation, disruption or loss of cristae in mitochondria, the irregular nucleus and condensed chromatin laid against the nuclear membrane in pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA1 region, which are all related to oxidative stress, were also reduced after ginsenoside treatment. Processes of memory formation and functional plasticity are associated with postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95), protein kinase Cγ subunit (PKCγ) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In the present study, we found that long-term ginsenoside treatment prevented age-related reductions of PSD-95, PKCγ, and BDNF in

  6. Subclinical Doses of ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Modulators Prevent Alterations in Memory and Synaptic Plasticity Induced by Amyloid-β.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Puga, Karla; Rodríguez-Colorado, Javier; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2017-02-10

    In addition to coupling cell metabolism and excitability, ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP) are involved in neural function and plasticity. Moreover, alterations in KATP activity and expression have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and during amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced pathology. Thus, we tested whether KATP modulators can influence Aβ-induced deleterious effects on memory, hippocampal network function, and plasticity. We found that treating animals with subclinical doses (those that did not change glycemia) of a KATP blocker (Tolbutamide) or a KATP opener (Diazoxide) differentially restrained Aβ-induced memory deficit, hippocampal network activity inhibition, and long-term synaptic plasticity unbalance (i.e., inhibition of LTP and promotion of LTD). We found that the protective effect of Tolbutamide against Aβ-induced memory deficit was strong and correlated with the reestablishment of synaptic plasticity balance, whereas Diazoxide treatment produced a mild protection against Aβ-induced memory deficit, which was not related to a complete reestablishment of synaptic plasticity balance. Interestingly, treatment with both KATP modulators renders the hippocampus resistant to Aβ-induced inhibition of hippocampal network activity. These findings indicate that KATP are involved in Aβ-induced pathology and they heighten the potential role of KATP modulation as a plausible therapeutic strategy against AD.

  7. Control of Interference during Working Memory Updating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szmalec, Arnaud; Verbruggen, Frederick; Vandierendonck, Andre; Kemps, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the nature of the processes underlying working memory updating. In 4 experiments using the n-back paradigm, the authors demonstrate that continuous updating of items in working memory prevents strong binding of those items to their contexts in working memory, and hence leads to an increased susceptibility to proactive…

  8. Prophylactic Subacute Administration of Zinc Increases CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 Expression and Prevents the Long-Term Memory Loss in a Rat Model of Cerebral Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Alvarez, Victor Manuel; Soto-Rodriguez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Brambila, Eduardo; Torres-Soto, Maricela; Aguilar-Peralta, Ana Karina; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Alejandro; Tomás-Sanchez, Constantino; Limón, I Daniel; Eguibar, Jose R; Ugarte, Araceli; Hernandez-Castillo, Jeanett; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic subacute administration of zinc decreases lipoperoxidation and cell death following a transient cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, thus suggesting neuroprotective and preconditioning effects. Chemokines and growth factors are also involved in the neuroprotective effect in hypoxia-ischemia. We explored whether zinc prevents the cerebral cortex-hippocampus injury through regulation of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression following a 10 min of common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO). Male rats were grouped as follows: (1) Zn96h, rats injected with ZnCl2 (one dose every 24 h during four days); (2) Zn96h + CCAO, rats treated with ZnCl2 before CCAO; (3) CCAO, rats with CCAO only; (4) Sham group, rats with mock CCAO; and (5) untreated rats. The cerebral cortex-hippocampus was dissected at different times before and after CCAO. CCL2/CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Learning in Morris Water Maze was achieved by daily training during 5 days. Long-term memory was evaluated on day 7 after learning. Subacute administration of zinc increased expression of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 in the early and late phases of postreperfusion and prevented the CCAO-induced memory loss in the rat. These results might be explained by the induction of neural plasticity because of the expression of CCL2 and growth factors.

  9. Prophylactic Subacute Administration of Zinc Increases CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 Expression and Prevents the Long-Term Memory Loss in a Rat Model of Cerebral Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Alvarez, Victor Manuel; Soto-Rodriguez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Brambila, Eduardo; Torres-Soto, Maricela; Aguilar-Peralta, Ana Karina; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Alejandro; Tomás-Sanchez, Constantino; Limón, I. Daniel; Eguibar, Jose R.; Ugarte, Araceli; Hernandez-Castillo, Jeanett; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic subacute administration of zinc decreases lipoperoxidation and cell death following a transient cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, thus suggesting neuroprotective and preconditioning effects. Chemokines and growth factors are also involved in the neuroprotective effect in hypoxia-ischemia. We explored whether zinc prevents the cerebral cortex-hippocampus injury through regulation of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression following a 10 min of common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO). Male rats were grouped as follows: (1) Zn96h, rats injected with ZnCl2 (one dose every 24 h during four days); (2) Zn96h + CCAO, rats treated with ZnCl2 before CCAO; (3) CCAO, rats with CCAO only; (4) Sham group, rats with mock CCAO; and (5) untreated rats. The cerebral cortex-hippocampus was dissected at different times before and after CCAO. CCL2/CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Learning in Morris Water Maze was achieved by daily training during 5 days. Long-term memory was evaluated on day 7 after learning. Subacute administration of zinc increased expression of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 in the early and late phases of postreperfusion and prevented the CCAO-induced memory loss in the rat. These results might be explained by the induction of neural plasticity because of the expression of CCL2 and growth factors. PMID:26355725

  10. Memory Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood vessel (which carries the blood) bursts. continue Brain Injuries Affect Memory At any age, an injury to ... with somebody's memory. Some people who recover from brain injuries need to learn old things all over again, ...

  11. Neural reactivation reveals mechanisms for updating memory

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Brice A.; Bainbridge, Wilma A.; Chun, Marvin M.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to remember new information is often compromised by competition from prior learning, leading to many instances of forgetting. One of the challenges in studying why these lapses occur and how they can be prevented is that it is methodologically difficult to ‘see’ competition between memories as it occurs. Here, we used multi-voxel pattern analysis of human fMRI data to measure the neural reactivation of both older (competing) and newer (target) memories during individual attempts to retrieve newer memories. Of central interest was (a) whether older memories were reactivated during retrieval of newer memories, (b) how reactivation of older memories related to retrieval performance, and (c) whether neural mechanisms engaged during the encoding of newer memories were predictive of neural competition experienced during retrieval. Our results indicate that older and newer visual memories were often simultaneously reactivated in ventral temporal cortex—even when target memories were successfully retrieved. Importantly, stronger reactivation of older memories was associated with less accurate retrieval of newer memories, slower mnemonic decisions, and increased activity in anterior cingulate cortex. Finally, greater activity in the inferior frontal gyrus during the encoding of newer memories (memory updating) predicted lower competition in ventral temporal cortex during subsequent retrieval. Together, these results provide novel insight into how older memories compete with newer memories and specify neural mechanisms that allow competition to be overcome and memories to be updated. PMID:22399768

  12. Inhibiting the Activity of CA1 Hippocampal Neurons Prevents the Recall of Contextual Fear Memory in Inducible ArchT Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Kim, Karam; Yu, Lily Mae Yee; Hashikawa, Yoshiko; Sekine, Yukiko; Okumura, Yuki; Kawano, Masako; Hayashi, Masanobu; Kumar, Deependra; Boyden, Edward S.; McHugh, Thomas J.; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The optogenetic manipulation of light-activated ion-channels/pumps (i.e., opsins) can reversibly activate or suppress neuronal activity with precise temporal control. Therefore, optogenetic techniques hold great potential to establish causal relationships between specific neuronal circuits and their function in freely moving animals. Due to the critical role of the hippocampal CA1 region in memory function, we explored the possibility of targeting an inhibitory opsin, ArchT, to CA1 pyramidal neurons in mice. We established a transgenic mouse line in which tetracycline trans-activator induces ArchT expression. By crossing this line with a CaMKIIα-tTA transgenic line, the delivery of light via an implanted optrode inhibits the activity of excitatory CA1 neurons. We found that light delivery to the hippocampus inhibited the recall of a contextual fear memory. Our results demonstrate that this optogenetic mouse line can be used to investigate the neuronal circuits underlying behavior. PMID:26075894

  13. Grape powder intake prevents ovariectomy-induced anxiety-like behavior, memory impairment and high blood pressure in female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Patki, Gaurav; Allam, Farida H; Atrooz, Fatin; Dao, An T; Solanki, Naimesh; Chugh, Gaurav; Asghar, Mohammad; Jafri, Faizan; Bohat, Ritu; Alkadhi, Karim A; Salim, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Diminished estrogen influence at menopause is reported to be associated with cognitive decline, heightened anxiety and hypertension. While estrogen therapy is often prescribed to overcome these behavioral and physiological deficits, antioxidants which have been shown beneficial are gaining nutritional intervention and popularity. Therefore, in the present study, utilizing the antioxidant properties of grapes, we have examined effect of 3 weeks of grape powder (GP; 15 g/L dissolved in tap water) treatment on anxiety-like behavior, learning-memory impairment and high blood pressure in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Four groups of female Wistar rats were used; sham control, sham-GP treated, OVX and OVX+GP treated. We observed a significant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in OVX rats as compared to sham-controls. Furthermore, ovariectomy increased anxiety-like behavior and caused learning and memory impairment in rats as compared to sham-controls. Interestingly, providing grape powder treated water to OVX rats restored both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, decreased anxiety-like behavior and improved memory function. Moreover, OVX rats exhibited an impaired long term potentiation which was restored with grape powder treatment. Furthermore, ovariectomy increased oxidative stress in the brain, serum and urine, selectively decreasing antioxidant enzyme, glyoxalase-1 protein expression in the hippocampus but not in the cortex and amygdala of OVX rats, while grape powder treatment reversed these effects. Other antioxidant enzyme levels, including manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Cu/Zn SOD remained unchanged. We suggest that grape powder by regulating oxidative stress mechanisms exerts its protective effect on blood pressure, learning-memory and anxiety-like behavior. Our study is the first to examine behavioral, biochemical, physiological and electrophysiological outcome of estrogen depletion in rats and to test protective role of grape powder

  14. Hippocampal long term memory: effect of the cholinergic system on local protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lana, Daniele; Cerbai, Francesca; Di Russo, Jacopo; Boscaro, Francesca; Giannetti, Ambra; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2013-11-01

    The present study was aimed at establishing a link between the cholinergic system and the pathway of mTOR and its downstream effector p70S6K, likely actors in long term memory encoding. We performed in vivo behavioral experiments using the step down inhibitory avoidance test (IA) in adult Wistar rats to evaluate memory formation under different conditions, and immunohistochemistry on hippocampal slices to evaluate the level and the time-course of mTOR and p70S6K activation. We also examined the effect of RAPA, inhibitor of mTORC1 formation, and of the acetylcholine (ACh) muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine (SCOP) or ACh nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (MECA) on short and long term memory formation and on the functionality of the mTOR pathway. Acquisition test was performed 30 min after i.c.v. injection of RAPA, a time sufficient for the drug to diffuse to CA1 pyramidal neurons, as demonstrated by MALDI-TOF-TOF imaging. Recall test was performed 1 h, 4 h or 24 h after acquisition. To confirm our results we performed in vitro experiments on live hippocampal slices: we evaluated whether stimulation of the cholinergic system with the cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (CCh) activated the mTOR pathway and whether the administration of the above-mentioned antagonists together with CCh could revert this activation. We found that (1) mTOR and p70S6K activation in the hippocampus were involved in long term memory formation; (2) RAPA administration caused inhibition of mTOR activation at 1 h and 4 h and of p70S6K activation at 4 h, and long term memory impairment at 24 h after acquisition; (3) scopolamine treatment caused short but not long term memory impairment with an early increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1 h followed by stabilization at longer times; (4) mecamylamine plus scopolamine treatment caused short term memory impairment at 1 h and 4 h and reduced the scopolamine-induced increase of mTOR/p70S6K activation at 1 h and 4 h; (5

  15. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  16. Emerging memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Livio; Bez, Roberto; Sandhu, Gurtej

    2014-12-01

    Memory is a key component of any data processing system. Following the classical Turing machine approach, memories hold both the data to be processed and the rules for processing them. In the history of microelectronics, the distinction has been rather between working memory, which is exemplified by DRAM, and storage memory, exemplified by NAND. These two types of memory devices now represent 90% of all memory market and 25% of the total semiconductor market, and have been the technology drivers in the last decades. Even if radically different in characteristics, they are however based on the same storage mechanism: charge storage, and this mechanism seems to be near to reaching its physical limits. The search for new alternative memory approaches, based on more scalable mechanisms, has therefore gained new momentum. The status of incumbent memory technologies and their scaling limitations will be discussed. Emerging memory technologies will be analyzed, starting from the ones that are already present for niche applications, and which are getting new attention, thanks to recent technology breakthroughs. Maturity level, physical limitations and potential for scaling will be compared to existing memories. At the end the possible future composition of memory systems will be discussed.

  17. Memory protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  18. Declarative memory.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Wim J; Blokland, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Declarative Memory consists of memory for events (episodic memory) and facts (semantic memory). Methods to test declarative memory are key in investigating effects of potential cognition-enhancing substances--medicinal drugs or nutrients. A number of cognitive performance tests assessing declarative episodic memory tapping verbal learning, logical memory, pattern recognition memory, and paired associates learning are described. These tests have been used as outcome variables in 34 studies in humans that have been described in the literature in the past 10 years. Also, the use of episodic tests in animal research is discussed also in relation to the drug effects in these tasks. The results show that nutritional supplementation of polyunsaturated fatty acids has been investigated most abundantly and, in a number of cases, but not all, show indications of positive effects on declarative memory, more so in elderly than in young subjects. Studies investigating effects of registered anti-Alzheimer drugs, cholinesterase inhibitors in mild cognitive impairment, show positive and negative effects on declarative memory. Studies mainly carried out in healthy volunteers investigating the effects of acute dopamine stimulation indicate enhanced memory consolidation as manifested specifically by better delayed recall, especially at time points long after learning and more so when drug is administered after learning and if word lists are longer. The animal studies reveal a different picture with respect to the effects of different drugs on memory performance. This suggests that at least for episodic memory tasks, the translational value is rather poor. For the human studies, detailed parameters of the compositions of word lists for declarative memory tests are discussed and it is concluded that tailored adaptations of tests to fit the hypothesis under study, rather than "off-the-shelf" use of existing tests, are recommended.

  19. Memory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under contract to NASA during preparations for the space station, Memry Technologies Inc. investigated shape memory effect (SME). SME is a characteristic of certain metal alloys that can change shape in response to temperature variations. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Memry used its NASA-acquired expertise to produce a line of home and industrial safety products, and refined the technology in the mid-1990s. Among the new products they developed are three MemrySafe units which prevent scalding from faucets. Each system contains a small valve that reacts to temperature, not pressure. When the water reaches dangerous temperatures, the unit reduces the flow to a trickle; when the scalding temperature subsides, the unit restores normal flow. Other products are the FIRECHEK 2 and 4, heat-activated shutoff valves for industrial process lines, which sense excessive heat and cut off pneumatic pressure. The newest of these products is Memry's Demand Management Water Heater which shifts the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak demands, conserving energy and money.

  20. [Preventive action of nobiletin, a constituent of AURANTII NOBILIS PERICARPIUM with anti-dementia activity, against amyloid-beta peptide-induced neurotoxicity expression and memory impairment].

    PubMed

    Yamakuni, Tohru; Nakajima, Akira; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become a major health burden to society. However, no fundamentally therapeutic drugs for AD have been developed. Increasing evidence suggests that the elevation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in the brain is central to AD pathogenesis. Recently, in the course of our survey of substances having anti-dementia activity from natural resources, we have successfully found nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone contained in AURANTII NOBILIS PERICARPIUM which is a component of traditional Chinese medicines. In this review, we describe the beneficial effects of nobiletin on memory impairment and Abeta pathology in a transgenic mouse model introduced human "Swedish" and "London" mutant amyloid precursor protein. We also note the possible molecular mechanism underlying the protective action against Abeta-induced memory impairment provided by our studies using cultured hippocampal neurons. Namely, daily administration of nobiletin for four months rescued the memory impairment in fear conditioning, and decreased hippocampal Abeta deposit in the transgenic mice as analyzed by immunohistochemistry. PKA-dependent signaling and membrane trafficking of AMPA receptor subunit, GluR1, which are known to be required for long-term potentiation (LTP), have been demonstrated to be inhibited by a sublethal concentration of Abeta in cultured hippocampal neurons. Our in vitro studies evidently showed that a sublethal concentration of Abeta actually inhibited glutamate-induced increases in both PKA substrates phosphorylation and GluR1 membrane trafficking in cultured hippocampal neurons, whereas nobiletin reversed the Abeta-induced inhibition of such biochemical processes. The natural compound with these unique actions has thus potential to become a novel drug for fundamental treatment of AD.

  1. Flashbulb Memories

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, William; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We review and analyze the key theories, debates, findings, and omissions of the existing literature on flashbulb memories (FBMs), including what factors affect their formation, retention, and degree of confidence. We argue that FBMs do not require special memory mechanisms and are best characterized as involving both forgetting and mnemonic distortions, despite a high level of confidence. Factual memories for FBM-inducing events generally follow a similar pattern. Although no necessary and sufficient factors straightforwardly account for FBM retention, media attention particularly shapes memory for the events themselves. FBMs are best characterized in term of repetitions, even of mnemonic distortions, whereas event memories evidence corrections. The bearing of this literature on social identity and traumatic memories is also discussed. PMID:26997762

  2. Skilled Memory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-06

    Morse code (Bryan & Harter , 1899). In every case, memory performance of the expert seems to violate the established limits of short- term memory. How is...of immediate memory. Quarterly Journal of Experimental psychology, 1958, 10, 12-21. Bryan, W. L., & Harter N. psychological Review, 1899, 6, 345-375...16, 1980 Page 5 Civil Govt Non Govt Dr. Susan Chipman 1 Dr. John R. Anderson Learning and Development Department of Psychology National Institute of

  3. Virtual memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Virtual memory was conceived as a way to automate overlaying of program segments. Modern computers have very large main memories, but need automatic solutions to the relocation and protection problems. Virtual memory serves this need as well and is thus useful in computers of all sizes. The history of the idea is traced, showing how it has become a widespread, little noticed feature of computers today.

  4. An Intranasal Formulation of Erythropoietin (Neuro-EPO) Prevents Memory Deficits and Amyloid Toxicity in the APPSwe Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cruz, Yamila; Strehaiano, Manon; Rodríguez Obaya, Teresita; García Rodríguez, Julío César; Maurice, Tangui

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a cytokine known to have effective cytoprotective action in the brain, particularly in ischemic, traumatic, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative conditions. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of a low sialic form of EPO, Neuro-EPO, applied intranasally in rodent models of stroke or cerebellar ataxia and in a non-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we analyzed the protective effect of Neuro-EPO in APPSwe mice, a reference transgenic mouse model of AD. Mice were administered 3 times a day, 3 days in the week with Neuro-EPO (125, 250 μg/kg) intranasally, between 12 and 14 months of age. Motor responses, general activity, and memory responses were analyzed during and after treatment. The deficits in spontaneous alternation, place learning in the water-maze, and novel object recognition observed in APPSwe mice were alleviated by the low dose of Neuro-EPO. Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, trophic factor levels, and a synaptic marker were analyzed in the hippocampus or cortex of the animals. The increases in lipid peroxidation or in GFAP and Iba-1 contents in APPSwe mice were significantly reduced after Neuro-EPO. Activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways was analyzed. The increases in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, TNFα, or Fas ligand levels observed in APPSwe mice were reduced by Neuro-EPO. Finally, immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses of Aβ1-42 levels in the APPSwe mouse cortex and hippocampus showed a marked reduction in Aβ deposits and in soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 forms. This study therefore confirmed the neuroprotective activity of EPO, particularly for an intranasally deliverable formulation, devoid of erythropoietic side effects, in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Neuro-EPO alleviated memory alterations, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, apoptosis induction, and amyloid load in 14-month-old APPSwe mice.

  5. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  6. The Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant MitoQ Prevents Loss of Spatial Memory Retention and Early Neuropathology in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Meagan J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Franklin, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress contribute to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We examined the ability of the novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ (mitoquinone mesylate: [10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cycloheexadienlyl) decyl triphenylphosphonium methanesulfonate]) to prevent AD-like pathology in mouse cortical neurons in cell culture and in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). MitoQ attenuated β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity in cortical neurons and also prevented increased production of reactive species and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in them. To determine whether the mitochondrial protection conferred by MitoQ was sufficient to prevent the emergence of AD-like neuropathology in vivo, we treated young female 3xTg-AD mice with MitoQ for 5 months and analyzed the effect on the progression of AD-like pathologies. Our results show that MitoQ prevented cognitive decline in these mice as well as oxidative stress, Aβ accumulation, astrogliosis, synaptic loss, and caspase activation in their brains. The work presented herein suggests a central role for mitochondria in neurodegeneration and provides evidence supporting the use of mitochondria-targeted therapeutics in diseases involving oxidative stress and metabolic failure, namely AD. PMID:22049413

  7. Episodic Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    An account of episodic memories is developed that focuses on the types of knowledge they represent, their properties, and the functions they might serve. It is proposed that episodic memories consist of "episodic elements," summary records of experience often in the form of visual images, associated to a "conceptual frame" that provides a…

  8. Collaging Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  9. Memory Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Thomas G.; Nowak, Norman

    This paper outlines several "tricks" that aid students in improving their memories. The distinctions between operational and figural thought processes are noted. Operational memory is described as something that allows adults to make generalizations about numbers and the rules by which they may be combined, thus leading to easier memorization.…

  10. Collaging Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  11. Episodic Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    An account of episodic memories is developed that focuses on the types of knowledge they represent, their properties, and the functions they might serve. It is proposed that episodic memories consist of "episodic elements," summary records of experience often in the form of visual images, associated to a "conceptual frame" that provides a…

  12. β-glucan attenuated scopolamine induced cognitive impairment via hippocampal acetylcholinesterase inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ali; Inam, Wali; Khan, Shahab Ali; Hifza; Mahmood, Wajahat; Abbas, Ghulam

    2016-08-01

    β-glucan (polysaccharide) rich diet has been reported to enhance cognition in humans but the mechanism remained elusive. Keeping this in mind, the present study was designed to investigate the interaction of β-glucan with central cholinergic system. Briefly, in-silico analysis revealed promising interactions of β-glucan with the catalytic residues of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme. In line with this outcome, the in vitro assay (Ellman's method) also exhibited inhibition of AChE by β-glucan (IC50=0.68±0.08μg/µl). Furthermore, the in vivo study (Morris water maze) showed significant dose dependent reversal of the amnesic effect of scopolamine (2mg/kg i.p.) by β-glucan treatment (5, 25, 50 and 100mg/kg, i.p.). Finally, the hippocampi of aforementioned treated animals also revealed dose dependent inhibition of AChE enzyme. Hence, it can be deduced that β-glucan possesses potential to enhance central cholinergic tone via inhibiting AChE enzyme. In conclusion, the present study provides mechanistic insight to the cognition enhancing potential of β-glucan. Keeping in mind its dietary use and abundance in nature, it can be considered as economic therapeutic option against cognitive ailments associated with decline in cholinergic neurotransmission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel peptide VIP-TAT with higher affinity for PAC1 inhibited scopolamine induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjie; Yang, Yanxu; Cui, Zekai; Zheng, Lijun; Zeng, Zhixing; Zhang, Huahua

    2014-10-01

    A novel peptide VIP-TAT with a cell penetrating peptide TAT at the C-terminus of VIP was constructed and prepared using intein mediated purification with an affinity chitin-binding tag (IMPACT) system to enhance the brain uptake efficiency for the medical application in central nervous system. It was found by labeling VIP-TAT and VIP with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) that the extension with TAT increased the brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT significantly. Then short-term and long-term treatment with scopolamine (Scop) was used to evaluate the effect of VIP-TAT or VIP on Scop induced amnesia. Both short-term and long-term administration of VIP-TAT inhibited the latent time reduction in step-through test induced by Scop significantly, but long-term administration of VIP aggravated the Scop induced amnesia. Long-term i.p. injection of VIP-TAT was shown to have positive effect by inhibiting the oxidative damage, apoptosis and the cholinergic system activity reduction that induced by Scop, while VIP exerted negative effect in brain opposite to that in periphery system. The in vitro data showed that VIP-TAT had not only protective but also proliferative effect on Neuro2a cells which was inhibited by PAC1 antagonist PACAP(6-38). Competition binding assay and cAMP assay confirmed that VIP-TAT had higher affinity and activation for PAC1 than VIP. So it was concluded that the significantly stronger protective effect of VIP-TAT against Scop induced amnesia than VIP was due to (1) the enhanced brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT and (2) the increased affinity and activation of VIP-TAT for receptor PAC1.

  14. Comparison of tetrahydroaminoacridine and physostigmine on scopolamine-induced free swim behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dokla, C P; Rydelek-Fitzgerald, L

    1991-01-01

    The effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on free swim behavior in rats pretreated with scopolamine (0.32 mg/kg, IP) was examined. Long-Evans rats received a single 5-min testing trial in a 1.5 m black swimming pool, and swim distance in three concentric annulus corridors (peripheral, middle, and inner) and the number of body-turn transitions (greater than 45 degrees) were measured. Physostigmine (1.0 mg/kg, IP) increased swim distance in the middle and inner annulus corridors, compared to tetrahydroaminoacridine (2.0 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, IP) and scopolamine alone (control) (Ps less than 0.01), and increased body-turn transitions, compared to all the other groups (Ps less than 0.05), but had no significant effect on peripheral annulus corridor swim distance, total swim distance, or swim speed. The results suggest that physostigmine produces uniquely different free swim patterns from tetrahydroaminoacridine following cholinergic blockade. These findings have implications for investigations attempting to restore spatial learning and navigation (e.g., Morris water maze) using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors following experimentally-induced cholinergic losses.

  15. Memory conformity affects inaccurate memories more than accurate memories.

    PubMed

    Wright, Daniel B; Villalba, Daniella K

    2012-01-01

    After controlling for initial confidence, inaccurate memories were shown to be more easily distorted than accurate memories. In two experiments groups of participants viewed 50 stimuli and were then presented with these stimuli plus 50 fillers. During this test phase participants reported their confidence that each stimulus was originally shown. This was followed by computer-generated responses from a bogus participant. After being exposed to this response participants again rated the confidence of their memory. The computer-generated responses systematically distorted participants' responses. Memory distortion depended on initial memory confidence, with uncertain memories being more malleable than confident memories. This effect was moderated by whether the participant's memory was initially accurate or inaccurate. Inaccurate memories were more malleable than accurate memories. The data were consistent with a model describing two types of memory (i.e., recollective and non-recollective memories), which differ in how susceptible these memories are to memory distortion.

  16. The scopolamine-reversal paradigm in rats and monkeys: the importance of computer-assisted operant-conditioning memory tasks for screening drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Buccafusco, Jerry J; Terry, Alvin V; Webster, Scott J; Martin, Daniel; Hohnadel, Elizabeth J; Bouchard, Kristy A; Warner, Samantha E

    2008-08-01

    The scopolamine-reversal model is enjoying a resurgence of interest in clinical studies as a reversible pharmacological model for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The cognitive impairment associated with scopolamine is similar to that in AD. The scopolamine model is not simply a cholinergic model, as it can be reversed by drugs that are noncholinergic cognition-enhancing agents. The objective of the study was to determine relevance of computer-assisted operant-conditioning tasks in the scopolamine-reversal model in rats and monkeys. Rats were evaluated for their acquisition of a spatial reference memory task in the Morris water maze. A separate cohort was proficient in performance of an automated delayed stimulus discrimination task (DSDT). Rhesus monkeys were proficient in the performance of an automated delayed matching-to-sample task (DMTS). The AD drug donepezil was evaluated for its ability to reverse the decrements in accuracy induced by scopolamine administration in all three tasks. In the DSDT and DMTS tasks, the effects of donepezil were delay (retention interval)-dependent, affecting primarily short delay trials. Donepezil produced significant but partial reversals of the scopolamine-induced impairment in task accuracies after 2 mg/kg in the water maze, after 1 mg/kg in the DSDT, and after 50 microg/kg in the DMTS task. The two operant-conditioning tasks (DSDT and DMTS) provided data most in keeping with those reported in clinical studies with these drugs. The model applied to nonhuman primates provides an excellent transitional model for new cognition-enhancing drugs before clinical trials.

  17. Allopregnanolone prevents memory impairment: effect on mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of hippocampal 3-α hydroxysteroid oxide-reductase.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carla; Casas, Sebastián; Giuliani, Fernando; Bazzocchini, Vanesa; García, Sebastián; Yunes, Roberto; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2012-02-10

    In this work we investigated how the neurosteroid allopregnanolone can modulate learning and memory processes. For this purpose, we used ovariectomized (OVX) rats subcutaneously injected with oestradiol benzoate (E) alone or E and progesterone (P). Then, rats were injected in dorsal hippocampus with allopregnanolone or vehicle. Animals were tested in inhibitory avoidance task (IA task). After behavioural test hippocampal mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of 3α-HOR, the enzyme responsible of allopregnanolone synthesis, were analysed. In IA task OVX-EP rats spent less time on platform, compared to those OVX or OVX-E. Regression analyses revealed that there was a significant negative relationship between E-P infusion and performance in this task. Pre-training allopregnanolone administration to OVX-EP rats increased the time spent on the platform. Interestingly, when enzymatic activity of 3α-HOR was tested, OVX-EP rats showed a significant decrease in the enzymatic activity, compared with OVX and OVX-E rats. In addition, OVX-EP group showed a significant increase in the enzymatic activity after intrahippocampal infusion of allopregnanolone. On the other hand, when mRNA expression of 3α-HOR was analysed no differences were observed when the hippocampal allopregnanolone injection was done. These results suggest that E and P have amnesic effects on female rats, being reversed by allopregnanolone through its modulation on hippocampal 3α-HOR activity.

  18. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist prevents mTBI-induced changes in hippocampus gene expression and memory deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, D.; Rachmany, L.; Rubovitch, V.; Lehrmann, E.; Zhang, Y.; Becker, K.G.; Perez, E.; Miller, J.; Hoffer, B.J.; Greig, N.H.; Pick, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a global problem reaching near epidemic numbers that manifests clinically with cognitive problems that decades later may result in dementias like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Presently, little can be done to prevent ensuing neurological dysfunctions by pharmacological means. Recently, it has become apparent that several CNS diseases share common terminal features of neuronal cell death. The effects of exendin-4 (Ex-4), a neuroprotective agent delivered via a subcutaneous micro-osmotic pump, were examined in the setting of mild TBI (mTBI). Utilizing a model of mTBI, where cognitive disturbances occur over time, animals were subjected to four treatments: sham; Ex-4; mTBI and Ex-4/mTBI. mTBI mice displayed deficits in novel object recognition, while Ex-4/mTBI mice performed similar to sham. Hippocampal gene expression, assessed by gene array methods, showed significant differences with little overlap in co-regulated genes between groups. Importantly, changes in gene expression induced by mTBI, including genes associated with AD were largely prevented by Ex-4. These data suggest a strong beneficial action of Ex-4 in managing secondary events induced by a traumatic brain injury. PMID:23059457

  19. Memory loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003257.htm Memory loss To use the sharing features on this ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  20. Beneficial effects of losartan for prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with sick sinus syndrome: analysis with memory function of pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Takii, Eiichi; Inage, Tomohito; Yoshida, Teruhisa; Ohe, Masatsugu; Gondo, Takeki; Haraguchi, Go; Ito, Shogo; Kumanomido, Jun; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Fukuomoto, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors may be useful in preventing the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). However, evaluation of such effect is difficult because many PAF episodes are asymptomatic and not all episodes are detected by intermittent electrocardiographic monitoring. A pacemaker has been developed with dedicated functions for AF detection and electrocardiogram storage. Accordingly, we examined the effect of losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker on PAF occurrence using this new modality. We enrolled 70 consecutive patients who had undergone dual-chamber pacemaker implantation for sick sinus syndrome. Finally, 62 patients participated in the study. Thirty patients were randomized to the losartan group (mean 43 ± 12 mg/day) and 32 patients to the control group. They were followed up for 3 months. The frequency, the maximum duration and the total duration of PAF recorded by the stored electrocardiograms for the last 1 month during the observation period and study period were compared between the two groups. The change in the frequency of PAF from the observation period in the losartan and control groups was similar (-35 ± 25 vs. -67 ± 62 times; NS). However, the change in the maximum duration and the total duration of PAF was significantly shorter in the losartan group than in the control group (-493 ± 158 vs. -10 ± 69 min; p < 0.05, and -4007 ± 2334 vs. 1119 ± 714 min; p < 0.05, respectively). Losartan suppressed the maximum duration and the total duration of PAF in patients with sick sinus syndrome without hemodynamic changes. This is the first study to show the effect of a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor on the secondary prevention of PAF using the dedicated functions of a pacemaker for PAF detection and electrocardiogram storage.

  1. Intranasal “painless” Human Nerve Growth Factors Slows Amyloid Neurodegeneration and Prevents Memory Deficits in App X PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Capsoni, Simona; Marinelli, Sara; Ceci, Marcello; Vignone, Domenico; Amato, Gianluca; Malerba, Francesca; Paoletti, Francesca; Meli, Giovanni; Viegi, Alessandro; Pavone, Flaminia; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is being considered as a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment but the clinical application is hindered by its potent pro-nociceptive activity. Thus, to reduce systemic exposure that would induce pain, in recent clinical studies NGF was administered through an invasive intracerebral gene-therapy approach. Our group demonstrated the feasibility of a non-invasive intranasal delivery of NGF in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. NGF therapeutic window could be further increased if its nociceptive effects could be avoided altogether. In this study we exploit forms of NGF, mutated at residue R100, inspired by the human genetic disease HSAN V (Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy Type V), which would allow increasing the dose of NGF without triggering pain. We show that “painless” hNGF displays full neurotrophic and anti-amyloidogenic activities in neuronal cultures, and a reduced nociceptive activity in vivo. When administered intranasally to APPxPS1 mice ( n = 8), hNGFP61S/R100E prevents the progress of neurodegeneration and of behavioral deficits. These results demonstrate the in vivo neuroprotective and anti-amyloidogenic properties of hNGFR100 mutants and provide a rational basis for the development of “painless” hNGF variants as a new generation of therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22666365

  2. Memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Squire, Larry R; Genzel, Lisa; Wixted, John T; Morris, Richard G

    2015-08-03

    Conscious memory for a new experience is initially dependent on information stored in both the hippocampus and neocortex. Systems consolidation is the process by which the hippocampus guides the reorganization of the information stored in the neocortex such that it eventually becomes independent of the hippocampus. Early evidence for systems consolidation was provided by studies of retrograde amnesia, which found that damage to the hippocampus-impaired memories formed in the recent past, but typically spared memories formed in the more remote past. Systems consolidation has been found to occur for both episodic and semantic memories and for both spatial and nonspatial memories, although empirical inconsistencies and theoretical disagreements remain about these issues. Recent work has begun to characterize the neural mechanisms that underlie the dialogue between the hippocampus and neocortex (e.g., "neural replay," which occurs during sharp wave ripple activity). New work has also identified variables, such as the amount of preexisting knowledge, that affect the rate of consolidation. The increasing use of molecular genetic tools (e.g., optogenetics) can be expected to further improve understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying consolidation. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Squire, Larry R.; Genzel, Lisa; Wixted, John T.; Morris, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Conscious memory for a new experience is initially dependent on information stored in both the hippocampus and neocortex. Systems consolidation is the process by which the hippocampus guides the reorganization of the information stored in the neocortex such that it eventually becomes independent of the hippocampus. Early evidence for systems consolidation was provided by studies of retrograde amnesia, which found that damage to the hippocampus-impaired memories formed in the recent past, but typically spared memories formed in the more remote past. Systems consolidation has been found to occur for both episodic and semantic memories and for both spatial and nonspatial memories, although empirical inconsistencies and theoretical disagreements remain about these issues. Recent work has begun to characterize the neural mechanisms that underlie the dialogue between the hippocampus and neocortex (e.g., “neural replay,” which occurs during sharp wave ripple activity). New work has also identified variables, such as the amount of preexisting knowledge, that affect the rate of consolidation. The increasing use of molecular genetic tools (e.g., optogenetics) can be expected to further improve understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying consolidation. PMID:26238360

  4. Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Ivan; Furini, Cristiane R G; Myskiw, Jociane C

    2016-04-01

    Fear memory is the best-studied form of memory. It was thoroughly investigated in the past 60 years mostly using two classical conditioning procedures (contextual fear conditioning and fear conditioning to a tone) and one instrumental procedure (one-trial inhibitory avoidance). Fear memory is formed in the hippocampus (contextual conditioning and inhibitory avoidance), in the basolateral amygdala (inhibitory avoidance), and in the lateral amygdala (conditioning to a tone). The circuitry involves, in addition, the pre- and infralimbic ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the central amygdala subnuclei, and the dentate gyrus. Fear learning models, notably inhibitory avoidance, have also been very useful for the analysis of the biochemical mechanisms of memory consolidation as a whole. These studies have capitalized on in vitro observations on long-term potentiation and other kinds of plasticity. The effect of a very large number of drugs on fear learning has been intensively studied, often as a prelude to the investigation of effects on anxiety. The extinction of fear learning involves to an extent a reversal of the flow of information in the mentioned structures and is used in the therapy of posttraumatic stress disorder and fear memories in general.

  5. The memory ameliorating effects of DHP1402, an herbal mixture, on cholinergic blockade-induced cognitive dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haneul; Lee, Hyung Eun; Jung, In Ho; Jeon, Se Jin; Zhang, Jiabao; Kwon, Yubeen; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2017-09-14

    The seeds of Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa (Bunge) Hu ex H.F Chow (Rhamnaceae) and the roots of Codonopsis lanceolata (Siedbold & Zucc.) Benth. & Hook. f ex Trautv. (Campanulaceae), contained in the DHP1402, have long been used for treating dementia or hypomnesia as folk medicine. It has been reported that Z. jujuba var. spinosa and C. lanceolata are effective in improving cognitive function, but via different mechanisms. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the synergistic effects of Z. jujuba var. spinosa and C. lanceolata on scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Scopolamine, a cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonist, was used to induce cognitive dysfunction. We employed several behavioral tasks to estimate the synergistic effect of the seeds of Z. jujuba var. spinosa and the roots of C. lanceolata. In addition, we introduced the Western blotting, the antagonism passive avoidance task to investigate a synergistic effect of an herbal formulation. Synergistic effects of a combination of Z. jujuba var. spinosa and C. lanceolata at a 5:1 ratio [(w/w), DHP1402] were observed against cognitive dysfunction in the passive avoidance and Y-maze tasks. DHP1402 also ameliorated memory deficits in a dose-dependent manner in these behavioral tasks, as well as in the Morris water maze task. According to the Western blot results, the phosphorylation levels of protein kinase A (PKA), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus were also increased in a synergistic manner after the administration of DHP1402. In addition, we found that the effects of DHP1402 on cognitive function were mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signalling, based on the antagonism studies. Furthermore, we found that DHP1402 has inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). DHP1402 attenuates cholinergic blockade-induced cognitive dysfunction through NMDA receptor modulation, PKA-ERK-CREB pathway activation

  6. Is external memory memory? Biological memory and extended mind.

    PubMed

    Michaelian, Kourken

    2012-09-01

    Clark and Chalmers (1998) claim that an external resource satisfying the following criteria counts as a memory: (1) the agent has constant access to the resource; (2) the information in the resource is directly available; (3) retrieved information is automatically endorsed; (4) information is stored as a consequence of past endorsement. Research on forgetting and metamemory shows that most of these criteria are not satisfied by biological memory, so they are inadequate. More psychologically realistic criteria generate a similar classification of standard putative external memories, but the criteria still do not capture the function of memory. An adequate account of memory function, compatible with its evolution and its roles in prospection and imagination, suggests that external memory performs a function not performed by biological memory systems. External memory is thus not memory. This has implications for: extended mind theorizing, ecological validity of memory research, the causal theory of memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Working memory.

    PubMed

    Baddeley, A

    1992-01-31

    The term working memory refers to a brain system that provides temporary storage and manipulation of the information necessary for such complex cognitive tasks as language comprehension, learning, and reasoning. This definition has evolved from the concept of a unitary short-term memory system. Working memory has been found to require the simultaneous storage and processing of information. It can be divided into the following three subcomponents: (i) the central executive, which is assumed to be an attentional-controlling system, is important in skills such as chess playing and is particularly susceptible to the effects of Alzheimer's disease; and two slave systems, namely (ii) the visuospatial sketch pad, which manipulates visual images and (iii) the phonological loop, which stores and rehearses speech-based information and is necessary for the acquisition of both native and second-language vocabulary.

  8. Elder abuse and neglect--"old phenomenon": new directions for research, legislation, and service developments. (2008 Rosalie S. Wolf Memorial Elder Abuse Prevention Award--International Category Lecture).

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Ariela

    2009-01-01

    This article poses the question: Is elder abuse and neglect a social problem, showing that it is. Elder abuse, though, is still the most hidden form of mistreatment and a key to governmental responses to an ageing population. It is an important facet as a family violence problem, an intergenerational concern, as well as a health, justice and human rights issue. Because the phenomenon of elder abuse and neglect is so complex and multi-dimensional, it has to be addressed by multi-professional and inter-disciplinary approaches. Raising awareness is a fundamental prevention strategy and an important step in causing changes in attitudes and behaviors. This has been accomplished by INPEA and the article was developed from the lecture given by the author on receiving the International Rosalie Wolf Award from INPEA. The discussion focuses on elder abuse as a product of global ageing, stemming from population ageing, which is consistent with an increased prevalence of abuse of all vulnerable groups, older people among them. It is pointed out that baseline and trend data on the nature and prevalence of senior abuse are crucial to policy responses and the development of appropriate programs and services. Difficulties in assessing the scope of the phenomenon, though, are due to: problems in definitions and methodology, which create difficulties in comparing data from various countries; lack of social and familial awareness; isolation of some elders, especially migrants; elder abuse as a 'hidden issue' that usually occurs in the privacy of the home and is viewed as a family affair; limited access to institutional settings. Difficulties also exist in constructing a unifying research framework in order to study the phenomenon due to a lack of comparison groups, a lack of representative national surveys and difficulties in measurement. There is currently, however, an increase in prevalence and incidence studies from both sides of the Atlantic and especially from Europe. But while

  9. Involvement of hippocampal Arc in amnesia and its recovery by alcoholic extract of Ashwagandha leaves.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Akash; Wadhwa, Renu; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2013-11-01

    Arc (Activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein) is a member of the immediate-early gene (IEG) family protein. Because of its critical role in learning and memory, it is widely considered to be an important protein in synaptic plasticity and related neurobiological functions. Alcoholic extract of Ashwagandha leaves (i-Extract) was recently shown to have preventive and therapeutic potential for scopolamine-induced amnesia and glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of Arc in scopolamine-induced amnesia and its recovery by i-Extract with particular focus to the changes in Arc expression in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice. Morris water maze test showed that spatial learning and memory of mice were drastically reduced by scopolamine administration but improved with i-Extract treatment as compared to control and scopolamine-challenged mice. Molecular analysis revealed a remarkable decline in Arc expression in both hippocampus and cerebral cortex of amnesic mice, which was recovered after i-Extract treatment. Interestingly, Arc expression showed better recovery in the hippocampus than the cerebral cortex and the pre-treatment with i-Extract was more effective than the post-treatment. These findings suggest that Arc may be involved in i-Extract mediated recovery from amnesia.

  10. Piracetam improves children's memory after general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, Ułbołgan A

    2009-01-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia may account for postoperative complications including cognitive impairment. The purpose of the study was to assess the influence of general anaesthetics on children's memory and effectiveness of piracetam for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. The study included patients receiving different kinds of anaesthesia for various surgical procedures, randomly allocated to two groups. According to immediate postoperative treatment, the study group received intravenous piracetam 30 mg kg(-1) and the control group--placebo. The cognitive functions were examined preoperatively and within 10 consecutive postoperative days using the ten-word memory test. The study group consisted of 123 children, the control one--of 127. Declines in memory indexes were observed in all anaesthetized patients. The most injured function was long-term memory. The intravenous administration of piracetam improved this cognitive function. The study results confirm that general anaesthesia affects the memory function in children. Piracetam is effective for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction after anaesthesia.

  11. Retracing Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    2005-01-01

    There are plenty of paths to poetry but few are as accessible as retracing ones own memories. When students are asked to write about something they remember, they are given them the gift of choosing from events that are important enough to recall. They remember because what happened was funny or scary or embarrassing or heartbreaking or silly.…

  12. Fueling Memories

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jonathan D.; Pollizzi, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of the adaptive immune response is rapid and robust activation upon rechallenge. In the current issue of Immunity van der Windt et al. (2012) provide an important link between mitochondrial respiratory capacity and the development of CD8+ T cell memory. PMID:22284413

  13. Childhood Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Lourdes Diaz

    2001-01-01

    Describes how artwork can be a valuable catalyst for discussions in preservice education classes, allowing students to explore how their work as educators relates to their childhood memories and can be shaped by childhood experiences. Examines an art exhibition in which diverse artists depicted autobiographical text in their paintings. Discusses…

  14. Childhood Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Lourdes Diaz

    2001-01-01

    Describes how artwork can be a valuable catalyst for discussions in preservice education classes, allowing students to explore how their work as educators relates to their childhood memories and can be shaped by childhood experiences. Examines an art exhibition in which diverse artists depicted autobiographical text in their paintings. Discusses…

  15. Hollow memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    A hollow-core optical fibre filled with warm caesium atoms can temporarily store the properties of photons. Michael Sprague from the University of Oxford, UK, explains to Nature Photonics how this optical memory could be a useful building block for fibre-based quantum optics.

  16. [Neural correlates of memory].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshikatsu

    2013-01-01

    Memory can be divided into several types, although all of them involve three successive processes: encoding, storage, and retrieval. In terms of the duration of retention, neurologists classify memory into immediate, recent, and remote memories, whereas psychologists classify memory into short-term and long-term memories. In terms of the content, episodic, semantic, and procedural memories are considered to be different types of memory. Furthermore, researchers on memory have proposed relatively new concepts of memory, i.e., working memory and prospective memory. This article first provides explanations for these several types of memory. Next, neuropsychological characteristics of amnesic syndrome are briefly outlined. Finally, how several different types of memory are affected (or preserved) in patients with amnesic syndrome is described.

  17. A Comprehensive Behavioral Test Battery to Assess Learning and Memory in 129S6/Tg2576 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Andrea; Bauer, Björn; Abner, Erin L.; Ashkenazy-Frolinger, Tal; Hartz, Anika M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic Tg2576 mice overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) are a widely used Alzheimer’s disease (AD) mouse model to evaluate treatment effects on amyloid beta (Aβ) pathology and cognition. Tg2576 mice on a B6;SJL background strain carry a recessive rd1 mutation that leads to early retinal degeneration and visual impairment in homozygous carriers. This can impair performance in behavioral tests that rely on visual cues, and thus, affect study results. Therefore, B6;SJL/Tg2576 mice were systematically backcrossed with 129S6/SvEvTac mice resulting in 129S6/Tg2576 mice that lack the rd1 mutation. 129S6/Tg2576 mice do not develop retinal degeneration but still show Aβ accumulation in the brain that is comparable to the original B6;SJL/Tg2576 mouse. However, comprehensive studies on cognitive decline in 129S6/Tg2576 mice are limited. In this study, we used two dementia mouse models on a 129S6 background—scopolamine-treated 129S6/SvEvTac mice (3–5 month-old) and transgenic 129S6/Tg2576 mice (11–13 month-old)–to establish a behavioral test battery for assessing learning and memory. The test battery consisted of five tests to evaluate different aspects of cognitive impairment: a Y-Maze forced alternation task, a novel object recognition test, the Morris water maze, the radial arm water maze, and a Y-maze spontaneous alternation task. We first established this behavioral test battery with the scopolamine-induced dementia model using 129S6/SvEvTac mice and then evaluated 129S6/Tg2576 mice using the same testing protocol. Both models showed distinctive patterns of cognitive impairment. Together, the non-invasive behavioral test battery presented here allows detecting cognitive impairment in scopolamine-treated 129S6/SvEvTac mice and in transgenic 129S6/Tg2576 mice. Due to the modular nature of this test battery, more behavioral tests, e.g. invasive assays to gain additional cognitive information, can easily be added. PMID:26808326

  18. Mechanisms of Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Larry R.

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on the brain processes and brain systems involved in learning and memory from a neuropsychological perspective of analysis. Reports findings related to the locus of memory storage, types of memory and knowledge, and memory consolidation. Models of animal memory are also examined. An extensive reference list is included. (ML)

  19. [Will memory be lost with menopause--can an ageing woman be protected from memory disorder?].

    PubMed

    Remes, Anne; Tanila, Heikki; Hallikainen, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Approximately two out of three persons affected with Alzheimer's disease are women. Estrogen is known to have positive effects on the levels of brain-derived mediators and circulation. Along with menopause, decreasing female sex hormone levels have been assumed to promote the development of memory disorders. It is possible that timing of the start of hormone replacement therapy exactly to the menopause could provide the best benefit in respect of memory and information processing. Prevention and treatment of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases along with regular exercise and a healthy diet are more important than hormone therapy in the prevention of memory disorders.

  20. Cell memory-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers 'memory-based therapy', which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. Cell memory-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers ‘memory-based therapy’, which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  2. The coumarin scopoletin potentiates acetylcholine release from synaptosomes, amplifies hippocampal long-term potentiation and ameliorates anticholinergic- and age-impaired memory.

    PubMed

    Hornick, A; Lieb, A; Vo, N P; Rollinger, J M; Stuppner, H; Prast, H

    2011-12-01

    In a previous study the simple, naturally derived coumarin scopoletin (SCT) was identified as an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening approach. In this study the potential of SCT as procholinergic and cognition-enhancing therapeutic was investigated in a more detailed way, using different experimental approaches like measuring newly synthesized acetylcholine (ACh) in synaptosomes, long-term potentiation (LTP) experiments in hippocampal slices, and behavior studies. SCT enhanced the K+-stimulated release of ACh from rat frontal cortex synaptosomes, showing a bell-shaped dose effect curve (E(max): 4 μM). This effect was blocked by the nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists mecamylamine (MEC) and dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHE). The nAChR agonist (and AChE inhibitor) galantamine induced a similar increase in ACh release (E(max): 1 μM). SCT potentiated LTP in hippocampal slices of rat brain. The high-frequency stimulation (HFS)-induced, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dependent LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at CA3-CA1 synapses was greatly enhanced by pre-HFS application of SCT (4 μM for 4 min). This effect was mimicked by nicotine (2 μM) and abolished by MEC, suggesting an effect on nAChRs. SCT did not restore the total inhibition of LTP by NMDA receptor antagonist D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). SCT (2 μg, i.c.v.) increased T-maze alternation and ameliorated novel object recognition of mice with scopolamine-induced cholinergic deficit. It also reduced age-associated deficits in object memory of 15-18-month-old mice (2 mg/kg sc). Our findings suggest that SCT possesses memory-improving properties, which are based on its direct nAChR agonistic activity. Therefore, SCT might be able to rescue impaired cholinergic functions by enhancing nAChR-mediated release of neurotransmitters and promoting neural plasticity in hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  3. The coumarin scopoletin potentiates acetylcholine release from synaptosomes, amplifies hippocampal long-term potentiation and ameliorates anticholinergic- and age-impaired memory

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, A.; Lieb, A.; Vo, N.P.; Rollinger, J.M.; Stuppner, H.; Prast, H.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study the simple, naturally derived coumarin scopoletin (SCT) was identified as an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening approach. In this study the potential of SCT as procholinergic and cognition-enhancing therapeutic was investigated in a more detailed way, using different experimental approaches like measuring newly synthesized acetylcholine (ACh) in synaptosomes, long-term potentiation (LTP) experiments in hippocampal slices, and behavior studies. SCT enhanced the K+-stimulated release of ACh from rat frontal cortex synaptosomes, showing a bell-shaped dose effect curve (Emax: 4 μM). This effect was blocked by the nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists mecamylamine (MEC) and dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHE). The nAChR agonist (and AChE inhibitor) galantamine induced a similar increase in ACh release (Emax: 1 μM). SCT potentiated LTP in hippocampal slices of rat brain. The high-frequency stimulation (HFS)-induced, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dependent LTP of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at CA3-CA1 synapses was greatly enhanced by pre-HFS application of SCT (4 μM for 4 min). This effect was mimicked by nicotine (2 μM) and abolished by MEC, suggesting an effect on nAChRs. SCT did not restore the total inhibition of LTP by NMDA receptor antagonist d, l-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). SCT (2 μg, i.c.v.) increased T-maze alternation and ameliorated novel object recognition of mice with scopolamine-induced cholinergic deficit. It also reduced age-associated deficits in object memory of 15–18-month-old mice (2 mg/kg sc). Our findings suggest that SCT possesses memory-improving properties, which are based on its direct nAChR agonistic activity. Therefore, SCT might be able to rescue impaired cholinergic functions by enhancing nAChR-mediated release of neurotransmitters and promoting neural plasticity in hippocampus. PMID:21945033

  4. Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Michael Andrew; Blanchard, Sean P.; Debardeleben, Nathan A.

    2014-07-25

    As supercomputers continue to get faster and more powerful in the future, they will also have more nodes. If nothing is done, then the amount of memory in supercomputer clusters will soon grow large enough that memory failures will be unmanageable to deal with by manually replacing memory DIMMs. "Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux" is a process oriented method to solve this problem by using the Linux kernel to disable (offline) faulty memory pages containing bad addresses, preventing them from being used again by a process. The process of offlining memory pages simplifies error handling and results in reducing both hardware and manpower costs required to run Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) clusters. This process will be necessary for the future of supercomputing to allow the development of exascale computers. It will not be feasible without memory error handling to manually replace the number of DIMMs that will fail daily on a machine consisting of 32-128 petabytes of memory. Testing reveals the process of offlining memory pages works and is relatively simple to use. As more and more testing is conducted, the entire process will be automated within the high-performance computing (HPC) monitoring software, Zenoss, at LANL.

  5. [Memory complaints among community-dwelling elderly in Japan: comprehensive health examination for the community elderly for prevention of the geriatric syndrome and a bed-ridden state ("Otasha-kenshin") part III].

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Hajime; Suzuki, Takao; Yoshida, Yuko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kim, Hunkyung; Furuna, Taketo; Sugiura, Miho

    2005-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that memory complaints may predict cognitive decline and dementia among the elderly. The present study was therefore conducted to clarify memory complaint characteristics among elderly dwelling in an urban community in Japan. The participants analyzed in the present study were 453 men and 385 women aged 70 to 84 years living in an urban Japanese community. Data on problems related to memory complaints, cognitive decline (below 24 points on Mini-Mental State Examination), depression (measured by Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview), hearing and vision problems, I-ADL (measured by TMIG Index of Competence), self-rated health, age, sex, and years of education were collected at a comprehensive mass health examination for the elderly ("Otasha-kenshin"). Twenty-seven percent of male respondents and 32% of female respondents reported having current trouble remembering things (reported as "frequently" or "sometimes"). We collected specific descriptions of the memory complaint difficulties the subjects were experiencing. A quarter of the responses indicated problems with forgetting persons' names, a fifth with forgetting where things had been left, 15% with leaving things behind, and a quarter with prospective memory failure. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis to explore correlates showed that in men self-rated health and cognitive decline, and in women hearing problems and self-rated health were significantly and independently related to the memory complaint. These findings suggest that in addition to cognitive decline, self-rated health and hearing problems may influence memory complaints, and that memory complaints in men may be a reliable, simple indicator of cognitive decline. We now need to carry out a longitudinal study to clarify predictive validity.

  6. Memory effects in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  7. A Beginner's Guide to Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Elizabeth M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is designed to equip the reader with the information needed to deal with questions of computer memory. Discussed are core memory; semiconductor memory; size of memory; expanding memory; charge-coupled device memories; magnetic bubble memory; and read-only and read-mostly memories. (KC)

  8. SODR Memory Control Buffer Control ASIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Optical Disk Recorder (SODR) is a state of the art mass storage system for future NASA missions requiring high transmission rates and a large capacity storage system. This report covers the design and development of an SODR memory buffer control applications specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The memory buffer control ASIC has two primary functions: (1) buffering data to prevent loss of data during disk access times, (2) converting data formats from a high performance parallel interface format to a small computer systems interface format. Ten 144 p in, 50 MHz CMOS ASIC's were designed, fabricated and tested to implement the memory buffer control function.

  9. Memory Retrieval and Interference: Working Memory Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Copeland, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Working memory capacity has been suggested as a factor that is involved in long-term memory retrieval, particularly when that retrieval involves a need to overcome some sort of interference (Bunting, Conway, & Heitz, 2004; Cantor & Engle, 1993). Previous work has suggested that working memory is related to the acquisition of information during…

  10. Atomic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, R. G.; Hahn, E. L.

    1984-12-01

    The fundamental principles of atomic-memory effects related to the Loschmidt paradox in the second law of thermodynamics are introduced and illustrated with simple analogies, photographs, and diagrams; and the results of RF and laser experiments are summarized. Nuclear-spin echoes in response to RF pulses and the NMR free-induction decay phenomenon are described, and the extension of these concepts to the visible spectrum in laser-frequency-switching and multipulsed-laser experiments is examined with an emphasis on studies of free-induction decay in LaF3 crystals containing Pr impurities (DeVoe and Brewster). The laser-induced phenomena can be applied to studies of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions, and an improved understanding of the RF effects is needed to enhance the performance of medical NMR imaging systems.

  11. Optical memory

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  12. Order-memory and association-memory.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Two highly studied memory functions are memory for associations (items presented in pairs, such as SALT-PEPPER) and memory for order (a list of items whose order matters, such as a telephone number). Order- and association-memory are at the root of many forms of behaviour, from wayfinding, to language, to remembering people's names. Most researchers have investigated memory for order separately from memory for associations. Exceptions to this, associative-chaining models build an ordered list from associations between pairs of items, quite literally understanding association- and order-memory together. Alternatively, positional-coding models have been used to explain order-memory as a completely distinct function from association-memory. Both classes of model have found empirical support and both have faced serious challenges. I argue that models that combine both associative chaining and positional coding are needed. One such hybrid model, which relies on brain-activity rhythms, is promising, but remains to be tested rigourously. I consider two relatively understudied memory behaviours that demand a combination of order- and association-information: memory for the order of items within associations (is it William James or James William?) and judgments of relative order (who left the party earlier, Hermann or William?). Findings from these underexplored procedures are already difficult to reconcile with existing association-memory and order-memory models. Further work with such intermediate experimental paradigms has the potential to provide powerful findings to constrain and guide models into the future, with the aim of explaining a large range of memory functions, encompassing both association- and order-memory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Emotional memory persists longer than event memory.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition performance for event memory differs from that for emotional memory. Although event recognition deteriorated equally for episodes that were or were not emotionally salient, emotional recognition remained high for only stimuli related to emotional episodes. Recognition performance pertaining to delayed emotional memory is an accurate predictor of the context of past episodes.

  14. Memory and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... meet your neighbor for coffee? Episodic memory, which captures the “what,” “where,” and “when” of our daily ... This type of memory also includes vocabulary and knowledge of language. In addition, procedural memory, your memory ...

  15. Maintaining memories by reactivation.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Björn; Born, Jan

    2007-12-01

    According to a widely held concept, the formation of long-term memories relies on a reactivation and redistribution of newly acquired memory representations from temporary storage to neuronal networks supporting long-term storage. Here, we review evidence showing that this process of system consolidation takes place preferentially during sleep as an 'off-line' period during which memories are spontaneously reactivated and redistributed in the absence of interfering external inputs. Moreover, postlearning sleep leads to a reorganization of neuronal representations and qualitative changes of memory content. We propose that memory reactivations during sleep are accompanied by a transient destabilization of memory traces. Unlike wake reactivations that form part of an updating of memories with respect to current perceptual input, reactivations during sleep allow for gradually adapting newly acquired memories to pre-existing long-term memories whereby invariants and certain other features of these memories become extracted.

  16. Memory distortion and false memory creation.

    PubMed

    Loftus, E F

    1996-01-01

    The 1990s have brought to public attention thousands of cases that began when a grown-up daughter or son walked into a therapist's office seeking help for depression, low self-esteem, or any of a number of life's problems. Many of these cases grew to involve memories of childhood sexual abuse recovered while in therapy--memories that did not exist, or at least were not remembered, before therapy began. Many of these cases also involved families torn violently apart. What should we make of these new-found memories? Are they true memories that were successfully revived in therapy? Are they false memories that were unwittingly planted? Are they symbolic expressions--historically false but representing some deep underlying truth? Insights from cognitive psychology may shed some light. Much of the litigation that has resulted from the emergence of "repressed memories" has been hazardous to the patients, and their families, as well as to the therapists who treat them.

  17. The impact of different directed forgetting instructions on implicit and explicit memory: new evidence from a modified process dissociation procedure.

    PubMed

    David, Daniel; Brown, Richard J

    2003-02-01

    In contrast to previous research on directed forgetting, the present studies adopted a recent modification of the process dissociation procedure (Jacoby, 1991; Richardson-Klavehn & Gardiner, 1995) to accommodate the cross-contamination of memory test performance by implicit and explicit memorial factors. In Experiment 1, 120 subjects were compared in global directed forgetting, item-by-item directed forgetting, and control conditions on estimates of voluntary conscious memory, involuntary conscious memory, and involuntary unconscious memory performance. In Experiment 2, 80 subjects were compared in specific directed forgetting and control conditions on estimates of voluntary conscious memory, involuntary conscious memory, and involuntary unconscious memory performance. Subjects showed significant decrements in voluntary and involuntary conscious memory performance following instructions for directed forgetting in all conditions. None of the directed forgetting conditions showed a decrement in involuntary unconscious memory performance. Results suggest that, regardless of instruction type, directed forgetting prevents the conscious expression of memorial information (both voluntary and involuntary) while leaving unconscious memory intact.

  18. Ginkgo biloba and Memory: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Field, B H; Vadnal, R

    1998-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract has been increasingly popular for the treatment of memory problems. However, it is not commonly understood that this extract is composed of numerous chemicals, including flavonoid glycosides, terpene lactones, biflavones, and other miscellaneous components. It remains to be established exactly which components are biologically helpful. The extracts come from the leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree which is cultivated extensively for this purpose. Our aging population will consist of approximately 79 million people 65 y.o. or older in the year 2050. Since memory disorders increase dramatically with age, this poses a major challenge to both the pharmaceutical and nutritional industries to provide products which improve or prevent problems with memory. Our culture is based on the ability to recall information, therefore problems with memory are fundamental to our entire social system. Dementias are disorders that affect memory and intellectual functioning, and are caused primarily by Alzheimer's disease and vascular disorders (multi-infarct dementia). New drug therapies have been developed to improve cognition, through stimulation of the cholinergic system. In recent decades, an extract of the leaves of the tree Ginkgo biloba L. has been used to improve memory in these disorders. The European experience with Ginkgo extract is much greater than that of the U.S. Clinical studies to date have indicated a probable therapeutic benefit of Ginkgo biloba extract. Further human studies are needed to identify which clinical population is most responsive to Ginkgo treatment. In addition, it would be very useful to identify which chemical compound or compounds provide therapeutic effects in memory disorders. These bioactive components may be further concentrated for increased benefit in increasing cognitive memory capabilities. In addition, pharmaceutical companies might be able to modify memory-enhancing Ginkgo-derived molecules to increase potency and

  19. Reducing unwanted trauma memories by imaginal exposure or autobiographical memory elaboration: An analogue study of memory processes

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Anke; Mauchnik, Jana; Handley, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Unwanted memories of traumatic events are a core symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder. A range of interventions including imaginal exposure and elaboration of the trauma memory in its autobiographical context are effective in reducing such unwanted memories. This study explored whether priming for stimuli that occur in the context of trauma and evaluative conditioning may play a role in the therapeutic effects of these procedures. Healthy volunteers (N = 122) watched analogue traumatic and neutral picture stories. They were then randomly allocated to 20 min of either imaginal exposure, autobiographical memory elaboration, or a control condition designed to prevent further processing of the picture stories. A blurred picture identification task showed that neutral objects that preceded traumatic pictures in the stories were subsequently more readily identified than those that had preceded neutral stories, indicating enhanced priming. There was also an evaluative conditioning effect in that participants disliked neutral objects that had preceded traumatic pictures more. Autobiographical memory elaboration reduced the enhanced priming effect. Both interventions reduced the evaluative conditioning effect. Imaginal exposure and autobiographical memory elaboration both reduced the frequency of subsequent unwanted memories of the picture stories. PMID:21227404

  20. Memory beyond expression.

    PubMed

    Delorenzi, A; Maza, F J; Suárez, L D; Barreiro, K; Molina, V A; Stehberg, J

    2014-01-01

    The idea that memories are not invariable after the consolidation process has led to new perspectives about several mnemonic processes. In this framework, we review our studies on the modulation of memory expression during reconsolidation. We propose that during both memory consolidation and reconsolidation, neuromodulators can determine the probability of the memory trace to guide behavior, i.e. they can either increase or decrease its behavioral expressibility without affecting the potential of persistent memories to be activated and become labile. Our hypothesis is based on the findings that positive modulation of memory expression during reconsolidation occurs even if memories are behaviorally unexpressed. This review discusses the original approach taken in the studies of the crab Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata, which was then successfully applied to test the hypothesis in rodent fear memory. Data presented offers a new way of thinking about both weak trainings and experimental amnesia: memory retrieval can be dissociated from memory expression. Furthermore, the strategy presented here allowed us to show in human declarative memory that the periods in which long-term memory can be activated and become labile during reconsolidation exceeds the periods in which that memory is expressed, providing direct evidence that conscious access to memory is not needed for reconsolidation. Specific controls based on the constraints of reminders to trigger reconsolidation allow us to distinguish between obliterated and unexpressed but activated long-term memories after amnesic treatments, weak trainings and forgetting. In the hypothesis discussed, memory expressibility--the outcome of experience-dependent changes in the potential to behave--is considered as a flexible and modulable attribute of long-term memories. Expression seems to be just one of the possible fates of re-activated memories.

  1. Problems of neural memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Andrei L.

    2005-01-01

    The paper considers the neural memory of the human brain from the viewpoint of visual information processing. A model that explains the principle of data recording and storing, memory relaxation, associative remembering and other memory functions is offered. The model of associative memory is based on the methods of holography, "wave biochemistry" and autowaves. Brief consideration is given to the associative properties of holographic neural structures and the memory architecture using running chemical reactions. The paper also outlines the problem of developing artificial memory elements for restoring the brain functions and possible interface devices for coupling neurons to electronic systems.

  2. Benzodiazepines and memory

    PubMed Central

    Roth, T.; Roehrs, T.; Wittig, R.; Zorick, F.

    1984-01-01

    1 Benzodiazepines possess anterograde amnesic properties, disrupting both short-term and long-term memory function. 2 The amount of amnesia is systematically related to dose effects and half-life differences among the benzodiazepines. 3 Memory deficits are found for episodic, semantic, and iconic memory function. 4 The deficits in long-term memory are probably the result of a disruption of consolidation of information in memory and not retrieval from memory. The disruption is produced by rapid sleep onset. 5 Thus the long-term amnesia is really a retrograde effect of sleep and not the anterograde effect of the drug. PMID:6151849

  3. Covalent modification of DNA regulates memory formation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Courtney A; Sweatt, J David

    2007-03-15

    DNA methylation is a covalent chemical modification of DNA catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing and has been studied extensively as a lifelong molecular information storage mechanism put in place during development. Here we report that DNMT gene expression is upregulated in the adult rat hippocampus following contextual fear conditioning and that DNMT inhibition blocks memory formation. In addition, fear conditioning is associated with rapid methylation and transcriptional silencing of the memory suppressor gene PP1 and demethylation and transcriptional activation of the synaptic plasticity gene reelin, indicating both methyltransferase and demethylase activity during consolidation. DNMT inhibition prevents the PP1 methylation increase, resulting in aberrant transcription of the gene during the memory-consolidation period. These results demonstrate that DNA methylation is dynamically regulated in the adult nervous system and that this cellular mechanism is a crucial step in memory formation.

  4. Complementary attentional components of successful memory encoding

    PubMed Central

    Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.; Golomb, Julie D.; Chun, Marvin M.

    2012-01-01

    Attention during encoding improves later memory, but how this happens is poorly understood. To investigate the role of attention in memory formation, we combined a variant of a spatial attention cuing task with a subsequent memory fMRI design. Scene stimuli were presented in the periphery to either the left or right of fixation, preceded by a central face cue whose gaze oriented attention to the probable location of the scene. We contrasted activity for scenes appearing in cued versus uncued locations to identify: (1) regions where cuing facilitated processing, and (2) regions involved in reorienting. We then tested how activity in these facilitation and reorienting regions of interest predicted subsequent long-term memory for individual scenes. In facilitation regions such as parahippocampal cortex, greater activity during encoding predicted memory success. In reorienting regions such as right temporoparietal junction, greater activity during encoding predicted memory failure. We interpret these results as evidence that memory formation benefits from attentional facilitation of perceptual processing combined with suppression of the ventral attention network to prevent reorienting to distractors. PMID:23108276

  5. Retrieval Is Not Necessary to Trigger Reconsolidation of Object Recognition Memory in the Perirhinal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoyo-Zedillo, Marianela; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J.; Chavez-Marchetta, Gianfranco; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico; Balderas, Israela

    2014-01-01

    Memory retrieval has been considered as requisite to initiate memory reconsolidation; however, some studies indicate that blocking retrieval does not prevent memory from undergoing reconsolidation. Since N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors in the perirhinal cortex have…

  6. Bayesian Analysis of Recognition Memory: The Case of the List-Length Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Simon; Lee, Michael D.; Kinnell, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Recognition memory experiments are an important source of empirical constraints for theories of memory. Unfortunately, standard methods for analyzing recognition memory data have problems that are often severe enough to prevent clear answers being obtained. A key example is whether longer lists lead to poorer recognition performance. The presence…