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Sample records for meningitis por streptococcus

  1. Streptococcus bovis meningitis and hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam Hewitt; Sra, Harminder K; Bawa, Sandeep; Stevens, Richard

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of Streptococcus bovis (Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus) meningitis, a rare cause of central nervous system (CNS) infection in an adult, and comment on the importance of investigation of the lower gastrointestinal tract to identify a portal of entry in cases of systemic Streptococcus bovis infection. PMID:20421434

  2. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nicanor; Guevara, Jose M; Tilley, Drake H; Briceno, Jesus A; Zunt, Joseph R; Montano, Silvia M

    2013-02-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats' cheese from an uncertain source.

  3. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and sphenoid sinus mucocele. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Conte, Aristide; Chinello, Pierangelo; Civljak, Rok; Bellussi, Angelo; Noto, Pasquale; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis caused by Streptococcus salivarius in a 49-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed cerebrospinal fluid fistula due to a sphenoid mucocele. We reviewed the literature concerning meningitis caused by this uncommon organism and to the best of our knowledge this is the first case of S. salivarius meningitis associated with sphenoid mucocele. PMID:15936084

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis Presenting with Acute Urinary Retention and Emphysematous Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Endo, Akiko; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acute urinary retention and aseptic meningitis has occasionally been described, which is referred to as meningitis-retention syndrome. In contrast, acute urinary retention has rarely been reported in bacterial meningitis. We herein report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis presenting with acute urinary retention which led to emphysematous cystitis in an elderly woman. She presented with impaired consciousness and a distended lower abdomen. She was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis by lumbar puncture. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the presence of emphysematous cystitis. She completely recovered with antibiotic therapy without any complications. Acute urinary retention can occur secondary to pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27477423

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G.; Täuber, Martin G.; Leib, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  6. Identification of Streptococcus suis Meningitis through Population-Based Surveillance, Togo, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Haoua; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mounkoro, Didier; Tidjani, Loukoumane; Agbenoko, Kodjo; Alassani, Issifou; Amidou, Moussa; Tamekloe, Stanislas; Laing, Kenneth G.; Witney, Adam A.; Hinds, Jason; van der Linden, Mark P.G.; Gessner, Bradford D.

    2016-01-01

    During 2010–2014, we enrolled 511 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis into surveillance in 2 districts of northern Togo. We identified 15 persons with Streptococcus suis infection; 10 had occupational contact with pigs, and 12 suffered neurologic sequelae. S. suis testing should be considered in rural areas of the African meningitis belt. PMID:27314251

  7. Identification of Streptococcus suis Meningitis through Population-Based Surveillance, Togo, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Tall, Haoua; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mounkoro, Didier; Tidjani, Loukoumane; Agbenoko, Kodjo; Alassani, Issifou; Amidou, Moussa; Tamekloe, Stanislas; Laing, Kenneth G; Witney, Adam A; Hinds, Jason; van der Linden, Mark P G; Gessner, Bradford D; Moïsi, Jennifer C

    2016-07-01

    During 2010-2014, we enrolled 511 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis into surveillance in 2 districts of northern Togo. We identified 15 persons with Streptococcus suis infection; 10 had occupational contact with pigs, and 12 suffered neurologic sequelae. S. suis testing should be considered in rural areas of the African meningitis belt. PMID:27314251

  8. Streptococcus gallolyticus (bovis): a rare presentation of meningitis in the ED.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua D; Wilson, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a fairly common and often deadly manifestation of altered mental status in the elderly, carrying a mortality rate of greater than 20% despite antibiotic therapy. Most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We present a case of meningitis caused by Streptococcus gallolyticus in an elderly, otherwise healthy woman. There have been no reports in the emergency medicine literature and only a few reports in the literature of S gallolyticus as a cause of altered mental status and meningitis, specifically of immunocompetent patients.

  9. An unusual case of Streptococcus agalactiae meningitis in a patient with sys-temic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Protonotariou, E; Arampatzi, A; Ourailoglou, V; Diza, E; Skoura, L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) is a major cause of sepsis and meningitis in neonates and an important cause of invasive disease in adults. Case description: We describe an unusual case of fatal bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae in a young man suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus for over 20 years. The young man was transferred intubated in AHEPA University Hospital in a coma; twenty-four hours upon arrival and despite intense invasive treatment, he died from multiple organ failure. Conclusion: The risk of serious infections in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus even under treatment with moderate doses of corticosteroids is high. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4):372-373.

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Piet, Jurgen R; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van Schaik, Barbera D C; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Jakobs, Marja E; Schipper, Kim; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; van der Poll, Tom; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Using a clinical phenotype based approach with bacterial whole-genome sequencing we identified pneumococcal arginine biosynthesis genes to be associated with outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. Pneumococci harboring these genes show increased growth in human blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mouse models of meningitis and pneumonia showed that pneumococcal strains without arginine biosynthesis genes were attenuated in growth or cleared, from lung, blood and CSF. Thus, S. pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in invasive pneumococcal disease.

  11. Spontaneous meningitis due to Streptococcus salivarius subsp. salivarius: cross-reaction in an assay with a rapid diagnostic kit that detected Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens.

    PubMed

    Shirokawa, Taijiro; Nakajima, Jun; Hirose, Kazuhito; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Nagaoka, Shoko; Suzuki, Masatsune

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius subsp. salivarius occasionally causes meningitis associated with iatrogenic or traumatic events. We herein describe a case of meningitis caused by this organism in a patient without any apparent risk factors. In an assay of the patient's cerebrospinal fluid, cross-reaction occurred with Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen-coated latex particles in the Pastorex Meningitis Kit. In the in vitro assays, three of the five clinically isolated S. salivarius strains showed cross-reactions with the kit, indicating that these strains expressed pneumococcal antigen-like antigens. This case shows that meningitis caused by S. salivarius can occur spontaneously and it may sometimes be misdiagnosed as S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24492701

  12. Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Case Strain Traced to Oral Flora of Anesthesiologist▿

    PubMed Central

    Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Gertz, Robert E.; Kim, Clara Y.; de Fijter, Sietske; DiOrio, Mary; Moore, Matthew R.; Beall, Bernard W.

    2010-01-01

    Two women in labor received intrapartum spinal anesthesia from the same anesthesiologist approximately 1 h apart. Within 15 h, both patients developed Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and one patient died. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from both patients and tongue swab specimens from the anesthesiologist yielded isolates of an indistinguishable S. salivarius strain. PMID:20504987

  13. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis case strain traced to oral flora of anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, Patricia L; Gertz, Robert E; Kim, Clara Y; de Fijter, Sietske; DiOrio, Mary; Moore, Matthew R; Beall, Bernard W

    2010-07-01

    Two women in labor received intrapartum spinal anesthesia from the same anesthesiologist approximately 1 h apart. Within 15 h, both patients developed Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and one patient died. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from both patients and tongue swab specimens from the anesthesiologist yielded isolates of an indistinguishable S. salivarius strain. PMID:20504987

  14. Clinical and laboratory features of Streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  15. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T.; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  16. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... several types of meningitis. The most common is viral meningitis. You get it when a virus enters the ... meningitis. Antiviral medicines may help some types of viral meningitis. Other medicines can help treat symptoms. There are ...

  17. [Group A streptococcal meningitis: Streptococcus pneumoniae is not the only one to seep into the CSF fluid leak!].

    PubMed

    Zappella, N; Barrelet, A; Pangon, B; Laurent, V; Bruneel, F

    2013-11-01

    We reported a case of group A streptococcal meningitis in a patient with a CSF fluid leak. This case underlined several relevant points: (i) an unfrequent cause of bacterial meningitis; (ii) the main diagnosis to evoke when the direct examination of CSF shows Gram+ cocci with a negative pneumococcal antigen; (iii) that bacteria other than Streptococcus pneumoniae are possible in front of a meningitis associated with a CSF fluif leak. PMID:24161291

  18. Streptococcus suis toxic-shock syndrome and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Leelarasamee, A; Nilakul, C; Tien-Grim, S; Srifuengfung, S; Susaengrat, W

    1997-01-01

    Three cases with S. suis bacteremia and meningitis were reported. The first case was a 23-year-old butcher who was a regular drinker of alcohol for two years and developed streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome. The organism was transmitted to him through a minor cut in his right arm. The second cases was a 49-year-old female laborer who had been consuming locally produced alcohol for 20 years and developed fever and meningitis. Unfortunately, she succumbed in seven days despite intensive supportive and cefotaxime treatments. The third case was a 45-year-old regular alcoholic drinker and car painter who was seen at a private hospital due to contusion at his left lateral chest wall. However, fever and confusion due to meningitis was detected upon admission. Irreversible deafness developed within 48 hours of ceftriaxone therapy for meningitis. He finally recovered with deafness. S. suis was isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures in all three cases though initially reported to be viridans group of streptococci.

  19. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-12-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations.

  20. Interferon-γ from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-γ in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-γ to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 104 colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-γ mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-γ antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-γ produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  1. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... system, infecting the meninges and causing meningitis. continue Bacteria and Viruses Many viruses can cause viral meningitis. ... examined under a microscope to see if any bacteria, cells, or substances that indicate inflammation or infection ...

  2. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas.

  3. The surface protein HvgA mediates group B streptococcus hypervirulence and meningeal tropism in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Asmaa; Disson, Olivier; Bellais, Samuel; Bouaboud, Abdelouhab; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Khun, Huot; Mechler, Charlotte; Tardieux, Isabelle; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS) is a normal constituent of the intestinal microflora and the major cause of human neonatal meningitis. A single clone, GBS ST-17, is strongly associated with a deadly form of the infection called late-onset disease (LOD), which is characterized by meningitis in infants after the first week of life. The pathophysiology of LOD remains poorly understood, but our epidemiological and histopathological results point to an oral route of infection. Here, we identify a novel ST-17–specific surface-anchored protein that we call hypervirulent GBS adhesin (HvgA), and demonstrate that its expression is required for GBS hypervirulence. GBS strains that express HvgA adhered more efficiently to intestinal epithelial cells, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and microvascular endothelial cells that constitute the blood–brain barrier (BBB), than did strains that do not express HvgA. Heterologous expression of HvgA in nonadhesive bacteria conferred the ability to adhere to intestinal barrier and BBB-constituting cells. In orally inoculated mice, HvgA was required for intestinal colonization and translocation across the intestinal barrier and the BBB, leading to meningitis. In conclusion, HvgA is a critical virulence trait of GBS in the neonatal context and stands as a promising target for the development of novel diagnostic and antibacterial strategies. PMID:20956545

  4. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    The most common causes of meningitis are viral infections. These infections usually get better without treatment. But, bacterial meningitis infections are very serious. They may result in death or ...

  5. Streptococcus agalactiae Meningitis in Adult Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of group B streptococcus meningitis in a 72-year-old female patient who was admitted in our hospital with a 21-day history of bilateral lower thigh pain and swelling associated with fever, headache, and vomiting. Her past medical history was remarkable for DM type 2, hypertension, and hypothyroidism. Upon admission, examination showed bilateral warmth and tender soft tissue swelling around the knees and MRI showed cellulitis of distal thirds of both thighs. The next day, the patient became drowsy. Neurologic examination showed neck rigidity and right sided hemiparesis. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood cultures yielded group B streptococcus sensitive to ceftriaxone, penicillin G, and vancomycin. The patient received ceftriaxone for a total of 14 days after which she improved and was discharged from the hospital with right sided weakness. PMID:26904325

  6. Pathophysiology of acute meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and adjunctive therapy approaches.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Collodel, Allan; Moreira, Ana Paula; Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro de

    2012-05-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute purulent infection affecting piamater, arachnoid and the subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory host's response is potentially fatal and contributes to the neurological sequelae. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx, followed by bacteremia, microbial invasion and blood-brain barrier traversal. S. pneumoniae is recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors inducing the activation of factor nuclear kappa B or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and subsequent up-regulation of lymphocyte populations and expression of numerous proteins involved in inflammation and immune response. Many brain cells can produce cytokines, chemokines and others pro-inflammatory molecules in response to bacteria stimuli, as consequence, polymorphonuclear are attracted, activated and released in large amounts of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, leading to the peroxynitrite formation, generating oxidative stress. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage, blood-brain barrier breakdown contributing to cell injury during pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:22618789

  7. Biochemical mediators of meningeal inflammatory response to group B streptococcus in the newborn piglet model.

    PubMed

    Ling, E W; Noya, F J; Ricard, G; Beharry, K; Mills, E L; Aranda, J V

    1995-12-01

    The meningeal inflammatory response to a heat-killed mutant unencapsulated strain of type III group B Streptococcus (GBS) was studied in a newborn piglet model. GBS (10(9) colony-forming unit equivalents) or saline (control) was inoculated intraventricularly. Serial cerebrospinal fluid measurements were done at baseline and over the course of the next 24 h for cytochemical changes and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and prostaglandins. In separate experiments, we defined the time course of early changes during the first 6 h and dose response relationship over a range of inocula 10(6) to 10(9) colony-forming unit equivalents. The intraventricular inoculation of the heat-killed unencapsulated GBS induced marked leukocytosis and increased protein by 6 h. These changes were preceded by a several hundredfold increase in TNF (maximum at 2 h) and prostaglandins (maximum at 2-4 h). The early and sharp rise in TNF suggests its pivotal role in initiating the inflammatory cascade. The magnitude of the inflammatory response increased with increasing bacterial dose over the range studied. To study the effect of encapsulation of GBS in the induction of meningeal inflammation, we compared the response to the unencapsulated mutant strain with that to the encapsulated parent strain. The encapsulated strain produced much smaller inflammatory changes, and only with high doses of bacteria. The GBS cell wall appeared to be the primary bacterial product triggering inflammation. Intraventricular injection of the heat-killed unencapsulated GBS with exposed cell wall can serve as a valid model for studying neonatal meningitis.

  8. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications. Viral meningitis is caused by viruses like enteroviruses , which are very common in summer and early ... or when they sneeze without covering their mouths. Enteroviruses begin to multiply in the digestive tract and ...

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 burden in the African meningitis belt: exploration of functionality in specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Blumental, S; Moïsi, J C; Roalfe, L; Zancolli, M; Johnson, M; Burbidge, P; Borrow, R; Yaro, S; Mueller, J E; Gessner, B D; Goldblatt, D

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 (Sp1) constitutes an important cause of seasonal endemic meningitis in all age groups in the African meningitis belt. Despite a higher meningitis incidence, the Burkinabé population has an Sp1-specific antibody seroprevalence similar to that reported in the United Kingdom (UK). We aimed to establish whether the opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) of pneumococcal IgG naturally present in Burkina Faso differs from that seen in individuals in the UK and to compare the OPAs generated by natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Samples collected from pneumococcal vaccine-naive Burkinabé and UK subjects were matched for age (1 to 39 years) and anti-Sp1 IgG level, analyzed for OPA to 3 S. pneumoniae serotypes (1, 5, and 19A), and compared to postvaccine samples. Furthermore, the Burkinabé samples were assessed for IgG avidity and serotype-specific IgM concentrations. One hundred sixty-nine matched serum samples from both populations were selected. A greater proportion of Burkinabé subjects aged 1 to 19 years had functional Sp1 activity (OPA ≥ 8) compared to UK subjects (12% versus 2%, P < 0.001); however, the proportions were similar among adults (9%). The correlation between Sp1 IgG concentration and OPA was good (P < 0.001), but many individuals had nonfunctional IgG, which was not related to avidity. While the Sp1 IgM concentrations correlated with OPA, not all of the function in serum samples with low IgG could be attributed to IgM. Finally, vaccine-induced Sp1-specific IgG was more functional than equivalent amounts of naturally occurring IgG. In conclusion, despite a substantially higher pneumococcal meningitis incidence, no decreased functional immunity to Sp1 could be evidenced in the Burkinabé population compared to that in the population from the UK. Furthermore, the naturally induced antibodies were less functional than vaccine-induced antibodies. PMID:25651921

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 1 Burden in the African Meningitis Belt: Exploration of Functionality in Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Moïsi, J. C.; Roalfe, L.; Zancolli, M.; Johnson, M.; Burbidge, P.; Borrow, R.; Yaro, S.; Mueller, J. E.; Gessner, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 (Sp1) constitutes an important cause of seasonal endemic meningitis in all age groups in the African meningitis belt. Despite a higher meningitis incidence, the Burkinabé population has an Sp1-specific antibody seroprevalence similar to that reported in the United Kingdom (UK). We aimed to establish whether the opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) of pneumococcal IgG naturally present in Burkina Faso differs from that seen in individuals in the UK and to compare the OPAs generated by natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Samples collected from pneumococcal vaccine-naive Burkinabé and UK subjects were matched for age (1 to 39 years) and anti-Sp1 IgG level, analyzed for OPA to 3 S. pneumoniae serotypes (1, 5, and 19A), and compared to postvaccine samples. Furthermore, the Burkinabé samples were assessed for IgG avidity and serotype-specific IgM concentrations. One hundred sixty-nine matched serum samples from both populations were selected. A greater proportion of Burkinabé subjects aged 1 to 19 years had functional Sp1 activity (OPA ≥ 8) compared to UK subjects (12% versus 2%, P < 0.001); however, the proportions were similar among adults (9%). The correlation between Sp1 IgG concentration and OPA was good (P < 0.001), but many individuals had nonfunctional IgG, which was not related to avidity. While the Sp1 IgM concentrations correlated with OPA, not all of the function in serum samples with low IgG could be attributed to IgM. Finally, vaccine-induced Sp1-specific IgG was more functional than equivalent amounts of naturally occurring IgG. In conclusion, despite a substantially higher pneumococcal meningitis incidence, no decreased functional immunity to Sp1 could be evidenced in the Burkinabé population compared to that in the population from the UK. Furthermore, the naturally induced antibodies were less functional than vaccine-induced antibodies. PMID:25651921

  11. Real-time PCR for detection of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 in cerebrospinal fluid of human patients with meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Diep, To Song; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Sinh, Dinh Xuan; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Campbell, James; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an emerging zoonotic pathogen and is the main cause of acute bacterial meningitis in adult patients in Vietnam. We developed an internally controlled real-time PCR for detection of S. suis serotype 2 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples targeted at the cps2J gene. Sensitivity and specificity in culture-confirmed clinical samples were 100%. The PCR detected S. suis serotype 2 infection in 101 of 238 (42.4%) prospectively collected CSF samples, of which 55 (23%) were culture positive. Culture-negative but PCR-positive CSF samples were significantly associated with the use of antimicrobial agents before admission. S. suis serotype 2 infection was more common than infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis combined. Our results strikingly illustrate the additional diagnostic value of PCR in patients who are pretreated with antimicrobial agents and demonstrate the extremely high prevalence of S. suis infections among Vietnamese adult patients with bacterial meningitis. PMID:21767702

  12. A Case Report on the Successful Treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Infectious Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Initially Presenting with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms often present with abdominal and lower back pain, but prolonged fever may be the only symptom. Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms initially presenting with meningitis are extremely rare; there are no reports of their successful treatment. Cases with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative bacteria are even rarer with a higher mortality rate than those caused by other bacteria. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with lower limb weakness and back pain. Examination revealed fever and neck stiffness. Cerebrospinal fluid showed leukocytosis and low glucose levels. The patient was diagnosed with meningitis and bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with antibiotics. Fever, inflammatory response, and neurologic findings showed improvement. However, abdominal computed tomography revealed an aneurysm not present on admission. Antibiotics were continued, and a rifampicin soaked artificial vascular graft was implanted. Tissue cultures showed no bacteria, and histological findings indicated inflammation with high leukocyte levels. There were no postoperative complications or neurologic abnormalities. Physical examination, blood tests, and computed tomography confirmed there was no relapse over the following 13 months. This is the first reported case of survival of a patient with an infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm initially presenting with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26779361

  13. Clinical presentation and prognostic factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis according to the focus of infection

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Christian; Konradsen, Helle Bossen; Samuelsson, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    Background We conducted a nationwide study in Denmark to identify clinical features and prognostic factors in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae according to the focus of infection. Methods Based on a nationwide registration, clinical information's was prospectively collected from all reported cases of pneumococcal meningitis during a 2-year period (1999–2000). Clinical and laboratory findings at admission, clinical course and outcome of the disease including follow-up audiological examinations were collected retrospectively. The focus of infection was determined according to the clinical diagnosis made by the physicians and after review of the medical records. Results 187 consecutive cases with S. pneumoniae meningitis were included in the study. The most common focus was ear (30%), followed by lung (18%), sinus (8%), and other (2%). In 42% of cases a primary infection focus could not be determined. On admission, fever and an altered mental status were the most frequent findings (in 93% and 94% of cases, respectively), whereas back rigidity, headache and convulsion were found in 57%, 41% and 11% of cases, respectively. 21% of patients died during hospitalisation (adults: 27% vs. children: 2%, Fisher Exact Test, P < 0.001), and the causes of death were due to neurological – and systemic complications or the combination of both in 8%, 5% and 6% of cases, respectively. Other causes (e.g. gastrointestinal bleeding, incurable cancer) accounted for 2% of cases. 41% of survivors had neurological sequelae (hearing loss: 24%, focal neurological deficits: 16%, and the combination of both: 1%). The mortality varied with the focus of the infection (otogenic: 7%, sinusitic: 33%, pneumonic: 26%, other kind of focus: 50%, no primary infection focus: 21%, Log rank test: P = 0.0005). Prognostic factors associated with fatal outcome in univariate logistic regression analysis were advanced age, presence of an underlying disease, history of headache, presence of a lung focus

  14. B7 homolog 3 aggravates brain injury in a murine model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XUQIN; WANG, YANPING; WANG, ZHEDONG; YAN, RUHONG; LIU, JIE; MENG, XIANGYING; LI, YAN; WANG, JIANGHUAI; WANG, JIAN

    2015-01-01

    Despite the application of antibiotics, Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP)-induced meningitis continues to be a life-threatening disease with a high fatality rate and an elevated risk of serious neurological sequelae, particularly in developing countries. In this study, the contribution of the co-stimulatory molecule B7 homolog 3 (B7-H3) to the pathogenesis of experimental SP-induced meningitis was investigated. Mice were challenged with the intracerebroventricular injection of serotype 3 SP with or without B7-H3. The clinical status of mice with SP-induced meningitis was examined by body weight loss and spontaneous motor activity with neurological scoring. Coronal brain sections were analyzed by counting Nissl-positive neurons and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. Protein expression of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100B in brain tissues was examined with immunohistochemical staining. All experiments were performed in a randomized and blinded setting. By the intracerebroventricular injection of SP suspension, a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis was successfully established. In this SP-induced meningitis model, B7-H3 deteriorated the clinical status, as manifested by a decreased neurological score and increased body weight loss. Following the B7-H3 challenge, the number of Nissl-positive cells decreased and TUNEL-stained positive cells increased in the brain tissues of mice with SP meningitis, which demonstrates the enhancement of neuronal necrosis and apoptosis, respectively. Protein expression of NSE was decreased, while that of S100B was increased. These in vivo findings indicate that B7-H3 aggravates brain injury during the pathological process of experimental SP-induced meningitis. PMID:26136926

  15. [A pediatric case of pneumococcal meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 35F].

    PubMed

    Kara, Soner Sertan; Polat, Meltem; Tapisiz, Anıl; Nar Otgun, Selin; Tezer, Hasan

    2014-04-01

    Pneumococci are one of the most common causes of bacterial meningitis in children. It's also responsible for the other invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) including bacteremia and pneumonia worldwide. Unvaccinated children are more prone to IPD. Although IPD tend to have a higher prevalence under 2 years of age and in children with primary/secondary immunodeficiencies, and various predisposing factors, older age groups with no underlying diseases also experience IPD. In this report, a pediatric case diagnosed with meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 35F with no underlying condition and no history of pneumococcal vaccination was presented. An 11-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with the complaints of high (39.4°C) fever, headache, vomiting and sleepiness. On the basis of findings from physical examination and laboratory results, the patient was prediagnosed as bacterial meningitis and empirical ceftriaxone and vancomycin therapy was initiated. The cerebrospinal fluid culture of the patient yielded penicillin-susceptible pneumococci and the isolate was identified as serotype 35F by quellung reaction. Vancomycin treatment discontinued depending on the culture result, and the patient fully recovered with 14-days of ceftriaxone therapy without any complications during his follow-ups. Although effective antibiotics are available for IPD, vaccination is indispensable considering the high mortality rates. Seven serotypes (1, 5, 6A, 6B, 14, 19F, 23F) which are currently included in the vaccine, were the most common serotypes related to IPD globally. After mass infant vaccination has been introduced, invasive pneumococcal diseases due to the vaccine serotypes have tended to decrease in both vaccinated young children and non-vaccinated age groups due to herd immunity. Nevertheless, non-vaccine serotypes (NVTs) have emerged as the agents of IPD as a result of serotype replacement. 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was

  16. Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae as leading causes of pediatric bacterial meningitis in nine Mexican hospitals following 3 years of active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Cruz, Enrique; Martinez-Longoria, Cesar Adrian; Llausas-Magana, Eduardo; Luevanos-Velazquez, Antonio; Vazquez-Narvaez, Jorge Alejandro; Beltran, Sandra; Limon-Rojas, Ana Elena; Urtiz-Jeronimo, Fernando; Castaneda-Narvaez, Jose Luis; Otero-Mendoza, Francisco; Aguilar-Del Real, Fernando; Rodriguez-Chagoyan, Jesus; Rivas-Landeros, Rosa Maria; Volker-Soberanes, Maria Luisa; Hinojosa-Robles, Rosa Maria; Arzate-Barbosa, Patricia; Aviles-Benitez, Laura Karina; Elenes-Zamora, Fernando Ivan; Becka, Chandra M.; Ruttimann, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Meningococcal meningitis is reported as a rare condition in Mexico. There are no internationally published studies on bacterial causes of meningitis in the country based on active surveillance. This study focuses on finding the etiology of bacterial meningitis in children from nine Mexican Hospitals. Methods: From January 2010 to February 2013, we conducted a three years of active surveillance for meningitis in nine hospitals throughout Mexico. Active surveillance started at the emergency department for every suspected case, and microbiological studies confirmed/ruled out all potentially bacterial pathogens. We diagnosed based on routine cultures from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (not polymerase chain reaction or other molecular diagnostic tests), and both pneumococcal serotyping and meningococcal serogrouping by using standard methods. Results: Neisseria meningitidis was the leading cause, although 75% of cases occurred in the northwest of the country in Tijuana on the US border. Serogroup C was predominant. Streptococcus pneumoniae followed Neisseria meningitides, but was uniformly distributed throughout the country. Serotype 19A was the most incident but before universal implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Other bacteria were much less common, including Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus agalactiae (these two affecting mostly young infants). Conclusions: Meningococcal meningitis is endemic in Tijuana, Mexico, and vaccination should be seriously considered in that region. Continuous universal vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine should be nationally performed, and polymerase chain reaction should be included for bacterial detection in all cultures – negative but presumably bacterial meningitis cases. PMID:27551428

  17. Evaluation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and memory in adult rats survivors of the neonatal meningitis by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Lemos, Joelson C; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Carradore, Mirelle M; Moreira, Ana Paula; Collodel, Allan; Zanatta, Jessiele R; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in neonates and young infants, causing sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis. The survivors from this meningitis can suffer serious long-term neurological consequences, such as, seizures, hearing loss, learning and memory impairments. Neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) control the neuronal cell death during the brain development and play an important role in neuronal differentiation, survival and growth of neurons. Neonate Wistar rats, received either 10μL of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of GBS suspension at a concentration of 1×10(6)cfu/mL. Sixty days after induction of meningitis, the animals underwent behavioral tests, after were killed and the hippocampus and cortex were retired for analyze of the BDNF and NGF levels. In the open-field demonstrated no difference in motor, exploratory activity and habituation memory between the groups. The step-down inhibitory avoidance, when we evaluated the long-term memory at 24h after training session, we found that the meningitis group had a decrease in aversive memory when compared with the long-term memory test of the sham group. BDNF levels decreased in hippocampus and cortex; however the NGF levels decreased only in hippocampus. These findings suggest that the meningitis model could be a good research tool for the study of the biological mechanisms involved in the behavioral alterations secondary to GBS meningitis.

  18. Immunoinformatics Approach in Designing Epitope-based Vaccine Against Meningitis-inducing Bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae Type b)

    PubMed Central

    Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Ma’rup, Ahmad; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Parikesit, Arli Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis infection is one of the major threats during Hajj season in Mecca. Meningitis vaccines are available, but their uses are limited in some countries due to religious reasons. Furthermore, they only give protection to certain serogroups, not to all types of meningitis-inducing bacteria. Recently, research on epitope-based vaccines has been developed intensively. Such vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines in that they are safer to use and well responded to the antibody. In this study, we developed epitope-based vaccine candidates against various meningitis-inducing bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The epitopes were selected from their protein of polysaccharide capsule. B-cell epitopes were predicted by using BCPred, while T-cell epitope for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I was predicted using PAProC, TAPPred, and Immune Epitope Database. Immune Epitope Database was also used to predict T-cell epitope for MHC class II. Population coverage and molecular docking simulation were predicted against previously generated epitope vaccine candidates. The best candidates for MHC class I- and class II-restricted T-cell epitopes were MQYGDKTTF, MKEQNTLEI, ECTEGEPDY, DLSIVVPIY, YPMAMMWRNASNRAI, TLQMTLLGIVPNLNK, ETSLHHIPGISNYFI, and SLLYILEKNAEMEFD, which showed 80% population coverage. The complexes of class I T-cell epitopes–HLA-C*03:03 and class II T-cell epitopes–HLA-DRB1*11:01 showed better affinity than standards as evaluated from their ΔGbinding value and the binding interaction between epitopes and HLA molecules. These peptide constructs may further be undergone in vitro and in vivo testings for the development of targeted vaccine against meningitis infection. PMID:27812281

  19. Using PCR-based detection and genotyping to trace Streptococcus salivarius meningitis outbreak strain to oral flora of radiology physician assistant.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz, Robert E; Shewmaker, Patricia L; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  20. Using PCR-Based Detection and Genotyping to Trace Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Outbreak Strain to Oral Flora of Radiology Physician Assistant

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz Jr., Robert E.; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S.; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  1. Efficacy of GM6001 as an adjuvant to ceftriaxone in a neonatal rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Han, Qizheng

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis; therefore, MMP inhibitors may be a neuroprotective treatment for brain injury caused by meningitis because of their antiinflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the MMP inhibitor GM6001 in a rat model of S. pneumoniae meningitis. For these experiments, 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into an uninfected group, meningitis group, antibiotic group and GM6001+antibiotic group. Uninfected animals were sham infected with sterile saline. Rats in the other three groups were inoculated with S. pneumoniae and left untreated, treated with ceftriaxone, or treated with ceftriaxone combined with GM6001. Rats in the meningitis group were severely ill, and MMP-9 was significantly up-regulated. The change in brain water content was consistent with the MMP-9 level. A significant loss of neurons and impaired learning function were observed in the meningitis group. Treatment with the antibiotic and GM6001 significantly down-regulated the level of MMP-9, decreased the brain water content, attenuated neuronal injury and improved learning. Conclusions: GM6001 protected the brain from damage caused by S. pneumoniae, and this effect may occur via downregulating MMP-9 and decreasing brain water content. PMID:25576979

  2. Meningitis - tuberculous

    MedlinePlus

    Tubercular meningitis; TB meningitis ... Tuberculous meningitis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis . This is the bacteria that causes tuberculosis ( TB ). The bacteria spread to the brain and spine from another place in the body. ...

  3. Bacterial Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... group B Streptococcus , Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae , and Listeria monocytogenes . In the United States, about 4,100 ... Newborns Group B Streptococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes Infants and Children Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, ...

  4. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency requiring immediate diagnosis and immediate treatment. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common and most aggressive pathogens of meningitis. Emerging antibiotic resistance is an upcoming challenge. Clinical and experimental studies have established a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms resulting in brain damage, sequelae and neuropsychological deficits. We summarize the current pathophysiological concept of acute bacterial meningitis and present current treatment strategies. PMID:21180625

  5. Meningitis - cryptococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Most cryptococcal meningitis is caused by the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans . This fungus is found in soil around the world. Another type of Cryptococcus can also cause meningitis, but it will not ...

  6. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... opisthotonos ) Pneumococcal meningitis is an important cause of fever in children. ... room if you suspect meningitis in a young child who has the following ... fever Call the local emergency number if you develop ...

  7. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially from late spring to fall when these viruses spread most often. However, only a small number ... infected with enteroviruses will actually develop meningitis. Other viruses that can cause meningitis are Mumps virus Herpesviruses, ...

  8. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  9. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available.

  10. Meningitis - staphylococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Staphylococcal meningitis is caused by Staphylococcus bacteria. When it is caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria, it usually develops as a complication of surgery or ...

  11. Treating Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways to treat bacterial meningitis. 1 They compared steroids (dexamethasone) with pla- cebo. The doctors gave medication ( ... compared anti- biotics by themselves with antibiotics plus steroids. Dr. Fritz and colleagues compared the mortality (deaths) ...

  12. Meningitis - meningococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most commonly used antibiotics for meningococcal meningitis. Penicillin in high doses is almost always effective, too. If the patient is allergic to penicillin, chloramphenicol may be used. Sometimes corticosteroids may be ...

  13. Meningococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. The extended meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa, stretching from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia ... ampicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone. Under epidemic conditions in Africa in areas with limited health infrastructure and resources, ...

  14. Eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Chotmongkol, Verajit

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis is defined by the presence of at least 10% eosinophils in the total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leukocyte count. Although there are several possible causes of eosinophils in the CSF, parasitic infection is the main cause. The three common parasites causing eosinophilic meningitis include Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, and Taenia solium. Even though these parasites are endemic in tropical countries, they are now spreading globally due to extensive traveling, and physicians worldwide should pay more attention to this condition. This chapter will review risk factors, clinical manifestations, and treatment of these three parasites.

  15. Meningitis - gram-negative

    MedlinePlus

    Gram-negative meningitis ... Acute bacterial meningitis can be caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Meningococcal and H. influenzae meningitis are caused by Gram-negative bacteria and are covered in detail in other articles. This article ...

  16. Childhood meningitis in the conjugate vaccine era: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Manish; Willis, Louise; Kadambari, Seilesh; Gormley, Stuart; Young, Zoe; Beckley, Rebecca; Gantlett, Katherine; Orf, Katharine; Blakey, Sarah; Martin, Natalie G; Kelly, Dominic F; Heath, Paul T; Nadel, Simon; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial conjugate vaccines have dramatically changed the epidemiology of childhood meningitis; viral causes are increasingly predominant, but the current UK epidemiology is unknown. This prospective study recruited children under 16 years of age admitted to 3 UK hospitals with suspected meningitis. 70/388 children had meningitis-13 bacterial, 26 viral and 29 with no pathogen identified. Group B Streptococcus was the most common bacterial pathogen. Infants under 3 months of age with bacterial meningitis were more likely to have a reduced Glasgow Coma Score and respiratory distress than those with viral meningitis or other infections. There were no discriminatory clinical features in older children. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) white blood cell count and plasma C-reactive protein at all ages, and CSF protein in infants <3 months of age, distinguished between bacterial meningitis and viral meningitis or other infections. Improved diagnosis of non-bacterial meningitis is urgently needed to reduce antibiotic use and hospital stay.

  17. Chickenpox complicated by pneumococcal meningitis: a rare coinfection.

    PubMed

    Rebahi, H; Mouaffak, Y; Soraa, N; Younous, S

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial complications, particularly skin superinfections, are common during chickenpox. However, reports of acute bacterial meningitis associated with chickenpox are unusual and amount to only a very few observations. For the most part, they are caused by Neisseria meningitidis or Streptococcus pyogenes. We report an infrequent occurrence of pneumococcal meningitis 2 days after the onset of a chickenpox rash in a 7-year-old previously healthy boy. Based on data from the literature, we attempt to understand the possible mechanisms resulting in bacterial complications, particularly meningitis, during chickenpox and to determine the means to prevent it.

  18. Neutrophilic bacterial meningitis: pathology and etiologic diagnosis of fatal cases.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Liu, Lindy; Bhatnagar, Julu; Jones, Tara; Patel, Mitesh; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Zaki, Sherif R

    2013-08-01

    The frequency of fatalities due to acute bacterial meningitis has decreased significantly due to vaccinations, early diagnoses, and treatments. We studied brain tissues of patients with fatal neutrophilic meningitis referred to the Centers for Disease Control for etiologic diagnosis from 2000-2009 to highlight aspects of the disease that may be preventable or treatable. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were extracted from records. Of 117 cases in the database with a diagnosis of meningitis or meningoencephalitis, 39 had neutrophilic inflammation in the meninges. Inflammatory cells infiltrated the superficial cortex in 16 of 39 (41%) cases. Bacteria were found using Gram and bacterial silver stains in 72% of cases, immunohistochemistry in 69% (including two cases where the meningococcus was found outside the meninges), and PCR in 74%. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the cause of the meningitis in 14 patients and Neisseria meningitidis in 9. In addition, Streptococcus spp. were found to be the cause in six cases, while Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Fusobacterium were the cause of one case each. There were six cases in which no specific etiological agent could be determined. The mean age of the patients with S. pneumoniae was 39 years (range 0-65), with N. meningitidis was 19 years (range 7-51), whereas that for all others was 31 years (range 0-68). In summary, our study shows that S. pneumoniae continues to be the most frequent cause of fatal neutrophilic bacterial meningitis followed by N. meningitidis, both vaccine preventable diseases. PMID:23558577

  19. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult. PMID:26954796

  20. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging pathogen to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia, multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a human neonatal meningitis clinical case causes disease signs and mortality in N...

  1. Iron acquisition and regulation systems in Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ruiguang; Sun, Xuesong

    2014-05-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus species are responsible for millions of cases of meningitis, bacterial pneumonia, endocarditis, erysipelas and necrotizing fasciitis. Iron is essential for the growth and survival of Streptococcus in the host environment. Streptococcus species have developed various mechanisms to uptake iron from an environment with limited available iron. Streptococcus can directly extract iron from host iron-containing proteins such as ferritin, transferrin, lactoferrin and hemoproteins, or indirectly by relying on the employment of specialized secreted hemophores (heme chelators) and small siderophore molecules (high affinity ferric chelators). This review presents the most recent discoveries in the iron acquisition system of Streptococcus species - the transporters as well as the regulators.

  2. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... No. 04-4840 Back to Meningitis and Encephalitis Information Page See a list of all NINDS Disorders Publicaciones en Español Meningitis y Encefalitis Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  3. Meningitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. Most cases are caused by bacteria or viruses, but some can be due to certain medications or illnesses. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but is usually serious and can be life threatening if not treated right away. Viral meningitis ( ...

  4. The management of bacterial meningitis in children.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Curtis, Nigel; Fuller, David G

    2003-08-01

    Bacterial meningitis is still a major cause of death and disability in children worldwide. With the advent of conjugate vaccines against the three major pathogens, the burden of disease is increasingly concentrated in developing countries that cannot afford the vaccines. Antibiotic resistance is an increasing problem; in developed countries, high-level resistance to beta-lactams among Streptococcus pneumoniae necessitates the addition of vancomycin to third-generation cephalosporins. In many developing countries, the problems are more fundamental. Increasing resistance of S. pneumoniae to penicillin and chloramphenicol and of Haemophilus influenzae to chloramphenicol means that many children with bacterial meningitis receive ineffective treatments, as third-generation cephalosporins are often unavailable or unaffordable. Case fatality rates are as high as 50% and neurological sequelae occur in one-third of survivors. The use of corticosteroids in meningitis is controversial; the evidence that they protect against neurological complications of childhood meningitis (particularly severe hearing loss) is strongest when: meningitis is caused by H. influenzae type b; dexamethasone is given before the first dose of antibiotics; a bactericidal antibiotic such as a third-generation cephalosporin is used; and in the early stages of the infection. There are few controlled clinical trials on which to base recommendations about other adjuvant therapy for meningitis. Avoidance of secondary brain injury from hypoxia, hypotension, hypo-osmolarity and cerebral oedema, hypoglycaemia or convulsions is essential for a good outcome. The problem of bacterial meningitis will only be solved if protein-conjugate vaccines (or other effective vaccine strategies) against S. pneumonia, H. influenzae and epidemic strains of Neisseria meningitidis are available to all the world's children. Making third-generation cephalosporins affordable in the developing world is also a necessary intervention

  5. Streptococcal Meningitis Resulting from Contact with an Infected Horse

    PubMed Central

    Downar, James; Willey, Barbara M.; Sutherland, Jeffrey W.; Mathew, Kelly; Low, Donald E.

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of group C streptococcal meningitis in a woman with a history of close animal contact as well as head trauma as a result of a kick by a horse. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures grew Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, as did a throat culture taken from the colt that had kicked her 2 weeks prior to admission. PMID:11376093

  6. Etiology of Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Iran: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yeganeh-Sefidan, Fatemeh; Salahi-Eshlaqi, Behnaz; Ebrahimzadeh-Leylabadlo, Hamed

    2015-08-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is one of the most severe infectious diseases, causing neurologic sequel, and a case fatality rate of 20-30%. The aim of this paper was to summarize the main causes of ABM in Iran. We searched the data for relevant articles using meningitis, etiology, and Iran as search terms. We found 23 papers for inclusion in the review that focused specifically on the ABM, addressing etiology and acute meningitis. Finally, during the 23 years, a total of 18163 cases were recorded, and 1074 cases of which met the criteria for bacterial meningitis. The most common agent associated with bacterial meningitis was S. pneumoniae, followed by H. influenzae, Enterobacter spp., N. meningitidis, and group B streptococcus. The total incidence of ABM during 1991 to 2002 was higher than during 2003-2013. S. pneumoniae still remains a main cause of bacterial meningitis. For improved outcomes, studies are needed to further clarify the etiology of meningitis in Iran, explore simple, accurate, and practical diagnostic tools as PCR, and investigate the most appropriate specific and supportive interventions to manage and prevent meningitis as vaccination.

  7. Meningitis admitted to a military hospital: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Travis; Hammes, John S

    2012-10-01

    Meningitis is a common admission diagnosis. No case series or descriptive studies on meningitis have recently been published. Additionally, no recent data exist on meningitis in the U.S. Military Health System. We reviewed charts of adult patients admitted to Naval Medical Center San Diego between January 2004 and December 2008 with an admission diagnosis of meningitis. Charts were excluded if they did not meet our case definition of meningitis, if missing data, or if meningitis was nosocomial or iatrogenic. We reviewed results of cerebrospinal fluid cultures during this period. We compared rates and characteristics, and outcomes of bacterial and aseptic meningitis. Two hundred twenty-one cases met our criteria. Of these, 208 were aseptic. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction testing was positive for enteroviruses and herpes simplex viruses in 42 (20.2%) and 17 (8.2%) cases, respectively. Of culture/polymerase chain reaction/serologically positive cases, the pathogens were Neisseria meningitidis (3), Streptococcus pneumoniae (3), viridans streptococci (2), Cryptococcus neoformans (2), Coccidioides immitis (2), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (1). Three patients had poor outcomes: one died from S. pneumoniae and two had long-term neurologic deficits. Meningitis is a common admission diagnosis, but serious virulent pathogens are uncommon and adverse outcomes are rare.

  8. Epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Niamey, Niger, 1981-96.

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, G.; Schuchat, A.; Djibo, S.; Ousséini, A.; Cissé, L.; Chippaux, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    In the African meningitis belt the importance of endemic meningitis is not as well recognized as that of epidemics of meningococcal meningitis that occur from time to time. Using retrospective surveillance, we identified a total of 7078 cases of laboratory-diagnosed bacterial meningitis in Niamey, Niger, from 1981 to 1996. The majority (57.7%) were caused by Neisseria meningitidis, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (13.2%) and Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) (9.5%). The mean annual incidence of bacterial meningitis was 101 per 100,000 population (70 per 100,000 during 11 non-epidemic years) and the average annual mortality rate was 17 deaths per 100,000. Over a 7-year period (including one major epidemic year) for which data were available, S. pneumoniae and Hib together caused more meningitis deaths than N. meningitidis. Meningitis cases were more common among males and occurred mostly during the dry season. Serogroup A caused 85.6% of meningococcal meningitis cases during the period investigated; three-quarters of these occurred among children aged < 15 years, and over 40% among under-5-year-olds. Both incidence and mortality rates were highest among infants aged < 1 year. In this age group, Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, followed by S. pneumoniae. The predominant cause of meningitis in persons aged 1-40 years was N. meningitidis. Use of the available vaccines against meningitis due to N. meningitidis, S. pneumoniae, and Hib could prevent substantial endemic illness and deaths in sub-Saharan Africa, and potentially prevent recurrent meningococcal epidemics. PMID:10427935

  9. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  10. [Meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mouchrif, Issam; Berdaii, Adnane; Labib, Ismail; Harrandou, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is a rare but serious complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Bacterial meningitis is mainly caused by Gram-positive cocci, implying an exogenous contamination which suggests a lack of asepsis. The evolution is usually favorable after treatment, but at the expense of increased health care costs and, sometimes, of significant neurological sequelae. We report a case of bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section. PMID:27642477

  11. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  12. Meninges in cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Mahendru, G; Chong, V

    2009-10-02

    Primary malignant tumours arising from the meninges are distinctly uncommon, and when they occur, they are usually sarcomas. In contrast, metastatic meningeal involvement is increasingly seen as advances in cancer therapy have changed the natural history of malignant disease and prolonged the life span of cancer patients. The meninges can either be infiltrated by contiguous extension of primary tumours of the central nervous system, paranasal sinuses and skull base origin or can be diffusely infiltrated from haematogenous dissemination from distant primary malignancies. Imaging in these patients provides crucial information in planning management. This article reviews the pertinent anatomy that underlies imaging findings, discusses the mechanism of meningeal metastasis and highlights different imaging patterns of meningeal carcinomatosis and the pitfalls.

  13. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  14. [Rapid identification of meningitis due to bacterial pathogens].

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Kimiko

    2013-01-01

    We constructed a new real-time PCR method to detect causative pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patient due to bacterial meningitis. The eight pathogens targeted in the PCR are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aurues, Neisseria meningitides, Listeria monocytogenes, Esherichia coli, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The total time from DNA extraction from CSF to PCR analysis was 1.5 hour. The pathogens were detected in 72% of the CSF samples (n=115) by real-time PCR, but in only 48% by culture, although the microorganisms were completely concordant. The detection rate of pathogens with PCR was significantly better than that with cultures in patients with antibiotic administration.In conclusion, detection with real-time PCR is useful for rapidly identifying the causative pathogens of meningitis and for examining the clinical course of chemotherapy.

  15. Hypopituitarism as consequence of late neonatal infection by Group B streptococcus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Amanda Santana; Fernandes, Ana Lourdes Lima Araújo; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a condition characterized by dysfunction of the pituitary gland hormone production. The insults of the perinatal period, which includes the late infection by Group B Streptococcus, consists in a rare etiology of this condition. We present the case of a 39-days-old infant with meningitis caused by Streptococcus Group B, which showed, among other consequences, hypopituitarism. PMID:26161231

  16. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date.

  17. Vaccine preventable meningitis in Malaysia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Hannah C; Jefferies, Johanna M C; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide bacterial meningitis accounts for more than one million cases and 135,000 deaths annually. Profound, lasting neurological complications occur in 9-25% of cases. This review confirms the greatest risk from bacterial meningitis is in early life in Malaysia. Much of the disease burden can be avoided by immunization, particularly against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite inclusion of the Hib vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme and the licensure of pneumococcal vaccines, these two species are the main contributors to bacterial meningitis in Malaysia, with Neisseria meningitidis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing a smaller proportion of disease. The high Hib prevalence may partly be due to dated, small-scale studies limiting the understanding of the current epidemiological situation. This highlights the need for larger, better quality surveillance from Malaysia to evaluate the success of Hib immunization and to help guide immunization policy for vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis.

  18. Unilateral common cavity deformity: Recurrent meningitis due to insufficient newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Kivekäs, Ilkka; Vasama, Juha-Pekka; Weitz-Tuoretmaa, Annamaria; Hakomäki, Jari; Rautiainen, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Insufficient newborn hearing screening may leave the other ear with undetected hearing loss. Subsequently, the missed pathology behind the impairment may have potential risk for severe infections. We describe a case of recurrent Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis in an infant with unilateral common cavity deformity. The diagnosis of the deaf left ear was delayed due to insufficient newborn hearing screening and not until the second meningitis the pathology behind the deafness was confirmed. Subtotal petrosectomy was performed unsuccessfully and resulted in another meningitis. We highlight the importance of proper newborn hearing screening and surgical technique to treat cochlear malformations.

  19. [Congenital skull base defect causing recurrent bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Berliner, Elihay; Bar Meir, Maskit; Megged, Orli

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life threatening disease. Most patients will experience only one episode throughout life. Children who experience bacterial meningitis more than once, require further immunologic or anatomic evaluation. We report a 9 year old child with five episodes of bacterial meningitis due to a congenital defect of the skull base. A two and a half year old boy first presented to our medical center with pneumococcal meningitis. He was treated with antibiotics and fully recovered. Two months later he presented again with a similar clinical picture. Streptococcus pneumoniae grew in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture. CT scan and later MRI of the brain revealed a defect in the anterior middle fossa floor, with protrusion of brain tissue into the sphenoidal sinus. Corrective surgery was recommended but the parents refused. Three months later, a third episode of pneumococcal meningitis occurred. The child again recovered with antibiotics and this time corrective surgery was performed. Five years later, the boy presented once again with clinical signs and symptoms consistent with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture was positive, but the final identification of the bacteria was conducted by broad spectrum 16S ribosomal RNA PCR (16S rRNA PCR) which revealed a sequence of Neisseria lactamica. CT and MRI showed recurrence of the skull base defect with encephalocele in the sphenoid sinus. The parents again refused neurosurgical intervention. A year later the patient presented with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture obtained after initiation of antibiotics was negative, but actinobacillus was identified in the CSF by 16S rRNA PCR. The patient is scheduled for neurosurgical intervention. In patients with recurrent bacterial meningitis caused by organisms colonizing the oropharynx or nasopharynx, an anatomical defect should be carefully sought and surgically repaired. PMID:23350293

  20. Population-based surveillance for bacterial meningitis in the Dominican Republic: implications for control by vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gomez, E; Peguero, M; Sanchez, J; Castellanos, P L; Feris, J; Peña, C; Brudzinski-LaClaire, L; Levine, O S

    2000-12-01

    Quantifying the local burden of disease is an important step towards the introduction of new vaccines, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine. We adapted a generic protocol developed by the World Health Organization for population-based surveillance of bacterial meningitis. All hospitals that admit paediatric patients with meningitis in the National District, Dominican Republic were included in the system and standard laboratory methods were used. The system identified 111 cases of confirmed bacterial meningitis. Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, followed by group B streptococcus, S. pneumoniae, and N. meningitidis. Unlike hospital-based case series, this population-based system was able to calculate incidence rates. The incidence of Hib meningitis was 13 cases per 100,000 children < 5 years old. The data from this study were used by the Ministry of Health to support the introduction of routine Hib vaccination and will be used to monitor its effectiveness.

  1. Recent advances in understanding the molecular basis of group B Streptococcus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Maisey, Heather C.; Doran, Kelly S.; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus commonly colonises healthy adults without symptoms, yet under certain circumstances displays the ability to invade host tissues, evade immune detection and cause serious invasive disease. Consequently, Group B Streptococcus remains a leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. Here we review recent information on the bacterial factors and mechanisms that direct host–pathogen interactions involved in the pathogenesis of Group B Streptococcus infection. New research on host signalling and inflammatory responses to Group B Streptococcus infection is summarised. An understanding of the complex interplay between Group B Streptococcus and host provides valuable insight into pathogen evolution and highlights molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:18803886

  2. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilitic aseptic meningitis is a complication of untreated syphilis. It involves inflammation of the tissues covering the ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacteria Treponema pallidum . Syphilis has three main ...

  3. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Meningitis and Encephalitis ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  4. DISCUSSION ON MENINGITIS

    PubMed Central

    1929-01-01

    (1) Meningitis: two groups of cases. (2) A method of washing out the subarachnoid space in cases of septic meningitis secondary to infection of the ear. (3) Discussion on the value of maintaining a positive pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid when operating on a septic region communicating with the subarachnoid space. (4) Leaking cerebrospinal fluid from the region of the ear: operative treatment. PMID:19986899

  5. Approach to Chronic Lymphocytic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Nadkarni, Nilesh

    2015-09-01

    Chronic meningitis is a common clinical problem. Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy is important in improving the overall outcome and to prevent long-lasting sequels. As many etiological agents lead to the development of chronic lymphocytic meningitis, it is important to develop a systematic approach to the diagnosis; taking clues from history, examination and laboratory tests, to make an accurate diagnosis and institute appropriate therapy. This review focuses on the diagnostic approach towards the commonly encountered situation of chronic lymphocytic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is defined as meningeal inflammation that persists for more than 4 weeks. Chronic meningitis accounts for less than 10% of all the cases of meningitis.1 Causes of chronic lymphocytic meningitis are mainly divided into infectious and non-infectious listed in Table 1.2 Due to advancement in investigations, diseases causing chronic meningitis may be diagnosed earlier than 4 weeks and hence the definition should be considered as a rough guideline. PMID:27608867

  6. Usefulness of inflammatory biomarkers in discriminating between bacterial and aseptic meningitis in hospitalized children from a population with low vaccination coverage

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Jacek; Avonts, Dirk; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Michalak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most frequent pathogens responsible for meningitis beyond the neonatal period. Aseptic meningitis is a disabling condition, but bacterial meningitis if left untreated is 100% fatal. The aim of the study was to analyze the usefulness of biochemical and hematological parameters in distinguishing between bacterial and non-bacterial meningitis in children with meningitis from a population with low rates of vaccination against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. Material and methods This study is a retrospective chart review of children hospitalized with meningitis. In patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis the following parameters were compared: C-reactive protein, D-dimers, fibrinogen, glucose level, and leukocyte level, and in cerebrospinal fluid, protein, glucose, and leukocyte concentrations were analyzed. Number of points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score (BMS) was calculated. The predictive value of each parameter to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis was evaluated. Results In total, 129 patients were included in the study: 65 diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and 64 with aseptic meningitis. Bacterial and aseptic meningitis were statistically significantly different based on each analyzed parameter (p < 0.000001). Among children with aseptic meningitis 42 (66%) scored 0 points in the BMS, while all the children with bacterial meningitis had at least one point. Conclusions In children with meningitis inflammatory biomarkers differ statistically significantly depending on the etiology – bacterial or aseptic. Serum concentration of C-reactive protein higher than 80 mg/dl is a useful marker of bacterial etiology of meningitis. A high Bacterial Meningitis Score is indicative for bacterial meningitis. PMID:27186188

  7. Different meningitis-causing bacteria induce distinct inflammatory responses on interaction with cells of the human meninges.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Mark I; Weller, Roy O; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2004-06-01

    The interactions of bacterial pathogens with cells of the human leptomeninges are critical events in the progression of meningitis. An in vitro model based on the culture of human meningioma cells was used to investigate the interactions of the meningeal pathogens Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. A rank order of association with meningioma cells was observed, with N. meningitidis showing the highest levels of adherence, followed by E. coli, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Neisseria meningitidis and H. influenzae did not invade meningioma cells or induce cell death, but induced a concentration-dependent secretion of inflammatory mediators. Neisseria meningitidis induced higher levels of IL-6, MCP-1, RANTES and GM-CSF than H. influenzae, but there was no significant difference in the levels of IL-8 induced by both pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae was also unable to invade meningioma cells, but low concentrations of bacteria failed to stimulate cytokine secretion. However, higher concentrations of pneumococci led to cell death. By contrast, only E. coli K1 invaded meningioma cells directly and induced rapid cell death before an inflammatory response could be induced. These data demonstrate that the interactions of different bacterial pathogens with human meningeal cells are distinct, and suggest that different intervention strategies may be needed in order to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis.

  8. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  9. Amoeba Host Model for Evaluation of Streptococcus suis Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Charette, Steve J.; Filion, Geneviève; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Grenier, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen worldwide that causes meningitis, septicemia, and endocarditis. In this study, we demonstrate that the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be a relevant alternative system to study the virulence of S. suis. PMID:21742906

  10. Meninges of the spine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by 3 connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges. Consisting of the pia mater (closest to the ... the dura mater (farthest from the CNS), the meninges also support blood vessels and contain cerebrospinal fluid. ...

  11. Meninges of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by 3 connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges. Consisting of the pia mater (closest to the ... the dura mater (farthest from the CNS), the meninges also support blood vessels and contain cerebrospinal fluid. ...

  12. [Endocarditis, meningitis, pneumopathy and pneumococcal cerebral abscess in an alcoholic smoker].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Roth, S; Montagne, N

    2001-10-01

    We report a case of mitral endocarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in a 43 year old man with history of alcohol abuse and cigarette smoking. The pneumococcal endocarditis was associated with pneumonia, meningitis and brain abscess. Only transesophageal echocardiography could confirm the presence of vegetation. The patient was treated medically with good results. PMID:11887774

  13. Aetiological agents of cerebrospinal meningitis: a retrospective study from a teaching hospital in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in low-resource settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, the meningitis belt has been characterized by particularly high and seasonal incidences of bacterial meningitis extending throughout life. Despite the progress being made in treating the condition, the mortality rates continue to be high, ranging between 2% and 30% globally. In Ghana, the mortality rate of meningitis has been estimated to range from 36% to 50%. However little information is available on the pathogens contributing to meningitis and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Updated information is essential to adjust the recommendations for empirical treatment or prevention of meningitis which could have immense implications for local and global health. Methods We retrospectively reviewed laboratory records of all patients suspected of bacterial meningitis who underwent a lumbar puncture from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data were retrieved from laboratory record books and double entered into a Microsoft® excel spreadsheet. Results Records of 4,955 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed. Of these, 163 (3.3%, 95%CI: 2.8% to 3.8%) were confirmed meningitis and 106 (2.1%, 95%CI: 1.7% to 2.6%) were probable meningitis cases. Confirmed meningitis cases were made up of 117 (71.8%) culture positive bacteria, 19 (11.7%) culture positive Cryptococcus neoformans and 27(16.6%) Gram positive bacteria with negative culture. The most prevalent bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae 91 (77.7%), followed by E.coli 4 (3.4%), Salmonella species 4 (3.4%), Neisseria meningitidis 3 (2.5%), Pseudomonas species 3(2.5%) and others. Pneumococcal isolates susceptibility to penicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone were 98.9% (95%CI: 94.0% to 100.0%), 83.0% (95%CI: 73.4% to 90.1%) and 100.0% (95%CI: 95.8% to 100.0%) respectively. Conclusion Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of meningitis among all age groups and its

  14. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  15. Scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jun-Young; Han, Mi Ah; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2013-12-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi induces vasculitis leading to symptoms of systemic organ invasion including meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of scrub typhus patients to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and the therapeutic outcomes, and to determine the predictor factors. Cases were 22 patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and controls were 303 patients without meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of pneumonitis was associated with the occurrence of scrub typhus meningitis and meningoencephalitis (odds ratio [OR] 8.9; P < 0.001; confidence interval [CI] 2.9-27.2). Although appropriate antimicrobials such as doxycycline agents were administered at an early stage, meningitis or meningoencephalitis still occurred in some cases. Physicians should be aware that meningitis or meningoencephalitis may develop during appropriate drug therapy such as doxycycline. Close observation and great care are essential for patients with risk factors, particularly pneumonitis.

  16. The novel species Streptococcus tigurinus and its association with oral infection.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Andrea; Bostanci, Nagihan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a novel species of viridans streptococci, shown to cause severe invasive infections such as infective endocarditis, spondylodiscitis and meningitis. S. tigurinus belongs to the Streptococcus mitis group and is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and Streptococcus infantis. The presence of S. tigurinus in the human oral cavity has been documented, including in patients with periodontal disease. This review addresses the available scientific knowledge on S. tigurinus and its association with closely related streptococci, and discusses its putative involvement in common oral infections. While there is as yet no strong evidence on the involvement of S. tigurinus with oral infections, its presence in the oral cavity and its association with endocarditis warrants special attention for a link between oral and systemic infection.

  17. Diagnostic performance of a multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-03-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: cytomegalovirus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=2), human herpes virus 6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. PMID:26711635

  18. Folic acid prevented cognitive impairment in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Steckert, Amanda V; Moreira, Ana Paula; Dominguini, Diogo; Ferrari, Pâmela; Gubert, Carolina; Kapczinski, Flávio; Jornada, Luciano K; Danielski, Lucineia G; Petronilho, Fabricia; Budni, Josiane; Quevedo, João

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, with a high mortality rate and neurological sequelae. In contrast, folic acid plays an important role in neuroplasticity and the preservation of neuronal integrity. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of folic acid on memory, oxidative damage, enzymatic defence, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. In animals that received folic acid at a dose of 10 or 50 mg, there was a reduction in both crossing and rearing during an open-field task compared with the training session, demonstrating habituation memory. During a step-down inhibitory avoidance task, there was a difference between the training and the test sessions, demonstrating aversive memory. In the hippocampus, BDNF expression decreased in the meningitis group; however, adjuvant treatment with 10 mg of folic acid increased BDNF expression, decreased lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, nitrate/nitrite levels, and myeloperoxidase activity and increased superoxide dismutase activity. In frontal cortex adjuvant treatment with 10 mg of folic acid decreased lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation. There is substantial interest in the role of folic acid and related pathways in nervous system function and in folic acid's potential therapeutic effects. Here, adjuvant treatment with vitamin B9 prevented memory impairment in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  19. Group-A-streptococcal meningitis in a 7-year-old child – a rare pathogen in a non-immune compromised patient

    PubMed Central

    van Zitteren, Leonarda Maria (LM); Arents, Niek LA; Halbertsma, Feico

    2011-01-01

    A case is presented of meningitis in a 7-year-old female child caused by Group A streptococcus (GAS), a rare bacterial cause of meningitis, with a high rate of morbidity (46%) and mortality (10%). GAS is susceptible for empiric antibiotic therapy aimed at the most prevalent pathogens of meningitis. As GAS meningitis is typically associated with ear-nose-throat (ENT) infections, specific search for a reservoir is advised. Bacterial typification often demonstrates M-protein gene sequence type (EMM type) 1.0 associated with upper respiratory tract infections and also severe, invasive GAS infections. Follow-up investigation including neurologic developmental status and audiologic testing is necessary. Although GAS is a very uncommon cause of acute bacterial meningitis in children, high morbidity and mortality have been reported. Being associated with ENT infections, a search for a GAS reservoir is proposed. GASs are susceptible for common empiric antibiotic therapies in meningitis. Follow-up investigation is necessary. PMID:22674699

  20. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Perlin, David; Xue, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Fungal meningitis is a serious disease caused by a fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) mostly in individuals with immune system deficiencies. Fungal meningitis is often fatal without proper treatment, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high even with antifungal drug interventions. Currently, cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal meningitis in HIV-1/AIDS, and its disease mechanism has been extensively studied. The key steps for fungi to infect brain and cause meningitis after establishment of local infection are the dissemination of fungal cells to the bloodstream and invasion through the blood brain barrier to reach the CNS. In this review, we use cryptococcal CNS infection as an example to describe the current molecular understanding of fungal meningitis, including the establishment of the infection, dissemination, and brain invasion. Host and microbial factors that contribute to these infection steps are also discussed. PMID:22460646

  1. Management of neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Weller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of tumor cells, also referred to as neoplastic meningitis, is most frequently seen in patients with late-stage cancer and mostly associated with a poor prognosis. Basically, neoplastic meningitis may affect all patients with a malignant tumor but is most common in patients affected by lung cancer, breast carcinoma, melanoma or hematologic neoplasms such as lymphoma and leukemia. Controlled clinical trials are largely lacking which results in various non-standardized treatment regimens. The presence of solid tumor manifestations in the CNS as well as the extracranial tumor load defines the most appropriate treatment approach. Radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and intrathecal treatment must be considered. For each patient, the individual situation needs to be carefully evaluated to determine the potential benefit as well as putative side effects associated with any therapy. A moderate survival benefit and particularly relief from pain and neurological deficits are the main treatment goals. Here, we summarize the management of patients with neoplastic meningitis and review the available treatment options.

  2. Bacterial Pore-Forming Cytolysins Induce Neuronal Damage in a Rat Model of Neonatal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Reiß, Anja; Braun, Johann S.; Jäger, Katja; Freyer, Dorette; Laube, Gregor; Bührer, Christoph; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Stadelmann, Christine; Nizet, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Background. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) are leading causes of bacterial meningitis in neonates and children. Each pathogen produces a pore-forming cytolytic toxin, β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-h/c) by GBS and pneumolysin by SP. The aim of this study was to understand the role of these pore-forming cytotoxins, in particular of the GBS β-h/c, as potential neurotoxins in experimental neonatal meningitis. Methods. Meningitis was induced in 7- and 11-day-old rats by intracisternal injection of wild type (WT) GBS or SP and compared with isogenic β-h/c- or pneumolysin-deficient mutants, or a double mutant of SP deficient in pneumolysin and hydrogen peroxide production. Results. GBS β-h/c and SP pneumolysin contributed to neuronal damage, worsened clinical outcome and weight loss, but had no influence on the early kinetics of leukocyte influx and bacterial growth in the cerebrospinal fluid. In vitro, β-h/c-induced neuronal apoptosis occurred independently of caspase-activation and was not preventable by the broad spectrum caspase-inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Conclusions. These data suggest that both cytolytic toxins, the GBS β-h/c and SP pneumolysin, contribute to neuronal damage in meningitis and extend the concept of a key role for bacterial pore-forming cytolysins in the pathogenesis and sequelae of neonatal meningitis. PMID:21186256

  3. Candida lusitaniae causing fatal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, P. S.; Durairaj, P.; Padhye, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fatal meningitis due to Candida lusitaniae in a 35 year old previously healthy man is described. C. lusitaniae is an opportunistic fungal pathogen reported infrequently in the English literature. This is the third case report of meningitis and the first fatal infection in an adult from Central India due to C. lusitaniae known to the authors. PMID:8290437

  4. Trend of bacterial meningitis in Bahrain from 1990 to 2013 and effect of introduction of new vaccines.

    PubMed

    Saeed, N; AlAnsari, H; AlKhawaja, S; Jawad, J S; Nasser, K; AlYousef, E

    2016-06-15

    Meningitis is among the 10 commonest infectious causes of death worldwide. This retrospective analysis of reported cases of meningitis in Bahrain aimed to assess the trend in the incidence of bacterial meningitis from 1990 to 2013, before and after the introduction of new vaccines. Of 1455 reported cases of meningitis during the study period 73.1% were viral and 26.9% were bacterial etiology (tuberculous meningitis 8.3%; Streptococcus pneumoniae 4.9%, Haemophilus influenzae 3.6% and Neisseria meningitidis 1.7%). There was a peak of meningitis cases in 1995-1996. The incidence of meningitis due to H. influenzae and N. meningitidis showed a marked reduction after the introduction of the corresponding vaccines in 1998 and 2001 respectively, and S. pneumoniae became the predominant organism after Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The changing trend in the etiology of bacterial meningitis points to the need to study vaccination programme modifications, such as pneumococcal vaccine for the adult population, especially high-risk groups.

  5. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world. PMID:17521780

  6. Streptococcus tigurinus, a novel member of the Streptococcus mitis group, causes invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Andrea; Mueller, Nicolas J; Tarr, Philip E; Eich, Gerhard; Schulthess, Bettina; Bahlmann, Anna S; Keller, Peter M; Bloemberg, Guido V

    2012-09-01

    We recently described the novel species Streptococcus tigurinus sp. nov. belonging to the Streptococcus mitis group. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. According to its phenotypic and molecular characteristics, S. tigurinus is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated by 16S rRNA gene analysis. We retrospectively analyzed our 16S rRNA gene molecular database, which contains sequences of all clinical samples obtained in our institute since 2003. We detected 17 16S rRNA gene sequences which were assigned to S. tigurinus, including sequences from the 3 S. tigurinus strains described previously. S. tigurinus originated from normally sterile body sites, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or heart valves, of 14 patients and was initially detected by culture or broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR, followed by sequencing. The 14 patients had serious invasive infections, i.e., infective endocarditis (n = 6), spondylodiscitis (n = 3), bacteremia (n = 2), meningitis (n = 1), prosthetic joint infection (n = 1), and thoracic empyema (n = 1). To evaluate the presence of Streptococcus tigurinus in the endogenous oral microbial flora, we screened saliva specimens of 31 volunteers. After selective growth, alpha-hemolytic growing colonies were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and subsequent molecular methods. S. tigurinus was not identified among 608 strains analyzed. These data indicate that S. tigurinus is not widely distributed in the oral cavity. In conclusion, S. tigurinus is a novel agent of invasive infections, particularly infective endocarditis.

  7. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    PubMed

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  8. Infectious Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Piquet, Amanda L; Lyons, Jennifer L

    2016-08-01

    The clinician who is evaluating a patient with a suspected central nervous system infection often faces a large differential diagnosis. There are several signs, symptoms, geographical clues, and diagnostic testing, such as cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, which can be helpful in identifying the etiological agent. By taking a systematic approach, one can often identify life-threatening, common, and/or treatable etiologies. Here the authors describe some of the pearls and pitfalls in diagnosing and treating acute infectious meningitis and encephalitis. PMID:27643906

  9. The effect of Haemophilus influenzae type B and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on childhood meningitis mortality: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two of the most prevalent causes of severe bacterial meningitis in children, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae, are preventable by existing vaccines increasingly available in developing countries. Our objective was to estimate the dose-specific effect of Hib and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) on childhood meningitis mortality in low-income countries for use in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Methods We systematically searched and reviewed published vaccine efficacy trials and observational studies reporting the effect of Hib or PCV vaccines on organism-specific meningitis, bacterial meningitis and all-cause meningitis incidence and mortality among children less than five years old in low- and middle-income countries. Data collection and quality assessments were performed using standardized guidelines. For outcomes available across multiple studies (≥2) and approximating meningitis mortality, we pooled estimates reporting dose-specific effects using random effects meta-analytic methods, then combined these with meningitis etiology data to determine the preventable fraction of childhood meningitis mortality for inclusion in LiST. Results We identified 18 studies of Hib conjugate vaccines reporting relevant meningitis morbidity and mortality outcomes (2 randomized controlled trials [RCTs], 16 observational studies) but few provided dose-specific effects. A meta-analysis of four case-control studies examined the dose-specific effect of Hib conjugate vaccines on Hib meningitis morbidity (1 dose: RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.38-1.06; 2 doses: RR=0.09, 95% CI 0.03-0.27; 3 doses: RR=0.06, 95% CI 0.02-0.22), consistent with results from single RCTs. Pooled estimates of two RCTs provided evidence for the effect of three doses of PCV on vaccine-serotype meningitis morbidity (RR=0.16, 95% CI 0.02-1.20). We considered these outcomes of severe disease as proxy estimates for meningitis mortality and combined the estimates of protective effects

  10. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  11. Concurrent meningitis and vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Tuhin; Datta, Sumana; Agrawal, Neha; Bar, Mita; Kar, Arnab; Adhikary, Apu; Ranjan, Kunal

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic infectious disease in India. It is often associated with other infective conditions but concomitant infection of malaria and meningitis are uncommon. We present a case of meningitis with vivax malaria infection in a 24-year-old lady. This case emphasizes the importance of high index of clinical suspicion to detect other infective conditions like meningitis when fever does not improve even after anti-malarial treatment in a patient of malaria before switching therapy suspecting drug resistance, which is quite common in this part of world. PMID:26985423

  12. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Noella Maria Delia; Shah, Ira; Ohri, Alpana; Shah, Forum

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) meningitis is rarely known to occur in children. We report an 11-year-old girl with fever, headache and vomiting, right hemiparesis with left-sided upper motor neuron facial nerve palsy and bladder incontinence. On investigation, she was found to have MRSA meningitis with an acute left thalamo-corpuscular infarct. She was treated with vancomycin, linezolid and rifampicin. She recovered successfully with residual right-sided lower limb monoparesis. MRSA meningitis is rare but can occur in children. PMID:26609421

  13. Hospital Surveillance of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis in Senegal and the Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae Type b Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Osseynou; Fleming, Jessica A.; Dieye, Yakou; Mutombo wa Mutombo, Boniface; Ba, Mamadou; Cisse, Moussa Fafa; Diallo, Aissatou Gaye; Sow, Iyane; Slack, Mary P. E.; Faye, Pape Coumba; Ba, Mady; Diallo, Ndiouga; Weiss, Noel S.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children living in low-resource settings. Pediatric bacterial meningitis cases < 5 years of age were identified through a regional hospital surveillance system for 3 years after introduction of routine immunization with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine in Senegal in July 2005. Cases from the national pediatric hospital were also tracked from 2002 to 2008. The regional surveillance system recorded 1,711 suspected pediatric bacterial meningitis cases. Of 214 laboratory-confirmed cases, 108 (50%) were caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, 42 (20%) to Hib, and 13 (6%) to Neisseria meningitidis. There was a 98% reduction in the number of hospitalized Hib meningitis cases from Dakar Region in 2008 compared with 2002. The surveillance system provides important information to the Ministry of Health as they consider self-funding Hib vaccine and introducing pneumococcal vaccine. PMID:21118944

  14. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  15. Lethal otogenic Candida meningitis.

    PubMed

    Koch, S; Rudel, B; Tietz, H-J

    2004-10-01

    History revealed a chronic obstructive pulmonary condition which had been treated with prednisolone for a long time. There was a raised temperature with further signs of an acute inflammatory underlying disease and internal hydrocephalus. After performing trepanation, the symptoms of raised intercerebral pressure ceased. Candida albicans could be detected microbiologically in the cerebrospinal fluid. There was no pneumonia at the time of admission. Despite instituting immediate intensive care with administration of antibiotics and antimycotics, the patient died 11 days after inpatient admission. Autopsy revealed a C. albicans mycosis originating from the right middle ear with extensive suppurative meningitis, which was the immediate cause of death. Confluent bronchopneumonia had developed in both lower lung lobes at the time of death, but did not show any signs of mycosis and had contributed indirectly to the death of the patient.

  16. Clinical Features of Group B Streptococcus Prosthetic Joint Infections and Molecular Characterization of Isolates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Corvec, S.; Illiaquer, M.; Touchais, S.; Boutoille, D.; van der Mee-Marquet, N.; Quentin, R.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Bémer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  17. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clinical Streptococcus salivarius Strain CCHSS3 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P.; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  19. Complete genome sequence of the clinical Streptococcus salivarius strain CCHSS3.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  20. A milk-borne outbreak of serious infection due to Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Lancefield Group C).

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A. T.; Roulson, M.; Ironside, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    An outbreak of infection due to Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Lancefield Group C) is described. At least 11 patients were affected and the infection was responsible for, or contributed to, the deaths of seven of these. Clinical features included septicaemia, meningitis and endocarditis. The source of infection was unpasteurized milk from a dairy herd with mild intermittent mastitis. PMID:3402548

  1. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  2. Hypervirulent Clone of Group B Streptococcus Serotype III Sequence Type 283, Hong Kong, 1993–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Irene; Fung, Kitty; Liyanapathirana, Veranja; Luo, Ming Jing; Lai, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We describe a hypervirulent clone of group B Streptococcus serotype III, subtype 4, sequence type 283, that caused invasive disease with a predilection for meningitis in Hong Kong during 1993–2012. The organism is associated with high mortality and increased summer prevalence and is linked to diseased fish from freshwater fish farms. PMID:27648702

  3. Hypervirulent Clone of Group B Streptococcus Serotype III Sequence Type 283, Hong Kong, 1993-2012.

    PubMed

    Ip, Margaret; Ang, Irene; Fung, Kitty; Liyanapathirana, Veranja; Luo, Ming Jing; Lai, Raymond

    2016-10-01

    We describe a hypervirulent clone of group B Streptococcus serotype III, subtype 4, sequence type 283, that caused invasive disease with a predilection for meningitis in Hong Kong during 1993-2012. The organism is associated with high mortality and increased summer prevalence and is linked to diseased fish from freshwater fish farms. PMID:27648702

  4. Considering syphilis in aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Sarup; Chadwick, David; Chawla, Girish

    2009-12-01

    Clinicians need to consider syphilis in the differential diagnosis of macular or papular rashes with neurological conditions, particularly aseptic meningitis, as early diagnosis and treatment lead to a better prognosis. PMID:20095316

  5. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2005].

    PubMed

    Stefanoff, Paweł; Rosińska, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    In Poland, 2 806 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2005, of which 998 had bacterial aetiology, 1469 viral, and 339 cases had other or unknown origin. Incidence of bacterial neuroin-fections increased in 2003-2005, following a decreasing trend observed during the past decade. Etiological factor was determined in 486 (49%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 135 cases, Haemophilus influenzae in 59 cases and Streptococ-cus pneumoniae in 111 cases. Unlike previously in 2005 serogroup B was no longer the predominant type of N. meningitidis cultured from patients. Both types B and C constituted similar proportions of all strains serotyped in 2005. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2005 remained on the same level as in 2004. Etiological factor of central nervous system aseptic infections were established only in minor proportion of cases--3% of meningitis and 20% of encephalitis. Among confirmed cases, there were 177 cases of tick-borne encephalitis and 13 cases of herpetic encephalitis. Tick borne encephalitis incidence decreased in 2005 (0.46), compared to 2003-2004. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of northeastern part of the country.

  6. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2006].

    PubMed

    Kicman-Gawłowska, Agnieszka; Chrześcijańska, Irena; Stefanoff, Paweł

    2008-01-01

    In Poland, 3 693 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2006, of which 989 had bacterial aetiology, 1 874--viral aetiology, and 512--other or unknown origin. The etiological agent was determined in 455 (46%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 148 cases, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) in 39 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 119 cases. An increasing trend in meningococcal infections incidence has been observed in 2006, and a substantial decrease of Hib incidence, related to increasing vaccination coverage. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2006 increased compared to year 2005. Etiological factors of central nervous system aseptic infections were established only in minor proportion of cases--3% of meningitis and 20% of encephalitis. Among confirmed cases, there were 317 cases of tick-borne encephalitis and 31 cases of herpetic encephalitis. Tick borne encephalitis incidence increased in 2006 (0.83), compared to 2004 - 2005. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  7. [Streptococcus intermedius: a rare cause of brain abscess in children].

    PubMed

    Jouhadi, Z; Sadiki, H; Hafid, I; Najib, J

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, also known as the Streptococcus milleri group. Although this is a commensal agent of the mouth and upper airways, it has been recognized as an important pathogen in the formation of abscesses. However, it has rarely been involved in the formation of brain abscess in children. We report 4 pediatric cases of brain abscess caused by S. intermedius. Three boys and 1 girl, all aged over 2 years, were admitted for a febrile meningeal syndrome and seizures, caused by a S. intermedius brain abscess. Diagnosis was obtained by brain imaging combined with culture of cerebrospinal fluid. The outcome was favorable after antibiotic therapy and abscess puncture. S. intermedius should be considered a potential pathogen involved in the development of brain abscess in children.

  8. [Hemangiopericytoma of the meninges].

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Hasegawa, T; Kawano, H; Shoin, K; Yamamoto, S; Matsubara, F

    1983-09-01

    A 44-year-old farmer complained blurred vision and disturbance of recent memory. During his driving car traffic accident happened due to his right homonymous hemianopsia. On the 1st admission, neurological examination revealed choked disc(1 D.), hemianopsia, memory disturbance, dyscalculia, dyslexia and dysgraphia. The angiograms showed feeding arteries from left middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery. Tumor vessels looked like cork-screw in the arterial phase and homogeneous tumor shadow was depicted in late venous phase. Contrast enhancement CT scan revealed a nodular homogeneous high dense lesion on the occipital region. Hemorrhage during every craniotomy was too much to remove and at last metastasized to left II rib and right VIII rib and right radius. Their histological examination reveals numerous endothelial-lined vascular channels and atypia of tumor cells with mitoses. Silver impregnation demonstrates networks of reticulum fibers surrounding the capillaries and tumor cells. Hemangiopericytoma in meninges forms entity and our case reports the WHO classification. Total removal should have to be done once for all by means of LASER (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation). PMID:6664454

  9. Imipramine reverses depressive-like parameters in pneumococcal meningitis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Milioli, Graziele; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Cipriano, Andreza L; Costa, Caroline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Comim, Clarissa M; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio; Quevedo, João

    2012-06-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious disease of the central nervous system, associated with acute inflammation and might cause damage to the host, such as deafness, blindness, seizure, and learning deficits. However, infectious diseases can play a significant role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disturbances. In this context, we evaluated depressive-like parameters; corticosterone and ACTH levels in pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats. Wistar rats underwent a magna cistern tap receiving either 10 μL sterile saline or a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at the concentration of 5 × 10(9) cfu/mL. After 3 days of meningitis induction procedure, the animals were treated with imipramine at 10 mg/kg or saline for 14 days (3rd-17th day). The consumption of sweet food was measured for 7 days (10th-17th day). The meningitis group decreased the sucrose intake and increased the levels of corticosterone and ACTH levels in the serum and TNF-α in the cortex; however, the treatment with imipramine reverted the reduction of sweet food consumption, normalized hormonal levels and TNF-α in the cortex. Our results supported the hypothesis that the pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats showed depressive-like behavior and alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  10. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    PubMed

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  11. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    PubMed

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites.

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, L D; Fedorko, D P

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is relatively common, can progress rapidly, and can result in death or permanent debilitation. This infection justifiably elicits strong emotional reactions and, hopefully, immediate medical intervention. This review is a brief presentation of the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis and a review of current knowledge, literature, and recommendations on the subject of laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Those who work in clinical microbiology laboratories should be familiar with the tests used in detecting bacteria and bacterial antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and should always have the utmost appreciation for the fact that results of such tests must always be reported immediately. Academic and practical aspects of the laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis presented in this review include the following: anatomy of the meninges; pathogenesis; changes in the composition of CSF; etiological agents; processing CSF; microscopic examination of CSF; culturing CSF; methods of detecting bacterial antigens and bacterial components in CSF (counter-immunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, latex agglutination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and gas-liquid chromatography); use of the polymerase chain reaction; and practical considerations for testing CSF for bacterial antigens. PMID:1576585

  13. Computational approaches to identify common subunit vaccine candidates against bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Munikumar, Manne; Priyadarshini, I Vani; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Umamaheswari, Amineni; Vengamma, Bhuma

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis, an infection of the membranes (meninges) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the brain and spinal cord, is a major cause of death and disability all over the world. From perinatal period to adult, four common organisms responsible for most of the bacterial meningitis are Streptococcus pneumonia, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenza and Staphylococcus aureus. As the disease is caused by more organisms, currently available vaccines for bacterial meningitis are specific and restricted to some of the serogroups or serotypes of each bacterium. In an effort to design common vaccine against bacterial meningitis, proteomes of the four pathogens were compared to extract seven common surface exposed ABC transporter proteins. Pro-Pred server was used to investigate the seven surface exposed proteins for promiscuous T-cell epitopes prediction. Predicted 22 T-cell epitopes were validated through published positive control, SYFPEITHI and immune epitope database to reduce the epitope dataset into seven. T-cell epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170 of spermidine/putrescine ABC transporter permease (potH) protein was conserved across the four selected pathogens of bacterial meningitis. Hence, structural analysis was extended for epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170. Crystal structures of HLA-DRB alleles were retrieved and structure of potH was modeled using Prime v3.0 for structural analysis. Computational docking of HLA-DRB alleles and epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170 of potH was performed using Glide v5.7. RMSD and RMSF of simulation studies were analyzed by Desmond v3.2. The docking and simulation results revealed that the HLA-DRB-epitope complex was stable with interaction repressive function of HLA. Thus, the epitope would be ideal candidate for T-cell driven subunit vaccine design against bacterial meningitis.

  14. Identification of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis in Culture-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Khater, Walaa Shawky; Elabd, Safia Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Meningitis is a serious communicable disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is an endemic disease in Egypt caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. In some settings, bacterial meningitis is documented depending mainly on positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results or CSF positive latex agglutination test, missing the important role of prior antimicrobial intake which can yield negative culture and latex agglutination test results. This study aimed to utilize molecular technology in order to diagnose bacterial meningitis in culture-negative CSF samples. Materials and Methods. Forty culture-negative CSF samples from suspected cases of bacterial meningitis were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for the presence of lytA, bexA, and ctrA genes specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively. Results. Positive real-time PCR results for Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected in 36 (90%) of culture-negative CSF samples while no positive results for Haemophilus influenzae or Neisseria meningitidis were detected. Four (10%) samples were negative by real-time PCR for all tested organisms. Conclusion. The use of molecular techniques as real-time PCR can provide a valuable addition to the proportion of diagnosed cases of bacterial meningitis especially in settings with high rates of culture-negative results. PMID:27563310

  15. Identification of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis in Culture-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Meningitis is a serious communicable disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is an endemic disease in Egypt caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. In some settings, bacterial meningitis is documented depending mainly on positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results or CSF positive latex agglutination test, missing the important role of prior antimicrobial intake which can yield negative culture and latex agglutination test results. This study aimed to utilize molecular technology in order to diagnose bacterial meningitis in culture-negative CSF samples. Materials and Methods. Forty culture-negative CSF samples from suspected cases of bacterial meningitis were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for the presence of lytA, bexA, and ctrA genes specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively. Results. Positive real-time PCR results for Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected in 36 (90%) of culture-negative CSF samples while no positive results for Haemophilus influenzae or Neisseria meningitidis were detected. Four (10%) samples were negative by real-time PCR for all tested organisms. Conclusion. The use of molecular techniques as real-time PCR can provide a valuable addition to the proportion of diagnosed cases of bacterial meningitis especially in settings with high rates of culture-negative results. PMID:27563310

  16. Bacterial meningitis: new therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Spreer, Annette; Eiffert, Helmut

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with high mortality and long-term morbidity. Outcome critically depends on the rapid initiation of effective antibiotic therapy. Since a further increase of the incidence of pathogens resistant to antibacterials can be expected both in community-acquired and nosocomial bacterial meningitis, the choice of an optimum initial empirical antibiotic regimen will gain significance. In this context, the use of antibiotics which are bactericidal but do not lyse bacteria, may emerge as a therapeutic option. Conversely, the role of corticosteroids, which decrease the entry of hydrophilic antibacterials into the cerebrospinal fluid, as adjunctive therapy will probably decline as a consequence of the increasing antibiotic resistance of bacteria causing meningitis. Consequent vaccination of all children at present is the most efficient manner to reduce disease burden. PMID:24073921

  17. Meningitis, Clinical Presentation of Tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease. PMID:25789186

  18. Neonatal meningitis complicating with pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Agrawal, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocephalus is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the cranial cavity. This gas may arise either from a trauma, a tumor, a surgical, or a diagnostic procedure or occasionally from an infection. Pneumocephalus as a complication of bacterial meningitis, in absence of trauma or a procedure, is extremely rare, particularly in a newborn. A case of pneumocephalus occurring in a baby, suffering from neonatal meningitis, acquired probably through unsafe cutting and tying of the cord, is reported here. Cutting, tying, and care of the umbilical cord is of utmost importance to prevent neonatal infection as the same is a potential cause of serious anaerobic infections, besides tetanus. PMID:24741257

  19. [Laboratory diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Marí, José María Navarro; Ruiz, Mercedes Pérez; Anza, Diego Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytic meningitis, mainly those with an acute and benign course, are caused by viruses. In our area, the most commonly involved agents are enteroviruses, herpes simplex, varicella zoster and Toscana viruses. Nucleic acids amplification techniques (NAAT) are the methods of choice to diagnose viral meningitis from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. They are more rapid and sensitive, and indeed, they are not influenced by the viability of the virus in the clinical specimen as traditional methods are. The development of commercial equipments, the degree of automation, and the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems are the most important premises to choose the molecular method in each laboratory. Recently, commercial kits of real-time PCR are available for the detection of enteroviruses and herpesviruses, which are the most frequently viruses involved in meningitis. Although NAAT from the clinical sample have replaced cell culture for diagnostic purposes, the combination of both methods remain useful. When the detection of the causal agent from the CSF sample is not possible, other specimens (pharyngeal exudates, stools) or serological methods can be used. Serology is the reference method for meningitis caused by West Nile virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which are less frequently detected in our area.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of an Atypical Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 19A Isolated from Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa-Robles, Rosa Maria; Barcenas-Walls, Jose Ramon; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain MTY32702340SN814 isolated in Monterrey, Mexico, from a girl with bacterial meningitis. The strain belongs to the atypical and multidrug-resistant serogroup 19A. This is the first report in the literature of sequence type 3936 (ST3936) in S. pneumoniae serotype 19A. PMID:27103715

  1. Meningitis associated with strongyloidiasis in an area endemic for strongyloidiasis and human T-lymphotropic virus-1: a single-center experience in Japan between 1990 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Taniguchi, T; Kinjo, M; McGill, R L; McGill, A T; Tsuha, S; Shiiki, S

    2013-12-01

    Meningitis caused by enteric flora is a known complication of strongyloidiasis, and human T-lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) predisposes individuals to severe strongyloidiasis. We reviewed the clinical features of bacterial meningitis associated with strongyloidiasis seen at a single center in subtropical Japan, in an area endemic for both strongyloidiasis and HTLV-1. We found 33 episodes in 21 patients between 1990 and 2010. The results were remarkable for the high incidence of meningitis due to Gram-positive cocci (27.3 %), especially Streptococcus bovis, and culture-negative cases (42.4 %). Given the high incidence of Gram-positive meningitis, a modified approach to corticosteroid use would be advisable in areas where strongyloidiasis is endemic, due to the potentially adverse consequences of glucocorticoid therapy.

  2. Guidelines for the management of suspected and confirmed bacterial meningitis in Canadian children older than one month of age.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of bacterial meningitis in infants and children has decreased since the routine use of conjugated vaccines targeting Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. However, this infection continues to be associated with considerable mortality and morbidity if not treated effectively with empirical antimicrobial therapy. Diagnosis still rests on clinical signs and symptoms, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. This position statement outlines the rationale for current recommended empirical therapy using a third-generation cephalosporin and vancomycin for suspected bacterial meningitis. It also provides new recommendations for the use of adjuvant corticosteroids in this setting. Once antibiotic susceptibilities of the pathogen are known, antimicrobials should be reviewed and modified accordingly. Recommendations for treatment duration as well as audiology testing are included. The present statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on bacterial meningitis published in 2007 and revised in 2008.

  3. Guidelines for the management of suspected and confirmed bacterial meningitis in Canadian children older than one month of age

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bacterial meningitis in infants and children has decreased since the routine use of conjugated vaccines targeting Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. However, this infection continues to be associated with considerable mortality and morbidity if not treated effectively with empirical antimicrobial therapy. Diagnosis still rests on clinical signs and symptoms, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. This position statement outlines the rationale for current recommended empirical therapy using a third-generation cephalosporin and vancomycin for suspected bacterial meningitis. It also provides new recommendations for the use of adjuvant corticosteroids in this setting. Once antibiotic susceptibilities of the pathogen are known, antimicrobials should be reviewed and modified accordingly. Recommendations for treatment duration as well as audiology testing are included. The present statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on bacterial meningitis published in 2007 and revised in 2008. PMID:24665226

  4. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Roger, Thierry; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-03-29

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (-794 CATT5-8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (-173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and -173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P= 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P= 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P= 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12,P= 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P= 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy.

  5. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (−794 CATT5–8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (−173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and −173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P = 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P = 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P = 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12, P = 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P = 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy. PMID:26976591

  6. A diagnostic rule for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R.; Singh, S; Kohli, N.

    1999-01-01

    Diagnostic confusion often exists between tuberculous meningitis and other meningoencephalitides. Newer diagnostic tests are unlikely to be available in many countries for some time. This study examines which clinical features and simple laboratory tests can differentiate tuberculous meningitis from other infections. Two hundred and thirty two children (110 tuberculous meningitis, 94 non-tuberculous meningitis, 28 indeterminate) with suspected meningitis and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis were enrolled. Tuberculous meningitis was defined as positive CSF mycobacterial culture or acid fast bacilli stain, or basal enhancement or tuberculoma on computed tomography (CT) scan with clinical response to antituberculous treatment. Non-tuberculous meningitis was defined as positive CSF bacterial culture or Gram stain, or clinical response without antituberculous treatment. Thirty clinical/laboratory features of patients with tuberculous meningitis and non-tuberculous meningitis were compared by univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. Five features were independently predictive of the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (p < 0.007): prodromal stage ⩾ 7 days, optic atrophy on fundal examination, focal deficit, abnormal movements, and CSF leucocytes < 50% polymorphs. When validated on another set of 128 patients, if at least one feature was present, sensitivity was 98.4% and, if three or more were present, specificity was 98.3%. This simple rule would be useful to physicians working in regions where tuberculosis is prevalent.

 PMID:10451394

  7. A multi-target real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of meningitis-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Marco; Savini, Vincenzo; Favalli, Cartesio; Fontana, Carla

    2013-01-01

    A central nervous system (CNS) infection, such as meningitis, is a serious and life-threatening condition. Bacterial meningitis can be severe and may result in brain damage, disability or even death. Rapid diagnosis of CNS infections and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms are needed to improve the patient outcome. Bacterial culture of a patient's cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is currently considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing bacterial meningitis. From the CSF cultures researchers can assess the in vitro susceptibility of the causative microorganism to determine the best antibiotic treatment. However, many of the culture assays, such as microscopy and the latex agglutination test are not sensitive. To enhance pathogen detection in CSF samples we developed a multi-target real-time PCR assay that can rapidly identify six different microorganisms: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes and Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study we applied this PCR analysis to 296 CSF samples from patients who were suspected of having meningitis. Of the 296 samples that were examined, 59 samples were positive according to the CSF culture and/or molecular assays. Forty-six CSF samples were positive for both the CSF culture and our real-time PCR assay, while 13 samples were positive for the real-time PCR but negative for the traditional assays. This discrepancy may have been caused by the fact that these samples were collected from 23 patients who were treated with antimicrobials before CSF sampling.

  8. Antagonism of ampicillin and chloramphenicol for meningeal isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, J L; Mason, E O; Baker, C J

    1981-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b has led to the recommendation that ampicillin and chloramphenicol be given as the initial therapy for suspected bacterial meningitis in infants and children. However, during the first 2 months of life, H. influenzae type b is a rare cause of meningitis, whereas group B streptococcus is the most frequently isolated agent. Since ampicillin and chloramphenicol have been shown to be antagonistic for other streptococci, an in vitro study of their effect on group B streptococci was performed. The effect of ampicillin and chloramphenicol, alone and in combination, on 18 meningeal isolates was determined for 2 different inocula of group B streptococci, using microtiter broth dilution and growth kinetic assays. Isoboles, fractional lethal concentration indices, or both indicated antagonism for all strains. Growth kinetic assays for two representative strains demonstrated inhibition of the early bactericidal activity of ampicillin by chloramphenicol. These findings of in vitro antagonism suggest that this combination may be contraindicated for the treatment of infants with group B streptococcal meningitis. PMID:7030197

  9. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lundbo, Lene F.; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Hougaard, David M.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Methods Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified by linking Danish national registries. DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. The association between SNPs and susceptibility to IPD and IMD, mortality and pneumococcal serotypes was investigated. Results 372 children with pneumococcal meningitis, 907 with pneumococcal bacteremia and 1273 controls were included. We included 406 cases with meningococcal meningitis, 272 with meningococcal bacteremia, and 672 controls. The NFKBIE SNP was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis (aOR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20–2.36), but not bacteremia (aOR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.86–1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. Conclusions A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:26870821

  10. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the meninges that cover a person's brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high death rates and with disability in people who survive. Corticosteroids have been used as an adjunct to antituberculous drugs to treat people with tuberculous meningitis, but their role has been controversial. Objectives To evaluate the effects of corticosteroids as an adjunct to antituberculous treatment on death and severe disability in people with tuberculous meningitis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register up to the 18 March 2016; CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and Current Controlled Trials. We also contacted researchers and organizations working in the field, and checked reference lists. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared corticosteroid plus antituberculous treatment with antituberculous treatment alone in people with clinically diagnosed tuberculous meningitis and included death or disability as outcome measures. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed search results and methodological quality, and extracted data from the included trials. We analysed the data using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used a fixed-effect model. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis, where we included all participants randomized to treatment in the denominator. This analysis assumes that all participants who were lost to follow-up have good outcomes. We carried out a sensitivity analysis to explore the impact of the missing data. Main results Nine trials that included 1337 participants (with 469 deaths) met the inclusion criteria. At follow-up from three to 18 months, steroids reduce deaths by almost one quarter (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87; nine trials, 1337 participants, high quality evidence). Disabling neurological deficit is not common in survivors, and steroids may have little or no

  11. The cost of treatment for child pneumonias and meningitis in the Northern Areas of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hamidah; Waters, Hugh; Omer, Saad B; Khan, Aamir; Baig, Imam Yar; Mistry, Rozina; Halsey, Neal

    2006-01-01

    Pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis place a significant economic burden on health care systems, particularly in developing countries. This study estimates treatment costs for these diseases in health facilities in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. Health facility resources are organized by categories--including salaries, capital costs, utilities, overhead, maintenance and supplies--and quantified using activity-based costing (ABC) techniques. The average cost of treatment for an outpatient case of child pneumonia is dollar 13.44. For hospitalized care, the health system spent an average of dollar 71 per episode for pneumonia, dollar 235 for severe pneumonia, and dollar 2,043 for meningitis. These costs provide important background information for the potential introduction of the conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines in Pakistan. PMID:17044548

  12. Gallium-67 uptake in meningeal sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.G.; Hicks, B.H.; Maisey, M.N.

    1986-07-01

    A case of sarcoidosis limited to the central nervous system is described in which the diagnosis was suggested by high Ga-67 uptake in the cranial and spinal meninges. The diagnosis was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. Treatment with oral corticosteroids resulted in clinical improvement and marked reduction in Ga-67 uptake in the meninges. This is the first reported case of the central nervous system sarcoid diagnosed by Ga-67 imaging.

  13. Echovirus 18 meningitis in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min; Ho, Tzong-Shiann; Shen, Ching-Fen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2011-03-01

    Eighty cases of echovirus 18 infection among young children during an outbreak in 2006 in Taiwan were enrolled. Twenty percent of the patients had a comorbid condition. Twenty-five cases (31%) were complicated by aseptic meningitis. The most frequent diagnoses in children without meningitis were pharyngitis/tonsillitis (35%) and vesicular viral exanthem (33%). The case-fatality rate among the children with meningitis was 4%. Echovirus 18 was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of 68% of the children.

  14. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    êcher le portage pharyngé devrait être déterminé. Pour résoudre ce problème, le consortium MenAfriCar (Consortium Africain du Portage Méningococcique) a été établi en 2009 pour étudier le mode de portage du méningocoque dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite avant et après l’ introduction de PsA-TT. Cet article décrit comment le consortium a été établi, ses objectifs et les méthodes de laboratoire et de terrain standardisées qui ont été utilisées pour atteindre ces objectifs. L’ expérience du consortium MenAfriCar aidera à planifier les futures études sur l’ épidémiologie du portage du méningocoque dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite et d’ ailleurs. Se está utilizando una vacuna meningocócica conjugada (MenAfriVac™) de polisacárido del serogrupo A / tétano toxoide (PsA-TT) en países del cinturón Africano de meningitis. Las experiencias obtenidas con otras vacunas conjugadas polisacárido/proteína han demostrado que una parte importante de su éxito se debe a su habilidad para prevenir la colonización faríngea de los portadores, acabando por lo tanto con la transmisión, y a la de inducir la protección de rebaño. Si PsA-TT ha de cumplir el objetivo de prevenir epidemias, debe ser capaz de prevenir el estado de portador faríngeo, al igual que la enfermedad invasiva por meningococo, y para ello es necesario determinar si la PsA-TT puede prevenir la colonización faríngea. Con el fin de abordar esta cuestión se estableció un consorcio africano en el 2009 - el MenAfriCar (African Meningococcal Carriage Consortium) – para investigar los patrones del estado de portador de meningococo en países del cinturón Africano de la meningitis, antes y después de la introducción de PsA-TT. Este artículo describe como se estableció el consorcio, sus objetivos y los métodos estandarizados de campo y de laboratorio que se utilizaron para alcanzarlos. La experiencia del consorcio MenAfriCar ayudar

  15. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the meninges that cover a person's brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high death rates and with disability in people who survive. Corticosteroids have been used as an adjunct to antituberculous drugs to treat people with tuberculous meningitis, but their role has been controversial. Objectives To evaluate the effects of corticosteroids as an adjunct to antituberculous treatment on death and severe disability in people with tuberculous meningitis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register up to the 18 March 2016; CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and Current Controlled Trials. We also contacted researchers and organizations working in the field, and checked reference lists. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared corticosteroid plus antituberculous treatment with antituberculous treatment alone in people with clinically diagnosed tuberculous meningitis and included death or disability as outcome measures. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed search results and methodological quality, and extracted data from the included trials. We analysed the data using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used a fixed-effect model. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis, where we included all participants randomized to treatment in the denominator. This analysis assumes that all participants who were lost to follow-up have good outcomes. We carried out a sensitivity analysis to explore the impact of the missing data. Main results Nine trials that included 1337 participants (with 469 deaths) met the inclusion criteria. At follow-up from three to 18 months, steroids reduce deaths by almost one quarter (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87; nine trials, 1337 participants, high quality evidence). Disabling neurological deficit is not common in survivors, and steroids may have little or no

  16. Capsular polysaccharide of Group B Streptococcus mediates biofilm formation in the presence of human plasma.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fan Di; Mallet, Adeline; Caliot, Elise; Gao, Cherry; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Dramsi, Shaynoor

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an asymptomatic colonizer of human mucosal surfaces that is responsible for sepsis and meningitis in neonates. Bacterial persistence and pathogenesis often involves biofilm formation. We previously showed that biofilm formation in medium supplemented with glucose is mediated by the PI-2a pilus. Here, biofilm formation was tested in cell culture medium supplemented with human plasma. GBS strains were able to form biofilms in these conditions unlike Group A Streptococcus (GAS) or Staphylococcus aureus. Analysis of mutants impaired for various surface components revealed that the GBS capsule is a key component in this process.

  17. Periprosthetic breast abscess caused by Streptococcus pyogenes after scarlet fever.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Paolo; Langella, Marika; Marangi, Giovanni Francesco; Vulcano, Ettore; Gherardi, Giovanni; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of a 32-year-old white women, affected by breast cancer and treated with mastectomy, who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with a tissue expander. She presented a periprosthetic infection from Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) after scarlet fever. S. pyogenes may be responsible for suppurative complications of the respiratory system and a variety of metastatic foci of infection such as suppurative arthritic, endocarditis, meningitis, or brain abscess. Even though, in the literature, several cases and types of infection associated with breast implantation have been described, to our knowledge this is the first case report of periprosthetic infection after scarlet fever. Signs, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of GAS infection that occurred 2 months after the surgery are discussed.

  18. The efficacy of cefuroxime in the treatment of bacterial meningitis in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Bahaeldin, H K; Elbaroudy, R; Omran, N

    1983-01-01

    Forty-eight infants and children with bacterial meningitis received daily dosages of cefuroxime ranging from 90 to 300 mg/kg during the first two to four days of treatment and 45 to 149 mg/kg during the subsequent six to eight days of treatment. Cefuroxime was clinically and bacteriologically effective in 40 (83%) of the patients. All strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Salmonella typhi were sensitive to cefuroxime. Fourteen strains of Haemophilus influenzae were sensitive, and one was moderately sensitive, to the drug. Nine strains of Staphylococcus aureus were sensitive to cefuroxime, but three were resistant, as was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No toxicity was encountered.

  19. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  20. Streptococcus agalactiae infection in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brandon J; Hancock, Bryan M; Del Cid, Natasha; Bermudez, Andres; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an encapsulated, Gram-positive bacterium that is a leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, and an emerging aquaculture pathogen. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a genetically tractable model vertebrate that has been used to analyze the pathogenesis of both aquatic and human bacterial pathogens. We have developed a larval zebrafish model of GBS infection to study bacterial and host factors that contribute to disease progression. GBS infection resulted in dose dependent larval death, and GBS serotype III, ST-17 strain was observed as the most virulent. Virulence was dependent on the presence of the GBS capsule, surface anchored lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and toxin production, as infection with GBS mutants lacking these factors resulted in little to no mortality. Additionally, interleukin-1β (il1b) and CXCL-8 (cxcl8a) were significantly induced following GBS infection compared to controls. We also visualized GBS outside the brain vasculature, suggesting GBS penetration into the brain during the course of infection. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a valuable model organism to study GBS pathogenesis. PMID:25617657

  1. "Bacterial Meningitis in children and adolescents: an observational study based on the national surveillance system"

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Félix O; Pérez, Antonio E

    2005-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis is a group of life threatening infections that mostly affect children and adolescents, and may be the cause of severe neurological sequelae. Cuba has implemented massive vaccination programmes against both Neisseria meningitidis (serogroup C in 1979 and B in 1987), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (1999), two of the main causal pathogens. We described and discussed some epidemiological aspects of the current status of bacterial meningitis to learn from the Cuban experience. Methods A nationwide observational study on children and adolescents from 1 to 18 years old was carried out from 1998 to 2003, estimating the incidence and case-fatality rate by age group and causal pathogens, as well as the seasonality and frequency of overcrowded dormitories. The association between disease and attendance to day care centres or boarding schools was estimated by using relative risk (Chi-squared test and Fisher Exact Test). Results The overall number of cases was 1023; the incidence ranged from 3.4 to 8.5 per 100 000 population, with the higher figures in children 1–5 years old (16.8 per 100 000 population). Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B were the main identified agents. The average case-fatality rate was 10.5% and the most lethal agents were Streptococcus pneumoniae (27%) and Haemophilus influenzae type b (10.7%). Overall percentage of cases who slept in overcrowded dormitories was 15%, reaching 30.6% in adolescents. Seasonality was only evident among meningococcal meningitis cases between September–October. The attendance to boarding high school showed an association with disease only in 1998 and 1999 (RR = 2.1; p > 0.05). Conclusion The highest incidence of bacterial meningitis was observed among children from 1–5 years old. Pneumococcus was both the leading causal and the most lethal agent. Sleeping in overcrowded dormitories was more frequent among adolescents. No strong

  2. Epidemiology and Risk Factors Associated with Developing Bacterial Meningitis among Children in Gaza Strip

    PubMed Central

    JAROUSHA, Abdel Moat Al; AFIFI, Ahmed.Al

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis is still the leading cause of high morbidity and mortality among the children. The present study was conducted to determine the epidemiology, clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis and to evaluate the risk factors associated with developing the infection. Methods This cross sectional study was conducted in three hospitals of Gaza strip -Palestine during the period 2009. All the children with clinical diagnosis of meningitis /meningoencephalitis admitted to these hospitals were included in the study. They were subjected to clinical examination as well as CSF bacteriological and serological investigations. Results During the period (2009), 1853 patients were admitted to the hospitals with suspect of meningitis by pediatricians, 73 (3.9%) proved by culture to be acute bacterial meningitis, of these patients 62% were males and 38% were females. The common isolated pathogens were Neisseria meningitides (47.9%), Streptococcus pneumonia (15.1%), Haemophilus influenza (13.7%), E. coli (11.0%), Enterobacter spp. (6.8%), Citrobacter spp. (2.7%), Providencia spp. (1.4%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1.4%). The common recorded symptoms were fever (78%), neck stiffness (47%), vomiting (37%), poor feeding (19%), and irritability (16%). Statistical analysis showed that there was statistical significance associated developing of infection with malnutrition (low hemoglobin level), high house crowdness and irritability (P-value <0.05). The ANOVA statistical analysis showed that S. pneumonia has an impact on developing low hemoglobin level and leukocytosis. Conclusion N. meningitides is still dominant and needs vaccination. The risk factors should be taken into consideration in any future plan. PMID:26175971

  3. Pre-infection physical exercise decreases mortality and stimulates neurogenesis in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liebetanz, David; Gerber, Joachim; Schiffner, Christina; Schütze, Sandra; Klinker, Florian; Jarry, Hubertus; Nau, Roland; Tauber, Simone C

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise has been shown to increase neurogenesis, to decrease neuronal injury and to improve memory in animal models of stroke and head trauma. Therefore, we investigated the effect of voluntary wheel running on survival, neuronal damage and cell proliferation in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Mice were housed in cages equipped with voluntary running wheels or in standard cages before induction of bacterial meningitis by a subarachnoid injection of a Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. 24 hours later antibiotic treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg twice daily). Experiments were terminated either 30 hours or 4 days (short-term) or 7 weeks (long-term) after infection, and the survival time, inflammatory cytokines and corticosterone levels, neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the cognitive function were evaluated in surviving mice. Survival time was significantly increased in running mice compared to control animals (p = 0.0087 in short-term and p = 0.016 in long-term experiments, log-rank test). At the end of the long-term experiment, mortality was lower in trained than in sedentary animals (p = 0.031, Fisher's Exact test). Hippocampal neurogenesis--assessed by the density of doublecortin-, TUC-4- and BrdU + NeuN-colabeled cells--was significantly increased in running mice in comparison to the sedentary group after meningitis. However, Morris water maze performance of both groups 6 weeks after bacterial meningitis did not reveal differences in learning ability. In conclusion, physical exercise prior to infection increased survival in a mouse model of bacterial meningitis and stimulated neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation.

  4. Edaravone attenuates hippocampal damage in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis by reducing HMGB1 and iNOS expression via the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Ma, Qian-qian; Yan, Yan; Xu, Feng-dan; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Zhou, Wei-qin; Feng, Zhi-chun

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) is a free radical scavenger that has shown potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in variety of disease models. In this study, we investigated whether edaravone produced neuroprotective actions in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were infected on postnatal d 11 by intracisternal injection of a certain inoculum of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The mice received intracisternal injection of 10 μL of saline containing edaravone (3 mg/kg) once a day for 7 d. The severity of pneumococcal meningitis was assessed with a clinical score. In mice with severe meningitis, the survival rate from the time of infection to d 8 after infection was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. In mice with mild meningitis, the CSF inflammation and cytokine levels in the hippocampus were analyzed d 7 after infection, and the clinical neurological deficit score was evaluated using a neurological scoring system d 14 after infection. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice and heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1 KO) mice were used to confirm the involvement of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in the neuroprotective actions of edaravone. Results: In mice with severe meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly increased the survival rate (76.4%) compared with the meningitis model group (32.2%). In mice with mild meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly decreased the number of leukocytes and TNF- levels in CSF, as well as the neuronal apoptosis and protein levels of HMGB1 and iNOS in the hippocampus, but did not affect the high levels of IL-10 and IL-6 in the hippocampus. Moreover, edaravone treatment significantly improved the neurological function of mice with mild meningitis. In Nrf2 KO or HO-1 KO mice with the meningitis, edaravone treatment was no longer effective in improving the survival rate of the mice with severe meningitis (20.2% and 53.6%, respectively

  5. Cryptococcal Meningitis: Diagnosis and Management Update

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Mahsa; Boulware, David R; Rhein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cryptococcal meningitis are promising and have been improving long-term survival. Point of care testing has made diagnosing cryptococcal meningitis rapid, practical, and affordable. Targeted screening and treatment programs for cryptococcal antigenemia are a cost effective method for reducing early mortality on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Optimal initial management with amphotericin and flucytosine improves survival against alternative therapies, although amphotericin is difficult to administer and flucytosine is not available in middle or low income countries, where cryptococcal meningitis is most prevalent. Controlling increased intracranial pressure with serial therapeutic lumbar punctures has a proven survival benefit. Delaying ART initiation for 4 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis is associated with improved survival. Fortunately, new approaches have been leading the way toward improving care for cryptococcal meningitis patients. New trials utilizing different combinations of antifungal therapy are reviewed, and we summarize the efficacy of different regimens. PMID:26279970

  6. Two cases of rheumatoid meningitis.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino; Chang, Edward; Hammond, Robert R; Yang, Isaac; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Chou, Benedict T; Choi, Soo I; Jen, Joanna C; Pope, Whitney B; Bell, David A; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the form of rheumatoid meningitis (RM) is rare and most commonly occurs in the setting of longstanding severe RA. Due to a wide range of clinical presentations and nonspecific laboratory findings, it presents a diagnostic challenge often requiring brain biopsy. Only a few histopathologically confirmed cases have been described in the literature. Our aim is to describe two cases of RM and review the literature. The first case is of a previously healthy 37-year-old man who presented with severe headaches and focal neurologic deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal and parietal sulci. The second case is of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild chronic joint pain who presented with confusion, personality changes and seizures. Both patients ultimately underwent brain biopsy which demonstrated RM on pathologic examination. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in significant clinical improvement in both cases. To our knowledge, our unusual case of RM in the young man is the fifth reported case of rheumatoid meningitis in a patient with no prior history of RA. Such an atypical presentation makes diagnosis even more difficult and highlights the need for awareness of this entity in the diagnostic consideration of a patient presenting with unexplained neurologic symptoms. Our literature review underscores the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of CNS involvement in RA.

  7. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  8. Association between facial cutaneous coccidioidomycosis and meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Arsura, E L; Kilgore, W B; Caldwell, J W; Freeman, J C; Einstein, H E; Johnson, R H

    1998-01-01

    The skin is frequently a site of extrapulmonary dissemination in patients with coccidioidomycosis. Clinical experience in an endemic area suggests an association between facial cutaneous coccidioidomycosis and meningitis. Awareness of this association is important because coccidioidal meningitis is the most ominous site of spread in coccidioidomycosis. In this study, we assess whether cutaneous dissemination involving the face is associated with meningitis to a greater degree than that limited to the body. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 201 patients from 1987 to 1996 with disseminated coccidioidomycosis and found 30 patients with cutaneous involvement. Their mean age was 29.5 +/- 11.6 years; 20 patients were male; 14 were African American, 12 were Hispanic, 3 were white, and 1 was Asian. Nineteen patients had facial involvement, and 11 had isolated body involvement. Meningitis developed in 11 patients, 10 with facial involvement and 1 with only body involvement. Patients with facial lesions were more likely to have meningitis (odds ratio, 11.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 529, P = .023). The identification of a subgroup of patients at significant risk of developing meningitis may allow earlier detection and perhaps improved management of patients with meningeal disease. PMID:9682625

  9. Climate Change and Cerebrospinal Meningitis in the Ghanaian Meningitis Belt

    PubMed Central

    Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Nabie, Vivian Adams

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) is one of the infectious diseases likely to be affected by climate change. Although there are a few studies on the climate change-CSM nexus, none has considered perceptions of community members. However, understanding public perception in relation to a phenomenon is very significant for the design of effective communication and mitigation strategies as well as coping and adaptation strategies. This paper uses focus group discussions (FGDs) to fill this knowledge lacuna. Results show that although a few elderly participants ascribed fatal causes (disobedience to gods, ancestors, and evil spirits) to CSM infections during FGDs, majority of participants rightly linked CSM infections to dry, very hot and dusty conditions experienced during the dry season. Finally, community members use a suite of adaptation options to curb future CSM epidemics. PMID:25003550

  10. Climate change and cerebrospinal meningitis in the Ghanaian meningitis belt.

    PubMed

    Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Nabie, Vivian Adams

    2014-07-01

    Cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) is one of the infectious diseases likely to be affected by climate change. Although there are a few studies on the climate change-CSM nexus, none has considered perceptions of community members. However, understanding public perception in relation to a phenomenon is very significant for the design of effective communication and mitigation strategies as well as coping and adaptation strategies. This paper uses focus group discussions (FGDs) to fill this knowledge lacuna. Results show that although a few elderly participants ascribed fatal causes (disobedience to gods, ancestors, and evil spirits) to CSM infections during FGDs, majority of participants rightly linked CSM infections to dry, very hot and dusty conditions experienced during the dry season. Finally, community members use a suite of adaptation options to curb future CSM epidemics. PMID:25003550

  11. Meningeal fibroma: a rare meningioma mimic.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Goyal, Nishant; Sarkar, Chitra; Suri, Vaishali; Garg, Ajay; Kale, Shashank S; Suri, Ashish

    2014-08-01

    Meningeal fibromas are rare intracranial tumors that mimic meningiomas radiologically as well as histologically. The authors report 2 cases of meningeal fibroma with detailed clinical, radiological, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features, and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity. Knowledge of this rare tumor is essential for pathologists to be able distinguish it from more common meningeal tumors, especially in younger patients. This knowledge is also essential for neurosurgeons, as incomplete resection may lead to tumor recurrence, and such patients require close follow-up.

  12. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases.

  13. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    êcher le portage pharyngé devrait être déterminé. Pour résoudre ce problème, le consortium MenAfriCar (Consortium Africain du Portage Méningococcique) a été établi en 2009 pour étudier le mode de portage du méningocoque dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite avant et après l’ introduction de PsA-TT. Cet article décrit comment le consortium a été établi, ses objectifs et les méthodes de laboratoire et de terrain standardisées qui ont été utilisées pour atteindre ces objectifs. L’ expérience du consortium MenAfriCar aidera à planifier les futures études sur l’ épidémiologie du portage du méningocoque dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite et d’ ailleurs. Se está utilizando una vacuna meningocócica conjugada (MenAfriVac™) de polisacárido del serogrupo A / tétano toxoide (PsA-TT) en países del cinturón Africano de meningitis. Las experiencias obtenidas con otras vacunas conjugadas polisacárido/proteína han demostrado que una parte importante de su éxito se debe a su habilidad para prevenir la colonización faríngea de los portadores, acabando por lo tanto con la transmisión, y a la de inducir la protección de rebaño. Si PsA-TT ha de cumplir el objetivo de prevenir epidemias, debe ser capaz de prevenir el estado de portador faríngeo, al igual que la enfermedad invasiva por meningococo, y para ello es necesario determinar si la PsA-TT puede prevenir la colonización faríngea. Con el fin de abordar esta cuestión se estableció un consorcio africano en el 2009 - el MenAfriCar (African Meningococcal Carriage Consortium) – para investigar los patrones del estado de portador de meningococo en paí

  14. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay developed to diagnose adult bacterial meningitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Tsung; Hsiao, Kuang-Ming; Chen, Jin-Cherng; Su, Cheng-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis causes high morbidity and mortality; the associated clinical symptoms often are insensitive or non-specific; and the pathogenic bacteria are geographically diverse. Clinical diagnosis requires a rapid and accurate methodology. This study aimed to develop a new multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay to detect simultaneously six major bacteria that cause adult bacterial meningitis in Taiwan: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Species-specific primers for the six bacteria were developed using reference strains. The specificities of the mPCRs for these bacteria were validated, and the sensitivities were evaluated via serial dilutions. The mPCR assay specifically detected all of the six pathogens, particularly with sensitivities of 12 colony forming units (CFU)/mL, 90 CFU/mL, and 390 CFU/mL for E. coli, S. pneumoniae, and K. pneumoniae, respectively. This mPCR assay is a rapid and specific tool to detect the six major bacterial pathogens that cause acute adult meningitis in Taiwan, particularly sensitive for detecting E. coli, S. pneumoniae, and K. pneumoniae. The assay may facilitate early diagnosis and guidance for antimicrobial therapy for adult patients with this deadly disease in Taiwan. PMID:26332098

  15. Assessing pneumococcal meningitis association with viral respiratory infections and antibiotics: insights from statistical and mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Opatowski, Lulla; Varon, Emmanuelle; Dupont, Claire; Temime, Laura; van der Werf, Sylvie; Gutmann, Laurent; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Watier, Laurence; Guillemot, Didier

    2013-08-01

    Pneumococcus is an important human pathogen, highly antibiotic resistant and a major cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. Better prevention requires understanding the drivers of pneumococcal infection incidence and antibiotic susceptibility. Although respiratory viruses (including influenza) have been suggested to influence pneumococcal infections, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown, and viruses are rarely considered when studying pneumococcus epidemiology. Here, we propose a novel mathematical model to examine hypothetical relationships between Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis incidence (SPMI), acute viral respiratory infections (AVRIs) and antibiotic exposure. French time series of SPMI, AVRI and penicillin consumption over 2001-2004 are analysed and used to assess four distinct virus-bacteria interaction submodels, ascribing the interaction on pneumococcus transmissibility and/or pathogenicity. The statistical analysis reveals strong associations between time series: SPMI increases shortly after AVRI incidence and decreases overall as the antibiotic-prescription rate rises. Model simulations require a combined impact of AVRI on both pneumococcal transmissibility (up to 1.3-fold increase at the population level) and pathogenicity (up to threefold increase) to reproduce the data accurately, along with diminished epidemic fitness of resistant pneumococcal strains causing meningitis (0.97 (0.96-0.97)). Overall, our findings suggest that AVRI and antibiotics strongly influence SPMI trends. Consequently, vaccination protecting against respiratory virus could have unexpected benefits to limit invasive pneumococcal infections.

  16. Comparative analysis of the localization of lipoteichoic acid in Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, S J; Johnston, B P

    1987-01-01

    The cellular locations of deacylated lipoteichoic acid (dLTA) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) were examined in late-exponential-phase cells of a serotype III strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci [GBS]) isolated from an infant with late-onset meningitis and compared with a fresh clinical isolate of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci [GAS]). LTA and dLTA were found to be associated with the protoplast membranes of both organisms, with only dLTA found in mutanolysin cell wall digests. Both organisms released dLTA during growth, but only the GAS released substantial levels of LTA into the culture medium. However, penicillin treatment (5 micrograms/ml for 60 min) of GBS resulted in the recovery of LTA in cell wall digests as well as in the culture medium. These results suggest that under normal growth conditions, the hydrophobic region (glycolipid) of LTA remains associated with the cytoplasmic membrane of GBS and unavailable for hydrophobic interactions at the cell surface with epithelial cells. In contrast, release of LTA into the environment by the GAS allows the fatty acid moieties to interact with hydrophobic domains on the surface of epithelial cells. These results may help explain the marked differences in the specificity of binding between these two major streptococcal pathogens for human fetal and adult epithelial cells. PMID:3308704

  17. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  18. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  19. A history of acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Uiterwijk, Anouk; Koehler, Peter J

    2012-07-01

    Although meningitis was not yet known as such, its symptoms have been conceptualized in different ways and many theories about its causes have been formulated in the course of time. Terms like hydrocephalus and brain fever were used for different clinical manifestations of what today would be recognized as meningitis. Pathological-anatomical findings led to the emergence of the clinical entity from several old concepts of disease. Initially, diagnostic means were limited and therapeutic methods did not differ much from those that had been applied for centuries, even far into the nineteenth century. Discoveries in bacteriology and the introduction of the lumbar puncture provided a new paradigm for knowledge of the pathophysiology and treatment of what then became known with the term meningitis. The development of new therapeutic methods including antiserum, sulfonamides, and penicillin resulted in a decreasing mortality during the past century. Nowadays, with the use of antibiotics, bacterial meningitis can often be cured. PMID:22724490

  20. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  1. Meningitis in service-age personnel.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Houlberg, K

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of meningitis is declining in the UK population largely due to increased availability of vaccinations against the most common bacterial strains. Acute bacterial meningitis, however, is a life-threatening condition and distinguishing it from more benign causes of headache and fever is difficult in an operational environment due to limited access to diagnostic tests. Despite medical advances, the case fatality rate in the United Kingdom in adults with invasive meningococcal disease is 10.5%. Acute bacterial meningitis presents with the classical triad of fever, neck pain and altered mental state in less than half of adults, and in the initial course of the disease it frequently mimics common viral illnesses. The aim of this article is to discuss the recognition and management of meningitis with special emphasis on the deployed military environment. PMID:26292395

  2. Hemi-meningitis with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Ozan; Yarar, Coskun; Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Ekici, Arzu; Bör, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. HLH may occur as a complication of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), particularly in patients with immunodeficiencies. Herein, we describe a 16-year-old girl with neurological complications associated EBV-induced HLH. Her cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images with enhancement of meningeal surface in the right hemisphere that was consistent with right hemi-meningitis. Hydrocephalus, dilated subdural spaces, delayed myelination, edema, diffuse parenchymal atrophy, calcifications, diffuse/patchy white matter abnormalities have all been previously described with HLH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hemi-meningitis associated with HLH. We suggest that clinicians should consider HLH with vascular disorders when they determine unilateral meningitis on a brain MRI. PMID:27570395

  3. Meningitis B Vaccine Falls Short of Expectations

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health in Minneapolis. The meningitis ... immunity. Researchers at Princeton University, the University of Minnesota and Public Health England tested blood samples collected ...

  4. A Practical Approach to Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Richie, Megan B; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Meningitis is an inflammatory syndrome involving the meninges that classically manifests with headache and nuchal rigidity and is diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid examination. In contrast, encephalitis refers to inflammation of the brain parenchyma itself and often results in focal neurologic deficits or seizures. In this article, the authors review the differential diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on infectious etiologies. The recommended practical clinical approach focuses on early high-yield diagnostic testing and empiric antimicrobial administration, given the high morbidity associated with these diseases and the time-sensitive nature of treatment initiation. If the initial workup does not yield a diagnosis, further etiology-specific testing based upon risk factors and clinical characteristics should be pursued. Effective treatment is available for many causes of meningitis and encephalitis, and when possible should address both the primary disease process as well as potential complications.

  5. [The meninges, an anatomical point of view].

    PubMed

    Sakka, L; Chazal, J

    2005-03-01

    The meninges correspond to an anatomical concept. For the morphologist, the microscopic organization, the hypothetical presence of a subdural space, the nature of the interface between the deep meningeal layer and the nervous parenchyma in the perivascular spaces are the central issues. For the clinician, dynamic aspects of cerebrospinal fluid flow, secretion, and resorption are essential factors with practical consequences in terms of disease and patient management. Comparative anatomy, embryology, and organogenesis provide an interesting perspective for the descriptive and functional anatomy of the meninges. Usually considered as protective membranes, the meninges play a prominent role in the development and maintenance of the central nervous system. The meninges are in constant evolution, from their formation to senescence. The meninges present three layers in children and adults: the dura mater, the arachnoid and the pia mater. The cerebrospinal fluid is secreted by the choroid plexuses, flows through the ventricles and the subarachnoid space, and is absorbed by arachnoid granulations. Other sites of secretion and resorption are suggested by comparative anatomy and human embryology and organogenesis.

  6. Extra cellular matrix features in human meninges.

    PubMed

    Montagnani, S; Castaldo, C; Di Meglio, F; Sciorio, S; Giordano-Lanza, G

    2000-01-01

    We collected human fetal and adult normal meninges to relate the age of the tissue with the presence of collagenous and non-collagenous components of Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM). Immunohistochemistry led us to observe some differences in the amount and in the distribution of these proteins between the two sets of specimens. In particular, laminin and tenascin seem to be expressed more intensely in fetal meninges when compared to adult ones. In order to investigate whether the morphofunctional characteristics of fetal meninges may be represented in pathological conditions we also studied meningeal specimens from human meningiomas. Our attention was particularly focused on the expression of those non-collagenous proteins involved in nervous cell migration and neuronal morphogenesis as laminin and tenascin, which were present in lesser amount in normal adult specimens. Microscopical evidences led us to hipothesize that these proteins which are synthesized in a good amount during the fetal development of meninges can be newly produced in tumors. On the contrary, the role of tenascin and laminin in adult meninges is probably only interesting for their biophysical characteristics.

  7. Malignant solitary fibrous tumor of the meninges.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kumiko; Tada, Toyohiro; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugiyama, Naotake; Inaguma, Shingo; Takahashi, Seishiro S; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2004-05-01

    Increasing numbers of solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) in the meninges have been reported since this entity was first recognized. While most cases previously reported were considered to be benign, the malignant potential of extrathoracic SFTs has not been excluded. The authors report a rare case of a meningeal SFT with malignant behavior occurring in a Japanese female patient, initially resected when she was 44 years old and recurring in the same place four times during a 26-year follow-up period. A metastatic tumor to the right lung arose 25 years after the resection of the first meningeal tumor and focal invasion into the cerebellum was also observed with her last (5th) meningeal tumor. Immunohistochemical analysis showed all tumors to be diffusely positive for CD34 and negative for EMA, with a so-called "patternless" histological pattern, featuring thin collagen fibers between tumor cells. A focal "staghorn" vascular pattern was also observed. Ki67 (MIB-1) labeling indices and mitosis rates were 3.1+/-1.2% and less than 1/10 high power fields (HPF) in the first meningeal tumor and 16.1+/-6.4% and 6/10HPF in the last (5th) one, respectively. Thus, the present case suggests that meningeal SFTs possess malignant potential so that careful long-term follow up is required.

  8. Protecting the herd: the remarkable effectiveness of the bacterial meningitis polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in altering transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stephens, David S

    2011-01-01

    Interrupting human-to-human transmission of the agents (Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) of bacterial meningitis by new capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (PPCVs) has proven to be a remarkable (and unanticipated) contributor to vaccine effectiveness. Herd immunity accounts for ∼50% of the protection by meningococcal serogroup C PPCVs, pneumococcal PPCV7, and H. influenzae b PPCVs. Nasopharyngeal carriage can be reduced ≥75% for vaccine serotypes; the decrease in carriage is correlated with disease reduction in unvaccinated individuals, and the impact of herd immunity lasts for years. Based on these data, models for using herd immunity in vaccine-based prevention strategies are underway for control of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the immunologic basis of herd immunity and impact on microbial biology need more study, protecting the unvaccinated by altering pathogen transmission dynamics is a powerful effect of PPCVs and increasingly important in vaccine introduction, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

  9. Spontaneous remission of acromegaly: apoplexy mimicking meningitis or meningitis as a cause of apoplexy?

    PubMed

    Villar-Taibo, Rocío; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Alvarez-San Martín, Rosa M; Kyriakos, Georgios; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro

    2014-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare but potentially life-threatening clinical syndrome characterized by ischemic infarction or hemorrhage into a pituitary tumor. The diagnosis of pituitary tumor apoplexy is frequently complicated because of the nonspecific nature of its signs and symptoms, which can mimic different neurological processes, including meningitis. Several factors have been associated with apoplexy, such as dopamine agonists, radiotherapy, or head trauma, but meningitis is a rarely reported cause. We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with acromegaly due to a pituitary macroadenoma. Before surgical treatment, she arrived at Emergency with fever, nausea, vomiting and meningismus. Symptoms and laboratory tests suggested bacterial meningitis, and antibiotic therapy was initiated, with quick improvement. A computerized tomography (CT) scan at admission did not reveal any change in pituitary adenoma, but a few weeks later, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed data of pituitary apoplexy with complete disappearance of the adenoma. Currently, her acromegaly is cured, but she developed hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus following apoplexy. We question whether she really experienced meningitis leading to apoplexy or whether apoplexy was misinterpreted as meningitis. In conclusion, the relationship between meningitis and pituitary apoplexy may be bidirectional. Apoplexy can mimic viral or bacterial meningitis, but meningitis might cause apoplexy, as well. This fact highlights the importance of differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with pituitary adenomas and acute neurological symptoms.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Versus Nonbacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting-Ting; Hu, Zhi-De; Qin, Bao-Dong; Ma, Ning; Tang, Qing-Qin; Wang, Li-Li; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Ren-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in bacterial meningitis (BM), but the results were heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of PCT as a marker for BM detection. A systematic search of the EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases was performed to identify studies published before December 7, 2015 investigating the diagnostic accuracy of PCT for BM. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy method. The overall diagnostic accuracy of PCT detection in CSF or blood was pooled using the bivariate model. Twenty-two studies involving 2058 subjects were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The overall specificities and sensitivities were 0.86 and 0.80 for CSF PCT, and 0.97 and 0.95 for blood PCT, respectively. Areas under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.90 and 0.98 for CSF PCT and blood PCT, respectively. The major limitation of this systematic review and meta-analysis was the small number of studies included and the heterogeneous diagnostic thresholds adopted by eligible studies. Our meta-analysis shows that PCT is a useful biomarker for BM diagnosis. PMID:26986140

  11. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Andam, Cheryl P.; Hanage, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25461843

  12. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Andam, Cheryl P; Hanage, William P

    2015-07-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci.

  13. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  14. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  15. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus strains within the "Streptococcus milleri group".

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, R A; Fraser, H; Hardie, J M; Beighton, D

    1990-01-01

    A biochemical scheme was developed by which strains of Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus anginosus can reliably be distinguished from within the "Streptococcus milleri group." Strains identified as S. intermedius were differentiated by the ability to produce detectable levels of alpha-glucosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-D-fucosidase, beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and sialidase with 4-methylumbelliferyl-linked fluorogenic substrates in microdilution trays after 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, together with the production of hyaluronidase. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were differentiated by the production of alpha-glucosidase and hyaluronidase by the former and the production of beta-glucosidase by the latter. The majority of strains of the S. milleri group obtained from dental plaque were identified as S. intermedius, as were most strains isolated from abscesses of the brain and liver. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were from a wider variety of infections, both oral and nonoral, than were strains of S. intermedius, with the majority of strains from urogenital infections being identified as S. anginosus. PMID:2380375

  16. Serologic studies of Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus morbillorum by crossed immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, R M; Lambe, D W

    1979-07-01

    A reference antigen-antibody system for Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus morbillorum was established with crossed immunoelectrophoresis. A comparison of S. intermedius, S. constellatus, and S. morbillorum with crossed immunoelectrophoresis and crossed immunoelectrophoresis with intermediate gel indicated that S. intermedius and S. constellatus are closely related antigenically with as many as six common cytoplasmic antigens. S. morbillorum was antigenically more distinct; antiserum of one strain of S. morbillorum was monospecific, indicating that specific serogroups of S. morbillorum exist. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis and tandem crossed immunoelectrophoresis revealed that S. intermedius, S. constellatus, and S. morbillorum also share some common antigens with Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mitis, but S. intermedius, S. constellatus, and S. morbillorum are antigenically distinct from Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus bovis.

  17. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii.

  18. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  19. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  20. Staphylococcus aureus meningitis from osteomyelitis of the spine.

    PubMed Central

    Markus, H. S.; Allison, S. P.

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of vertebral osteomyelitis presenting with secondary Staphylococcus aureus meningitis are described. In staphylococcal meningitis a search for a primary source should include the lower vertebral spine. PMID:2616438

  1. Microbial study of meningitis and encephalitis cases.

    PubMed

    Selim, Heba S; El-Barrawy, Mohamed A; Rakha, Magda E; Yingst, Samuel L; Baskharoun, Magda F

    2007-01-01

    Meningitis and/or encephalitis can pose a serious public health problem especially during outbreaks. A rapid and accurate diagnosis is important for effective earlier treatment. This study aimed to identify the possible microbial causes of meningitis and/or encephalitis cases. CSF and serum samples were collected from 322 patients who had signs and symptoms suggestive of meningitis and/or encephalitis. Out of 250 cases with confirmed clinical diagnosis, 83 (33.2%) were definitely diagnosed as bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis cases (by using CSF culture, biochemical tests, latex agglutination test, and CSF stain), 17 (6.8%) were definitely diagnosed as having viral causes ( by viral isolation on tissue culture, PCR and ELISA), and one (0.4%) was diagnosed as fungal meningitis case (by India ink stain, culture, and biochemical tests). Also, there was one encephalitis case with positive serum ELISA IgM antibodies against Sandfly scilian virus. N. meningitidis, S. pneumonia and M. tuberculosis were the most frequently detected bacterial agents, while Enteroviruses, herpes simplex viruses and varicella zoster viruses were the most common viral agents encountered. Further studies are needed to assess the role of different microbial agents in CNS infections and their effective methods of diagnosis.

  2. Three Streptococcus pneumoniae sialidases: three different products.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; Kiefel, Milton J; Wilson, Jennifer C; Andrew, Peter W; Oggioni, Marco R; Taylor, Garry L

    2011-02-16

    Streptococcus penumoniae is a major human pathogen responsible for respiratory tract infections, septicemia, and meningitis and continues to produce numerous cases of disease with relatively high mortalities. S. pneumoniae encodes up to three sialidases, NanA, NanB, and NanC, that have been implicated in pathogenesis and are potential drug targets. NanA has been shown to be a promiscuous sialidase, hydrolyzing the removal of Neu5Ac from a variety of glycoconjugates with retention of configuration at the anomeric center, as we confirm by NMR. NanB is an intramolecular trans-sialidase producing 2,7-anhydro-Neu5Ac selectively from α2,3-sialosides. Here, we show that the first product of NanC is 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en) that can be slowly hydrated by the enzyme to Neu5Ac. We propose that the three pneumococcal sialidases share a common catalytic mechanism up to the final product formation step, and speculate on the roles of the enzymes in the lifecycle of the bacterium.

  3. [Clinical, epidemiological and etiological studies of adult aseptic meningitis: Report of 13 cases with mumps meningitis].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Shinichi; Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Neshige, Shuichiro; Himeno, Takahiro; Kono, Ryuhei; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    We experienced 13 cases (29.8 ± 7.0 years) of mumps meningitis and 365 cases of adult aseptic meningitis during 11 years from 2004 to 2014. A small epidemic of mumps occurred for 3-4 years, and the incidence rate of adult mumps meningitis coincided with the epidemic without seasonal fluctuation. Parotitis was observed in 8 of the 13 mumps meningitis patients (61.5%) and orchitis in 2 of 7 male patients (28.6%). There were no differences in clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and outcome between patients with adult mumps meningitis and those with echovirus 9 meningitis (9 patients), except for the low frequency of nausea/vomiting and a high percentage of mononuclear cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in those with mumps. Eight patients had contact with persons with mumps before the symptomatic stage of meningitis. Only one patient had received mumps vaccination in childhood. On the basis of the values of the anti-mumps IgM and IgG antibodies, we speculated primary infection and the re-infection of mumps in 6 and 2 patients, respectively. Moreover, second vaccine failure was suggested in the vaccinated patient.

  4. Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis, Ethiopia, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Mihret, Wude; Lema, Tsehaynesh; Merid, Yared; Kassu, Afework; Abebe, Workeabeba; Moges, Beyene; Tenna, Admasu; Woldegebriel, Fitsum; Yidnekachew, Melaku; Mekonnen, Wondale; Ahmed, Arslan; Yamuah, Lawrence; Silamsaw, Mezgebu; Petros, Beyene; Oksnes, Jan; Rosenqvist, Einar; Ayele, Samuel; Aseffa, Abraham; Caugant, Dominique A; Norheim, Gunnstein

    2016-01-01

    Among 139 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis in Ethiopia, 2012-2013, meningococci (19.4%) and pneumococci (12.9%) were the major disease-causing organisms. Meningococcal serogroups detected were A (n = 11), W (n = 7), C (n = 1), and X (n = 1). Affordable, multivalent meningitis vaccines for the African meningitis belt are urgently needed.

  5. Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis, Ethiopia, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Mihret, Wude; Lema, Tsehaynesh; Merid, Yared; Kassu, Afework; Abebe, Workeabeba; Moges, Beyene; Tenna, Admasu; Woldegebriel, Fitsum; Yidnekachew, Melaku; Mekonnen, Wondale; Ahmed, Arslan; Yamuah, Lawrence; Silamsaw, Mezgebu; Petros, Beyene; Oksnes, Jan; Rosenqvist, Einar; Ayele, Samuel; Aseffa, Abraham; Caugant, Dominique A.

    2016-01-01

    Among 139 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis in Ethiopia, 2012–2013, meningococci (19.4%) and pneumococci (12.9%) were the major disease-causing organisms. Meningococcal serogroups detected were A (n = 11), W (n = 7), C (n = 1), and X (n = 1). Affordable, multivalent meningitis vaccines for the African meningitis belt are urgently needed. PMID:26689450

  6. Chromosomal imbalances in meningeal solitary fibrous tumors.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew J; Summersgill, Brenda M; Fisher, Cyril; Shipley, Janet M; Dean, Andrew F

    2002-06-01

    We present the results of a comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis of three meningeal solitary fibrous tumors (SFT). One case showed loss of chromosome 3 and two tumors had deletions of the region 3p21-p26. Other chromosomal losses included 4p15, 8q22-q24, 10, 11q14-q25, 17q11- q23, 20, and 21 in one case each. In addition, there were gains of 18p11-p13 in one case, and 1p11-p36 and 20q11-q13 in another. To our knowledge, there are no previous CGH or cytogenetic data on meningeal SFT, and loss of material on chromosome 3 has not been described in SFT at other sites. Our findings are discussed in relation to published molecular genetic and cytogenetic data on meningioma and hemangiopericytoma, the two lesions with which meningeal SFT are most likely to be confused.

  7. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids. PMID:26438456

  8. Use of radiologic modalities in coccidioidal meningitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Goldstein, E.; Hoeprich, P.D.; McGahan, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of pentetate indium trisodium CSF studies, technetium Tc 99m brain scans, and computerized tomographic (CT) scans was evaluated in eight patients in whom coccidioidal meningitis developed following a dust storm in the Central Valley of California. The 111In flow studies and the CT scans demonstrated hydrocephalus in five patients with clinical findings suggesting this complication. Ventriculitis has not previously been diagnosed before death in patients with coccidioidal meningitis; however, it was demonstrated in two patients by the technetium Tc 99m brain scan. The finding that communicating hydrocephalus occurs early in meningitis and interferes with CSF flow into infected basilar regions has important therapeutic implications in that antifungal agents injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space may not reach these regions.

  9. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  10. Anatomy and imaging of the normal meninges.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel; Kirmi, Olga

    2009-12-01

    The meninges are an important connective tissue envelope investing the brain. Their function is to provide a protective coating to the brain and also participate in the formation of blood-brain barrier. Understanding their anatomy is fundamental to understanding the location and spread of pathologies in relation to the layers. It also provides an insight into the characteristics of such pathologies when imaging them. This review aims to describe the anatomy of the meninges, and to demonstrate the imaging findings of specific features.

  11. [Solitary fibrous tumor of the meninges].

    PubMed

    Gentil Perret, A; Mosnier, J F; Duthel, R; Brunon, J; Barral, F; Boucheron, S

    1999-12-01

    We report a case of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the meninges. SFTs have been initially described in the pleura. SFTs show similar histological findings as in other locations. SFTs show a diffuse positive staining for vimentin and CD34. Meningeal SFTs have usually a favourable outcome. These tumors have to be essentially distinguished from hemangiopericytomas and fibrous meningiomas. Immunostaining for CD34 is of value for this purpose. CD34 expression is often patchy and weaker in hemangiopericytomas whereas it is rarely observed in fibrous meningiomas. It is of great interest to isolate SFTs from hemangiopericytomas because of their favourable outcome.

  12. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Attout, H; Guez, S; Seriès, C

    2007-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common cause of cerebral salt wasting syndrome. There are few reports of this condition in infectious meningitis. We describe a patient with hyponatremia and bacterial meningitis. Hyponatremia rapidly improved after administration of sodium chloride. The purpose of this report is to alert clinicians to the fact that hyponatremic patients with central nervous system disease do not necessarily have a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), but may have cerebral salt wasting syndrome. By contrast with SIADH, the treatment requires saline administration.

  13. Temporary divergence paralysis in viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Stef L M; Gan, Ivan M

    2008-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman who reported diplopia and headache was found to have comitant esotropia at distance fixation and normal alignment at reading distance (divergence paralysis). Eye movement, including abduction, was normal as was the rest of the neurologic examination. Brain MRI was normal. Lumbar puncture showed an elevated opening pressure and a cerebrospinal fluid formula consistent with viral meningitis. The patient was treated with intravenous fluids and analgesics and with a temporary prism to alleviate diplopia. Within 3 weeks, she had fully recovered. This is the first report of divergence palsy in viral meningitis.

  14. Fatal Streptococcus canis infections in intensively housed shelter cats.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, P A; Bannasch, M J; Bachmann, R; Byrne, B A; Hurley, K F

    2007-03-01

    Three independent, fatal outbreaks of Streptococcus canis infection occurred in a 2-year period in shelter cats. The outbreaks occurred in Northern California (Yolo County), Southern California (Kern County), and North Carolina (Guilford County). An estimation of the affected population is >150 cats among 3 affected shelters, with a mortality rate of up to 30%. Among 20 cats submitted for necropsy there were 2 distinct pathologic presentations. The first (shelters 1 and 2) was skin ulceration and chronic respiratory infection that progressed, in some cats, to necrotizing sinusitis and meningitis. The second (shelter 3) was rapid progression from necrotizing fasciitis with skin ulceration to toxic shock-like syndrome, sepsis, and death. S canis was the sole pathogen identified in most cases. Whether hypervirulent S canis strains exist is unknown; there is little understanding of how these bacteria cause invasive disease in cats.

  15. Fatal Streptococcus canis infections in intensively housed shelter cats.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, P A; Bannasch, M J; Bachmann, R; Byrne, B A; Hurley, K F

    2007-03-01

    Three independent, fatal outbreaks of Streptococcus canis infection occurred in a 2-year period in shelter cats. The outbreaks occurred in Northern California (Yolo County), Southern California (Kern County), and North Carolina (Guilford County). An estimation of the affected population is >150 cats among 3 affected shelters, with a mortality rate of up to 30%. Among 20 cats submitted for necropsy there were 2 distinct pathologic presentations. The first (shelters 1 and 2) was skin ulceration and chronic respiratory infection that progressed, in some cats, to necrotizing sinusitis and meningitis. The second (shelter 3) was rapid progression from necrotizing fasciitis with skin ulceration to toxic shock-like syndrome, sepsis, and death. S canis was the sole pathogen identified in most cases. Whether hypervirulent S canis strains exist is unknown; there is little understanding of how these bacteria cause invasive disease in cats. PMID:17317801

  16. Structural and Functional Analysis of Cell Wall-anchored Polypeptide Adhesin BspA in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Rego, Sara; Heal, Timothy J; Pidwill, Grace R; Till, Marisa; Robson, Alice; Lamont, Richard J; Sessions, Richard B; Jenkinson, Howard F; Race, Paul R; Nobbs, Angela H

    2016-07-29

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the predominant cause of early-onset infectious disease in neonates and is responsible for life-threatening infections in elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Clinical manifestations of GBS infection include sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Here, we describe BspA, a deviant antigen I/II family polypeptide that confers adhesive properties linked to pathogenesis in GBS. Heterologous expression of BspA on the surface of the non-adherent bacterium Lactococcus lactis confers adherence to scavenger receptor gp340, human vaginal epithelium, and to the fungus Candida albicans Complementary crystallographic and biophysical characterization of BspA reveal a novel β-sandwich adhesion domain and unique asparagine-dependent super-helical stalk. Collectively, these findings establish a new bacterial adhesin structure that has in effect been hijacked by a pathogenic Streptococcus species to provide competitive advantage in human mucosal infections. PMID:27311712

  17. Meningococcal meningitis: vaccination outbreak response and epidemiological changes in the African meningitis belt.

    PubMed

    Carod Artal, Francisco Javier

    2015-07-01

    The main approach to controlling epidemics of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt has been reactive vaccination campaigns with serogroup A polysaccharide vaccine once the outbreak reached an incidence threshold. Early reactive vaccination is effective in reducing morbidity and mortality. A recent paper in International Health has shown that earlier reactive vaccination campaigns may be even more effective than increasing the coverage area of vaccination. Monovalent serogroup A conjugate vaccine programs have recently been launched to prevent transmission in endemic areas in the African meningitis belt. Conjugate vaccines can induce immunological memory and have impact on pharyngeal carriage. However, reactive vaccination still has a role to play taking into account the dynamic changes in the epidemiology of meningitis in this area. PMID:25878213

  18. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M.; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C.; Perea, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years’ experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. Methods. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). Results. The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100 000 in 2004–2010 to 0.02 per 100 000 in 2011–2013 (P < .0001). Conclusions. In addition to supporting timely outbreak response, the enhanced meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. PMID:26553668

  19. Sepsis and Meningitis due to Listeria Monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Aygen, Bilgehan; Esel, Duygu; Kayabas, Uner; Alp, Emine; Sumerkan, Bulent; Doganay, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This study focused on the effect of immuno-compromising conditions on the clinical presentation of severe listerial infection. Patients and Methods Nine human listeriosis cases seen from 1991-2002 were reviewed. All adult patients, from whose blood, peritoneal fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) the L. monocytogenes was isolated, were included in this retrospective study. Results Listeriosis presented as primary sepsis with positive blood cultures in 5 cases and meningitis with positive CSF cultures in 4 cases. All of these patients had at least one underlying disease, most commonly, hematologic malignancy, diabetes mellitus, amyloidosis and hepatic cirrhosis; 55.6% had received immunosuppressive or corticosteroid therapy within a week before the onset of listeriosis. The patients were adults with a mean age of 60 years. Fever, night sweats, chills and lethargy were the most common symptoms; high temperature (> 38℃), tachycardia, meningeal signs and poor conditions in general were the most common findings on admission. The mortality rate was 33.3% and was strictly associated with the severity of the underlying disease. Mortality differences were significant between sepsis (20%) and meningitis (50%) patients. Conclusion Listeriosis as an uncommon infection in our region and that immuno-suppressive therapy is an important pre-disposing factor of listeriosis. Sepsis and meningitis were more common in this group of patients and had the highest case-fatality rate for food-borne illnesses. PMID:17594151

  20. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction. PMID:23671802

  1. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction.

  2. The mood-stabilizer lithium prevents hippocampal apoptosis and improves spatial memory in experimental meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liechti, Fabian D; Stüdle, Nicolas; Theurillat, Regula; Grandgirard, Denis; Thormann, Wolfgang; Leib, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Brain damage caused by this disease is characterized by apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, a morphological correlate of learning deficits in experimental paradigms. The mood stabilizer lithium has previously been found to attenuate brain damage in ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the brain. An infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis was used to investigate the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative potential of lithium. To assess an effect on the acute disease, LiCl was administered starting five days prior to intracisternal infection with live Streptococcus pneumoniae. Clinical parameters were recorded, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled, and the animals were sacrificed 42 hours after infection to harvest the brain and serum. Cryosections of the brains were stained for Nissl substance to quantify brain injury. Hippocampal gene expression of Bcl-2, Bax, p53, and BDNF was analyzed. Lithium concentrations were measured in serum and CSF. The effect of chronic lithium treatment on spatial memory function and cell survival in the dentate gyrus was evaluated in a Morris water maze and by quantification of BrdU incorporation after LiCl treatment during 3 weeks following infection. In the hippocampus, LiCl significantly reduced apoptosis and gene expression of Bax and p53 while it increased expression of Bcl-2. IL-10, MCP-1, and TNF were significantly increased in animals treated with LiCl compared to NaCl. Chronic LiCl treatment improved spatial memory in infected animals. The mood stabilizer lithium may thus be a therapeutic alternative to attenuate neurofunctional deficits as a result of pneumococcal meningitis.

  3. Modulation of Hippocampal Neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 Regulatory Protein 2 (Faim2) in the Course of Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B.; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis. PMID:24335530

  4. Modulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 regulatory protein 2 (Faim2) in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis.

  5. Tricuspid valve endocarditis with Group B Streptococcus after an elective abortion: the need for new data.

    PubMed

    Palys, Erica E; Li, John; Gaut, Paula L; Hardy, W David

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, commonly known as Group B streptococcus (GBS), was originally discovered as a cause of bovine mastitis. GBS colonizes the genital tract of up to 40% of women and has become a major pathogen in neonatal meningitis. GBS endocarditis is thought to be an uncommon manifestation of this infection and carries a higher mortality compared to other streptococcal pathogens. Studies have shown that endocarditis after abortion has an incidence of about one per million. However, this figure was published prior to routine use of echocardiography for diagnosis. The American Heart Association has recently declared transesophageal echocardiography the gold standard for endocarditis diagnosis. This case report illustrates that, given the potentially devastating consequences of endocarditis, there is a need for updated studies to adequately assess the true incidence of this infection. Pending the outcome of these studies, routine GBS screening and prophylactic antibiotics prior to abortion should be recommended.

  6. FATAL CASE OF STREPTOCOCCUS SUIS INFECTION IN A YOUNG WILD BOAR (SUS SCROFA) FROM SOUTHWESTERN SPAIN.

    PubMed

    Risco, David; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M; García-Jiménez, Waldo L; Gonçalves, Pilar; Martínez, Remigio; García, Alfredo; Rosales, Rubén; Gómez, Luis; de Mendoza, Javier Hermoso

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus suis is a recognized pathogen that may cause important diseases in pigs and humans. This microorganism has been repeatedly isolated from wild boar (Sus scrofa). However, its health implications for this wild species are still unknown. This article reports a detailed description of a fatal case of septicemia by S. suis affecting a young wild boar. The affected animal, about 15 days old, was found near death and exhibiting neurologic signs at a wild boar estate in southwestern Spain. Postmortem examination showed generalized congestion, brain hemorrhages and lobular pneumonia. Histopathological evaluation demonstrated the presence of meningitis and encephalitis with marked congestion and suppurative bronchopneumonia. Streptococcus suis serotype 2 isolates exhibiting important virulence factors (extracellular factor, muramidase-released protein, and suylisin) were isolated from the affected animal. This study confirms the presence of potentially virulent and zoonotic strains of S. suis in wild boar from Spain. PMID:26056897

  7. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P < 0.001). There was significant difference in CSFcortisol levels in bacterial and aseptic meningitis (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Cortisol levels in CSF are highly elevated in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  8. Tuberculous meningitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sinha, Manish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. HIV-infected patients have a high incidence of tuberculous meningitis as well. The exact incidence and prevalence of tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected patients are not known. HIV infection does not significantly alter the clinical manifestations, laboratory, radiographic findings, or the response to therapy. Still, some differences have been noted. For example, the histopathological examination of exudates in HIV-infected patients shows fewer lymphocytes, epithelioid cells, and Langhan's type of giant cells. Larger numbers of acid-fast bacilli may be seen in the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. The chest radiograph is abnormal in up to 46% of patients with tuberculous meningitis. Tuberculous meningitis is likely to present with cerebral infarcts and mass lesions. Cryptococcal meningitis is important in differential diagnosis. The recommended duration of treatment in HIV-infected patients is 9-12 months. The benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids is uncertain. Antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis treatment should be initiated at the same time, regardless of CD4 cell counts. Tuberculous meningitis may be a manifestation of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated a significant impact of HIV co-infection on mortality from tuberculous meningitis. HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have significantly higher mortality. The best way to prevent HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis is to diagnose and isolate infectious cases of tuberculosis promptly and administer appropriate treatment.

  9. [Clinical, epidemiological, and etiological studies of aseptic meningitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Shinichi; Neshige, Shuichiro; Himeno, Takahiro; Hara, Naoyuki; Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Takao, Shinichi; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    From summer to autumn, we noted the occurrence of a small epidemic of aseptic meningitis in adults. Over the last 10 years, we have encountered 203 male (mean age, 34.6 ± 15.0 years) and 157 female (mean age, 35.6 ± 16.3 years) patients with aseptic meningitis. We could identify the causative virus in 17 (81%) of 21 cases during the abovementioned months in 2012. Identification rates of the virus in the stool, cerebrospinal fluid, throat swab, and serum samples were 71%, 67%, 42%, and 5%, respectively. The etiological viruses included enteroviruses in all cases, such as echovirus type 9 (E9) in 9 cases, echovirus type 6 (E6) in 4 cases, coxsackievirus type A9 in 1 case, and unknown type of enterovirus in 3 cases. No differences in the clinical manifestations and laboratory findings were noted between E9 meningitis and E6 meningitis. In addition, we countered 14 cases of mumps meningitis, 7 cases of varicella-zoster virus meningitis and 6 cases of herpes simplex meningitis during the last 10 years; these cases did not occur as an epidemic, but occurred sporadically. Cases of mumps meningitis were noted in all seasons, and cases of varicella-zoster virus meningitis were only noted from summer to winter. The etiology of epidemic aseptic meningitis in adults could be mainly due to enterovirus infection, and its prognosis was benign.

  10. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Chuan T.; Burrell, Louise M.; Johnson, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  11. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chuan T; Burrell, Louise M; Johnson, Douglas F

    2016-08-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  12. Confirmed viral meningitis with normal CSF findings.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Naghum; Desjobert, Edouard; Lumley, Janine; Webster, Daniel; Jacobs, Michael

    2014-07-17

    An 18-year-old woman presented with a progressively worsening headache, photophobia feverishness and vomiting. Three weeks previously she had returned to the UK from a trip to Peru. At presentation, she had clinical signs of meningism. On admission, blood tests showed a mild lymphopenia, with a normal C reactive protein and white cell count. Chest X-ray and CT of the head were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy was normal. CSF protein and glucose were in the normal range. MRI of the head and cerebral angiography were also normal. Subsequent molecular testing of CSF detected enterovirus RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. The patient's clinical syndrome correlated with her virological diagnosis and no other cause of her symptoms was found. Her symptoms were self-limiting and improved with supportive management. This case illustrates an important example of viral central nervous system infection presenting clinically as meningitis but with normal CSF microscopy.

  13. [Duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Pereira, P Ricardo; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    The duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis is a controversial issue. Antibiotic regimens have changed over time along with the criteria used to determine the ideal antibiotic therapy duration. The authors aim to make an historical overview on this matter and simultaneously add the evidence of recent studies, pointing out some issues in results interpretation, namely, their design and the associated demographic and epidemiological questions. Clinical assays on this subject, with statistically significant results, are quite recent. Most of the scientific knowledge has been acquired empirically through the times. The actual investigation paradigm, in what concerns to antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis, lays on the dichotomy: "short versus long duration regimens". Nevertheless, so far, the existing studies have not completely cleared this doubt. Thus, despite some evidence suggests that short duration antibiotic regimens are effective for some patients, in patients with severe disease presentations or with other morbidities its use may be questioned.

  14. Suspected meningococcal meningitis on an aircraft carrier.

    PubMed

    Farr, Wesley; Gonzalez, Michele J; Garbauskas, Heather; Zinderman, Craig E; LaMar, James E

    2004-09-01

    A suspected case of meningococcal meningitis was diagnosed in a 24-year-old sailor onboard an aircraft carrier at sea in 2003. He was immediately confined to the ship's hospital ward under respiratory isolation precautions and was treated with intravenously administered antibiotics. His illness resolved without sequelae. A total of 99 close contacts from the ship were identified and given antibiotic prophylaxis, with directly observed therapy. British public health authorities were contacted to trace and treat persons identified as close contacts during a port call a few days before presentation. Managing a communicable disease such as meningococcal meningitis in the austere shipboard environment represents a unique challenge to military medical personnel. Successful management is possible through prompt treatment, respiratory isolation, and open communication between primary health care providers and public health officials. The identification of shipboard close contacts and other infection control procedures used by the ship's medical department are reviewed.

  15. Congenital malformations of the skull and meninges.

    PubMed

    Kanev, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    The surgery and management of children who have congenital malformations of the skull and meninges require multidisciplinary care and long-term follow-up by multiple specialists in birth defects. The high definition of three-dimensional CT and MRI allows precise surgery planning of reconstruction and management of associated malformations. The reconstruction of meningoencephaloceles and craniosynostosis are challenging procedures that transform the child's appearance. The embryology, clinical presentation, and surgical management of these malformations are reviewed.

  16. Unusual cause of fatal anthrax meningitis.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Emine; Parlak, Mehmet; Atli, Seval Bilgiç

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of fatal anthrax meningoencephalitis in the province of Muş located in eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The organism isolated from cerebrospinal fluid was identified as Bacillus anthracis. The patient was treated with crystallized penicillin G (24 MU/day IV) and ciprofloxacin (2 × 400/day IV), but died 5 days after hospitalization. Although it is a rare case, we consider that the patients who have skin, respiratory and neurological systems might also have hemorrhagic meningitis.

  17. Effects of Polysaccharide Fucoidin on Cerebrospinal Fluid Interleukin-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Pneumococcal Meningitis in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Granert, Carl; Raud, Johan; Waage, Anders; Lindquist, Lars

    1999-01-01

    The inflammatory response in bacterial meningitis is mediated by cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which are produced in the subarachnoid space by different cells, e.g., leukocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. The recruitment of leukocytes into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been shown to contribute to the neurological damage in this disease, a process which could be enhanced by treatment with antibiotics. In this study, we have used a rabbit meningitis model for two sets of experiments with intracisternal (i.c.) injections of Streptococcus pneumoniae. First, pneumococcal cell wall (PCW) components were injected i.c., inducing an inflammatory response with pleocytosis and increased levels of CSF TNF-α) and IL-1 at 6 and 12 h after PCW injection. Treatment with fucoidin, known to inhibit leukocyte rolling, abolished pleocytosis and inhibited the release of TNF-α and IL-1. In the second experiment, live pneumococcal bacteria were injected i.c. and treatment with one dose of ampicillin (40 mg/kg of body weight intravenously) was given 16 h after induction of meningitis, causing a sevenfold increase in CSF leukocytes over a 4-h period. CSF IL-1 levels at 16 h were high but did not increase further at 20 h. Also, CSF TNF-α levels were high at 16 h and tended to increase at 20 h. Fucoidin treatment prevented the antibiotic-induced increase of CSF leukocytes but had no effect on the TNF-α and IL-1 levels. Taken together, fucoidin reduced CSF TNF-α and IL-1 levels in acute bacterial meningitis induced by PCW fragments but had no effect later in the course of the disease, when live bacteria were used and an inflammatory increase was caused by a dose of antibiotics. PMID:10225856

  18. [Benign recurring aseptic meningitis. What requires our attention?].

    PubMed

    Kruis, T; Kredel, L; Nassir, M; Godbersen, M; Schneider, T

    2016-02-01

    Benign recurrent aseptic meningitis (BRAM) or Mollaret's meningitis is a rare disease characterized by recurrent episodes of aseptic meningitis followed by spontaneous recovery. Disease courses over several years have been reported. In most cases, BRAM is caused by HSV-2, less frequently by other viruses or autoimmune diseases. In up to 10 %, the aetiology remains unclear. We present a case of idiopathic BRAM and discuss clinical findings, diagnosis and therapeutic options of this rare illness.

  19. Chemical meningitis: a rare presentation of Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Braksick, Sherri A; Murphy, Lauren L; Morparia, Neha P; Natt, Neena; Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-04-01

    Rathke's cleft cysts (RCC) are usually benign, sellar and/or suprasellar lesions originating from the remnants of Rathke's pouch. Rarely, RCC can present with chemical meningitis, sellar abscess, lymphocytic hypophysitis, or intracystic hemorrhage. We describe an unusual presentation of RCC in which the patient presented with a clinical picture of chemical meningitis consisting of meningeal irritation, inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid profile, and enhancing pituitary and hypothalamic lesions, in addition to involvement of the optic tracts and optic nerve.

  20. Genetic manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS).

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe, often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  1. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-01-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S. salivarius from S. bovis and S. bovis variant. PMID:6490816

  2. The microvasculature of the human cerebellar meninges.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michiko; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2002-12-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebellar meninges was investigated. The surface meninges were poor in vasculature. In the sulci, the meninges were highly vascular but had few capillaries. The venous blood vessels gave long side branches at right angles to the parent vessels in a cruciform pattern, running horizontally along the cerebellar sulci. They were situated at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. Anastomoses between these horizontal branches gave a crosshatched appearance. Short branches often extended to the bases of the sulci, terminating in T-shaped bifurcations with numerous tiny branches, like the roots of a tree. The arteries ran perpendicular to venous branches which were parallel to each other exclusively along the sagittal plane. These arteries bifurcated to straddle the horizontally running veins at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. They gave off many small branches like teeth of a fork from each artery in the secondary or tertiary sulci after they bifurcated to straddle the venous branches and penetrated the cerebellar cortex at the bases of sulci. These fork-like ramifications in the bases of the sulci were most likely responsible for the ready development of pronounced ischemic state. They might also play an important role in the occurrence of ischemic damage at the bases of sulci in cases of severe generalized ischemia.

  3. [Infantile meningitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus].

    PubMed

    Shirota, Go; Morozumi, Miyuki; Ubukata, Kimiko; Shiro, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial (RS) virus commonly causes infantile respiratory tract infection causing significant morbidity and mortality, but rarely meningitis. We report a case of meningitis caused by RS virus subgroup B in a 56-day-old boy admitted for high fever who underwent blood examination and lumbar puncture. Empirical chemotherapy was started with intravenous ampicillin, gentamicin, and cefotaxime based on laboratory data on CSF cells (84/microL) and serum CRP (13.8mg/dL) data. RS virus subgroup B was only detected using real-time PCR comprehensive reverse transcription from the first CSF, but no bacterial gene was detected. No bacteria grew from his CSF, urine, or blood. Fever and serum CRP dropped in a few days. He had neither seizures nor disturbance of consciousness and was discharged on day 11 after admission. No evidence of encephalopathy was detected in brain MRI or electroencephalography. RS virus rarely causes meningitis, but a percentage of RS-virus-infected infants exhibit symptoms such as seizure and disturbance of consciousness. We should recognize that the RS virus may cause neurological complications associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  4. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    A meningococcal serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac(™) ) is being deployed in countries of the African meningitis belt. Experience with other polysaccharide/protein conjugate vaccines has shown that an important part of their success has been their ability to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage and hence to stop transmission and induce herd immunity. If PsA-TT is to achieve the goal of preventing epidemics, it must be able to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage as well as invasive meningococcal disease and whether PsA-TT can prevent pharyngeal carriage needs to be determined. To address this issue, a consortium (the African Meningococcal Carriage (MenAfriCar) consortium) was established in 2009 to investigate the pattern of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt prior to and after the introduction of PsA-TT. This article describes how the consortium was established, its objectives and the standardised field and laboratory methods that were used to achieve these objectives. The experience of the MenAfriCar consortium will help in planning future studies on the epidemiology of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt and elsewhere.

  5. Testing for meningitis in children with bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Michael; Williams, Ronald; McSherry, George; Geskey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Viral bronchiolitis accounts for almost 20% of all-cause hospitalizations of infants (ie, children younger than age 1 year). The annual incidence of fever in viral bronchiolitis has been documented at 23% to 31%. However the incidence of concurrent serious bacterial infections is low (1%-7%), with meningitis occurring in less than 1% to 2% of cases, but lumbar puncture is performed in up to 9% of viral bronchiolitis cases. To our knowledge, no study has examined clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. We present a retrospective, case-control study of hospitalized infants younger than one year diagnosed with viral bronchiolitis who underwent lumbar puncture as part of an evaluation for meningitis. The objective of the study was to determine clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. Although the presence of apnea, cyanosis, meningeal signs, positive urine culture results, and young age were factors found to be preliminarily associated with the performance of a lumbar puncture in the setting of bronchiolitis, young age was the only significant clinical factor found after multivariable regression; no other demographic, clinical, laboratory, or radiologic variables were found to be significant.

  6. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Lea-Jessica; Tauber, Simone C.; Merres, Julika; Kress, Eugenia; Stope, Matthias B.; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1−/−, IL-6−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice in contrast to IL-6−/− and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6−/− or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone. PMID:27057100

  7. Sub-meninges implantation reduces immune response to neural implants.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Neil T; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L

    2013-04-15

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability.

  8. Sub-meninges Implantation Reduces Immune Response to Neural Implants

    PubMed Central

    Markwardt, Neil T.; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. PMID:23370311

  9. Mollaret meningitis: case report with a familial association.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Snyder, Graham E

    2011-09-01

    Mollaret meningitis is a syndrome characterized by recurrent bouts of meningitis that occur over a period of several years in an affected patient. Also known as recurrent lymphocytic meningitis, this entity involves repeated episodes of headache, stiff neck, fever, and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Herpes simplex virus type 2 is the most frequently implicated causative agent, and treatment involves the use of antiviral medications. We describe a case of Mollaret meningitis in a 47-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with his eighth episode of meningitis during a period of 20 years. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction testing for herpes simplex virus type 2 was positive, and further testing excluded other common viral, bacterial, and inflammatory causes of meningeal irritation. The patient's family history was significant for a brother who also had multiple episodes of aseptic meningitis during a period of several years. This represents the first published report of a possible familial association involving Mollaret meningitis. It is likely that Mollaret meningitis is underrecognized among emergency physicians, and improved recognition of this entity may limit unwarranted antibiotic use and shorten or eliminate unnecessary hospital admission.

  10. [Eosinophllic meningitis, a very rare entity in Europe].

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Jean-Blaise; Fumeaux, Christophe; Petignat, Pierre-Auguste

    2013-11-13

    Eosinophilic meningitis is a rare entity, which is a complication of an underlying disease. Its diagnosis and treatment is always a challenge for the hospital practitioner. The aim of this case report and review is to identify the most important aetiologies, and show the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of Eosinophilic meningitis. The most frequent causes of Eosinophilic meningitis are parasitic and fungal infections. In Europe Eosinophilic meningitis is essentially seen in travellers returning from endemic areas for these agents. The treatment is directed against the underlying disease and can differ depending on the aetiology and severity of the clinical manifestations.

  11. From Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa to the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, M. Teresa; Jodar, Luis; Granoff, Dan; Rabinovich, Regina; Ceccarini, Costante; Perkin, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Polysaccharide vaccines had been used to control African meningitis epidemics for >30 years but with little or modest success, largely because of logistical problems in the implementation of reactive vaccination campaigns that are begun after epidemics are under way. After the major group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics in 1996–1997 (250 000 cases and 25 000 deaths), African ministers of health declared the prevention of meningitis a high priority and asked the World Health Organization (WHO) for help in developing better immunization strategies to eliminate meningitis epidemics in Africa. Methods. WHO accepted the challenge and created a project called Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa (EVA) that served as an organizational framework for external consultants, PATH, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Consultations were initiated with major vaccine manufacturers. EVA commissioned a costing study/business plan for the development of new group A or A/C conjugate vaccines and explored the feasibility of developing these products as a public–private partnership. Representatives from African countries were consulted. They confirmed that the development of conjugate vaccines was a priority and provided information on preferred product characteristics. In parallel, a strategy for successful introduction was also anticipated and discussed. Results. The expert consultations recommended that a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine be developed and introduced into the African meningitis belt. The results of the costing study indicated that the “cost of goods” to develop a group A – containing conjugate vaccine in the United States would be in the range of US$0.35–$1.35 per dose, depending on composition (A vs A/C), number of doses/vials, and presentation. Following an invitation from BMGF, a proposal was submitted in the spring of 2001. Conclusions. In June 2001

  12. Penicillin susceptibility breakpoints for Streptococcus pneumoniae and their effect on susceptibility categorisation in Germany (1997-2013).

    PubMed

    Imöhl, M; Reinert, R R; Tulkens, P M; van der Linden, M

    2014-11-01

    Continuous nationwide surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was conducted in Germany. From July 1, 1997, to June 30, 2013, data on penicillin susceptibility were available for 20,437 isolates. 2,790 of these isolates (13.7 %) originate from patients with meningitis and 17,647 isolates (86.3 %) are from non-meningitis cases. A slight decline in isolates susceptible at 0.06 and 0.12 μg/ml can be noticed over the years. Overall, 89.1 % of the isolates had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤0.015 μg/ml. In 2012/2013, the first three isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae with MICs of 8 μg/ml were found. The application of different guidelines with other MIC breakpoints for the interpretation of penicillin resistance leads to differences in susceptibility categorisation. According to the pre-2008 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) interpretive criteria, 5.3 % of isolates overall were intermediate and 1.4 % were resistant to penicillin. Application of the 2008-2014 CLSI interpretive criteria resulted in 7.6 % resistance among meningitis cases and 0.5 % intermediate resistance in non-meningitis cases. Referring to the 2009-2014 European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints, 7.6 % of the isolates in the meningitis group were resistant to penicillin. In the non-meningitis group, 6.1 % of the isolates were intermediate and 0.5 % were resistant. These differences should be kept in mind when surveillance studies on pneumococcal penicillin resistance are compared.

  13. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  14. Acute septicemia caused by Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Saumya, Dona; Wijetunge, S; Dunn, Patricia; Wallner-Pendleton, Eva; Lintner, Valerie; Matthews, Tammy; Pierre, Traci; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus, previously known as Streptococcus bovis biotypes I and II/2, is a well-known cause of sepsis and meningitis in humans and birds. The present case report describes an outbreak of fatal septicemia associated with S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (S. bovis biotype II/2) in 11 turkey flocks in Pennsylvania between 2010 and 2013. Affected poults were 2-3 wk of age. Major clinical observation was sudden increase in mortality among turkey poults without any premonitory clinical signs. Postmortem examination findings revealed acute septicemia with lesions such as fibrinous pericarditis, meningitis, splenic multifocal fibrinoid necrosis, hepatitis, osteochondritis, myositis, and airsacculitis. Gram-positive cocci were isolated from several organs by routine bacterial culture. Biotyping identified bacteria as streptococci, whereas 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identified them as S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles revealed that all the strains isolated were sensitive to penicillin and erythromycin with different sensitivity profiles for other antibacterial agents tested. The present study reports the first confirmed case of acute septicemia in turkey poults caused by S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus.

  15. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit.

  16. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  17. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-associated meningitis, southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Navarro-Marí, José-María; Sánchez-Seco, María-Paz; Gegúndez, María-Isabel; Palacios, Gustavo; Savji, Nazir; Lipkin, W Ian; Fedele, Giovanni; de Ory-Manchón, Fernando

    2012-05-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) was detected in 2 patients with acute meningitis in southern Spain within a 3-year period. Although the prevalence of LCMV infection was low (2 [1.3%] of 159 meningitis patients), it represents 2.9% of all pathogens detected. LCMV is a noteworthy agent of neurologic illness in immunocompetent persons.

  18. Mollaret's meningitis and herpes simplex virus type 2 infections.

    PubMed

    Farazmand, P; Woolley, P D; Kinghorn, G R

    2011-06-01

    Benign recurrent aseptic meningitis is a rare disorder described by Mollaret in 1944. When initially described, this form of aseptic meningitis had no identifiable infecting agent. New sophisticated diagnostic tools have now identified herpes simplex type 2 virus as the most commonly isolated agent. Antiviral treatment has been used successfully for prophylaxis and treatment.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious meningitis and ventriculitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Hazany, Saman; Go, John L; Law, Meng

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging findings of meningitis are usually nonspecific with respect to the causative pathogen because the brain response to these insults is similar in most cases. In this article, we will use a few representative cases to describe the characteristic magnetic resonance findings of meningitis and its complications, including ventriculitis. PMID:25296276

  20. Isolation of Acanthamoeba culbertsoni from a patient with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Lalitha, M K; Anandi, V; Srivastava, A; Thomas, K; Cherian, A M; Chandi, S M

    1985-04-01

    A case of amoebic meningitis, presumably primary, was encountered in the Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, South India, in November 1983. The patient, a 40-year-old man, had cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea before the meningitis developed. Acanthamoeba culbertsoni was repeatedly demonstrated in and cultured from the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient responded dramatically to a combination therapy of penicillin and chloramphenicol. PMID:3988911

  1. Chronic aseptic meningitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lancman, M E; Mesropian, H; Granillo, R J

    1989-08-01

    Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. It may occur early in the course of the disease and sometimes may be the initial symptom. We report a patient with chronic aseptic meningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed several ischemic lesions and an appearance which was compatible with chronic inflammation of the ependyma of the lateral ventricles.

  2. Aseptic Meningitis with Craniopharyngioma Resection: Consideration after Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny X.; Alkire, Blake C.; Lam, Allen C.; Curry, William T.; Holbrook, Eric H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While bacterial meningitis is a concerning complication after endoscopic skull base surgery, the diagnosis can be made without consideration for aseptic meningitis. This article aims to (1) present a patient with recurrent craniopharyngioma and multiple postoperative episodes of aseptic meningitis and (2) discuss the diagnosis and management of aseptic meningitis. Design Case report and literature review. Results A 65-year-old female patient with a symptomatic craniopharyngioma underwent transsphenoidal resection. She returned postoperatively with symptoms concerning for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture demonstrated mildly elevated leukocytes with normal glucose levels. Cultures were sterile and she was discharged on antibiotics. She returned 18 days postoperatively with altered mental status and fever. Again, negative CSF cultures suggested aseptic meningitis. Radiological and intraoperative findings were now concerning for widespread cerebrovascular vasospasm due to leaked craniopharyngioma fluids. In the following months, her craniopharyngioma recurred and required multiple surgical resections. Days after her last operation, she returned with mental status changes and a sterile CSF culture. She was diagnosed with recurrent aseptic meningitis and antibiotics were discontinued. The patient experienced near complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusions Consideration of aseptic meningitis following craniopharyngioma resection is critical to avoid unnecessary surgical re-exploration and prolonged courses of antibiotics. PMID:27722072

  3. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  4. Intrathecal chemotherapy with ACNU for meningeal gliomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T. K.; Beuls, E.; Shimizu, K.; Koulousakis, A.; Sturm, V.

    1992-01-01

    ACNU [1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl) methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride], one of the chloroethylnitrosoureas (CENUs), is believed to be effective against malignant glioma when intravenously or intrathecally administered. A rat model with meningeal gliomatosis (MG) induced by an intracisternal inoculation of rat C6 or 9L glioma cells was intrathecally and intravenously treated with ACNU in order to test the feasibility of intrathecal chemotherapy with ACNU in the treatment of meningeal gliomatosis. The median survival time (MST) of the animals was significantly prolonged when ACNU was intrathecally administered at dosages of 0.5 to 1.5 mg kg-1 in the early stages of MG, i.e. within 3 days after the tumour inoculation, whereas intravenous therapy with ACNU at a dose of 15 mg kg-1 did not exhibit any efficacy in the rats inoculated with C6 glioma cells (C6-MG). Intrathecal ACNU, however, at dosages of up to 1.5 mg kg-1 failed to demonstrate any therapeutic effect in the late stage of MG, i.e. 5 days after the tumour inoculation, except in the rats inoculated with 9L brain tumour cells (9L-MG). Intravenous chemotherapy with ACNU at a dose of 15 mg kg-1 extended the MST of the 9L-MG rats more significantly in the late stage of MG than in its early stage. This points to the feasibility of intrathecal ACNU in the treatment of meningeal gliomatosis in its early stages, but not in its late stages in which intravenous ACNU might be more effective than intrathecal treatment against MG of which the parenchyma has already been deeply invaded by the tumour. Images Figure 5 PMID:1457369

  5. Retinoic acid from the meninges regulates cortical neuron generation.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Ashique, Amir M; Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Patterson, Katelin P; Hecht, Jonathan H; Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Choe, Youngshik; May, Scott R; Kume, Tsutomu; Napoli, Joseph L; Peterson, Andrew S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2009-10-30

    Extrinsic signals controlling generation of neocortical neurons during embryonic life have been difficult to identify. In this study we demonstrate that the dorsal forebrain meninges communicate with the adjacent radial glial endfeet and influence cortical development. We took advantage of Foxc1 mutant mice with defects in forebrain meningeal formation. Foxc1 dosage and loss of meninges correlated with a dramatic reduction in both neuron and intermediate progenitor production and elongation of the neuroepithelium. Several types of experiments demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) is the key component of this secreted activity. In addition, Rdh10- and Raldh2-expressing cells in the dorsal meninges were either reduced or absent in the Foxc1 mutants, and Rdh10 mutants had a cortical phenotype similar to the Foxc1 null mutants. Lastly, in utero RA treatment rescued the cortical phenotype in Foxc1 mutants. These results establish RA as a potent, meningeal-derived cue required for successful corticogenesis.

  6. Cryptococcal meningitis in a goat – a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptococcus spp. are saprophytic and opportunistic fungal pathogens that are known to cause severe disease in immunocompromised animals. In goats there are reports of clinical cryptococcal pneumonia and mastitis but not of meningitis. Case presentation The following report describes a case of a five year old buck showing severe neurological signs, including paraplegia and strong pain reaction to touch of the hindquarters region. Treatment with antibiotics was unsuccessful and the animal was euthanized for humanitarian reasons. Postmortem examination revealed lumbar meningitis, lung nodules and caseous lymphadenitis lesions. Encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans were identified from the lungs and meninges, showing that cryptococcal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of goats showing paresis and hyperesthesia. The possibility of concurrent immunosuppression due to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection is raised. Conclusions Cryptoccocal meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis list of goat diseases with ataxia and hyperesthesia. PMID:24708822

  7. Telocytes in meninges and choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Popescu, B O; Gherghiceanu, M; Kostin, S; Ceafalan, L; Popescu, L M

    2012-05-16

    Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified type of interstitial cells present in a wide variety of organs in humans and mammals (www.telocytes.com). They are characterized by a small cell body, but extremely long cell processes - telopodes (Tp), and a specific phenotype. TCs establish close contacts with blood capillaries, nerve fibers and stem cells. We report here identification of TCs by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence in rat meninges and choroid plexus/subventricular zone, in the vicinity of putative stem cells. The presence of TCs in brain areas involved in adult neurogenesis might indicate that they have a role in modulation of neural stem cell fate.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid ferritin in children with viral and bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, M; Mamishi, S; Mahmoudi, S; Pourakbari, B; Khotaei, G; Daneshjou, K; Hashemi, N

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that the prognosis of bacterial meningitis has been improved by the influence of antibiotics, this disease is still one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Rapid differentiation between bacterial and aseptic meningitis, and the need for immediate antibiotic treatment in the former, is crucial in the prognosis of these patients. Ferritin is one of the most sensitive biochemical markers investigated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the early diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic capability of CSF ferritin in differentiating bacterial and viral meningitis in the paediatric setting. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the referral Children's Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, during 2008 and 2009. According to the inclusion criteria, CSF samples from 42 patients with suspected meningitis were obtained and divided into two meningitis groups, bacterial (n = 18) and viral (n = 24). Ferritin and other routine determinants (i.e., leucocytes, protein and glucose) were compared between the two groups. Ferritin concentration in the bacterial meningitis group was 106.39 +/- 86.96 ng/dL, which was considerably higher than in the viral meningitis group (10.17 +/- 14.09, P < 0.001). Mean CSF protein concentration and cell count were significantly higher in the bacterial meningitis group and showed a positive correlation with CSF ferritin. In conclusion, this study suggests that CSF ferritin concentration is an accurate test for the early differentiation of bacterial and aseptic meningitis; however, further investigation on a larger cohort of patients is required to confirm this finding.

  9. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R.; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P.; Williams, Matthew L.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)–ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  10. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt in cryptococcal meningitis with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Tang, L M

    1990-05-01

    Fourteen patients with cryptococcal meningitis were reviewed. All patients had a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for hydrocephalus. Early recognitions and prompt relief of hydrocephalus were useful for eight patients who showed rapid deterioration of consciousness or signs of cerebral herniation. There was no surgical response in four patients who had had weeks of confusion or mental change. It seems, therefore, that the duration of disturbance of consciousness or change of mentality before shunting is critical in determination of the outcome of the treatment. Ventricular shunting was effective in relieving papilledema in five patients. However, the surgery did not prevent the development of papilledema to optic atrophy and subsequent blindness in two patients. Hence, in addition to hydrocephalus with increased intracranial pressure, conditions such as direct invasion of the optic pathways by Cryptococcus neoformans or optochiasmatic arachnoiditis may be responsible for the visual failure. Ventricular shunting was also helpful in restoring paraparesis in one patient. Of the cerebrospinal fluid determinations, low protein concentration was a favorable indicator for surgery. Of the seven patients who received the surgical procedure before the start of antifungal therapy, four showed a significant improvement despite active infection of the central nervous system. None of the seven patients deteriorated because of the surgical operation. Thus, active stage of cryptococcal meningitis does not contraindicate the necessity of shunting, and premedication with antifungal drugs is unnecessary. Also, no shunt-related morbidity and mortality was seen in this study.

  11. Rheumatoid Meningitis: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Observations.

    PubMed

    Stretz, Christoph; Song, Xianyuan; Killory, Brendan D; Ollenschleger, Martin D; Nouh, Amre M

    2016-03-01

    A 75-year-old female with untreated rheumatoid arthritis presented with two weeks of behavioral changes and cognitive decline. A neurologic examination showed severe encephalopathy, brisk reflexes, and bilateral Babinski sign. A contrast-enhanced brain MRI demonstrated right meningeal enhancement and periventricular white matter disease. A computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) of the head and neck was negative for vasculitis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated lymphocytic pleocytosis. The patient's serum rheumatoid factor levels were elevated. A biopsy of the leptomeninges and cortex showed lymphocytic vasculitis of the cortical tissue and patchy lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates of dural small vessels consistent with rheumatoid meningitis. The patient received pulse-dose steroids followed by cyclophosphamide infusions. At her three month follow-up appointment, the patient's mental status had improved mildly. A follow-up brain MRI showed resolution of enhancement, but progression of subcortical bihemispheric white matter disease. Subsequently, the patient developed a respiratory infection and passed away. In rheumatoid arthritis, symptoms of encephalopathy, headaches, seizures, or focal neurologic deficits should raise suspicion for CNS involvement. This potentially treatable disease warrants prompt diagnosis.

  12. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  13. Etiology of aseptic meningitis and clinical characteristics in immune-competent adults.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Hyun; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Min; Park, Kwang-Ryul; Youn, Young Chul; Shin, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Viral meningitis is the most common cause of aseptic meningitis. Use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has increased the ability to determine the etiology of viral meningitis. This study used PCR analysis to evaluate the etiology of aseptic meningitis in 177 previously healthy adults over a 5-year period, as well as analyzing the clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings, and prognosis according to each etiology. The most frequent cause of aseptic meningitis was enterovirus (EV), followed by varicella zoster virus (VZV). Patients with EV meningitis were significantly younger than those with VZV meningitis. The percentage of lymphocytes in white blood cell counts and protein concentrations in the CSF differed significantly among patients with EV, VZV and meningitis of undetermined etiology. Younger age and lower percentage of lymphocyte and protein level in CSF analysis may be suggestive of EV meningitis. Further prospective studies are warranted to identify the correlations between the clinical characteristics and the etiologies of meningitis.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of group B streptococcal meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period from Angola.

    PubMed

    Florindo, Carlos; Gomes, João P; Rato, Márcia G; Bernardino, Luís; Spellerberg, Barbara; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Borrego, Maria J

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major pathogen of neonates and immunocompromised adults. Prior studies have demonstrated that, beyond the neonatal period, S. agalactiae rarely causes invasive infections in children. However, during 2004-2005, S. agalactiae was the causative agent of 60 meningitis episodes in children aged 3 months to 12 years from Angola. To identify and study the specific causative genetic lineages of S. agalactiae childhood meningitis, which lack characterization to date, we conducted an extensive molecular analysis of the recovered isolates (n = 21). This constitutes what we believe to be the first molecular study of the population structure of invasive S. agalactiae isolates from Africa. A low genetic diversity was observed among the isolates, where the majority belonged to clonal complex (CC) 17 presenting the capsular subtype III-2 (86 % of cases) and marked by the intron group II GBSi1, which has previously been observed to be associated with neonatal hosts. The predominance of single-locus variants of sequence type (ST) 17 suggested the local diversification of this hypervirulent clone, which displayed novel alleles of the fbsB and sip virulence genes. The absence of the scpB-lmb region in two S. agalactiae isolates with the Ia/ST23 genotype is more typical of cattle than human isolates. Globally, these data provide novel information about the enhanced invasiveness of the CC17 genetic lineage in older children and suggest the local diversification of this clone, which may be related to the future emergence of a novel epidemic clone in Angola. PMID:21474607

  15. Epidemiology of Meningitis in an HIV-Infected Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C.; Williams, Darlisha A.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Crabtree, Mary B.; Miller, Barry R.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. PMID:25385864

  16. Viral etiology of aseptic meningitis among children in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseininasab, Ali; Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar; Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Moeini, Mahsa; Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Abbasian, Amin; Kadivar, Mohamad Rahim

    2011-05-01

    Aseptic meningitis refers to a clinical syndrome of meningeal inflammation in which bacteria cannot be identified in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The viral etiology and the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory characteristics of aseptic meningitis among children aged 2 months to 15 years in Shiraz, southern Iran were determined. From May 2007 to April 2008, 65 patients were admitted to the hospital with aseptic meningitis. Seven viruses, non-polio human enteroviruses, mumps virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Viruses were detected in 30 (46.2%) patients in whom non-polio human enterovirus and mumps virus were detected in 13 (43.3%) and 11 (36.7%), respectively. The remaining 6 (20%) of the cases were caused by HSV, VZV, HCMV, and HHV-6. Haemophilus influenzae and non-polio human enterovirus were detected in one patient simultaneously. Viral meningitis was found to be more frequent during spring and summer. The majority (66.6%) of the patients were treated in the hospital for 10 days and had received antibiotics in the case of bacterial meningitis. Rapid diagnosis of viral meningitis using PCR testing of CSF can help shorten hospitalization, and avoid the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  17. Epidemiology of meningitis in an HIV-infected Ugandan cohort.

    PubMed

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C; Williams, Darlisha A; Boxrud, Dave J; Crabtree, Mary B; Miller, Barry R; Rolfes, Melissa A; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-02-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical.

  18. Development of primer sets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification that enables rapid and specific detection of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus agalactiae are the three main pathogens causing bovine mastitis, with great losses to the dairy industry. Rapid and specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification methods (LAMP) for identification and differentiation of these three ...

  19. Rapid detection of eight causative pathogens for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Naoko; Murayama, Somay Y; Morozumi, Miyuki; Nakayama, Eiichi; Okada, Takafumi; Iwata, Satoshi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2009-04-01

    We aimed to detect causative pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from patients diagnosed with bacterial meningitis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae described previously, five other pathogens, Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes, were targeted, based on a large-scale surveillance in Japan. Results in CSF from neonates and children (n=150), and from adults (n=18) analyzed by real-time PCR with molecular beacon probes were compared with those of conventional culturing. The total time from DNA extraction from CSF to PCR analysis was 1.5 h. The limit of detection for these pathogens ranged from 5 copies to 28 copies per tube. Nonspecific positive reactions were not recognized for 37 microorganisms in clinical isolates as a negative control. The pathogens were detected in 72.0% of the samples by real-time PCR, but in only 48.2% by culture, although the microorganisms were completely concordant. With the real-time PCR, the detection rate of H. influenzae from CSF was high, at 45.2%, followed by S. pneumoniae (21.4%), S. agalactiae (2.4%), E. coli (1.8%), L. monocytogenes (0.6%), and M. pneumoniae (0.6%). The detection rate with PCR was significantly better than that with cultures in patients with antibiotic administration (chi2=18.3182; P=0.0000). In conclusion, detection with real-time PCR is useful for rapidly identifying the causative pathogens of meningitis and for examining the clinical course of chemotherapy.

  20. [Epidemiological study of nosocomial meningitis in neurological patients].

    PubMed

    Ostabal, M I; Suárez Pinilla, M A; Sanz Sebastián, C; Millastre, A

    1996-03-01

    We realized a retrospective study of all the patients who developed a nosocomial meningitis after to admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of our hospital, during the last five years. Nosocomial meningitis was found in 3.29% of the neurologic patients. The most frequent causes of the meningitis was the external ventricular drainage (14.8%), post-neurosurgical (0.8%) and head injury (0.0007%). The causative bacterias were stafilococo, S. pneumoniae, K. pneunomiae and P. aeruginosa. The mortality was of the 39.06%.

  1. [Sandfly virus meningitis in a Danish traveller returning from Tuscany].

    PubMed

    Nissen, Nanna Bang; Jespersen, Sanne; Vinner, Lasse; Fomsgaard, Anders; Laursen, Alex

    2011-10-01

    We report the first case of Sandfly virus meningitis in a Danish traveller returning from Tuscany. A 52 year-old man was admitted with headache, fever and photophobia. Spinal fluid showed evidence of aseptic meningitis. Indirect immuno-fluorescence assays showed presence of immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG antibodies reactive against Toscana virus, and Phlebovirus RNA was detected in blood by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patient recovered spontaneously. Since Sandfly virus is a very common cause of meningitis in the Mediterranean countries, it is important to be aware of this disease in travellers returning from these areas.

  2. Salmonella typhimurium meningitis in an adult patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Swe, K Swe; Nagel, G; Van der Westhuizen, M; Hoosen, A A

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella meningitis is an unusual complication of Salmonella sepsis and occurs mainly in children. A rare case of Salmonella typhimurium meningitis occurring in an adult HIV positive man who presented with a history of fever and diarrhoea is reported. On examination he was dehydrated, and had oral thrush, weakness of lower limbs and neck stiffness. A septic diagnostic screen was performed and he was commenced on empiric intravenous cefotaxime therapy for meningitis. S typhimurium was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid and blood culture specimens. It was non-lactose fermenting, oxidase negative, H(2)S positive and motile. Cefotaxime was continued for 14 days and the patient responded without neurological sequelae. PMID:17158637

  3. Emerging resistant serotypes of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Elshafie, Sittana; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution, vaccine serotype coverage, and antibiotic resistance of S. pneumoniae serotypes isolated from patients with invasive diseases, after the introduction of pneumococcal 7-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-7). Methods A total of 134 isolates were collected from blood and cerebrospinal fluid specimens at Hamad Hospital during the period from 2005 to 2009. Isolate serotyping was done using the Quellung reaction. The prevaccination period was considered before 2005. Results The most common serotypes for all age groups were 3 (12.70%), 14 (11.90%), 1 (11.90%), 19A (9.00%), 9V (5.20%), 23F (5.20%), and 19F (4.50%). Coverage rates for infant <2 years for PCV-7, the 10-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-10), and the 13-valent conjugated vaccine (PCV-13) were 34.78%, 52.17%, and 78.26%, respectively. Coverage rates of these vaccines were 50%, 67.86%, and 75% for the 2–5 years age group; 27.12%, 40.68%, and 64.41% for the age group 6–64 years; and 25%, 33.33%, and 66.67% for the ≥65 years age group, respectively. The percentage of nonsusceptible isolates to penicillin, cefotaxime, and erythromycin were 43.86%, 16.66%, and 22.81%, respectively. Thirty-seven isolates (32.46%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, 23F, 1, 9V, 12F, 4, 6B, 3, and 15A. Compared to previous results before the introduction of PCV-7, there was a significant reduction in penicillin-nonsusceptable S. pneumoniae from 66.67% to 43.86%, and a slight insignificant reduction in erythromycin nonsusceptible strains from 27.60% to 22.8%, while there was a significant increase in cefotaxime nonsusceptible strains from 3.55% to 16.66%. Conclusion Invasive pneumococcal strains and the emergence of MDR serotypes is a global burden that must be addressed through multiple strategies, including vaccination, antibiotic stewardship, and continuous

  4. Specific detection of common pathogens of acute bacterial meningitis using an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Hamidreza; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; MirabSamiee, Siamak; Khansarinejad, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis is critical for antimicrobial treatment of patients. Although PCR-based methods have been widely used for the diagnosis of acute meningitis caused by bacterial pathogens, the main disadvantage of these methods is their high cost. This disadvantage has hampered the widespread use of molecular assays in many developing countries. The application of multiplex assays and "in-house" protocols are two main approaches that can reduce the overall cost of a molecular test. In the present study, an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR was developed and validated for the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The analysis of a panel of other human pathogens showed no cross-reactivity in the assay. The analytical sensitivity of the in-house assay was 792.3 copies/ml, when all three bacteria were presentin the specimens. This value was calculated as 444.5, 283.7, 127.8 copies/ml when only S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis and H. influenzae, respectively, were present. To demonstrate the diagnostic performance of the assay, a total of 150 archival CSF samples were tested and compared with a commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit. A diagnostic sensitivity of 92.8% and a specificity of 95.1% were determined for the present tetraplex-PCR assay. The results indicate that the established method is sensitive, specific and cost-effective, and can be used particularly in situations where the high cost of commercial kits prevents the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:27401970

  5. Recombination-deficient Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Daneo-Moore, L.; Volpe, A.

    1985-05-01

    A UV-sensitive derivative was obtained from Streptococcus sanguis Challis. The organism could be transformed with a number of small streptococcal plasmids at frequencies equal to, or 1 logarithm below, the transformation frequencies for the parent organism. However, transformation with chromosomal DNA was greatly impaired in the UV-sensitive derivative.

  6. Carcinomatous Meningitis from Unknown Primary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Favier, L.; Ladoire, L.; Guiu, B.; Arnould, L.; Guiu, S.; Boichot, C.; Isambert, N.; Besancenot, J.F.; Muller, M.; Ghiringhelli, F.

    2009-01-01

    Carcinomatous meningitis (CM) occurs in 3 to 8% of cancer patients. Patients present with a focal symptom, and multifocal signs are often found following neurological examination. The gold standard for diagnosis remains the demonstration of carcinomatous cells in the cerebrospinal fluid on cytopathological examination. Despite the poor prognosis, palliative treatment could improve quality of life and, in some cases, overall survival. We report on a patient who presented with vertigo, tinnitus and left-sided hearing loss followed by progressive diffuse facial nerve paralysis. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of CM. However, no primary tumor was discovered, even after multiple invasive investigations. This is the first reported case in the English-language medical literature of CM resulting from a carcinoma of unknown primary origin. PMID:20737034

  7. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges.

  8. Acute meningitis caused by Cladosporium sphaerospermum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Yu; Lu, Po-Liang; Lee, Kun-Mu; Chang, Tsung Chain; Lai, Chung-Chih; Chang, Ko; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2013-12-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis of the central nervous system is rare but typically associated with high mortality. Treatment has not been standardized, but the combination of antifungal chemotherapy with surgical debridement is recommended. We report a 73-year-old, retired, male timber merchant with acute meningitis caused by Cladosporium sphaerospermum. The patient, who had well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus, presented with fever and weakness of the lower limbs. No brain abscess was apparent by cranial computed tomography. C. sphaerospermum was isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid and identified based on both morphology and DNA sequencing. He was treated with combination antifungal chemotherapy with amphotericin B and voriconazole for 28 days, followed by voriconazole monotherapy for 46 days. To date, the patient has recovered without significant sequelae. This patient represents the first reported case of cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by C. sphaerospermum. Moreover, the therapy was successful for totally less than 3 months of treatment duration.

  9. A Case of Tuberculous Meningitis with Tuberculoma in Nonimmunocompromised Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hammad; Bihler, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tuberculous (TB) meningitis in nonimmunocompromised immigrant worker who initially presented with headache and later with generalized tonic clonic seizures and disseminated tuberculosis. PMID:27413568

  10. Regulation of radial glial survival by signals from the meninges.

    PubMed

    Radakovits, Randor; Barros, Claudia S; Belvindrah, Richard; Patton, Bruce; Müller, Ulrich

    2009-06-17

    Radial glial cells (RGCs) in the developing cerebral cortex are progenitors for neurons and glia, and their processes serve as guideposts for migrating neurons. So far, it has remained unclear whether RGC processes also control the function of RGCs more directly. Here, we show that RGC numbers and cortical size are reduced in mice lacking beta1 integrins in RGCs. TUNEL stainings and time-lapse video recordings demonstrate that beta1-deficient RGCs processes detach from the meningeal basement membrane (BM) followed by apoptotic death of RGCs. Apoptosis is also induced by surgical removal of the meninges. Finally, mice lacking the BM components laminin alpha2 and alpha4 show defects in the attachment of RGC processes at the meninges, a reduction in cortical size, and enhanced apoptosis of RGC cells. Our findings demonstrate that attachment of RGC processes at the meninges is important for RGC survival and the control of cortical size.

  11. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, B; Mangala; Prakash, G K; Shetty, K J; Ballal, H S

    2006-05-01

    We report a case of a 65 year male with meningitis who had polyuria, severe hyponatremia, volume depletion and very high urinary sodium excretion. He was diagnosed to have cerebral salt wasting syndrome based on clinical and laboratory parameters.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid "leaks" and meningitis following acoustic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Glasscock, M E; Hays, J W; Jackson, C G; Sismanis, A

    1982-01-01

    We reviewed 271 intracanalicular and cerebellopontine angle lesions removed over the past ten years, 237 by the translabyrinthine or combined approach which created a mastoid defect. The patients were divided into three groups with the following results: (1) obliteration of the mastoid defect combined with older wound closure techniques in the first 188 patients produced CSF leakage in 25% and meningitis in 16% of cases; (2) not obliterating the defect intentionaly in 16 patients produced CSF leakage in 50% and meningitis in 25% of cases; (3) obliteration of the defect combined with newer packing and closure techniques in the last 33 patients produced CSF leakage and meningitis in only 6% of cases. Four problem areas were identified: the eustachian tube, middle ear, mastoid defect, and postauricular wound. Of these, obliteration of the mastoid defect was most important in minimizing postoperative CSF wound leakage, CSF rhinorrhea, and meningitis. PMID:6806745

  13. Use of Intrathecal Fluorescein in Recurrent Meningitis after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Swati; Singh, Satinder; Sharma, Shalabh; Lahiri, Asish K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital anomalies of the cochlea and labyrinth can be associated with meningitis and varying degrees of hearing loss or deafness. Despite antibiotics, meningitis remains a life threatening complication. Case Report: We report a case of recurrent meningitis following episodes of otitis media in a cochlear implantee child with bilateral vestibulocochlear malformation, due to fistula in the stapes footplate. Intrathecal fluorescin was used to identify the leak site. Conclusion: Recurrent meningitis can indicate for possible immunological or anatomical abnormalities as well for chronic parameningeal infections. Intraoperative use of intrathecal fluorescin is an ideal investigative tool to demonstrate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak site in patients in whom other investigations fail to do so. PMID:27429952

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid "leaks" and meningitis following acoustic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Glasscock, M E; Hays, J W; Jackson, C G; Sismanis, A

    1982-01-01

    We reviewed 271 intracanalicular and cerebellopontine angle lesions removed over the past ten years, 237 by the translabyrinthine or combined approach which created a mastoid defect. The patients were divided into three groups with the following results: (1) obliteration of the mastoid defect combined with older wound closure techniques in the first 188 patients produced CSF leakage in 25% and meningitis in 16% of cases; (2) not obliterating the defect intentionaly in 16 patients produced CSF leakage in 50% and meningitis in 25% of cases; (3) obliteration of the defect combined with newer packing and closure techniques in the last 33 patients produced CSF leakage and meningitis in only 6% of cases. Four problem areas were identified: the eustachian tube, middle ear, mastoid defect, and postauricular wound. Of these, obliteration of the mastoid defect was most important in minimizing postoperative CSF wound leakage, CSF rhinorrhea, and meningitis.

  15. Bacterial meningitis: an update of new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Spreer, Annette; Ribes, Sandra; Eiffert, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of bacterial meningitis critically depends on the rapid initiation of bactericidal antibiotic therapy and adequate management of septic shock. In community-acquired meningitis, the choice of an optimum initial empirical antibiotic regimen depends on the regional resistance patterns. Pathogens resistant to antibacterials prevail in nosocomial bacterial meningitis. Dexamethasone is recommended as adjunctive therapy for community-acquired meningitis in developed countries. In comatose patients, aggressive measures to lower intracranial pressure <20 mmHg (in particular, external ventriculostomy, osmotherapy and temporary hyperventilation) were effective in a case-control study. Although many experimental approaches were protective in animal models, none of them has been proven effective in patients. Antibiotics, which are bactericidal but do not lyse bacteria, and inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases or complement factor C5 appear the most promising therapeutic options. At present, vaccination is the most efficient method to reduce disease burden. Palmitoylethanolamide appears promising to enhance the resistance of the brain to infections. PMID:26293166

  16. Toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Baliu, C; Sanclemente, G; Cardona, M; Castel, M A; Perez-Villa, F; Moreno, A; Cervera, C

    2014-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations in immunosuppressed patients. Encephalitis and intracranial mass lesions are easily recognized as typical manifestations of toxoplasmosis. However, meningitis caused by T. gondii is a rare condition with very few cases described in the literature. We present the case of a heart transplant recipient who developed toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis. After an extensive review of the medical literature, we found only 1 case of meningitis in solid organ transplant recipients and <25 cases in immunosuppressed patients, such as patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus or those with Hodgkin's disease. In this report, we consider toxoplasmosis in the differential diagnosis of meningitis in immunocompromised individuals.

  17. Liver metastasis of meningeal hemangiopericytoma: a study of 5 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Regina C.; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Rubin, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal tumors in the liver, whether primary or metastatic, are rare. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is characteristically associated with delayed metastasis and the liver is one of the most common sites. Despite its consistent histological features, a pathological diagnosis of HPC in the liver is sometimes not straightforward due to its rarity and usually remote medical history of the primary meningeal tumor. In this report, the clinicopathological features of 5 cases of metastatic HPC to the liver were reviewed and described. PMID:27044772

  18. Computed Tomography in Cases of Coccidioidal Meningitis, With Clinical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Shetter, Andrew G.; Fischer, Donald W.; Flom, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    Cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans of 22 patients with coccidioidal meningitis were reviewed and their clinical course was analyzed. Abnormalities of the ventricular system or the basilar cisterns or both were present in 16 instances. Although it is not a definitive diagnostic tool, the CT scan is helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of coccidioidal meningitis and in predicting the prognosis of patients affected by the disease. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:4024632

  19. Cryptococcal meningitis presenting as sinusitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Iyer, S P; Movva, K; Wiebel, M; Chandrasekar, P; Alangaden, G; Carron, M; Tranchida, P; Revankar, S G

    2013-10-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a relatively common invasive fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, especially in solid organ transplant recipients. Clinical presentation typically includes fever, headache, photophobia, neck stiffness, and/or altered mental status. Unusual presentations may delay diagnosis. Therapy is challenging in renal transplant patients because of the nephrotoxicity associated with amphotericin B, the recommended treatment. We present a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a renal transplant recipient presenting as acute sinusitis with successful treatment using fluconazole as primary therapy.

  20. Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis in an immunocompetent host: a case report.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Zenkner, Francis de Moura; França, Josiane; Santos, Breno Riegel

    2010-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 53-year-old man with a long history of alcohol abuse, with Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis, an organism that rarely causes human infection and is primarily found in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. The patient improved with high-dose ampicillin and gentamicin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first Brazilian reported case of E. gallinarum meningitis and probably the first case described in an immunocompetent host. PMID:20464133

  1. Association between Experimental Bacterial Meningitis and Periapical Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Soraia; Ceretta, Renan Antonio; Generoso, Jaqueline S.; Simões, Lutiana R.; Ribeiro, Patrícia Ávila; Budni, Josiane; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis in African adults is significantly higher than those in better resourced settings. At the same time, the periodontal diseases are highly prevalent and can affect up to 90% of the population. Dental caries in Uganda was recorded in 40% and 62.5% of the children and adults, respectively. We hypothesize that pneumococcal meningitis could interfere in the development of periapical lesion. The aim of this study was to evaluate periapical lesion in Wistar rats subjected to pneumococcal meningitis. Materials and Methods The animals were divided in control, control/periapical lesion, meningitis, and meningitis/periapical lesion groups. The surgical exposure of molars and the infection of the dental pulp were from the oral environment. Pulp necrosis was induced on the left mandibular first molars during adulthood. Dental pulps were exposed by drilling cavities on the central portion of the occlusal surface with a 1011 HL round bur in high speed to a depth nearly equal to the bur diameter. Animals were subjected to behavioral task and evaluation of the size of periodontal ligament. Data from periodontal ligament space and open field task were reported as mean ± SEM and analysed by Two-way ANOVA and paired Student’s t-test, respectively. Results and Conclusion Meningitis/periapical increased the periodontal ligament space by 61% when compared with control/periapical. In the open-field task, there were no differences in the number of crossings and rearing movements between training and test session in meningitis and periapical lesion groups demonstrating habituation memory impairment. Bacterial meningitis and periapical lesion may play an important role in development of cognitive impairment. PMID:26155479

  2. Computed tomography in cases of coccidioidal meningitis, with clinical correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Shetter, A.G.; Fischer, D.W.; Flom, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    Cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans of 22 patients with coccidioidal meningitis were reviewed and their clinical course was analyzed. Abnormalities of the ventricular system or the basilar cisterns or both were present in 16 instances. Although it is not a definitive diagnostic tool, the CT scan is helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of coccidioidal meningitis and in predicting the prognosis of patients affected by the disease. 19 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Natural transformation and genome evolution in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Straume, Daniel; Stamsås, Gro Anita; Håvarstein, Leiv Sigve

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a frequent colonizer of the human nasopharynx that has the potential to cause severe infections such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis. Despite considerable efforts to reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease, it continues to be a major public health problem. After the Second World War, antimicrobial therapy was introduced to fight pneumococcal infections, followed by the first effective vaccines more than half a century later. These clinical interventions generated a selection pressure that drove the evolution of vaccine-escape mutants and strains that were highly resistant against antibiotics. The remarkable ability of S. pneumoniae to acquire drug resistance and evade vaccine pressure is due to its recombination-mediated genetic plasticity. S. pneumoniae is competent for natural genetic transformation, a property that enables the pneumococcus to acquire new traits by taking up naked DNA from the environment and incorporating it into its genome through homologous recombination. In the present paper, we review current knowledge on pneumococcal transformation, and discuss how the pneumococcus uses this mechanism to adapt and survive under adverse and fluctuating conditions. PMID:25445643

  4. Development of a multilocus sequence typing scheme for Streptococcus gallolyticus.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yusuke; Tien, Le Hong Thuy; Nomoto, Ryohei; Osawa, Ro

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus is often found as a member of the normal gut microflora in various animals. However, it has been reported to cause mastitis in cattle, septicaemia in pigeons, and meningitis, septicaemia and endocarditis in humans. However, little is known about the epidemiology and crucial virulence factors of S. gallolyticus. To help address these issues, we developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for S. gallolyticus. Seven housekeeping gene fragments were sequenced from each of 58 S. gallolyticus isolates collected from diverse origins and sources. The MLST scheme had good discriminatory ability. The 63 strains, including the 5 whole genome sequenced strains examined, resolved into 57 sequence types (STs), with 52 STs represented by only a single strain. With respect to the identification of S. gallolyticus subspecies (i.e. S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus and S. gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus), the results of biochemical tests and DNA-DNA hybridization were in high concordance with those of the MLST scheme. The MLST scheme developed in this study may be a useful tool capable of replacing the conventional methods used for S. gallolyticus subspecies identification. The results of this study suggest that the biology and virulence of two pathogenic S. gallolyticus subspecies (i.e. S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus and S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus) are very different. The MLST scheme offers researchers a valuable typing tool that will promote further investigation of the epidemiology of S. gallolyticus. PMID:24131946

  5. Evolutionary inactivation of a sialidase in group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Hirose, Yujiro; Nakata, Masanobu; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Goto, Kana; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Lewis, Amanda L.; Kawabata, Shigetada; Nizet, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns. GBS possesses a protein with homology to the pneumococcal virulence factor, NanA, which has neuraminidase (sialidase) activity and promotes blood-brain barrier penetration. However, phylogenetic sequence and enzymatic analyses indicate the GBS NanA ortholog has lost sialidase function – and for this distinction we designate the gene and encoded protein nonA/NonA. Here we analyze NonA function in GBS pathogenesis, and through heterologous expression of active pneumococcal NanA in GBS, potential costs of maintaining sialidase function. GBS wild-type and ΔnonA strains lack sialidase activity, but forced expression of pneumococcal NanA in GBS induced degradation of the terminal sialic acid on its exopolysaccharide capsule. Deletion of nonA did not change GBS-whole blood survival or brain microvascular cell invasion. However, forced expression of pneumococcal NanA in GBS removed terminal sialic acid residues from the bacterial capsule, restricting bacterial proliferation in human blood and in vivo upon mouse infection. GBS expressing pneumococcal NanA had increased invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Thus, we hypothesize that nonA lost enzyme activity allowing the preservation of an effective survival factor, the sialylated exopolysaccharide capsule. PMID:27352769

  6. Characterization of Afb, a novel bifunctional protein in Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Dehbashi, Sanaz; Pourmand, Mohammad Reza; Mashhadi, Rahil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Streptococcus agalactiae is the leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns and results in pneumonia and bacteremia in adults. A number of S. agalactiae components are involved in colonization of target cells. Destruction of peptidoglycan and division of covalently linked daughter cells is mediated by autolysins. In this study, autolytic activity and plasma binding ability of AFb novel recombinant protein of S. agalactiae was investigated. Materials and Methods: The gbs1805 gene was cloned and expressed. E. coli strains DH5α and BL21 were used as cloning and expression hosts, respectively. After purification, antigenicity and binding ability to plasma proteins of the recombinant protein was evaluated. Results: AFb, the 18KDa protein was purified successfully. The insoluble mature protein revealed the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This insoluble mature protein revealed that it has the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin plasma proteins. Furthermore, in silico analysis demonstrated the AFb has an autolytic activity. Conclusions: AFb is a novel protein capable of binding to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This findings lay a ground work for further investigation of the role of the bacteria in adhesion and colonization to the host. PMID:27092228

  7. Gene repertoire evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes inferred from phylogenomic analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB).

  8. Gene Repertoire Evolution of Streptococcus pyogenes Inferred from Phylogenomic Analysis with Streptococcus canis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Lefébure, Tristan; Richards, Vince P.; Lang, Ping; Pavinski-Bitar, Paulina; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, is an important human pathogen classified within the pyogenic group of streptococci, exclusively adapted to the human host. Our goal was to employ a comparative evolutionary approach to better understand the genomic events concomitant with S. pyogenes human adaptation. As part of ascertaining these events, we sequenced the genome of one of the potential sister species, the agricultural pathogen S. canis, and combined it in a comparative genomics reconciliation analysis with two other closely related species, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus equi, to determine the genes that were gained and lost during S. pyogenes evolution. Genome wide phylogenetic analyses involving 15 Streptococcus species provided convincing support for a clade of S. equi, S. pyogenes, S. dysgalactiae, and S. canis and suggested that the most likely S. pyogenes sister species was S. dysgalactiae. The reconciliation analysis identified 113 genes that were gained on the lineage leading to S. pyogenes. Almost half (46%) of these gained genes were phage associated and 14 showed significant matches to experimentally verified bacteria virulence factors. Subsequent to the origin of S. pyogenes, over half of the phage associated genes were involved in 90 different LGT events, mostly involving different strains of S. pyogenes, but with a high proportion involving the horse specific pathogen S. equi subsp. equi, with the directionality almost exclusively (86%) in the S. pyogenes to S. equi direction. Streptococcus agalactiae appears to have played an important role in the evolution of S. pyogenes with a high proportion of LGTs originating from this species. Overall the analysis suggests that S. pyogenes adaptation to the human host was achieved in part by (i) the integration of new virulence factors (e.g. speB, and the sal locus) and (ii) the construction of new regulation networks (e.g. rgg, and to some extent speB). PMID:22666370

  9. Comparison of experimental models for Streptococcus suis infection of conventional pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pallarés, Francisco J.; Halbur, Patrick G.; Schmitt, Cameron S.; Roth, James A.; Opriessnig, Tanja; Thomas, Peter J.; Kinyon, Joann M.; Murphy, Dee; Frank, Dagmar E.; Hoffman, Lorraine J.

    2003-01-01

    Four different experimental models for Streptococcus suis-induced disease were compared to find a model that closely mimics naturally occurring disease in conventional pigs. Fourteen, 2-week old pigs free of S. suis type 2 were used in 2 experiments. In experiment 1, 3 pigs were inoculated intravenously (IV) and 3 pigs intranasally (IN) with S. suis. Two out of 3 of the IV-inoculated pigs exhibited signs of severe central nervous system disease (CNS) and were euthanized. Streptococcus suis type 2 was isolated from whole blood, joints, and serosal surfaces of both pigs. No clinical signs and no growth of S. suis were detected in the IN-inoculated pigs. In experiment 2, 4 pigs were inoculated IV and another 4 were inoculated IN with the same isolate as in experiment 1. One hour before inoculation the IN-inoculated pigs were given 5 mL of 1% acetic acid intranasally (IN-AA). All the IV-inoculated pigs showed CNS disease and lameness, and 2 of the pigs became severely affected and were euthanized. All the IN-AA inoculated pigs exhibited roughened hair coats and 2 pigs developed severe CNS disease and were euthanized. Streptococcus suis was isolated from the joints and blood of 3 pigs in the IV-inoculated group. Streptococcus suis was isolated from blood of 2 pigs, meninges of 3 pigs, and joints of 1 pig in the IN-AA inoculated group. Natural exposure to S. suis most likely occurs by the intranasal route. The IN-AA model should serve as a good model for S. suis-induced disease, because the natural route of exposure is intranasal and the IN-AA model was effective in inducing disease that mimics what is observed in the field. PMID:12889730

  10. The impact of protein-conjugate polysaccharide vaccines: an endgame for meningitis?

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2013-01-01

    The development and implementation of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines against invasive bacterial diseases, specifically those caused by the encapsulated bacteria Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, has been one of the most effective public health innovations of the last 25 years. These vaccines have resulted in significant reductions in childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, with their effectiveness due in large part to their ability to induce long-lasting immunity in a range of age groups. At the population level this immunity reduces carriage and interrupts transmission resulting in herd immunity; however, these beneficial effects can be counterbalanced by the selection pressures that immunity against carriage can impose, potentially promoting the emergence and spread of virulent vaccine escape variants. Studies following the implementation of meningococcal serogroup C vaccines improved our understanding of these effects in relation to the biology of accidental pathogens such as the meningococcus. This understanding has enabled the refinement of the implementation of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines against meningitis-associated bacteria, and will be crucial in maintaining and improving vaccine control of these infections. To date there is little evidence for the spread of virulent vaccine escape variants of the meningococcus and H. influenzae, although this has been reported in pneumococci. PMID:23798695

  11. First Isolation of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae from a Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kichan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Her, Moon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus species are emerging potential pathogens in marine mammals. We report the isolation and identification of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae in a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

  12. First Isolation of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae from a Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kichan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Hee-Soo; Her, Moon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus species are emerging potential pathogens in marine mammals. We report the isolation and identification of Streptococcus halichoeri and Streptococcus phocae in a Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) in South Korea. PMID:26555114

  13. GLYOXYLATE FERMENTATION BY STREPTOCOCCUS ALLANTOICUS

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, R. C.; Drucker, H.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    Valentine, R. C. (University of Illinois, Urbana), H. Drucker, and R. S. Wolfe. Glyoxylate fermentation by Streptococcus allantoicus. J. Bacteriol. 87:241–246. 1964.—Extracts of Streptococcus allantoicus were found to degrade glyoxylate, yielding tartronic semialdehyde and CO2. Tartronic semialdehyde was prepared chemically, and its properties were compared with the enzymatic product: reduction by sodium borohydride yielded glycerate; heating at 100 C yielded glycolaldehyde and CO2; autoxidation yielded mesoxalic semialdehyde; periodate oxidation yielded glyoxylate and a compound presumed to be formate. Tartronic semialdehyde reductase was present in extracts of S. allantoicus and in a species of Pseudomonas grown on allantoin. A scheme for the synthesis of acetate from glyoxylate by S. allantoicus is discussed. PMID:14151040

  14. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2008].

    PubMed

    Turczyńska, Aleksandra; Polkowska, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    In Poland, 2 475 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2008, of which 979 had bacterial aetiology, 1 122--viral aetiology, and 374--other or unknown origin. The etiological agent was determined in 555 (56%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 220 cases, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) in 23 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 151 cases. An increasing trend in meningococcal infections incidence has been observed in 2008, and a substantial decrease of Hib incidence, related to increasing vaccination coverage. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2008 decreased compared to year 2007. Among confirmed cases, there were 202 cases of tick-borne encephalitis. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  15. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2009].

    PubMed

    Polkowska, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    In Poland, 2 517 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2009, of which 865 had bacterial aetiology, 1 244--viral aetiology, and 408-- other or unknown origin. The etiological agent was determined in 493 (57%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 190 cases, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) in 13 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 163 cases. An increasing trend in pneumococcal infections incidence has been observed since 2005, and a substantial decrease of Hib incidence, related to increasing vaccination coverage. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2009 increased compared to year 2008. Among confirmed cases, there were 351 cases of tick-borne encephalitis. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  16. Purulent meningoventriculitis caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus in a snow leopard (Panthera uncia).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, R; Nakamura, S; Hori, H; Kato, Y; Une, Y

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (SEZ) is a zoonotic pathogen that causes respiratory tract infections in man and animals. SEZ infections are very rare in felids. This report describes purulent meningoventriculitis caused by SEZ in an approximately 16-year-old male snow leopard (Panthera uncia). The animal exhibited neurological signs and died 1 month after their onset. On necropsy examination, the surface blood vessels of the brain were swollen and there was an increased volume and turbidity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Microscopically, suppurative inflammation accompanied by gram-positive cocci was observed in the meninges and near the ventricles. SEZ was isolated from the brain tissue and CSF. This is the first report of infection with SEZ in a felid other than a domestic cat. This animal had not had direct contact with horses, but it had been fed horse flesh that may have been the source of infection.

  17. Fatal septicemia caused by the zoonotic bacterium Streptococcus iniae during an outbreak in Caribbean reef fish.

    PubMed

    Keirstead, N D; Brake, J W; Griffin, M J; Halliday-Simmonds, I; Thrall, M A; Soto, E

    2014-09-01

    An outbreak of Streptococcus iniae occurred in the early months of 2008 among wild reef fish in the waters of the Federation of St Kitts and Nevis, lasting almost 2 months. Moribund and dead fish were collected for gross, histological, bacteriological, and molecular analysis. Necropsy findings included diffuse fibrinous pericarditis, pale friable livers, and serosal petechiation. Cytological and histological analysis revealed granulocytic and granulomatous inflammation with abundant coccoid bacterial organisms forming long chains. Necrosis, inflammation, and vasculitis were most severe in the pericardium, meninges, liver, kidneys, and gills. Bacterial isolates revealed β-hemolytic, Gram-positive coccoid bacteria identified as S. iniae by amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Results from biochemical and antimicrobial susceptibility analysis, together with repetitive element palindromic polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting, suggest that a single strain was responsible for the outbreak. The inciting cause for this S. iniae-associated cluster of mortalities is unknown.

  18. Crystal structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin provides key insights into early steps of pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Sara L.; Feil, Susanne C.; Morton, Craig J.; Farrand, Allison J.; Mulhern, Terrence D.; Gorman, Michael A.; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney K.; Parker, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming proteins are weapons often used by bacterial pathogens to breach the membrane barrier of target cells. Despite their critical role in infection important structural aspects of the mechanism of how these proteins assemble into pores remain unknown. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world’s leading cause of pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and otitis media. Pneumolysin (PLY) is a major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae and a target for both small molecule drug development and vaccines. PLY is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), a family of pore-forming toxins that form gigantic pores in cell membranes. Here we present the structure of PLY determined by X-ray crystallography and, in solution, by small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure reveals PLY assembles as a linear oligomer that provides key structural insights into the poorly understood early monomer-monomer interactions of CDCs at the membrane surface. PMID:26403197

  19. Pontine abscess with initial treatment failure following infectious endocarditis with Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Knudtzen, Fredrikke Christie; Lynge, Maja; Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 65-year-old man admitted to the department of infectious diseases on suspicion of meningitis with headache, fever and double vision. A cerebral MRI revealed a 17×30 mm pontine abscess with surrounding oedema. The patient had, 2 months prior to admission, been treated for Streptococcus salivarius aortic valve endocarditis. The abscess was not suitable for surgery, and the patient received multidrug antibiotic treatment for 4 weeks. The patient initially responded well clinically, but was readmitted 4 weeks after discontinuation of treatment, with headache and dizziness. A new cerebral MRI showed progression of the abscess. He received an additional 8 weeks of broad spectrum antibiotic treatment, followed by 12 weeks of oral treatment with pivampicillin. His symptoms resolved and a cerebral MRI at discontinuation of treatment showed regression of the abscess to 7.5 mm. PMID:26139646

  20. Pathological changes in red tilapias (Oreochromis spp.) naturally infected by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Zamri-Saad, M; Amal, M N A; Siti-Zahrah, A

    2010-01-01

    The pathological changes present in 300 red tilapias (Oreochromis spp.) naturally infected by Streptococcus agalactiae are described. The most consistent gross findings were marked congestion of internal organs, particularly the liver, spleen and kidneys. Other features included exophthalmos, softening of the brain and the occasional accumulation of fluid within the abdominal cavity. Microscopical examination confirmed the presence of marked congestion of the liver, spleen and kidneys. The endothelial cells lining major blood vessels of the liver and occasionally the spleen were swollen and vacuolated. There was evidence of vascular thrombosis with infarction of surrounding tissue. Bacterial colonies were noted within and immediately surrounding the affected blood vessels. The meninges were thickened by the infiltration of numerous heterophils. Similar infiltrates of heterophils and lymphocytes were observed in the lamina propria of the intestine. The kidneys were severely congested and haemorrhagic, with extensive interstitial nephritis. PMID:20334871

  1. Evaluation of a ceftiofur-washed whole cell Streptococcus suis bacterin in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The efficacy of currently available washed whole cell Streptococcus suis bacterins is generally poor. We developed and tested the efficacy of a novel ceftiofur-washed whole cell bacterin. Sixty-six, 2-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) pigs were randomly divided into 5 groups. Three groups were vaccinated 28 and 14 d prior to challenge. The 3 ceftiofur-washed whole cell bacterins each contained 1 of 3 different adjuvants (Montanide ISA 25, Montanide ISA 50, and Saponin). Pigs exhibiting severe central nervous system disease or severe joint swelling and lameness were euthanized immediately and necropsied. All remaining pigs were necropsied at 14 d post inoculation. The ceftiofur-washed whole cell S. suis bacterin with Montanide ISA 50 adjuvant significantly (P < 0.05) reduced bacteremia, meningitis, pneumonia, and mortality associated with S. suis challenge. Further work on this novel approach to bacterin production is warranted. PMID:15352553

  2. Purulent meningoventriculitis caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus in a snow leopard (Panthera uncia).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, R; Nakamura, S; Hori, H; Kato, Y; Une, Y

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (SEZ) is a zoonotic pathogen that causes respiratory tract infections in man and animals. SEZ infections are very rare in felids. This report describes purulent meningoventriculitis caused by SEZ in an approximately 16-year-old male snow leopard (Panthera uncia). The animal exhibited neurological signs and died 1 month after their onset. On necropsy examination, the surface blood vessels of the brain were swollen and there was an increased volume and turbidity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Microscopically, suppurative inflammation accompanied by gram-positive cocci was observed in the meninges and near the ventricles. SEZ was isolated from the brain tissue and CSF. This is the first report of infection with SEZ in a felid other than a domestic cat. This animal had not had direct contact with horses, but it had been fed horse flesh that may have been the source of infection. PMID:22516084

  3. Crystal structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin provides key insights into early steps of pore formation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Sara L; Feil, Susanne C; Morton, Craig J; Farrand, Allison J; Mulhern, Terrence D; Gorman, Michael A; Wade, Kristin R; Tweten, Rodney K; Parker, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming proteins are weapons often used by bacterial pathogens to breach the membrane barrier of target cells. Despite their critical role in infection important structural aspects of the mechanism of how these proteins assemble into pores remain unknown. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world's leading cause of pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and otitis media. Pneumolysin (PLY) is a major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae and a target for both small molecule drug development and vaccines. PLY is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), a family of pore-forming toxins that form gigantic pores in cell membranes. Here we present the structure of PLY determined by X-ray crystallography and, in solution, by small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure reveals PLY assembles as a linear oligomer that provides key structural insights into the poorly understood early monomer-monomer interactions of CDCs at the membrane surface. PMID:26403197

  4. Prospective investigation of pituitary functions in patients with acute infectious meningitis: is acute meningitis induced pituitary dysfunction associated with autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, F; De Bellis, A; Teksahin, H; Alp, E; Bizzarro, A; Sinisi, A A; Bellastella, G; Paglionico, V A; Bellastella, A; Unluhizarci, K; Doganay, M; Kelestimur, F

    2012-12-01

    Previous case reports and retrospective studies suggest that pituitary dysfunction may occur after acute bacterial or viral meningitis. In this prospective study we assessed the pituitary functions, lipid profile and anthropometric measures in adults with acute bacterial or viral meningitis. Moreover, in order to investigate whether autoimmune mechanisms could play a role in the pathogenesis of acute meningitis-induced hypopituitarism we also investigated the anti-pituitary antibodies (APA) and anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) prospectively. Sixteen patients (10 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age 40.9 ± 15.9) with acute infectious meningitis were included and the patients were evaluated in the acute phase, and at 6 and 12 months after the acute meningitis. In the acute phase 18.7% of the patients had GH deficiency, 12.5% had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. At 12 months after acute meningitis 6 of 14 patients (42.8%) had GH deficiency, 1 of 14 patients (7.1%) had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. Two of 14 patients (14.3%) had combined hormone deficiencies and four patients (28.6%) had isolated hormone deficiencies at 12 months. Four of 9 (44.4%) hormone deficiencies at 6 months were recovered at 12 months, and 3 of 8 (37.5%) hormone deficiencies at 12 months were new-onset hormone deficiencies. At 12 months there were significant negative correlations between IGF-I level vs. LDL-C, and IGF-I level vs. total cholesterol. The frequency of AHA and APA positivity was substantially high, ranging from 35 to 50% of the patients throughout the 12 months period. However there were no significant correlations between AHA or APA positivity and hypopituitarism. The risk of hypopituitarism, GH deficiency in particular, is substantially high in the acute phase, after 6 and 12 months of the acute infectious meningitis. Moreover we found that 6th month after meningitis is too early to make a decision for pituitary dysfunction and these patients should be screened for at least 12 months

  5. Rifampicin in tuberculous meningitis: a retrospective assessment.

    PubMed

    Latorre, P; Gallofré, M; Laporte, J R; Massons, J

    1984-01-01

    To shed some light on the potential value of rifampicin in the treatment of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in adults, a retrospective analysis has been made of 143 medical records from 4 hospitals for the period 1967-80. Treatment of TBM with rifampicin and other antituberculous drugs in combination (Group B) was compared to other regimes which did not include rifampicin (Group A). There were 64 patients in Group B and 79 in Group A. The two groups of patients did not differ significantly in their prognostic characteristics. The total mortality was 14.7%: it was higher among patients not treated with rifampicin (24%; Group A) than amongst those given rifampicin (3.1%; Group B; chi 2 = 10.74; p less than 0.005). The difference was also statistically significant (chi 2 = 6.88; p less than 0.01) if patients who died during the first 48 h after the institution of treatment were excluded. No significant difference in mortality rate was found when patients treated with rifampicin plus isoniazid (INH) 8-10 mg/kg (1 death out of 41 patients) were compared to patients treated with INH 15 mg/kg (2 deaths out of 20 patients). Neurological sequelae recorded during a 6 month follow-up period were more severe among patients not treated with rifampicin.

  6. Six months therapy for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Sophie; Ryan, Hannah; Modi, Manish; Bhatia, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the main form of tuberculosis that affects the central nervous system and is associated with high rates of death and disability. Most international guidelines recommend longer antituberculous treatment (ATT) regimens for TBM than for pulmonary tuberculosis disease to prevent relapse. However, longer regimens are associated with poor adherence, which could contribute to increased relapse, development of drug resistance, and increased costs to patients and healthcare systems. Objectives To compare the effects of short-course (six months) regimens versus prolonged-course regimens for people with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Search methods We searched the following databases up to 31 March 2016: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; INDMED; and the South Asian Database of Controlled Clinical Trials. We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for ongoing trials. We also checked article reference lists and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies of adults and children with TBM treated with antituberculous regimens that included rifampicin for six months or longer than six months. The primary outcome was relapse, and included studies required a minimum of six months follow-up after completion of treatment. Data collection and analysis Two review authors (SJ and HR) independently assessed the literature search results for eligibility, and performed data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessments of the included studies. We contacted study authors for additional information when necessary. Most data came from single arm cohort studies without a direct comparison so we pooled the findings for each group of cohorts and

  7. Six months therapy for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Sophie; Ryan, Hannah; Modi, Manish; Bhatia, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the main form of tuberculosis that affects the central nervous system and is associated with high rates of death and disability. Most international guidelines recommend longer antituberculous treatment (ATT) regimens for TBM than for pulmonary tuberculosis disease to prevent relapse. However, longer regimens are associated with poor adherence, which could contribute to increased relapse, development of drug resistance, and increased costs to patients and healthcare systems. Objectives To compare the effects of short-course (six months) regimens versus prolonged-course regimens for people with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Search methods We searched the following databases up to 31 March 2016: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; INDMED; and the South Asian Database of Controlled Clinical Trials. We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for ongoing trials. We also checked article reference lists and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies of adults and children with TBM treated with antituberculous regimens that included rifampicin for six months or longer than six months. The primary outcome was relapse, and included studies required a minimum of six months follow-up after completion of treatment. Data collection and analysis Two review authors (SJ and HR) independently assessed the literature search results for eligibility, and performed data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessments of the included studies. We contacted study authors for additional information when necessary. Most data came from single arm cohort studies without a direct comparison so we pooled the findings for each group of cohorts and

  8. Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., two novel Streptococcus species isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Vandamme, Peter; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; Elfahime, El Mostafa; Farricha, Omar El; Swings, Jean; Amar, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on two unidentified Gram-stain positive, catalase and oxidase negative, non-hemolytic Streptococcus-like organisms recovered from raw camel milk in Morocco. Phenotypic characterization and comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that the two strains were highly different from each other and that they did not correspond to any recognized species of the genus Streptococcus. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the unidentified organisms each formed a hitherto unknown sub-line within the genus Streptococcus, displaying a close affinity with Streptococcus moroccensis, Streptococcus minor and Streptococcus ovis. DNA G+C content determination, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and biochemical tests demonstrated the bacterial isolates represent two novel species. Based on the phenotypic distinctiveness of the new bacteria and molecular genetic evidence, it is proposed to classify the two strains as Streptococcus tangierensis sp. nov., with CCMM B832(T) (=LMG 27683(T)) as the type strain, and Streptococcus cameli sp. nov., with CCMM B834(T) (=LMG 27685(T)) as the type strain.

  9. CSF ADA Determination in Early Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Gopal Chandra; Sharma, Brijesh; Gupta, B B

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous and Cryptococcal meningitis are common in HIV patients. A highly specific and sensitive rapid test for diagnosis of Tuberculous meningitis especially in setting of HIV is not available in developing countries where the burden of disease is high. We measured ADA (adenosine deaminase) levels using spectrophotometric method in the CSF of HIV patients with meningitis to differentiate Tuberculous meningitis from meningitis due to other causes. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare ADA values between tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and nontuberculous (non-TB) meningitis patients and a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis curve was drawn from these values. Levels of ADA in the CSF of patients with TBM were significantly higher than those in patients with meningitis due to other causes. CSF ADA level determination with a cut-off value of 6 IU/L was found to be highly specific and fairly sensitive test for the diagnosis of TBM in HIV positive patients. PMID:27144055

  10. Streptococcus agalactiae septicemia in a patient with diabetes and hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a well-known pathogen during pregnancy and in neonates. Among non-pregnant adults, invasive infection, although rare, is showing increasing frequency, especially in chronically ill, immunosuppressed, or older patients. Although rare, the clinical features of meningeal infection caused by S. agalactiae are similar to other bacterial meningitis. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man previously diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and alcoholic liver cirrhosis, who was admitted at the emergency department with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 11/12, generalized spasticity, bilateral Babinski sign, and hypertension. The clinical outcome was bad, with refractory shock and death within 24 hours of hospitalization. The bacteriological work-up isolated S. agalactiae in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), blood, and urine. An autopsy revealed meningoencephalitis, acute myocardial infarction, and pyelonephritis due to septic emboli. The authors point out the atypical CSF findings, the rapid fatal outcome, and the importance of including this pathogen among the etiologic possibilities of invasive infections in this group of patients. PMID:26894044

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 Flavodoxin: Structural and Biophysical Characterization of a Novel Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cárdenas, Ángela; Rojas, Adriana L.; Conde-Giménez, María; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Sancho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) strain TIGR4 is a virulent, encapsulated serotype that causes bacteremia, otitis media, meningitis and pneumonia. Increased bacterial resistance and limited efficacy of the available vaccine to some serotypes complicate the treatment of diseases associated to this microorganism. Flavodoxins are bacterial proteins involved in several important metabolic pathways. The Sp flavodoxin (Spfld) gene was recently reported to be essential for the establishment of meningitis in a rat model, which makes SpFld a potential drug target. To facilitate future pharmacological studies, we have cloned and expressed SpFld in E. coli and we have performed an extensive structural and biochemical characterization of both the apo form and its active complex with the FMN cofactor. SpFld is a short-chain flavodoxin containing 146 residues. Unlike the well-characterized long-chain apoflavodoxins, the Sp apoprotein displays a simple two-state thermal unfolding equilibrium and binds FMN with moderate affinity. The X-ray structures of the apo and holo forms of SpFld differ at the FMN binding site, where substantial rearrangement of residues at the 91–100 loop occurs to permit cofactor binding. This work will set up the basis for future studies aiming at discovering new potential drugs to treat S. pneumoniae diseases through the inhibition of SpFld. PMID:27649488

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 Flavodoxin: Structural and Biophysical Characterization of a Novel Drug Target.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cárdenas, Ángela; Rojas, Adriana L; Conde-Giménez, María; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Sancho, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) strain TIGR4 is a virulent, encapsulated serotype that causes bacteremia, otitis media, meningitis and pneumonia. Increased bacterial resistance and limited efficacy of the available vaccine to some serotypes complicate the treatment of diseases associated to this microorganism. Flavodoxins are bacterial proteins involved in several important metabolic pathways. The Sp flavodoxin (Spfld) gene was recently reported to be essential for the establishment of meningitis in a rat model, which makes SpFld a potential drug target. To facilitate future pharmacological studies, we have cloned and expressed SpFld in E. coli and we have performed an extensive structural and biochemical characterization of both the apo form and its active complex with the FMN cofactor. SpFld is a short-chain flavodoxin containing 146 residues. Unlike the well-characterized long-chain apoflavodoxins, the Sp apoprotein displays a simple two-state thermal unfolding equilibrium and binds FMN with moderate affinity. The X-ray structures of the apo and holo forms of SpFld differ at the FMN binding site, where substantial rearrangement of residues at the 91-100 loop occurs to permit cofactor binding. This work will set up the basis for future studies aiming at discovering new potential drugs to treat S. pneumoniae diseases through the inhibition of SpFld. PMID:27649488

  13. Serotype and genotype distribution among invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Colombia, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eliana L; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n = 629) and multilocus sequence typing (n = 10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ≥0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain(6B)ST90, Spain(9V)ST156, Spain(23F)ST81, and Colombia(23F)ST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction.

  14. Serotype and Genotype Distribution among Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Colombia, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Eliana L.; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n = 629) and multilocus sequence typing (n = 10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ≥0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain6BST90, Spain9VST156, Spain23FST81, and Colombia23FST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction. PMID:24416330

  15. The meninges: new therapeutic targets for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Russi, Abigail E; Brown, Melissa A

    2015-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) largely comprises nonregenerating cells, including neurons and myelin-producing oligodendrocytes, which are particularly vulnerable to immune cell-mediated damage. To protect the CNS, mechanisms exist that normally restrict the transit of peripheral immune cells into the brain and spinal cord, conferring an "immune-specialized" status. Thus, there has been a long-standing debate as to how these restrictions are overcome in several inflammatory diseases of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we highlight the role of the meninges, tissues that surround and protect the CNS and enclose the cerebral spinal fluid, in promoting chronic inflammation that leads to neuronal damage. Although the meninges have traditionally been considered structures that provide physical protection for the brain and spinal cord, new data have established these tissues as sites of active immunity. It has been hypothesized that the meninges are important players in normal immunosurveillance of the CNS but also serve as initial sites of anti-myelin immune responses. The resulting robust meningeal inflammation elicits loss of localized blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and facilitates a large-scale influx of immune cells into the CNS parenchyma. We propose that targeting the cells and molecules mediating these inflammatory responses within the meninges offers promising therapies for MS that are free from the constraints imposed by the BBB. Importantly, such therapies may avoid the systemic immunosuppression often associated with the existing treatments.

  16. Appearance of the canine meninges in subtraction magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Lam, Richard; Keenihan, Erin K; Frean, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The canine meninges are not visible as discrete structures in noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) images, and are incompletely visualized in T1-weighted, postgadolinium images, reportedly appearing as short, thin curvilinear segments with minimal enhancement. Subtraction imaging facilitates detection of enhancement of tissues, hence may increase the conspicuity of meninges. The aim of the present study was to describe qualitatively the appearance of canine meninges in subtraction MR images obtained using a dynamic technique. Images were reviewed of 10 consecutive dogs that had dynamic pre- and postgadolinium T1W imaging of the brain that was interpreted as normal, and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Image-anatomic correlation was facilitated by dissection and histologic examination of two canine cadavers. Meningeal enhancement was relatively inconspicuous in postgadolinium T1-weighted images, but was clearly visible in subtraction images of all dogs. Enhancement was visible as faint, small-rounded foci compatible with vessels seen end on within the sulci, a series of larger rounded foci compatible with vessels of variable caliber on the dorsal aspect of the cerebral cortex, and a continuous thin zone of moderate enhancement around the brain. Superimposition of color-encoded subtraction images on pregadolinium T1- and T2-weighted images facilitated localization of the origin of enhancement, which appeared to be predominantly dural, with relatively few leptomeningeal structures visible. Dynamic subtraction MR imaging should be considered for inclusion in clinical brain MR protocols because of the possibility that its use may increase sensitivity for lesions affecting the meninges.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in Adults: The Czech Republic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rozsypal, Hanus; Smiskova, Dita; Benes, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Background. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is currently the third most frequent pathogen of bacterial meningitis in adults. Methods. A prospective study of patients with LM meningitis in a Czech tertiary care hospital, carried out from 1997 to 2012. Results. Thirty-one patients were diagnosed with LM meningitis, which was 7% of a total of 440 adult patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) over a 16-year period. Their median age was 63 years, range 26–80 years. Nineteen patients (61%) had underlying immunocompromising comorbidity; 15 patients (48%) were older than 65 years. Fourteen patients (45%) had arterial hypertension. The typical triad of fever, neck stiffness, and altered mental status was present in 21 patients (68%). The median count of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leukocytes was 680/μL, protein level 2.6 g/L, and glucose ratio 0.28. Four patients (13%) died, and nine (29%) survived with moderate to severe sequelae. Conclusion. LM meningitis is known to affect immunosuppressed and elderly patients. Arterial hypertension seems to be another important predisposing factor. Clinical symptoms, CSF findings, and disease outcomes, did not significantly differ from other community-acquired ABM in our study, although the CSF leukocyte count was lower. Ampicillin showed good clinical and bacteriological efficacy in the majority of patients. PMID:24106719

  18. Human parasitic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Chen, Yao-Shen; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2013-06-01

    The major cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Taiwan is Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Humans are infected by ingesting terrestrial and freshwater snails and slugs. In 1998 and 1999, two outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection were reported among 17 adult male immigrant Thai laborers who had eaten raw golden apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata). Another outbreak associated with consuming a health drink consisting of raw vegetable juice was reported in 2001. These adult cases differed from reports in the 1970s and 1980s, in which most of the cases were in children. With improvements in public health and education of foreign laborers, there have since been only sporadic cases in Taiwan. Review of clinical research indicates inconsistent association of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results with clinical features of eosinophilic meningitis. MRI features were nonspecific but there was an association between the presence of high brain MRI signal intensities and severity of peripheral and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Inflammatory markers have been identified in the CSF of patients with eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and the matrix metalloproteinase system may be associated with blood-brain barrier disruption. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection is not a reportable disease in Taiwan. It is important that a public advisory and education program be developed to reduce future accidental infection.

  19. Role of Capsule and Suilysin in Mucosal Infection of Complement-Deficient Mice with Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Maren; Beineke, Andreas; Singpiel, Alena; Willenborg, Jörg; Dutow, Pavel; Goethe, Ralph; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Klos, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains are invasive extracellular bacteria causing septicemia and meningitis in piglets and humans. One objective of this study was to elucidate the function of complement in innate immune defense against S. suis. Experimental infection of wild-type (WT) and C3−/− mice demonstrated for the first time that the complement system protects naive mice against invasive mucosal S. suis infection. S. suis WT but not an unencapsulated mutant caused mortality associated with meningitis and other pathologies in C3−/− mice. The capsule contributed also substantially to colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Experimental infection of C3−/− mice with a suilysin mutant indicated that suilysin expression facilitated an early disease onset and the pathogenesis of meningitis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed C3 antigen deposition on the surface of ca. 40% of S. suis WT bacteria after opsonization with naive WT mouse serum, although to a significantly lower intensity than on the unencapsulated mutant. Ex vivo multiplication in murine WT and C3−/− blood depended on capsule but not suilysin expression. Interestingly, S. suis invasion of inner organs was also detectable in C5aR−/− mice, suggesting that chemotaxis and activation of immune cells via the anaphylatoxin receptor C5aR is, in addition to opsonization, a further important function of the complement system in defense against mucosal S. suis infection. In conclusion, we unequivocally demonstrate here the importance of complement against mucosal S. suis serotype 2 infection and that the capsule of this pathogen is also involved in escape from complement-independent immunity. PMID:24686060

  20. Streptococcus suis Interactions with the Murine Macrophage Cell Line J774: Adhesion and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Mariela; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 is an important etiological agent of swine meningitis, and it is also a zoonotic agent. Since one hypothesis of the pathogenesis of S. suis infection is that bacteria enter the bloodstream and invade the meninges and other tissues in close association with mononuclear phagocytes, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of S. suis type 2 to adhere to macrophages. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique was standardized to simply and accurately measure the rate of bacterial attachment to phagocytic cells. Results were confirmed by plate counting. Adhesion was dependent on bacterial concentration and incubation time and was not affected by cytochalasin pretreatment of macrophages. Inhibition studies showed that the sialic acid moiety of the S. suis capsule would be, at least in part, responsible for bacterial recognition by macrophages. Serum preopsonization of bacteria increased adhesion levels. Complement would be partially implicated in the serum-enhanced binding of S. suis to cells. Adhesion varied among different S. suis type 2 isolates. However, high bacterial concentrations of several isolates were cytotoxic for cells, and these cytotoxic effects correlated with suilysin production. Indeed, hemolytic strain supernatants, as well as purified suilysin, reproduced cytotoxic effects observed with live bacteria, and these effects were inhibited by cholesterol pretreatment. Bacterial adhesion and cytotoxicity were confirmed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We hypothesize that attachment of bacteria to phagocytes could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. suis infection by allowing bacterial dissemination and causing a bacteremia and/or septicemia. This interaction could also be related to the activation of the host inflammatory response observed during meningitis. PMID:12117940

  1. Role of capsule and suilysin in mucosal infection of complement-deficient mice with Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Maren; Beineke, Andreas; Singpiel, Alena; Willenborg, Jörg; Dutow, Pavel; Goethe, Ralph; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Klos, Andreas; Baums, Christoph G

    2014-06-01

    Virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains are invasive extracellular bacteria causing septicemia and meningitis in piglets and humans. One objective of this study was to elucidate the function of complement in innate immune defense against S. suis. Experimental infection of wild-type (WT) and C3(-/-) mice demonstrated for the first time that the complement system protects naive mice against invasive mucosal S. suis infection. S. suis WT but not an unencapsulated mutant caused mortality associated with meningitis and other pathologies in C3(-/-) mice. The capsule contributed also substantially to colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Experimental infection of C3(-/-) mice with a suilysin mutant indicated that suilysin expression facilitated an early disease onset and the pathogenesis of meningitis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed C3 antigen deposition on the surface of ca. 40% of S. suis WT bacteria after opsonization with naive WT mouse serum, although to a significantly lower intensity than on the unencapsulated mutant. Ex vivo multiplication in murine WT and C3(-/-) blood depended on capsule but not suilysin expression. Interestingly, S. suis invasion of inner organs was also detectable in C5aR(-/-) mice, suggesting that chemotaxis and activation of immune cells via the anaphylatoxin receptor C5aR is, in addition to opsonization, a further important function of the complement system in defense against mucosal S. suis infection. In conclusion, we unequivocally demonstrate here the importance of complement against mucosal S. suis serotype 2 infection and that the capsule of this pathogen is also involved in escape from complement-independent immunity.

  2. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy.

  3. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  4. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  5. Stroke Secondary to Aseptic Meningitis After Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Aneurysm with Parent Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Mavili, Ertugrul Ikizceli, Tuerkan; Durak, Ahmet Candan; Kurtsoy, Ali

    2009-07-15

    Aseptic meningitis related to hydrogel-coated coils is a known complication, but it is extremely rare after platinum bare coil aseptic meningitis. Here we report the development of aseptic meningitis causing brain stem and cerebellar infarct in a patient with a giant aneurysm treated with bare platinum coils. We conclude that aneurysm size is an important factor affecting the occurrence of aseptic meningitis associated with stroke.

  6. Group A Streptococcus endometritis following medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Joubrel, Caroline; Nedellec, Sophie; Campagna, Jennifer; Agostini, Aubert; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Casetta, Anne; Raymond, Josette; Poyart, Claire; Kernéis, Solen

    2014-07-01

    Medical abortion is not recognized as a high-risk factor for invasive pelvic infection. Here, we report two cases of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) endometritis following medical abortions with a protocol of oral mifepristone and misoprostol. PMID:24829245

  7. Group A Streptococcus Endometritis following Medical Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Nicolas; Joubrel, Caroline; Nedellec, Sophie; Campagna, Jennifer; Agostini, Aubert; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Casetta, Anne; Raymond, Josette; Kernéis, Solen

    2014-01-01

    Medical abortion is not recognized as a high-risk factor for invasive pelvic infection. Here, we report two cases of group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) endometritis following medical abortions with a protocol of oral mifepristone and misoprostol. PMID:24829245

  8. Predictive value of decoy receptor 3 in postoperative nosocomial bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Juan; Shao, Li-Hua; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Rui-Ping; Liu, Hai-Hong; Dong, Xiao-Meng; Ma, Li-Xian

    2014-11-03

    Nosocomial bacterial meningitis requires timely treatment, but what is difficult is the prompt and accurate diagnosis of this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) levels in the differentiation of bacterial meningitis from non-bacterial meningitis. A total of 123 patients were recruited in this study, among them 80 patients being with bacterial meningitis and 43 patients with non-bacterial meningitis. Bacterial meningitis was confirmed by bacterial culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the level of DcR3 in CSF. CSF levels of DcR3 were statistically significant between patients with bacterial meningitis and those with non-bacterial meningitis (p<0.001). A total of 48.75% of patients with bacterial meningitis received antibiotic>24 h before CSF sampling, which was much higher than that of non-bacterial meningitis. CSF leucocyte count yielded the highest diagnostic value, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) of 0.928, followed by DcR3. At a critical value of 0.201 ng/mL for DcR3, the sensitivity and specificity were 78.75% and 81.40% respectively. DcR3 in CSF may be a valuable predictor for differentiating patients with bacterial meningitis from those with non-bacterial meningitis. Further studies are needed for the validation of this study.

  9. De Novo Meningitis Caused by Propionibacterium acnes in a Patient with Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Jason P.; Trevino, Sergio E.; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Kuhlmann, F. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a known cause of postneurosurgical meningitis; however, it is rarely implicated in de novo meningitis. Herein we report a case of a 49-year-old male with de novo meningitis caused by P. acnes with metastatic melanoma as the only identified risk factor for his infection. PMID:24478417

  10. The immunophenotypic spectrum of meningeal hemangiopericytoma: a comparison with fibrous meningioma and solitary fibrous tumor of meninges.

    PubMed

    Perry, A; Scheithauer, B W; Nascimento, A G

    1997-11-01

    Despite controversy regarding its histogenesis, meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a well-defined clinicopathologic entity exhibiting high rates of recurrence and late extracranial metastasis. It must be distinguished from several benign neoplasms, particularly fibrous meningioma (FM) and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). To determine the immunoprofile of HPC, we studied 27 meningeal examples, including 13 low-grade and 14 high-grade tumors. For comparison, 20 FMs and eight SFTs of the meninges were also evaluated. The immunotype of HPC included vimentin (85%), factor XIIIa (78%) in individual scattered cells, Leu-7 (70%), and CD34 (33%) in a weak, patchy pattern. Focal desmin and cytokeratin positivity was only occasionally encountered (20% each). The SFT shared a similar immunophenotype, except that CD34 expression (100%) was characteristically strong and diffuse. The FM characteristically expressed epithelial membrane antibody (EMA) (80%) and S-100 protein (80%); CD34 reactivity (60%) was patchy and weak. Both within and among all three tumor types, MIB-1 labeling indices varied widely. Specifically, they were unrelated to tumor grade in HPC. Significant reactivity for p53 protein was detected in 52% of HPCs, 17% of SFTs, and 5% of FMs. Meningeal HPC exhibits a distinct antigenic profile, one enabling the exclusion of other entities in nearly all cases. The rare expression of desmin or cytokeratin in HPC suggests either the occurrence of divergent differentiation or, less likely, the possibility that its distinctive morphology is but a phenotype shared by several types of meningeal sarcoma.

  11. The Evolution of the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    PubMed Central

    Tiffay, Kathleen; Jodar, Luis; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Socquet, Muriel; LaForce, F. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2001, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was tasked to develop, test, license, and introduce a group A meningococcal (MenA) conjugate vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa. African public health officials emphasized that a vaccine price of less than US$0.50 per dose was necessary to ensure introduction and sustained use of this new vaccine. Methods. Initially, MVP envisioned partnering with a multinational vaccine manufacturer, but the target price and opportunity costs were problematic and formal negotiations ended in 2002. MVP chose to become a “virtual vaccine company,” and over the next decade managed a network of public–private and public–public partnerships for pharmaceutical development, clinical development, and regulatory submission. MVP supported the transfer of key know-how for the production of group A polysaccharide and a new conjugation method to the Serum Institute of India, Ltd, based in Pune, India. A robust staff structure supported by technical consultants and overseen by advisory groups in Europe and Africa ensured that the MenA conjugate vaccine would meet all international standards. Results. A robust project structure including a team of technical consultants and 3 advisory groups in Europe and Africa ensured that the MenA conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, MenAfriVac) was licensed by the Drug Controller General of India and prequalified by the World Health Organization in June 2010. The vaccine was introduced in Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger in December 2010. Conclusions. The development, through a public–private partnership, of a safe, effective, and affordable vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa, PsA-TT, offers a new paradigm for the development of vaccines specifically targeting populations in resource-poor countries. PMID:26553666

  12. Severe cochlear dysplasia causing recurrent meningitis: a surgical lesson.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D S; Proops, D W; Phelps, P D

    1993-08-01

    Meningitis may be the sole presenting sign of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula of the temporal bone. An eight-year-old boy suffering from recurrent meningitis was found to have bilateral severe cochlear dysplasia. Bilateral tympanotomies were performed, planning to obliterate each vestibule. In the right ear a stapedectomy was performed, resulting in a torrential 'CSF gusher' and difficulty in packing the vestibule. CSF rhinorrhoea requiring revision surgery and two episodes of gram-negative bacterial meningitis complicated the post-operative management, resulting in a prolonged hospital stay. Subsequently, the left ear was managed in a different fashion, leaving the stapes in situ, with grafts placed to seal the oval window niche. We would recommend this alternative procedure in cases of severe cochlear dysplasia, where abnormalities of the vestibule and basal turn of the cochlea mean that performing a stapedectomy to pack the vestibule may result in a severe 'CSF gusher', by opening directly into the subarachnoid space.

  13. A case of solitary fibrous tumor of the meninges.

    PubMed

    Sanno, N; Shimura, T; Maeda, S; Teramoto, A

    2001-01-01

    We report a rare case of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the meninges of the posterior fossa presenting as an intracerebellar hemorrhage. A 29-year-old woman was admitted with sudden-onset severe headache, nausea, and vomiting. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the brain revealed an intracerebellar hemorrhage 3.5cm in diameter. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a heterogeneous enhancement mass. A posterior craniotomy found a firm, highly vascular tumor attached to the meninges. Histologically, the tumor showed mostly sclerotic tissues with spindle cells. In few areas, the tumor had a more compact arrangement of spindle-shaped cells with vascular spaces and highly cellular components. Immunohistochemical study revealed strong CD-34 immunopositivity in many tumor cells. The tumor was diagnosed as SFT of the meninges. We report the clinical and histological features of this newly described tumor with a heterogeneous component.

  14. Metastatic solitary fibrous tumor of the meninges. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ng, H K; Choi, P C; Wong, C W; To, K F; Poon, W S

    2000-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a unique tumor composed of interstitial dendritic cells that was first described in the thorax and subsequently reported in diverse organs. Extrathoracic SFTs are predominantly benign but rare malignant cases have been documented. In the nervous system, SFT has been described as a meningeal lesion although all 14 previously reported cases were benign. The authors report the first case of a meningeal SFT occurring in a 55-year-old woman. The tumor first presented as a meningeal lesion that after three recurrences over a 10-year period metastasized to the soft tissues and lungs. The potentially malignant nature of cranial SFTs, especially those with atypical histological features and high mitotic counts, should be recognized.

  15. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10−7). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10−6; G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05–5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10−5; G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54–0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10−7). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  16. Arterial cerebrovascular complications in 94 adults with acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial vascular complications are an important complication of acute bacterial meningitis. Ischemic stroke in meningitis is reported as a result of vasculitis, vasospasm, endocarditis or intraarterial thrombosis. The aim of the study was to identify the value of measuring cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) on transracranial doppler (TCD) in the identification of patients at risk for meningitis-associated stroke. Methods We retrospectively studied patients with acute bacterial meningitis who were treated in our university hospital from 2000 to 2009. Data were analyzed with the main focus on the incidence of an increase of CBFv on TCD, defined as peak systolic values above 150 cm/s, and the development of stroke. Results In total, 114 patients with acute bacterial meningitis were treated, 94 of them received routine TCD studies during their hospital stay. 41/94 patients had elevated CBFv values. This increase was associated with an increased risk of stroke (odds ratio (95% confidence intervall) = 9.15 (1.96-42.67); p < 0.001) and unfavorable outcome (Glasgow Outcome Score < 4; odds ratio (95% confidence intervall) = 2.93 (1.23-6.98); p = 0.018). 11/32 (34.4%) patients with an increase of CBFv who received nimodipine and 2/9 (22.2%) patients with an increase of CBFv who did not receive nimodipine developed stroke (p = 0.69). Conclusions In summary, TCD was found to be a valuable bedside test to detect arterial alterations in patients with bacterial meningitis. These patients have an increased risk of stroke. PMID:22112693

  17. [A meningitis case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasim; Irmak, Hasan; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2008-10-01

    Turkey is located at an endemic area for brusellosis and tuberculosis which are both important public health problems. Meningitis caused by Brucella and Mycobacterium spp. may be confused since the clinical and laboratory findings are similar. In this report, a meningitis case with Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection has been presented. A 19-years-old woman was admitted to our clinic with severe headache, fever, vomiting, meningeal irritation symptoms, confusion and diplopia. The patient was initially diagnosed as Brucella meningitis based on her history (stockbreeding, consuming raw milk products, clinical symptoms concordant to brucellosis lasting for 4-5 months), physical examination and laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Standard tube agglutination test for brucellosis was positive at 1/80 titer in CSF and at 1/640 titer in serum, whereas no growth of Brucella spp. was detected in CSF and blood cultures. Antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, rifampicin and doxycyclin was started, however, there was no clinical improvement and agitation and confusion of the patient continued by the end of second day of treatment. Repeated CSF examination yielded acid-fast bacteria. The patient was then diagnosed as meningitis with double etiology and the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone, streptomycin, morphozinamide, rifampicin and isoniazid for thirty days. Tuberculosis meningitis was confirmed with the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the 14th day of cultivation (BACTEC, Becton Dickinson, USA) of the CSF sample. On the 30th day of treatment she was discharged on anti-tuberculous treatment with isoniazid and rifampicin for 12 months. The follow-up of the patient on the first and third months of treatment revealed clinical and laboratory improvement. Since this was a rare case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection, this report emphasizes that such co-infections should be kept in mind especially in the endemic areas for tuberculosis and brucellosis

  18. Sphingomonas paucimobilis: an unusual cause of meningitis-case report.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Velayuthan, Rukumani Devi

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis is an aerobic gram-negative bacillus. The bacteria can cause infections, which can be devastating and, therefore, the patients need adequate and early antibiotic cover. We are presenting an interesting case of meningitis secondary to an unusual S. paucimobilis infection. This is the second case to our knowledge in the literature on meningitis due to S. paucimobilis. The 31-year-old previously healthy man presented with 2 months' history of weight loss and loss of appetite. He had fever and headache for 3 weeks. He was also speaking irrelevantly for 3 weeks. He had change of behaviour for 1 day. The patient was a farmer and worked in the soil. On examination, he was not responding to questions and was not obeying commands. Computed tomography (CT) brain with contrast revealed meningeal enhancement and cerebral oedema. Lumbar puncture was performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure was more than 50 cm H2O. CSF analysis showed meningitis picture with raised white cell count of 210/μL (predominantly neutrophils), glucose 3.1 mmol/L, and raised protein 2.47 g/L. He was given intravenous ceftriaxone. The following day, his condition deteriorated. CSF culture grew S. paucimobilis sensitive to ceftriaxone. S. paucimobilis causes severe meningitis. This can lead to hydrocephalus, which results in a need for extraventricular drainage. A good occupational history is important with regard to finding the aetiology of serious meningitis (including rare bacteria) even before the culture result is known. Appropriate treatment can be given early and adequately to prevent mortality.

  19. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2004].

    PubMed

    Stefanoff, Paweł; Rosińska, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    In Poland, 2 725 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2004, of which 945 had bacterial etiology, 1427 viral, and 353 cases had other or unknown origin. Incidence of bacterial neuroinfections increased in 2004, despite a decreasing trend observed during the past decade. Etiological factor was determined in 433 (46%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 119 cases, Haemophilus influenzae in 77 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 107 cases. As in the previous years, serotype B was the predominant type of N. meningitidis cultured from patients, but type C appears to be systematically increasing, accounting for 27% of the strains serotyped in 2004. Viral neuroinfections were less common in 2004, compared to previous years. Etiological factor of central nervous system aseptic infections were established only in 17% of cases. Among confirmed cases, there were 262 cases of tick-borne encephalitis and 15 cases of herpetic encephalitis. Tick borne encephalitis incidence decreased in 2004 (0.7), compared to 2003 (339 cases, incidence 0.9). Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  20. Endocarditis caused by unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium)

    PubMed Central

    Fotoglidis, A; Pagourelias, E; Kyriakou, P; Vassilikos, V

    2015-01-01

    Background Infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers is caused mainly by Staphylococcus species and usually affects the right heart valves. Case Description We report the case of a 37-years-old intravenous drug abuser, who was diagnosed with infective endocarditis of the mitral and aortic valve. An unusual Streptococcus species (Streptococcus pluranimalium) was isolated from surgical specimens (peripheral arterial emboli, valves’ vegetations) which, according to the literature, is related to animals’ diseases such as infective endocarditis in adult broiler parents, with no references existing regarding causing such disease in humans. This unusual coccus infection caused specific clinical features (sizable vegetation on mitral valve >2cm, smaller vegetations on aortic valve, systemic emboli), resistance to antimicrobial therapy, rapid progression of the disease (despite of medical therapy and surgical replacement of both valves), and finally the death of the patient two months after the initial presentation of infective endocarditis. Conclusion Unusual cases of infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers are emerging and are characterized by changing microbiological profile and varying clinical characteristics. Clinical doctors must be aware of these cases, especially when their patients present an atypical clinical course, and reappraise their medical management. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):182-185. PMID:27418771

  1. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-01-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine. PMID:591633

  2. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    PubMed

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-10-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine.

  3. Herpes simplex virus 2 meningitis: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephanie; Mateen, Farrah J; Aksamit, Allen J

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 is a leading cause of viral meningitis and the most commonly recognized infectious cause of benign, recurrent meningitis. We report a retrospective, observational cohort study of patients with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) meningitis, confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The terms "herpes simplex," "meningitis," or "encephalitis" were searched in the medical records system of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (1995-2008). Patients were included if they had a clinical diagnosis of meningitis and HSV-2 detected by PCR in the CSF. There were 28 patients with 33 episodes identified (83 % female; mean age at presentation of meningitis 36 years, range 17-53; mean time to HSV2 detection from symptom onset 3 days, range 0-6; history of genital herpes 23 %). No patient took oral antiviral treatment at the time of presentation. Episodes were most likely to include headache (100 %), photophobia (47 %), self-reported fever (45 %), meningismus (44 %), and nausea and/or vomiting (29 %). CSF at the time of meningitis was notable for elevated protein (mean 156 g/dL, range 60-258) and white cell count (mean 504 cells/μL, range 86-1,860) with normal glucose (mean 54 mg/dL, range 32-80). Mollaret cells were never detected. Neuroimaging was most often normal (83 %) when performed, although some cases showed nonspecific (14 %) or meningeal changes (3 %). There was no consistent relationship to genital herpes. The duration of treatment with intravenous acyclovir ranged from 3 to 14 days for the first meningitic episode (daily dose range from 500 to 1,000 mg and total dose range from 500 mg q8h for 3 days to 800 mg q8h for 14 days). For subsequent episodes, the duration of treatment of intravenous acyclovir ranged from less than 1 to 14 days (total dose range from 1,390 mg for 1 day to 900 mg q8h for 10 days). The dose of valacyclovir ranged from 500 mg once daily to 500 mg four times daily. The median duration

  4. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow.

  5. Group A streptococcal meningitis in a patient with palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Otsuka, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with a 10-year history of palmoplantar pustulosis, a recent history of cranial surgery and a persistent upper airway infection presented with a high fever and deep coma. The patient was diagnosed with Group A Streptococcal meningitis and promptly treated with antibiotics. Although his general condition recovered well, sensorineural hearing loss and facial palsy remained. Group A Streptococcal meningitis is a rare condition, and its typical clinical picture and epidemiological features remain poorly understood. Physicians need to be more aware of this infection, which is extremely rare but frequently causes various complications and yields a high mortality.

  6. Viral loads of cerebrospinal fluid in infants with enterovirus meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hisashi; Ioi, Hiroaki; Ishii, Chiako; Hasegawa, Yuka; Amaha, Masahiro; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Takekuma, Kouji; Hoshika, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    For a better understanding of the role of the viral load, free radicals, and cytokines in viral meningitis, we surveyed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from patients below 1 year of age who showed positive for enterovirus. In their first examinations interleukin (IL)-6 and free radicals increased whereas pleocytosis was rarely observed. IL-6 decreased within the short period. Viral loads and free radicals increased simultaneously. IL-6 and free radicals of CSF are helpful for diagnosis and treatment of viral meningitis at an early stage.

  7. Outbreak of meningitis due to Serratia marcescens after spinal anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ersoz, G; Uguz, M; Aslan, G; Horasan, E S; Kaya, A

    2014-06-01

    This article describes an outbreak of meningitis caused by Serratia marcescens in patients who had undergone spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. Bacterial meningitis was diagnosed in 12 of the 46 patients who underwent a caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia in a 75-bed private hospital between 6(th) and 14(th) March 2011. S. marcescens was isolated from samples taken from four prefilled syringes and one bag containing 5% dextrose with norepinephrine, suggesting that medications used in spinal anaesthesia were contaminated extrinsically. Strategies for prevention of anaesthesia-associated infections in operating theatres are discussed.

  8. Detectability of early brain meningitis with magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-08-01

    The ability of high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect early brain meningitis was evaluated in a canine model. Contrast dose, timing postinjection, and imaging technique (specifically the use of magnetization transfer) were assessed. Imaging of five canines was performed at 1.5 T 24 hours after injection of Cowans staphylococcus into the cisterna magna. Two control animals also were imaged using the same protocol. Contrast doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.8 mmol/kg gadoteridol were compared. Scans were performed at 2, 13, and 22 minutes after an initial injection of 0.1 mmol/kg. Thirty minutes after the initial injection of contrast, a supplemental dose of 0.2 mmol/kg was given. Scans were then repeated at 2, 12, and 22 minutes after this dose was administered. A second supplemental contrast injection of 0.5 mmol/kg was given at 70 minutes, and immediate postinjection scans with and without MT were acquired. Results. In the animals receiving a cisternal injection of bacteria, the degree of meningeal enhancement was greatest at 0.8 mmol/kg, intermediate at 0.3 mmol/kg, and least at 0.1 mmol/kg. Scans in control studies did not demonstrate abnormal meningeal enhancement. High-contrast dose, MT, and acquisition of immediate postcontrast scans all resulted in statistically significant improvement. On masked film review, abnormal meningeal enhancement was noted in only 2 of 5 experimental dogs at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg (regardless of the use of MT) compared with all animals at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg. In 18 of 37 dogs (paired scans with and without MT), when abnormal enhancement was noted, the use of MT improved the visualization of abnormal meningeal enhancement. In early brain meningitis, high-contrast dose (0.3 mmol/kg), MT, and scanning immediately after injection improve detection of abnormal meningeal enhancement, thus facilitating the diagnosis of meningitis. Of these factors, contrast dose is the most important. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Chronic mycobacterial meningitis due to Mycobacterium chelonae: a case report.

    PubMed

    Salmanzadeh, Shokrallah; Honarvar, Negin; Goodarzi, Hamed; Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Nashibi, Roohangiz; Serajian, Amir Arsalan; Hashemzadeh, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of chronic meningitis due to Mycobacterium chelonae. This organism is a rapidly growing Mycobacterium (RGM) and can be found worldwide in environmental sources such as soil, dust, and water. M. chelonae is an uncommon cause of meningitis; the majority of infections caused by this organism are localized cutaneous or soft tissue infections, and rarely lung infections. The organism is indistinguishable phenotypically, so we applied PCR based on the rpoB gene sequence followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for molecular identification. The subsequent sequencing of RFLP products revealed 99.7% similarity with M. chelonae.

  10. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century

    PubMed Central

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M.; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n = 2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4–12.9; P < 0.01). Valve surgery was protective (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04–0.4; P < 0.01). Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly

  11. Stress responses in Streptococcus species and their effects on the host.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Park, Sang-Sang; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-11-01

    Streptococci cause a variety of diseases, such as dental caries, pharyngitis, meningitis, pneumonia, bacteremia, endocarditis, erysipelas, and necrotizing fasciitis. The natural niche of this genus of bacteria ranges from the mouth and nasopharynx to the skin, indicating that the bacteria will inevitably be subjected to environmental changes during invasion into the host, where it is exposed to the host immune system. Thus, the Streptococcus-host interaction determines whether bacteria are cleared by the host's defenses or whether they survive after invasion to cause serious diseases. If this interaction was to be deciphered, it could aid in the development of novel preventive and therapeutic agents. Streptococcus species possess many virulent factors, such as peroxidases and heat-shock proteins (HSPs), which play key roles in protecting the bacteria from hostile host environments. This review will discuss insights into the mechanism(s) by which streptococci adapt to host environments. Additionally, we will address how streptococcal infections trigger host stress responses; however, the mechanism by which bacterial components modulate host stress responses remains largely unknown.

  12. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Lachara V; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated.

  13. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of Streptococcus suis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Huong, Vu Thi Lan; Ha, Ngo; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Horby, Peter; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Zhu, Xiaotong; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Hien, Tran Tinh; Zamora, Javier; Schultsz, Constance; Wertheim, Heiman Frank Louis; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus suis, a bacterium that affects pigs, is a neglected pathogen that causes systemic disease in humans. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize global estimates of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of this zoonosis. We searched main literature databases for all studies through December 2012 using the search term "streptococcus suis." The prevalence of S. suis infection is highest in Asia; the primary risk factors are occupational exposure and eating of contaminated food. The pooled proportions of case-patients with pig-related occupations and history of eating high-risk food were 38.1% and 37.3%, respectively. The main clinical syndrome was meningitis (pooled rate 68.0%), followed by sepsis, arthritis, endocarditis, and endophthalmitis. The pooled case-fatality rate was 12.8%. Sequelae included hearing loss (39.1%) and vestibular dysfunction (22.7%). Our analysis identified gaps in the literature, particularly in assessing risk factors and sequelae of this infection.

  14. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Lachara V.; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  15. Biofilm formation by Streptococcus agalactiae: influence of environmental conditions and implicated virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an important human pathogen that colonizes the urogenital and/or the lower gastro-intestinal tract of up to 40% of healthy women of reproductive age and is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in the neonates. GBS can also infect the elderly and immuno-compromised adults, and is responsible for mastitis in bovines. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS can form biofilm-like three-dimensional structures that could enhance its ability to colonize and persist in the host. Biofilm formation by GBS has been investigated in vitro and appears tightly controlled by environmental conditions. Several adhesins have been shown to play a role in the formation of GBS biofilm-like structures, among which are the protein components of pili protruding outside the bacterial surface. Remarkably, antibodies directed against pilus proteins can prevent the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofilm formation in the context of GBS asymptomatic colonization and dissemination to cause invasive disease remain to be investigated in detail. PMID:25699242

  16. Case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis: Gram staining as a useful initial diagnostic clue for tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Sayoko; Kawamura, Yasuyosi; Nishiyama, Kyouhei; Hatanaka, Hiroki; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Ono, Yasuo; Miyazawa, Yukihisa; Nishiya, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever, headache, and loss of consciousness. Four days before admission, he had had difficulty speaking. On the day of admission, his colleague had found him to be unconscious and lying on his back. He was admitted to our hospital. The temperature at the eardrum was 35.2°C. Neurologic evaluation was negative. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed slight ventricular enlargement bilaterally. An X-ray film of the chest showed no abnormality. On the second hospital day, neck stiffness was noted. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contained 870 white cells/μl, most of which were neutrophils; the glucose level in the CSF was 10 mg/dl, and the protein level was 140 mg/dl. Stained smears of the CSF, including Gram staining and India-ink preparations, disclosed no microorganisms. Capsular antigen tests for several bacteria were negative. Antimicrobial agents were started. However, by changing the microscope focus slightly while viewing Gram stains of the CSF, we could see brightened and Gram-positive bacilli that had been phagocytosed by neutrophils. This finding suggested the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of the CSF and gastric juice revealed anti-acid bacilli. Polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis in the gastric juice was positive. This case showed that Gram staining could be useful as an initial adjunct for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis, particularly when the CSF shows predominantly neutrocytic pleocytosis, but no other evidence of bacterial meningitis.

  17. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  18. A case of recurrent benign lymphocytic (Mollaret's) meningitis and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, P J; Sergi, E E; Margaritis, A S; Kioumourtzis, A G; Kanellopoulos, G D; Mallios, P K; Dimitrakis, D J; Poulikakos, D J; Aspiotis, A A; Deliousis, A D; Flevaris, C P; Zacharof, A K

    2010-12-01

    Mollaret's meningitis is a rare form of benign recurrent aseptic meningitis first described in 1944. We report a case of Mollaret's meningitis due to Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV2), diagnosed with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) implementation in the Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the patient and treated successfully with acyclovir. To our knowledge, this is the first case of Mollaret's meningitis reported in Greece. We reviewed the literature since PCR has become widely available. Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 has been the most commonly identified causative agent of Mollaret's meningitis.

  19. Non-group D streptococcal meningitis misidentified as enterococcal meningitis. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of misdiagnosis by screening microbiology.

    PubMed

    Bayer, A S; Yoshikawa, T T; Nolan, F; Shibata, S; Guze, L B

    1978-11-01

    Two patients had nonhemolytic Gram-positive coccal meningitis. Both pathogens were initially misidentified as a group D enterococcus by growth in "selective" media, which led to the use of inappropriate and potentially toxic systemic and intrathecal aminoglycosides. Careful evaluation of the antibiotic sensitivity data and additional microbiological studies allowed correct identification of the organism. The important diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in differentiating true enterococcal infections, especially meningitis, from those caused by other alpha-hemolytic or nonhemolytic streptococci are emphasized. A simple laboratory schema for rapid recognition of such pathogens is reviewed.

  20. Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, G P

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae continues to be a major cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle and a source of economic loss for the industry. Veterinarians are often asked to provide information on herd level control and eradication of S. agalactiae mastitis. This review collects and collates relevant publications on the subject. The literature search was conducted in 1993 on the Agricola database. Articles related to S. agalactiae epidemiology, pathogen identification techniques, milk quality consequences, and control, prevention, and therapy were included. Streptococcus agalactiae is an oblique parasite of the bovine mammary gland and is susceptible to treatment with a variety of antibiotics. Despite this fact, where state or provincial census data are available, herd prevalence levels range from 11% (Alberta, 1991) to 47% (Vermont, 1985). Infection with S. agalactiae is associated with elevated somatic cell count and total bacteria count and a decrease in the quantity and quality of milk products produced. Bulk tank milk culture has, using traditional milk culture techniques, had a low sensitivity for identifying S. agalactiae at the herd level. New culture methods, using selective media and large inocula, have substantially improved the sensitivity of bulk tank culture. Efficacy of therapy on individual cows remains high. Protocols for therapy of all infected animals in a herd are generally successful in eradicating the pathogen from the herd, especially if they are followed up with good udder hygiene techniques. PMID:9220132

  1. Subtractive genomics approach to identify putative drug targets and identification of drug-like molecules for beta subunit of DNA polymerase III in Streptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Georrge, John J; Umrania, V V

    2012-07-01

    The prolonged use of the antibiotics over the years has transformed many organisms resistant to multiple drugs. This has made the field of drug discovery of vital importance in curing various infections and diseases. The drugs act by binding to a specific target protein of prime importance for the cell's survival. Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes are the few gram positive organisms that have developed resistance to drugs. It causes pneumonia, meningitis, pharyngitis, otitis media, sinusitis, bacteremia, pericarditis, and arthritis infections. The present study was carried out to identify potential drug targets and inhibitors for beta subunit of DNA polymerase III in these three Streptococcus species that might facilitate the discovery of novel drugs in near future. Various steps were adopted to find out novel drug targets. And finally 3D structure of DNA polymerase III subunit beta was modeled. The ligand library was generated from various databases to find the most suitable ligands. All the ligands were docked using Molegro Virtual Docker and the lead molecules were investigated for ADME and toxicity. PMID:22415782

  2. We have got you 'covered': how the meninges control brain development.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2011-06-01

    The meninges have traditionally been viewed as specialized membranes surrounding and protecting the adult brain from injury. However, there is increasing evidence that the fetal meninges play important roles during brain development. Through the release of diffusible factors, the meninges influence the proliferative and migratory behaviors of neural progenitors and neurons in the forebrain and hindbrain. Meningeal cells also secrete and organize the pial basement membrane (BM), a critical anchor point for the radially oriented fibers of neuroepithelial stem cells. With its emerging role in brain development, the potential that defects in meningeal development may underlie certain congenital brain abnormalities in humans should be considered. In this review, we will discuss what is known about assembly of the fetal meninges and review the role of meningeal-derived proteins in mouse and human brain development.

  3. Recurrent meningitis in a child with IgG3 subclass deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vehapoglu, Aysel; Ozgurhan, Gamze; Demir, Aysegul Dogan; Uzuner, Selcuk; Nursoy, Mustafa Atilla; Turkmen, Serdar

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent meningitis is an uncommon life-threatening condition. Here, the case of a 6-year-old boy is reported who had two episodes of meningitis with an IgG3 subclass deficiency. The boy had aseptic meningitis at the age of 3 years, followed by bacterial meningitis at the age of 4 years. Primary immunoglobulin deficiencies are a group of disorders associated with an increased incidence and/or severity of infection. Recurrent infections, sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia are the most frequently observed illnesses in patients with IgG subclass deficiencies, of which an IgG3 subclass deficiency is the most common, especially in adults. Although cases of recurrent viral or bacterial meningitis have been reported, herein a patient is presented with recurrence of aseptic and bacterial meningitis 1 year after the initial episode. Some researchers recommend that all children with episodes of recurrent meningitis should be screened for primary immunoglobulin or complement deficiencies.

  4. Differential effect of p47phox and gp91phox deficiency on the course of Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Manuela; Leib, Stephen L; Meli, Damian N; Brandes, Ralf P; Täuber, Martin G; Christen, Stephan

    2003-07-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and is characterized by massive infiltration of granulocytes into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). To assess the role of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pneumococcal meningitis, mice deficient in either the gp91 subunit (essential for functioning of the phagocyte enzyme) or the p47 subunit (essential for functioning of homologous enzymes in nonphagocytic cells) were intracisternally infected with live Streptococcus pneumoniae, and defined disease parameters were measured during the acute stage of infection. While none of the parameters measured (including CSF bacterial titers) were significantly different in gp91(-/-) and wild-type mice, the infection in p47(-/-) mice was associated with significantly increased inflammation of the subarachnoid and ventricular space, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and the presence of interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 in the cortex. These changes were associated with approximately 10-fold-higher CSF bacterial titers in p47(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice (P < 0.001). In contrast to infection with live bacteria, the inflammatory response, including CSF leukocytosis, was significantly attenuated in p47(-/-) mice (but not gp91(-/-) mice) challenged with a fixed number of heat-inactivated pneumococci. Impairment of the host defense appeared to be responsible for the higher bacterial titers in p47(-/-) mice. Therefore, these results indicate that ROS generated by a gp91-independent NADPH oxidase(s) are important for establishing an adequate inflammatory response to pneumococcal CSF infection.

  5. Toscana virus meningitis in Portugal, 2002-2005.

    PubMed

    Santos, L; Simões, J; Costa, R; Martins, S; Lecour, H

    2007-06-01

    Toscana virus infection is endemic in Italy, but has also been documented in other Mediterranean countries. Our aim was to investigate the occurrence of Toscana virus (TOSV) meningitis in children and young adults in a metropolitan area in the north of Portugal. Cerebrospinal fluid samples from 308 patients with the diagnosis of meningitis and with negative bacterial culture were tested for enteroviruses and herpesviruseses by reverse transcription PCR. Those samples that proved negative for enterovirus and herpesvirus were tested for Toscana virus with a commercial reverse transcription nested PCR assay. In total, we investigated 106 samples, collected between May and September during the four-year period between 2002 and 2005 from patients younger than 30 years old. Toscana virus was the cause of meningitis in six (5.6%) of the cases, three children and three young adults. All had a benign course and self-limited disease. Since a first case report of TOSV infection 1985 and another in 1996, both in foreign tourists, these six cases of Toscana virus meningitis are, to our knowledge, the first diagnosed in Portuguese inhabitants, and they underline the need for more studies on the prevalence of this virus in Portugal.

  6. Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical-pathological correlations (MeninGene-Path).

    PubMed

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and vascular damage. Of the 27 patients with known time from the admission to death, 14 patients died within 7 days of admission and 13 after 7 days of admission. Eleven of 25 (44 %) patients had been treated with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy. Observed pathological processes were inflammation of medium-large arteries in 30 brains (97 %), cerebral haemorrhage in 24 (77 %), cerebritis in 24 (77 %), thrombosis in 21 (68 %), infarction in 19 (61 %) and ventriculitis in 19 (of 28 cases, 68 %). Inflammation of medium-large arteries led to obstruction of the vascular lumen in 14 (of 31 cases, 45 %). Vascular inflammation was associated with infarction and thrombosis of brain parenchymal vessels. Hippocampal dentate gyrus apoptosis between patients treated with and without dexamethasone was similar (p = 0.66); however, dexamethasone treated patients had higher total pathology score than non-dexamethasone treated patients (p = 0.003). Our study shows that vascular damage is key in the process of brain damage in pneumococcal meningitis. Data and material of this study will be made open-access for translational research in pneumococcal meningitis (MeninGene-Path). PMID:27001057

  7. Coccidioidal meningitis. The use of amphotericin B in treatment.

    PubMed

    EINSTEIN, H E; HOLEMAN, C W; SANDIDGE, L L; HOLDEN, D H

    1961-06-01

    Amphotericin B is the first agent to alter favorably the course of coccidioidal meningitis. The morbidity and toxicity of the drug are at present its chief limiting factors. Although no cures were obtained in a series of 11 cases, significant remissions usually followed a course of therapy. Comparison with similar groups showed a significant prolongation of life in adequately treated cases.

  8. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Vermezoglu, Oznur; Ocal Topcu, Didem; Karbuz, Adem; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates. PMID:27738536

  9. Eosinophilic meningitis: cause of a chronic pain syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Clouston, P D; Corbett, A J; Pryor, D S; Garrick, R

    1990-01-01

    Three tourists developed eosinophilic meningitis after visiting the Fijian Islands. Two had a severe and long lasting illness with chronic intractable pain. In one patient electrophysiological studies and MRI scan of the brain were abnormal and provided evidence of both radicular and cerebral parenchymal involvement by the most likely causative agent, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Images PMID:2246659

  10. [Salmonella meningitis in an infant due to a pet turtle].

    PubMed

    Ricard, C; Mellentin, J; Ben Abdallah Chabchoub, R; Kingbede, P; Heuclin, T; Ramdame, A; Bouquet, A; Couttenier, F; Hendricx, S

    2015-06-01

    In humans, Salmonella most often causes self-limiting gastroenteritis, but more severe symptoms such as sepsis and meningitis can also occur and can sometimes have a fatal outcome. Even if the meningitis is not fatal, sequelae such as epilepsy, cranial nerve palsies, and hydrocephalus can occur. In the United States, it has been estimated that approximately 6% of the human cases of salmonellosis can be attributed to contact with reptiles or amphibians. The infection may take place by direct contact between reptile and human or indirectly via contact with an environment contaminated with Salmonella from a reptile. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Vitkin is a common gut inhabitant of reptiles. Though human cases due to this organism are exceedingly rare, it may infect young infants and immunocompromised individuals with a history of intimate associations with reptiles. Gastroenteritis is the most common presentation ; others include peritonitis, meningitis and bacteremia. We report a case of meningitis caused by S. enterica subsp. enterica serotype Vitkin in a 1-month-old child due to a pet turtle. PMID:26014646

  11. Variations of relative humidity in relation to meningitis in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seefeldt, M. W.; Hopson, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The meningitis belt is a region covering Sub-Saharan Africa from the Sahel of West Africa eastward to western Ethiopia. The region is prone to meningitis epidemics during the dry season extending from approximately January to May, depending on the region. Relative humidity has been found to be a critical environmental factor indicating the susceptibility of a region to meningitis epidemics. This study evaluates the variation of relative humidity across West Africa over 30 dry-seasons (1979 - 2009) using the NASA-MERRA dataset. The method of self-organizing maps is employed to characterize the changes in relative humidity patterns across the region within a given dry season as well as changes over the 30 years. A general pattern of changes in relative humidity is indicated as the rainbelt retreats to the south at the onset of the dry season and then returns to the region at the end of the dry season. Within each dry season there is a unique pattern. The climatological conditions of relative humidity at the onset of the dry season provide an indication of the moisture environment for the entire dry season. Year to year variation in the relative humidity patterns are found to be gradual. Future applications involve using the results from the SOM evaluation to be used for future decisions involving prevention of meningitis epidemics.

  12. One Family's Crusade To Inform the Public about Meningococcal Meningitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronek, Linda and Carl

    2001-01-01

    Describes meningococcal meningitis, which strikes over 100 college students yearly. Living in dormitories puts students at risk for contracting the disease. The current vaccine protects against the four main types of the infection, though it is not perfect protection. Some states have adopted legislation requiring all incoming college freshmen and…

  13. Vaccine May Reduce Incidence of Meningitis-Related Hearing Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dorothy

    1988-01-01

    Hearing loss as a result of meningitis, now the leading nongenetic cause of deafness in infants and young children, may be reduced by the introduction of the HiB (Hemophilus influenzae type B) vaccine. It is highly effective, relatively safe, and recommended for most children over 24 months and high risk children 18-24 months old. (VW)

  14. Tuberculous granulomas in childhood tuberculous meningitis: radiological features and course.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, A; Schoeman, J F; Donald, P R

    2001-02-01

    The clinical course and serial cranial computerized tomographic (CT) findings of 202 children with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) admitted to Tygerberg Hospital between 1985 and 1994 were reviewed with regard to the incidence, CT appearance and clinical course of associated intracranial tuberculous granulomas. Thirty-four patients (16.85 per cent) had associated intracranial granulomas. Thirty-eight individual lesions were analysed and classified as meningeal, parenchymal or ependymal according to their central nervous system (CNS) location. Twenty-five patients had round to irregular, brain iso-, hypo- or hyperdense meningeal granulomas with variable degrees of enhancement and peri-lesional hypodensities. Four patients had diffusely enhancing, brain isodense, enplaque-like ependymal granulomas associated with the ventricular ependymal lining. Four patients with miliary tuberculosis and TBM showed multiple small diffusely enhancing, brain iso- or hyperdense parenchymal lesions and associated hypodensities on initial CT. Although granulomas in the meningeal and ependymal group had the propensity to paradoxically enlarge or appear on standard four-drug antituberculosis therapy, the majority resolved uneventfully. Rapid resolution of small parenchymal granulomas associated with miliary tuberculosis occurred in all cases. Most granulomas in this series were co-incidental, asymptomatic CT findings. In rare cases, the development or enlargement of a strategically located granuloma may result in complications. PMID:11245351

  15. Structural analysis of the lipoteichoic acids isolated from bovine mastitis Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023 and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250.

    PubMed

    Czabańska, Anna; Neiwert, Olga; Lindner, Buko; Leigh, James; Holst, Otto; Duda, Katarzyna A

    2012-11-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an amphiphilic polycondensate located in the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, LTAs were isolated from the three bovine mastitis species Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023, and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250. Structural investigations of these LTAs were performed applying 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance experiments as well as chemical analyses and mass spectrometry. Compositional analysis revealed the presence of glycerol (Gro), Glc, alanine (Ala), and 16:0, 16:1, 18:0, 18:1. The LTAs of the three Streptococcus strains possessed the same structure, that is, a lipid anchor comprised of α-Glcp-(1→2)-α-Glcp-(1→3)-1,2-diacyl-sn-Gro and the hydrophilic backbone consisting of poly(sn-Gro-1-phosphate) randomly substituted at O-2 of Gro by d-Ala.

  16. Structural analysis of the lipoteichoic acids isolated from bovine mastitis Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023 and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250.

    PubMed

    Czabańska, Anna; Neiwert, Olga; Lindner, Buko; Leigh, James; Holst, Otto; Duda, Katarzyna A

    2012-11-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an amphiphilic polycondensate located in the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, LTAs were isolated from the three bovine mastitis species Streptococcus uberis 233, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 2023, and Streptococcus agalactiae 0250. Structural investigations of these LTAs were performed applying 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance experiments as well as chemical analyses and mass spectrometry. Compositional analysis revealed the presence of glycerol (Gro), Glc, alanine (Ala), and 16:0, 16:1, 18:0, 18:1. The LTAs of the three Streptococcus strains possessed the same structure, that is, a lipid anchor comprised of α-Glcp-(1→2)-α-Glcp-(1→3)-1,2-diacyl-sn-Gro and the hydrophilic backbone consisting of poly(sn-Gro-1-phosphate) randomly substituted at O-2 of Gro by d-Ala. PMID:23036931

  17. Antibody binding to Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis cell fractions

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Katherine A.; Bowden, George H.; Richmond, Dorothy A.; Sheridan, Michael J.; Cole, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective To determine which cell fraction(s) of Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 serve as the best source of antigens recognized by salivary SIgA antibodies in infants. Design Whole cells of 38 reference and wild-type isolates of Streptococcus mitis, S. oralis, S. gordonii, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and E. faecalis were fractionated into cell walls CW), protease-treated cell walls (PTCW), cell membranes (CM) and cell protein (CP). Whole cells and these fractions were tested for binding by rabbit anti-S. mitis SK145 and anti-S. oralis SK100 sera, and also by salivary SIgA antibodies from infants and adults. Results Anti-SK145 and anti-SK100 sera bound whole cells and fractions of all strains of S. mitis and S. oralis variably. Cluster analysis of antibody binding data placed the strains into S. mitis, S. oralis and ‘Non-S. mitis/non-S. oralis’ clusters. Antigens from CW and CM best discriminated S. mitis from S. oralis. CM bound the most infant salivary SIgA antibody and PTCW bound the least. In contrast, adult salivary SIgA antibody bound all of the cell fractions and at higher levels. Conclusions Presumably the relatively short period of immune stimulation and immunological immaturity in infants, in contrast to adults, result in low levels of salivary SIgA antibody that preferentially bind CM of S. mitis but not PTCW. By utilizing isolated cell walls and membranes as sources of antigens for proteomics it may be possible to identify antigens common to oral streptococci and dissect the fine specificity of salivary SIgA antibodies induced by oral colonization by S. mitis. PMID:17904095

  18. Multicenter Evaluation of BioFire FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis Panel for Detection of Bacteria, Viruses, and Yeast in Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens.

    PubMed

    Leber, Amy L; Everhart, Kathy; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Cullison, Jillian; Daly, Judy; Holt, Sarah; Lephart, Paul; Salimnia, Hossein; Schreckenberger, Paul C; DesJarlais, Sharon; Reed, Sharon L; Chapin, Kimberle C; LeBlanc, Lindsay; Johnson, J Kristie; Soliven, Nicole L; Carroll, Karen C; Miller, Jo-Anne; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Mestas, Javier; Bankowski, Matthew; Enomoto, Tori; Hemmert, Andrew C; Bourzac, Kevin M

    2016-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis and treatment of infectious meningitis and encephalitis are critical to minimize morbidity and mortality. Comprehensive testing of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) often includes Gram stain, culture, antigen detection, and molecular methods, paired with chemical and cellular analyses. These methods may lack sensitivity or specificity, can take several days, and require significant volume for complete analysis. The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis (ME) Panel is a multiplexed in vitro diagnostic test for the simultaneous, rapid (∼1-h) detection of 14 pathogens directly from CSF specimens: Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, cytomegalovirus, enterovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, human herpesvirus 6, human parechovirus, varicella-zoster virus, and Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii We describe a multicenter evaluation of 1,560 prospectively collected CSF specimens with performance compared to culture (bacterial analytes) and PCR (all other analytes). The FilmArray ME Panel demonstrated a sensitivity or positive percentage of agreement of 100% for 9 of 14 analytes. Enterovirus and human herpesvirus type 6 had agreements of 95.7% and 85.7%, and L. monocytogenes and N. meningitidis were not observed in the study. For S. agalactiae, there was a single false-positive and false-negative result each, for a sensitivity and specificity of 0 and 99.9%, respectively. The specificity or negative percentage of agreement was 99.2% or greater for all other analytes. The FilmArray ME Panel is a sensitive and specific test to aid in diagnosis of ME. With use of this comprehensive and rapid test, improved patient outcomes and antimicrobial stewardship are anticipated. PMID:27335149

  19. Multicenter Evaluation of BioFire FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis Panel for Detection of Bacteria, Viruses, and Yeast in Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens.

    PubMed

    Leber, Amy L; Everhart, Kathy; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Cullison, Jillian; Daly, Judy; Holt, Sarah; Lephart, Paul; Salimnia, Hossein; Schreckenberger, Paul C; DesJarlais, Sharon; Reed, Sharon L; Chapin, Kimberle C; LeBlanc, Lindsay; Johnson, J Kristie; Soliven, Nicole L; Carroll, Karen C; Miller, Jo-Anne; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Mestas, Javier; Bankowski, Matthew; Enomoto, Tori; Hemmert, Andrew C; Bourzac, Kevin M

    2016-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis and treatment of infectious meningitis and encephalitis are critical to minimize morbidity and mortality. Comprehensive testing of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) often includes Gram stain, culture, antigen detection, and molecular methods, paired with chemical and cellular analyses. These methods may lack sensitivity or specificity, can take several days, and require significant volume for complete analysis. The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis (ME) Panel is a multiplexed in vitro diagnostic test for the simultaneous, rapid (∼1-h) detection of 14 pathogens directly from CSF specimens: Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, cytomegalovirus, enterovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, human herpesvirus 6, human parechovirus, varicella-zoster virus, and Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii We describe a multicenter evaluation of 1,560 prospectively collected CSF specimens with performance compared to culture (bacterial analytes) and PCR (all other analytes). The FilmArray ME Panel demonstrated a sensitivity or positive percentage of agreement of 100% for 9 of 14 analytes. Enterovirus and human herpesvirus type 6 had agreements of 95.7% and 85.7%, and L. monocytogenes and N. meningitidis were not observed in the study. For S. agalactiae, there was a single false-positive and false-negative result each, for a sensitivity and specificity of 0 and 99.9%, respectively. The specificity or negative percentage of agreement was 99.2% or greater for all other analytes. The FilmArray ME Panel is a sensitive and specific test to aid in diagnosis of ME. With use of this comprehensive and rapid test, improved patient outcomes and antimicrobial stewardship are anticipated.

  20. Evaluation of Pastorex meningitis kit performance for the rapid identification of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Uadiale, Kennedy; Bestman, Agatha; Kamau, Charity; Caugant, Dominique A.; Greig, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (NmC) has caused outbreaks in Nigeria of increasing size in three consecutive years since 2013. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for meningitis can facilitate quick identification of the causative pathogen; Pastorex can detect N. meningitidis serogroups A, C (NmC), Y/W135, N. meningitidis serogroup B/Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae, and group B Streptococcus. There is no published field evaluation of Pastorex in the identification of NmC. We report our experience with Pastorex in detecting NmC in field conditions. Methods During sequential outbreaks of NmC in Nigeria in 2013, 2014 and 2015, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from suspected cases of meningitis that met the case definition. Pastorex latex agglutination rapid test was done in the field and trans-isolate media were inoculated with CSF for culture and/or PCR, which was used as the reference standard for 63 paired samples. Results The sensitivity of Pastorex for NmC was 80.0% (95% CI 65.4–90.4%) and the specificity was 94.4% (95% CI 72.7–99.9%). The positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 14.4 (95% CI 2.1–97.3) and negative LR was 0.2 (95% CI 0.1–0.4). The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 97.3% (95% CI 85.8–99.9) and 65.4% (95% CI 44.3–82.8), respectively, with a prevalence estimate of 71.4% (95% CI 58.6–82.1). Conclusion Pastorex showed good performance in detecting NmC under field conditions. Prepositioning Pastorex at peripheral health facilities during non-epidemic periods is constrained by a short shelf-life of 1 month after the kit is opened. There is need for development of RDTs that are cheaper and with less challenging requirements for storage and usage. PMID:27496511

  1. The use of dried cerebrospinal fluid filter paper spots as a substrate for PCR diagnosis of the aetiology of bacterial meningitis in the Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Elliott, I; Dittrich, S; Paris, D; Sengduanphachanh, A; Phoumin, P; Newton, P N

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether dried cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) conserved on filter paper can be used as a substrate for accurate PCR diagnosis of important causes of bacterial meningitis in the Lao PDR. Using mock CSF, we investigated and optimized filter paper varieties, paper punch sizes, elution volumes and quantities of DNA template to achieve sensitive and reliable detection of bacterial DNA from filter paper specimens. FTA Elute Micro Card™ (Whatman, Maidstone, UK) was the most sensitive, consistent and practical variety of filter paper. Following optimization, the lower limit of detection for Streptococcus pneumoniae from dried mock CSF spots was 14 genomic equivalents (GE)/μL (interquartile range 5.5 GE/μL) or 230 (IQR 65) colony forming units/mL. A prospective clinical evaluation for S. pneumoniae, S. suis and Neisseria meningitidis was performed. Culture and PCR performed on fresh liquid CSF from patients admitted with a clinical diagnosis of meningitis (n = 73) were compared with results derived from dried CSF spots. Four of five fresh PCR-positive CSF samples also tested PCR positive from dried CSF spots, with one patient under the limit of detection. In a retrospective study of S. pneumoniae samples (n = 20), the median (IQR; range) CSF S. pneumoniae bacterial load was 1.1 × 10(4) GE/μL (1.2 × 10(5) ; 1 to 6.1 × 10(6) DNA GE/μL). Utilizing the optimized methodology, we estimate an extrapolated sensitivity of 90%, based on the range of CSF genome counts found in Laos. Dried CSF filter paper spots could potentially help us to better understand the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in resource-poor settings and guide empirical treatments and vaccination policies.

  2. The use of dried cerebrospinal fluid filter paper spots as a substrate for PCR diagnosis of the aetiology of bacterial meningitis in the Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, I; Dittrich, S; Paris, D; Sengduanphachanh, A; Phoumin, P; Newton, P N

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether dried cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) conserved on filter paper can be used as a substrate for accurate PCR diagnosis of important causes of bacterial meningitis in the Lao PDR. Using mock CSF, we investigated and optimized filter paper varieties, paper punch sizes, elution volumes and quantities of DNA template to achieve sensitive and reliable detection of bacterial DNA from filter paper specimens. FTA Elute Micro Card™ (Whatman, Maidstone, UK) was the most sensitive, consistent and practical variety of filter paper. Following optimization, the lower limit of detection for Streptococcus pneumoniae from dried mock CSF spots was 14 genomic equivalents (GE)/μL (interquartile range 5.5 GE/μL) or 230 (IQR 65) colony forming units/mL. A prospective clinical evaluation for S. pneumoniae, S. suis and Neisseria meningitidis was performed. Culture and PCR performed on fresh liquid CSF from patients admitted with a clinical diagnosis of meningitis (n = 73) were compared with results derived from dried CSF spots. Four of five fresh PCR-positive CSF samples also tested PCR positive from dried CSF spots, with one patient under the limit of detection. In a retrospective study of S. pneumoniae samples (n = 20), the median (IQR; range) CSF S. pneumoniae bacterial load was 1.1 × 104 GE/μL (1.2 × 105; 1 to 6.1 × 106 DNA GE/μL). Utilizing the optimized methodology, we estimate an extrapolated sensitivity of 90%, based on the range of CSF genome counts found in Laos. Dried CSF filter paper spots could potentially help us to better understand the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in resource-poor settings and guide empirical treatments and vaccination policies. PMID:23738720

  3. A plasmid in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M D; Guild, W R

    1979-01-01

    Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid has been detected in three related laboratory strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Strains D39S, R36, and R36NC each contain a minimum of two copies per cell of a 2.0-megadalton plasmid (pDP1). A plasmid twice as large as this smaller one is also present in much lower quantity in these strains, but neither plasmid is present in four strains related to these or in a drug-resistant clinical isolate from Paris. The plasmid yield was not amplified in the presence of chloramphenicol. No phenotype has been correlated with the presence of pDP1, which has existed in strains carried for many years in laboratory collections. Images PMID:33961

  4. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine

    2008-09-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a major dairy starter used in yogurt and cheese production. In Streptococcus genus, S. thermophilus is the only one food species among commensal and opportunistic pathogen species. Comparative genomics suggest that this species recently emerged and evolved by combination of loss-of-function and horizontal gene transfer events. These gene transfer events detected in S. thermophilus have originated from other dairy species and might contribute to its adaptation to the milk environment.

  5. Infections Associated with Streptococcus intermedius in Children.

    PubMed

    Faden, Howard S

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a viridans Streptococcus belonging to the Anginosus group. In the past 7 years, it has been associated with abscesses in 48 children, 40% of whom had complicated and/or life-threatening illness. It was the sole pathogen in 35 cases. Seventy-five percent of the infections occurred in winter and spring. None occurred in infants younger than 1 year.

  6. Serotype O18 avian pathogenic and neonatal meningitis Escherichia coli strains employ similar pathogenic strategies for the onset of meningitis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Subramanian; Chang, Alexander C; Hodges, Jacqueline; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Nicholson, Bryon A; Nolan, Lisa K; Prasadarao, Nemani V

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis Escherichia coli K1 (NMEC) are thought to be transmitted from mothers to newborns during delivery or by nosocomial infections. However, the source of E. coli K1 causing these infections is not clear. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) have the potential to cause infection in humans while human E. coli have potential to cause colibacillosis in poultry, suggesting that these strains may lack host specificity. APEC strains are capable of causing meningitis in newborn rats; however, it is unclear whether these bacteria use similar mechanisms to that of NMEC to establish disease. Using four representative APEC and NMEC strains that belong to serotype O18, we demonstrate that these strains survive in human serum similar to that of the prototypic NMEC strain E44, a derivative of RS218. These bacteria also bind and enter both macrophages and human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (HCMEC/D3) with similar frequency as that of E44. The amino acid sequences of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA), an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of meningitis, are identical within these representative APEC and NMEC strains. Further, these strains also require FcγRI-α chain (CD64) and Ecgp96 as receptors for OmpA in macrophages and HCMEC/D3, respectively, to bind and enter these cells. APEC and NMEC strains induce meningitis in newborn mice with varying degree of pathology in the brains as assessed by neutrophil recruitment and neuronal apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that serotype O18 APEC strains utilize similar pathogenic mechanisms as those of NMEC strains in causing meningitis.

  7. Picornaviruses in cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Anjos, Elizabete; Kaijalainen, Svetlana; Roivainen, Merja; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Human enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral meningitis. Viral-bacterial interaction may affect the clinical course and outcome of bacterial meningitis. In Africa, viruses might be responsible for 14-25% of all meningitis cases. However, only few studies from Africa have reported detection of viruses in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or mixed viral-bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of picornaviruses in the CSF of children suffering from meningitis in Luanda, Angola. The study included 142 consecutive children enrolled in a prospective study of bacterial meningitis in Luanda between 2005 and 2006, from whom a CSF sample was available. CSF samples were obtained at hospital admission, stored in a deep-freeze, and transported to Finland for testing by real-time PCR for picornaviruses. Enteroviruses were detected in 4 (3%) of 142 children with presumed bacterial meningitis. A 5-month-old girl with rhinovirus and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis recovered uneventfully. An 8-year-old girl with human enterovirus and pneumococcal meningitis developed no sequelae. A 2-month-old girl with human enterovirus and malaria recovered quickly. A 7-month-old girl with human enterovirus was treated for presumed tuberculous meningitis and survived with severe sequelae. Mixed infections of the CNS with picornaviruses and bacteria are rare. Detection of an enterovirus does not affect the clinical picture and outcome of bacterial meningitis.

  8. Isolation of Streptococcus tigurinus - a novel member of Streptococcus mitis group from a case of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Dhotre, Shree V; Mehetre, Gajanan T; Dharne, Mahesh S; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus tigurinus is a new member of the Streptococcus viridians group and is closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. The type strain AZ_3a(T) of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated only by newer molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene analysis. During the course of study on bacteraemia and infective endocarditis with reference to periodontitis and viridians group of streptococci, a strain of S. tigurinus isolated from subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontitis identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, which was originally identified as Streptococcus pluranimalium by Vitek 2. Confirmation by 16S rRNA gene analysis showed 99.39% similarity (1476/1485 bp) with S. tigurinus AZ_3a(T) (AORU01000002). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of S. tigurinus from the oral cavity of a periodontitis patient.

  9. Srr2, a multifaceted adhesin expressed by ST-17 hypervirulent Group B Streptococcus involved in binding to both fibrinogen and plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Six, Anne; Bellais, Samuel; Bouaboud, Abdelouhab; Fouet, Agnès; Gabriel, Christelle; Tazi, Asmaa; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire

    2015-09-01

    The Group B Streptococcus (GBS) 'hypervirulent' ST-17 clone is strongly associated with invasive neonatal meningitis. Comparative genome analyses revealed that the serine-rich repeat (Srr) glycoprotein Srr2 is a cell wall-anchored protein specific for ST-17 strains, the non-ST-17 isolates expressing Srr1. Here, we unravel the binding capacity of GBS Srr proteins to relevant components of the host fibrinolysis pathway. We demonstrate that: (i) Srr2 binds plasminogen and plasmin whereas Srr1 does not; (ii) the ability of ST-17 strains to bind fibrinogen reflects a high level surface display of Srr2 combined with a higher affinity of Srr2 than Srr1 to bind this ligand; and (iii) Srr2 binding to host plasma proteins results in the formation of bacterial aggregates that are efficiently endocytosed by phagocytes. Importantly, we show that Srr2 increased bacterial survival to phagocytic killing and bacterial persistence in a murine model of meningitis. We conclude that Srr2 is a multifaceted adhesin used by the ST-17 clone to hijack ligands of the host coagulation system, thereby contributing to bacterial dissemination and invasiveness, and ultimately to meningitis. PMID:26094503

  10. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis.

  11. Penetration of Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus sanguinis into dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Susanne; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küpper, Harald; Raser, Gerhard; Willershausen, Brita; Callaway, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the difference in virulence of acidogenic and aciduric oral streptococci in an in vitro caries model using their penetration depths into dental enamel. 30 caries-free extracted molars from 11- to 16-year-olds were cleaned ultrasonically for 1 min with de-ionized water and, after air-drying, embedded in epoxy resin. After 8-h of setting at room temperature, the specimens were ground on the buccal side with SiC-paper 1200 (particle size 13-16 μm). Enamel was removed in circular areas sized 3 mm in diameter; the mean depth of removed enamel was 230 ± 60 μm. 15 specimens each were incubated anaerobically under standardized conditions with 24 h-cultures of Streptococcus sanguinis 9S or Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176 in Balmelli broth at 37 ± 2 °C; the pH-values of the broths were measured at the beginning and end of each incubation cycle. After 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks 3 teeth each were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in cacodylate buffer for 24 h, washed 3× and dehydrated 30-60min by sequential washes through a series of 30-100% graded ethanol. The teeth were cut in half longitudinally; afterward, two slits were made to obtain fracture surfaces in the infected area. After critical-point-drying the fragments were gold-sputtered and viewed in a scanning electron microscope at magnifications of ×20-20,000. After 10 weeks of incubation, penetration of S. sanguinis of 11.13 ± 24.04 μm below the break edges into the enamel was observed. The invasion of S. sobrinus reached depths of 87.53 ± 76.34 μm. The difference was statistically significant (paired t test: p = 0.033). The experimental penetration depths emphasize the importance of S. sanguinis versus S. sobrinus in the context of the extended ecological plaque hypothesis. PMID:25805186

  12. The CovS/CovR Acid Response Regulator Is Required for Intracellular Survival of Group B Streptococcus in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cumley, Nicola J.; Smith, Leanne M.; Anthony, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis and septicemia. The ability of this organism to survive inside phagocytic cells is poorly understood but thought to be an important step for the establishment of disease in the host. Here, we demonstrate that GBS shows prolonged survival within J774 macrophages and that the capacity to survive is not significantly changed across a diverse range of strains representing different serotypes, multilocus sequence types (MLST), and sites of clinical isolation. Using staining for the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) and by pharmacological inhibition of phagosome acidification, we demonstrate that streptococci reside in a phagosome and that acidification of the phagosome is required for GBS to survive intracellularly. Moreover, we show that the GBS two-component system CovS/CovR, which is the major acid response regulator in this organism, is required for survival inside the phagosome. PMID:22331428

  13. [Real-time PCR detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens].

    PubMed

    Vacková, Z; Lžičařová, D; Stock, N K; Kozáková, J

    2015-10-01

    The study aim was to implement a molecular real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) for the detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical (culture negative) specimens from patients with suspected invasive bacterial disease. Clinical specimens are referred to the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Meningococcal Infections, Unit for Airborne Bacterial Infections, Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology, National Institute of Public Health from various regions of the Czech Republic. Clinical specimens are, in particular, cerebrospinal fluid, anti-coagulated blood or serum and, exceptionally, post-mortem specimens. The NRL has implemented molecular diagnosis of these bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis and sepsis from clinical specimens since 1999. The first diagnostic method was semi-nested PCR followed by electrophoretic analysis. In 2014, a molecular qualitative real-time PCR assay was implemented.

  14. In silico prediction of conserved vaccine targets in Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated from fish, cattle, and human samples.

    PubMed

    Pereira, U P; Soares, S C; Blom, J; Leal, C A G; Ramos, R T J; Guimarães, L C; Oliveira, L C; Almeida, S S; Hassan, S S; Santos, A R; Miyoshi, A; Silva, A; Tauch, A; Barh, D; Azevedo, V; Figueiredo, H C P

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Lancefield group B; group B streptococci) is a major pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis in fish, mastitis in cows, and neonatal sepsis and meningitis in humans. The available prophylactic measures for conserving human and animal health are not totally effective and have limitations. Effective vaccines against the different serotypes or genotypes of pathogenic strains from the various hosts would be useful. We used an in silico strategy to identify conserved vaccine candidates in 15 genomes of group B streptococci strains isolated from human, bovine, and fish samples. The degree of conservation, subcellular localization, and immunogenic potential of S. agalactiae proteins were investigated. We identified 36 antigenic proteins that were conserved in all 15 genomes. Among these proteins, 5 and 23 were shared only by human or fish strains, respectively. These potential vaccine targets may help develop effective vaccines that will help prevent S. agalactiae infection. PMID:24065646

  15. Incidence, Carriage and Case-Carrier Ratios for Meningococcal Meningitis in the African Meningitis Belt: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Koutangni, Thibaut; Boubacar Maïnassara, Halima; Mueller, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Background To facilitate the interpretation of meningococcal meningitis epidemiology in the “African meningitis belt”, we aimed at obtaining serogroup-specific pooled estimates of incidence, carriage and case-carrier ratios for meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt and describe their variations across the endemic, hyperendemic and epidemic context. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting serogroup-specific meningococcal meningitis monthly incidence and carriage in the same population and time period. Epidemiological contexts were defined as endemic (wet season, no epidemic), hyperendemic (dry season, no epidemic), and epidemic (dry season, epidemic). Findings Eight studies reporting a total of eighty pairs of serogroup-specific meningococcal meningitis incidence and carriage estimates were included in this review. For serogroup A, changes associated with the transition from endemic to hyperendemic incidence and from hyperendemic to epidemic incidence were 15-fold and 120-fold respectively. Changes in carriage prevalence associated with both transitions were 1-fold and 30-fold respectively. 
For serogroup W and X, the transition from endemic to hyperendemic incidence involved a 4-fold and 1•1-fold increase respectively. Increases in carriage prevalence for the later transition were 7-fold and 1•7-fold respectively. No data were available for the hyperendemic-epidemic transition for these serogroups. Our findings suggested that the regular seasonal variation in serogroup A meningococcal meningitis incidence between the rainy and the dry season could be mainly driven by seasonal change in the ratio of clinical cases to subclinical infections. In contrast appearance of epidemic incidences is related to a substantial increase in transmission and colonisation and to lesser extent with changes in the case-carrier ratio. Conclusion Seasonal change in the rate of progression to disease given carriage

  16. A cascade of morphogenic signaling initiated by the meninges controls corpus callosum formation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Youngshik; Siegenthaler, Julie A; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2012-02-23

    The corpus callosum is the most prominent commissural connection between the cortical hemispheres, and numerous neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with callosal agenesis. By using mice either with meningeal overgrowth or selective loss of meninges, we have identified a cascade of morphogenic signals initiated by the meninges that regulates corpus callosum development. The meninges produce BMP7, an inhibitor of callosal axon outgrowth. This activity is overcome by the induction of expression of Wnt3 by the callosal pathfinding neurons, which antagonize the inhibitory effects of BMP7. Wnt3 expression in the cingulate callosal pathfinding axons is developmentally regulated by another BMP family member, GDF5, which is produced by the adjacent Cajal-Retzius neurons and turns on before outgrowth of the callosal axons. The effects of GDF5 are in turn under the control of a soluble GDF5 inhibitor, Dan, made by the meninges. Thus, the meninges and medial neocortex use a cascade of signals to regulate corpus callosum development.

  17. [A case of colchicine-responsive Mollaret's meningitis with MEFV gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Kinohshita, Tomomi; Matsushima, Akira; Satoh, Shunichi; Hoshi, Kenichi; Kishida, Dai; Yahikozawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with recurrent meningitis. She presented with 10 episodes of meningitis in 10 months. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated pleocytosis, with neutrophils dominant at the early stage, and lymphocytes dominant at the late stage. Mollaret cells were found and the level of IL-6 was increased in cerebrospinal fluid. Several antibiotics and antiviral agents failed to prevent relapse. However, colchicine therapy successfully prevented the recurrence of meningitis. Genetic testing for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) showed a mutation in the MEFV gene. It is difficult to diagnose the cause of Mollaret's meningitis in some patients. FMF, neuro-Behçet's disease, and neuro-Sweet disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent meningitis. In addition, colchicine therapy can prevent the relapse of meningitis in such cases.

  18. Congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula through the inner ear and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Proops, D; Sellars, S; Evans, J; Michaels, L

    1993-06-01

    Congenital deformities of the labyrinth of the inner ear can be associated with a fistulous communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the middle ear cavity. We describe seven such cases, six confirmed by high resolution CT and one by postmortem histological section. The seven patients all presented with meningitis although a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was demonstrated at subsequent surgery or postmortem. The lesions were bilateral in three patients, unilateral in three and probably bilateral in the postmortem case although only one temporal bone was obtained. In every case there was a dilated sac instead of the normal two and a half turn cochlea on the affected side and this was confirmed at surgery. The demonstration of the basal cochlear turn is of paramount importance in any deaf child presenting with meningitis. A true Mondini deformity with a normal basal turn and some hearing is not at risk of developing a fistula. PMID:8345296

  19. Pasteurella multocida bacterial meningitis caused by contact with pigs

    PubMed Central

    López, C.; Sanchez-Rubio, P.; Betrán, A.; Terré, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida belongs to the normal flora of the respiratory and digestive tract of many animals. Animal exposure is a considerable risk factor for Pasteurella infection. P. multocida is the most common cause of local infection after an animal bite but is an unusual cause of meningitis. We present a case of bacterial meningitis by P. multocida in a 37-year-old man who worked in a pig farm and was bitten by a pig. The patient had a defect located in the lamina cribosa and this lesion could be the gateway of the infection, although in this case the infection could also be acquired through the pig bite. The bacteria was identified as P. multocida with the biochemical test API 20E (bioMérieux). In agreement with findings in the literature, the strain was susceptible in vitro to penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, imipenem and tetracycline. PMID:24294240

  20. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccato, Pietro; Trzaska, Sylwia; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Kalashnikova, Olga; del Corral, John; Cousin, Remi; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Bell, Michael; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2013-01-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular meningitis and malaria. In this paper, we present the new and improved products that have been developed for: (i) estimating dust aerosol for forecasting risks of meningitis and (ii) for monitoring temperature and rainfall and integrating them into a vectorial capacity model for forecasting risks of malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map Room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  1. Intradural Extramedullary Tuberculoma of the Spinal Cord Following Tuberculous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Deok-Ki; Kwon, Young-Min

    2015-06-01

    Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord (IETSC) is an uncommon disease which can occurs secondary to tuberculous meningitis. A 31-year-old woman was diagnosed as tuberculous meningitis after mental disorientation. Her mentality was recovered after antituberculous therapy. After 7 months of antituberculous therapy, paraplegia has developed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass lesion between the T1 and T12 spinal levels with arachnoid thickening which results in the development of tuberculoma. She received surgical resection of IETSC followed by antituberculous therapy and neurological function has been improved. The two years after surgical treatment, spinal MRI showed syringomyelia between T1 to L1. But, her neurological outcome was not aggravated. PMID:26217394

  2. Ischemic infarction in 25 children with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Leiguarda, R; Berthier, M; Starkstein, S; Nogués, M; Lylyk, P

    1988-02-01

    Twenty-five cases (38%) of ischemic infarction occurred among 65 cases of tuberculous meningitis in patients less than 14 years of age. The male:female ratio was 1.3:1. The most frequent clinical findings were meningeal signs, fever, alteration of consciousness, cranial nerve involvement, seizures, and focal neurologic deficit. Twenty-three patients had anterior circulation infarcts, and two more had infarcts in the vertebrobasilar territories. Distribution of infarcts in the anterior circulation was shown by computed tomography in the territories of the following arteries: lenticulostriate, 10 cases unilateral and 6 bilateral; middle cerebral, 3 cases; internal carotid, 1 case; multiple areas, 3 cases. Of the 25 ischemic infarction cases, 23 (92%) had hydrocephalus, 19 (76%) basal exudates, and 2 (8%) tuberculomas. Outcome was poor since no patient with infarction recovered completely. Six died and bilateral subcortical infarcts led to a considerably higher mortality than unilateral ones, whether cortical or subcortical.

  3. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow. PMID:27460561

  4. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, P.; Trzaska, S.; Perez, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; del Corral, J.; Cousin, R.; Blumenthal, M. B.; Connor, S.; Thomson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use, and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular Meningitis and Malaria. In this paper we present the new and improved products that have been developed for monitoring dust, temperature, rainfall and vectorial capacity model for monitoring and forecasting risks of Meningitis and Malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  5. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  7. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome following neurosurgical intervention in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nagotkar, L; Shanbag, P; Dasarwar, N

    2008-07-01

    Cerebral salt wasting is characterized by inappropriate natriuresis and volume contraction in the presence of cerebral pathology. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapy is challenging. We report two children with tuberculous meningitis and hydrocephalus who developed cerebral salt wasting following neurosurgical intervention. The first patient was managed with rigorous salt and water replacement whereas the second patient required the addition of fludrocortisone for control of salt-wasting.

  8. Chronic Meningitis Complicating Intracranial Hypertension in Neurobrucellosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Betul; Nacaroglu, Senay Asik; Coskun, Cigdem; Kuscu, Demet Yandım; Onder, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    In neurobrucellosis, even though meningitis is encountered frequently, chronic intracranial hypertension is a rare manifestation. Early diagnosis and treatment is very important for the prevention of permanent visual loss secondary to poststasis optic atrophy in these cases. We report a case that presented with permanent visual loss secondary to intracranial hypertension in neurobrucellosis. Our goal is to draw attention to the consideration of neurobrucellosis in cases with papilla stasis, even in the absence of neurological findings in endemic areas.

  9. Development of internally controlled duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays for the detection of microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Eoin; Coughlan, Helena; Higgins, Owen; Boo, Teck Wee; Cormican, Martin; Barrett, Louise; Smith, Terry J; Reddington, Kate; Barry, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Three duplex molecular beacon based real-time Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) assays have been designed and experimentally validated targeting RNA transcripts for the detection and identification of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae respectively. Each real-time NASBA diagnostics assay includes an endogenous non-competitive Internal Amplification Control (IAC) to amplify the splice variant 1 mRNA of the Homo sapiens TBP gene from human total RNA. All three duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays were determined to be 100% specific for the target species tested for. Also the Limits of Detection (LODs) for the H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae duplex real-time NASBA assays were 55.36, 0.99, and 57.24 Cell Equivalents (CE) respectively. These robust duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays have the potential to be used in a clinical setting for the rapid (<60min) specific detection and identification of the most prominent microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis in humans. PMID:27319375

  10. Development of internally controlled duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays for the detection of microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Eoin; Coughlan, Helena; Higgins, Owen; Boo, Teck Wee; Cormican, Martin; Barrett, Louise; Smith, Terry J; Reddington, Kate; Barry, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Three duplex molecular beacon based real-time Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) assays have been designed and experimentally validated targeting RNA transcripts for the detection and identification of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae respectively. Each real-time NASBA diagnostics assay includes an endogenous non-competitive Internal Amplification Control (IAC) to amplify the splice variant 1 mRNA of the Homo sapiens TBP gene from human total RNA. All three duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays were determined to be 100% specific for the target species tested for. Also the Limits of Detection (LODs) for the H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae duplex real-time NASBA assays were 55.36, 0.99, and 57.24 Cell Equivalents (CE) respectively. These robust duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays have the potential to be used in a clinical setting for the rapid (<60min) specific detection and identification of the most prominent microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis in humans.

  11. Eosinophilic meningitis: a case series and review of literature of Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Gnathostoma spinigerum.

    PubMed

    Shah, I; Barot, S; Madvariya, M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis is defined as the presence of >10 eosinophils/μL in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or at least 10% eosinophils in the total CSF leukocyte count. Eosinophilic meningitis has been reported in two case series and two case reports in India till date and has not been reported in children below 15 years of age. We present two children with eosinophilic meningitis with peripheral eosinophilia and the proposed etiologic agents based on the clinical setting and their response to antihelminthic agents.

  12. Bifrontal meningeal fibrosarcoma in a patient with metastases to the liver, kidneys and suprarenal glands.

    PubMed

    Aung, T H; Tse, C H

    1993-09-01

    Primary meningeal sarcoma is a rare malignant tumour of the central nervous system and metastases to the liver, kidney and the suprarenal gland have not been reported elsewhere. A 47 year old Chinese woman who presented with a short history of headache and vomiting was found to have metastatic meningeal fibrosarcoma in the liver 4 months after resection of primary bifrontal meningeal fibrosarcoma. The computerized tomography findings and relevant histology are presented.

  13. Atypical clinical presentation of meningococcal meningitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Ilaria; Pileri, Paola; Merello, Maria; Gnesin, Paolo; Cogi, Enrico; Aggiusti, Carlo; Giacomelli, Laura; Ettori, Stefano; Colombini, Paolo; Collidá, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    A young woman was examined in the Emergency Department for fever, pharyngitis and widespread petechial rash. Physical examination, including neurological evaluation, did not show any other abnormalities. Chest X-ray was negative. Blood exams showed leukocytosis and CPR 20 mg/dL (nv<0.5 mg/dL). On the basis of these results and petechial rash evidence, lumbar puncture was performed. CSF was opalescent; physico-chemical examination showed: total proteins 2.8 (nv 0.15-0.45), glucose 5 (nv 59-80), WBC 7600/μL (nv 0-4/ μL). In the hypothesis of meningococcal meningitis, antimicrobial therapy was started. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for N. meningitidis. During the first hours the patient experienced hallucinations and mild psychomotor agitation, making a spontaneous recovery. A brain MRI showed minimal extra-axial inflammatory exudates. She was discharged after 10 days in good condition. We underline the need to consider meningococcal meningitis diagnosis when any suggestive symptom or sign is present, even in the absence of the classic meningitis triad, to obtain earlier diagnosis and an improved prognosis. PMID:27668905

  14. [Blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in purulent cerebrospinal meningitis].

    PubMed

    Przyjałkowski, W; Lipowski, D; Kolasa, T; Issa, E; Olejnik, Z

    1996-01-01

    Our investigations concerned the blood-brain barrier (b.b.b.) in patients with acute bacterial purulent meningitis. For that purpose concentrations of proteins, which are synthesized beyond the central nervous system and in normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) exist only in slight amounts, were determined in CSF and in blood serum. Albumin was examined in the CSF of 59 patients and in the serum of 35 of them, transferrin of 40 and 32 patients, respectively. Etiological verification was obtained in 84.7% of patients. The control group consisted of 20 persons. Quantitative analytical tests were carried out by means of immunochemical, turbidimetric methods. High levels of albumin and transferrin in CSF and low in serum of patients with meningitis were observed. The obtained results, confirmed by statistical analysis, demonstrate that in the acute phase of purulent meningitis b.b.b is impaired, what leads to the transfer of the proteins from the blood serum into the cerebrospinal fluid and that transferrins a better indicator of the damage to blood-brain barrier than albumin. PMID:8657349

  15. Enolase of Streptococcus Suis Serotype 2 Enhances Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Inducing IL-8 Release.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingying; Li, Na; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hongtao; Liu, Jianfang; Xia, Xiaojing; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Gu, Jingmin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Lei, Liancheng

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is an emerging zoonosis, and meningitis is the most frequent clinical manifestation, but mechanism of its virulent factor, enolase (Eno), is unknown in meningitis. In this study, Eno was inducibly expressed and added to an in vitro Transwell co-culture model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) consisted of porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells (PBMECs) and astrocytes (ACs), the results showed that Eno induces a significant increase in BBB permeability and promotes the release of IL-8 et al. cytokines. Furthermore, IL-8 could significantly destroy the integrity of the BBB model in vitro. In mice models administered Eno for 24 h, Eno could significantly promote Evans blue (EB) moving from the blood to the brain and significantly increased the serum and brain levels of IL-8, as detected by ELISA. While G31P (IL-8 receptor antagonist) significantly decreased the concentration of EB in the brains of mice injected with Eno. The present study demonstrated that SS2 Eno may play an important role in disrupting BBB integrity by prompting IL-8 release. PMID:26732390

  16. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures.

    PubMed

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-06-13

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes.

  17. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thi Hoa; Tran, Thi Bich Chieu; Tran, Thi Thu Nga; Nguyen, Van Dung; Campbell, James; Pham, Hong Anh; Huynh, Huu Tho; Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau; Bryant, Juliet E; Tran, Tinh Hien; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-03-28

    Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of major economic significance to the swine industry and is increasingly recognized as an emerging zoonotic agent in Asia. In Vietnam, S. suis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adult humans. Zoonotic transmission is most frequently associated with serotype 2 strains and occupational exposure to pigs or consumption of infected pork. To gain insight into the role of pigs for human consumption as a reservoir for zoonotic infection in southern Vietnam, we determined the prevalence and diversity of S. suis carriage in healthy slaughterhouse pigs. Nasopharyngeal tonsils were sampled from pigs at slaughterhouses serving six provinces in southern Vietnam and Ho Chi Minh City area from September 2006 to November 2007. Samples were screened by bacterial culture. Isolates of S. suis were serotyped and characterized by multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antibiotic susceptibility profiles and associated genetic resistance determinants, and the presence of putative virulence factors were determined. 41% (222/542) of pigs carried S. suis of one or multiple serotypes. 8% (45/542) carried S. suis serotype 2 which was the most common serotype found (45/317 strains, 14%). 80% of serotype 2 strains belonged to the MLST clonal complex 1,which was previously associated with meningitis cases in Vietnam and outbreaks of severe disease in China in 1998 and 2005. These strains clustered with representative strains isolated from patients with meningitis in PFGE analysis, and showed similar antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor profiles. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of S. suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam. Strict hygiene at processing facilities, and health education programs addressing food safety and proper handling of pork should be encouraged.

  18. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K.; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes. PMID:27304968

  19. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfestation syndrome with Escherichia coli meningitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed Central

    Smallman, L A; Young, J A; Shortland-Webb, W R; Carey, M P; Michael, J

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfestation syndrome accompanied by Gram negative bacteraemia and meningitis were studied. Both occurred in non-immunosuppressed West Indian women. Images PMID:3517071

  20. An unusual case of E coli meningitis in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kangath, Raghesh Varot; Midturi, John

    2013-03-05

    Spontaneous non-traumatic Escherichia coli meningitis is very rare in adults. We report a case of a 48-year-old woman with Marfan's syndrome with E coli meningitis. Apparently, the relation between an increased risk of meningitis and Marfan's syndrome is not well known. This patient was discharged on intravenous antibiotic therapy after a diagnosis of E coli meningitis without looking for the cause by imaging studies previously. Her blood cultures were negative ruling out haematogenous spread. Our work-up revealed extensive dural ectasia with intrasacral meningoceles extending into the pelvis possibly acting as a portal of entry for the bacteria into the brain from the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Galactokinase activity in Streptococcus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutkins, R.; Morris, H.A.; McKay, L.L.

    1985-10-01

    ATP-dependent phosphorylation of (/sup 14/C)galactose by 11 strains of streptococcus thermophilus indicated that these organisms possessed the Leloir enzyme, galactokinase (galK). Activities were 10 times higher in fully induced, galactose-fermenting (Gal/sup +/) strains than in galactose-nonfermenting (Gal/sup -/) strains. Lactose-grown, Gal/sup -/ cells released free galactose into the medium and were unable to utilize residual galactose or to induce galK above basal levels. Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus 19258 also released galactose into the medium, but when lactose was depleted, growth on galactose commenced, and galK increased from 0.025 to 0.22 ..mu..mol of galactose phosphorylated per min per mg of protein. When lactose was added to galactose-grown cells of S. thermophilus 19258, galK activity rapidly decreased. These results suggest that galK in Gal/sup +/ S. thermophilus is subject to an induction-repression mechanism, but that galK cannot be induced in Gal/sup -/ strains.

  2. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  3. Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov., isolated from the oral cavity of donkeys.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kazuko; Saito, Masanori; Tsudukibashi, Osamu; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo

    2013-08-01

    Four Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid isolates that were obtained from donkey oral cavities formed two distinct clonal groups when characterized by phenotypic and phylogenetic studies. From the results of biochemical tests, the organisms were tentatively identified as a streptococcal species. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two of the isolates were related most closely to Streptococcus ursoris with 95.6 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and to Streptococcus ratti with 92.0 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates, however, were related to Streptococcus criceti with 95.0 and 89.0 % similarities based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively. From both phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, the four isolates formed two distinct clonal groups and are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus. The names proposed for these organisms are Streptococcus orisasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1801(T) = JCM 17942(T) = DSM 25193(T)) and Streptococcus dentasini sp. nov. (type strain NUM 1808(T) = JCM 17943(T) = DSM 25137(T)).

  4. Distribution of Streptococcus troglodytae and Streptococcus dentirousetti in chimpanzee oral cavities.

    PubMed

    Miyanohara, Mayu; Imai, Susumu; Okamoto, Masaaki; Saito, Wataru; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Momoi, Yasuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and phenotypic properties of the indigenous streptococci in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) oral cavities. Eleven chimpanzees (aged from 9 to 44 years, mean ± SD, 26.9 ± 12.6 years) in the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University were enrolled in this research and brushing bacterial samples collected from them. Streptococci were isolated from the oral cavities of all chimpanzees. The isolates (n = 46) were identified as thirteen species by 16S rRNA genes analysis. The predominant species was Streptococcus sanguinis of mitis streptococci from five chimpanzees (45%). Mutans streptococci were isolated from six chimpanzees (55%). The predominant species in the mutans streptococci were Streptococcus troglodytae from four chimpanzees (36%), this species having been proposed as a novel species by us, and Streptococcus dentirousetti from three chimpanzees (27%). Streptococcus mutans was isolated from one chimpanzee (9%). However, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus macacae and Streptococcus downei, which are indigenous to human and monkey (Macaca fasciclaris) oral habitats, were not isolated. Of the mutans streptococci, S. troglodytae, S. dentirousetti, and S. mutans possessed strong adherence activity to glass surface.

  5. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius Kills Streptococcus pneumoniae Planktonic Cells and Pneumococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Talekar, Sharmila J.; Chochua, Sopio; Nelson, Katie; Klugman, Keith P.; Quave, Cassandra L.; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC’s, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC)50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms. PMID:24823499

  6. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Sharmila J; Chochua, Sopio; Nelson, Katie; Klugman, Keith P; Quave, Cassandra L; Vidal, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC)50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms.

  7. Degradation of human immunoglobulins by proteases from Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from various human sources.

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, M B; Dahlén, G; Kaijser, B; Nygren, H

    1984-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to degrade human secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA), IgG, and IgM was tested in 102 strains by use of the thin-layer enzyme assay cultivation technique. The strains were isolated from patients with acute phases of otitis media, meningitis, and pneumonia as well as from symptomless carriers. An ability to degrade S-IgA, IgG, and IgM was revealed in 50, 84, and 96 strains, respectively. An IgG- and IgM-degrading ability of S. pneumoniae has not previously been reported. A concurrent degradation of the three immunoglobulins was revealed in 38 strains; degradation of two of them was revealed in 54 strains, and degradation of only one of them was revealed in 9 strains. One strain failed to degrade any of the immunoglobulins. Correlations were not found between the ability of the S. pneumoniae strains to degrade S-IgA, IgG, or IgM and the serotype affiliation or between the ability to degrade IgG or IgM and the origin of strains. However, the ability to degrade S-IgA was evident more often in strains isolated from symptomless carriers and from bronchial secretions of patients with acute pneumonia than it was in strains from patients with acute meningitis or acute otitis media or from the blood of patients with acute pneumonia. These latter findings may indicate a biological significance of S-IgA-degrading ability in bacterial colonization of mucosal surfaces. Images PMID:6368393

  8. Adjunctive Dexamethasone in HIV-Associated Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, J.; Wolbers, M.; Kibengo, F.M.; Ggayi, A.-B.M.; Kamali, A.; Cuc, N.T.K.; Binh, T.Q.; Chau, N.V.V.; Farrar, J.; Merson, L.; Phuong, L.; Thwaites, G.; Van Kinh, N.; Thuy, P.T.; Chierakul, W.; Siriboon, S.; Thiansukhon, E.; Onsanit, S.; Supphamongkholchaikul, W.; Chan, A.K.; Heyderman, R.; Mwinjiwa, E.; van Oosterhout, J.J.; Imran, D.; Basri, H.; Mayxay, M.; Dance, D.; Phimmasone, P.; Rattanavong, S.; Lalloo, D.G.; Day, J.N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cryptococcal meningitis associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes more than 600,000 deaths each year worldwide. Treatment has changed little in 20 years, and there are no imminent new anticryptococcal agents. The use of adjuvant glucocorticoids reduces mortality among patients with other forms of meningitis in some populations, but their use is untested in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. METHODS In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we recruited adult patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Laos, Uganda, and Malawi. All the patients received either dexamethasone or placebo for 6 weeks, along with combination antifungal therapy with amphotericin B and fluconazole. RESULTS The trial was stopped for safety reasons after the enrollment of 451 patients. Mortality was 47% in the dexamethasone group and 41% in the placebo group by 10 weeks (hazard ratio in the dexamethasone group, 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 1.47; P = 0.45) and 57% and 49%, respectively, by 6 months (hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.53; P = 0.20). The percentage of patients with disability at 10 weeks was higher in the dexamethasone group than in the placebo group, with 13% versus 25% having a prespecified good outcome (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.69; P<0.001). Clinical adverse events were more common in the dexamethasone group than in the placebo group (667 vs. 494 events, P = 0.01), with more patients in the dexamethasone group having grade 3 or 4 infection (48 vs. 25 patients, P = 0.003), renal events (22 vs. 7, P = 0.004), and cardiac events (8 vs. 0, P = 0.004). Fungal clearance in cerebrospinal fluid was slower in the dexamethasone group. Results were consistent across Asian and African sites. CONCLUSIONS Dexamethasone did not reduce mortality among patients with HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis and was associated with more adverse events and disability

  9. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  10. Epidemic meningitis due to Group A Neisseria meningitidis in the African meningitis belt: a persistent problem with an imminent solution.

    PubMed

    Marc LaForce, F; Ravenscroft, Neil; Djingarey, Mamoudou; Viviani, Simonetta

    2009-06-24

    Epidemic meningitis in Africa remains an important and unresolved public health problem. Bacteriologic and epidemiologic data collected over the past 30 years have consistently established the importance of Group A Neisseria meningitidis as the dominant etiologic agent. The meningococcal Group A capsule is the major virulence factor; it is a polysaccharide comprised of a repeating unit of partly O-acetylated alpha-1,6-linked N-acetylmannosamine phosphate. Meningitis epidemics occur annually during the dry season (January to May) and stop with the first rains. Until now, control of these meningitis epidemics has relied on a reactive vaccination strategy with polysaccharide vaccines that is logistically complicated and has not put an end to recurrent epidemics. A meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVac) has been developed and tested in Phase II clinical trials in Africa. The vaccine has been shown to be safe and to generate a sustained immunologic response with functional antibody 20 times higher than that seen with polysaccharide vaccine. Widespread use of such a vaccine is likely to generate herd immunity and to put an end to Group A meningococcal epidemics. PMID:19477559

  11. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  12. Galactose metabolism by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Abranches, Jacqueline; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Burne, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    The galK gene, encoding galactokinase of the Leloir pathway, was insertionally inactivated in Streptococcus mutans UA159. The galK knockout strain displayed only marginal growth on galactose, but growth on glucose or lactose was not affected. In strain UA159, the sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) for lactose and the PTS for galactose were induced by growth in lactose and galactose, although galactose PTS activity was very low, suggesting that S. mutans does not have a galactose-specific PTS and that the lactose PTS may transport galactose, albeit poorly. To determine if the galactose growth defect of the galK mutant could be overcome by enhancing lactose PTS activity, the gene encoding a putative repressor of the operon for lactose PTS and phospho-beta-galactosidase, lacR, was insertionally inactivated. A galK and lacR mutant still could not grow on galactose, although the strain had constitutively elevated lactose PTS activity. The glucose PTS activity of lacR mutants grown in glucose was lower than in the wild-type strain, revealing an influence of LacR or the lactose PTS on the regulation of the glucose PTS. Mutation of the lacA gene of the tagatose pathway caused impaired growth in lactose and galactose, suggesting that galactose can only be efficiently utilized when both the Leloir and tagatose pathways are functional. A mutation of the permease in the multiple sugar metabolism operon did not affect growth on galactose. Thus, the galactose permease of S. mutans is not present in the gal, lac, or msm operons. PMID:15466549

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae NanC

    PubMed Central

    Owen, C. David; Lukacik, Petra; Potter, Jane A.; Sleator, Olivia; Taylor, Garry L.; Walsh, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen that causes a range of disease states. Sialidases are important bacterial virulence factors. There are three pneumococcal sialidases: NanA, NanB, and NanC. NanC is an unusual sialidase in that its primary reaction product is 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac2en, also known as DANA), a nonspecific hydrolytic sialidase inhibitor. The production of Neu5Ac2en from α2–3-linked sialosides by the catalytic domain is confirmed within a crystal structure. A covalent complex with 3-fluoro-β-N-acetylneuraminic acid is also presented, suggesting a common mechanism with other sialidases up to the final step of product formation. A conformation change in an active site hydrophobic loop on ligand binding constricts the entrance to the active site. In addition, the distance between the catalytic acid/base (Asp-315) and the ligand anomeric carbon is unusually short. These features facilitate a novel sialidase reaction in which the final step of product formation is direct abstraction of the C3 proton by the active site aspartic acid, forming Neu5Ac2en. NanC also possesses a carbohydrate-binding module, which is shown to bind α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialosides, as well as N-acetylneuraminic acid, which is captured in the crystal structure following hydration of Neu5Ac2en by NanC. Overall, the pneumococcal sialidases show remarkable mechanistic diversity while maintaining a common structural scaffold. PMID:26370075

  14. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century: A Systematic Review of 111 Cases (2000-2013).

    PubMed

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n = 2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4-12.9; P < 0.01). Valve surgery was protective (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04-0.4; P < 0.01). Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly affects native aortic

  15. Characteristics and Outcome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis in the XXI Century: A Systematic Review of 111 Cases (2000-2013).

    PubMed

    de Egea, Viviana; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; de Alarcón, Arístides; Lepe, José Antonio; Miró, José M; Gálvez-Acebal, Juan; García-Pavía, Pablo; Navas, Enrique; Goenaga, Miguel Angel; Fariñas, María Carmen; Vázquez, Elisa García; Marín, Mercedes; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an infrequent cause of severe infectious endocarditis (IE). The aim of our study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical and microbiological characteristics, and outcome of a series of cases of S. pneumoniae IE diagnosed in Spain and in a series of cases published since 2000 in the medical literature. We prospectively collected all cases of IE diagnosed in a multicenter cohort of patients from 27 Spanish hospitals (n = 2539). We also performed a systematic review of the literature since 2000 and retrieved all cases with complete clinical data using a pre-established protocol. Predictors of mortality were identified using a logistic regression model. We collected 111 cases of pneumococcal IE: 24 patients from the Spanish cohort and 87 cases from the literature review. Median age was 51 years, and 23 patients (20.7%) were under 15 years. Men accounted for 64% of patients, and infection was community-acquired in 96.4% of cases. The most important underlying conditions were liver disease (27.9%) and immunosuppression (10.8%). A predisposing heart condition was present in only 18 patients (16.2%). Pneumococcal IE affected a native valve in 93.7% of patients. Left-sided endocarditis predominated (aortic valve 53.2% and mitral valve 40.5%). The microbiological diagnosis was obtained from blood cultures in 84.7% of cases. In the Spanish cohort, nonsusceptibility to penicillin was detected in 4.2%. The most common clinical manifestations included fever (71.2%), a new heart murmur (55%), pneumonia (45.9%), meningitis (40.5%), and Austrian syndrome (26.1%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 47.7% of patients. The in-hospital mortality rate was 20.7%. The multivariate analysis revealed the independent risk factors for mortality to be meningitis (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.4-12.9; P < 0.01). Valve surgery was protective (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04-0.4; P < 0.01). Streptococcus pneumoniae IE is a community-acquired disease that mainly affects native aortic

  16. Risk Factors of Streptococcus suis Infection in Vietnam. A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dang Trung Nghia; Le, Thi Phuong Tu; Wolbers, Marcel; Cao, Quang Thai; Nguyen, Van Minh Hoang; Tran, Vu Thieu Nga; Le, Thi Phuong Thao; Nguyen, Hoan Phu; Tran, Thi Hong Chau; Dinh, Xuan Sinh; To, Song Diep; Hoang, Thi Thanh Hang; Hoang, Truong; Campbell, James; Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau; Nguyen, Tran Chinh; Nguyen, Van Dung; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Spratt, Brian G.; Tran, Tinh Hien; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis infection, an emerging zoonosis, is an increasing public health problem across South East Asia and the most common cause of acute bacterial meningitis in adults in Vietnam. Little is known of the risk factors underlying the disease. Methods and Findings A case-control study with appropriate hospital and matched community controls for each patient was conducted between May 2006 and June 2009. Potential risk factors were assessed using a standardized questionnaire and investigation of throat and rectal S. suis carriage in cases, controls and their pigs, using real-time PCR and culture of swab samples. We recruited 101 cases of S. suis meningitis, 303 hospital controls and 300 community controls. By multivariate analysis, risk factors identified for S. suis infection as compared to either control group included eating “high risk” dishes, including such dishes as undercooked pig blood and pig intestine (OR1 = 2.22; 95%CI = [1.15–4.28] and OR2 = 4.44; 95%CI = [2.15–9.15]), occupations related to pigs (OR1 = 3.84; 95%CI = [1.32–11.11] and OR2 = 5.52; 95%CI = [1.49–20.39]), and exposures to pigs or pork in the presence of skin injuries (OR1 = 7.48; 95%CI = [1.97–28.44] and OR2 = 15.96; 95%CI = [2.97–85.72]). S. suis specific DNA was detected in rectal and throat swabs of 6 patients and was cultured from 2 rectal samples, but was not detected in such samples of 1522 healthy individuals or patients without S. suis infection. Conclusions This case control study, the largest prospective epidemiological assessment of this disease, has identified the most important risk factors associated with S. suis bacterial meningitis to be eating ‘high risk’ dishes popular in parts of Asia, occupational exposure to pigs and pig products, and preparation of pork in the presence of skin lesions. These risk factors can be addressed in public health campaigns aimed at preventing S. suis infection

  17. The Streptococcus suis transcriptional landscape reveals adaptation mechanisms in pig blood and cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zongfu; Wu, Chunyan; Shao, Jing; Zhu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Weixue; Zhang, Wenwei; Tang, Min; Pei, Na; Fan, Hongjie; Li, Jiguang; Yao, Huochun; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Xun; Lu, Chengping

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen of pigs, and it is also recognized as a zoonotic agent for humans. SS infection may result in septicemia or meningitis in the host. However, little is known about genes that contribute to the virulence process and survival within host blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Small RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as key regulators of virulence in several bacteria, but they have not been investigated in SS. Here, using a differential RNA-sequencing approach and RNAs from SS strain P1/7 grown in rich medium, pig blood, or CSF, we present the SS genome-wide map of 793 transcriptional start sites and 370 operons. In addition to identifying 29 sRNAs, we show that five sRNA deletion mutants attenuate SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Homology searches revealed that 10 sRNAs were predicted to be present in other pathogenic Streptococcus species. Compared with wild-type strain P1/7, sRNAs rss03, rss05, and rss06 deletion mutants were significantly more sensitive to killing by pig blood. It is possible that rss06 contributes to SS virulence by indirectly activating expression of SSU0308, a virulence gene encoding a zinc-binding lipoprotein. In blood, genes involved in the synthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and subversion of host defenses were up-regulated. In contrast, in CSF, genes for CPS synthesis were down-regulated. Our study is the first analysis of SS sRNAs involved in virulence and has both improved our understanding of SS pathogenesis and increased the number of sRNAs known to play definitive roles in bacterial virulence. PMID:24759092

  18. Antagonistic action of Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Darling, C L; Hart, G D

    1976-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus faecalis were found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Löwenstein-Jensen and Middlebrook 7H11 agars, but not on the latter medium when antibacterial drugs were added. S. faecalis was found to be more inhibitory than S. salivarius to 15 strains of M. tuberculosis. S. salivarius produced little or no inhibition of growth of Runyon group III organisms but was very antagonistic to Runyon group I mycobacteria. Images PMID:824304

  19. Rose Bengal plate agglutination and counterimmunoelectrophoresis tests on spinal fluid in the diagnosis of Brucella meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, R; Maraví-Poma, E; Delgado, G; Rivero, A

    1978-01-01

    Rose Bengal and counterimmunoelectrophoresis, two tests that detect antibodies against different structural antigens, when carried out on spinal fluid permitted rapid diagnosis of human Brucella meningitis. The Rose Bengal test was positive in five out of five patients studied, and counterimmunoelectrophoresis was positive in all but one. The Brucella meningitis was characterized by an increase of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:632350

  20. A case of Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis in a patient with abnormal levels of isolated immunological markers.

    PubMed

    Simsek, B; Guven, E; Gumral, R; Mert, G; Saracli, M A; Besirbellioglu, B; Yildiran, S T

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is considered rare in immunocompetent patients and is mainly a disease of immunocompromised patients. We report a case of cryptococcal meningitis, due to Cryptococcus neoformans, in an apparently healthy individual with abnormal levels of isolated immunological markers. Regardless of the patient's immune status, the result of the disease can be serious unless the disease is diagnosed early. PMID:27402508

  1. Bordetella holmesii meningitis in a 12-year-old anorectic girl.

    PubMed

    Van Balen, Tessa; Nieman, An-Emmie; Hermans, Mirjam H A; Schneeberger, Peter M; de Vries, Esther

    2012-04-01

    We describe a 12-year-old anorectic girl with Bordetella holmesii meningitis, the techniques used for its identification, and minimum inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics for 7 B. Holmesii strains collected in the Netherlands during the past 12 years. B. holmesii meningitis has not been previously reported.

  2. Herpes zoster and meningitis due to reactivation of varicella vaccine virus in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Young; Hanson, David C; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-03-01

    Neurologic complications from varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation are rare. In this article, we describe a previously immunized child who developed herpes zoster with meningitis. Vaccine strain of VZV was recovered from a skin swab and the cerebrospinal fluid. Reactivation of the vaccine strain of VZV should be recognized as a potential cause of meningitis in children.

  3. Vaccine-induced waning of Haemophilus influenzae empyema and meningitis, Angola.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Monteiro, Lurdes; Silvestre, Silvia da Conceição; Anjos, Elizabete; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Pitkäranta, Anne; Roine, Irmeli

    2014-11-01

    In Angola during 2003-2012, we detected Haemophilus influenzae in 18% of 2,634 and 26% of 2,996 bacteriologically positive pleural or cerebrospinal fluid samples, respectively, from children. After vaccination launch in 2006, H. influenzae empyema declined by 83% and meningitis by 86%. Severe H. influenzae pneumonia and meningitis are preventable by vaccination.

  4. Neuroinfections complicating foreign body implants after perinatal trauma or meningitis in 60 children.

    PubMed

    Rudinsky, B; Bauer, F; Kalavsky, M; Huttova, M; Sramka, M; Kalavsky, E; Benca, J; Karvaj, M; Jarcuska, P; Liskova, A; Kralinsky, K; Ondrusova, A; Taziarova, M; Pevalova, L; Kovac, M; Miklosko, Jozef

    2007-06-01

    Meningitis after artificial implants in 60 children, mainly after foreign body infections (FBI) was caused more frequently by coagulase negative staphylococci and Ps. aeruginosa than other organisms and was significantly associated with perinatal trauma, hydrocephalus, haemorrhage or VLBW and had more neurologic sequels despite mortality was similar to other nosocomial meningitis.

  5. Place of Colistin-Rifampicin Association in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Meningitis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Souhail, Dahraoui; Bouchra, Belefquih; Belarj, Badia; Laila, Rar; Mohammed, Frikh; Nassirou, Oumarou Mamane; Azeddine, Ibrahimi; Haimeur, Charki; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is an important challenge due to the accumulation of resistance of this bacteria and low meningeal diffusion of several antimicrobial requiring use of an antimicrobial effective combination to eradicate these species. We report a case of Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant nosocomial meningitis which was successfully treated with intravenous and intrathecal colistin associated with rifampicin. PMID:27064923

  6. Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov., isolated from oral cavities of elephants.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-09-01

    Four Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped organisms were isolated from elephant oral cavities. The isolates were tentatively identified as streptococcal species based on the results of biochemical tests. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the organisms to be members of the genus Streptococcus. Two isolates (NUM 6304(T) and NUM 6312) were related most closely to Streptococcus salivarius with 96.8 % and 93.1 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA gene and the RNA polymerase β subunit encoding gene (rpoB), respectively, and to Streptococcus vestibularis with 83.7 % similarity based on the 60 kDa heat-shock protein gene (groEL). The other two isolates (NUM 6306(T) and NUM 6318) were related most closely to S. vestibularis with 97.0 % and 82.9 % similarity based on the 16S rRNA and groEL genes, respectively, and to S. salivarius with 93.5 % similarity based on the rpoB gene. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, these isolates are suggested to represent novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus loxodontisalivarius sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6304(T) = JCM 19287(T) = DSM 27382(T)) and Streptococcus saliviloxodontae sp. nov. (type strain NUM 6306(T) = JCM 19288(T) = DSM 27513(T)) are proposed.

  7. Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov., isolated from raw camel milk.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Zaina; Amar, Mohamed; Ouadghiri, Mouna; Cnockaert, Margo; Aerts, Maarten; El Farricha, Omar; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Two catalase- and oxidase-negative Streptococcus-like strains, LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T), were isolated from raw camel milk in Morocco. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing assigned these bacteria to the genus Streptococcus with Streptococcus rupicaprae 2777-2-07(T) as their closest phylogenetic neighbour (95.9% and 95.7% similarity, respectively). 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between the two strains was 96.7%. Although strains LMG 27682(T) and LMG 27684(T) shared a DNA-DNA hybridization value that corresponded to the threshold level for species delineation (68%), the two strains could be distinguished by multiple biochemical tests, sequence analysis of the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthase (pheS), RNA polymerase (rpoA) and ATP synthase (atpA) genes and by their MALDI-TOF MS profiles. On the basis of these considerable phenotypic and genotypic differences, we propose to classify both strains as novel species of the genus Streptococcus, for which the names Streptococcus moroccensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27682(T)  = CCMM B831(T)) and Streptococcus rifensis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27684(T)  = CCMM B833(T)) are proposed.

  8. Assessments for the impact of mineral dust on the meningitis incidence in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, Nadège; Chiapello, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Recently, mineral dust has been suspected to be one of the important environmental risk factor for meningitis epidemics in West Africa. The current study is one of the first which relies on long-term robust aerosol measurements in the Sahel region to investigate the possible impact of mineral dust on meningitis cases (incidence). Sunphotometer measurements, which allow to derive aerosol and humidity parameters, i.e., aerosol optical thickness, Angström coefficient, and precipitable water, are combined with quantitative epidemiological data in Niger and Mali over the 2004-2009 AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program period. We analyse how the extremely high aerosol loads in this region may influence both the calendar (onset, peaks, end) and the intensity of meningitis. We highlight three distinct periods: (i) from November to December, beginning of the dry season, humidity is weak, there is no dust and no meningitis cases; (ii) from January to April, humidity is still weak, but high dust loads occur in the atmosphere and this is the meningitis season; (iii) from May to October, humidity is high and there is no meningitis anymore, in presence of dust or not, which flow anyway in higher altitudes. More specifically, the onset of the meningitis season is tightly related to mineral dust flowing close to the surface at the very beginning of the year. During the dry, and the most dusty season period, from February to April, each meningitis peak is preceded by a dust peak, with a 0-2 week lead-time. The importance (duration, intensity) of these meningitis peaks seems to be related to that of dust, suggesting that a cumulative effect in dust events may be important for the meningitis incidence. This is not the case for humidity, confirming the special contribution of dust at this period of the year. The end of the meningitis season, in May, coincides with a change in humidity conditions related to the West African Monsoon. These results, which are

  9. Meningeal afferent signaling and the pathophysiology of migraine.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Vega, Carolina; Moy, Jamie; Dussor, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder. Attacks are complex and consist of multiple phases but are most commonly characterized by intense, unilateral, throbbing headache. The pathophysiology contributing to migraine is poorly understood and the disorder is not well managed with currently available therapeutics, often rendering patients disabled during attacks. The mechanisms most likely to contribute to the pain phase of migraine require activation of trigeminal afferent signaling from the cranial meninges and subsequent relay of nociceptive information into the central nervous system in a region of the dorsal brainstem known as the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Events leading to activation of meningeal afferents are unclear, but nerve endings within this tissue are mechanosensitive and also express a variety of ion channels including acid-sensing ion channels and transient receptor-potential channels. These properties may provide clues into the pathophysiology of migraine by suggesting that decreased extracellular pH and environmental irritant exposure in the meninges contributes to headache. Neuroplasticity is also likely to play a role in migraine given that attacks are triggered by routine events that are typically nonnoxious in healthy patients and clear evidence of sensitization occurs during an attack. Where and how plasticity develops is also not clear but may include events directly on the afferents and/or within the TNC. Among the mediators potentially contributing to plasticity, calcitonin gene-related peptide has received the most attention within the migraine field but other mechanisms may also contribute. Ultimately, greater understanding of the molecules and mechanisms contributing to migraine will undoubtedly lead to better therapeutics and relief for the large number of patients across the globe who suffer from this highly disabling neurological disorder.

  10. [Community-acquired Pseudomonas stutzeri meningitis in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Sünbül, Mustafa; Zivalioğlu, Muammer; Taşdelen Fişgin, Nuriye

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri which is an aerobic, non-fermentative gram-negative bacillus frequently found in soil, water and hospital environment, rarely leads to serious community-acquired infections. In this report a case of community-acquired meningitis due to P. stutzeri was presented. A 73-years-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of nausea, vomiting, headache, dizziness, difficulties in walking and speaking and loss of consciousness. There was no history of an underlying disease or immunosuppression. Physical examination revealed nuchal rigidity, however, Kernig and Brudzinski signs were negative. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 0.4 mg/dl glucose (simultaneous blood glucose 145 mg/dl), and 618 mg/dl protein and 640 leucocyte/mm3 (90% PMNL). No bacteria were detected in Gram stained and Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stained CSF smears. Upon the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis, treatment with ceftriaxone and ampicillin was initiated, however, the patient died after 16 hours of hospitalization. CSF culture yielded the growth of gram-negative oxidase-positive bacteria and the isolate was identified as P. stutzeri by Vitek-2 Compact system (bioMerieux, France). The isolate was found to be sensitive to piperacillin/tazobactam, amikacin, gentamycin, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem and meropenem. Since the patient was lost due to acute respiratory and cardiac failure, it was not possible to change the therapy to agent specific therapy. In conclusion, it should always be kept in mind that uncommon agents could lead to community-acquired meningitis in elderly patients and empirical treatment protocols might fail in such cases resulting in high morbidity and mortality. PMID:19334394

  11. C1 inhibitor treatment improves host defense in pneumococcal meningitis in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; van der Poll, Tom; Florquin, Sandrine; Polfliet, Machteld M J; van den Berg, Timo K; Dijkstra, Christine D; Roord, John J; Hack, C Erik; van Furth, A Marceline

    2007-07-01

    In spite of antibiotic treatment, pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The complement system is a key component of innate immunity against invading pathogens. However, activation of complement is also involved in tissue damage, and complement inhibition by C1 inhibitor (C1-inh) is beneficial in animal models of endotoxemia and sepsis. In the present study, we demonstrate classical pathway complement activation during pneumococcal meningitis in rats. We also evaluate the effect of C1-inh treatment on clinical illness, bacterial clearance, and inflammatory responses in rats and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. C1-inh treatment was associated with reduced clinical illness, a less-pronounced inflammatory infiltrate around the meninges, and lower brain levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. C1-inh treatment increased bacterial clearance, possibly through an up-regulation of CR3. Hence, C1-inh may be a useful agent in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis.

  12. EDA-containing fibronectin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pupek, Małgorzata; Jasonek, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin containing an alternatively spliced extra domain A (EDA-FN) participates in diverse biological cell functions, being also directly or indirectly engaged during an inflammatory response to brain injury and/or neuron regeneration. We analyzed FN and EDA-FN isoform levels by ELISA in 85 cerebrospinal fluid samples and 67 plasma samples obtained from children suffering from bacterial or viral meningitis and non-meningitis peripheral inflammation. We have found that the cerebrospinal level of EDA-FN was significantly lower in the bacterial meningitis group than in the viral- and non-meningitis groups. In the patients' plasma, EDA-FN was almost undetectable. The determination of fibronectin containing the EDA segment might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker of bacterial meningitis in children.

  13. 9230 FECAL ENTEROCOCCUS/STREPTOCOCCUS GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1903 the genus name Enterococcus was proposed for gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccoid-shaped bacterial of intestinal origin. Several years later, it was suggested that the genus name be changed to Streptococcus because of the organisms' ability to form chains of coccoid...

  14. Nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae as an Otopathogen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Kaur, Ravinder; Casey, Janet R.; Sabharwal, Vishakha; Pelton, Stephen; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Among 34 Spn sequential isolates from middle ear fluid we found a case of a nontypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae (NT-Spn) in a child with AOM. The strain was pneumolysin PCR positive and capsule gene PCR negative. Virulence of the NT-Spn was confirmed in a chinchilla model of AOM. PMID:21251566

  15. Streptococcus-Zebrafish Model of Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Melody N.; Pfeifer, John D.; Caparon, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Due to its small size, rapid generation time, powerful genetic systems, and genomic resources, the zebrafish has emerged as an important model of vertebrate development and human disease. Its well-developed adaptive and innate cellular immune systems make the zebrafish an ideal model for the study of infectious diseases. With a natural and important pathogen of fish, Streptococcus iniae, we have established a streptococcus- zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis. Following injection into the dorsal muscle, zebrafish developed a lethal infection, with a 50% lethal dose of 103 CFU, and died within 2 to 3 days. The pathogenesis of infection resembled that of S. iniae in farmed fish populations and that of several important human streptococcal diseases and was characterized by an initial focal necrotic lesion that rapidly progressed to invasion of the pathogen into all major organ systems, including the brain. Zebrafish were also susceptible to infection by the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, disease was characterized by a marked absence of inflammation, large numbers of extracellular streptococci in the dorsal muscle, and extensive myonecrosis that occurred far in advance of any systemic invasion. The genetic systems available for streptococci, including a novel method of mutagenesis which targets genes whose products are exported, were used to identify several mutants attenuated for virulence in zebrafish. This combination of a genetically amenable pathogen with a well-defined vertebrate host makes the streptococcus-zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis a powerful model for analysis of infectious disease. PMID:12065534

  16. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders after streptococcus infection.

    PubMed

    Maini, Baljeet; Bathla, Manish; Dhanjal, Gurdeep S; Sharma, Prem D

    2012-10-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a group of disorders recently recognized as a clinical entity. A case of PANDAS is described here, which remitted after 1 month of treatment. Recent Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus infection should be considered in a child who presents with a sudden explosive onset of tics or obsessive compulsive symptoms. PMID:23372243

  17. Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Capsule In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Auger, Jean-Philippe; Meekhanon, Nattakan; Okura, Masatoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    Many Streptococcus suis isolates from porcine endocarditis in slaughterhouses have lost their capsule and are considered avirulent. However, we retrieved capsule- and virulence-recovered S. suis after in vivo passages of a nonencapsulated strain in mice, suggesting that nonencapsulated S. suis are still potentially hazardous for persons in the swine industry. PMID:27648583

  18. Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Capsule In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Jean-Philippe; Meekhanon, Nattakan; Okura, Masatoshi; Osaki, Makoto; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Many Streptococcus suis isolates from porcine endocarditis in slaughterhouses have lost their capsule and are considered avirulent. However, we retrieved capsule- and virulence-recovered S. suis after in vivo passages of a nonencapsulated strain in mice, suggesting that nonencapsulated S. suis are still potentially hazardous for persons in the swine industry. PMID:27648583

  19. Actinomyces meyeri meningitis: the need for anaerobic cerebrospinal fluid cultures.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Otsuka, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    We herein present a rare case of Actinomyces meyeri-induced meningitis that occurred in a patient of advanced age with poor oral hygiene. Although Gram staining of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed Gram-positive rods and a blood culture was positive for the organism, a bacterial culture of the CSF was negative. Anaerobic cultures of CSF specimens are not routinely performed; however, anaerobes are sometimes involved in central nervous system infection. We therefore believe that anaerobic cultures should be considered in high-risk cases, such as those involving necrotizing bowel lesions or poor oral hygiene. A negative result on a CSF culture can result in misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment.

  20. Isavuconazole Is Effective for the Treatment of Experimental Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Nathan P; Kovanda, Laura; Najvar, Laura K; Bocanegra, Rosie; Olivo, Marcos; Kirkpatrick, William R; Patterson, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of isavuconazole against cryptococcal meningitis. Treatment with either oral isavuconazole (120 mg/kg and 240 mg/kg twice a day [BID]) or fluconazole as the positive control significantly improved survival in mice infected intracranially with either Cryptococcus neoformans USC1597 or H99 and significantly reduced brain fungal burdens for both isolates. Concentrations of isavuconazole in plasma and brain tissue also demonstrated that the greatest improvements in survival and fungal burden were associated with elevated exposures. PMID:27324761

  1. Simultaneous genital ulcer and meningitis: a case of EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Jairo Tavares; Lopes, Leonardo da Costa; Prokopowitsch, Aleksander Snioka

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a broad spectrum of diseases, mainly because of its genomic characteristics, which result in different latency patterns in immune cells and infective mechanisms. The patient described in this report is a previously healthy young man who presented to the emergency department with clinical features consistent with meningitis and genital ulcers, which raised concern that the herpes simplex virus was the causative agent. However, the polymerase chain reaction of cerebral spinal fluid was positive for EBV. The authors highlight the importance of this infection among the differential diagnosis of central nervous system involvement and genital ulceration. PMID:27547743

  2. Imaging of the meninges and the extra-axial spaces.

    PubMed

    Kirmi, Olga; Sheerin, Fintan; Patel, Neel

    2009-12-01

    The separate meningeal layers and extraaxial spaces are complex and can only be differentiated by pathologic processes on imaging. Differentiation of the location of such processes can be achieved using different imaging modalities. In this pictorial review we address the imaging techniques, enhancement and location patterns, and disease spread that will promote accurate localization of the pathology, thus improving accuracy of diagnosis. Typical and unusual magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound imaging findings of many conditions affecting these layers and spaces are described.

  3. A Case of Tuberculous Meningitis with Atypical Multiple Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Hu, Z; Li, T

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This case describes a rare case of tuberculous meningitis. A 50-year old female presented with seven days of numbness on the left side, fatigue and a three-day headache. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed multiple lesions in the dorsal medulla and upper cervical spine. After admission, she developed a long-term fever, cranial nerves palsy and showed little response to corticosteroid, antibacterial and antiviral therapy. She received a diagnostic anti-tuberculous therapy (ATT); despite that, all examinations for tuberculosis were negative. After ATT lasting 16 days, she recovered and was discharged from hospital with slight asthenia and hypoesthesia. PMID:25867567

  4. Delayed liver metastasis of a meningeal solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Buccauw, Kurt; Sciot, Raf; Wolter, Pascal; Aerts, Raymond; Claus, Filip

    2011-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT's) are rare soft tissue neoplasms of mesenchymal origin, most commonly reported in the thoracic cavity. They exhibit an aggressive and infiltrative nature and have a tendency to recur either locally or distantly, the latter typically being a late event. Primary therapy consists of complete excision and prognosis is poor in case of recurrence. In this manuscript, we discuss the imaging features and treatment options for a patient presenting with delayed liver metastasis ten years after treatment for a meningeal SFT.

  5. From suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to confirmed histoplasma meningitis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Vivek; Khararjian, Armen; Wheat, Joseph; Zhang, Sean X; Crain, Barbara; Baras, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with chronic obstructive lung disease who was on steroids, presented to the hospital after a fall with subacute headaches and ataxia. During the patient's hospital course, his clinical condition deteriorated with myoclonic jerks, fevers and severe encephalopathy. An extensive workup, including EEG, brain MRI and lumbar puncture, revealed possible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Unfortunately, the patient failed to improve and died 12 days after admission. A brain-only autopsy revealed he had acute histoplasma meningitis with patchy superficial cerebritis. PMID:27389723

  6. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome secondary to tubercular meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Kunal Kishor; Singh, Satyajeet Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Arora, Charu Dutt

    2016-01-01

    Tubercular meningitis (TBM) is a devastating extra pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and demonstrates a high neurological morbidity. A rare complication of this condition is Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS), which is a neurobehavioral disorder characterised by hyper-sexuality, visual agnosia, bulimia, placidity, hyperorality and memory deficits caused by lesions to the amygdala. The amygdala lesions can be due to many causes, including traumatic brain injury, systemic conditions and infections such as tuberculosis. Here, we present a case of partial KBS in a patient undergoing treatment for TBM. PMID:27530874

  7. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome secondary to tubercular meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Kunal Kishor; Singh, Satyajeet Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Arora, Charu Dutt

    2016-08-16

    Tubercular meningitis (TBM) is a devastating extra pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and demonstrates a high neurological morbidity. A rare complication of this condition is Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS), which is a neurobehavioral disorder characterised by hyper-sexuality, visual agnosia, bulimia, placidity, hyperorality and memory deficits caused by lesions to the amygdala. The amygdala lesions can be due to many causes, including traumatic brain injury, systemic conditions and infections such as tuberculosis. Here, we present a case of partial KBS in a patient undergoing treatment for TBM.

  8. Revisitingmolecular serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ninety-two Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes have been described so far, but the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduced in the Brazilian basic vaccination schedule in 2010 covers only the ten most prevalent in the country. Pneumococcal serotype-shifting after massive immunization is a major concern and monitoring this phenomenon requires efficient and accessible serotyping methods. Pneumococcal serotyping based on antisera produced in animals is laborious and restricted to a few reference laboratories. Alternatively, molecular serotyping methods assess polymorphisms in the cps gene cluster, which encodes key enzymes for capsular polysaccharides synthesis in pneumococci. In one such approach, cps-RFLP, the PCR amplified cps loci are digested with an endonuclease, generating serotype-specific fingerprints on agarose gel electrophoresis. Methods In this work, in silico and in vitro approaches were combined to demonstrate that XhoII is the most discriminating endonuclease for cps-RFLP, and to build a database of serotype-specific fingerprints that accommodates the genetic diversity within the cps locus of 92 known pneumococci serotypes. Results The expected specificity of cps-RFLP using XhoII was 76% for serotyping and 100% for serogrouping. The database of cps-RFLP fingerprints was integrated to Molecular Serotyping Tool (MST), a previously published web-based software for molecular serotyping. In addition, 43 isolates representing 29 serotypes prevalent in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2007 to 2013, were examined in vitro; 11 serotypes (nine serogroups) matched the respective in silico patterns calculated for reference strains. The remaining experimental patterns, despite their resemblance to their expected in silico patterns, did not reach the threshold of similarity score to be considered a match and were then added to the database. Conclusion The cps-RFLP method with XhoII outperformed the antisera-based and other molecular serotyping

  9. The meninges contribute to the conditioned taste avoidance induced by neural cooling in male rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Chambers, Kathleen C

    2002-08-21

    After consumption of a novel sucrose solution, temporary cooling of neural areas that mediate conditioned taste avoidance can itself induce conditioned avoidance to the sucrose. It has been suggested that this effect is either a result of inactivation of neurons in these areas or of cooling the meninges. In a series of studies, we demonstrated that cooling the outer layer of the meninges, the dura mater, does not contribute to the conditioned taste avoidance induced by cooling any of these areas. The present experiments were designed to determine whether the inner layers of the meninges are involved. If they are involved, then one would expect that cooling locations in the brain that do not mediate conditioned taste avoidance, such as the caudate putamen (CP), would induce conditioned taste avoidance as long as the meninges were cooled as well. One also would expect that cooling neural tissue without cooling the meninges would reduce the strength of the conditioned taste avoidance. Experiment 1 established that the temperature of the neural tissue and meninges around the cold probes implanted in the CP were cooled to temperatures that have been shown to block synaptic transmission. Experiment 2 demonstrated that cooling the caudate putamen and overlying cortex and meninges induced conditioned taste avoidance. In experiment 3, a circle of meninges was cut away so that the caudate putamen and overlying cortex could be cooled without cooling the meninges. The strength of the conditioned taste avoidance was substantially reduced, but it was not entirely eliminated. These data support the hypothesis that cooling the meninges contributes to the conditioned taste avoidance induced by neural cooling. They also allow the possibility that neural inactivation produces physiological changes that can induce conditioned taste avoidance.

  10. Nucleotide homeostasis and purinergic nociceptive signaling in rat meninges in migraine-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Yegutkin, Gennady G; Guerrero-Toro, Cindy; Kilinc, Erkan; Koroleva, Kseniya; Ishchenko, Yevheniia; Abushik, Polina; Giniatullina, Raisa; Fayuk, Dmitriy; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Extracellular ATP is suspected to contribute to migraine pain but regulatory mechanisms controlling pro-nociceptive purinergic mechanisms in the meninges remain unknown. We studied the peculiarities of metabolic and signaling pathways of ATP and its downstream metabolites in rat meninges and in cultured trigeminal cells exposed to the migraine mediator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Under resting conditions, meningeal ATP and ADP remained at low nanomolar levels, whereas extracellular AMP and adenosine concentrations were one-two orders higher. CGRP increased ATP and ADP levels in meninges and trigeminal cultures and reduced adenosine concentration in trigeminal cells. Degradation rates for exogenous nucleotides remained similar in control and CGRP-treated meninges, indicating that CGRP triggers nucleotide release without affecting nucleotide-inactivating pathways. Lead nitrate-based enzyme histochemistry of whole mount meninges revealed the presence of high ATPase, ADPase, and AMPase activities, primarily localized in the medial meningeal artery. ATP and ADP induced large intracellular Ca(2+) transients both in neurons and in glial cells whereas AMP and adenosine were ineffective. In trigeminal glia, ATP partially operated via P2X7 receptors. ATP, but not other nucleotides, activated nociceptive spikes in meningeal trigeminal nerve fibers providing a rationale for high degradation rate of pro-nociceptive ATP. Pro-nociceptive effect of ATP in meningeal nerves was reproduced by α,β-meATP operating via P2X3 receptors. Collectively, extracellular ATP, which level is controlled by CGRP, can persistently activate trigeminal nerves in meninges which considered as the origin site of migraine headache. These data are consistent with the purinergic hypothesis of migraine pain and suggest new targets against trigeminal pain.

  11. Spontaneous gram-negative bacillary meningitis in adult patients: characteristics and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous meningitis caused by gram-negative bacilli in adult patients is uncommon and poorly characterized. Our objective is to describe and compare the characteristics and the outcome of adult patients with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis (GNBM) and spontaneous meningitis due to other pathogens. Methods Prospective single hospital-based observational cohort study conducted between 1982 and 2006 in a university tertiary hospital in Barcelona (Spain). The Main Outcome Measure: In-hospital mortality. Results Gram-negative bacilli meningitis was diagnosed in 40 (7%) of 544 episodes of spontaneous acute bacterial meningitis. The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas species. On admission, characteristics associated with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis by multivariate modeling were advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition of infection, urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection, absence of rash, hypotension, and a high cerebrospinal fluid white-cell count. Nine (23%) episodes were acquired in the hospital and they were most commonly caused by Pseudomonas. The in-hospital mortality rate was 53%. The mortality rate was higher among patients with Gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitis and their risk of death was twenty times higher than among patients infected with Neisseria meningitidis (odds ratio 20.47; 95% confidence interval 4.03-103.93; p<0.001). Conclusions Gram-negative bacilli cause 9% of spontaneous bacterial meningitis of known etiology in adults. Characteristics associated with GNBM include advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition, and urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection. The mortality rate is higher among patients with gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitides. PMID:24079517

  12. Childhood pyogenic meningitis: clinical and investigative indicators of etiology and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Abdul-Wahab B. R.; Adedoyin, Olanrewaju T.; Abdul-Karim, Aishat A.; Olanrewaju, Abdul-Waheed I.

    2007-01-01

    The relevant parameters of 71 consecutive pediatric admissions for pyogenic meningitis at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, were analyzed to identify possible clinical and nonmicrobiologic investigative clues of disease etiology and mortality. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was Gram-smear positive (GSP) in 41 (57.6%) of the 71 cases. Twenty-three (56.1%) had Gram-positive cocci (GPC), 14 (34.2%) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and three (7.3%) Gram-negative diplococci (GND). The respective mean ages of GPC, GNB and GND cases were 4.49 +/- 5.3, 3.06 +/- 4.8 and 4.47 +/-4.9 years. Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 22 (78.6%) of the 28 CSF isolates (p=0.00), Haemophilus influenzae for two (7.1%) cases and Neisseria meningitides in one (3.5%). Anemia was significantly more common among GSP cases (p=0.04), as was convulsion among those with GNB-positive smears (p=0.03) and a bulging fontanelle in the Gram-smear-negative category. Otherwise, the prevalence and resolution times of the other clinical parameters were comparable across the etiological categories. There were 30 deaths (42.3%) among which GNB-positive cases had significantly shorter stay (p=0.045). Mortality was significantly higher in those with an abnormal respiratory rhythm at admission (p=0.04), purulent/turbid CSF (p=0.03), CSF protein of >150 mg/dl (p=0.02) and glucose <1 mg/dl (p=0.047). Our findings highlight the inherent limitations of predicting the etiology of pediatric meningitides from the clinical parameters as well as the poor prognostic import of respiratory dysrhythmia and a profoundly deranged CSF protein and glucose. The etiological burden of GPC/S. pneumoniae in childhood meningitides in sub-Saharan Africa, the propensity of GNB/H. influenzae for quick fatality and the need for the relevant preventive vaccines are expounded in the discussion. PMID:17722674

  13. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine. PMID:26558118

  14. Genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 isolated from pigs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Doto, Daniela Sabatini; Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Calderaro, Franco Ferraro; Matajira, Carlos Emilio Cabrera; de Moura Gomes, Vasco Tulio; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Mesquita, Renan Elias; Timenetsky, Jorge; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes septicemia, meningitis, arthritis, and pneumonia in swine and humans. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of S. suis serotype 2 isolated from pigs showing signs of illness in Brazil using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), single-enzyme amplified fragment length polymorphism (SE-AFLP), and profiling of virulence-associated markers. A total of 110 isolates were studied, 62.7% of which were isolated from the central nervous system and 19.1% from the respiratory tract. Eight genotypes were obtained from the combination of virulence genes, with 43.6% and 5.5% frequencies for the mrp (+) /epf (+) /sly (+) and mrp (-) /epf (-) /sly (-) genotypes, respectively. The presence of isolates with epf gene variation with higher molecular weight also appears to be a characteristic of Brazilian S. suis serotype 2. The PFGE and SE-AFLP were able to type all isolates and, although they presented a slight tendency to cluster according to state and year of isolation, it was also evident the grouping of different herds in the same PFGE subtype and the existence of isolates originated from the same herd classified into distinct subtypes. No further correlation between the isolation sites and mrp/epf/sly genotypes was observed. PMID:27127337

  15. A Zebrafish Larval Model to Assess Virulence of Porcine Streptococcus suis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Edoardo; Cao, Rui; Wells, Jerry M.; van Baarlen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an encapsulated Gram-positive bacterium, and the leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in young pigs resulting in considerable economic losses in the porcine industry. It is also considered an emerging zoonotic agent. In the environment, both avirulent and virulent strains occur in pigs, and virulent strains appear to cause disease in both humans and pigs. There is a need for a convenient, reliable and standardized animal model to assess S. suis virulence. A zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infection model has several advantages, including transparency of larvae, low cost, ease of use and exemption from ethical legislation up to 6 days post fertilization, but has not been previously established as a model for S. suis. Microinjection of different porcine strains of S. suis in zebrafish larvae resulted in highly reproducible dose- and strain-dependent larval death, strongly correlating with presence of the S. suis capsule and to the original virulence of the strain in pigs. Additionally we compared the virulence of the two-component system mutant of ciaRH, which is attenuated for virulence in both mice and pigs in vivo. Infection of larvae with the ΔciaRH strain resulted in significantly higher survival rate compared to infection with the S10 wild-type strain. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a rapid and reliable model to assess the virulence of clinical porcine S. suis isolates. PMID:26999052

  16. Response of swine spleen to Streptococcus suis infection revealed by transcription analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Astract Background Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2), a major swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent, has greatly challenged global public health. Systematical information about host immune response to the infection is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of diseases. Results 104 and 129 unique genes were significantly up-regulated and down-regulated in the spleens of pigs infected with SS2 (WT). The up-regulated genes were principally related to immune response, such as genes involved in inflammatory response; acute-phase/immune response; cell adhesion and response to stress. The down-regulated genes were mainly involved in transcription, transport, material and energy metabolism which were representative of the reduced vital activity of SS2-influenced cells. Only a few genes showed significantly differential expression when comparing avirulent isogenic strain (ΔHP0197) with mock-infected samples. Conclusions Our findings indicated that highly pathogenic SS2 could persistently induce cytokines mainly by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) pathway, and the phagocytosis-resistant bacteria could induce high level of cytokines and secrete toxins to destroy deep tissues, and cause meningitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, endocarditis, and arthritis. PMID:20937098

  17. [Case of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis leading to discovery of early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ijyuuin, Toshiro; Umehara, Fujio

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year old man was brought to our hospital because of acute onset of fever and consciousness disturbance. He had been hemodialyzed three times a week because of chronic renal failure since 13 years ago. Neurological examination revealed deteriorated consciousness and neck stiffness. A lumbar puncture yielded clouded fluid with a WBC 7,912/mm³ (polymorphonuclear cells 88%, mononuclear cells 12%), 786 mg/dl of protein and 4 mg/dl of glucose (blood glucose 118 mg/dl). Brain CT and MRI were unremarkable. He was treated with ceftriaxone and ampicillin. Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from the blood sample, but not from cerebrospinal fluid. The patient responded promptly to antibiotics therapy (ampicillin 3g/day, ceftriaxone 1g/day), and within several days he became lucid and afebrile. Isolated S. salivarius was sensitive for ampicillin and ceftriaxone. We diagnosed this case as S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis. A gastrointestinal diagnostic workup revealed an asymptomatic gastric adenocarcinoma. S. salivarius is a common inhabitant of the oral mucosa that has been associated with infection in different sites. Meningeal infection by S. salivarius generally related to neoplasia of colon or iatrogenia, has been described on few occasions. This is the first report of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis associated with gastric neoplasm. Neurologist should be aware of the association of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:22688117

  18. Characterization of Spbhp-37, a Hemoglobin-Binding Protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Espejel, María E.; Rodríguez, Mario A.; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Ríos-Castro, Emmanuel; Olivares-Trejo, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive microorganism that is the cause of bacterial pneumonia, sinusitis and otitis media. This human pathogen also can cause invasive diseases such as meningitis, bacteremia and septicemia. Hemoglobin (Hb) and haem can support the growth and viability of S. pneumoniae as sole iron sources. Unfortunately, the acquisition mechanism of Hb and haem in this bacterium has been poorly studied. Previously we identified two proteins of 37 and 22 kDa as putative Hb- and haem-binding proteins (Spbhp-37 and Spbhp-22, respectively). The sequence of Spbhp-37 protein was database annotated as lipoprotein without any function or localization. Here it was immunolocalized in the surface cell by transmission electron microscopy using specific antibodies produced against the recombinant protein. The expression of Spbhp-37 was increased when bacteria were grown in media culture supplied with Hb. In addition, the affinity of Sphbp-37 for Hb was determined. Thus, in this work we are presenting new findings that attempt to explain the mechanism involved in iron acquisition of this pathogen. In the future these results could help to develop new therapy targets in order to avoid the secondary effects caused by the traditional therapies. PMID:27200302

  19. Characterization of Spbhp-37, a Hemoglobin-Binding Protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Romero-Espejel, María E; Rodríguez, Mario A; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Ríos-Castro, Emmanuel; Olivares-Trejo, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive microorganism that is the cause of bacterial pneumonia, sinusitis and otitis media. This human pathogen also can cause invasive diseases such as meningitis, bacteremia and septicemia. Hemoglobin (Hb) and haem can support the growth and viability of S. pneumoniae as sole iron sources. Unfortunately, the acquisition mechanism of Hb and haem in this bacterium has been poorly studied. Previously we identified two proteins of 37 and 22 kDa as putative Hb- and haem-binding proteins (Spbhp-37 and Spbhp-22, respectively). The sequence of Spbhp-37 protein was database annotated as lipoprotein without any function or localization. Here it was immunolocalized in the surface cell by transmission electron microscopy using specific antibodies produced against the recombinant protein. The expression of Spbhp-37 was increased when bacteria were grown in media culture supplied with Hb. In addition, the affinity of Sphbp-37 for Hb was determined. Thus, in this work we are presenting new findings that attempt to explain the mechanism involved in iron acquisition of this pathogen. In the future these results could help to develop new therapy targets in order to avoid the secondary effects caused by the traditional therapies.

  20. Genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 isolated from pigs in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Doto, Daniela Sabatini; Moreno, Luisa Zanolli; Calderaro, Franco Ferraro; Matajira, Carlos Emilio Cabrera; de Moura Gomes, Vasco Tulio; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Mesquita, Renan Elias; Timenetsky, Jorge; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes septicemia, meningitis, arthritis, and pneumonia in swine and humans. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of S. suis serotype 2 isolated from pigs showing signs of illness in Brazil using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), single-enzyme amplified fragment length polymorphism (SE-AFLP), and profiling of virulence-associated markers. A total of 110 isolates were studied, 62.7% of which were isolated from the central nervous system and 19.1% from the respiratory tract. Eight genotypes were obtained from the combination of virulence genes, with 43.6% and 5.5% frequencies for the mrp+/epf+/sly+ and mrp−/epf−/sly− genotypes, respectively. The presence of isolates with epf gene variation with higher molecular weight also appears to be a characteristic of Brazilian S. suis serotype 2. The PFGE and SE-AFLP were able to type all isolates and, although they presented a slight tendency to cluster according to state and year of isolation, it was also evident the grouping of different herds in the same PFGE subtype and the existence of isolates originated from the same herd classified into distinct subtypes. No further correlation between the isolation sites and mrp/epf/sly genotypes was observed. PMID:27127337