Science.gov

Sample records for mental health perspective

  1. Disaster Management: Mental Health Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Math, Suresh Bada; Nirmala, Maria Christine; Moirangthem, Sydney; Kumar, Naveen C.

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ‘preventive medicine’ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ‘R’s such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immediate action), Relief (Sustained rescue work), Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources), Recovery (Returning to normalcy) and Resilience (Fostering). Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA) and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health. PMID:26664073

  2. Contemporary Perspectives on Spirituality and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pulkit; Charak, Ruby; Sharma, Vibha

    2009-01-01

    The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly. PMID:21938086

  3. Contemporary perspectives on spirituality and mental health.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pulkit; Charak, Ruby; Sharma, Vibha

    2009-01-01

    The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly.

  4. A Samoan perspective on infant mental health.

    PubMed

    Masoe, Paula; Bush, Allister

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes background to the development of the relatively new field of infant mental health and why this may be important for Pacific communities in Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ) and elsewhere. There is a discussion of Samoan concepts and research that could inform infant mental health theory and practice. A Pacific home visiting programme based at Taeaomanino Trust in Porirua, Aotearoa/NZ has formed a collaboration with child and adolescent mental health service clinicians with an interest in infant mental health, to further develop infant mental health understandings and practices in this early intervention service. The benefits and practical application of this collaboration are discussed. The paper ends with a personal perspective from one of the authors on her Samoan reflection on the relevance of attachment ideas to her family relationships and work with Pacific infants, mothers and their families.

  5. Refugees' time perspective and mental health.

    PubMed

    Beiser, M; Hyman, I

    1997-07-01

    The authors' goal was to investigate factors protective of the mental health of refugees, with a particular focus on time splitting and suppression of the past. Structured interviews covering premigration and postmigration stresses, personal and social resources, and mental health were given to 1,348 Southeast Asian refugees resettled in Vancouver, British Columbia, and to a comparison sample of 319 residents of Vancouver. Both groups of subjects also performed a task designed to measure orientation toward past, present, and future. Compared with resident Canadians, refugees were more likely to exhibit an atomistic time perspective in which past, present, and future are split. Temporal atomism and avoidance of nostalgia were associated with a lower risk of depression than were other time perspectives. Under conditions of extreme adversity, time splitting and suppression of the past may be adaptive strategies, mitigating the risk of depression.

  6. Rape: Legal issues in mental health perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jiloha, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Rape of women by men has occurred throughout recorded history and across cultures and religions. It is a crime against basic human right and a most common crime against women in India. In this article, rape is discussed from legal and mental health perspective. In India ‘rape laws’ began with enactment of Indian Penal Code in 1860. There have been subsequent amendments and the main issue of focus remained the definition of ‘rape and inclusion of ‘marital rape’ in the ambit of rape. Law Commission Reports related to rape and the psychological impacts of rape have been discussed. PMID:24082245

  7. Rape: Legal issues in mental health perspective.

    PubMed

    Jiloha, R C

    2013-07-01

    Rape of women by men has occurred throughout recorded history and across cultures and religions. It is a crime against basic human right and a most common crime against women in India. In this article, rape is discussed from legal and mental health perspective. In India 'rape laws' began with enactment of Indian Penal Code in 1860. There have been subsequent amendments and the main issue of focus remained the definition of 'rape and inclusion of 'marital rape' in the ambit of rape. Law Commission Reports related to rape and the psychological impacts of rape have been discussed.

  8. Disaster mental health services: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Weeks, S M

    1999-02-01

    1. Services that may be provided by psychiatric-mental health nurses following a disaster include education, intervention, problem solving, advocacy, and referral. 2. Nurses providing disaster mental health services must be flexible and creative. Strong observational skills and teamwork are also essential characteristics in disaster settings. 3. Psychiatric-mental health nurses who wish to receive training for disaster mental health volunteer opportunities should contact their local chapter of the American Red Cross.

  9. Global mental health: perspectives from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Fekadu, Abebaw; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Background Global mental health (GMH) advocates for access to and the equitable provision of mental health care. Although the treatment gap is a useful construct to measure access and equitability of care, it fails to communicate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the urgent need to address care disparities. Objective The aim of this article is to present a perspective on the practical application of the principles of GMH to understand the real-life impact of the treatment gap and the approaches taken to improve treatment coverage in Ethiopia. Design A case study method is used. Results Multiple international collaborations undertaken in Ethiopia and facilitated by GMH to improve care, capacity, and the evidence base for increased treatment coverage are described briefly. A series of steps taken at the local and national levels to address the treatment gap are highlighted. The stories of two patients are also presented to illustrate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the potential transformational impact of addressing the treatment gap on patients, families, and communities. Conclusions GMH has a key role to play in addressing the treatment gap, which improves the life of people with mental disorders, their families, and their communities. However, national-level policy support and coordination are essential for any realistic improvement in treatment coverage. The reflections offered through the case examples may have utility in similar low-income settings. PMID:25280740

  10. Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary and International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klineberg, Otto

    The World Federation for Mental Health was founded as an international apolitical organization concerned with quality of life rather than merely the absence or prevention of mental illness. An examination of the manner and extent to which mental problems arise in different cultural settings can provide data needed to understand the relationship…

  11. Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary and International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klineberg, Otto

    The World Federation for Mental Health was founded as an international apolitical organization concerned with quality of life rather than merely the absence or prevention of mental illness. An examination of the manner and extent to which mental problems arise in different cultural settings can provide data needed to understand the relationship…

  12. Rethinking mental health: a European WHO perspective

    PubMed Central

    RUTZ, WOLFGANG

    2003-01-01

    In spite of recent clinical and research advances, an increased burden of mortality and morbidity related to stress and mental ill health can be noted, especially in European societies and populations undergoing stressful transitions and dramatic changes. A societal syndrome, consisting of depression, suicide, abuse, risk-taking and violent behaviour as well as vascular morbidity and mortality, can be observed, reflecting individual psychopathology related to disturbances of the serotonin metabolism as one of the oldest, most basic cerebral instruments of mankind to survive, to socialize, to cope with stress and danger. In a time where mental health professionals look for new and challenging identities, they have a tendency to abdicate from social psychiatric and public health activities in favour of more prestigious positions in brain research, genetics or advanced psychotherapy. A redefinition, reconceptualization and renaissance of social psychiatry seems timely and necessary, responding to the burden, advances and possibilities related to mental health we find today. It should proceed from the reductionism which often has characterized earlier psychosocial and social psychiatric approaches, utilize modern knowledge about neuroplasticity, psychoimmunology, neuropsychology and neurophilosophy, reflect the interaction between environment and structure, nature and nurture, and integrate different areas of knowledge in a holistic public mental health approach. Political decisions and societal solutions can be more or less in line with basic human preconditions. Consequences of failure to respect this already can be seen. A new awareness and responsibility-taking with regard to basic human ethological, physiological, psychological and existential conditions is needed and has to be concretized in innovative public mental health approaches. PMID:16946915

  13. An Expanded Perspective on Children's Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, E. Wayne; Blau, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    Comments on three articles (see records EJ733583, EJ733584, and EJ733585) on the status of children's mental health services in the United States, which appeared in the September 2005 issue of the "American Psychologist." The current authors suggest that, although this series of articles provides important information, the articles fall…

  14. Mental health policy and mental health service user perspectives on involvement: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ada; Stickley, Theodore

    2007-08-01

    This paper is a report of an exploration of the concept of service user involvement in mental health nursing using a discourse analysis approach. Service user involvement has come to be expected in mental health nursing policy and practice. This concept, however, is often applied somewhat ambiguously and some writers call for a clearer understanding of what service users actually want. A Foucauldian discourse analysis was conducted in 2005, examining literature and health policies published by the United Kingdom government and service users. The discursive perspectives of both were explored and conceptual themes were generated from the data. Concepts occurring within government discourse include language relating to service users, the notion of service user involvement and power. Concepts from the service user discourse include power, change and control, theory, policy and practice, and experiential expertise. Differences in perspectives were found within these themes which distinguished government from service user discourses. Greater flexibility in ideas and perspectives was demonstrated by service users, with a seemingly greater range of theoretical underpinnings. Greater awareness is needed of the significance of language, of how subtle inferences may be drawn from the rhetorical language of policies, of how these might affect the involvement of service users, and of the implications for the role of mental health nurses. Nurses need to be aware of these tensions and conflicts in managing their practice and in creating a mental health nursing philosophy of 'involvement'. If true 'involvement' is to ensue, nurses may also need to consider the transfer of power to service users.

  15. Promoting critical perspectives in mental health nursing education.

    PubMed

    McKie, A; Naysmith, S

    2014-03-01

    This paper explores themes relevant to mental health nursing using the example of one educational module of a nursing degree. The authors argue that the educational preparation of mental health nursing students in higher education must address certain contested philosophical, conceptual, social and ethical dimensions of contemporary mental health care practice. These themes are discussed within the context of a third-year mental health nursing module within a Scottish nursing degree programme. By interlinking epistemology and ontology, the notion of student as 'critical practitioner', involving the encouragement of 'critical thinking', is developed. This is shown via engagement with parallel perspectives of the sciences and the humanities in mental health. Narratives of student nurse engagement with selected literary texts demonstrate the extent to which issues of knowledge, self-awareness and personal development are central to a student's professional journey as they progress through an academic course. The paper concludes by suggesting that these 'critical perspectives' have important wider implications for curriculum design in nursing education. Insights from critical theory can equip nurse educators to challenge consumerist tendencies within contemporary higher education by encouraging them to remain knowledgeable, critical and ethically sensitive towards the needs of their students.

  16. Teachers' perspectives of mental health needs in Nigerian schools.

    PubMed

    Ibeziako, Patricia; Bella, Tolulope; Omigbodun, Olayinka; Belfer, Myron

    2009-12-01

    This study assessed teachers' perspectives on children's mental health needs and the development of school-based mental health programmes in South-West Nigeria. Focus group discussions were held with teachers from randomly selected urban and rural primary schools in Ibadan, Nigeria. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Teachers identified significant mental health problems in school-age children and described a variety of bio-psychosocial contributing factors. These ranged from problems with primary support systems to poverty, spiritual factors, medical illnesses and genetic vulnerability. The school environment was recognised as an ideal place for dealing with child mental health issues despite deficiencies in teachers' knowledge, skills and resources. A school mental health programme that would provide training for teachers and awareness campaigns as well as human, material and financial resources was proposed. The findings from this study provide a background for understanding the current state of interventions to address child mental health problems in a resource poor country in sub- Saharan Africa and specific areas where future program development is most likely to have an impact.

  17. Mental health provider perspectives regarding integrated medical care for patients with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Greenwald, Devra E; Bauer, Mark S; Charns, Martin P; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2012-11-01

    Integrated care for medical conditions is essential for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This qualitative study describes mental health provider perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators of integrated care for patients with SMI. We interviewed providers from a national sample of Veterans Health Administration facilities that scored in the top or bottom percentile in medical care quality. Providers from high-performing sites reported substantial in-person contacts with general medical providers, while providers from low-performing sites reported stigma and limited communication with medical providers as major concerns. Interventions to improve mental health and medical provider communication may facilitate integrated care for persons with SMI.

  18. The Mentally Ill in Jail: Contemporary Clinical and Practice Perspectives for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Horace; Alexander, Vinette

    2017-04-01

    Individuals with serious mental illnesses (SMI) who are incarcerated pose major treatment challenges for both correctional personnel and healthcare providers, yet deserve the same high standards of care as those in traditional mental health facilities. The literature references these challenges as types of mental health treatment disparities, and calls for improvement measures from clinicians, researchers, policy-makers, and advocates. From the standpoint of psychiatric-mental health (PMH) nursing, this paper explores, examines, and offers some contemporary clinical and practice perspectives for providing best-practice psychiatric care for SMI individuals who are in jails. The diverse roles of PMH nursing can contribute meaningfully to tackling quality improvement initiatives on mental health treatment agendas for SMI inmates.

  19. Mental health services in the Dominican Republic from the perspective of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Susan; Little, Tariana V; Reyna, Patricia; Sosa Lovera, Angelina; Garces-King, Jasmine; Queen, Kaila; Nahar, Ritu

    2016-08-29

    This study examines mental health services in five different regions of the Dominican Republic (DR) from the perspectives of health care providers. The purpose of this research was to (1) examine existing mental health care services; (2) identify barriers to treatment and mental health services delivery; and (3) explore potential strategies to improve mental health services delivery. Thirty-seven health care workers including physicians, nurses, psychologists, governmental administrators, and non-governmental community health workers were part of five focus groups and subsequent follow-up interviews. Transcripts were coded and analysed to obtain the most parsimonious categories of themes. Results indicated that there is insufficient funding allocated to mental health. The unreliable distribution of psychiatric medications precludes care for patients with severe chronic mental illness. Stigmatising attitudes among health care providers influences the quality of care. The prevalence of domestic violence is a significant public health problem contributing to mental illness. In conclusion, our study findings call for a re-examination of priority public health foci, with special attention to mental health and domestic violence in the DR. From a policy perspective, mental health care should be integrated into primary care and coupled with provider and patient education to reduce stigma. A social determinants approach could ameliorate systemic factors contributing to mental illness.

  20. [Conceptualizing mental health into practice: considerations from the Latin American social medicine/collective health perspective].

    PubMed

    Stolkiner, Alicia; Gómez, Sara Ardila

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss about the possibilities of a mental health definition from the perspective of the Latin American social medicine/collective health movement. Some relations between that movement and the mental health are pointed out. A historical analysis of that movement is presented. The conceptualizations of the health-sickness-care process are considered, emphasizing the complexity, rights perspective and the reference to life, in contrast with the objetivation/medicalization trend. Finally, these ideas are linked with the current debates on the Mental Health field.

  1. Perspectives of Individuals With Mental Illness on Community Mental Health Services in China: A Qualitative Exploration.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Lili; Sun, Xiaojia; Zeng, Kai

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about the perspectives of individuals with mental illness on community mental health services (CMHS) in China. The current study aimed to explore these perspectives. Semi-structured interviews were completed with a purposive sample of 25 individuals with mental illness recruited from three communities in Guangzhou City, China. The Colaizzi method was used for data analysis. Three main themes were identified: (a) patients' perceptions of CMHS, (b) patients' barriers to accessing CMHS, and (c) patients' expectations of CMHS. The identified issues should be taken into consideration in improving CMHS. CMHS staff, including nurses, should make patients more aware of CMHS. To increase CMHS use and make it more responsive to patients' expectations, staff should try to resolve patients' stigma and desire to return to society. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(7), 30-37.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Understanding Integrated Mental Health Services in Head Start: Staff Perspectives on Mental Health Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Beth L.; Simpson, Jennifer; Everhart, Maria C.; Vale, Elizabeth; Gettman, Maria Garcia

    2004-01-01

    Despite mandates for Head Start programs to provide mental health services to families and children, considerable variability remains in the level and type of services provided by mental health consultants. A qualitative study was conducted to explore staff perceptions about the role of mental health consult- ants and, in particular; the ways in…

  3. Home care assistants’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Åke; Hansson, Anna; Religa, Dorota; Hillerås, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elderly people with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity, are at risk of developing poor mental health. These seniors often remain in their homes with support from home care assistants (HCAs). Mental health promotion by HCAs needs to be studied further because they may be among the first to observe changes in clients’ mental health status. Aim To describe HCAs’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among homebound seniors with multimorbidity. Methods We applied a descriptive qualitative study design using semi-structured interviews. Content analyses were performed on five focus group interviews conducted in 2014 with 26 HCAs. Results Most HCAs stated that they were experienced in caring for clients with mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and high alcohol consumption. The HCAs mentioned as causes, or risk factors, multiple chronic conditions, feelings of loneliness, and social isolation. The findings reveal that continuity of care and seniors’ own thoughts and perceptions were essential to detecting mental health problems. Observation, collaboration, and social support emerged as important means of detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health. Conclusion The HCAs had knowledge of risk factors, but they seemed insecure about which health professionals had the primary responsibility for mental health. They also seemed to have detected early signs of mental health problems, even though good personal knowledge of the client and continuity in home visits were crucial to do so. When it came to mental health promotion, the suggestions related to the aim of ending social isolation, decreasing feelings of loneliness, and increasing physical activity. The results indicate that the HCAs seemed dependent on supervision by district nurses and on care managers’ decisions to support the needed care, to schedule assignments related to the detection of mental health

  4. Community mental health nurses' perspectives of recovery-oriented practice.

    PubMed

    Gale, J; Marshall-Lucette, S

    2012-05-01

    Recovery-oriented practice, an approach aligned towards the service user perspective, has dominated the mental health care arena. Numerous studies have explored service users' accounts of the purpose, meaning and importance of 'recovery'; however, far less is known about healthcare staff confidence in its application to care delivery. A self-efficacy questionnaire and content analysis of nursing course documents were used to investigate a cohort of community mental health nurses' recovery-oriented practice and to determine the extent to which the current continuing professional development curriculum met their educational needs in this regard. Twenty-three community mental health nurses completed a self-efficacy questionnaire and 28 course documents were analysed. The findings revealed high levels of nurses' confidence in their understanding and ability to apply the recovery model and low levels of confidence were found in areas of social inclusion. The content analysis found only one course document that used the whole term 'recovery model'. The findings suggest a gap in the nurses' perceived ability and confidence in recovery-oriented practice with what is taught academically. Hence, nursing education needs to be more explicitly focused on the recovery model and its application to care delivery.

  5. Health provider perspectives on mental health service provision for Chinese people living in Christchurch, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Qiuhong; GAGE, Jeffrey; BARNETT, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    Background Migration imposes stress and may contribute to the incidence of mental illness among natives of mainland China living overseas. Both cultural norms and service inadequacies may act as barriers to accessing needed mental health services. Objective Assess New Zealand health providers' perspectives on the utilization of mental health services by immigrants from mainland China. Methods A qualitative study in Christchurch, New Zealand involved in-depth interviews with nine mental health professionals with experience in providing services to Chinese clients. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Four main themes emerged from the interviews: (1) specific mental health concerns of Chinese migrants; (2) subgroups of migrants most likely to manifest mental health problems; (3) barriers to accessing services; and (4) the centrality of social support networks to the mental health of Chinese migrants. Conclusions Qualitative research with health providers in high-income countries who provide mental health services to the growing numbers of migrants from mainland China can identify areas where improved cultural sensitivity could increase both the utilization of mental health services by Chinese immigrants and the effectiveness of these services. PMID:24991180

  6. Mental disorders, health inequalities and ethics: A global perspective

    PubMed Central

    NGUI, EMMANUEL M.; KHASAKHALA, LINCOLN; NDETEI, DAVID; ROBERTS, LAURA WEISS

    2010-01-01

    The global burden of neuropsychiatry diseases and related mental health conditions is enormous, underappreciated and under resourced, particularly in the developing nations. The absence of adequate and quality mental health infrastructure and workforce is increasingly recognized. The ethical implications of inequalities in mental health for people and nations are profound and must be addressed in efforts to fulfil key bioethics principles of medicine and public health: respect for individuals, justice, beneficence, and non-malfeasance. Stigma and discrimination against people living with mental disorders affects their education, employment, access to care and hampers their capacity to contribute to society. Mental health well-being is closely associated to several Millennium Development Goals and economic development sectors including education, labour force participation, and productivity. Limited access to mental health care increases patient and family suffering. Unmet mental health needs have a negative effect on poverty reduction initiatives and economic development. Untreated mental conditions contribute to economic loss because they increase school and work absenteeism and dropout rates, healthcare expenditure, and unemployment. Addressing unmet mental health needs will require development of better mental health infrastructure and workforce and overall integration of mental and physical health services with primary care, especially in the developing nations. PMID:20528652

  7. Health care providers' perspective of the gender influences on immigrant women's mental health care experiences.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Joyce M; Donnelly, Tamphd T

    2007-10-01

    The number of immigrants coming to Canada has increased in the last three decades. It is well documented that many immigrant women suffer from serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders. Evidence has shown that immigrant women experience difficulties in accessing and using mental health services. Informed by the post-colonial feminist perspective, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provide mental health services to immigrant women. In-depth interviews were used to obtain information about immigrant women's mental health care experiences. The primary goal was to explore how contextual factors intersect with race, gender, and class to influence the ways in which immigrant women seek help and to increase awareness and understanding of what would be helpful in meeting the mental health care needs of the immigrant women. The study's results reveal that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties accessing mental health care due to insufficient language skills, unfamiliarity/unawareness of services, and low socioeconomic status; (b) participants identified structural barriers and gender roles as barriers to accessing the available mental health services; (c) the health care relationship between health care providers and women had profound effects on whether or not immigrant women seek help for mental health problems.

  8. Preventive agricultural medicine: a student's perspective of farmers' mental health.

    PubMed

    Tabereaux, Paul B; Wheat, John R

    2002-01-01

    As a medical student completing a required rural community medicine clerkship, I discovered my home community's concern for mental health of farmers. A local economic downturn affects everyone, but especially the farmers. One farmer had recently committed suicide. Leaning heavily on work presented at a Nebraska summit on the farm crisis and mental health and on the National Rural Health Association issue paper on rural mental health, I found farmer and rural mental health to be a widespread concern, exacerbated by a scarcity of rural mental health resources. In my recommendations for rural Alabama, I endorse recommendations of others, including strengthening the local family physician role as "front door" to the mental health system, outreach with such agents as extension personnel and ministers, and farm crisis hotlines.

  9. The promise and the reality: a mental health workforce perspective on technology-enhanced youth mental health service delivery.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Simone; Lawn, Sharon; Matthews, Ben; Venning, Anthony; Wyld, Kaisha; Jones, Gabrielle; Winsall, Megan; Antezana, Gaston; Schrader, Geoffrey; Bidargaddi, Niranjan

    2016-10-10

    Digital technologies show promise for reversing poor engagement of youth (16-24 years) with mental health services. In particular, mobile and internet based applications with communication capabilities can augment face-to-face mental health service provision. The literature in this field, however, fails to adequately capture the perspectives of the youth mental health workforce regarding utility and acceptability of technology for this purpose. This paper describes results of in-depth qualitative data drawn from various stakeholders involved in provision of youth mental health services in one Australian rural region. Data were obtained using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with regional youth mental health clinicians, youth workers and support/management staff (n = 4 focus groups; n = 8 interviews) and analysed via inductive thematic analysis. Results question the acceptability of technology to engage clients within youth mental health services. Six main themes were identified: young people in a digital age, personal connection, power and vulnerability, professional identity, individual factors and organisational legitimacy. These findings deepen the understanding of risks and challenges faced when adopting new technologies in mental healthcare. Recommendations for technology design and implementation in mental health services are made.

  10. Mental health in the early 1980s: some perspectives*

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, N.

    1983-01-01

    The field of mental health, at the present time, has an important potential for rapid development. The reasons for this include important new knowledge that has become available, increased awareness of governments about the size of mental health problems and about the importance of psychosocial factors, and the development of an appropriate technology and a new doctrine of mental health care which allow useful interventions to be made, even when financial resources are extremely scarce. PMID:6601533

  11. International and Transracial Adoptions: A Mental Health Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Christopher; And Others

    The key dependent variable in adoption research is the child's mental health, in the short and the long term. Defining mental health as the development of basic ego strength and a feeling of self-worth, which enable an individual to cope with stresses later in life, this book focuses on how well adolescents and young adults have fared in adoption.…

  12. New Mental Health Perspectives for the Black Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Carol M.

    1974-01-01

    A new model for mental health service delivery is required, based not on traditional assumptions of adjusting clients to their situation but rather are based on the eradication of the causes of such conditions in the social environment. The developmental history of such a mental health program is described for a predominantly black urban area in…

  13. Collaboration in crisis: Carer perspectives on police and mental health professional's responses to mental health crises.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Alice; Warren, Narelle; Peterson, Violeta; Hollander, Yitzchak; Boscarato, Kara; Lee, Stuart

    2016-10-01

    For many situations involving a mental health crisis, carers (e.g. family or friends) are present and either attempt to help the person overcome the crisis or request assistance from professional services (e.g. mental health or police). Comparatively, little research has explored how carers experience the crisis, the professional response and how the nature of the response, in turn, impacts carers. The current study was conducted to explore these issues during individual interviews with nine carers who had previous contact with police and mental health services during a crisis response. Collected data described the definition and perceived impact of a mental health crisis for carers, how carers had experienced a crisis response from police and mental health services, and how the professional response had impacted on carers. Of importance was the finding that carers were often themselves traumatized by witnessing or being involved in the crisis, however, were rarely offered direct education or support to help them cope or prevent future crises. A number of carers described a reluctance to request assistance from professional services due to previous poor experiences. This highlighted the importance of implementing strategies to deliver more timely, respectful, specialist and collaborative crisis responses to improve carer and consumer outcomes. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Postpartum Mental Health Promotion: Perspectives from Mothers and Home Visitors.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Mariette J; Attawar, Dhiwya; Volk, Jennifer S; Cooper, Marion; Quddus, Farzana; McCarthy, Julie-Anne

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study was to examine the implementation of the Towards Flourishing Mental Health Promotion Strategy, a demonstration project designed to promote the mental well-being of parents and their children that was added to an existing public health home visiting program. Structured interviews were conducted with program stakeholders including 13 women receiving home visiting services in the postpartum period and 6 home visitors. Thematic analysis of individual transcripts was conducted and results were compiled according to common themes. The results indicate that women and home visitors perceived the integration of a mental health promotion strategy into an existing public health program as feasible, acceptable and useful. The strategy provides a mechanism for women and home visitors to dialog about mental health and appears to have early positive impacts on the women. Factors that facilitated and impeded the successful implementation of the strategy are described. These results point to promising strategies to reach women early in the postpartum period to support their mental health. They also shed light on the barriers to supporting mental health, indicating the need to address stigma related to mental health and the social determinants of health. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Challenges in relating to mental health professionals: Perspectives of persons with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Adnøy Eriksen, Kristin; Arman, Maria; Davidson, Larry; Sundfør, Bengt; Karlsson, Bengt

    2014-04-01

    A previous analysis showed that mental health service users experienced profound loneliness, struggled to relate to other people, and were careful in considering what to share with health-care professionals. Being recognized by professionals in relationships may contribute to recovery processes characterized by 'connectedness', 'hope and optimism', 'identity', 'meaning', and 'empowerment'. This paper regards people as mainly seeking contact and meaning (relational perspective) and aims to describe service users' understanding of being in relationships with professionals, and how these relationships may limit or enhance recovery. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze data from in-depth interviews. Participants described three levels of connectedness with professionals: (i) being detached; (ii) being cautious; and (iii) being open and trusting. Level of connectedness seemed to be associated with opportunities for promoted recovery. Trusting relationships may strengthen identity, provide opportunities for meaning and hope, and contribute to opening new perspectives, and lessen significance of internal voices. Adopting a relational perspective may assist professionals in recognizing the service user as a person involved in making sense of life experiences and in the process of connecting to other people. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  16. Eating Disorders: National Institute of Mental Health's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Mark; Insel, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is to reduce the burden of mental and behavioral disorders through research, and eating disorders embody an important fraction of this burden. Although past and current research has provided important knowledge regarding the etiology, classification, pathophysiology, and treatment of…

  17. Eating Disorders: National Institute of Mental Health's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Mark; Insel, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is to reduce the burden of mental and behavioral disorders through research, and eating disorders embody an important fraction of this burden. Although past and current research has provided important knowledge regarding the etiology, classification, pathophysiology, and treatment of…

  18. The clinical neuroscience course: viewing mental health from neurobiological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Kelly G

    2005-01-01

    Although the field of neuroscience is booming, a challenge for researchers in mental health disciplines is the integration of basic research findings into applied clinical approaches leading to effective therapies. Recently the National Institute of Mental Health called for translational research grants to encourage collaboration between neuroscientists and mental health professionals. In order for this "clinical neuroscience" to emerge and thrive, an important first step is the provision of appropriate course offerings so that future neuroscience researchers and mental health practitioners will have a common neurobiological base from which to make informed decisions about the most efficacious treatments for mental illnesses. Accordingly, an integrative course, Clinical Neuroscience, was developed to address these issues. After reviewing the historical origins of this emerging discipline, students are exposed to fundamental overviews of neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neural development before approaching the neurobiological components of several disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, Tourette's syndrome, drug abuse, obsessive compulsive disorder). Finally, the maintenance of mental health is emphasized as topics such as psychoneuroimmunology, coping with stress, and eating regulation are discussed. Important themes emphasized in this course include (1) the consideration of only empirically based evidence, (2) the view that mental illness represents a disruption of neurobiological homeostasis, (3) the acknowledgement that, because the brain is a plastic organ, the clinical relevance of environmental and behavioral influences is difficult to overestimate, and (4) the recognition of the value of ecologically relevant animal models in the investigation of various aspects of mental illness. Because of the importance of stress maintenance in mental health, exercises have been developed to increase students' awareness of their own coping strategies. Finally

  19. The Clinical Neuroscience Course: Viewing Mental Health from Neurobiological Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Kelly G.

    2005-01-01

    Although the field of neuroscience is booming, a challenge for researchers in mental health disciplines is the integration of basic research findings into applied clinical approaches leading to effective therapies. Recently the National Institute of Mental Health called for translational research grants to encourage collaboration between neuroscientists and mental health professionals. In order for this “clinical neuroscience” to emerge and thrive, an important first step is the provision of appropriate course offerings so that future neuroscience researchers and mental health practitioners will have a common neurobiological base from which to make informed decisions about the most efficacious treatments for mental illnesses. Accordingly, an integrative course, Clinical Neuroscience, was developed to address these issues. After reviewing the historical origins of this emerging discipline, students are exposed to fundamental overviews of neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neural development before approaching the neurobiological components of several disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, Tourette’s syndrome, drug abuse, obsessive compulsive disorder). Finally, the maintenance of mental health is emphasized as topics such as psychoneuroimmunology, coping with stress, and eating regulation are discussed. Important themes emphasized in this course include (1) the consideration of only empirically based evidence, (2) the view that mental illness represents a disruption of neurobiological homeostasis, (3) the acknowledgement that, because the brain is a plastic organ, the clinical relevance of environmental and behavioral influences is difficult to overestimate, and (4) the recognition of the value of ecologically relevant animal models in the investigation of various aspects of mental illness. Because of the importance of stress maintenance in mental health, exercises have been developed to increase students’ awareness of their own coping strategies

  20. Assessing Mental Health Needs of Rural Schools in South Texas: Counselors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Steve F.; Rueda, Breeze; Mata-Villarreal, Jennifer; Mundy, Marie-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Texas continues to fall short of the necessary mental health resources for those communities and populations in rural counties. The purpose of this article was to review the mental health resource needs of rural schools in South Texas. The study focused primarily on the perspectives of the school counselors in the identified districts. Funded by a…

  1. Maltese Students' Perspectives about Their Experiences at School and Their Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Cefai, Carmel; Fabri, Francis

    2013-01-01

    In this article we report Maltese primary and secondary students' perspectives about their school experiences and their mental health. Questionnaires were completed by 281 students. Relationships emerged between students' reports about their involvement in bullying, mental health status, and a range of typical features of school environments. A…

  2. Maltese Students' Perspectives about Their Experiences at School and Their Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Cefai, Carmel; Fabri, Francis

    2013-01-01

    In this article we report Maltese primary and secondary students' perspectives about their school experiences and their mental health. Questionnaires were completed by 281 students. Relationships emerged between students' reports about their involvement in bullying, mental health status, and a range of typical features of school environments. A…

  3. The mental health service crisis of neoliberalism -- an antipodean perspective.

    PubMed

    Carney, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Major transformations in forms of governance of the liberal state have been wrought over the course of the last century, including the rise of neoliberalism and 'new public management.' Mental health too has witnessed change, with pharmacological treatment displacing residential care, a shift to community-based services, mainstreaming with general health care, and greater reliance on civil society institutions such as the family or markets. This article considers whether mental health law, and its court/tribunal 'gatekeepers' have kept pace with those changes. It argues that the focus of the liberal project needs to shift to measures which will better guarantee access to mental health services, and keep a more watchful eye on both 'hidden' coercion of people on community treatment orders, and passive neglect of human need.

  4. [Urban culture and mental health: an anthropological perspective].

    PubMed

    Andrès, Cédric

    2012-01-01

    This article is an anthropological reflection on the trans-cultural issues specific to large urban centers. The author questions how can a person develop and create an identity in this context. He then examines how proximity and isolation relative to urban settings contribute to the mental health of urban populations. Finally, he examines how characteristics of city life conditions assistance to people with mental disorders in urban settings.

  5. Development of a mental health smartphone app: perspectives of mental health service users.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, John; Cummins, John; Behan, Laura; O'Brien, Sinead M

    2016-10-01

    Current mental health policy emphasises the importance of service user involvement in the delivery of care. Information Technology can have an effect on quality and efficiency of care. The aim of this study is to gain the viewpoint of service users from a local mental health service in developing a mental health app. A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Eight volunteers aged 18-49 years were interviewed with the aid of a semi-structured questionnaire. Interviewees defined a good app by its ease of use. Common themes included availability of contact information, identifying triggers, the ability to rate mood/anxiety levels on a scale, guided relaxation techniques, and the option to personalise the app. The researchers will aim to produce an app that is easily accessible, highly personalisable and will include functions highlighted as important (i.e. contact information, etc.). This research will assist in the development of an easy-to-use app that could increase access to services, and allow service users to take an active role in their care. In previous studies, apps were developed without the involvement of service users. This study recognises the important role of service users in this area.

  6. [Mental health from a cognitive-behavioral perspective].

    PubMed

    Keegan, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a succinct overview of the conception of mental health held by the cognitive-behavioral paradigm. For some of these models, human suffering is ubiquitious and largely unavoidable. Therefore, suffering cannot be linearly equated to pathology. Mental health implies acting towards achieving our valued goals, despite the negative emotions and thoughts that this may activate. The paper describes some cognitive and metacognitive phenomena characteristically associated to psychopathology, as well as some principles to establish the normalcy of both emotional experience and behavior. It establishes a difference between consultations motivated by mental disorders and those motivated by life crises and by a desire of achieving personal growth. Finally, the paper analyzes the conditions in which implementing treatment is desirable and necessary.

  7. Criminal Offenders and "Mainstream" Outpatient Mental Health Care: Emerging Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallone, Nathaniel J.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses inconsistencies in societal responses to criminal behavior. Maintains that some offenders who are both guilty of criminal behavior and psychiatrically (or biochemically) disordered are being diverted from the criminal justice system into the mental health system. Suggests that clinical neuropsychology and psychopharmacology can…

  8. Rurality and African American Perspectives on Children's Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukolo, Abraham; Heflinger, Craig Anne

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of race and place of residence on caregivers' perceptions of children's mental health services is underresearched. Differences in caregiver strain, barriers-to-care endorsement, and provider satisfaction are examined among 175 rural and urban African American caregivers from one Southern state whose children received Medicaid…

  9. Criminal Offenders and "Mainstream" Outpatient Mental Health Care: Emerging Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallone, Nathaniel J.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses inconsistencies in societal responses to criminal behavior. Maintains that some offenders who are both guilty of criminal behavior and psychiatrically (or biochemically) disordered are being diverted from the criminal justice system into the mental health system. Suggests that clinical neuropsychology and psychopharmacology can…

  10. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Marc H

    2013-10-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. Every culture is characterized, and distinguished from other cultures, by deep-rooted and widely acknowledged ideas about how one needs to feel, think, and act as an adequately functioning member of the culture. Insofar as parents subscribe to particular conventions of a culture, they likely follow prevailing "cultural scripts" in childrearing. Broadening our definition, it is therefore the continuing task of parents also to enculturate children by preparing them for the physical, psychosocial, and educational situations that are characteristic of their specific culture. Cross-cultural comparisons show that virtually all aspects of parenting children are informed by culture: culture influences when and how parents care for children, what parents expect of children, and which behaviors parents appreciate, emphasize and reward or discourage and punish. Thus, cultural norms become manifest in the mental health of children through parenting. Furthermore, variations in what is normative in different cultures challenge our assumptions about what is universal and inform our understanding of how parent-child relationships unfold in ways both culturally universal and specific. This essay concerns the contributions of culture to parenting and child mental health. No study of a single society can address this broad issue. It is possible, however, to learn lessons about parenting and child mental health from the study of different societies.

  11. Parenting and child mental health: a cross-cultural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Marc H

    2013-01-01

    In its most general instrumental sense, parenting consists of care of the young in preparing them to manage the tasks of life. Parents provide childhood experiences and populate the environments that guide children's development and so contribute to child mental health. Parenting is expressed in cognitions and practices. However, parents do not parent, and children do not grow up, in isolation, but in multiple contexts, and one notable context of parenting and child mental health is culture. Every culture is characterized, and distinguished from other cultures, by deep-rooted and widely acknowledged ideas about how one needs to feel, think, and act as an adequately functioning member of the culture. Insofar as parents subscribe to particular conventions of a culture, they likely follow prevailing “cultural scripts” in childrearing. Broadening our definition, it is therefore the continuing task of parents also to enculturate children by preparing them for the physical, psychosocial, and educational situations that are characteristic of their specific culture. Cross-cultural comparisons show that virtually all aspects of parenting children are informed by culture: culture influences when and how parents care for children, what parents expect of children, and which behaviors parents appreciate, emphasize and reward or discourage and punish. Thus, cultural norms become manifest in the mental health of children through parenting. Furthermore, variations in what is normative in different cultures challenge our assumptions about what is universal and inform our understanding of how parent-child relationships unfold in ways both culturally universal and specific. This essay concerns the contributions of culture to parenting and child mental health. No study of a single society can address this broad issue. It is possible, however, to learn lessons about parenting and child mental health from the study of different societies. PMID:24096792

  12. Parent Perspectives on Community Mental Health Services for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Baker-Ericzen, Mary; Stadnick, Nicole; Taylor, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The community mental health (CMH) system provides treatment for behavioral and psychiatric problems in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Although parent stakeholder perspectives are important to improving care, these perspectives have not been systematically examined for this population in the CMH sector. Twenty-one semi-structured…

  13. Parent Perspectives on Community Mental Health Services for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Baker-Ericzen, Mary; Stadnick, Nicole; Taylor, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The community mental health (CMH) system provides treatment for behavioral and psychiatric problems in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Although parent stakeholder perspectives are important to improving care, these perspectives have not been systematically examined for this population in the CMH sector. Twenty-one semi-structured…

  14. Mental health-promoting dialogues from the perspective of community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Åke; Ebbeskog, Britt; Gustafsson, Sanna Aila; Religa, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Mental health promotion needs to be studied more deeply within the context of primary care, because persons with multiple chronic conditions are at risk of developing poor mental health. In order to make progress in the understanding of mental health promotion, the aim of this study was to describe the experiences of health-promoting dialogues from the perspective of community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity – what these seniors believe is important for achieving a dialogue that may promote their mental health. Seven interviews with six women and one man, aged 83–96 years, were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results were summarized into nine subcategories and three categories. The underlying meaning of the text was formulated into an overarching theme that embraced every category, “perceived and well-managed as a unique individual”. These seniors with multimorbidity missed someone to talk to about their mental health, and needed partners that were accessible for health dialogues that could promote mental health. The participants missed friends and relatives to talk to and they (crucially) lacked health care or social service providers for health-promoting dialogues that may promote mental health. An optimal level of care can be achieved through involvement, continuity, and by providing a health-promoting dialogue based on seniors’ needs and wishes, with the remembrance that general health promotion also may promote mental health. Implications for clinical practice and further research are discussed. PMID:24812516

  15. A qualitative exploration of the perspectives of mental health professionals on stigma and discrimination of mental illness in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hanafiah, Ainul Nadhirah; Van Bortel, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Stigma of mental illness has been identified as a significant barrier to help-seeking and care. Basic knowledge of mental illness - such as its nature, symptoms and impact - are neglected, leaving room for misunderstandings on mental health and 'stigma'. Numerous researches have been conducted on stigma and discrimination of people with mental disorders. However, most of the literature investigates stigma from a cultural conception point of view, experiences of patients or public attitudes towards mental illness but little to none from the standpoint of mental health professionals. In Malaysia, this research on stigma is particularly limited. Therefore, the state of stigma and discrimination of people with mental illness was investigated from the perspectives of mental health professionals in Malaysia. In-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 mental health professionals from both government and private sectors including psychiatrists, psychologists and counsellors. The interviews were approximately 45-minutes long. The data was subsequently analysed using the basic thematic approach. Seven principal themes, each with their own sub-themes, emerged from the analysis of 'stigma of mental illness' from mental health professionals' point of view, including: (1) main perpetrators, (2) types of mental illness carrying stigma, (3) demography and geography of stigma, (4) manifestations of stigma, (5) impacts of stigma, (6) causes of stigma and (7) proposed initiatives to tackle stigma. Stigma of mental illness is widespread in Malaysia. This is most evident amongst people suffering from conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. Stigma manifests itself most often in forms of labelling, rejection, social exclusion and in employment. Family, friends and workplace staff are reported to be the main perpetrators of discriminatory conducts. According to the perspectives of the mental health professionals, implications of

  16. Stress, work and mental health: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    deVries, Marten W; Wilkerson, Bill

    2003-02-01

    The United Nations, WHO and the World Bank have called the current prevalence rate of neuro-psychiatric disorder approaches of 1 in 4 individuals worldwide and 'unheralded public health crisis'. Rates are driven by an early onset, high impairment and high chronicity of these disorders. Most importantly, detection and treatment rates are low, estimated at les than 10% worldwide resulting in 500 million people underserved. The related economic costs soared in 1999 to 120 billion dollars in Europe and North America, with over 60 billion dollars assigned to stress related disorders. Contributing factors are bio-psycho-social and include rapid social change as well as the time compression of modern life resulting in the experience of increased work-life stress that parallels a decade long intensification of activities in the workplace. Coping with the requirements of the new economy of mental performance has lagged behind at many individual and social levels as we cling to adjustments made during the industrial economy of the last century. A climate of transition, and more recently, terror and fear have stressed the landscape of mental health and work already ravaged by the destructive forces of stigma. This presentation will examine the other side of prosperity from the point of view of stress in the workplace as two global problems converge at this time in history, the escalation of neuro-psychiatric disorders and the increasing dependence on the mental faculties of the world's citizens. In this paper we also discuss how the international community can work together to help reduce the burden of mental disorders worldwide and sketch the implications for research and policy. Ultimately the media will need to be enlisted to educate the public on the value of investments in mental health.

  17. Mental health nursing from a solution focused perspective.

    PubMed

    Wand, Timothy

    2010-06-01

    Solution focused therapy (SFT) is a relatively new and increasingly popular model of brief intervention in mental health care. The central assertion of SFT is that the individual's problem or difficulty (and its cause) need not determine the direction in which the discussion proceeds. Instead the role of the SFT practitioner is to identify what the individual wants to be different and then to explore and elaborate on that difference. This paper outlines the principles of SFT and highlights the compatibility of this approach with the core values of nursing practice. Specific strategies and techniques used in SFT are detailed with clinical examples to illustrate the application of SFT to mental health nursing practice. A summary of current research outcomes and future prospects for SFT in clinical practice and education is also presented.

  18. Perspectives of Japanese mothers with severe mental illness regarding the disclosure of their mental health status to their children.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Rie; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2012-10-01

    This study examined Japanese mothers with severe mental illness and their perspectives about disclosing their mental health status to their children. Seventy-four outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia or mood disorders were recruited. We utilized a cross-sectional design and a self-report questionnaire. Approximately 72% of the participants disclosed their mental health status to their children. The reasons for disclosure and nondisclosure varied. Our findings indicate that although both the disclosing and nondisclosing groups held beliefs about disclosure, many mothers appeared to struggle with these issues. It is essential that clinicians are aware of this issue so they may appropriately help the mothers.

  19. Shared decision making in public mental health care: perspectives from consumers living with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Woltmann, Emily M; Whitley, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical and empirical work regarding decision making in mental health suggests that mental health consumers have better outcomes when their preferences are integrated into quality of life decisions. A wealth of research, however, indicates that providers have difficulty predicting what their clients' priorities are. This study investigates consumer decision-making preferences and understanding of construction of decisions in community mental health. People living with severe mental illness being treated in the public mental health care system (N=16) participated in qualitative interviews regarding case management decision making as a part of a larger study investigating a decision support system to facilitate shared decision making. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and cross-case thematic analyses were conducted. Mental health consumers generally endorse a "shared" style of decision making. When asked what "shared" means, however, consumers describe a two-step process which first prioritizes autonomy, and if that is not possible, defers to case managers' judgment. Consumers also primarily focused on the relationship and affective components of decision making, rather than information-gathering or deliberating on options. Finally, when disagreements arose, consumers primarily indicated they handled them. Mental health consumers may have a different view of decision making than the literature on shared decision making suggests. Mental health consumers may consciously decide to at least verbally defer to their case managers, and remain silent about their preferences or wishes.

  20. Workforce Development and Mental Health Transformation: A State Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoge, Michael A; Wolf, Jessica; Migdole, Scott; Cannata, Elisabeth; Gregory, Francis X

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a workforce crisis in behavioral health has been recognized for decades. However, workforce problems often have been viewed as too large, too complex, and too daunting for individual states to tackle. This article reviews the progress of one state in systematically strengthening its workforce as part of a federally supported effort to transform mental health services. The workforce priorities in Connecticut are identified and the specific workforce transformation projects and their impact are described. The success in sustaining these initiatives after cessation of federal support is reviewed. The authors conclude by offering five recommendations to guide comprehensive state workforce development. This work has particular salience for the many states across the nation that have identified behavioral health service and workforce needs as obstacles to comprehensive health care reform.

  1. Physical health nurse consultant role to improve physical health in mental health services: A carer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Karen; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general population. Awareness of this health disparity is increasing; however, strategies to address the problem are limited. Carers play an important role in the physical health care of people with mental illness, particularly in facilitating navigation of and advocating in the health care system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant position has been suggested as a way to address the physical health care disparity and limited research available suggests that positive outcomes are possible. In the present study, a qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken, involving in-depth interviews with people identifying as mental health carers. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted involving a total of 13 carers. The resulting data were analyzed thematically. Views and opinions about the proposed physical health nurse consultant (PHNC) position were sought during these interviews and are reported in this paper. Two main sub-themes were evident relating to characteristics of this role: reliability and consistency; and communication and support. Essentially carers expressed a need for support for themselves and consumers in addressing physical health concerns. Successful implementation of this position would require a consistent and reliable approach. Carers are significant stakeholders in the physical health of consumers of mental health services and their active involvement in identifying and tailoring services, including development of the physical health nurse consultant must be seen as a priority. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Triangulating perspectives on functional neuroimaging for disorders of mental health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging is being used in clinical psychiatry today despite the vigorous objections of many in the research community over issues of readiness. To date, a systematic examination of the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in this debate has not yet been attempted. To this fill this gap, we interviewed investigators who conduct functional neuroimaging studies involving adults with mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, and/or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, providers who offer clinical neuroimaging services in the open marketplace, and consumers of these services, in order to understand perspectives underlying different views and practices. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted over the telephone. Verbal consent was obtained and all interviews were audio recorded. Interviews of investigators and service providers followed the same interview guide. A separate set of questions was developed for consumers. All interviews were transcribed and made software ready. We applied the qualitative methodology of constant comparison to analyze the data, whereby two researchers independently analyzed the results into textual themes. Coding discrepancies were discussed until consensus was achieved. Results Investigators, service providers, and consumers held many common perspectives about the potential or actual risks and benefits of functional neuroimaging for mental illness. However, we also found striking divergences. Service providers focused on the challenges posed by the persistence of symptoms based diagnostic categories, whereas the limitations of the science in this area was the challenge noted most frequently by investigators. The majority of consumers stated that their expectations were met. Conclusion Our findings point toward a fundamental tension between academic investigators on the one hand, and commercial service providers and their customers on the other. This scenario poses dangers to

  3. [The current perspectives regarding the burden on mental health caregivers].

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lucilene; Vieira, Mariana Verderoce; Ricci, Maira Aparecida Malagutti; Mazza, Rafael Severio

    2012-04-01

    A systematic literature review was performed regarding the burden on mental health caregivers. The studies were selected from the Virtual Health Library - Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde (BVS), using the keyword caregiver burden. The main criteria for this study were: full-text articles published between 2000 and 2010, in Portuguese, English or Spanish; indexed on the BVS databases; which investigated the burden of mental health caregivers, and had caregivers as the main subject. The analysis was performed considering the following: title, year of publication, objectives, methodological approach, instruments and main results. The analysis of 114 full-text articles showed the predominant objectives were the burden on informal caregivers and the validation of psychometric scales, particularly the Zarit Scale. Some studies showed an association between high levels of burden, feelings of guilt and depressive symptoms. On the other hand, psycho-educational interventions were indicated as having a positive impact. This theme has a growing scientific interest and there is a need for deeper studies addressing formal caregivers.

  4. Predictive analytics in mental health: applications, guidelines, challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Nierenberg, A A; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of 'predictive analytics in mental health' has recently generated tremendous interest with the bold promise to revolutionize clinical practice in psychiatry paralleling similar developments in personalized and precision medicine. Here, we provide an overview of the key questions and challenges in the field, aiming to (1) propose general guidelines for predictive analytics projects in psychiatry, (2) provide a conceptual introduction to core aspects of predictive modeling technology, and (3) foster a broad and informed discussion involving all stakeholders including researchers, clinicians, patients, funding bodies and policymakers.

  5. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Zambia: a care provider's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the 1991 reforms of the health system in Zambia, mental health is still given low priority. This is evident from the fragmented manner in which mental health services are provided in the country and the limited budget allocations, with mental health services receiving 0.4% of the total health budget. Most of the mental health services provided are curative in nature and based in tertiary health institutions. At primary health care level, there is either absence of, or fragmented health services. Aims The aim of this paper was to explore health providers' views about mental health integration into primary health care. Methods A mixed methods, structured survey was conducted of 111 health service providers in primary health care centres, drawn from one urban setting (Lusaka) and one rural setting (Mumbwa). Results There is strong support for integrating mental health into primary health care from care providers, as a way of facilitating early detection and intervention for mental health problems. Participants believed that this would contribute to the reduction of stigma and the promotion of human rights for people with mental health problems. However, health providers felt they require basic training in order to enhance their knowledge and skills in providing health care to people with mental health problems. Recommendations It is recommended that health care providers should be provided with basic training in mental health in order to enhance their knowledge and skills to enable them provide mental health care to patients seeking help at primary health care level. Conclusion Integrating mental health services into primary health care is critical to improving and promoting the mental health of the population in Zambia. PMID:20653981

  6. Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  7. Consumers' perspectives on helpful and hindering factors in mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Glass, C R; Arnkoff, D B

    2000-11-01

    We summarize the four papers in this issue by consumers evaluating their mental health treatment, focusing on aspects of their treatment that they collectively found helpful and hindering. These factors include the context of treatment, the therapy relationship, interventions used and issues addressed, helpful experiences outside the mental health system, and hindering views of mental illness and treatment. We then present comments by two clients in outpatient therapy on the same topic. Research on clients' perceptions of their outpatient psychotherapy is discussed in reference to these six consumer perspectives, and future directions for therapists and researchers are suggested.

  8. Hispanic immigrants in the USA: social and mental health perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Renato D; Parekh, Amrita; Wainberg, Milton L; Duarte, Cristiane S; Araya, Ricardo; Oquendo, María A

    2016-09-01

    Hispanic immigration in the USA and its effect on many areas of US society are of great relevance to health care, public health, mental health, and medical and social sciences. In this report, we review and discuss pertinent literature on causes, procedures, and eventual outcomes of Hispanic migration waves throughout the last four decades. Hispanic immigrants do not constitute a monolithic group, despite the clear predominance of Mexican and Mexican-American segments. Common features of Hispanic immigrants include a younger average age, higher presence of married households, and lower educational levels than the overall US population. Differences within the Hispanic immigrant population are present in naturalisation figures, English language fluency, occupational and income status, health insurance coverage, and sense of accomplishment in the host society. We examine most of these aspects in the context of the so-called Hispanic paradox, presented as both a cause and a result of a heavily discussed acculturative process. We investigate prevalence and other data on depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and psychotic syndromes, with emphasis on the need to do further neurobiological, epigenetic, and sociocultural research in the Hispanic population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Perspectives of Family Members on Using Technology in Youth Mental Health Care: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Winnie; Rivard, Lysanne

    2017-01-01

    Background Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are increasingly recognized as having an important role in the delivery of mental health services for youth. Recent studies have evaluated young people’s access and use of technology, as well as their perspectives on using technology to receive mental health information, services, and support; however, limited attention has been given to the perspectives of family members in this regard. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of family members on the use of ICTs to deliver mental health services to youth within the context of specialized early intervention for a first-episode psychosis (FEP). Methods Six focus groups were conducted with family members recruited from an early intervention program for psychosis. Twelve family members participated in the study (target sample was 12-18, and recruitment efforts took place over the duration of 1 year). A 12-item semistructured focus group guide was developed to explore past experiences of technology and recommendations for the use of technology in youth mental health service delivery. A qualitative thematic analysis guided the identification and organization of common themes and patterns identified across the dataset. Results Findings were organized by the following themes: access and use of technology, potential negative impacts of technology on youth in recovery, potential benefits of using technology to deliver mental health services to youth, and recommendations to use technology for (1) providing quality information in a manner that is accessible to individuals of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, (2) facilitating communication with health care professionals and services, and (3) increasing access to peer support. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is among the first (or the first) to explore the perspectives of family members of youth being treated for FEP on the use of technology for mental health care. Our results highlight

  10. Perspectives of Family Members on Using Technology in Youth Mental Health Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shalini; Daniel, Winnie; Rivard, Lysanne

    2017-06-23

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are increasingly recognized as having an important role in the delivery of mental health services for youth. Recent studies have evaluated young people's access and use of technology, as well as their perspectives on using technology to receive mental health information, services, and support; however, limited attention has been given to the perspectives of family members in this regard. The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of family members on the use of ICTs to deliver mental health services to youth within the context of specialized early intervention for a first-episode psychosis (FEP). Six focus groups were conducted with family members recruited from an early intervention program for psychosis. Twelve family members participated in the study (target sample was 12-18, and recruitment efforts took place over the duration of 1 year). A 12-item semistructured focus group guide was developed to explore past experiences of technology and recommendations for the use of technology in youth mental health service delivery. A qualitative thematic analysis guided the identification and organization of common themes and patterns identified across the dataset. Findings were organized by the following themes: access and use of technology, potential negative impacts of technology on youth in recovery, potential benefits of using technology to deliver mental health services to youth, and recommendations to use technology for (1) providing quality information in a manner that is accessible to individuals of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, (2) facilitating communication with health care professionals and services, and (3) increasing access to peer support. To our knowledge, this is among the first (or the first) to explore the perspectives of family members of youth being treated for FEP on the use of technology for mental health care. Our results highlight the importance of considering diverse experiences

  11. Identifying and Reducing Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes Among American Indians and Alaskan Natives Using Public Health, Mental Healthcare and Legal Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Payne, Hannah E; Steele, Michalyn; Bingham, Jennie L; Sloan, Chantel D

    2017-01-31

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate disparities in mental healthcare delivery in American Indian/Alaska Native populations from three perspectives: public health, legal policy and mental healthcare and provide evidence-based recommendations toward reducing those disparities. Data on mental health funding to tribes were obtained from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. As a result of analysis of these data, vital statistics and current literature, we propose three recommendations to reduce mental health disparities. First, where possible, increase mental health funding opportunities for federally-recognized tribes. Second, model funding practices on principles of tribal self-determination. Finally, support diverse interventions that are culturally-based and culturally-appropriate.

  12. “Life Grows Between the Rocks” Latino adolescents’ and parents’ perspectives on mental health stressors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Carolyn; Lindgren, Sandi

    2010-01-01

    Latino adolescents, an increasingly larger proportion of youth in the US, are at special risk for mental health problems, including depression and suicidal ideation. Little is known about the meaning of mental health stressors for Latino adolescents and their parents. We conducted a descriptive study to elicit Latino adolescents’ and parents’ perspectives regarding mental health stressors as a basis for future preventive interventions. Eight focus groups were conducted with 53 Latino participants, two per sub-group (boys, girls, mothers, fathers). Three categories of mental health stressors included discrimination, immigration, and familial disconnection. Findings support the need for collaborative interventions and multi-level strategies (individual, family, and community) to address stressors in Latino adolescents’ experiences. PMID:19170104

  13. Health system challenges to integration of mental health delivery in primary care in Kenya- perspectives of primary care health workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health system weaknesses in Africa are broadly well known, constraining progress on reducing the burden of both communicable and non-communicable disease (Afr Health Monitor, Special issue, 2011, 14-24), and the key challenges in leadership, governance, health workforce, medical products, vaccines and technologies, information, finance and service delivery have been well described (Int Arch Med, 2008, 1:27). This paper uses focus group methodology to explore health worker perspectives on the challenges posed to integration of mental health into primary care by generic health system weakness. Methods Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 20 health workers drawn from a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a mental health training programme for primary care, 10 from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 health workers from the control group where staff had not received the training). Results These focus group discussions suggested that there are a number of generic health system weaknesses in Kenya which impact on the ability of health workers to care for clients with mental health problems and to implement new skills acquired during a mental health continuing professional development training programmes. These weaknesses include the medicine supply, health management information system, district level supervision to primary care clinics, the lack of attention to mental health in the national health sector targets, and especially its absence in district level targets, which results in the exclusion of mental health from such district level supervision as exists, and the lack of awareness in the district management team about mental health. The lack of mental health coverage included in HIV training courses experienced by the health workers was also striking, as was the intensive focus during district supervision on HIV to

  14. Case Series: Mental Health Needs and Perspectives of Rural Children Reared by Parents Who Abuse Methamphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostler, Teresa; Haight, Wendy; Black, James; Choi, Ga-Young; Kingery, Linda; Sheridan, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This case-based, mixed-methods study was undertaken to understand the perspectives and mental health needs of rural children exposed to parental methamphetamine abuse. Method: Participants were 23 children involved with a state child protective agency because of parental methamphetamine abuse. A semistructured interview provided…

  15. Relationships between Students' Mental Health and Their Perspectives of Life at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Lawson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships between students' self-reported mental health and their perspectives about life at school in metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia. Design/methodology/approach: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and a purpose designed Living and Learning at School Questionnaire (LLSQ)…

  16. Case Series: Mental Health Needs and Perspectives of Rural Children Reared by Parents Who Abuse Methamphetamine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostler, Teresa; Haight, Wendy; Black, James; Choi, Ga-Young; Kingery, Linda; Sheridan, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This case-based, mixed-methods study was undertaken to understand the perspectives and mental health needs of rural children exposed to parental methamphetamine abuse. Method: Participants were 23 children involved with a state child protective agency because of parental methamphetamine abuse. A semistructured interview provided…

  17. Relationships between Students' Mental Health and Their Perspectives of Life at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Lawson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships between students' self-reported mental health and their perspectives about life at school in metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia. Design/methodology/approach: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and a purpose designed Living and Learning at School Questionnaire (LLSQ)…

  18. Public-Sector Managed Care for Children's Mental Health Services: Stakeholders' Perspectives. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stangl, Dalene K.; Tweed, Dan L.; Farmer, Betsy; Langmeyer, David; Stelle, Lynn; Behar, Lenore B.; Gagliardi, Julia; Burns, Barbara J.

    This paper presents contributions at a symposium about Carolina Alternatives (CA), a North Carolina program that blends capitated financing with public sector managed care for mental health and substance abuse services for children and youth eligible for Medicaid. The symposium focused on stakeholders' perspectives and on expenditure patterns of…

  19. What do persons with mental illnesses need to quit smoking? Mental health consumer and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Morris, Chad D; Waxmonsky, Jeanette A; May, Mandy G; Giese, Alexis A

    2009-01-01

    Forty-one percent (41%) of persons in the U.S. who reported having recent mental illnesses also smoke cigarettes. Tobacco use among this population is associated with up to 25 less years of life and excess medical comorbidity compared to the general population. While research demonstrates that tobacco interventions can be effective for persons with mental illnesses, they are not commonly utilized in clinical practice. The current study explored how to adapt evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions to meet the unique physiological, psychological, and social challenges facing persons with mental illnesses. Ten focus groups were conducted utilizing a semi-structured discussion; 5 for adult mental health consumers (n = 62) and 5 with mental health clinicians and administrators (n = 22). Content analysis was used to organize themes into categories. Five thematic categories were found: (1) Barriers to treatment, (2) Resources and infrastructure, (3) Negative influences on smoking behavior, (4) Knowledge deficits, and (5) Treatment needs. These findings are instructive in developing appropriate tobacco cessation services for this population. Specifically, these data have been incorporated into a mental health provider toolkit for smoking cessation and have informed the development of a tobacco cessation intervention study.

  20. Preventing Filipino Mental Health Disparities: Perspectives from Adolescents, Caregivers, Providers, and Advocates.

    PubMed

    Javier, Joyce R; Supan, Jocelyn; Lansang, Anjelica; Beyer, William; Kubicek, Katrina; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2014-12-01

    Filipino Americans are the second largest immigrant population and second largest Asian ethnic group in the U.S. Disparities in youth behavioral health problems and the receipt of mental health services among Filipino youth have been documented previously. However, few studies have elicited perspectives from community stakeholders regarding how to prevent mental health disparities among Filipino youth. The purpose of the current study is to identify intervention strategies for implementing mental health prevention programs among Filipino youth. We conducted semi-structured interviews (n=33) with adolescents, caregivers, advocates, and providers and focus groups (n=18) with adolescents and caregivers. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analyzed using a methodology of "coding consensus, co-occurrence, and comparison" and was rooted in grounded theory. Four recommendations were identified when developing mental health prevention strategies among Filipino populations: address the intergenerational gap between Filipino parents and children, provide evidence-based parenting programs, collaborate with churches in order to overcome stigma associated with mental health, and address mental health needs of parents. Findings highlight the implementation of evidence-based preventive parenting programs in faith settings as a community-identified and culturally appropriate strategy to prevent Filipino youth behavioral health disparities.

  1. Staff perspectives on two rare mental health disorders.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Samantha; Lowe, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS)/pervasive arousal withdrawal syndrome (PAWS) and conversion disorder (CD) are two rare mental health disorders that commonly affect children and young people. In the most extreme cases of PRS/PAWS, young people may be unable to perform activities of daily living and rely on adults for physical and emotional support. CD can present as loss of sensation in vision and touch, pain in certain areas and an inability to walk. It is important that children's nurses are aware of these disorders and have some insight into the most helpful approaches. Young people need to feel that their experiences are validated, which can elicit feelings in staff from an urge to help to intense frustration. It is essential for staff to be able to talk and reflect to allow such feelings to be understood. Although these are rare conditions, this article outlines what to do if young people present with features of PRS/PAWS or CD in a general healthcare setting.

  2. Resilience in mental health: linking psychological and neurobiological perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Rutten, B P F; Hammels, C; Geschwind, N; Menne-Lothmann, C; Pishva, E; Schruers, K; van den Hove, D; Kenis, G; van Os, J; Wichers, M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on psychological and biological findings on resilience (i.e. the successful adaptation and swift recovery after experiencing life adversities) at the level of the individual, and to integrate findings from animal and human studies. Method Electronic and manual literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO, using a range of search terms around biological and psychological factors influencing resilience as observed in human and experimental animal studies, complemented by review articles and cross-references. Results The term resilience is used in the literature for different phenomena ranging from prevention of mental health disturbance to successful adaptation and swift recovery after experiencing life adversities, and may also include post-traumatic psychological growth. Secure attachment, experiencing positive emotions and having a purpose in life are three important psychological building blocks of resilience. Overlap between psychological and biological findings on resilience in the literature is most apparent for the topic of stress sensitivity, although recent results suggest a crucial role for reward experience in resilience. Conclusion Improving the understanding of the links between genetic endowment, environmental impact and gene–environment interactions with developmental psychology and biology is crucial for elucidating the neurobiological and psychological underpinnings of resilience. PMID:23488807

  3. [Indicators of governance in mental health policies and programmes in Mexico: a perspective of key actors].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Castro, Lina; Arredondo, Armando; Pelcastre-Villafuerte, Blanca Estela; Hufty, Marc

    To analyse the role of Mexico's mental health system governance in the development of mental health policies and programmes, from the perspective of its own actors. A map was developed for identifying the actors in Mexico's mental health system. A guide was designed for in-depth interviews, which were recorded and arranged in categories for their analysis. The Atlas-ti v.7 software was used for the organisation of qualitative data and Policy Maker v.4 was used to determine the position and influence of actors within the health system. The actors were identified according to their level of influence in mental health policies: high, medium and low. Actors with a high level of influence participate in national policies, actors with medium influence are involved in regional or local policies and the participation of actors with a low level of influence is considered marginal. This study facilitated understanding of governance in mental health. The level of influence of the actors directly affects the scope of governance indicators. Relevant data were obtained to improve policies in mental health care. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Employee Health in the Mental Health Workplace: Clinical, Administrative, and Organizational Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jai L; Kapoor, Reena; Cole, Robert; Steiner, Jeanne L

    2016-04-01

    Issues of mental health and employee health have risen to increasing prominence in recent years. However, there have been few explorations of the clinical and administrative challenges that these issues raise, particularly in settings that are themselves mental health workplaces. In order to identify and understand such challenges, a brief case of acute employee illness in a mental health workplace is described followed by a discussion of salient clinical, administrative, and organizational considerations. The case raises questions about medicolegal responsibilities and relationships between clinicians and patients in mental health settings, illuminates tensions between clinical staff and human resources processes, and draws attention to the need for illness prevention and mental health promotion initiatives in the workplace. Increased awareness of these issues, complications, and potential solutions would benefit clinicians, administrators, and mental health institutions.

  5. Barriers to genuine consumer and carer participation from the perspectives of Australian systemic mental health advocates.

    PubMed

    Gee, Alison; McGarty, Craig; Banfield, Michelle

    2016-06-01

    Consumer and carer participation in mental health service development and evaluation has widespread nominal support. However, genuine and consistent participation remains elusive due to systemic barriers. This paper explores barriers to reform for mental health services from the perspectives of consumers and carers actively engaged in advocating for improvements in the mental health system. Qualitative research with two mental health systemic advocacy organisations analysed 17 strategic communication documents and nine interviews to examine barriers to reform and participation identified by consumer and carer advocates and staff. A number of individual-level barriers were described, however advocates gave more focus to systemic barriers, for which five themes emerged. These reflected lack of awareness, limited participation opportunities, slow progress for change, policy issues and mental health culture including stigma. Findings highlight systemic barriers to participation for consumer and carer advocates as a whole and the influence of these barriers on the individual experiences of those engaged in advocacy and representation work. Participants also emphasised the need for leadership to overcome some of these obstacles and move towards genuine consumer and carer participation and reform. Findings are discussed in the context of power within mental health systems.

  6. Children's mental health policies in the United States: perspectives from advocates and state leaders.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Janice L; Aratani, Yumiko

    2015-12-01

    Previous research suggests a disconnect on both policy and practice between advocates and state leaders in child mental health. To compare advocates' and state leader's perspectives and understanding on the three main themes in children's mental health policies: (i) state's initiatives to empower and engage families and youth in policy and practice; (ii) state's fiscal support for family and youth driven services; and (iii) policy challenges to improving children's mental health services and outcomes. This study draws on data from national surveys of State Children's Mental Health Directors (2006) and of state affiliates of Mental Health America (2007). The findings from 38 responses representing 19 states suggest differences between state leaders and advocates on their understanding of family and youth engagement, service access, quality and fiscal supports. While state directors and advocates seem to have similar understanding on the existence of states' efforts related to evidence-based practices, many advocates are unaware of the specifics of the strategies that states undertook or funded. Advocates also did not know which types of settings were eligible for reimbursement for children's services. Advocates lack some information that is vital to fulfilling their role. Policymakers seem unaware of key challenges that families face and therefore appear to be without critical information that fuels the agenda for advocates. The challenge for both set of actors is how to get beyond this information asymmetry to advance efforts to improve mental health. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Mental health/illness and prisons as place: frontline clinicians׳ perspectives of mental health work in a penal setting.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicola; Jordan, Melanie; Kane, Eddie

    2014-09-01

    This article takes mental health and prisons as its two foci. It explores the links between social and structural aspects of the penal setting, the provision of mental healthcare in prisons, and mental health work in this environment. This analysis utilises qualitative interview data from prison-based fieldwork undertaken in Her Majesty׳s Prison Service, England. Two themes are discussed: (1) the desire and practicalities of doing mental health work and (2) prison staff as mental health work allies. Concepts covered include equivalence, training, ownership, informal communication, mental health knowledge, service gatekeepers, case identification, and unmet need. Implications for practice are (1) the mental health knowledge and understanding of prison wing staff could be appraised and developed to improve mental healthcare and address unmet need. Their role as observers and gatekeepers could be considered. (2) The realities of frontline mental health work for clinicians in the penal environment should be embraced and used to produce and implement improved policy and practice guidance, which is in better accord with the actuality of the context - both socially and structurally.

  8. Recognizing and addressing the stigma associated with mental health nursing: a critical perspective.

    PubMed

    Gouthro, Trina Johnena

    2009-11-01

    Negative and stigmatizing beliefs regarding mental health nursing discredit the valuable contributions of mental health nurses, but more importantly, these beliefs discredit the needs of people who access mental health care. The stigma associated with mental health nursing, however, has received little attention in the literature. In this article, the author explores the stigma associated with mental health nursing from a critical lens. Recommendations are proposed to address the stigma associated with mental health nursing and mental illness, concurrently, within nursing education.

  9. A postcolonial feminist perspective inquiry into immigrant women's mental health care experiences.

    PubMed

    Maureen O'Mahony, Joyce; Truong Donnelly, Tam

    2010-07-01

    The number of immigrants coming to Canada has increased in the last three decades. As a result, there is greater emphasis on health care providers and the health care system to provide culturally appropriate and equitable care. It is well documented that many immigrant women suffer from serious mental health problems and experience difficulties in accessing and using mental health services. In this paper we advocate for new ways of research inquiry in exploring immigrant women's mental health care experiences, ones that move beyond the individual experiences of health and illness toward recognition that the health of immigrant women must be addressed within the social, cultural, economic, historical, and political context of their lives. Drawing on past research we demonstrate how the postcolonial feminist perspective can be used to illuminate the ways in which race, gender, and class relations influence social, cultural, political, and economic factors, which, in turn, shape the lives of immigrant women. We suggest that postcolonial feminism provides an analytic lens to (a) generate transformative knowledge about immigrant women's mental health care experiences; (b) improve equitable health care; and (c) increase understanding of what would be helpful in meeting the immigrant women's health care needs.

  10. Gamification in Healthcare: Perspectives of Mental Health Service Users and Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Hopia, Hanna; Raitio, Katja

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore the perceptions and experiences that mental health service users (n = 10) and healthcare professionals (n = 32) have regarding the use of gamification in mental health care. Data was gathered by interviews. The mental health service users described promoting and retarding factors in the use of gamification, while professionals described the requirements for using gamification and changes occurring in the work culture. Additional research is needed on how game-playing elements could be integrated as a systematic part of mental health practice and how the digital skills of professionals could be effectively developed.

  11. Using modular psychotherapy in school mental health: Provider perspectives on intervention-setting fit

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Ludwig, Kristy; Romano, Evalynn; Koltracht, Jane; Stoep, Ann Vander; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective The “fit” or appropriateness of well-researched interventions within usual care contexts is among the most commonly-cited, but infrequently researched, factors in the successful implementation of new practices. The current study was initiated to address two exploratory research questions: (1) How do clinicians describe their current school mental health service delivery context? and (2) How do clinicians describe the fit between modular psychotherapy and multiple levels of the school mental health service delivery context? Method Following a year-long training and consultation program in an evidence-based, modular approach to psychotherapy, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with seventeen school-based mental health providers to evaluate their perspectives on the appropriateness of implementing the approach within a system of school-based health centers. Interviews were transcribed and coded for themes using conventional and directed content analysis. Results Findings identified key elements of the school mental health context including characteristics of the clinicians, their practices, the school context, and the service recipients. Specific evaluation of intervention-setting appropriateness elicited many comments about both practical and value-based (e.g., cultural considerations) aspects at the clinician and client levels, but fewer comments at the school or organizational levels. Conclusions Results suggest that a modular approach may fit well with the school mental health service context, especially along practical aspects of appropriateness. Future research focused on the development of methods for routinely assessing appropriateness at different stages of the implementation process is recommended. PMID:24134063

  12. Cultural Perspectives on Mental Health Practice in Arab Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Abdel-Sattar

    Individuals in Arabian cultures, as in any other culture, are forced into different life experiences and therefore, deliberately and inadvertently, develop many different and unique cultural values and perspectives. When practicing therapy, these differences must be taken into account before maximum success can be achieved. This paper concentrates…

  13. Mental health parity legislation.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Arlene; Cullen-Drill, Mary

    2010-09-01

    Although recognition and treatment of mental health disorders have become integrated into routine medical care, inequities remain regarding limits on mental health outpatient visits and higher copayments and deductibles required for mental health services when accessed. Two federal laws were passed by Congress in 2008: The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act. Both laws became effective on January 1, 2010. The purpose of this article is to discuss provisions of each act and provide clinical examples describing how patients are affected by lack of parity and may potentially benefit from implementation of these new laws. Using available evidence, we examine the potential strengths and limitations of mental health parity legislation from the health policy perspectives of health care access, cost, and quality and identify the important role of nurses as patient and mental health parity advocates.

  14. Mental Health, Racism, and Sexism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles V., Ed.; And Others

    This volume, successor to the 1973 volume "Racism and Mental Health," presents a range of perspectives on mental health, prejudice, and discrimination. Contributors are of multiracial, multiethnic, and gender-diverse backgrounds. They use their existential experiences to analyze pressing mental health and mental illness issues. Contributions…

  15. Mental Health, Racism, and Sexism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willie, Charles V., Ed.; And Others

    This volume, successor to the 1973 volume "Racism and Mental Health," presents a range of perspectives on mental health, prejudice, and discrimination. Contributors are of multiracial, multiethnic, and gender-diverse backgrounds. They use their existential experiences to analyze pressing mental health and mental illness issues. Contributions…

  16. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession.

  17. Community perspectives on post-Katrina mental health recovery in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Diana; Allien, Charles E; Dunn, Donisha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F

    2011-01-01

    Disaster-affected communities may face prolonged challenges to community-wide mental health recovery due to limitations in local resources, infrastructure, and leadership. REACH NOLA, an umbrella non-profit organization comprising academic institutions and community-based agencies, sought to promote community recovery, increase mental health service delivery capacity, and develop local leadership in post-Katrina New Orleans through its Mental Health infrastructure and Training Project (MHIT). The project offered local health service providers training and follow-up support for implementing evidence-based and new approaches to mental health service delivery. This commentary shares the perspectives of three community leaders who co-directed MHIT. They describe the genesis of MHIT, the experience of each agency in adopting leadership roles in addressing post-disaster needs, challenges and growth opportunities, and then overarching lessons learned concerning leadership in a prolonged crisis. These lessons may be relevant to community agencies addressing hurricane recovery in other areas of the Gulf States as well as to inform long-term disaster recovery efforts elsewhere.

  18. Community Perspectives on Post-Katrina Mental Health Recovery in New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Diana; Allen, Charles E.; Dunn, Donisha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    Disaster-affected communities may face prolonged challenges to community-wide mental health recovery due to limitations in local resources, infrastructure, and leadership. REACH NOLA, an umbrella non-profit organization comprising academic institutions and community-based agencies, sought to promote community recovery, increase mental health service delivery capacity, and develop local leadership in post-Katrina New Orleans through its Mental Health Infrastructure and Training Project (MHIT). The project offered local health service providers training and follow-up support for implementing evidence-based and new approaches to mental health service delivery. This commentary shares the perspectives of leaders of three community leaders who co-directed MHIT. They describe the genesis of MHIT, the experience of each agency in adopting leadership roles in addressing post-disaster needs, challenges and growth opportunities, and then overarching lessons learned concerning leadership in a prolonged crisis. These lessons may be relevant to community agencies addressing hurricane recovery in other areas of the Gulf States as well as to inform long-term disaster recovery efforts elsewhere. PMID:22352081

  19. International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators.

    PubMed

    Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Kallioniemi, Marja; Lundqvist, Peter; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Stallones, Lorann; Brumby, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective.

  20. Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours ... mental health should be part of your complete medical evaluation before starting antiretroviral medications. And you should ...

  1. Service-user and carer perspectives on compliance and compulsory treatment in community mental health services.

    PubMed

    Gault, Iris

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study analyzing service-user (SU) and carer perspectives on medication compliance and their experience of compulsory treatment. Eleven SUs and eight carers were interviewed. The research is set against the background of changes to mental health legislation in England, in the form of Supervised Community Treatment. This signals a change in community mental health practice and urges a reconsideration of concepts such as compliance, concordance and coercion. These concepts are discussed in the context of legislative changes and in relation to the perspectives of service-SUs and carers. Five themes emerged from qualitative interview data, analysed using an adapted form of grounded theory: loss of credible identity, playing the game, medicalization, therapeutic competence and incompetence and increased control. The findings suggest that SUs are initially reluctant to comply with mental health treatment, but do eventually accept the need for treatment; they also stress the significance of respectful relationships with professionals and the importance of communicative competence.

  2. Barriers and facilitators of a healthy lifestyle among persons with serious and persistent mental illness: perspectives of community mental health providers.

    PubMed

    McKibbin, Christine L; Kitchen, Katherine A; Wykes, Thomas L; Lee, Aaron A

    2014-07-01

    The investigators used qualitative methods to examine perspectives of community mental health professionals on obesity management in adults with serious mental illness (SMI). Data from 5 focus groups were subjected to constant comparison analysis and grounded theory. Results showed that influences at individual, social, community, and societal levels impact development and maintenance of obesity. Mental health providers desired a collaborative relationship with health promotion program staff. They also believed that frequent, group-based health promotion should include participation incentives for adults with SMI and should occur over durations of at least 6-months to achieve improved health outcomes for this population.

  3. What Is Mental Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myths and Facts Recovery is Possible What Is Mental Health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social ... mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people to: ...

  4. Problematization of perspectives on health promotion and empowerment in mental health nursing--within the research network "MeHNuRse" and the Horatio conference, 2012.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Patrik D; Nunstedt, Håkan; Berglund, Inger J; Ahlström, Britt H; Hedelin, Birgitta; Skärsäter, Ingela; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2014-01-01

    Mental illness is increasing worldwide, while society's response seems to be a trend toward narrower and more specialized mental health care. This development is creating great demands on mental health nurses to include a health promotion perspective in care and support of persons with mental illness. A health promotion perspective emphasizes cooperation and communication with people who suffer from long-term mental illness, focusing on their independence and health. From a health perspective, every human being is an actor in his/her own life, with an inherent ability to make his/her own choices. However, persons who suffer from long-term mental illness are at risk of losing power and control over areas of their lives and their health. Mental health nurses are in a position to support these individuals in promoting health and in maintaining or regaining control over their lives. The emphasis of this paper is to problematize mental health nurses' responsibility to provide health-promoting nursing care in relation to empowerment by means of emancipation, self-efficacy, and self-management. We argue that mental health nurses can work from a health-promoting perspective by using these concepts and that this challenges some of the traditional ideas of health promotion in mental health nursing. The theoretical background discussions in this paper have their origin in the research network "Mental Health Nursing Research in Scandinavia" (MeHNuRse) and from the professional discussions developed during a 2012 workshop that included mental health nurses and researchers at the European Horatio Festival in Stockholm.

  5. Problematization of perspectives on health promotion and empowerment in mental health nursing—Within the research network “MeHNuRse” and the Horatio conference, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Patrik D.; Nunstedt, Håkan; Berglund, Inger J.; Ahlström, Britt H.; Hedelin, Birgitta; Skärsäter, Ingela; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2014-01-01

    Mental illness is increasing worldwide, while society's response seems to be a trend toward narrower and more specialized mental health care. This development is creating great demands on mental health nurses to include a health promotion perspective in care and support of persons with mental illness. A health promotion perspective emphasizes cooperation and communication with people who suffer from long-term mental illness, focusing on their independence and health. From a health perspective, every human being is an actor in his/her own life, with an inherent ability to make his/her own choices. However, persons who suffer from long-term mental illness are at risk of losing power and control over areas of their lives and their health. Mental health nurses are in a position to support these individuals in promoting health and in maintaining or regaining control over their lives. The emphasis of this paper is to problematize mental health nurses’ responsibility to provide health-promoting nursing care in relation to empowerment by means of emancipation, self-efficacy, and self-management. We argue that mental health nurses can work from a health-promoting perspective by using these concepts and that this challenges some of the traditional ideas of health promotion in mental health nursing. The theoretical background discussions in this paper have their origin in the research network “Mental Health Nursing Research in Scandinavia” (MeHNuRse) and from the professional discussions developed during a 2012 workshop that included mental health nurses and researchers at the European Horatio Festival in Stockholm. PMID:24717267

  6. Mental health promotion in public health: perspectives and strategies from positive psychology.

    PubMed

    Kobau, Rosemarie; Seligman, Martin E P; Peterson, Christopher; Diener, Ed; Zack, Matthew M; Chapman, Daniel; Thompson, William

    2011-08-01

    Positive psychology is the study of what is "right" about people-their positive attributes, psychological assets, and strengths. Its aim is to understand and foster the factors that allow individuals, communities, and societies to thrive. Cross-sectional, experimental, and longitudinal research demonstrates that positive emotions are associated with numerous benefits related to health, work, family, and economic status. Growing biomedical research supports the view that positive emotions are not merely the opposite of negative emotions but may be independent dimensions of mental affect. The asset-based paradigms of positive psychology offer new approaches for bolstering psychological resilience and promoting mental health. Ultimately, greater synergy between positive psychology and public health might help promote mental health in innovative ways.

  7. Mental Health Promotion in Public Health: Perspectives and Strategies From Positive Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Martin E.P.; Peterson, Christopher; Diener, Ed; Zack, Matthew M.; Chapman, Daniel; Thompson, William

    2011-01-01

    Positive psychology is the study of what is “right” about people—their positive attributes, psychological assets, and strengths. Its aim is to understand and foster the factors that allow individuals, communities, and societies to thrive. Cross-sectional, experimental, and longitudinal research demonstrates that positive emotions are associated with numerous benefits related to health, work, family, and economic status. Growing biomedical research supports the view that positive emotions are not merely the opposite of negative emotions but may be independent dimensions of mental affect. The asset-based paradigms of positive psychology offer new approaches for bolstering psychological resilience and promoting mental health. Ultimately, greater synergy between positive psychology and public health might help promote mental health in innovative ways. PMID:21680918

  8. "Music Therapy Helped Me Get Back Doing": Perspectives of Music Therapy Participants in Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Tríona; Edwards, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Mental health service development internationally is increasingly informed by the collaborative ethos of recovery. Service user evaluation of experiences within music therapy programs allows new phenomena about participation in services to be revealed that might otherwise remain unnoticed. The aim of this study was to demonstrate how asking service users about their experience of music therapy can generate useful information, and to reflect upon the feedback elicited from such processes in order to gain a deeper understanding of how music therapy is received among service users in mental health. Six mental health service users described their experiences of music therapy in one or two individual interviews. Transcripts of interviews were analyzed using the procedures and techniques of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Interviews with mental health service users provided rich, in-depth accounts reflecting the complex nature of music therapy participation. Super-ordinate themes refer to the context in which music therapy was offered, the rich sound world of music in music therapy, the humanity of music therapy, and the strengths enhancing opportunities experienced by service users. Participants indicated that they each experienced music therapy in unique ways. Opinions about the value of music therapy were revealed through an interview process in which the researcher holds an open attitude, welcoming all narrative contributions respectfully. These findings can remind practitioners of the importance of closely tuning into the perspectives and understandings of those who have valuable expertise to share about their experience of music therapy services in mental health. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Consumer participation in mental health services: looking from a consumer perspective.

    PubMed

    Lammers, J; Happell, B

    2003-08-01

    Widespread changes to the structure and delivery of mental health services have effected considerable change in the role of the service user or consumer. The view of consumers of mental health services as passive recipients of care and treatment is gradually undergoing a significant shift, in light of an increasing expectation that consumers be provided with opportunities to become actively involved in all aspects of their care. Consumer participation is now broadly reflected in government policy; however, to date there has been little exploration of the extent to which the policy is being realized in practice. To provide a greater understanding of these experiences and opinions, in-depth interviews were conducted with consumers of mental health services (n = 15). The interview transcripts were analysed through the identification and explication of major themes. The findings reinforce the need to view consumers as heterogeneous and respond to individual needs and interests regarding consumer participation. Despite variations in experience there is a clear need to develop mechanisms to support consumer involvement and to influence the attitudes of health professions to become more valuing of a consumer perspective. Nurses are in an ideal position to lead this process.

  10. [New perspective on psychiatric mental health nursing research: revisiting the resilience of children].

    PubMed

    Shu, Bih-Ching

    2014-02-01

    Rapid changes in societal and environmental conditions mean that many health issues remain unresolved, especially in the realms of childhood social-emotional and mental problems. These problems threaten to affect the future development of affected children. Therefore, this article introduces the new perspective on gene-environment interactions and epigenetics in neuroscience, the definition of resilience, and current developments in related research. This article further integrates the literature to identify the association of resilience in children's emotional and behavioral adjustment. These evidence-based studies demonstrate the significance of resilience intervention and assessment in psychiatric nursing. These developments hold the potential to upgrade clinical applications and enhance the development of individuals.

  11. Eradicating Barriers to Mental Health Care Through Integrated Service Models: Contemporary Perspectives for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Horace; Alexander, Vinette

    2016-06-01

    There has been renewed, global interest in developing new and transformative models of facilitating access to high-quality, cost-effective, and individually-centered health care for severe mentally-ill (SMI) persons of diverse racial/ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, in our present-day health-service delivery systems, scholars have identified layers of barriers to widespread dispersal of well-needed mental health care both nationally and internationally. It is crucial that contemporary models directed at eradicating barriers to mental health services are interdisciplinary in context, design, scope, sequence, and best-practice standards. Contextually, nurses are well-positioned to influence the incorporation and integration of new concepts into operationally interdisciplinary, evidence-based care models with measurable outcomes. The aim of this concept paper is to use the available evidence to contextually explicate how the blended roles of psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing can be influential in eradicating barriers to care and services for SMI persons through the integrated principles of collaboration, integration and service expansion across health, socioeconomic, and community systems. A large body of literature proposes that any best-practice standards aimed at eliminating barriers to the health care needs of SMI persons require systematic, well-coordinated interdisciplinary partnerships through evidence-based, high-quality, person-centered, and outcome-driven processes. Transforming the conceptual models of collaboration, integration and service expansion could be revolutionary in how care and services are coordinated and dispersed to populations across disadvantaged communities. Building on their longstanding commitment to individual and community care approaches, and their pivotal roles in research, education, leadership, practice, and legislative processes; PMH nurses are well-positioned to be both influential and instrumental in

  12. Health system challenges to integration of mental health delivery in primary care in Kenya--perspectives of primary care health workers.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Rachel; Othieno, Caleb; Okeyo, Stephen; Aruwa, Julyan; Kingora, James; Jenkins, Ben

    2013-09-30

    Health system weaknesses in Africa are broadly well known, constraining progress on reducing the burden of both communicable and non-communicable disease (Afr Health Monitor, Special issue, 2011, 14-24), and the key challenges in leadership, governance, health workforce, medical products, vaccines and technologies, information, finance and service delivery have been well described (Int Arch Med, 2008, 1:27). This paper uses focus group methodology to explore health worker perspectives on the challenges posed to integration of mental health into primary care by generic health system weakness. Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 20 health workers drawn from a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a mental health training programme for primary care, 10 from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 health workers from the control group where staff had not received the training). These focus group discussions suggested that there are a number of generic health system weaknesses in Kenya which impact on the ability of health workers to care for clients with mental health problems and to implement new skills acquired during a mental health continuing professional development training programmes. These weaknesses include the medicine supply, health management information system, district level supervision to primary care clinics, the lack of attention to mental health in the national health sector targets, and especially its absence in district level targets, which results in the exclusion of mental health from such district level supervision as exists, and the lack of awareness in the district management team about mental health. The lack of mental health coverage included in HIV training courses experienced by the health workers was also striking, as was the intensive focus during district supervision on HIV to the detriment of other

  13. Patient participation in mental health care - perspectives of healthcare professionals: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Kim; Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2017-09-22

    In contemporary Western liberal society, patient participation has become a key goal in psychiatric healthcare treatment. Health professionals must encourage patients to play an active and involved part in their treatment. According to Danish health law, patients have the right to participate in their treatment, and the mental health system therefore needs to be reformed in order to ensure that treatment is based on individual, liberal, values. However, patient participation is not clearly defined, and it is therefore a challenge to transfer it to clinical practice. This integrative review's aims are to explore how professionals perceive the challenges regarding patient participation in the treatment course in mental health care. An integrative review. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria: six employed qualitative methodologies and one utilised a mixed-methods approach. The empirical studies took place in Norway, the UK and Australia, all in a mental health setting. Three themes were identified: 'Patient participation as collaboration between the healthcare professional and patient', 'Challenges to participation' and 'From a professional's perspective - what expectations do patients have when participating in decision-making?' Different synonymous terms describing the patient's active role during treatment - user participation, collaboration, partnership, user involvement and patient participation - are linked to a recovery-oriented approach, shared decision-making, shared ownership and care plans. This integrative review achieves specific knowledge around patient participation, comparing the situation for adult patients with various mental disorders. However, upon reflecting on the included studies, patient participation is not clearly defined, and it is therefore difficult to transfer it to clinical practice. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Perspectives on Games, Computers, and Mental Health: Questions about Paradoxes, Evidences, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Desseilles, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of mental health, games and computerized games present questions about paradoxes, evidences, and challenges. This perspective article offers perspectives and personal opinion about these questions, evidences, and challenges with an objective of presenting several ideas and issues in this rapidly developing field. First, games raise some questions in the sense of the paradox between a game and an issue, as well as the paradox of using an amusing game to treat a serious pathology. Second, games also present evidence in the sense that they involve relationships with others, as well as learning, communication, language, emotional regulation, and hedonism. Third, games present challenges, such as the risk of abuse, the critical temporal period that may be limited to childhood, their important influence on sociocognitive learning and the establishment of social norms, and the risk of misuse of games.

  15. Understanding community mental health administrators' perspectives on dialectical behavior therapy implementation.

    PubMed

    Herschell, Amy D; Kogan, Jane N; Celedonia, Karen L; Gavin, James G; Stein, Bradley D

    2009-07-01

    In this study, key informant interviews were conducted with 13 administrators from nine community-based mental health agencies implementing dialectical behavior therapy in order to assess their perspectives on implementation. Four major themes were identified. They include opinions about dialectical behavior therapy and its fit with existing practices, resource concerns (for example, reimbursement issues, time commitment, and staff training), staff selection for training and staff turnover, and ongoing client referrals. Understanding agency administrators' unique perspectives and addressing their concerns is critical to treatment implementation given administrators' role in determining whether and how a treatment will be implemented. Better understanding of the fit between dialectical behavior therapy and existing service structures, the impact of staff turnover on implementation, and the resources required for implementation are all needed to ensure successful implementation and sustainability.

  16. Perspectives on Games, Computers, and Mental Health: Questions about Paradoxes, Evidences, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Desseilles, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of mental health, games and computerized games present questions about paradoxes, evidences, and challenges. This perspective article offers perspectives and personal opinion about these questions, evidences, and challenges with an objective of presenting several ideas and issues in this rapidly developing field. First, games raise some questions in the sense of the paradox between a game and an issue, as well as the paradox of using an amusing game to treat a serious pathology. Second, games also present evidence in the sense that they involve relationships with others, as well as learning, communication, language, emotional regulation, and hedonism. Third, games present challenges, such as the risk of abuse, the critical temporal period that may be limited to childhood, their important influence on sociocognitive learning and the establishment of social norms, and the risk of misuse of games. PMID:27458390

  17. International Aspects of Mental Health Work with Refugees and Future Directions: A European Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauff, Edvard

    This paper describes past and present European efforts to address the mental health needs of refugees. It begins with a brief historical survey of mental health services for refugees after the Second World War and delineates the policy recommendations from the 1948 International Congress on Mental Health. The next section describes current…

  18. Staff Perspectives on Consultation and Integrated Mental Health Services in Early Childhood Settings. Data Trends #110

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. In the article summarized in this "Data Trends" the authors "explore whether having an integrated model of mental health consultation is related to how staff think about and deliver mental health services." According to…

  19. Challenges and Opportunities in Global Mental Health: a Research-to-Practice Perspective.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, Milton L; Scorza, Pamela; Shultz, James M; Helpman, Liat; Mootz, Jennifer J; Johnson, Karen A; Neria, Yuval; Bradford, Jean-Marie E; Oquendo, Maria A; Arbuckle, Melissa R

    2017-05-01

    Globally, the majority of those who need mental health care worldwide lack access to high-quality mental health services. Stigma, human resource shortages, fragmented service delivery models, and lack of research capacity for implementation and policy change contribute to the current mental health treatment gap. In this review, we describe how health systems in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are addressing the mental health gap and further identify challenges and priority areas for future research. Common mental disorders are responsible for the largest proportion of the global burden of disease; yet, there is sound evidence that these disorders, as well as severe mental disorders, can be successfully treated using evidence-based interventions delivered by trained lay health workers in low-resource community or primary care settings. Stigma is a barrier to service uptake. Prevention, though necessary to address the mental health gap, has not solidified as a research or programmatic focus. Research-to-practice implementation studies are required to inform policies and scale-up services. Four priority areas are identified for focused attention to diminish the mental health treatment gap and to improve access to high-quality mental health services globally: diminishing pervasive stigma, building mental health system treatment and research capacity, implementing prevention programs to decrease the incidence of mental disorders, and establishing sustainable scale up of public health systems to improve access to mental health treatment using evidence-based interventions.

  20. Provider Perspectives on School-Based Mental Health for Urban Minority Youth: Access and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Brandon E.; Lambros, Katina M.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides results from a qualitative study on the efforts of school-based mental health providers (SBMHPs) who serve students in urban, suburban, and ethnically diverse settings to help families access quality mental health services. School-based mental health plays a key role in the provision of direct and indirect intervention…

  1. Research priorities in mental health occupational therapy: A study of clinician perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hitch, Danielle; Lhuede, Kate

    2015-10-01

    The evidence to support mental health occupational therapy has proliferated in the early years of this century, but this growth has tended to be organic rather than targeted. Previous efforts to identify research priorities in this area of practice are either out dated, or encompass discrete areas of practice. The aim of this study was to identify priority areas for research in mental health occupational therapy from clinician's perspectives. A Policy Delphi method was used to enable occupational therapists to define and differentiate their perspectives on research priorities. Forty-two occupational therapists took part in the first two rounds of this method, with 69% (n = 29) going on to complete the third and final round of data collection. A Likert scale was used to rate the importance of each priority, and descriptive quantitative analysis undertaken to identify those most consistently identified as being highly important. Four research priorities were identified as being highly important in this study: (i) working in an occupationally focussed way; (ii) consumer experience of therapy groups; (iii) identifying factors which increase consumer engagement in occupation; and (iv) engaging patients on the inpatient unit in meaningful and positive occupation. Two of the priority areas are already the subject of substantial evidence bases, but there has been far less research into consumer experiences of groups and occupational engagement in acute settings. Collaboration between research teams and greater consumer inclusion are recommended for the future. This study provides an updated indication of research priorities for mental health occupational therapy in Australia. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  2. Recovery-promoting professional competencies: perspectives of mental health consumers, consumer-providers and providers.

    PubMed

    Russinova, Zlatka; Rogers, E Sally; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Lyass, Asya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically validate a set of conceptually derived recovery-promoting competencies from the perspectives of mental health consumers, consumer-providers and providers. A national sample of 603 consumers, 153 consumer-providers and 239 providers completed an anonymous survey via the Internet. The survey evaluated respondents' perceptions about a set of 37 competencies hypothesized to enhance clients' hope and empowerment and inquired about interactions with providers that enhanced clients' recovery process. We used descriptive statistics and ranking to establish the relevance of each competency and generalized linear models and post-hoc tests to examine differences in the consumers', consumer-providers' and providers' assessments of these competencies. Analyses confirmed the recovery relevance of several competencies and their relative importance within each group of study participants. They also revealed that while most competencies tended to have universal significance, others depended more strongly on the client's preferences. Finally, differences in the perceptions of consumers, consumer-providers and providers about the recovery relevance of these competencies were established. The study highlighted the crucial role practitioners play in enhancing recovery from serious mental illnesses through specific strategies and attitudes that acknowledge clients' personhood and foster their hopefulness, empowerment and illness management. It informed the development of a new instrument measuring providers' recovery-promoting competence and provides guidelines for sharpening the recovery focus of a wide range of mental health and rehabilitation services.

  3. Mental Health Systems for People with Mental Retardation: A Canadian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarfas, Donald E.

    1988-01-01

    A survey was made of provincial ministries and voluntary associations in nine Canadian provinces and two territories, to assess service provision to mentally retarded citizens with emotional problems. The survey focused on government agencies' involvement in service delivery, settings for short- and long-term care, quality of services available,…

  4. Children's mental health services and ethnic diversity: Gujarati families' perspectives of service provision for mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Nisha; Vostanis, Panos; Abuateya, Hala; Jewson, Nick

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore Gujarati parents' and adolescents' perceptions of child and adolescent mental health services and how these should be improved to best meet their needs. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with 15 parents and 15 young people, recruited from a community centre. Overall, the quality of the service appeared more important than its responsiveness to culture or ethnicity for both young people and their parents. These findings indicate the need for further evidence and debate on whether Black and ethnic minority families should be treated as though they are a homogenous group.

  5. The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program: desirable knowledge, skills and attitudes from the perspective of nurses.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Palmer, Christine; Tennent, Rebeka

    2011-03-01

    To enhance the understanding of the skills and attitudes of mental health nurses working in the Australian Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program places qualified mental health nurses alongside community-based general practitioners, private psychiatric practices and other appropriate organisations to provide clients with mental health conditions with a more integrated treatment plan. An exploratory, qualitative approach was undertaken, given the paucity of relevant research in this area. Exploratory individual interviews were conducted with ten mental health nurses working in this scheme. Data analysis was organised and managed using QSR NVivo qualitative analysis software. Respondents identified specific skills and attitudes required for practice under the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. Eight areas of skill and attitude were identified as essential for mental health nurses working in this field. This study highlights that many of these skills and attitudes are specific to the setting where mental health nurses are working. Mental health nurses working under this programme have a role to play in the dissemination of knowledge about their practice. More needs to be done by governments and other institutions to ensure that general practitioners and other health professionals understand the role played by mental health nurses in the provision of care. The extent to which the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program becomes a sustainable strategy to promote quality and accessible mental health care will depend to some degree on the capacity to identify the skills and attitudes necessary for practice. The findings presented in this paper provide a significant contribution to articulating the essential characteristics required for this area of practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Mixed methods study examining work reintegration experiences from perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders.

    PubMed

    Kukla, Marina; Rattray, Nicholas A; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reintegration for Veterans is often challenging. One difficult aspect of reintegration—transitioning into the civilian workplace—has not been fully explored in the literature. To address this gap and examine work reintegration, this mixed methods study examined the perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders receiving Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare. Forty Veterans rated factors that affect work success; participants also provided narratives on their most and least successful work experiences. We used t-tests and qualitative analysis to compare participants who did and did not serve in combat. Several themes relevant to work reintegration emerged in the narratives, particularly for Veterans who served in combat. An array of work difficulties were reported in the months following military discharge. In addition, Veterans who served in combat reported significantly more work barriers than Veterans who did not serve in combat, particularly health-related barriers. In conclusion, Veterans with mental health disorders who served in combat experienced more work reintegration difficulty than their counterparts who did not serve in combat. The role of being a Veteran affected how combat Veterans formed their self-concept, which also shaped their work success and community reintegration, especially during the early transition period.

  7. Promoting youth mental health: priorities for policy from an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, Debra J

    2011-02-01

    This paper considers the priorities for policy to promote youth mental health in Australia. The Ottawa Charter is applied as a conceptual framework to determine current strengths and future priorities across the entire spectrum of interventions for mental health promotion. The five platforms of the Ottawa Charter are used to categorize some of the major initiatives that promote youth mental health. Areas of strength and major gaps within each platform are identified. Australia was shown to be at the forefront of many youth mental health promotion initiatives, particularly in the service reorientation and personal skills platforms of the Ottawa Charter. While significant progress has been made in some areas of youth mental health promotion, areas of critical need for policy focus were: oversight of all public policies for their impact on youth mental health; more supportive environments for youth and better interconnection with mental health care; community action to support the youth voice; investment in resources for parents and families; ensuring quality inreach and outreach to provide young people with positive mental health messages and improve mental health literacy; and embedding and expanding effective innovations in youth mental health services reorientation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Qualitative exploration of stakeholders' perspectives of involuntary admission under the Mental Health Act 2001 in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Siobhán; Casey, Dympna; Cooney, Adeline; Higgins, Agnes; McGuinness, David; Bainbridge, Emma; Keys, Mary; Georgieva, Irina; Brosnan, Liz; Beecher, Claire; Hallahan, Brian; McDonald, Colm; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-10-27

    There is international interest in, and continued concern about, the potential long-term impact of involuntary admission to psychiatric institutions, and the effect this coercive action has on a person's well-being and human rights. Involuntary detention in hospital remains a controversial process that involves stakeholders with competing concerns and who often describe negative experiences of the process, which can have long-lasting effects on the therapeutic relationship with service users. The aim of the present study was to explore the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the involuntary admission and detention of people under the Mental Health Act 2001 in Ireland. Focus groups were used to collect data. Stakeholders interviewed were service users, relatives, general practitioners, psychiatrists, mental health nurses, solicitors, tribunal members, and police. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Three key categories emerged: (i) getting help; (ii) detention under the Act; and (iii) experiences of the tribunal process. This research highlights gaps in information and uncertainty about the involuntary admission process for stakeholders, but particularly for service users who are most affected by inadequate processes and supports. Mental health law has traditionally focussed on narrower areas of detention and treatment, but human rights law requires a greater refocussing on supporting service users to ensure a truly voluntary approach to care. The recent human rights treaty, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, is to guarantee a broad range of fundamental rights, such as liberty and integrity, which can be affected by coercive processes of involuntary admission and treatment.

  9. National Trainers’ Perspectives on Challenges to Implementation of an Empirically-Supported Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Rochelle F.; Gros, Kirstin Stauffacher; Davidson, Tatiana M.; Barr, Simone; Cohen, Judith; Deblinger, Esther; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined perceived challenges to implementation of an empirically supported mental health treatment for youth (Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy; TF-CBT) and explored the potential use of technology-based resources in treatment delivery. Thematic interviews were conducted with 19 approved national TF-CBT trainers to assess their perspectives about challenges to implementation of TF-CBT and to explore their perceptions about the potential value of innovative, technology-based solutions to enhance provider fidelity and improve quality of care. These data offer some important insights and implications for training in evidence-based treatments, provider fidelity and competence, and patient engagement, particularly for those interventions targeting trauma-related symptoms among youth. PMID:23605292

  10. A Call for Integrating a Mental Health Perspective into Systems of Care for Abused and Neglected Infants and Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Lieberman, Alicia F.

    2011-01-01

    A system of care for abused and neglected infants and young children should adopt a comprehensive perspective, with mental health considerations systematically incorporated into policies and decisions affecting children and their families. Children age birth to 5 years have disproportionately high rates of maltreatment, with long-term consequences…

  11. Good Intentions: Teaching and Specialist Support Staff Perspectives of Student Disclosure of Mental Health Issues in Post-Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Annie; Street, Annette F.; Fossey, Ellie

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from a qualitative case study, as part of which staff perspectives of student disclosure of mental health issues in an Australian post-secondary vocational education setting were explored. Twenty teaching and specialist support staff from four vocational education and training institutions participated in individual…

  12. How Adult Children Influence Older Parents' Mental Health: Integrating Stress-Process and Life-Course Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milkie, Melissa A.; Bierman, Alex; Schieman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we integrate insights from the life-course and stress-process perspectives to argue that adult children's negative treatment of parents, as well as negative events that children experience, detrimentally affect elderly parents' mental health over time. We argue that these strains may affect mothers more than fathers, and blacks more…

  13. Good Intentions: Teaching and Specialist Support Staff Perspectives of Student Disclosure of Mental Health Issues in Post-Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venville, Annie; Street, Annette F.; Fossey, Ellie

    2014-01-01

    This article reports findings from a qualitative case study, as part of which staff perspectives of student disclosure of mental health issues in an Australian post-secondary vocational education setting were explored. Twenty teaching and specialist support staff from four vocational education and training institutions participated in individual…

  14. How Adult Children Influence Older Parents' Mental Health: Integrating Stress-Process and Life-Course Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milkie, Melissa A.; Bierman, Alex; Schieman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we integrate insights from the life-course and stress-process perspectives to argue that adult children's negative treatment of parents, as well as negative events that children experience, detrimentally affect elderly parents' mental health over time. We argue that these strains may affect mothers more than fathers, and blacks more…

  15. Barriers to exercise prescription and participation in people with mental illness: the perspectives of nurses working in mental health.

    PubMed

    Stanton, R; Reaburn, P; Happell, B

    2015-08-01

    Exercise is valuable in the treatment of mental illness, yet personal and organizational barriers limit widespread implementation by nurses in mental health settings. Using a self-report questionnaire, we sought to identify how often nurses prescribe exercise and their level of agreement with previously identified barriers to exercise prescription and participation for mental health consumers. Nurses disagree that many of the previously identified barriers should impede exercise prescription for people with mental illness. Nurses agree that many of the barriers expressed by mental health consumers might prevent exercise participation. Our study provides valuable new insight into the role of nurses in the provision of exercise for people with mental illness; however, it is limited to a small sample. Confirmation of these findings in larger, geographically and professionally diverse groups is needed. Evidence is mounting for the efficacy of exercise in the treatment of people with mental illness. Nurses working in mental health settings are well placed to provide exercise advice for people with mental illness. However, quantitative examinations of the barriers to exercise prescription experienced by nurses, or their views regarding the barriers to exercise participation experienced by people with mental illness, are lacking. In this study, 34 nurses completed the Exercise in Mental Illness Questionnaire-Health Professionals Version (EMIQ-HP). This survey examined the frequency of exercise prescription and the level of agreement with statements regarding barriers to exercise prescription for, and exercise participation by, people with mental illness. The level of agreement scores for statements for each section was summed, with a higher score indicating a higher level of agreement. Nurses disagree with many of the barriers to exercise prescription presented in the literature. The level of agreement scores did not differ between nurses who prescribe exercise 'Always

  16. Community Families: Bridging the gap between mental health services and civil society - A qualitative study from users' perspective.

    PubMed

    Væggemose, Ulla; Lou, Stina; Frumer, Michal; Christiansen, Nanna Limskov Stærk; Aagaard, Jørgen; Ørtenblad, Lisbeth

    2017-03-01

    Social interventions to support people with severe mental illness are important to improving the quality of life. The perspectives of users are essential in this process. This article explores users' experiences, investments and concerns of a befriending programme. Focus group and individual qualitative interviews with service users. Overall, the experiences with the programme were positive, and the social interaction was highly valued. However, that the relationships were arranged and facilitated by mental health workers remained an unresolved concern even after several years. People with severe mental illness benefit from relationships despite the need of professional assistant.

  17. Access to physical health care for people with serious mental illness: a nursing perspective and a human rights perspective-common ground?

    PubMed

    Nankivell, Janette; Platania-Phung, Chris; Happell, Brenda; Scott, David

    2013-06-01

    Relative to the general population, people with serious mental illness (SMI) experience elevated risks of physical disease and illness and live shorter lives. A human rights perspective argues that people with serious mental illness have a right to equal access to physical health care. Nurses in mental health services can contribute to improving the availability and accessibility of physical health care. This study, involving focus group interviews with nurses in a large regional and rural mental health care district of Queensland, Australia, revealed significant problems in access to physical health care for service users. The current article reports on our exploratory analysis of nurses' views and perceptions to identify (1) orientation of nurses to human rights, and (2) access of consumers with SMI to general practitioner services. It was rare for nurses to raise the topic of human rights, and when raised, it was not as a strategy for improving access to physical health care services that they felt consumers with SMI greatly needed. Two main themes were identified as causes of poor access: clinical barriers to physical care and attitudinal barriers to physical care. In light of these results, the authors explore a human rights perspective on access and how this provides an inclusive lobbying umbrella under which nurses and other groups can pursue access to physical health services that are adequate, accessible, and non-discriminatory. The article then discusses the implications for these findings for the value of human rights as a perspective and means of increasing physical health of people with SMI.

  18. Youth Perspectives on Restrictive Mental Health Placement: Unearthing a Counter Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polvere, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Though research has focused on clinical characteristics and behavioral problems of youth in out-of-home mental health placement settings, few studies have examined how adolescents and emerging adults (Arnett, 2000) experience and make sense of treatment. In this study, semistructured interviews regarding the experience of mental health placement…

  19. Closing the Gap: Principal Perspectives on an Innovative School-Based Mental Health Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Kate F.; Powers, Joelle D.; Edwards, Jeffrey D.; Wegmann, Kate M.; Lechner, Ethan; Swick, Danielle C.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health needs among children in the United States have significant consequences for children and their families, as well as the schools that serve them. This qualitative study evaluated the second year of an innovative school-based mental health project that created a multi-system partnership between an urban school district, a public mental…

  20. Outpatient Mental Health Services for Children in Foster Care: A National Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Landsverk, John; Barth, Richard; Slymen, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine factors influencing the use of outpatient mental health services provided by mental health professionals (OMHS) for children in foster care using a national probability sample in the United States. Method: As part of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being, detailed survey data were collected on 462 children,…

  1. Outpatient Mental Health Services for Children in Foster Care: A National Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Landsverk, John; Barth, Richard; Slymen, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine factors influencing the use of outpatient mental health services provided by mental health professionals (OMHS) for children in foster care using a national probability sample in the United States. Method: As part of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being, detailed survey data were collected on 462 children,…

  2. Closing the Gap: Principal Perspectives on an Innovative School-Based Mental Health Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Kate F.; Powers, Joelle D.; Edwards, Jeffrey D.; Wegmann, Kate M.; Lechner, Ethan; Swick, Danielle C.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health needs among children in the United States have significant consequences for children and their families, as well as the schools that serve them. This qualitative study evaluated the second year of an innovative school-based mental health project that created a multi-system partnership between an urban school district, a public mental…

  3. Mental Health Practitioners' Reflections on Psychological Work in Uganda: Exploring Perspectives from Different Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jennifer; d'Ardenne, Patricia; Nsereko, James; Kasujja, Rosco; Baillie, Dave; Mpango, Richard; Birabwa, Harriet; Hunter, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    The Butabika-East London Link collaborated with Ugandan mental health services to train mental health professionals (psychiatric clinical officers, "PCOs", and clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, "Core Group") in psychological therapies. The aims of this research were to investigate how professionals were applying and…

  4. Mental Health Practitioners' Reflections on Psychological Work in Uganda: Exploring Perspectives from Different Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jennifer; d'Ardenne, Patricia; Nsereko, James; Kasujja, Rosco; Baillie, Dave; Mpango, Richard; Birabwa, Harriet; Hunter, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    The Butabika-East London Link collaborated with Ugandan mental health services to train mental health professionals (psychiatric clinical officers, "PCOs", and clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, "Core Group") in psychological therapies. The aims of this research were to investigate how professionals were applying and…

  5. Perspectives--Infant Mental Health Home Visiting Strategies: From the Parents' Points of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherston, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The author interviewed parents who had participated in infant mental health (IMH) home visiting programs in community mental health agencies in Detroit, Michigan, as part of a larger qualitative study exploring parents' and practitioners' perceptions of IMH practice. Parents were asked to describe what they remembered about the practitioner and…

  6. Youth Perspectives on Restrictive Mental Health Placement: Unearthing a Counter Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polvere, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Though research has focused on clinical characteristics and behavioral problems of youth in out-of-home mental health placement settings, few studies have examined how adolescents and emerging adults (Arnett, 2000) experience and make sense of treatment. In this study, semistructured interviews regarding the experience of mental health placement…

  7. Academically Successful Students with Serious Mental Health Difficulties: A Psychodynamic Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Sanjay R.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines some common assumptions made by clinicians about the relationship between intelligence and mental health difficulties. Drawing on work by Thomas Ogden (1976) and Alex Coren (1997) on academically successful students who present with serious mental health concerns, it aims to provide a psychodynamic, developmental…

  8. Challenges and opportunities in global mental health: a perspective from WHO.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S

    2016-12-01

    This paper enumerates and briefly discusses WHO's recent contributions to global mental health and the current challenges and opportunities in this area. It briefly discusses response to diversity across countries and communities, the need for innovations and global exchange of information, evidence and knowledge and raises issues like psychological interventions and human rights related to mental health.

  9. Children's Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... ol (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Mental health in childhood means reaching developmental and emotional milestones, ... health Articles Scientific articles and key findings Children’s Mental Health: What's New Policy Brief: Access to Mental Health ...

  10. Perspectives of pupils, parents, and teachers on mental health problems among Vietnamese secondary school pupils

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Secondary school can be a stressful period for adolescents, having to cope with many life changes. Very little research has been conducted on the mental health status of secondary school pupils in South East Asian countries, such as Vietnam. The study aimed to explore perceptions of mental health status, risk factors for mental health problems and strategies to improve mental health among Vietnamese secondary school students. Methods A qualitative design was used to address the main study question including: six in-depth interviews conducted with professionals (with two researchers, two psychiatrists, and two secondary school teachers) to learn about their experience of mental health problems among secondary school pupils; 13 focus group discussions (four with teachers, four with parents, and five with pupils); and 10 individual in-depth interviews with pupils who did not take part in the FGDs, to reflect on the collected data and to deepen the authors’ understanding. All interviews and FGDs were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed for the identification of emerging issues using qualitative techniques of progressive coding, analytic memoing and ongoing comparison. Results Our study confirms the need to pay attention to mental health of pupils in Vietnam. Depression, anxiety, stress, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts were seen as major problems by all stakeholders. Mental health problems were mainly associated with academic pressure, resulting from an overloaded curriculum and pressure from teachers and parents to succeed. The study found that pupils’ mental health demands interventions at many levels, including at the level of government (Ministry of Education and Training), schools, communities, families and pupils themselves. Conclusions Vietnamese secondary school pupils feel that their mental health status is poor, because of many risk factors in their learning and living environment. The need now is to investigate further to identify and

  11. School nurses' perspectives on managing mental health problems in children and young people.

    PubMed

    Pryjmachuk, Steven; Graham, Tanya; Haddad, Mark; Tylee, Andre

    2012-03-01

    To explore the views of school nurses regarding mental health problems in young people and their potential for engaging in mental health work with this client group. Mental health problems in children and young people are an important public health issue. Universal children's services play a key role in identifying and managing these problems and, while school nurses have an important function in this work, little is known about their views on this aspect of their role. A qualitative research design employing focus group methodology. School nurses (n = 33) were purposively sampled from four school nursing teams in two English cities for a series of focus groups. The focus group data were audio-recorded, transcribed and subsequently analysed using 'framework'. Four principal themes emerged from the data. In these themes, school nurses were found to value their involvement with the mental health of young people, recognising this as an important area of practice. Several obstacles to their work in this area were identified: heavy workloads, professional rivalries, a lack of confidence and limited education and training opportunities. The importance of support from local specialist mental health teams was emphasised. School nurses can be engaged in mental health work though, as public health specialists, their role should focus on health promotion, assessment, signposting and early intervention activities. To facilitate mental health work, school nurses are able to draw on established interpersonal skills and supportive networks; however, workload and a lack of confidence need to be managed and it is important that they are supported by constructive relationships with local specialist mental health teams. This study has implications for nurses and healthcare practitioners interested in enhancing the mental health of children and young people in school settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Ole Taeao Afua, the new morning: a qualitative investigation into Samoan perspectives on mental health and culturally appropriate services.

    PubMed

    Tamasese, Kiwi; Peteru, Carmel; Waldegrave, Charles; Bush, Allister

    2005-04-01

    The first objective was to develop a culturally appropriate research method to investigate Samoan perspectives on mental health issues. The second objective was to apply this to identify cultural values and understandings important in the care and treatment of Samoan people with mental health problems. Gender-specific focus groups consisting of Samoan elders and service providers were facilitated by Samoan researchers in the Samoan language. Systematic analysis of the transcripts, adapted to the cultural context, were conducted in Samoan and later translated into English. A culturally derived method, referred to as Fa'afaletui, reflecting Samoan communal values and familiar institutional structures within the community, allowed each focus group to come to a consensual view on issues discussed. The Samoan self was identified as an essential concept for understanding Samoan views of mental health. This self was described as a relational self and mental wellness as a state of relational harmony, where personal elements of spiritual, mental and physical are in balance. Mental ill health was sometimes linked to breaches of forbidden and sacred relationships, which could be addressed effectively only within protocols laid down in the culture. Additional stressors contributing to mental ill-health were identified as low income, unemployment, rising housing costs and the marginalization of Samoan cultural norms in New Zealand. Participants identified the need for a culturally based mental health service for Samoan people to address key cultural factors. The Fa'afaletui method is a new research method which is sensitive and responsive to Samoan cultural norms and is methodologically rigorous. Such an approach may be relevant for other Pacific Island cultures and other cultures, which have a strong emphasis on collectivity. The Samoan concept of self provides a theoretical foundation for understanding the mental health needs of Samoan people and a basis for developing

  13. Healthy living? By whose standards? Engaging mental health service recipients to understand their perspectives of, and barriers to, healthy living.

    PubMed

    Graham, Candida; Griffiths, Brenda; Tillotson, Sherri; Rollings, Crystal

    2013-09-01

    It is well recognized that mental health service recipients experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders, have poorer diets, and exercise less than the general population. This study sought to explore the meaning of a healthy lifestyle for this population and the barriers they experience to healthy living. Focus groups were conducted with 23 individuals who experience serious mental health issues. The meaning of a healthy lifestyle and the barriers participants experience to living healthily were explored. Participants perceived a healthy lifestyle in broader terms than professional guidelines for exercise and diet. A broad framework including friendship, affordable safe housing, employment, spiritual, and emotional good health, as well as healthy eating and exercise, is described. Barriers identified by participants were poor mental and physical health and stigma (structural, social, and self). An unexpected result was the group problem solving that occurred during the focus groups. Health care professionals need to understand mental health service recipients' perspectives of a "healthy lifestyle." An understanding of barriers within this context is required, as only then will we be able to empathize and assist as health care professionals. This study also shows that realistic, innovative, and pragmatic solutions occur when mental health service recipients are empowered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Conceptions of mental health care--from the perspective of parents' of adult children suffering from mental illness.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anita; Andershed, Birgitta; Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe parents' conceptions of the mental health care provided to adult children suffering from mental illness. Data were collected using qualitative research interviews with a purposive sample of sixteen mothers and ten fathers. Phenomenographic analysis was used to identify conceptions and formulate descriptive categories. The first category, questioning the availability of care, describes mental health care as being unequal in terms of accessibility and lacking in continuity. The second category, disapproval of parental exclusion, illustrates conceptions that mental healthcare professionals disregard parents and do not provide them with adequate information. The third category, questioning the quality of care, encompasses conceptions of lack of trust in the professionals' competence, an unsatisfactory environment as well as inadequate cooperation with other healthcare providers and authorities. Positive aspects, such as being seen and confirmed, were mentioned as valuable by the parents. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. A life course perspective on migration and mental health among Asian immigrants: the role of human agency.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fang; Xu, Jun; Fujishiro, Kaori; Takeuchi, David T

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between human agency and health is an important yet under-researched topic. This study uses a life course perspective to examine how human agency (measured by voluntariness, migratory reasons, and planning) and timing (measured by age at immigration) affect mental health outcomes among Asian immigrants in the United States. Data from the National Latino and Asian American Study showed that Asian immigrants (n=1491) with multiple strong reasons to migrate were less likely to suffer from mental health problems (i.e., psychological distress and psychiatric disorders in the past 12 months) than those without clear goals. Moreover, Asian immigrants with adequate migratory planning had lower levels of distress and lower rates of 12-month psychiatric disorders than those with poorly planned migration. Compared with migrants of the youngest age category (six or younger), those who migrated during preteen and adolescent years without clear goals had higher levels of psychological distress, and those who migrated during adulthood (25 years or older) were less likely to suffer from recent depressive disorders (with the exception of those migrating for life-improving goals). Furthermore, we found that well-planned migration lowered acculturative stress, and multiple strong reasons for migration buffered the negative effect of acculturative stress upon mental health. Findings from this study advance research on immigrant health from the life course perspective by highlighting the effects of exercising human agency during the pre-migration stage upon post-migration mental health.

  16. Negotiating the boundaries of psychosis: A qualitative study of the service provider perspective on treatment delay in community mental health.

    PubMed

    Kvig, Erling Inge; Moe, Cathrine; Brinchmann, Beate; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Sørgaard, Knut

    2017-08-23

    Evidence shows that many patients are detected and treated late in their course of illness, and that substantial delay occurs even after entry to mental health services. Although several studies have examined the service user and carer perspectives on treatment delay, few have explored the issue from the service provider perspective. The aim of this study was to broaden our understanding of treatment delay by exploring the service provider perspective on reasons for treatment delay in community mental health services. A qualitative study using data from focus group interviews with 33 healthcare professionals in community mental health care. Interview data were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim, and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Service providers perceived divergent or conflicting perspectives as the main challenge in early psychosis. Clinical negotiation was chosen as the main term describing the interactions between patients and healthcare professionals: This was observed in 3 overlapping areas: (1) Negotiating the patients status as help-seeker; (2) Negotiating the place and conditions of treatment and (3) Negotiating the meaning of distressing experiences and the timing of treatment options. This study suggests that delay in initiation of treatment for psychosis in community mental health is related to clinical challenges of early disengagement from services and diagnostic uncertainty. Service providers found negotiating the therapeutic relationship and patient-centred flexibility more useful in ensuring engagement than an assertive outreach approach. Diagnostic uncertainty was resolved through watchful waiting using a distress-overload conceptualization in assessing changes in mental state and service needs. © 2017 The Authors Early Intervention in Psychiatry Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Exploring the Scope of Consumer Participation in Mental Health Nursing Education: Perspectives From Nurses and Consumers.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Bennetts, Wanda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Tohotoa, Jenny

    2016-07-01

    Exploration of the views and experiences of nurse academics and consumer academics and educators regarding the scope of consumer participation in mental health nursing education. A qualitative, exploratory inquiry into the description and views of mental health nurse academics and consumer educators about these roles A significant variation in roles from guest speaker to substantive academic positions was evident, with most involvement brief and specifically teaching focused. Consumer participation in education was generally valued but noted to be limited in breadth and scope. Some concern was raised about the relevance of consumer academic roles, with a clear conceptualization of the consumer academic role necessary to facilitate their contribution to the education of health professionals. Mental health consumer involvement in the education of nurses has been shown to impact positively on the attitudes of health professionals to people with mental illness. Advocacy for increased, meaningful input from consumers into nursing education is therefore necessary to improve practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mental Health in the Perspectives of Biological Evolution and Cultural Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, V.

    1979-01-01

    Outlines and discusses characteristics of an ethological perspective on mental illness, which emphasizes the evolutionary background of humanity, his recent background since the agricultural and industrial revolutions, and the physiological and psychosomatic factors of the human species in dealing with stress. (CS)

  19. Staff perspectives: What is the function of adult mental health day hospital programs?

    PubMed

    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Ruhig, Megan; Mehak, Adrienne; Deathe van Dyk, Melanie; Cassin, Stephanie E; Ungar, Thomas; Koczerginski, David; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychiatric day hospital (DH) treatment has been offered since the 1930s and is appropriate for individuals experiencing intense psychiatric symptoms without requiring 24-hour inpatient care. No empirical research has examined the specific purpose of DH treatment from the perspectives of healthcare providers within these programs. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study was the first to address the question of the purpose and function of DH treatment from the outlook of frontline workers within this setting, and confirmed anecdotal observations that DH treatment provides an alternative to intensive psychiatric care, and also operates as "bridge" between these intensive services and purely outpatient treatment. Additional information emerged, such as the importance of the name of DH programs avoiding connotations of illness, the benefits and skills that draw patients to these programs, and challenges that staff and patients experience within DH programs (e.g. short length of treatment, barriers to treatment access). WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: This information can enhance curriculum development within these settings. For example, given the importance of skill building, it is essential to integrate the provision of skill building and coping strategies within these settings. In addition, given that the name of the setting can impact staff (and perhaps service users as well), ensuring that the name of such program highlight wellness and recovery may enable a different type of therapeutic community to develop within these settings. Introduction Despite the benefits of psychiatric day hospitals (DH), research has not addressed staff perspectives of these programs' effectiveness and barriers. Aim To elucidate staff perceptions of Adult Mental Health DH programs at two hospitals in Canada, allowing for improved programming, enhanced structure and increased understanding of DH settings within the continuum of care

  20. Social and clinical dimensions of citizenship from the mental health-care provider perspective.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Allison N; Clayton, Ashley; Gambino, Matthew; Rowe, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Citizenship is a theoretical framework regarding social inclusion and community participation of people with mental illnesses. It is defined by a person's connection to rights, responsibilities, roles, resources, and relationships. The application of this framework in public mental health settings is in its early stages. This study was an exploration of mental health providers' views of the potential contribution of this framework. Eight focus groups were conducted with 77 providers on teams in a large mental health center. A 12-item brief version of a 46-item measure of citizenship was a starting point for discussion of the relevance of the framework and citizenship supports in public mental health care. Two themes were presented: social, including relatedness, stigma, and meaningful choices, and clinical, including client empowerment and barriers to citizenship work in clinical settings. These themes are discussed in relation to the introduction of citizenship-oriented practices in mental health care. Participant comments reflect openness to the concept of citizenship and the need for greater access to normative community life for clients, but also skepticism regarding the ability of providers and mental health centers to incorporate citizenship approaches in current care models. Findings suggest there are challenges to developing and implementing citizenship supports in public mental health settings based on social and clinical factors and limitations. However, it is also noted that efforts to address challenges through consultation and education of providers can support the goal of a life in the community for persons with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Anglo-American nursing theory, individualism and mental health care: a social conflict perspective.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses social conflict theory to reconsider the relationship of American nursing theory and individualised mental health care in the UK. It is argued that nursing theory has developed within a context of 'American dream' individualism, and that this ideology may be problematic for some UK mental health nurses and service users whose values and beliefs are those of different socio-political traditions. The paper explores the historical background of Anglo-American nursing theory, and then uses conflict theory to generate challenging propositions about the culture bias and political instrumentality of individualised care in mental health settings. In so doing, it critiques the 'scientific' and 'liberal' preconceptions of individualised care which have dominated mental health care policy for over a decade.

  2. Scenarios for the future of mental health care: a social perspective.

    PubMed

    Giacco, Domenico; Amering, Michaela; Bird, Victoria; Craig, Thomas; Ducci, Giuseppe; Gallinat, Jürgen; Gillard, Steven George; Greacen, Tim; Hadridge, Phil; Johnson, Sonia; Jovanovic, Nikolina; Laugharne, Richard; Morgan, Craig; Muijen, Matthijs; Schomerus, Georg; Zinkler, Martin; Wessely, Simon; Priebe, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Social values and concepts have played a central role in the history of mental health care. They have driven major reforms and guided the development of various treatment models. Although social values and concepts have been important for mental health care in the past, this Personal View addresses what their role might be in the future. We (DG, PH, and SP) did a survey of professional stakeholders and then used a scenario planning technique in an international expert workshop to address this question. The workshop developed four distinct but not mutually exclusive scenarios in which the social aspect is central: mental health care will be patient controlled; it will target people's social context to improve their mental health; it will become virtual; and access to care will be regulated on the basis of social disadvantage. These scenarios are not intended as fixed depictions of what will happen. They could, however, be useful in guiding further debate, research, and innovation.

  3. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN INFANT MENTAL HEALTH-A SOUTH AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE.

    PubMed

    Berg, Astrid

    2016-11-01

    Reflective practice forms a pivotal part of mental health intervention in a setting where language and cultural differences require working together with a community counselor for language interpretation. Reflective practice in infant mental health began with Esther Bick's () infant observations and continued with Selma Fraiberg's () parent-infant psychotherapy. These two models formed the basis of the practice of infant mental health in a community in South Africa. A clinical example will highlight the importance of culturally informed observation that is then reflected upon. A qualitative study that examined the interaction among the participants in three clinical settings shows that a sustained partnership and tolerance for flexibility lie at the heart of good practice in intercultural settings. Object-relations theory offers an additional, in-depth understanding of the underlying psychic processes in reflective practice. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  4. Stakeholders' perspectives on community-based participatory research to enhance mental health services.

    PubMed

    Case, Andrew D; Byrd, Ronald; Claggett, Eddrena; DeVeaux, Sandra; Perkins, Reno; Huang, Cindy; Sernyak, Michael J; Steiner, Jeanne L; Cole, Robert; LaPaglia, Donna M; Bailey, Margaret; Buchanan, Candace; Johnson, Avon; Kaufman, Joy S

    2014-12-01

    Historically, consumers of mental health services have not been given meaningful roles in research and change efforts related to the services they use. This is quickly changing as scholars and a growing number of funding bodies now call for greater consumer involvement in mental health services research and improvement. Amidst these calls, community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged as an approach which holds unique promise for capitalizing on consumer involvement in mental health services research and change. Yet, there have been few discussions of the value added by this approach above and beyond that of traditional means of inquiry and enhancement in adult mental health services. The purpose of this paper is to add to this discussion an understanding of potential multilevel and multifaceted benefits associated with consumer-involved CBPR. This is accomplished through presenting the first-person accounts of four stakeholder groups who were part of a consumer-involved CBPR project purposed to improve the services of a local community mental health center. We present these accounts with the hope that by illustrating the unique outcomes associated with CBPR, there will be invigorated interest in CBPR as a vehicle for consumer involvement in adult mental health services research and enhancement.

  5. Health behavior change benefits: Perspectives of Latinos with serious mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Daniel E.; Burrows, Kimberly; Aschbrenner, Kelly; Barre, Laura K.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Alegría, Margarita; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the perceived benefits of engaging in health behavior change from the viewpoint of overweight and obese Latinos with severe mental illness (SMI) enrolled in the U.S. Qualitative, semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 obese Latinos with SMI who were enrolled in a randomized trial evaluating the effectiveness of a motivational health promotion intervention adapted for persons with SMI. Overweight and obese Latino participants believed that engaging in health behavior change would have both physical and mental health benefits, including chronic disease management, changes in weight and body composition, and increased self-esteem. Interventions that explicitly link physical activity and healthy eating to improvements in mental health and well-being may motivate Latinos with SMI to adopt health behavior change. PMID:26873582

  6. A call for integrating a mental health perspective into systems of care for abused and neglected infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Osofsky, Joy D; Lieberman, Alicia F

    2011-01-01

    A system of care for abused and neglected infants and young children should adopt a comprehensive perspective, with mental health considerations systematically incorporated into policies and decisions affecting children and their families. Children age birth to 5 years have disproportionately high rates of maltreatment, with long-term consequences for their mental and physical health. Research on normal development and developmental psychopathology has shown that early development unfolds in an ecology of transactional influences among biological, interpersonal, and environmental domains. Psychologists should collaborate with other early intervention disciplines to create systems of care based on an ecological-transactional model of development that includes early mental health principles in order to serve the needs of these young children. Didactic courses, practicums, and internships in infant and early childhood mental health should become integral components of undergraduate and graduate curricula in psychology in order to build capacity to achieve this goal. Recommendations are offered for systemic change by integrating infant and early childhood mental health principles into existing systems of care for young children and their families.

  7. Mental health: everyone's business.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Natalie

    2010-06-01

    Mental health is everyone's business the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses and the Wesley Mission affirmed last month. In the midst of a burgeoning demand for mental health services, the lack of funds allocated to mental health as part of a $7.3 billion health package in the federal budget does not add up.

  8. Managing people with mental health presentations in emergency departments--a service exploration of the issues surrounding responsiveness from a mental health care consumer and carer perspective.

    PubMed

    Morphet, Julia; Innes, Kelli; Munro, Ian; O'Brien, Anthony; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Reed, Fiona; Kudinoff, Teresa

    2012-08-01

    Mainstreaming of mental health services (MHS) within the Australian medical system has generated a fundamental transformation in the way consumers and carers access emergency MHS. People present to the Emergency Department (ED) with many health issues which can often include the management of their mental illness, physical co morbidity, or substance use. This paper discusses the issues surrounding access to EDs for clients, families and staff in the context of presentations for mental health problems at a southern metropolitan hospital in Victoria. The pilot project utilised focus groups with mental health care consumers and carers to collaboratively focus on and document the mental health client's 'journey of care' in the ED. There is evidence to suggest from this project that the ED mental health client journey needs continuous improvement and evaluation.

  9. [The teaching-learning process in mental health: the student's perspective about psychosocial rehabilitation and citizenship].

    PubMed

    Barros, Sônia; Claro, Heloísa Garcia

    2011-06-01

    The current national mental health policies confirm the need to encourage teaching, research and extension practices that favor new professional attitude. A previous study has shown that the students' representation about the competencies required in mental health fall into categories about the concepts of competence, cognitive resources, expressed feelings, and the concept of health and illness, but with no reference to themes related to the users' citizenship or psychosocial rehabilitation, which are central concepts in the course discipline. In this study, an analysis was made of the representation about these concepts, the knowledge and skills identified as being necessary to practice rehabilitation. Participants were students of a public university, attending the Mental Health Nursing class. The results show that students value the users' needs, but the representations about citizenship and psychosocial rehabilitation are founded on common sense about hazards and basic rights like health and leisure.

  10. Mental Health and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Mental Health and Heart Health Updated:Nov 10,2015 For years, doctors thought the connection between mental health and heart health was strictly behavioral – such as ...

  11. Common Mental Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Susan R.; Levine, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of common student mental health issues and approaches for student affairs practitioners who are working with students with mental illness, and ways to support the overall mental health of students on campus.

  12. Common Mental Health Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Susan R.; Levine, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of common student mental health issues and approaches for student affairs practitioners who are working with students with mental illness, and ways to support the overall mental health of students on campus.

  13. The psychological perspective on mental health and mental disorder research: introduction to the ROAMER work package 5 consensus document.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Knappe, Susanne; Schumann, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the theoretical framework of the Psychological Sciences' reviews and describes how improved psychological research can foster our understanding of mental health and mental disorders in a complementary way to biomedical research. Core definitions of the field and of psychological interventions and treatment in particular are provided. The work group's consensus regarding strength and weaknesses of European Union (EU) research in critical areas is summarized, highlighting the potential of a broader comprehensive "Behaviour Science programme" in forthcoming programmatic EU funding programmes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Data science for mental health: a UK perspective on a global challenge.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Andrew M; Stewart, Robert; John, Ann; Smith, Daniel J; Davis, Katrina; Sudlow, Cathie; Corvin, Aiden; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Kingdon, David; Hassan, Lamiece; Hotopf, Matthew; Lawrie, Stephen M; Russ, Tom C; Geddes, John R; Wolpert, Miranda; Wölbert, Eva; Porteous, David J

    2016-10-01

    Data science uses computer science and statistics to extract new knowledge from high-dimensional datasets (ie, those with many different variables and data types). Mental health research, diagnosis, and treatment could benefit from data science that uses cohort studies, genomics, and routine health-care and administrative data. The UK is well placed to trial these approaches through robust NHS-linked data science projects, such as the UK Biobank, Generation Scotland, and the Clinical Record Interactive Search (CRIS) programme. Data science has great potential as a low-cost, high-return catalyst for improved mental health recognition, understanding, support, and outcomes. Lessons learnt from such studies could have global implications.

  15. Academic Career Development Stress and Mental Health of Higher Secondary Students--An Indian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Anjali; Halder, Santoshi; Goswami, Nibedita

    2012-01-01

    The authors explored the mental health of students with their academic career-related stressors collecting data from 400 students of different schools of Eastern part of India by using; namely General Information Schedule (GIS), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), and the Academic Career Development Stress Scale. The data was subjected to t…

  16. Comorbidity of Chronic Pain and Mental Health Disorders: The Biopsychosocial Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatchel, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An exciting period in mental and physical health research is beginning, resulting from a paradigm shift from an outdated biomedical reductionism approach to a more comprehensive biopsychosocial model, which emphasizes the unique interactions among biological, psychological, and social factors required to better understand health and illness. This…

  17. Mental health research in the criminal justice system: The need for common approaches and international perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roesch, R; Ogloff, J R; Eaves, D

    1995-01-01

    There is a need for researchers and policy makers in the area of mental health and law to collaborate and develop common methods of approach to research. Although we have learned a great deal about the prevalence and needs of mentally ill offenders in jails and prisons, there are a number of research questions that remain. If the "second generation" of research is to be fruitful--and useful to policy makers--we need to be sure that the methods we employ are valid and that the findings we obtain are reliable. By collaborating with colleagues in other jurisdictions, we can begin to learn whether some of the existing findings are of a general nature, or dependent upon the system in which they were found. Similarly, while the first-generation research has alerted us to the needs of mentally ill offenders in jails and prisons, second-generation research is needed to help identify factors that may help prevent the "revolving door phenomenon," which results in mentally ill people being volleyed among mental health, criminal justice, and community settings. One area that has received embarrassingly little attention has been the need for considering the relationship between substance abuse and mental disorders. In our own work, we have found an alarmingly high degree of substance abuse among offenders, including mentally ill offenders. We have come to realize the importance of considering the role that substance abuse coupled with other mental disorders may play in the criminal justice system. As a result of this concern, the Surrey Mental Health Project recently hired a full-time drug and alcohol counselor whose job it is to work with inmates with substance abuse disorders while in the jail, and to help arrange continuing treatment resources upon their release. As Wilson et al. (1995) discuss, intensive case management projects may be particularly useful at targeting the unique needs of mentally ill offenders with multiple problems. Much of the research conducted with

  18. Strategy for Mental Health Improvement of Iranian Stillborn Mothers From Their Perspective: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Allahdadian, Maryam; Irajpour, Alireza; Kazemi, Ashraf; Kheirabadi, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mothers got stressed when they are informed about the occurrence of stillbirth. Many researchers believe that the failure to provide the required care by health teams during this hard time is the main determinant of maternal mental health in the future. In other words, psychosocial support by medical care providers can significantly improve mental outcomes of mother after stillbirth. Objectives: This study aimed to explore stillborn mothers’ suggested strategies to provide maternal mental health in the experience of stillbirth. Patients and Methods: Twenty women who had experienced stillbirths participated in this qualitative content analysis study. They were selected through purposeful sampling method. Data were gathered by individual interviews recorded on audiotapes, transcripted and then analyzed. Then, transcriptions were coded and classified. Finally, 3 main categories and 9 subcategories were emerged. Results: Analysis of participants’ viewpoints and their opinions about strategies to provide maternal mental health in the experience of stillbirth lead to development of 3 main categories: “before delivery strategies” with 3 subcategories, “during labor strategies” with 3 subcategories, and “postpartum strategies” with 3 subcategories. Analyses of findings showed that, health care providers can mitigate some of the long-term negative mental outcomes of stillborn mothers by spending extra time with grieving mothers, facilitating bonding, and validating their emotional expressions. Conclusions: According to the results, revision and modification of the care plan in the experience of stillbirth seems necessary to improve mental health in these mothers. According to suggested strategies, midwives and health care providers are health professionals who can effectively and properly care for stillborn mothers. PMID:26889389

  19. American Indian and Alaska Native mental health: diverse perspectives on enduring disparities.

    PubMed

    Gone, Joseph P; Trimble, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    As descendants of the indigenous peoples of the United States, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) have experienced a resurgence in population and prospects since the beginning of the twentieth century. Today, tribally affiliated individuals number over two million, distributed across 565 federally recognized tribal communities and countless metropolitan and nonreservation rural areas. Although relatively little evidence is available, the existing data suggest that AI/AN adults and youth suffer a disproportionate burden of mental health problems compared with other Americans. Specifically, clear disparities have emerged for AI/AN substance abuse, posttraumatic stress, violence, and suicide. The rapid expansion of mental health services to AI/AN communities has, however, frequently preceded careful consideration of a variety of questions about critical components of such care, such as the service delivery structure itself, clinical treatment processes, and preventive and rehabilitative program evaluation. As a consequence, the mental health needs of these communities have easily outpaced and overwhelmed the federally funded agency designed to serve these populations, with the Indian Health Service remaining chronically understaffed and underfunded such that elimination of AI/AN mental health disparities is only a distant dream. Although research published during the past decade has substantially improved knowledge about AI/AN mental health problems, far fewer investigations have explored treatment efficacy and outcomes among these culturally diverse peoples. In addition to routine calls for greater clinical and research resources, however, AI/AN community members themselves are increasingly advocating for culturally alternative approaches and opportunities to address their mental health needs on their own terms.

  20. The influence of culture on immigrant women's mental health care experiences from the perspectives of health care providers.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Joyce Maureen; Donnelly, Tam Truong

    2007-05-01

    It is well documented that serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders exist among immigrant women. Informed by Kleinman's explanatory model, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provided mental health services to immigrant women. Analysis of the data revealed that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties when accessing mental health care services due to cultural differences, social stigma, and unfamiliarity with Western biomedicine, (b) spiritual beliefs and practices that influence immigrant women's mental health care practices, and (c) the health care provider-client relationship, which exerts great influence on how immigrant women seek mental health care. The study also revealed that cultural background exerts both positive and negative influences on how immigrant women seek mental health care. We suggest that although cultural knowledge and practices influence immigrant women's coping choices and strategies, awareness of social and economic differences among diverse groups of immigrant women is necessary to improve the accessibility of mental health care for immigrant women.

  1. Experiences of being a young male Sami reindeer herder: a qualitative study in perspective of mental health

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Niclas; Ruong, Terje; Renberg, Ellinor Salander

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore experiences of what it is to be a young male Sami reindeer herder in Sweden, a group with previously known stigma and specific health issues, and to understand experiences in perspective of mental health. Methods A qualitative content analysis was employed. Data were collected by in-depth interviews with 15 strategically selected reindeer herders aged 18–35 years old. Results The analysis resulted in 5 sub-themes: (a) being “inside” or “outside” is a question of identity; (b) a paradox between being free/bound; (c) an experience of various threats and a feeling of powerlessness; (d) specific norms for how a “real” reindeer herder should be; and (e) the different impacts and meanings of relations. The overarching theme is summarized thus: being a young reindeer herder means so many (impossible) dreams and conditions. Overall, the experience of the informants was that being a reindeer herder is a privileged position that also implies many impossibilities and unjust adversities they have no control over, and that there is nothing they can do but “bite the bullet or be a failure.” Conclusions Knowledge about this group's experiences can be used to understand difficulties faced by young reindeer herders and its consequences regarding mental health problems. This also implies a need for a broader perspective when discussing future interventions aimed at preventing mental health problems in this group. PMID:23853764

  2. Mental health treatment preferences and challenges of living with multimorbidity from the veteran perspective.

    PubMed

    DiNapoli, Elizabeth A; Cinna, Christopher; Whiteman, Karen L; Fox, Lauren; Appelt, Cathleen J; Kasckow, John

    2016-10-01

    To explore middle-aged and older veterans' current disease-management practices, mental health treatment preferences, and challenges of living with multiple chronic health conditions (i.e., multimorbidity). Semi-structured qualitative interviews and self-report measures were collected from 28 middle-aged and older (50 years of age or older) veterans with multimorbidity. Our sample of veterans with multimorbidity was, on average, mildly depressed and anxious with elevated stress and disability. Veterans acknowledged the interaction of physical and emotional symptoms, which caused greater difficulty with health care management and daily functioning. Veterans had many concerns regarding their physical and emotional health conditions, such as continued disease progression and the addition of other emotional and physical health complications. Veterans also identified specific self-care approaches for disease management (e.g., medication, healthy lifestyle practices, and psychological stress management techniques), as well as barriers to engaging in care (e.g., money, transportation, and stigma). Participants preferred a combination of medication, psychotherapy, and healthy lifestyle practices for mental health treatment. The majority of participants (88.5%) agreed that these mental health treatments would be beneficial to integrate into disease management for older veterans with multimorbidity. Lastly, veterans provided an array of recommendations for improving Veteran's Administration services and reducing mental health stigma. These findings provide support for patient-centered approaches and integrated mental and physical health self-management in the Veteran's Administration for middle-aged and older veterans with multiple chronic conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Seeking asylum-trauma, mental health, and human rights: an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Newman, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Asylum seekers represent a highly traumatized group with experiences of systematic oppression, loss, displacement, and exposure to violence. Around the world many are viewed with distrust and anxiety. The Australian response to asylum seekers is one that has used prolonged detention with significant negative impact on mental health. This has prompted much social debate and the involvement of clinicians and researchers in advocating for the human rights of asylum seekers. This article reviews the impact of mandatory prolonged detention on the mental health of asylum seekers and the significance of this for recovery and adaption. It concludes that the mandatory detention of high-risk and oppressed groups compounds trauma, with a potential long-term negative impact on mental health.

  4. Prevalence of Mental Health Issues in the Borderlands: A Comparative Perspective

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Kathleen; Anders, Robert L.; Balcazar, Hector; Ibarra, Jorge; Perez, Eduardo; Flores, Luis; Ortiz, Melchor; Bean, Nathaniel H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to (a) examine the results of a binational study of two colonias near El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, focusing on mental health and (b) analyze those results in relation to the existing literature on Hispanic mental health to determine how border regions compare with Hispanic enclaves in nonborder regions. We focus on gender, birthplace, length of residency, and level of acculturation correlated with self-reported diagnoses of depression in our analysis. Our survey instrument incorporates portions of the Behavioral Risk Factor and Surveillance Survey; the SF36, version 2; and the CAGE scale for alcohol use and abuse. We found that birthplace, acculturation, and length of residency at the border did not correlate in the same ways to mental health issues as in nonborder regions. PMID:25374480

  5. [Liaison psychiatry: a new perspective on mental health in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Bórquez Rojas, E; Torres, P; Tapia, L; Rodríguez, A; Rocha, P; Larrea, J; Yulis, J; Bórquez, J A

    1989-01-01

    The situation of Mental Health in Latin America is analyzed. Urgently creating a system able at handling the psychiatric disease increase in the years to come is a conclusion this paper strongly aims at. The beginning of Psychiatry is reviewed, and the importance of Psychiatry at the General Hospital is outlined as well as its rapprochement toward the community, which led to a better control and prevention in the field of Mental Health. A definition of Psychiatry is proposed, as a branch of Medicine which stands in between mental hospitals and communities. Active teamwork, coupled with the physician's work and the tasks other members of the health personnel are engaged in, has led to a more integrated approach onto the ill thus benefiting not only patients but also the whole community.

  6. Recognition as a valued human being: perspectives of mental health service users.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Kristin Ådnøy; Sundfør, Bengt; Karlsson, Bengt; Råholm, Maj-Britt; Arman, Maria

    2012-05-01

    The acknowledgement of basic human vulnerability in relationships between mental health service users and professionals working in community-based mental health services (in Norway) was a starting point. The purpose was to explore how users of these services describe and make sense of their meetings with other people. The research is collaborative, with researcher and person with experienced-based knowledge cooperating through the research process. Data is derived from 19 interviews with 11 people who depend on mental health services for assistance at least three times a week. Data is analysed according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Results confirm that reciprocity is fundamental for relationships, and that recognizing the individual entails personal involvement. The participants describe a struggle, and recognizing this struggle may help the professional to achieve a deeper understanding of the individual.

  7. Prevalence of Mental Health Issues in the Borderlands: A Comparative Perspective.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Kathleen; Anders, Robert L; Balcazar, Hector; Ibarra, Jorge; Perez, Eduardo; Flores, Luis; Ortiz, Melchor; Bean, Nathaniel H

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to (a) examine the results of a binational study of two colonias near El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, focusing on mental health and (b) analyze those results in relation to the existing literature on Hispanic mental health to determine how border regions compare with Hispanic enclaves in nonborder regions. We focus on gender, birthplace, length of residency, and level of acculturation correlated with self-reported diagnoses of depression in our analysis. Our survey instrument incorporates portions of the Behavioral Risk Factor and Surveillance Survey; the SF36, version 2; and the CAGE scale for alcohol use and abuse. We found that birthplace, acculturation, and length of residency at the border did not correlate in the same ways to mental health issues as in nonborder regions.

  8. Professional perspectives on service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Penny; Brooks, Helen; Fraser, Claire; Lovell, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background Involving users/carers in mental health care-planning is central to international policy initiatives yet users frequently report feeling excluded from the care planning process. Rigorous explorations of mental health professionals’ experiences of care planning are lacking, limiting our understanding of this important translational gap. Objectives To explore professional perceptions of delivering collaborative mental health care-planning and involving service users and carers in their care. Design Qualitative interviews and focus groups with data combined and subjected to framework analysis. Setting UK secondary care mental health services. Participants 51 multi-disciplinary professionals involved in care planning and recruited via study advertisements. Results Emergent themes identified care-planning as a meaningful platform for user/carer involvement but revealed philosophical tensions between user involvement and professional accountability. Professionals emphasised their individual, relational skills as a core facilitator of involvement, highlighting some important deficiencies in conventional staff training programmes. Conclusions Although internationally accepted on philosophical grounds, user-involved care-planning is poorly defined and lacks effective implementation support. Its full realisation demands greater recognition of both the historical and contemporary contexts in which statutory mental healthcare occurs. PMID:26253574

  9. Professional perspectives on service user and carer involvement in mental health care planning: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bee, Penny; Brooks, Helen; Fraser, Claire; Lovell, Karina

    2015-12-01

    Involving users/carers in mental health care-planning is central to international policy initiatives yet users frequently report feeling excluded from the care planning process. Rigorous explorations of mental health professionals' experiences of care planning are lacking, limiting our understanding of this important translational gap. To explore professional perceptions of delivering collaborative mental health care-planning and involving service users and carers in their care. Qualitative interviews and focus groups with data combined and subjected to framework analysis. UK secondary care mental health services. 51 multi-disciplinary professionals involved in care planning and recruited via study advertisements. Emergent themes identified care-planning as a meaningful platform for user/carer involvement but revealed philosophical tensions between user involvement and professional accountability. Professionals emphasised their individual, relational skills as a core facilitator of involvement, highlighting some important deficiencies in conventional staff training programmes. Although internationally accepted on philosophical grounds, user-involved care-planning is poorly defined and lacks effective implementation support. Its full realisation demands greater recognition of both the historical and contemporary contexts in which statutory mental healthcare occurs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. New Perspectives in Mental Health: Addressing Cognitive Deficits in Remitted Depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jason I; Hergert, Danielle C

    2017-02-08

    The purpose of this essay is to explore the long-term impact of depression on cognitive functioning and to discuss possible treatment strategies that mental health and psychiatric nurses may employ in practice or pursue in research to improve patient outcomes. As psychiatric and mental health nurses play a valuable role in promoting recovery from depression, addressing cognitive difficulties associated with depression may be an important area for nursing practice. This essay will first introduce the rationale for evaluating cognitive deficits in remitted depression in regards to the impact on quality of life (QOL). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Strategies for Working with Asian Americans in Mental Health: Community Members' Policy Perspectives and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weng, Suzie S; Spaulding-Givens, Jennifer

    2017-01-04

    This qualitative study used snowball sampling of individuals known to provide informal assistance to Asian American community members with their mental health problems in a locality in the South where there has been an exponential increase of the Asian American population. The major themes found include: (1) the existence of cultural, language, knowledge, and transportation barriers and the importance of policy in addressing them; (2) the impact of the model minority myth and the need for inclusive policymaking; and (3) the unique service and policy needs of immigrants. Findings demonstrate the importance and value of including diverse Asian American individuals in mental health policymaking efforts.

  12. The current and ideal state of mental health training: pediatric resident perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Elisa; Richardson, Joshua E; Bostwick, Susan; Ward, Mary J; Green, Cori

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Mental health (MH) problems are prevalent in the pediatric population, and in a setting of limited resources, pediatricians need to provide MH care in the primary medical home yet are uncomfortable doing so citing a lack of training during residency as one barrier. The purpose of this study is to describe pediatric residents' experiences and perspectives on the current and ideal states of MH training and ideas for curriculum development to bridge this gap. A qualitative study using focus groups of pediatric residents from an urban academic medical center was performed. Audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Twenty-six residents participated in three focus groups, which is when thematic saturation was achieved. The team generated five major themes: capabilities, comfort, organizational capacity, coping, and education. Residents expressed uncertainty at every step of an MH visit. Internal barriers identified included low levels of comfort and negative emotional responses. External barriers included a lack of MH resources and mentorship in MH care, or an inadequate organizational capacity. These internal and external barriers resulted in a lack of perceived capability in handling MH issues. In response, residents reported inadequate coping strategies, such as ignoring MH concerns. To build knowledge and skills, residents prefer educational modalities including didactics, experiential learning through collaborations with MH specialists, and tools built into patient care flow. Insights: Pediatric residency programs need to evolve in order to improve resident training in MH care. The skills and knowledge requested by residents parallel the American Academy of Pediatrics statement on MH competencies. Models of collaborative care provide similar modalities of learning requested by residents. These national efforts have not been operationalized in training programs yet may be useful for curriculum development and

  13. [Towards a sustainable, cost-effective mental health care; a policy perspective].

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, P P T; Ravesteijn, B A; Janssen, R T J M; Tanke, M A C

    After a decade of robust growth in spending, Dutch mental healthcare is on a more stricter budgetary path since 2012. High prevalence of illness and limited spending, imply the need for efficient mental healthcare delivery.
    AIM: To advise how mental health care can be managed more efficiently. There will also have to be more differentiation between mild and serious psychiatric illnesses.
    METHOD: Review of academic articles and policy studies.
    RESULTS: With regard to the treatment of fairly common disorders, more attention needs to be given to integrated basic care and e-health. Employers and stakeholders can perhaps play a role in financing some of these services. Severe mental disorders can be handled more often on an integrated ambulatory basis setting than only in a hospital setting, while scaling down inpatient capacity. These steps would represent a major transition and would require spending cuts and a change in the provider 'landscape'.
    CONCLUSION: Sustainable mental healthcare is inseparably linked to an agenda that provides value for money and it implies a major transition. However, in principle, it should be possible to fit these changes into the current system of governance. More attention needs to be given to coordination between the various domains, and to a reduction in administrative costs. Reimbursement methods should align e-health, collaborative care, case-management and best-practice pathways.

  14. Qualitative analysis of US Department of veterans affairs mental health clinician perspectives on patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Dobscha, Steven K; Cromer, Risa; Crain, Aysha; Denneson, Lauren M

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced patient involvement in care has the potential to improve patient experiences and health outcomes. As such, large national and global healthcare systems and organizations, including the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), have made patient-centered care a primary goal. Little is known about mental health clinician perspectives on, and experiences with, providing patient-centered care. Our main objective was to better understand VA mental health clinicians' perceptions of patient-centered care, and ascertain possible facilitators and barriers to patient-centered practices in mental health settings. Qualitative study of six focus groups conducted in late 2013. Thirty-five mental health clinicians and staff from a large VA Medical Center. Transcripts were analyzed using an inductive and deductive thematic analysis approach. Participants described patient-centered care ideally as a process of shared discovery, and expressed general enthusiasm for patient-centered care. Participants described several ongoing patient-centered care practices but conveyed concerns about the practicalities of its full implementation. Participants expressed a strong desire to change the current biomedical culture and policies of the institution that may hinder clinicians' flexibility and clinician-clinician collaboration when serving patients. In particular, clinicians worried about being held responsible for addressing all of the needs or goals that a patient may identify. If patient-centered care is to be practiced fully in mental health settings, healthcare institutions need to develop multimodal strategies to enhance clinician-clinician and clinician-patient collaborations to promote and support a focus on discovery and shared accountability for outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  15. The experience of Black consumers in the mental health system--identifying barriers to and facilitators of mental health treatment using the consumers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Liat; Alvidrez, Jennifer

    2007-12-01

    Research has shown that relative to Whites, Blacks are less likely to seek outpatient mental health treatment and more likely to seek emergency services. Furthermore, Blacks often terminate treatment prematurely. The goal of the present study was to identify barriers to and facilitators of mental heath treatment among Blacks who have a documented need for mental health services. Thirty-four Black mental health consumers were interviewed for this purpose. Comments were categorized into four main categories: (a) barriers to treatment, (b) treatment facilitators, (c) recommendations for improvement of services, and (d) advice to potential consumers. The most common barriers were the importance of family privacy, lack of knowledge regarding available treatments, denial of mental health problems, and concerns about stigma, medications, and treatment. Participants also reported system barriers, such as not receiving appropriate information about services or receiving inadequate, dehumanizing services. Acknowledging the need for mental health services, having a supportive environment, and positive past treatment experiences were identified as treatment facilitators. Community outreach, adequate follow-up, and coordination of services also were important messages delivered by consumers. The results of this study indicate the importance of educating the general public, not just mental health consumers, about the nature of mental illness and available services.

  16. Stakeholder perspectives on a toolkit to enhance caregiver participation in community-based child mental health services.

    PubMed

    Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Mechammil, Molly; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    Client engagement in services is a critical element of effective community-based child and family mental health service delivery. Caregiver engagement is particularly important, as caregivers often serve as gatekeepers to child mental health care and typically must consent for services, facilitate service attendance, and are often the target of intervention themselves. Unfortunately, caregiver engagement has been identified as a significant challenge in community-based child mental health services. To address this gap, the Parent And Caregiver Active Participation Toolkit (PACT), which includes therapist training and participation tools for caregivers and therapists, was developed. Stakeholders' perspectives regarding the delivery of interventions designed to improve the quality and effectiveness of community-based care are essential to understanding the implementation of such interventions in routine service settings. As such, this mixed methods study examined the perspectives of 12 therapists, 8 caregivers, and 6 program managers who participated in a community-based randomized pilot study of PACT. Therapists, caregivers, and program managers agreed that PACT was acceptable, appropriate, and feasible to use in community settings and that both changes in therapist practices and caregiver participation resulted from implementing PACT. Some variable perceptions in the utility of the therapist training components were identified, as well as barriers and facilitators of PACT implementation. Results expand the parent pilot study's findings as well as complement and expand the literature on training community providers in evidence-based practices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. An Exploration of the Use of a Sensory Room in a Forensic Mental Health Setting: Staff and Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wiglesworth, Sophie; Farnworth, Louise

    2016-09-01

    Despite the increased use of sensory rooms, there is little published evidence related to their benefits. The purpose of this study was to explore staff and patient perspectives of the use of a sensory room in an Australian forensic mental health setting. Staff and patients on a forensic hospital unit were recruited for this study. Focus group data was obtained from the perspective of the healthcare staff. A sensory assessment identified patients' sensory preferences. The details of the patients sensory room use and stress experienced before and after using the sensory room were recorded. The results showed a mean decrease in stress that was attributed to the use of the sensory room. Stress reducing benefits of sensory room use may improve a patient's experience within a forensic mental health facility while applying a recovery approach. As a limitation of the study, patient stress was rated on an un-validated scale. Further research is needed for greater insight and evidence in evaluating the use of sensory rooms in forensic mental health settings in reducing stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Health professionals' perspective on the promotion of e-mental health apps in the context of maternal depression

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Michaela; Osma, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Objective Our study focuses on exploring (1) the intention of health professionals to use and recommend e-mental health applications, (2) how this intention of health professionals might be influenced, (3) which group of health professionals might be most accessible to promote e-mental health applications for maternal depression, and (4) for which tasks they rate them to be most useful. Materials and methods Based on a questionnaire informed by the theory of planned behavior, we collected 131 responses of U.S., Spanish, and Swiss health professionals in the field of pregnancy and maternal care (including psychologists, psychiatrists, midwives, and doctors) by means of an online survey. We analyzed the gathered data applying a structured equation model. Results Our study reveals that health professionals would in general intend to recommend and use e-mental health applications. However, their attitude towards e-mental health applications varies regarding the respective use cases and also differs among health professions. Conclusion We offer three alternative propositions for private or public organizations, associations, or any other entity whose purpose is service to the community for introducing e-mental health applications into practice. PMID:28704442

  19. Current clinical advances and future perspectives in the psychiatry/mental health field of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Cía, Alfredo H; Rojas, Rodrigo Córdoba; Adad, Miguel Abib

    2010-01-01

    The history of Mental Health in Latin America is relatively young. It dates back to the mid nineteenth century and widely developed during the twentieth century, with formidable scientific, social, political, and ethical challenges. Latin American psychiatry has contributed in the fields of epidemiology, phenomenology, social psychiatry, psychiatric and epistemological research, and clinical genetics as well. More recent advances can also be seen in clinical psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. Now, there is a formal and informal recognition of various areas of expertise, such as children and adolescents, addictions, anxiety disorders, among others. However, we need to solve the health problems resulting from mental illnesses as well as the disorders related to the social, environmental, political, and economic factors of a continent marked by the precariousness of underdevelopment, which have a high impact on population health. Therefore, considering and trying to minimize the impact of those factors, contributing to the destigmatization of mental illnesses and their consequences, together with the growing number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), human rights defenders, public figures, etc., and collaborating in building a society that guarantees the right to mental health and adequate treatment and rehabilitation are part of our present challenges in Latin America.

  20. PERSPECTIVES: Stories From the Trenches: The Application of Infant Mental Health Theory to Everyday Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The author was wholly unprepared for what he encountered when he entered Fraiberg's Child Development Project at the University of Michigan in 1973, joining five others in a special 2-year training program in infant mental health. He sputtered in astonishment. He resisted the interpretations. But there was no turning back, once he was exposed (on…

  1. Mental Health Services for African Americans: A Cultural/Racial Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Mental health services for minorities have remained biased and deficient. A discussion is included on some racial differences that affect assessment, diagnosis, and intervention of counseling services. A model is proposed that illustrates how cultural information can improve service delivery to African Americans. (JDM)

  2. International Perspectives on Youth Unemployment and Mental Health: Some Central Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryer, David

    1997-01-01

    Critiques five studies that examine the psychological effects of youth unemployment. Compares the current research agenda to that of the 1930s, presents a case for more empirical research, explores the connection between mental health and employment, and reflects on some of the broad issues affecting youth unemployment. (RJM)

  3. Perspectives of Young Emerging Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions on Vocational Peer Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klodnick, Vanessa V.; Sabella, Kathryn; Brenner, Christopher J.; Krzos, Izabela M.; Ellison, Marsha L.; Kaiser, Susan M.; Davis, Maryann; Fagan, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    For early emerging adults with serious mental health conditions, vocational services with peer mentors are a promising adaptation of adult system evidence-based practices. Peer mentors were added to the Individual Placement and Support model of supported employment for 17- to 20-year-olds receiving residential and psychiatric care. To explore the…

  4. Perspectives on Creativity, Counseling, and the Contributions of Counselors and Entertainers to Mental Health: The Rogers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladding, Samuel T.; Wallace, Melanie Drake

    2012-01-01

    In the 20th century, a group of talented individuals with the surname Rogers made creative contributions to American society. This article examines the most noted of these personalities and their effect on the mental health of a nation. Although it is unlikely that a group with the same last name will be as prominent again, it is crucial for…

  5. Understanding Teachers' Perspectives on Student Mental Health: Findings from a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froese-Germain, Bernie; Riel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This 2012 research report, based on a national online survey conducted by the Canadian Teachers’ Federation (CTF) in collaboration with the Mental Health Commission of Canada, gathers the responses of over 3,900 teachers who voluntarily took part in the survey. Teachers were asked to identify the potential barriers to the provision of mental…

  6. Cultural Competence and Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services: A Complementary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Davis, King E.

    2007-01-01

    The need for cultural competence and the need for evidence-based practice in mental health services are major issues in contemporary discourse, especially in the psychological treatment of people of color. Although these 2 paradigms are complementary in nature, there is little cross-fertilization in the psychological literature. The present…

  7. Cultural Competence and Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services: A Complementary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaley, Arthur L.; Davis, King E.

    2007-01-01

    The need for cultural competence and the need for evidence-based practice in mental health services are major issues in contemporary discourse, especially in the psychological treatment of people of color. Although these 2 paradigms are complementary in nature, there is little cross-fertilization in the psychological literature. The present…

  8. Children and Adolescents Exposed to Community Violence: A Mental Health Perspective for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, James J.; Overstreet, Stacy

    2000-01-01

    This article provides school psychologists with important information regarding child and adolescent mental health problems that have been shown to be related to community violence exposure. Implications for school psychologists who are working with youth exposed to community violence or at-risk populations are discussed. (Contains 86 references…

  9. Barriers and Facilitators of Responding to Problem Gambling: Perspectives from Australian Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Rodda, S N; Manning, V; Dowling, N A; Lee, S J; Lubman, D I

    2017-09-07

    Despite high rates of comorbidity between problem gambling and mental health disorders, few studies have examined barriers or facilitators to the implementation of screening for problem gambling in mental health services. This exploratory qualitative study identified key themes associated with screening in mental health services. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 30 clinicians and managers from 11 mental health services in Victoria, Australia. Major themes and subthemes were identified using qualitative content analysis. Six themes emerged including competing priorities, importance of routine screening, access to appropriate screening tools, resources, patient responsiveness and workforce development. Barriers to screening included a focus on immediate risk as well as gambling being often considered as a longer-term concern. Clinicians perceived problem gambling as a relatively rare condition, but did acknowledge the need for brief screening. Facilitators to screening were changes to system processes, such as identification of an appropriate brief screening instrument, mandating its use as part of routine screening, as well as funded workforce development activities in the identification and management of problem gambling.

  10. Healthcare Professionals' Perspectives on a Mental Health Educational Campaign for the Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawluk, Shane Ashley; Zolezzi, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore barriers and facilitators in implementing an educational campaign in mental health for the public in Qatar. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Healthcare facilities across Qatar were used as the setting. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 healthcare providers from a variety of professions, including…

  11. Responding to the Needs of Students with Mental Health Difficulties in Higher Education: An Irish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Esther

    2017-01-01

    This article presents findings from a recent national study supported by Association for Higher Education Access & Disability and the National Learning Network (2016) to investigate the experiences of students with mental health difficulties in higher education in Ireland. The data investigation was a combination of both survey and qualitative…

  12. Animals at the Crossroads: A Perspective on Credentialing in the Mental Health Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivack, James D.

    1984-01-01

    Examines the credentialing process in mental health and likens it to the process of animals in confrontation over territoriality. Examines the data on which credentialing claims are predicated and the implications of and to the marketplace of licensing and certification. (BH)

  13. Perspectives of Young Emerging Adults with Serious Mental Health Conditions on Vocational Peer Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klodnick, Vanessa V.; Sabella, Kathryn; Brenner, Christopher J.; Krzos, Izabela M.; Ellison, Marsha L.; Kaiser, Susan M.; Davis, Maryann; Fagan, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    For early emerging adults with serious mental health conditions, vocational services with peer mentors are a promising adaptation of adult system evidence-based practices. Peer mentors were added to the Individual Placement and Support model of supported employment for 17- to 20-year-olds receiving residential and psychiatric care. To explore the…

  14. Transcultural Psychiatry: An Hispanic Perspective. Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center Monograph Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Eligio R., Ed.; Padilla, Amado M., Ed.

    Presenting multi-ethnic views about the delivery of mental health services to the Hispanic population, this monograph contains 18 papers presented at the joint meeting of the Puerto Rican Medical Association's Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery Section, the Caribbean Psychiatric Association, and the American Psychiatric Association held in May…

  15. PERSPECTIVES: Stories From the Trenches: The Application of Infant Mental Health Theory to Everyday Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The author was wholly unprepared for what he encountered when he entered Fraiberg's Child Development Project at the University of Michigan in 1973, joining five others in a special 2-year training program in infant mental health. He sputtered in astonishment. He resisted the interpretations. But there was no turning back, once he was exposed (on…

  16. Responding to the Needs of Students with Mental Health Difficulties in Higher Education: An Irish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Esther

    2017-01-01

    This article presents findings from a recent national study supported by Association for Higher Education Access & Disability and the National Learning Network (2016) to investigate the experiences of students with mental health difficulties in higher education in Ireland. The data investigation was a combination of both survey and qualitative…

  17. Exploring nurses' and patients' perspectives of limit setting in a forensic mental health setting.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Tessa; Daffern, Michael; Martin, Trish

    2014-04-01

    Limit setting is an intervention that is frequently used by mental health nurses. However, limit setting is poorly conceptualized, its purpose is unclear, and there are few evidence-based guidelines to assist nurses to set limits in a safe and effective manner. What is known is that the manner in which nurses set limits influences patients' perceptions of the interactions and their emotional and behavioural responses. In this qualitative study, 12 nurses and 12 patients participated in personal, semistructured interviews that aimed to explore limit setting and to propose principles to guide practice. The findings suggested that: (i) limit setting is important to safety in mental health hospitals; (ii) engaging patients in an empathic manner is necessary when setting limits (when nurses engage in an empathic manner, the therapeutic relationship is more likely to be preserved and the risk of aggressive responses is reduced); and (iii) an authoritative (fair, respectful, consistent, and knowledgeable), rather than authoritarian (controlling and indifferent), limit-setting style enhances positive outcomes with regards to adherence, reduced likelihood of aggression, and preservation of the therapeutic relationship. In conclusion, a limit-setting style characterized by empathic responding and an authoritative, rather than authoritarian interpersonal, style is recommended. Elucidating the components of this style is critical for effective training and best practice of mental health nurses, and to reduce aggressive responses from limit setting. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. Implementation of Mindfulness Training for Mental Health Staff: Organizational Context and Stakeholder Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Gerard; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; McGrath, Caroline; Frazier, Jean A.; deTorrijos, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Occupational stress and burnout adversely impacts mental health care staff well-being and patient outcomes. Mindfulness training reduces staff stress and may improve patient care. However, few studies explore mental health setting implementation. This qualitative study used focus groups to evaluate stakeholders’ perceptions of organizational factors affecting implementation of an adapted version of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) for staff on adolescent mental health units. Common facilitators included leadership securing buy-in with staff, allocating staff time to participate, and quiet space for training and practice. Other facilitators were past staff knowledge of mindfulness, local champions, and acculturating staff with mindfulness through a non-mandatory training attendance policy. Common barriers were limited staff time to attend training sessions and insufficient training coverage for some staff. Staff also reported improved focus when interacting with adolescents and improved social cohesion on the units. We conclude that a mindfulness-based program for reducing occupational stress can be successfully implemented on adolescent mental health units. Implementation appeared to change the social context of the units, including staff and patient interactions. More broadly, our findings highlight the importance of environmental factors in shaping attitudes, diffusion of innovation, and acculturation of wellness program implementations. PMID:26500708

  19. Incorporating Children's Lives into a Life Course Perspective on Stress and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avison, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Emerging themes in demography, developmental medicine, and psychiatry suggest that a comprehensive understanding of mental health across the life course requires that we incorporate the lives of children into our research. If we can learn more about the ways in which the stress process unfolds for children, we will gain important insights into the…

  20. Interventions for Children Affected by War: An Ecological Perspective on Psychosocial Support and Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; Meyers-Ohki, Sarah E.; Charrow, Alexandra P.; Tol, Wietse A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children and adolescents exposed to armed conflict are at high risk of developing mental health problems. To date, a range of psychosocial approaches and clinical/psychiatric interventions has been used to address mental health needs in these groups. Aims To provide an overview of peer-reviewed psychosocial and mental health interventions designed to address mental health needs of conflict-affected children, and to highlight areas in which policy and research need strengthening. Methods We used standard review methodology to identify interventions aimed at improving or treating mental health problems in conflict-affected youth. An ecological lens was used to organize studies according to the individual, family, peer/school, and community factors targeted by each intervention. Interventions were also evaluated for their orientation toward prevention, treatment, or maintenance, and for the strength of the scientific evidence of reported effects. Results Of 2305 studies returned from online searches of the literature and 21 sources identified through bibliography mining, 58 qualified for full review, with 40 peer-reviewed studies included in the final narrative synthesis. Overall, the peer-reviewed literature focused largely on school-based interventions. Very few family and community-based interventions have been empirically evaluated. Only two studies assessed multilevel or stepped-care packages. Conclusions The evidence base on effective and efficacious interventions for conflict-affected youth requires strengthening. Postconflict development agendas must be retooled to target the vulnerabilities characterizing conflict-affected youth, and these approaches must be collaborative across bodies responsible for the care of youth and families. PMID:23656831

  1. PERSPECTIVES ON MONITORING MENTAL HEALTH LEGISLATION IN ENGLAND: A VIEW FROM THE FRONT LINE.

    PubMed

    Laing, Judy M

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the findings of an exploratory study involving semi-structured interviews with a sample of Mental Health Act (MHA) Commissioners. MHA Commissioners are employed by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in England to monitor patients who are deprived of their liberty under the Mental Health Act 1983 (as amended by the Mental Health Act 2007). The study was designed to examine the impact of the transfer of responsibility of mental health detention monitoring in April 2009 from the Mental Health Act Commission to the CQC. The interviews were devised around the United Nations Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture (OPCAT) framework, which provides a useful benchmark for effective monitoring of deprivations of liberty to national inspection bodies (known as National Preventive Mechanisms), such as the CQC. Article 18 of the OPCAT advises a regular system of preventive visits by independent expert monitors, as well focussing on the promotion and protection of human rights. There is paucity of data on the work of MHA Commissioners in England to date and the author was unable to locate any previous studies on the subject. This study is timely and important as the CQC has been heavily criticised following the abuses uncovered at Winterbourne View care home and in the wake of the Mid Staffordshire Inquiry. Consequently, in 2012, the CQC undertook a major strategic review. The findings of this study suggest that, whilst there is some evidence of compliance, the CQC still has some way to go to effectively fulfil its monitoring duties in line with the provisions of the OPCAT.

  2. Therapist, Parent, and Youth Perspectives of Treatment Barriers to Family-Focused Community Outpatient Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Melissa M.; Haine-Schlagel, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study describes treatment barriers to receiving family-focused child mental health services for youths with disruptive behavior problems from multiple perspectives. Data were collected during a series of focus groups and interviews, including: 4 therapist focus groups, 3 parent focus groups, and 10 youth semi-structured interviews. Therapist, parent, and youth stakeholder participants discussed perceived barriers to effective treatment, the problems with current child outpatient therapy, and desired changes (i.e., policy, intervention, etc.) to improve mental health services. Results indicate similar themes around treatment barriers and dissatisfaction with services within and across multiple stakeholder groups, including inadequate support and lack of family involvement; however, parents and therapists, in particular, identified different contributing factors to these barriers. Overall, stakeholders reported much frustration and dissatisfaction with current community-based outpatient child therapy services. Study findings can inform service provision, intervention development, and future research. PMID:24019737

  3. VA Community Mental Health Service Providers' Utilization of and Attitudes toward Telemental Health Care: The Gatekeeper's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, John Paul; Farmer, Mary Sue; Head, Katharine J.; Fortney, John; Teal, Cayla R.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Mental health (MH) providers in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) are important stakeholders in the development of the Veterans Health Administration (VA) telemental health (TMH) system, but their perceptions of these technologies have not been systematically examined. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the…

  4. Child Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat mental illnesses in children early on. Once mental illness develops, it becomes a regular part of your child's behavior. This makes it more difficult to treat. But it's not always easy to ... diagnose mental health problems, the doctor or mental health specialist ...

  5. "Shattering culture": perspectives on cultural competence and evidence-based practice in mental health services.

    PubMed

    Good, Mary-Jo DelVecchio; Hannah, Seth Donal

    2015-04-01

    The concept of culture as an analytic concept has increasingly been questioned by social scientists, just as health care institutions and clinicians have increasingly routinized concepts and uses of culture as means for improving the quality of care for racial and ethnic minorities. This paper examines this tension, asking whether it is possible to use cultural categories to develop evidenced-based practice guidelines in mental health services when these categories are challenged by the increasing hyperdiversity of patient populations and newer theories of culture that question direct connection between group-based social identities and cultural characteristics. Anthropologists have grown concerned about essentializing societies, yet unequal treatment on the basis of cultural, racial, or ethnic group membership is present in medicine and mental health care today. We argue that discussions of culture-patients' culture and the "culture of medicine"-should be sensitive to the risk of improper stereotypes, but should also be sensitive to the continuing significance of group-based discrimination and the myriad ways culture shapes clinical presentation, doctor-patient interactions, the illness experience, and the communication of symptoms. We recommend that mental health professionals consider the local contexts, with greater appreciation for the diversity of lived experience found among individual patients. This suggests a nuanced reliance on broad cultural categories of racial, ethnic, and national identities in evidence-based practice guidelines.

  6. Rural Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... mental health services in rural America. According to Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration 2015 data , 18.3% ... into primary care, and suicide prevention. Information regarding substance abuse is found in RHIhub's Substance Abuse Topic Guide . ...

  7. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help us make DBSAlliance.org better! Go! Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  8. International Student Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  9. International Student Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  10. Consumer and carer perspectives in the development of a mental health research, treatment and teaching facility: A thematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Katsikitis, M; Lane, B R; Ozols, I; Statham, D

    2017-09-01

    perspectives addressing the establishment of a mental health research, treatment and teaching facility in their region. Methods Two 2-hr focus groups were conducted, with separate groups held for mental health consumers (n = 9) and carers (n = 9), respectively. Discussions pertained to mental health literacy, gaps in current services, desires for an ideal facility (in terms of physical design and services offered) and what would help in recovery. Results Inductive thematic analysis was used to generate three themes: care outside of consultations, carer involvement in recovery and holistic approaches to mental health care. Consumers desired a facility that could cater to individual needs. Carers felt excluded in recovery and unable to provide effective support. Both groups preferred holistic approaches to mental health, expressing ambivalence towards medication and hospitalization. Discussion Consumers and carers have many needs that conventional practices may not meet. Implications for practice They have clear desires for equal partnership in recovery and for transformation of conventional treatment methods. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Use, quality, and outcomes of care for mental health: the rural perspective.

    PubMed

    Rost, Kathryn; Fortney, John; Fischer, Ellen; Smith, Jeffrey

    2002-09-01

    This review synthesizes empirical research in rural mental health services to identify current research priorities to improve the mental health of rural Americans. Using a conceptual framework of the multiple determinants of use, quality, and outcomes, the authors address (1) how key constructs are operationalized, (2) their theoretical influence on the care process, (3) reported differences for nonmetropolitan and metropolitan individuals or within nonmetropolitan individuals, (4) salient issues rural advocates have raised, and (5) key research questions. While the authors recognize that rurality is a useful political umbrella to organize advocacy efforts, they propose that investigators no longer employ any of the multiple definitions of the term in the literature as even intrarural comparisons have not provided compelling evidence about the underlying causes of observed outcomes differences. Until these underlying causes have been identified, it is difficult to determine which components of the nonmetropolitan service system need to be improved.

  12. Violent and aggressive behaviors in youth: a mental health and prevention perspective.

    PubMed

    Osofsky, H J; Osofsky, J D

    2001-01-01

    Aggressive behavior and violence leading to disciplinary and legal difficulties have reached epidemic proportions among our youth. The severity of problems and social and economic costs to society have increased markedly. In this article, the authors review the risk factors, situational concerns, and warning signs that are important in predicting school violence and in designing effective prevention and early intervention efforts. They then describe programs with which they are involved as mental health professionals that appear to be extremely promising and applicable to other communities. The prevention and intervention programs are distinctive in that they involve collaborations with law enforcement, including the police and criminal sheriff, and the juvenile court as well as parents and schools in their efforts to promote positive development. These clinical, educational, and public policy approaches offer mental health professionals increased opportunities to be of help in this critical area.

  13. Legal, social, cultural and political developments in mental health care in the UK: the Liverpool black mental health service users' perspective.

    PubMed

    Pierre, S A

    2002-02-01

    Documentary evidence suggests that attitudes among local health and social services professionals towards the concept of user involvement in health and social care remain deeply polarized, a position characterized by commentators simultaneously as praise and damnation. Perhaps user involvement in health and social care will enhance, and it appears to resonate with the logic of, participatory democracy, in localities where the centralization of power has posed questions as to the nature and purpose of local governance in public services provision. The problems experienced by Britain's black and ethnic minorities within the mental health system have been the subject of exhaustive social inquiry. This essay attempts to explore the way in which legal, social, cultural, and political developments interface with mental health care practice in the UK, in order to assist those responsible for mental health services provision to deliver services that are in line with the Government's expectation of a modernized mental health service that is safe, sound, and supportive. An exploration of these developments within the European, national (UK), and local (Liverpool) contexts is undertaken. An appropriate local response to national priorities will ostensibly cut a swathe through the barriers confronted by the ethnic minority mental health service user in the cross-cultural context, an important prerequisite for the implementation of genuine user involvement.

  14. "We are all fellow human beings": mental health workers' perspectives of being in relationships with clients in community-based mental health services.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Kristin Ådnøy; Arman, Maria; Davidson, Larry; Sundfør, Bengt; Karlsson, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Stable, trusting relationships are at the core of Norwegian community-based mental health services. Being acknowledged and respected may promote a client's recovery. The aim of this study was to explore mental health workers' experiences of relating to clients. The design involved multi-stage focus groups based on a participatory approach and using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Acknowledging the personhood of a client appears to offer opportunities for growth and development in the client as well as in the health worker, based on reciprocal processes of each person affecting the other and the health workers' openness to understanding the other person.

  15. Mental health disparities in the older Afro-Caribbean population living in the United States: cultural and practice perspectives for mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Horace A

    2012-09-01

    Cultural characteristics play an important role in the lives of many older Afro-Caribbean as they continue to migrate, acculturate, and assimilate in the United States. Many among this unique cultural subgroup will develop mental illness; however, despite the availability of effective treatment, seeking appropriate care within the formal mental health system continues to be a challenge for this group as a consequence of their cultural heritage. This review describes how these cultural determinants often lead to mental health disparities among older Afro-Caribbean living in the United States. Suggestions are also included for how mental health nurses and other professionals can incorporate research and practice into the caring model of cultural humility as they continue to come in contact with this population in various clinical settings. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Public health perspectives on postwar mental health: gender, housing and family in Kitimat, British Columbia, 1950s.

    PubMed

    Lucyk, Kelsey; McLaren, Lindsay; Stahnisch, Frank

    2014-07-11

    The aftermath of World War II brought rapid change to the ways in which Canadian communities were designed and how their populations experienced their lives. The purpose of this study is to explore how mental health was understood and experienced in the context of the postwar period using the well-documented construction (in 1953) of the comprehensively planned, resource-based community of Kitimat, British Columbia as a case example. A qualitative content analysis of primary sources from Kitimat's archival collections was conducted, and eight semi-structured, in-depth interviews were held with long-term residents to enrich the historical data. Findings were then interpreted to construct a historical narrative informed by an operationalized definition of mental health. Kitimat residents in the 1950s understood and experienced their lives in ways consistent with contemporary holistic conceptualizations of mental health, namely, their daily living experiences. A historic interpretation revealed that mental health was understood as something achieved and maintained through conformance with postwar ideals for gendered norms and the family unit, as well as being experienced through issues like housing and expectations of community living. Understanding mental health demands consideration of local circumstances of time and place. The use of historical analysis in public health provides important evidence for how mental health was understood in the past, in a place and at a time when explicit modern language was limited, and illustrates the prominent role of the social determinants of health vis-à-vis population well-being. This article may be of special interest to those working collaboratively in the fields of public health and urban planning.

  17. Gendered health inequalities in mental well-being? The Nordic countries in a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Olafsdottir, Sigrun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were to: (a) compare gender differences in mental well-being in the Nordic countries with gender differences in 28 other countries around the world; and (b) evaluate whether gender differences in the Nordic countries remain when other social and lifestyle factors are taken into account. Data were obtained from 32 countries around the world that participated in the 2011 health module of the International Social Survey Programme. Ordered logit regression models were used to evaluate whether gender differences remained significant when other social and lifestyle factors were considered. Gender differences in mental well-being in the Nordic countries are not particularly small and the four countries do not cluster together. The gender differences remain when other social and lifestyle factors are taken into account. There appears to be a similar Nordic health paradox for mental well-being outcomes as for physical health outcomes. Although there may be multiple reasons for this, continued gender equality, including sex segregation in the labour market and gendered expectations, are considered to play a part.

  18. Inpatient Mental Health Recapture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-07

    Administration Graduate Management Project Proposal Inpatient Mental Health Recapture A Business Case Analysis at Evans Army Community Hospital Fort Carson...This report provides a basis for evaluating potential costs and savings associated with relocation of inpatient mental health services to Evans...Recommendations Evans Army Community Hospital is currently hemorrhaging money for inpatient mental health services within the Colorado Springs

  19. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, Maria; Earl, Tara R

    2014-01-01

    Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans) who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care.

  20. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: Implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Maria; Earl, Tara R.

    2014-01-01

    Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans) who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care. PMID:24461570

  1. Mental Health Chaplains: Practitioners' Perspectives on Their Value, Purpose and Function in the UK National Health Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubi, Peter Madsen; Smart, Harry

    2016-01-01

    There is limited research into the value, purpose and function of Mental Health (MH) Chaplains. Yet, they are employed within National Health Service Trusts in the UK. Eight MH Chaplains were interviewed to explore how they see their value, purpose and function. The data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The data reveal…

  2. Mental Health Chaplains: Practitioners' Perspectives on Their Value, Purpose and Function in the UK National Health Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubi, Peter Madsen; Smart, Harry

    2016-01-01

    There is limited research into the value, purpose and function of Mental Health (MH) Chaplains. Yet, they are employed within National Health Service Trusts in the UK. Eight MH Chaplains were interviewed to explore how they see their value, purpose and function. The data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The data reveal…

  3. The link between mental health-related discrimination and suicidality: service user perspectives.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, S; Jeffery, D; Rüsch, N; Williams, P; Thornicroft, G; Clement, S

    2015-07-01

    Suicide is a major global public health issue. Mental illness is a risk factor for suicide, but as many individuals with a diagnosed mental health problem do not experience suicidal ideation or attempt suicide, other individual and societal factors must be considered. Mental illness-related discrimination is one potential risk factor. Using mixed methods, the influence of discrimination on suicidality amongst 194 individuals diagnosed with depression, bipolar or schizophrenia spectrum disorders was investigated. Qualitative interviews with a sub-sample of 58 individuals who reported a link between experience of discrimination and suicidality were analysed using framework analysis. Quantitative methods were used to examine the model derived from qualitative analyses. Results indicate that the experience of discrimination led 38% of the overall sample of 194 participants, to suicidal feelings and 20% reported that it contributed to making a suicide attempt. The qualitative model derived from interviews with a sub-sample of 58 participants suggested that the experience of discrimination is experienced as a stressor that exceeds coping resources, leading to a negative self-image and a perception of decreased supportive networks/social structure. The anticipation of further negative events and treatment, and the perception of a lack of supportive networks led individuals in this study to feelings of hopelessness and suicidality. Quantitative analyses provided support for the model. These data suggest that both psychological therapies aimed at improving coping skills and population-level anti-stigma interventions that reduce the occurrence of discrimination may provide some protection against suicide amongst individuals with mental health problems.

  4. Social determinants for health (mental): evaluating a non-governmental experience from the perspective of actors involved.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Maria Lucia Magalhães; Melo, Anna Karynne da Silva; Carvalho, Liliane Brandão; Ximenes, Veronica Morais; Godoy, Maria Gabriela Curubeto

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Psychiatric Reform, an ongoing process, and its developments involve the construction of new ways of seeing the subject in illness, establishing the mental health field in a new way of understanding the social determinants that reflect in the deinstitutionalization and social inclusion. This study, multidimensional analysis of the relationship between social determinants and deinstitutionalization in mental health focusing on a community movement in Northeast Brazil, whose proposed work is subjective and psychosocial dimensions, aims to explore and analyze how the experiences in course of the Movement highlights the importance of social determinants, the perspective of professionals. The methodological approach outlined in the qualitative approach in the form of case studies, employing techniques such as interviews and focus groups. The categorization of analytical information was built from the relationship established between a model based on the constituent dimensions of the psychiatric reform, covering different planes, namely epistemological, healthcare, legal and socio-political, and social determinants of health - living conditions, and work environment, community networks and support, economic, cultural and environmental behaviors and lifestyles. The results show emphasis on the social subject, making the processing and knowledge of professionals, adding new ways to produce health; dialogue with multiple stakeholders, building autonomy, participative management, concern for professionalization; reorganizing the work process; appreciation of the everyday activities that weave and; invention of a new social site, among other elements in close interface with the determinants of health. These elements indicate that care practices woven into the daily life of the Movement involve the disassembling the traditional model of mental health care, stimulating new forms of citizenship, thus contributing to the institutionalization and promoting equality

  5. Differences between British and Japanese perspectives on forensic mental health systems: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Akihiro; Tomoto, Aika; Omiya, Soichiro; Sato, Aiko; Iyo, Masaomi; Igarashi, Yoshito

    2017-01-01

    AIM To clarify the differences in views on forensic mental health (FMH) systems between the United Kingdom and Japan. METHODS We conducted a series of semi-structured interviews with six leading forensic psychiatrists. Based on a discussion by the research team, we created an interview form. After we finished conducting all the interviews, we qualitatively analyzed their content. RESULTS In the United Kingdom the core domain of FMH was risk assessment and management; however, in Japan, the core domain of FMH was psychiatric testimony. In the United Kingdom, forensic psychiatrists were responsible for ensuring public safety, and psychopathy was identified as a disease but deemed as not suitable for medical treatment. On the other hand, in Japan, psychopathy was not considered a mental illness. CONCLUSION In conclusion, there are considerable differences between the United Kingdom and Japan with regard to the concepts of FMH. Some ideas taken from both cultures for better FMH practice were suggested. PMID:28401045

  6. Sleep, dreaming, and mental health: a review of historical and neurobiological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Palagini, Laura; Rosenlicht, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    Theories as to the function of sleep and dreaming and their relationship to emotions have been studied since the beginning of recorded history. Earliest historical records show the predominant view to be that dreams were considered divine in origin and only later did dream theory become linked with the functioning of the brain, perhaps most famously in psychoanalytic theory. The development of sleep laboratory techniques ushered in a new era of the dream study and their relationship to mental health. In this review we outline the history of theories about the genesis and function of dreams and sleep and their relationship to mental illness from ancient mythic and religious views to the first tentative scientific approaches to the ascendency of psychoanalysis and ultimately to the modern era of neuroscience. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical and mental health perspectives of first year undergraduate rural university students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background University students are often perceived to have a privileged position in society and considered immune to ill-health and disability. There is growing evidence that a sizeable proportion experience poor physical health, and that the prevalence of psychological disorders is higher in university students than their community peers. This study examined the physical and mental health issues for first year Australian rural university students and their perception of access to available health and support services. Methods Cross-sectional study design using an online survey form based on the Adolescent Screening Questionnaire modeled on the internationally recognised HEADSS survey tool. The target audience was all first-year undergraduate students enrolled in an on-campus degree program. The response rate was 41% comprising 355 students (244 females, 111 males). Data was analysed using standard statistical techniques including descriptive and inferential statistics; and thematic analysis of the open-ended responses. Results The mean age of the respondents was 20.2 years (SD 4.8). The majority of the students lived in on-campus residential college style accommodation, and a third combined part-time paid work with full-time study. Most students reported being in good physical health. However, on average two health conditions were reported over the past six months, with the most common being fatigue (56%), frequent headaches (26%) and allergies (24%). Mental health problems included anxiety (25%), coping difficulties (19.7%) and diagnosed depression (8%). Most respondents reported adequate access to medical doctors and support services for themselves (82%) and friends (78%). However the qualitative comments highlighted concerns about stigma, privacy and anonymity in seeking counselling. Conclusions The present study adds to the limited literature of physical and mental health issues as well as barriers to service utilization by rural university students. It

  8. Physical and mental health perspectives of first year undergraduate rural university students.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rafat; Guppy, Michelle; Robertson, Suzanne; Temple, Elizabeth

    2013-09-15

    University students are often perceived to have a privileged position in society and considered immune to ill-health and disability. There is growing evidence that a sizeable proportion experience poor physical health, and that the prevalence of psychological disorders is higher in university students than their community peers. This study examined the physical and mental health issues for first year Australian rural university students and their perception of access to available health and support services. Cross-sectional study design using an online survey form based on the Adolescent Screening Questionnaire modeled on the internationally recognised HEADSS survey tool. The target audience was all first-year undergraduate students enrolled in an on-campus degree program. The response rate was 41% comprising 355 students (244 females, 111 males). Data was analysed using standard statistical techniques including descriptive and inferential statistics; and thematic analysis of the open-ended responses. The mean age of the respondents was 20.2 years (SD 4.8). The majority of the students lived in on-campus residential college style accommodation, and a third combined part-time paid work with full-time study. Most students reported being in good physical health. However, on average two health conditions were reported over the past six months, with the most common being fatigue (56%), frequent headaches (26%) and allergies (24%). Mental health problems included anxiety (25%), coping difficulties (19.7%) and diagnosed depression (8%). Most respondents reported adequate access to medical doctors and support services for themselves (82%) and friends (78%). However the qualitative comments highlighted concerns about stigma, privacy and anonymity in seeking counselling. The present study adds to the limited literature of physical and mental health issues as well as barriers to service utilization by rural university students. It provides useful baseline data for the

  9. Exploring sexual risks in a forensic mental health hospital: perspectives from patients and nurses.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Chris; Happell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Patients utilising forensic mental health inpatient services experience a range of sexual risks, including vulnerability to sexual exploitation and exposure to sexually transmissible infections. However, there is a paucity of research exploring the issue of sexual risks from the standpoint of patients and the nurses who work closely with them in inpatient secure settings. This article presents findings from a qualitative exploratory study, which investigated the views of patients and nurses about sexual relationships in forensic mental health settings. Risk was a major theme arising from the data and is the focus of this article. Subthemes from nurse participants included sexual safety, sexual vulnerability, unplanned pregnancies, and male sexuality issues. Subthemes from patients included risks associated with sexual activity, access to information and sexual health care, unplanned pregnancies, vulnerability, and male sexuality issues. Knowledge about these sexual risks by patients and nurses were well articulated, however information and assistance were considered by patients to be less than satisfactory in improving their knowledge or in providing the support they considered important to reduce sexual risks. The issue of risk needs to be addressed, and nurses would be well placed to contribute; however they require education to improve their ability to provide sexual health education to patients along with strategies to ensure patients receive the support and services they require to reduce their exposure to sexual risks.

  10. A multidimensional perspective of relations between self-concept (Self Description Questionnaire II) and adolescent mental health (Youth Self-Report).

    PubMed

    Marsh, Herbert W; Parada, Roberto H; Ayotte, Violaine

    2004-03-01

    Relations between self-concept and mental health are best understood from a multidimensional perspective. For responses by 903 adolescents (mean age = 12.6) to a new French translation of the Self Description Questionnaire II (SDQII), confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated a well-defined multidimensional factor structure of reliable, highly differentiated self-concept factors. Correlations between 11 SDQII factors and 7 mental health problems (Youth Self-Report; YSR) varied substantially (.11 to -.83; mean r = -.35). Single higher-order factors could not explain relations among SDQII factors, among YSR factors, or between the SDQII and YSR factors. This highly differentiated multivariate pattern of relations supports a multidimensional perspective of self-concept, not the unidimensional perspective still prevalent in mental health research and assessment.

  11. Defining continuity of care from the perspectives of mental health service users and professionals: an exploratory, comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Angela; Davies, Jonathon; McLaren, Susan; Whittock, Margaret; Lemma, Ferew; Belling, Ruth; Clement, Sarah; Burns, Tom; Catty, Jocelyn; Jones, Ian Rees; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-08-01

    Continuity of care (COC) is central to the organization and delivery of mental health services. Traditional definitions have excluded service users, and this lack of involvement has been linked to poor conceptual clarity surrounding the term. Consequently, very little is known about the differences and similarities in the conceptualization of COC by mental health service users and professionals. To explore and compare mental health service users' and professionals' definitions of COC. Using an exploratory, qualitative design, five focus groups with 32 service users each met twice. Data were analysed thematically to generate a service user-defined model of COC. In a cross-sectional survey, health and social care professionals (n = 184) defined COC; responses were analysed thematically. Service user and professional definitions were conceptually mapped and compared to identify similarities and differences. There was crossover between the service user and professional derived models of COC. Both contained temporal, quality, systemic, staff, hospital and needs-related elements of COC. Service users prioritized access, information, peer support and avoiding services; health professionals most frequently referred to staff, cross-sectional and temporal COC. Service users alone identified service avoidance, peer support and day centres as COC elements; professionals alone identified cross-sectional working. Important similarities and differences exist in service user and professional conceptualizations of COC. Further research is necessary to explore these differences, prior to integrating service user and professional perspectives in a validated COC framework which could enable the development and evaluation of interventions to improve COC, informing policy and practice. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Mental health of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth: A developmental resiliency perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mustanski, Brian; Newcomb, M.; Garofalo, R.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth are at increased risk for both victimization and internalizing mental health problems, but limited research has studied their association or factors that increase resilience. The sample included 425 LGBs between the ages of 16 and 24 year. The majority had disclosed their sexual orientation to family or friends (98%) and 97% had someone in their lives who was accepting. Racial/ethnic minority and female participants in general reported lower levels of disclosure and acceptance. Most participants reported some form of sexual orientation-related victimization (94%). Victimization was associated with psychological distress, but a compensatory model indicated that in the context of this victimization both peer and family support had significant promotive effects. A test of a protective model found social support did not ameliorate negative effects of victimization. The positive effects of family support decreased with age. Peer and family support were particularly important, but they did not significantly dampen the negative effects of victimization. Our findings suggest that mental health professionals working with LGB youth should address social support and that public health approaches are needed to reduce levels of victimization. PMID:21731405

  13. Privacy and confidentiality: perspectives of mental health consumers and carers in pharmacy settings.

    PubMed

    Hattingh, Hendrika Laetitia; Knox, Kathy; Fejzic, Jasmina; McConnell, Denise; Fowler, Jane L; Mey, Amary; Kelly, Fiona; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2015-02-01

    The study aims to explore within the community pharmacy practice context the views of mental health stakeholders on: (1) current and past experiences of privacy, confidentiality and support; and (2) expectations and needs in relation to privacy and confidentiality. In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted in three states in Australia, namely Queensland, the northern region of New South Wales and Western Australia, between December 2011 and March 2012. There were 98 participants consisting of consumers and carers (n = 74), health professionals (n = 13) and representatives from consumer organisations (n = 11). Participants highlighted a need for improved staff awareness. Consumers indicated a desire to receive information in a way that respects their privacy and confidentiality, in an appropriate space. Areas identified that require improved protection of privacy and confidentiality during pharmacy interactions were the number of staff having access to sensitive information, workflow models causing information exposure and pharmacies' layout not facilitating private discussions. Challenges experienced by carers created feelings of isolation which could impact on care. This study explored mental health stakeholders' experiences and expectations regarding privacy and confidentiality in the Australian community pharmacy context. A need for better pharmacy staff training about the importance of privacy and confidentiality and strategies to enhance compliance with national pharmacy practice requirements was identified. Findings provided insight into privacy and confidentiality needs and will assist in the development of pharmacy staff training material to better support consumers with sensitive conditions. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Editorial Perspective: Effective mental health and psychosocial interventions for children and adolescents in street situations.

    PubMed

    Watters, Cynthia

    2017-02-01

    Children and adolescents in street situations (CASS) in low- and middle-income countries (LAMIC) could arguably be regarded as the most at-risk group of children for mental health and psychosocial impairments compared with any other group of children. CASS, street-connected children and street children are some of the terms used to describe this group of children who have some association with the street; such as living, working or loitering for long periods of time on the street. These children are often described as 'voiceless'; a vulnerable group of children who experience a considerable amount of adversity from a young age.

  15. "Syntonic change": a mental health perspective on avoiding the crises associated with change within organizations.

    PubMed

    Everly, G S

    1999-01-01

    Historically, change within organizations has led to increased stress within the workforce. Organizational change is usually met with resentment and resistance yielding a crisis which impinges upon not only organizational effectiveness, but mental health as well. Most change efforts result in failure yielding dramatic declines in productivity, as well as accelerated attrition within the human resource. This paper proposes a model of "syntonic change" as a means of meeting both the needs of the organization to remain dynamic and flexible, and the needs of the workforce for a sense of trust and safety.

  16. Children's Mental Health. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plattner, Ilse Elisabeth; Haugen, Kirsten; Cohen, Alan; Levin, Diane E.

    2003-01-01

    Presents four articles discussing mental health issues that pertain to early childhood education: "Granting Children Their Emotions" (Ilse Elisabeth Plattner); "Double Vision: Parent and Professional Perspectives on Our Family's Year in Crisis" (Kirsten Haugen); "Coping with Stress and Surviving Challenging Times" (Alan Cohen); and "When the World…

  17. Obeah-illness versus psychiatric entities among jamaican immigrants: cultural and clinical perspectives for psychiatric mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Horace A

    2015-04-01

    In order to provide culturally authentic healthcare, psychiatric-mental health nurses and other professionals must familiarize themselves with the culture-specific syndromes, idioms of distress, beliefs and practices that may present among the diverse patient groups with whom they work. Psychiatric conditions relating to the Jamaican belief in "Obeah" are specific, culturally-interpreted phenomena that psychiatric nurses may encounter among Jamaican patients. This paper describes the phenomenon of Obeah and its influences on the worldview of life, health, illness; psychiatric conditions in the form of culture-bound syndromes; and help-seeking behaviors throughout Jamaican cultural communities. Inability to understand the obeah-illness concept from a culturally-interpreted perspective may be constrictive and result in less-than-optimal care. Armed with the knowledge of the concept of Obeah from a core belief perspective, how it influences psychiatric presentations, and embracing its significance to the Jamaican health belief model will assist in building a workable, caring, best-practice framework aimed toward a clinical and practice paradigm for this unique folk-health belief system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of patient-controlled psychiatric hospital admissions: mental health professionals' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Trine; Mehlsen, Mimi; Lomborg, Kirsten; Bliksted, Vibeke

    2017-07-01

    In a patient-controlled admission (PCA) programme, the decision about hospital admission is made solely by the patient, with no gatekeeper function allocated to the mental health professionals (MHPs). Current knowledge about how MHPs experience and evaluate PCA is sparse. This Danish multi-centre study examined the MHP assessment of the PCA programme in daily clinical practice, and compared PCA evaluations made by MHPs and patients. A questionnaire was developed and a survey conducted over the course of a year at all Danish mental health units included in the PCA programme. MHPs made an overall evaluation of the PCA programme. At each unique PCA, both patient and MHP evaluated the specific admission when the patient entered the unit and at discharge. In total, 546 questionnaires were included in the survey, based on 252 unique MHPs. The MHPs rated the PCA programme positively. The MHPs believed that PCA helped patients receive early help and avoid long admissions. Overall, agreement was poor when comparing patients' and MHPs' evaluation of the same PCA. MHPs (and patients) seem to be in favour of implementing the PCA programme. However, results revealed that MHPs and patients have different views of what caused the patient to admit themselves and why patients were discharged. MHPs should be aware that patients might have other reasons for admitting and discharging themselves than what seems most obvious to the MHP.

  19. African American and European American Veterans’ Perspectives on Receiving Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Frank; AhnAllen, Christopher G.; Wiltsey-Stirman, Shannon; Lester-Williams, Kristin; Klunk-Gillis, Julie; Dick, Alexandra M.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about client attitudes, especially Veterans’, toward the types of structured interventions that are increasingly being offered in public sector and VA mental health clinics, nor is the possible impact these attitudes may have on treatment engagement well understood. Previous work indicates that attitudes of African Americans and European Americans toward treatment may differ in important ways. Attitudes toward treatment have been a proposed explanation for lower treatment engagement and higher dropout rates among African Americans compared to European Americans. Yet to date, the relationship between race and attitudes toward treatment and treatment outcomes has been understudied, and findings inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to explore African American and European American Veteran attitudes toward mental health care, especially as they relate to structured treatments. Separate focus groups were conducted with 24 African American and 37 European American military Veterans. In general, both groups reported similar reasons to seek treatment and similar thoughts regarding the purpose of therapy. Differences emerged primarily regarding therapist preferences. In both groups, some participants expressed favorable opinions of structured treatments and others expressed negative views; treatment preferences did not appear to be influenced by race. PMID:25822316

  20. Beyond the crisis: building back better mental health care in 10 emergency-affected areas using a longer-term perspective.

    PubMed

    Epping-Jordan, JoAnne E; van Ommeren, Mark; Ashour, Hazem Nayef; Maramis, Albert; Marini, Anita; Mohanraj, Andrew; Noori, Aqila; Rizwan, Humayun; Saeed, Khalid; Silove, Derrick; Suveendran, T; Urbina, Liliana; Ventevogel, Peter; Saxena, Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Major gaps remain - especially in low- and middle-income countries - in the realization of comprehensive, community-based mental health care. One potentially important yet overlooked opportunity for accelerating mental health reform lies within emergency situations, such as armed conflicts or natural disasters. Despite their adverse impacts on affected populations' mental health and well being, emergencies also draw attention and resources to these issues and provide openings for mental health service development. Cases were considered if they represented a low- or middle-income country or territory affected by an emergency, were initiated between 2000 and 2010, succeeded in making changes to the mental health system, and were able to be documented by an expert involved directly with the case. Based on these criteria, 10 case examples from diverse emergency-affected settings were included: Afghanistan, Burundi, Indonesia (Aceh Province), Iraq, Jordan, Kosovo, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, Sri Lanka, and Timor-Leste. These cases demonstrate generally that emergency contexts can be tapped to make substantial and sustainable improvements in mental health systems. From these experiences, 10 common lessons learnt were identified on how to make this happen. These lessons include the importance of adopting a longer-term perspective for mental health reform from the outset, and focusing on system-wide reform that addresses both new-onset and pre-existing mental disorders. Global progress in mental health care would happen more quickly if, in every crisis, strategic efforts were made to convert short-term interest in mental health problems into momentum for mental health reform.

  1. Mental Health for Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Sexual health for men Urinary health for ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Other mental health conditions include bipolar disorder , ...

  2. No health without mental health.

    PubMed

    Prince, Martin; Patel, Vikram; Saxena, Shekhar; Maj, Mario; Maselko, Joanna; Phillips, Michael R; Rahman, Atif

    2007-09-08

    About 14% of the global burden of disease has been attributed to neuropsychiatric disorders, mostly due to the chronically disabling nature of depression and other common mental disorders, alcohol-use and substance-use disorders, and psychoses. Such estimates have drawn attention to the importance of mental disorders for public health. However, because they stress the separate contributions of mental and physical disorders to disability and mortality, they might have entrenched the alienation of mental health from mainstream efforts to improve health and reduce poverty. The burden of mental disorders is likely to have been underestimated because of inadequate appreciation of the connectedness between mental illness and other health conditions. Because these interactions are protean, there can be no health without mental health. Mental disorders increase risk for communicable and non-communicable diseases, and contribute to unintentional and intentional injury. Conversely, many health conditions increase the risk for mental disorder, and comorbidity complicates help-seeking, diagnosis, and treatment, and influences prognosis. Health services are not provided equitably to people with mental disorders, and the quality of care for both mental and physical health conditions for these people could be improved. We need to develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions that can be integrated into management of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Health-care systems should be strengthened to improve delivery of mental health care, by focusing on existing programmes and activities, such as those which address the prevention and treatment of HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria; gender-based violence; antenatal care; integrated management of childhood illnesses and child nutrition; and innovative management of chronic disease. An explicit mental health budget might need to be allocated for such activities. Mental health affects progress towards the achievement of several

  3. [Innovation in mental health from the perspective of users: a community movement in the Northeast of Brazil].

    PubMed

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães; Carvalho, Liliane Brandão; Ximenes, Veronica Morais; Melo, Anna Karynne da Silva; Godoy, Maria Gabriela Curubeto

    2012-03-01

    This study, originating from a multidimensional analysis on the innovation category in a Community Mental Health Movement of Bom Jardim (Fortaleza, Brazil) that examines subjective and psychosocial dimensions, seeks to examine to what extent the work developed by this movement is effectively an innovative model in mental healthcare from the perspective of users of this service. The methodology adopted was a qualitative case study method based on a critical-interpretive approach employing techniques such as in-depth interviews associated with focus groups. The categorization of the discursive material was conducted using a model based on the four main dimensions of psychiatric reform, namely conceptual, technical, legal and socio-cultural aspects. The results reveal the following: an emphasis on the individual rather than focusing on the sickness; care as the basis for purposeful actions; the co-production of genuine dialogue with multiple stakeholders, and the construction of autonomy emphasizing individual potential. In conclusion, it can be said that healthcare practices developed by the Movement involve deconstructing the traditional model of mental healthcare, permitting new forms of citizenship, thereby contributing to deinstitutionalization.

  4. Mental Health Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Strength and Quality of Evidence 2-4 Table 2-3 Targeted Skills 2-6 Table 3-1 Fundamental Principles of Mental Health Training and Implementation 3...well-being, readiness and performance. 3.3.9 User Acceptability Mental health training must be perceived to be useful by those being trained in order...the training from helpful. However, while user acceptability is necessary, it is not sufficient for establishing good mental health training [5], [6

  5. Mental Health - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Roads Media Mental Health: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Salud mental: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine Suicide (An Introduction) - English Suicide (An Introduction) - español (Spanish) MP3 ... MP3 Siloam Family Health ...

  6. Sexual abuse and violence among adolescent girls in Botswana: a mental health perspective.

    PubMed

    Seloilwe, Esther Salang; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2009-07-01

    The presence of sexual abuse among societies in Botswana is a phenomenon whose occurrence is usually denied albeit the police report on it and legal frameworks have been established to combat it. Several factors influence the concealment of sexual abuse among adolescent girls, which includes cultural factors and social status of the perpetrators. This paper espouses the concept of sexual abuse among adolescent girls, the existence of the problem, its magnitude, the factors that increase vulnerability to violence and abuse, and how these factors intersect with HIV and AIDS. Two case studies using a discovery method were used to explore the phenomenon under the study. The findings of the study indicated that sexual abuse and violence have profound mental health consequences including guilt, anxiety, depression and anger. Future research is suggested to explore this problem on a wider scale and develop interventions that can assist victims and perpetrators to cope with the situation.

  7. Paramedic-conducted Mental Health Counselling for Abused Women in Rural Bangladesh: An Evaluation from the Perspective of Participants

    PubMed Central

    Rimi, Nadia A; Jahan, Shamshad; Lindmark, and Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on evaluation of an initiative to use paramedics as the first-level mental health counsellors of abused women in rural Bangladesh (2003–2004) from the perspective of the abused women who participated in one or more counselling sessions. Thirty in-depth interviews, followed by a survey (n=372), targeted to cover all participants, were conducted in 2006. Overall, the arrangement, management of ethical issues, and skills of paramedics were rated favourably. Most (89%) abused women (n=372) considered the session useful; one-fourth of these women considered it very useful; and only a few abused women considered the session useless. Usefulness of the session was expressed mostly in terms of relief attained after talking about the issue. Most (87%) women reported being encouraged to be self-confident. In a context characterized by low self-confidence of women, lack of opportunity to talk about violence, and absence of professional mental health counselling services, this initiative is sufficiently promising to warrant further testing. PMID:19761082

  8. An exploration of artists' perspectives of participatory arts and health projects for people with mental health needs.

    PubMed

    Margrove, K L; Pope, J; Mark, G M

    2013-12-01

    This study addresses the views and experiences of artists who run participatory arts and health courses for those with mental health or social problems. Qualitative research with 11 artists from three different organizations providing participatory arts and health courses. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted. Participants provided oral contributions that were transcribed and then thematically analysed by the authors. Participants described perceived positive benefits of participatory arts and health courses, including developing friendships, self-expression and creativity, a non-judgmental environment, along with key issues arising, including managing challenging behaviours and provision of follow-on options. Results indicate that improvements in well-being can be identified by artists during courses, the activity can help develop friendships, courses can be well managed in community settings, and benefits of follow-on activities should be investigated in future. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. What Does Success Look Like in the Forensic Mental Health System? Perspectives of Service Users and Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, James D

    2016-03-21

    Outcomes research in forensic mental health (FMH) has concentrated on reoffending as the principal indicator of success. Defining success in one-dimensional, negative terms can create a distorted view of the diverse objectives of the FMH system. This qualitative study examined the complexity of success from the perspectives of people in the FMH system. Interviews were conducted with 18 forensic service users and 10 forensic service providers. Data were analyzed inductively using thematic analysis to identify predominant themes. The participants conceptualized success as a dynamic process materializing across six different domains in the context of the FMH system: (a) normal life, (b) independent life, (c) compliant life, (d) healthy life, (e) meaningful life, and (f) progressing life. The results indicate that people who provide or use FMH services emphasize a broad range of processes and outcomes, apart from public safety, when they think about success.

  10. Women Veterans and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > Women veterans and mental health Mental Health Women veterans and mental health Post-traumatic stress disorder ( ... hurt you. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and women veterans PTSD can occur after you have been ...

  11. Mental Retardation in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Michael; And Others

    This monograph presents a general introduction to the history, classification, and characteristics of mental retardation. It begins with a discussion of the history of mental retardation from ancient Greece and Rome to the present. The beginnings of special education are traced to the early 19th century in Europe. Major influences in treatment of…

  12. Understanding the Behavioral Determinants of Mental Health Service Use by Urban, Under-Resourced Black Youth: Adolescent and Caregiver Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Kerri; Pohle, Cara; Beall, Peggy; Lucksted, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Black adolescents with mental health problems are less likely than non-Black adolescents with mental health problems to receive treatment, primarily for non-financial reasons including negative perceptions of services and providers, and self-stigma associated with experiencing mental health problems. To better understand these obstacles, 16 adolescents and 11 caregivers, recruited from two K-8th grade elementary-middle schools, participated in four focus groups guided by the unified theory of behavior to explore mental health help-seeking behaviors and perceptions of mental health services. In the focus groups, caregivers acknowledged more positive attitudes about seeking mental health services than adolescents, but both expected the experience of actually doing so to be negative. Adolescents and caregivers also acknowledged social norms that inhibit their mental health help-seeking. Therefore, we conclude that interventions targeting expectancies and social norms might increase the connection of urban, under-resourced Black adolescents and their families to mental health services, and be particularly important given the long-term consequences of untreated mental health problems for this group. PMID:23355768

  13. Clinician and Parent Perspectives on Parent and Family Contextual Factors that Impact Community Mental Health Services for Children with Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The present study employed qualitative methods to examine multiple stakeholder perspectives regarding the role of parent and family contextual factors on community child mental health treatment for children with behavior problems. Findings suggest agreement between clinicians and parents on the number, types and importance of parent and family…

  14. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research in the Context of Hurricane Katrina: An Ecological Needs-Based Perspective and Introduction to the Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Carl F.; Overstreet, Stacy

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the special section on child and adolescent mental health research in the context of Hurricane Katrina. We outline the purpose and intent of the special section and present an integrative perspective based on broad contextual theories of human development with which to think about the impact of disasters like Katrina. The…

  15. Clinician and Parent Perspectives on Parent and Family Contextual Factors that Impact Community Mental Health Services for Children with Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The present study employed qualitative methods to examine multiple stakeholder perspectives regarding the role of parent and family contextual factors on community child mental health treatment for children with behavior problems. Findings suggest agreement between clinicians and parents on the number, types and importance of parent and family…

  16. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research in the Context of Hurricane Katrina: An Ecological Needs-Based Perspective and Introduction to the Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Carl F.; Overstreet, Stacy

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the special section on child and adolescent mental health research in the context of Hurricane Katrina. We outline the purpose and intent of the special section and present an integrative perspective based on broad contextual theories of human development with which to think about the impact of disasters like Katrina. The…

  17. Religion and mental health

    PubMed Central

    Behere, Prakash B.; Das, Anweshak; Yadav, Richa; Behere, Aniruddh P.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, the relation between religion and mental health and vice versa has been described. From primitive times different religions have different beliefs and systems of worshipping. Every religion with their belief system has implications on mental health and illness. We described how Hindu system of beliefs and rituals may have an effect in causation of various mental illnesses. It is also described how religion can help an individual to sustain one's life in various domains. The relationship between different religion and symptomatology is described. The impact and outcome of religion on mental health have been highlighted. PMID:23858253

  18. Cross cultural training in primary mental health care consultations in Moldova - The tEACH perspective.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jane Ege; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn

    2017-09-01

    This article reports experiences and challenges encountered in a cross-cultural training project in Moldova that was undertaken by tEACH, the teaching subcommittee of EACH: International Association for Communication in Healthcare, in cooperation with local and international stakeholders. As part of a major health policy reform, the aim was to equip a group of trainers with the skills to train Moldovan professionals in skills for primary mental health care, including communication skills. The project consisted of 3 weeks of training using mainly experiential teaching methods to allow participants to practice content and methods, including interactive lecturing, roleplay, feedback and video. A majority of the participants reported that they acquired key facilitation skills. They valued the opportunity to practice and receive feedback. However, some reported that there was too much focus on communication skills, which was thought to be less relevant in a Moldovan context. Furthermore our learner-centered approach was occasionally experienced as a lack of structure CONCLUSION: The tEACH expertise plays an important role in supporting trainers in cross-cultural contexts with effective communication skills methods. Teaching in a cross-cultural context is only successful through continuous dialogue with stakeholders and demands attention to cultural differences. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Mental health. Inside job.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Emma

    2005-11-17

    Four out of five prisoners suffer mental health problems. There are 139 liaison teams responsible for ensuring offenders are directed to hospitals where appropriate, but they are under-resourced and stretched to capacity. Mental health teams are working to reduce inappropriate referrals.

  20. Rethinking Mental Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartee, Edwin M.; Kelly, Jacquelyn M.

    Critical reasons for frustration and circularity in the formulation and implementation of mental health policy are analyzed. The primary reason proposed is the lack of equal, systematic and structurally-reinforced participation of mental health services consumers and their communities in the planning and implementing of policy and programs. This…

  1. Tobacco consumption and positive mental health: an epidemiological study from a positive psychology perspective.

    PubMed

    Bazo-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Peralta-Alvarez, Frank; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Alvarado, Germán F; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-05-04

    Positive mental health (PMH) is much more than the absence of mental illnesses. For example, PMH explains that to be happy or resilient can drive us to live a full life, giving us a perception of well-being and robustness against everyday problems. Moreover, PMH can help people to avoid risky behaviours like tobacco consumption (TC). Our hypothesis was that PMH is negatively associated with TC, and this association differs across rural, urban and migrant populations. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the PERU MIGRANT Study's dataset, including rural population from the Peruvian highlands (n = 201), urban population from the capital city Lima (n = 199) and migrants who were born in highlands but had to migrated because of terrorism (n = 589). We used an adapted version of the 12-item Global Health Questionnaire to measure PMH. The outcome was TC, measured as lifetime and recent TC. Log-Poisson robust regression, performed with a Maximum Likelihood method, was used to estimate crude prevalence ratios (PR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95%CI), adjusted by sex, age, family income and education which were the confounders. The modelling procedure included the use of LR Test, Akaike information criteria (AIC) and Bayesian information criteria (BIC). Cumulative occurrence of tobacco use (lifetime TC) was 61.7 % in the rural group, 78 % in the urban group and 76.2 % in rural-to-urban migrants. Recent TC was 35.3 % in the rural group, 30.7 % in the urban group and 20.5 % in rural-to-urban migrants. After adjusting for confounders, there was evidence of a negative association between PMH and lifetime TC in the rural group (PR = 0.93; 95%CI: 0.87-0.99), and a positive association between PMH and recent TC in migrants (PR = 1.1; 95%CI: 1.0-1.3). PMH was negatively associated with TC in rural participants only. Urbans exhibited just a similar trend, while migrants exhibited the opposite one. This evidence represents the first step in the route of knowing the potential

  2. The impact of voluntary exercise on mental health in rodents: a neuroplasticity perspective.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Sun, Yan; Li, Ruixi; Brana, Corinne; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-09-01

    There is growing interest in the effects of voluntary wheel running activity on brain and behaviour in laboratory rodents and their implications to humans. Here, the major findings to date on the impact of exercise on mental health and diseases as well as the possible underlying neurobiological mechanisms are summarised. Several critical modulating factors on the neurobehavioural effects of wheel running exercise are emphasized and discussed--including the amount of wheel running, sex and strain/species differences. We also reported the outcome of an empirical investigation of the impact of wheel running exercise on the expression of both cognitive and non-cognitive phenotypes in a triple (3 x Tg-AD) transgenic mouse model for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clear sex- and paradigm-specific effects of exercise on the genetically determined phenotypes are illustrated, including the efficacy of wheel running activity in attenuating the sex-specific cognitive deficits. It is concluded that the wheel running paradigm represents a unique environmental manipulation for the investigation of neurobehavioural plasticity in terms of gene-environment interactions relevant to the pathogenesis and therapies of certain neuropsychiatric conditions.

  3. A School Mental Health Issues Survey from the Perspective of Regular and Special Education Teachers, School Counselors, and School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repie, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the perceptions of regular and special education teachers, school counselors, and school psychologists on presenting problems of students, available community mental health services, family-based and community-based barriers to services, and the provision of mental health services in schools. A…

  4. Determining the effectiveness of mental health services from a consumer perspective: part 2: barriers to recovery and principles for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2008-04-01

    The routine use of standardized outcome measures has been introduced to assess the effectiveness of mental health service delivery throughout Australia. The use of these measures has been criticized for failing to reflect those aspects of treatment consumers consider to affect their recovery. This is the second of a two-part paper. Its aim is to explore the views of consumers regarding factors that impede recovery and to explore the principles that ideally should underpin the evaluation of mental health services. Focus group interviews were conducted with consumers of mental health services (n = 16) from one rural and one metropolitan mental health service in Victoria, Australia. This paper presents the findings, pertaining to aspects of mental health services that pose barriers to recovery. The main themes to emerge were: staffing issues; hearing the person not the illness; lack of safety and security; and, isolation. The main themes to emerge regarding the evaluation of mental health services were: consumer involvement; peer support and more responsive care and treatment. The views of participants suggest that the effective evaluation of mental health services requires an increased focus on the views and opinions of consumers in order to develop more responsive mental health services.

  5. Understanding Engagement in Mental Health Services for Preschool Children: An Analysis of Teacher, Clinician, and Parent Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivunen, Julie; Van Alst, Donna; Ocasio, Kerrie; Allegra, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of mental health clinicians in providing services in the preschool setting. Clinicians provided services for 3 years in urban, northern New Jersey preschools, in order to expand access to mental health services for vulnerable children. At the conclusion of the three-year period, focus groups…

  6. Beyond misdiagnosis, misunderstanding and mistrust: relevance of the historical perspective in the medical and mental health treatment of people of color.

    PubMed Central

    Suite, Derek H.; La Bril, Robert; Primm, Annelle; Harrison-Ross, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the relationship and relevance of the historical interaction primarily between African-American culture and the medical and mental health communities, and explore the role of historical experience in contributing to mistrust and underutilization of services by people of color. We conclude that failure on the part of practitioners to go beyond clinical history gathering to recognize and acknowledge the larger historical perspectives from which they and their patients of color draw conclusions and make decisions contributes to the mistrust of the medical and mental health communities and to perpetuation of the current climate of healthcare disparities. PMID:17722664

  7. MENTAL HEALTH DIRECTORY, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YOLLES, STANLEY F.; AND OTHERS

    THE DIRECTORY IS INTENDED AS A REFERENCE GUIDE TO MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS AND SERVICES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. IT IS ORGANIZED INTO A FEDERAL SECTION AND A STATE AND COMMUNITY SECTION, EACH OF WHICH IS PRECEDED BY AN INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT CONCERNING THE LISTINGS IN THAT SECTION. ADDRESSES AND SHORT DESCRIPTIONS OF THE MAJOR MENTAL HEALTH…

  8. Coping with Violence in Mental Health Care Settings: Patient and Staff Member Perspectives on De-escalation Practices.

    PubMed

    Berring, Lene Lauge; Pedersen, Liselotte; Buus, Niels

    2016-10-01

    This multiple case study explored de-escalation processes in threatening and violent situations based on patients and staff members perspectives. Our post hoc analysis indicated that de-escalation included responsive interactions influenced by the perspectives of both patients and staff members. We assembled their perspectives in a mental model consisting of three interdependent stages: (1) memories and hope, (2) safety and creativity and (3) reflective moments. The data indicated that both patients and staff strived for peaceful solutions and that a dynamic and sociological understanding of de-escalation can foster shared problem solving in violent and threatening situations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Understanding Treatment Gaps for Mental Health, Alcohol, and Drug Use in South Dakota: A Qualitative Study of Rural Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Broffman, Lauren; Spurlock, Margaret; Dulacki, Kristen; Campbell, Amy; Rodriguez, Fanny; Wright, Bill; McConnell, K John; Warne, Donald; Davis, Melinda M

    2017-01-01

    More than 25% of US adults experience mental health or substance use conditions annually, yet less than half receive treatment. This study explored how rural participants with behavioral health conditions pursue and receive care, and it examined how these factors differed across American Indian (AI) and geographic subpopulations. We undertook a qualitative follow-up study from a statewide survey of unmet mental health and substance use needs in South Dakota. We conducted semistructured phone interviews with a purposive sample of key informants with varying perceptions of need for mental health and substance use treatment. We interviewed 33 participants with mental health (n = 18), substance use (n = 9), and co-occurring disorders (n = 6). Twenty participants (61.0%) lived in rural communities that did not overlap with AI tribal land. Twelve participants (34.3%) were AI, 8 of whom lived on a reservation (24.2%). The discrepancy between actual and perceived treatment need was related to how participants defined mental health, alcohol, and drug use "problems." Mental health disorders and excessive alcohol consumption were seen as a normal part of life in rural and reservation communities; seeking mental health care or maintaining sobriety was viewed as the result of an individual's willpower and frequently related to a substantial life event (eg, childbirth). Participants recommended treatment gaps be addressed through multicomponent community-level interventions. This study describes how rural populations view mental health, alcohol, and drug use. Enhancing access to care, addressing discordant perceptions, and improving community-based interventions may increase treatment uptake. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  10. The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Rachel E.; Boulos, David; Garber, Bryan G.; Jetly, Rakesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS) collected detailed information on mental health problems, their impacts, occupational and nonoccupational determinants of mental health, and the use of mental health services from a random sample of 8200 serving personnel. The objective of this article is to provide a firm scientific foundation for understanding and interpreting the CFMHS findings. Methods: This narrative review first provides a snapshot of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), focusing on 2 key determinants of mental health: the deployment of more than 40,000 personnel in support of the mission in Afghanistan and the extensive renewal of the CAF mental health system. The findings of recent population-based CAF mental health research are reviewed, with a focus on findings from the very similar mental health survey done in 2002. Finally, key aspects of the methods of the 2013 CFMHS are presented. Results: The findings of 20 peer-reviewed publications using the 2002 mental health survey data are reviewed, along with those of 25 publications from other major CAF mental health research projects executed over the past decade. Conclusions: More than a decade of population-based mental health research in the CAF has provided a detailed picture of its mental health and use of mental health services. This knowledge base and the homology of the 2013 survey with the 2002 CAF survey and general population surveys in 2002 and 2012 will provide an unusual opportunity to use the CFMHS to situate mental health in the CAF in a historical and societal perspective. PMID:27270738

  11. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - DACA's impact on mental health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Health: NLM update Transcript DACA's impact on mental health : 10/02/2017 To use the sharing features ... will have profound adverse population-level effects on mental health' (end of quote). The perspective's authors add (and ...

  12. Existing public health surveillance systems for mental health in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Mental health is a challenging public health issue worldwide and surveillance is crucial for it. However, mental health surveillance has not been developed until recently in certain developed countries; many other countries, especially developing countries, have poor or even no health information systems. This paper presents surveillance related to mental health in China, a developing country with a large population of patients with mental disorders. Detailed information of seven relevant surveillance systems is introduced respectively. From the perspective of utilization, problems including accessibility, comprehensiveness and data quality are discussed. Suggestions for future development are proposed.

  13. E-mental health self-management for psychotic disorders: state of the art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    van der Krieke, Lian; Wunderink, Lex; Emerencia, Ando C; de Jonge, Peter; Sytema, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate to what extent information technology may support self-management among service users with psychotic disorders. The investigation aimed to answer the following questions: What types of e-mental health self-management interventions have been developed and evaluated? What is the current evidence on clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of the identified interventions? To what extent are e-mental health self-management interventions oriented toward the service user? A systematic review of references through July 2012 derived from MEDLINE, PsycINFO, AMED, CINAHL, and the Library, Information Science and Technology database was performed. Studies of e-mental health self-management interventions for persons with psychotic disorders were selected independently by three reviewers. Twenty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria. E-mental health self-management interventions included psychoeducation, medication management, communication and shared decision making, management of daily functioning, lifestyle management, peer support, and real-time self-monitoring by daily measurements (experience sampling monitoring). Summary effect sizes were large for medication management (.92) and small for psychoeducation (.37) and communication and shared decision making (.21). For all other studies, individual effect sizes were calculated. The only economic analysis conducted reported more short-term costs for the e-mental health intervention. People with psychotic disorders were able and willing to use e-mental health services. Results suggest that e-mental health services are at least as effective as usual care or nontechnological approaches. Larger effects were found for medication management e-mental health services. No studies reported a negative effect. Results must be interpreted cautiously, because they are based on a small number of studies.

  14. Editorial Perspective: 'From there to here': adapting child and adolescent mental health interventions for low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Divan, Gauri

    2017-03-01

    The majority of evidence for child and adolescent mental health interventions is generated in high-income countries. However, the majority of the world's children live in low- and middle-income countries, resulting in a large treatment gap for these disorders. A systematic approach to adapt evidence-based interventions so as to address cultural and contextual issues will increase an interventions acceptability and reach, allowing us to address these enormous unmet needs. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  15. Bouncing Back from a Breakup: Attachment, Time Perspective, Mental Health, and Romantic Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Steven P.; Sifers, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    Coping with a romantic breakup is a normal developmental task of emerging adulthood. Because of their role in influencing interpersonal relationships and adjustment, attachment history and time perspectives may influence resilience to romantic loss. In an online survey of 1,404 university students ages 18-25 who reported experiencing recent…

  16. Bouncing Back from a Breakup: Attachment, Time Perspective, Mental Health, and Romantic Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Steven P.; Sifers, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    Coping with a romantic breakup is a normal developmental task of emerging adulthood. Because of their role in influencing interpersonal relationships and adjustment, attachment history and time perspectives may influence resilience to romantic loss. In an online survey of 1,404 university students ages 18-25 who reported experiencing recent…

  17. Probation officers' perspectives on interagency collaboration for juvenile offenders with mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Craig S; Maschi, Tina M

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the interagency collaboration strategies used by juvenile probation officers in the treatment of delinquent youths. Thirty-one juvenile probation officers were interviewed about the strategies they use with youths who have mental disorders. Transcriptions of these interviews were analyzed with grounded-theory conventions. Interagency collaboration was described in a framework of three models. The monitoring model involved minimal involvement of probation officers with treatment providers, the teamwork model involved collaborative decision making and frequent consultation, and the partnership model involved the direct involvement of probation officers in the treatment process. Results of this study provide a framework for conceptualizing interagency collaboration and juvenile court authority. This framework may be used in case and program planning as well as in research to develop evidence-based strategies for the treatment of court-involved youths with mental disorders.

  18. Outcomes achieved by and police and clinician perspectives on a joint police officer and mental health clinician mobile response unit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stuart J; Thomas, Phillipa; Doulis, Chantelle; Bowles, Doug; Henderson, Kathryn; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Perez, Eva; Stafrace, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Despite their limited mental health expertise, police are often first to respond to people experiencing a mental health crisis. Often the person in crisis is then transported to hospital for care, instead of receiving more immediate assessment and treatment in the community. The current study conducted an evaluation of an Australian joint police-mental health mobile response unit that aimed to improve the delivery of a community-based crisis response. Activity data were audited to demonstrate utilization and outcomes for referred people. Police officers and mental health clinicians in the catchment area were also surveyed to measure the unit's perceived impact. During the 6-month pilot, 296 contacts involving the unit occurred. Threatened suicide (33%), welfare concerns (22%) and psychotic episodes (18%) were the most common reasons for referral. The responses comprised direct admission to a psychiatric unit for 11% of contacts, transportation to a hospital emergency department for 32% of contacts, and community management for the remainder (57%). Police officers were highly supportive of the model and reported having observed benefits of the unit for consumers and police and improved collaboration between services. The joint police-mental health clinician unit enabled rapid delivery of a multi-skilled crisis response in the community. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. State mental health policy: Promoting legislation and public policy debates in state legislatures: a psychiatrist's perspective.

    PubMed

    de Nesnera, Alexander

    2007-04-01

    Psychiatrists are urged to get involved in promoting legislation and public policy debates in state legislatures to effectively advocate for positive change in legislation and policy making. This column focuses on strategies that New Hampshire Psychiatric Society members have found effective in engaging policy makers and legislators in a dialogue that assertively promotes the views of patients with mental illness and the profession of psychiatry.

  20. Service user involvement in mental health assessment: comparing people's experiences of mental health triage assessments with theoretical perspectives on user involvement.

    PubMed

    Hird, Martin

    2007-09-01

    Separately, both user involvement and assessment are conceptually poorly defined by practitioners. Not surprisingly, reviews suggest that involvement in assessment is poorly researched, understood and largely achieved only at low levels. In this study fourteen service users and five assessors were interviewed, and a conceptual framework developed using grounded theory methods for data gathering and analysis. Two key dimensions of the experience emerged for involvement; the nature of the relationship with the assessor; and the construction of assessment as a process of dialogue. Recommendations for practice include: the use of an introductory letter to orientate service users to the assessment process; reconstructing the assessment as a series of encounters rather than as a single event; the provision of a written formulation to service users and; the introduction of systems to ensure that staff maintain their capacity for emotional reactivity to people presenting for this initial contact with mental health services.

  1. Closing the mental health gap in low-income settings by building research capacity: perspectives from Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Sweetland, Annika C; Oquendo, Maria A; Sidat, Mohsin; Santos, Palmira F; Vermund, Sten H; Duarte, Cristiane S; Arbuckle, Melissa; Wainberg, Milton L

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are the leading cause of disability worldwide, accounting for 22.7% of all years lived with disability. Despite this global burden, fewer than 25% of affected individuals ever access mental health treatment; in low-income settings, access is much lower, although nonallopathic interventions through traditional healers are common in many venues. Three main barriers to reducing the gap between individuals who need mental health treatment and those who have access to it include stigma and lack of awareness, limited material and human resources, and insufficient research capacity. We argue that investment in dissemination and implementation research is critical to face these barriers. Dissemination and implementation research can improve mental health care in low-income settings by facilitating the adaptation of effective treatment interventions to new settings, particularly when adapting specialist-led interventions developed in high-resource countries to settings with few, if any, mental health professionals. Emerging evidence from other low-income settings suggests that lay providers can be trained to detect mental disorders and deliver basic psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological interventions when supervised by an expert. We describe a new North-South and South-South research partnership between Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (Mozambique), Columbia University (United States), Vanderbilt University (United States), and Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Brazil), to build research capacity in Mozambique and other Portuguese-speaking African countries. Mozambique has both the political commitment and available resources for mental health, but inadequate research capacity and workforce limits the country's ability to assess local needs, adapt and test interventions, and identify implementation strategies that can be used to effectively bring evidence-based mental health interventions to scale within the public sector. Global training and

  2. Exploring Time Perspective in Greek Young Adults: Validation of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and Relationships with Mental Health Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Griva, Fay

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the factorial structure of the Greek version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI; Zimbardo and Boyd in "J Personal Soc Psychol" 77:1271-1288, 1999), in a sample of 337 university students, using principal axis factoring (PAF) with oblique rotation, and its dimensionality using parallel analysis.…

  3. What's in the 'treatment gap'? Ethnographic perspectives on addiction and global mental health from China, Russia, and the United States.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Nicholas; Garriott, William; Raikhel, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of a 'global mental health' agenda, focused on providing evidence-based interventions for mental illnesses in low- and middle-income countries. Anthropologists and cultural psychiatrists have engaged in vigorous debates about the appropriateness of this agenda. In this article, we reflect on these debates, drawing on ethnographic fieldwork on the management of substance use disorders in China, Russia, and the United States. We argue that the logic of 'treatment gaps,' which guides much research and intervention under the rubric of global mental health, partially obscures the complex assemblages of institutions, therapeutics, knowledges, and actors framing and managing addiction (as well as other mental health issues) in any particular setting.

  4. Primary mental health care in rural Punjab, Pakistan: providers, and user perspectives of the effectiveness of treatments.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Ilyas; Mujtaba, Muhammad; Chaudhry, Haroon; Jenkins, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    Neuro-psychiatric disorders are associated with a considerable burden of disease, not only globally, but also in low- and middle-income countries. Epidemiological information about treatment of these disorders is required to help formulate treatment and prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to describe different types of mental health care providers, and examine patients' knowledge of the treatments and their views about its effectiveness in rural Punjab, Pakistan. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of attenders at a 1-day psychiatric consultation clinic in rural Punjab, Pakistan. Patients sought help from five different types of providers and were treated with physical, psychotherapeutic and spiritual treatments. Most recognised psychiatric problems as treatable. There was a discrepancy between belief and knowledge of the treatment of mental disorders; most had a very basic understanding of treatment. They reported general practitioner (GP) treatments as more effective (56%) compared to other practitioners (20%). We argue that treatments given by primary mental health care providers need to be standardised. A systematic appraisal of the theoretical rationale of the mental health treatments prescribed in primary care settings is required in low-income countries like Pakistan. This will help ensure standardisation of care especially regarding spiritual/psychological therapies so that in future valid inferences can be made about their effectiveness in populations. Further work should include improving mental health literacy with special reference to treatments available for mental health problems.

  5. Mental health services for parents affected by mental illness.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Silvia; Becker, Thomas; Wiegand-Grefe, Silke

    2013-07-01

    Despite an increasing awareness of support needs of families affected by parental mental illness, there is a lack of adequate mental healthcare provision for parents. As contemporary mental health services are both user-focused and evidence based, the present review focuses on knowledge regarding the subjective perspective on parenting issues among affected parents and the evidence base for parenting programs. There has been a shift in the research focus from adverse effects of parental mental illness on children toward inclusion and the subjective perspective in affected mothers and, more recently, fathers with mental health problems. Parents report on role conflicts, parenting difficulties, and stigma. Despite a broad spectrum of parental needs, many parents are reluctant to use services. There is an increasing evidence base for intervention programs. Adequate care for parents affected by mental illness requires sensitivity for parents' subjective perspective, interagency collaboration, standard intake practice, high level of professional knowledge and skills, provision of family-friendly environments, evidence-based parenting programs comprising both individual and group approaches and peer support. There is a lack of research on other parenting needs such as desire for children, coping with custody loss, and childlessness related to mental illness.

  6. Atheism and mental health.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of the impact of religiosity on mental health is an enduring, if somewhat quiet, tradition. There has been virtually no exploration, however, of the influence of atheism on mental health. Though not a "religion," atheism can be an orienting worldview that is often consciously chosen by its adherents, who firmly believe in the "truth" of atheism-a phenomenon known as "positive atheism." Atheism, especially positive atheism, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance in the Western liberal democracies-a trend often referred to as the "new atheism." I argue that atheism, especially positive atheism, should be treated as a meaningful sociocultural variable in the study of mental health. I argue that atheism (just like theism) is an appropriate domain of study for social and cultural psychiatrists (and allied social scientists) interested in exploring socio-environmental stressors and buffers relating to mental health. Specifically, I argue that (1) atheism needs to be accurately measured as an individual-level exposure variable, with the aim of relating that variable to psychiatric outcomes, (2) there needs to be greater systematic investigation into the influence of atheism on psychiatry as an institution, and (3) the relation of atheism to mental health needs to be explored by examining atheistic theory and its practical application, especially as it relates to the human condition, suffering, and concepts of personhood.

  7. Shared decision-making in mental health care—A user perspective on decisional needs in community-based services

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Katarina; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Shared decision-making (SDM) is an emergent research topic in the field of mental health care and is considered to be a central component of a recovery-oriented system. Despite the evidence suggesting the benefits of this change in the power relationship between users and practitioners, the method has not been widely implemented in clinical practice. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate decisional and information needs among users with mental illness as a prerequisite for the development of a decision support tool aimed at supporting SDM in community-based mental health services in Sweden. Methods Three semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 22 adult users with mental illness. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using a directed content analysis. This method was used to develop an in-depth understanding of the decisional process as well as to validate and conceptually extend Elwyn et al.'s model of SDM. Results The model Elwyn et al. have created for SDM in somatic care fits well for mental health services, both in terms of process and content. However, the results also suggest an extension of the model because decisions related to mental illness are often complex and involve a number of life domains. Issues related to social context and individual recovery point to the need for a preparation phase focused on establishing cooperation and mutual understanding as well as a clear follow-up phase that allows for feedback and adjustments to the decision-making process. Conclusions and Implications for Practice The current study contributes to a deeper understanding of decisional and information needs among users of community-based mental health services that may reduce barriers to participation in decision-making. The results also shed light on attitudinal, relationship-based, and cognitive factors that are important to consider in adapting SDM in the mental health system. PMID:27167556

  8. Shared decision-making in mental health care-A user perspective on decisional needs in community-based services.

    PubMed

    Grim, Katarina; Rosenberg, David; Svedberg, Petra; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is an emergent research topic in the field of mental health care and is considered to be a central component of a recovery-oriented system. Despite the evidence suggesting the benefits of this change in the power relationship between users and practitioners, the method has not been widely implemented in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to investigate decisional and information needs among users with mental illness as a prerequisite for the development of a decision support tool aimed at supporting SDM in community-based mental health services in Sweden. Three semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 22 adult users with mental illness. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using a directed content analysis. This method was used to develop an in-depth understanding of the decisional process as well as to validate and conceptually extend Elwyn et al.'s model of SDM. The model Elwyn et al. have created for SDM in somatic care fits well for mental health services, both in terms of process and content. However, the results also suggest an extension of the model because decisions related to mental illness are often complex and involve a number of life domains. Issues related to social context and individual recovery point to the need for a preparation phase focused on establishing cooperation and mutual understanding as well as a clear follow-up phase that allows for feedback and adjustments to the decision-making process. The current study contributes to a deeper understanding of decisional and information needs among users of community-based mental health services that may reduce barriers to participation in decision-making. The results also shed light on attitudinal, relationship-based, and cognitive factors that are important to consider in adapting SDM in the mental health system.

  9. Religiosity and mental health.

    PubMed

    Pajević, Izet; Sinanović, Osman; Hasanović, Mevludin

    2005-06-01

    Mental health is not considered only as absence of mental disorders, but rather as the achievement of higher standards of available psychical potentials. True devotion and obedience to The God give the one a huge and incredible strength, constant source of spiritual emotional and moral energy, which is of help in resisting destructive and slavery attacks of the environment and its materialistic-consuming tendencies, as well as social and mental disruption. According to the opinion of numerous worldwide recognized mental health experts, humankind of today is confronted with a number of problems, which are the consequence of spiritual and moral-ethical degradation of human being. Therefore, religiosity became the field of interest of mental health researchers. The results of new studies undoubtedly indicate beneficial effects of religion on life and mental health in humans. Religiosity reduces tendencies for risky behaviour, impulsive reactions and aggression; it corrects tendencies towards psychopathic and paranoid behaviour, reduces converse, depressive and schizoid tendency, and provides successful overcome of emotional conflicts. In comparison to low-religious adolescents, the factors such as inner conflicts, frustration, fear, anxiety, psychological trauma, low self-esteem, unbalance of psychical homeostasis, emotional instability, and negative psychical energy are less present in highly religious adolescents and neutralized in a healthier and more efficient way. Beneficial impact of religion on mental health derives from precise cognitive-behavioural patterns, which provide a clear life orientation, solid basis and safe frames for personality development, assuring human to be continually on the way to achieve its own generic essence and reach its own maturity and self-actualization.

  10. Current challenges and future perspectives of the role of governments in the psychiatric/mental health systems of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Maass, Juan; Mella, Cesar; Risco, Luis

    2010-01-01

    The practices and systems of mental health in Latin America and the Caribbean are heterogeneous and are connected to dissociation between national macro systems and the complex quotidian that occurs in the daily attention of mental pathologies. The health care experiences in mental health are diverse and go back to the 1960s; these took a boost with the Caracas Declaration of 1990. The Health Care Reform has had several stages, lately focused in the strength that derives from a growing psychiatric epidemiology "base". In addition, it notes that the majority of countries have a National Plan of Mental Health, but they do not seem purposely deployed in local developmental plans or in other sectors. It is proposed the existence of a willing to discuss psychiatry, critical and bold; trans and intrasectoral face to the national and communal developments. Governments need to prioritize strategies in mental health as an integral part of another national project with regard for quality of life and productivity of citizens. The communication poses challenges for the next 15 years, with what is complete the first quarter of this century, proposing a series of measures even basic, but valid for this part of the continent.

  11. Occupational Mental Health, Labor Accidents and Occupational Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveillan, F. Pedro

    1973-01-01

    The article discusses the relationship between mental health and labor accidents as it pertains to accident prevention, treatment of accident victims, and their rehabilitation. It also comments briefly on mental health and occupational diseases and the scope of the field of occupational mental health from a Chilean perspective. (AG)

  12. Meeting the mental health needs of children and youth through integrated care: A systems and policy perspective.

    PubMed

    de Voursney, David; Huang, Larke N

    2016-02-01

    The health home program established under the Affordable Care Act (2010) is derived from the medical home concept originated by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 1968 to provide a care delivery model for children with special health care needs. As applied to behavioral health, health homes or medical homes have become increasingly adult-focused models, with a primary goal of coordinating physical and behavioral health care. For children and youth with serious emotional disorders, health homes must go beyond physical and behavioral health care to connect with other child-focused sectors, such as education, child welfare, and juvenile justice. Each of these systems have a significant role in helping children meet health and developmental goals, and should be included in integrated approaches to care for children and youth. Health homes for young people should incorporate a continuum of care from health promotion to the prevention and treatment of disorders. The challenge for child- and youth-focused health homes is to integrate effective services and supports into the settings where young people naturally exist, drawing on the best evidence from mental health, physical medicine, and other fields. What may be needed is not a health home as currently conceptualized for adults, nor a traditional medical home, but a family- and child-centered coordinated care and support delivery system supported by health homes or other arrangements. This article sets out a health home framework for children and youth with serious mental health conditions and their families, examining infrastructure and service delivery issues.

  13. Mental health in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    The concepts and management of mental health in Egypt are presented from the Pharaonic era through the Islamic Renaissance until today. Papyri from the Pharaonic period show that Soma and Psyche were not differentiated and mental disorders were described as symptoms of the heart and uterus. Although theories of causation were of a mystical nature, mental disorders were treated on a somatic basis. In the Islamic era, mental patients were neither maltreated nor tortured as a consequence of the belief that they may be possessed by a good Moslem genie. In the 14th century mental disorders was one of the four departments in Cairo's Kalawoon Hospital, a precursor of the place of psychiatry in general hospitals that was accepted in Europe six centuries later. The mental health services in Egypt today are described, and transcultural studies carried out in Egypt of the prevalence and phenomenology of anxiety, schizophrenia, depression, suicide, conversion and obsessive compulsive disorders are reviewed. The psychiatric services for children are in their infancy. Since 1983 the common and semi-accepted use of hashish has been joined by abuse by heroin and other substances.

  14. Consumer and case manager perspectives of service empowerment: relationship to mental health recovery.

    PubMed

    Crane-Ross, Dushka; Lutz, Wilma J; Roth, Dee

    2006-04-01

    This study examines the relationship between service empowerment and recovery. Service empowerment is defined as the extent to which consumers participate in service decisions and the level of reciprocity and respect within the relationship with their case managers. Assessments were made from two perspectives: consumers and their case managers. Structural equation models were developed to examine the direct and indirect effects of service empowerment on four recovery outcomes: Quality of Life, Level of Functioning, Consumer-Reported Symptomatology, and Case Manager-Reported Symptomatology. Consumers' perceptions of service empowerment were the most powerful predictor of recovery outcomes across the four models. Consumers' and case managers' perceptions were related but the magnitude of the relationship was small, indicating that considerable differences exist between their perceptions of service empowerment.

  15. Mental health, criminal justice and culture: some ways forward?

    PubMed

    Jones, Robin; Day, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    This paper aims to offer an overview of the mental health needs of Indigenous men and women in the criminal justice system and how Indigenous cultural perspectives on mental health might influence forensic mental health service provision. There is a need for both mental health and criminal justice agencies to collaborate more closely in developing new models of service provision that incorporate Indigenous perspectives on social and emotional wellbeing, recognize culturally specific mental health risk and protective factors in relation to prevention, early intervention and treatment, and take advantage of the opportunities for treatment that arise in the context of criminal justice system intervention.

  16. The other 23 hours: a qualitative study of fitness provider perspectives on social support for health promotion for adults with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Aschbrenner, Kelly; Mueser, Kim; Bartels, Stephen; Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Pratt, Sarah; Barre, Laura; Naslund, John; Kinney, Allison

    2015-05-01

    Current efforts to reduce the increased risk of premature death from preventable cardiovascular disease among adults with serious mental illness (SMI) through lifestyle change have had limited success. Engaging informal support systems to promote healthy behaviors in everyday life may increase the effectiveness of health promotion interventions targeting this at-risk population. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 fitness trainers serving adults with SMI in a health promotion program at community mental health centers to explore their perspectives on the potential of enlisting support from significant others for health behavior change. Trainers reported that the majority of participants had a relative or significant other who influenced their health behaviors, and they saw potential value in involving them in efforts to improve health outcomes by extending support into participants' daily lives. They did not feel qualified to work with families of individuals with mental illness, but they were willing to partner with providers who had experience in this area. Social workers who practice with families could play a critical role on health promotion teams addressing cardiovascular risk in adults with SMI by using their skills and experiences to engage families in supporting a relative through the process of health behavior change.

  17. Exploring the views of people with mental health problems' on the concept of coercion: Towards a broader socio-ethical perspective.

    PubMed

    Norvoll, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar

    2016-05-01

    In mental health care, coercion is a controversial issue that has led to much debate and research on its nature and use. Yet, few previous studies have explicitly explored the views on the concept of coercion among people with first-hand experiences of being coerced. This study includes semi-structured focus-groups and individual interviews with 24 participants who had various mental health problems and experiences with coercion. Data were collected in 2012-2013 in three regions of Norway and analysed by a thematic content analysis. Findings show that participants had wide-ranging accounts of coercion, including formal and informal coercion across health- and welfare services. They emphasised that using coercion reflects the mental health system's tendency to rely on coercion and the lack of voluntary services and treatment methods that are more helpful. Other core characteristics of coercion were deprivation of freedom, power relations, in terms of powerlessness and 'counter-power,' and coercion as existential and social life events. Participants' views are consistent with prevailing theories of coercion and research on perceived coercion. However, this study demonstrates a need for broader existential and socio-ethical perspectives on coercion that are intertwined with treatment and care systems in research and practice. Implications for mental health policy and services are discussed.

  18. Improving Implementation of Mental Health Services for Trauma in Multicultural Elementary Schools: Stakeholder Perspectives on Parent and Educator Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Rodríguez, Adriana; Zelaya, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Although more schools are offering mental health programs, few studies have involved the school community in research to improve their successful implementation. In this community partnered study, focus groups were conducted with school staff and parents to explore issues related to community engagement and feasibility of a mental health intervention for elementary school students exposed to trauma. Four educator focus groups, including 23 participants, and 2 parent focus groups, consisting of 9 Spanish-speaking and 7 English-speaking parents were conducted. Participants discussed facilitators and barriers to successful implementation of the program. Participants identified the importance of pre-implementation parent education, raising awareness of the impact of student mental health among educators, maintaining ongoing communication during the intervention, and addressing logistical concerns. Participants described clear considerations for parent and educator engagement both at the pre implementation phase and during implementation of the program. Implications for next steps of this community partnered approach are described. PMID:23576136

  19. Experience of Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners in Public Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Bethany J; Hurd, Manton; Chapman, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of health insurance coverage under the Accountable Care Act has meant that millions of people are now insured for mental health treatment, but with no significant increase in the mental health workforce. Services of psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) may be best utilized to improve access to and quality of public mental health services if the financial, political, scope of practice, and treatment model barriers that limit their ability or willingness to practice in these settings are better understood. This article reports qualitative results from a study that assessed barriers and best practices in the use of PMHNPs in county mental health services in California. Results indicate that PMHNPs are valued for their "whole person" perspective, collaborative approach, and interpersonal communication skills, but that significant knowledge gaps, regulatory constraints, and bureaucratic barriers in public mental health systems inhibit PMHNPs from practicing at the top of their scope.

  20. Elderly Mental Health: Needs*

    PubMed Central

    Parkar, Shubhangi R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the mental health needs of the elderly. It tackles the issues of their institutionalisation and community care. Rapid urbanisation in Indian society throws up special problems in elderly care. There is great evidence of a raise in morbidity, mortality, hospitalisation and loss of functional status related to common mental disorders in the elderly patients. Overlap of depression and anxiety is very common with up to almost half of the elderly patients reporting significant depressive and anxiety symptoms. Also, depression is the most common psychiatric disorder in late life. Growth in the elderly population means a direct increase in age related diseases such as dementia and poor mental health outcomes such as depression, anxiety, suicide and serious constraints on the quality of life among elderly individuals. The need to identify new and unmet problem areas and develop efficient therapeutic outcomes for this special population is stressed. PMID:25838727

  1. Pakistan mental health country profile.

    PubMed

    Karim, Salman; Saeed, Khalid; Rana, Mowaddat Hussain; Mubbashar, Malik Hussain; Jenkins, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    The Republic of Pakistan is a South East Asian country with a population of over 140.7 million. Its population is fast growing and the majority (70%) live in rural areas with a feudal or tribal value system. The economy is dependent on agriculture and 35% of the population live below the poverty line. Islam is the main religion and 'mental illnesses' are stigmatized and widely perceived to have supernatural causes. The traditional healers along with psychiatric services are the main mental health service providers. The number of trained mental health professionals is small as compared to the population demands and specialist services are virtually non-existent. Lack of data on prevalence of various mental illnesses and monitory constraints are the major hurdles in the development of mental health services. A number of innovative programmes to develop indigenous models of care like the 'Community Mental Health Programme' and 'Schools Mental Health Programme' have been developed. These programmes have been found effective in reducing stigma and increase awareness of mental illness amongst the adults and children living in rural areas. Efforts by the government and mental health professionals have led to the implementation of a 'National Mental Health Policy' and 'Mental Health Act' in 2001. These aim at integrating mental health services with the existing health services, improving mental health care delivery and safeguarding the rights of mentally ill people. A favourable political will and the help of international institutions like the World Health Organization are required to achieve these aims.

  2. Money, case complexity, and wait lists: perspectives on problems and solutions at children's mental health centers in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Reid, Graham J; Brown, Judith Belle

    2008-07-01

    Senior managers of children's mental health centers across Ontario, Canada were interviewed regarding the challenges and solutions of access and delivery of care. The central challenges--funding, case complexity, waitlists, staffing, and system integration--revealed a complex interplay between the policies and financing of children's mental health services and the provision of clinical services at the agency level and within the community. The desire for integration and collaboration was countered by competition for funding and service demands. A need for policies that allow for local solutions while providing leadership for sustained improvements in the ease and timeliness of access to care and effective clinical services emerged.

  3. [Compulsory outpatient treatment and mental health care: aspects of the legal discussion from the European and Israeli perspective].

    PubMed

    Hegendörfer, Gerhard

    2007-04-01

    Recent German legal initiatives for ordering compulsory outpatient treatment in mental health care are discussed and contrasted with regulations from other European countries and Israel. The legal basis for such coercive measures is comparatively assessed by use of these documents. European countries seem somewhat hesitant to incorporate compulsory outpatient treatment into their civil legislation frameworks. Legal initiatives on this issue in Germany were rejected both on the level of the Federal civil law, and on the State-level of public administrative law. From the legal point of view reasons against compulsory outpatient treatment in mental health care are embedded in the constitutional law and in international human rights.

  4. Closing the mental health gap in low-income settings by building research capacity: Perspectives from Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Sweetland, Annika C.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Sidat, Mohsin; Santos, Palmira F.; Vermund, Sten H.; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Arbuckle, Melissa; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are the leading cause of disability worldwide, accounting for 22.7% of all years lived with disability (YLDs). Despite this global burden, fewer than 25% of affected individuals ever access mental health treatment; in low-income settings, access is much lower, though non-allopathic interventions through traditional healers are common in many venues. Three main barriers to reducing the gap between individuals who need and those who have access to mental health treatment include stigma and lack of awareness, limited material and human resources, and insufficient research capacity. We argue that investment in dissemination and implementation research is critical to face these barriers. Dissemination and implementation research can improve mental health care in low-income settings by facilitating the adaptation of effective treatment interventions to new settings, particularly when adapting specialist-led interventions developed in high-resource countries to settings with few, if any, mental health professionals. In Mozambique, the World Health Organization estimates only 0.04 psychiatrists per 100,000 population, representing 30 times less than the global median, and more than 150 times lower than the median in high income countries. Emerging evidence from other low-income settings suggests that lay providers can be trained to detect mental disorders and deliver basic psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological interventions when supervised by an expert. Mozambique has both the political commitment and available resources for mental health, but inadequate research capacity and workforce limits the country’s ability to assess local needs, adapt and test interventions, and identify implementation strategies that can be used to effectively bring evidence-based mental health interventions to scale within the public sector. Global training and research partnerships are critical to building capacity, promoting bilateral learning between and

  5. Unmet Needs for Mental Health Services for Latino Older Adults: Perspectives from Consumers, Family Members, Advocates, and Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Concepción; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Yamada, Ann-Marie; Fuentes, Dahlia; Criado, Viviana; Garcia, Piedad; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2008-01-01

    This study qualitatively assessed the need for mental health services among Latino older adults in San Diego, California. The primary mental health issue was depression. Primary organizational barriers to accessing services were language and cultural barriers secondary to a lack of translators, dearth of information on available services, and scarcity of providers representative of the Latino community. Other challenges included a lack of transportation and housing, and the need for socialization and social support. Latino older adults experienced their unmet needs in ways associated with their cultural background and minority status. Age- and culturally-appropriate services are needed to overcome these barriers. PMID:18026876

  6. Enabling people, not completing tasks: patient perspectives on relationships and staff morale in mental health wards in England.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Himanshu; Levack, William M M; Johnson, Sonia

    2015-12-02

    Mental health inpatient wards are stressful places to work and concerns have been raised regarding quality of patient care and staff wellbeing on these wards. Recent research has suggested that robust support systems and conditions that allow staff to exercise professional autonomy in their clinical work result in better staff morale. Staff value having a voice in their organisations, and say that they would like more interaction with patients and processes to reduce violent incidents on wards. There has been little research into patients' views on staff morale and on how it may impact on their care. This study aimed to explore staff morale and staff-patient relationships from a patient perspective. A qualitative investigation was conducted using purposive sampling to select seven inpatient wards in England representing various subspecialties. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with three patients on each ward. A thematic approach to analysis was used, supported by NVivo 10 software. Patients valued staff who worked together as a cohesive team, treated them as individuals, practised in a collaborative way and used enabling approaches to support their recovery. Participating patients described observing staff closely and feeling concerned at times about their well-being and the impact on them of stress and adverse incidents. They tended to perceive ward staff and patients as closely and reciprocally linked, with staff morale having a significant impact on patient well-being and vice versa. Some participants also described modifying their own behaviour because of concerns about staff well-being. Administrative duties, staff shortages and detrimental effects of violent incidents on the ward were seen as compromising staff members' ability to be involved with patients' lives and care. Patient views about the factors impacting on staff morale on inpatient wards are similar to those of staff in qualitative studies. Their accounts suggest that staff and patient

  7. Lifestyle and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

  8. Teen Mothers' Mental Health.

    PubMed

    SmithBattle, Lee; Freed, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress is common in teen mothers. High rates of distress are attributed to teen mothers' childhood adversities and the challenges of parenting in the context of chronic stress, cumulative disadvantage, and limited social support. We describe the prevalence of psychological distress in teen mothers; what is known about its origins and impact on mothers and children; factors that promote teen mothers' mental health and resilience; and the many barriers that make it difficult to obtain traditional mental healthcare. We also briefly review the few studies that test interventions to improve teen mothers' mental health. Because barriers to traditional mental health treatment are ubiquitous and difficult to remedy, the second article in this two-part series calls for nurses in healthcare settings, schools, and home visiting programs to screen pregnant and parenting teens for adverse childhood experiences and psychological distress, and to integrate strength-based and trauma-based principles into their practice. Creating a supportive setting where past traumas and psychological distress are addressed with skill and sensitivity builds upon teen mothers' strengths and their aspirations to be the best parents they can be. These approaches facilitate the long-term health and development of mother and child.

  9. Lifestyle and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

  10. Selected Mental Health Audiovisuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    Presented are approximately 2,300 abstracts on audio-visual Materials--films, filmstrips, audiotapes, and videotapes--related to mental health. Each citation includes material title; name, address, and phone number of film distributor; rental and purchase prices; technical information; and a description of the contents. Abstracts are listed in…

  11. Media and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David

    1983-01-01

    Outlines some of the main issues and areas of debate at the first international Congress on Audio-Visual Communication and Mental Health, which was held in Helsinki in June 1983. The issues discussed include the connection between violent actions and violence on television and censorship. The declared congress objectives are listed. (Author/MBR)

  12. Appalachian Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Susan Emley, Ed.

    In this book, 17 psychologists, anthropologists, social workers and others explore important theoretical and applied issues concerning the mental health of Appalachian people. Rejecting the view of Appalachia as an area dominated by a culture of poverty, these papers portray a strong regional culture based on family, community, and religion. This…

  13. Pennsylvania Women's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Kathryn; And Others

    Women have undergone a revolution in their self-perception and their traditional relationships to work, money, marriage, and family. These social changes have implications for every aspect of women's lives, including their mental health. Because of the special problems and conflicts confronting women today, data need to be analyzed on policies,…

  14. Audiovisuals in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brigitte L.

    1982-01-01

    Describes major uses of film, television, and video in mental health field and discusses problems in selection, acquisition, cataloging, indexing, storage, transfer, care of tapes, patients' rights, and copyright. A sample patient consent form for media recording, borrower's evaluation sheet, sources of audiovisuals and reviews, and 35 references…

  15. Restraining good practice: Reviewing evidence of the effects of restraint from the perspective of service users and mental health professionals in the United Kingdom (UK).

    PubMed

    Cusack, P; McAndrew, S; Cusack, F; Warne, T

    2016-01-01

    Safeguarding, balancing the concept of risk with the need for public protection and its implication for the lives of individuals, is an important facet of contemporary mental health care. Integral to safeguarding is the protection of human rights; the right to live free from torture, inhuman, or degrading treatment, and having the right to liberty, security, respect, and privacy. Professionals are required to recognise all of these rights when delivering care to vulnerable people. In the United Kingdom (UK) there has been growing public concern regarding abusive practices in institutions, with a number of unacceptable methods of restraint being identified as a feature of care, particularly in mental health care. In keeping with the service user movement, and following a review of the literature, this paper discusses the evidence regarding restraint from the perspectives of service users and professionals within mental health services and considers the implications for future practice and research. In reviewing the literature, findings revealed that restraint can be a form of abuse, it's inappropriate use often being a consequence of fear, neglect, and lack of using de-escalation techniques. Using restraint in this way can have negative implications for the well-being of service users and mental health professionals alike. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mental Health: Keeping Your Emotional Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... emotional health can still have emotional problems or mental illness. Mental illness often has a physical cause. This could be ... problems with family, work, or school can trigger mental illness or make it worse.Counseling, support groups, and ...

  17. Postpartum mental health.

    PubMed

    Viinamäki, H; Rastas, S; Tukeva, L; Kuha, S; Niskanen, L; Saarikoski, S

    1994-09-01

    The mental health of parturients 1-2 months after delivery was assessed. The study was carried out using a questionnaire between September and November 1992 in connection with the postpartum visits of mothers to the maternity health care center. The need for psychological help was assessed using a 12-item questionnaire (General Health Questionnaire), according to which 28% of the subjects needed psychological help. These mothers did not differ from the others in terms of age, marital status, education, or financial situation. Nor was the need for psychological help associated with health habits, with traumatic life events or conflicts during childhood and adolescence, or with delivery-related factors. Mothers needing psychological help were more depressed and considered the social support they were receiving to be inadequate more often than the others. These women also more often reported marital problems during pregnancy and after delivery. None of the mothers had sought help because of mental health problems. It is concluded that antenatal and postnatal clinics should pay more attention to the mental health of mothers.

  18. Teacher Candidate Mental Health and Mental Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dods, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Providing teacher candidates with a strong foundation in mental health literacy during their teacher education program is crucial in ensuring novice teachers are prepared to support the mental health needs of their students. In addition to responding to students, teacher candidates are typically at an age when mental health disorders are common…

  19. Teacher Candidate Mental Health and Mental Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dods, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Providing teacher candidates with a strong foundation in mental health literacy during their teacher education program is crucial in ensuring novice teachers are prepared to support the mental health needs of their students. In addition to responding to students, teacher candidates are typically at an age when mental health disorders are common…

  20. Latina Mothers' Perceptions of Mental Health and Mental Health Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Elizabeth M.; Conner, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    Latina mothers' perceptions of mental health and factors that promote/restore mental health were explored in this qualitative study. Participants discussed the importance of community, safety, and financial stability in addition to conventional factors that are related to mental health. Implications for working with urban Latinas and their…

  1. Mental health and housing.

    PubMed

    Kari-Koskinen, O; Karvonen, P

    1976-01-01

    With the present trend away from the designing of individual buildings and towards the systematic planning of whole residential communities, it should be possible to take mental health requirements into account at the planning stage. At present, sociologists are all too seldom consulted on matters of residential planning. When discussing the relationship between housing and mental health one cannot restrict oneself only to the external aspects of the house, but rather one must also consider the opportunities available for the members of the family to satisfy their own needs, both within the home and in its immediate surroundings. Factors which may affect residential requirements include geographical location, type and standard of dwelling and time and continuity of occupation. A move between two districts or groups representing different housing norms and values may lead to withdrawal symptoms in the individual. This may arise equally well from the remoteness of the country districts as from the conflicting pressures brought on by the abundance of contacts available in the large towns. Town life tends to heighten susceptibility to neuroses and personality conflicts. The character of a residential area may affect the mental health of its occupants. Faris & Dunham (4), in studying the incidence of various types of mental illness with an urban population, observed that schizophrenia was most common among people who were in some way isolated from social involvement. The striving for spaciousness in residential areas and the creation of a "summer city" or "garden city" image or a "family-centred way of life" may lead to unexpected problems and have a variety of social consequences. Mental health difficulties have been noted, for example, among housewives in "dormitory" towns or suburbs (11). The institutions required by a community may be grouped into four categories, representing the basic needs of its members. These are (1) economic institutions, (2) social and

  2. Global mental health and neuroscience: potential synergies.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; He, Yanling; Phillips, Anthony; Sahakian, Barbara J; Williams, John; Patel, Vikram

    2015-02-01

    Global mental health has emerged as an important specialty. It has drawn attention to the burden of mental illness and to the relative gap in mental health research and services around the world. Global mental health has raised the question of whether this gap is a developmental issue, a health issue, a human rights issue, or a combination of these issues-and it has raised awareness of the need to develop new approaches for building capacity, mobilising resources, and closing the research and treatment gap. Translational neuroscience has also advanced. It comprises an important conceptual approach to understanding the neurocircuitry and molecular basis of mental disorders, to rethinking how best to undertake research on the aetiology, assessment, and treatment of these disorders, with the ultimate aim to develop entirely new approaches to prevention and intervention. Some apparent contrasts exist between these fields; global mental health emphasises knowledge translation, moving away from the bedside to a focus on health systems, whereas translational neuroscience emphasises molecular neuroscience, focusing on transitions between the bench and bedside. Meanwhile, important opportunities exist for synergy between the two paradigms, to ensure that present opportunities in mental health research and services are maximised. Here, we review the approaches of global mental health and clinical neuroscience to diagnosis, pathogenesis, and intervention, and make recommendations for facilitating an integration of these two perspectives.

  3. Mental health and violence: WPA Cairo declaration--international perspectives for intervention.

    PubMed

    Okasha, A

    2007-06-01

    This article consists of two sections. In the first section, the author presents a comprehensive review which highlights the psychological consequences suffered by populations living in war zones, revealing the worrying prevalence of fear, panic, depressions, behavioral disturbances and PTSD. Especially vulnerable groups include women, children, the disabled and the elderly. Loss and destruction of homes, loss of male heads of households to death or captivity, displacement and exposure to the dangers of sexual abuse and rape, almost always associated with war crimes leaves women, especially mothers at high risk of hopelessness and depression. The level of depressive symptomatology in the mother was found to be the best predictor of her child's reported morbidity. The devastation of families and the breakdown of the home structure deprive the elderly and the handicapped of the family care, which usually constitutes their primary resource of support. In the second section of the article, the author summarizes the efforts done by the World Psychiatric Association, in addressing the consequences of war and collective violence in the different regions of the world. The author suggests a comprehensive professional intervention program, involving several world organizations involved in health and education. Also, of special importance in that regard is the role of key religious institutions, to highlight the peaceful values carried by all religions and to replace the currently dominant messages of conflict and rejection of the "other".

  4. Providing mental health services to survivors: a Kwa Zulu-Natal perspective.

    PubMed

    Pillay, B J

    2000-01-01

    The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was established to deal with the history and future prevention of the abuse of human rights in South Africa. It aimed to restore relationships between the state and/or other perpetrators and victims of violence. Nevertheless, the process has highlighted the alarming prevalence of psychological trauma in our society. This paper reports on a study of individuals and/or families who presented their testimonies to the TRC in the Kwa Zulu-Natal and Free State Provinces of South Africa. The participants were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire designed by the author and a Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist. Most witnesses had recognisable psychiatric disorders. The most common was post-traumatic stress disorder (chronic), followed by either anxiety and mood disorders. The results from this study point to the pervasiveness and seriousness of the sequelae of trauma experienced by individuals and communities (both victims and perpetrators) in South Africa. Health professionals in South Africa have the mammoth task and responsibility to assist in the process of healing and reparation.

  5. Expatriate mental health.

    PubMed

    Foyle, M F; Beer, M D; Watson, J P

    1998-04-01

    This paper reviews the historical aspects of expatriate mental health, and comments on the paucity of literature in the medical and psychiatric journals. Data obtained from 397 expatriate probands examined during overseas service are described. It was noted that there was a high incidence of affective and adjustment disorders. The results showed six areas significantly related to those with affective disorders at interview, namely a history of consultation for psychological problems in out-patient departments or with the patient's own doctor, a history of depressed mood, and a family history of suicide, psychosis or personality disorder. Subjects with adjustment disorders at interview showed a significant positive correlation with four stressors (occupational anxiety, home country anxieties, acculturation and physical ill-health), but showed a negative association with a past personal history of consultation for psychological problems at out-patient departments or with their own doctors. These findings are discussed and practical applications suggested for improving expatriate mental health.

  6. Parents' Perspectives of School Mental Health Promotion Initiatives Are Related to Parents' Self-Assessed Parenting Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askell-Williams, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Achieving broad-scale parent engagement with school initiatives has proven elusive. This article reports survey data from 287 Maltese parents about their perceptions of the quality of their child's school's initiatives for promoting students' wellbeing and mental health. Findings indicate that, on average, parents rated school initiatives highly.…

  7. Parent Perspectives of an Evidence-Based Intervention for Children with Autism Served in Community Mental Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadnick, Nicole A.; Drahota, Amy; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that improvements to community mental health (CMH) care for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are needed. Recent research examining the feasibility of training CMH therapists to deliver a package of evidence-based practice intervention strategies (EBPs) targeting challenging behaviors for school-age children with ASD…

  8. Consumer perspectives and mental health reform movements in the United States: 30 years of first-person accounts.

    PubMed

    Gumber, Shinakee; Stein, Catherine H

    2013-09-01

    The present qualitative study examined 69 published first-person accounts written by adults diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1979-2010 within the historical context of the four major mental health movements in the United States. Content analysis techniques were used to identify major topics and overarching content categories in the first-person accounts written over the 30-year period. The frequency of topics in each content category was examined as a function of the decade and corresponding mental health movement in which accounts were published. Five overarching content categories emerged reflecting authors' conceptualizations of schizophrenia, their experiences with psychiatric hospitalization, medications, coping with social stigma, and achieving and maintaining valued social roles. Two summary categories emerged reflecting authors explicit views about what helped and what did not help in their experience of living with schizophrenia. With the exception of social stigma, frequency of topics within content categories did not change as a function of decade and corresponding mental health movement. Despite changes in mental health policies, treatment, and systems of care, the overall lack of significant differences in the content of first-person accounts across the 30-year period suggests an enduring nature to the experiences of individuals coping with schizophrenia. Implications of present findings for research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Interagency Collaboration in Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Mental Health Problems: The Perspective of the Service Users and the Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germundsson, Per; Hillborg, Helene; Danermark, Berth

    2011-01-01

    There is an aspiration and policy within the European Union to fully involve persons with disabilities in the community; this implies an opportunity to gainful employment. A large percentage of disabled persons remain unemployed despite this policy, especially persons with mental health problems. This study aims at investigating how people with…

  10. The Age of Uncertainty: Parent Perspectives on the Transitions of Young People with Mental Health Difficulties to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jivanjee, Pauline; Kruzich, Jean M.; Gordon, Lynwood J.

    2009-01-01

    For young people aged 16-24, the transition from adolescence to young adulthood involves predictable and unpredictable changes and they may encounter challenges in their roles, relationships, and responsibilities. Young people with mental health difficulties face additional challenges as they and their families navigate this transition. As a…

  11. Paraprofessional Home Visitors' Perspectives on Addressing Poor Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Mercer, Constance D.; Saylor, Elizabeth L.; Duggan, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand paraprofessional home visitors' perceptions of their training in addressing poor mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence, and their actions in working with families in addressing these issues. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 paraprofessional home visitors. Three main…

  12. The Age of Uncertainty: Parent Perspectives on the Transitions of Young People with Mental Health Difficulties to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jivanjee, Pauline; Kruzich, Jean M.; Gordon, Lynwood J.

    2009-01-01

    For young people aged 16-24, the transition from adolescence to young adulthood involves predictable and unpredictable changes and they may encounter challenges in their roles, relationships, and responsibilities. Young people with mental health difficulties face additional challenges as they and their families navigate this transition. As a…

  13. Paraprofessional Home Visitors' Perspectives on Addressing Poor Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Mercer, Constance D.; Saylor, Elizabeth L.; Duggan, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand paraprofessional home visitors' perceptions of their training in addressing poor mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence, and their actions in working with families in addressing these issues. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 paraprofessional home visitors. Three main…

  14. Parent Perspectives of an Evidence-Based Intervention for Children with Autism Served in Community Mental Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadnick, Nicole A.; Drahota, Amy; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that improvements to community mental health (CMH) care for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are needed. Recent research examining the feasibility of training CMH therapists to deliver a package of evidence-based practice intervention strategies (EBPs) targeting challenging behaviors for school-age children with ASD…

  15. Parents' Perspectives of School Mental Health Promotion Initiatives Are Related to Parents' Self-Assessed Parenting Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askell-Williams, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Achieving broad-scale parent engagement with school initiatives has proven elusive. This article reports survey data from 287 Maltese parents about their perceptions of the quality of their child's school's initiatives for promoting students' wellbeing and mental health. Findings indicate that, on average, parents rated school initiatives highly.…

  16. The Long-Term Effects of Parental Divorce on the Mental Health of Young Adults: A Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined effects on young adults (23 years) of parental divorce during childhood and adolescence using data from Britain's longitudinal National Child Development study. Found that divorce had a moderate, long-term negative impact on young adults' mental health; the relative risk of serious emotional disorders increased in the aftermath of…

  17. Interagency Collaboration in Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Mental Health Problems: The Perspective of the Service Users and the Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germundsson, Per; Hillborg, Helene; Danermark, Berth

    2011-01-01

    There is an aspiration and policy within the European Union to fully involve persons with disabilities in the community; this implies an opportunity to gainful employment. A large percentage of disabled persons remain unemployed despite this policy, especially persons with mental health problems. This study aims at investigating how people with…

  18. Mental Health Promotion and Illness Prevention: A Challenge for Psychiatrists

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, Chang-Uk

    2013-01-01

    Mental health is essential for individual and public health. To improve mental health, promotion, prevention, and the treatment of disease are required. These three kinds of interventions are interrelated but independent from one another. Although separate efforts for mental health promotion and prevention are needed as well as the public need of mental health promotion and well-being, psychiatrists usually are not accustomed to mental health promotion and prevention. This review introduces an overview of the concept, subjects according to target populations, and various intervention strategies for mental health promotion and prevention of mental illnesses. Based on literatures to date, understanding of developmental psychology, lifestyle medicine, and biopsychosocial contributors of mental health with a macroscopic perspective might help to practice mental health promotion and illness prevention. PMID:24474978

  19. A Multi-Level Examination of Stakeholder Perspectives of Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in a Large Urban Publicly-Funded Mental Health System.

    PubMed

    Beidas, Rinad S; Stewart, Rebecca E; Adams, Danielle R; Fernandez, Tara; Lustbader, Susanna; Powell, Byron J; Aarons, Gregory A; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Evans, Arthur C; Hurford, Matthew O; Rubin, Ronnie; Hadley, Trevor; Mandell, David S; Barg, Frances K

    2016-11-01

    Our goal was to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of evidence-based practices from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders in a large publicly funded mental health system. We completed 56 interviews with three stakeholder groups: treatment developers (n = 7), agency administrators (n = 33), and system leadership (n = 16). The three stakeholder groups converged on the importance of inner (e.g., agency competing resources and demands, therapist educational background) and outer context (e.g., funding) factors as barriers to implementation. Potential threats to implementation and sustainability included the fiscal landscape of community mental health clinics and an evolving workforce. Intervention characteristics were rarely endorsed as barriers. Inner context, outer context, and intervention characteristics were all seen as important facilitators. All stakeholders endorsed the importance of coordinated collaboration across stakeholder groups within the system to successfully implement evidence-based practices.

  20. Mental Health Program Reports - 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Julius, Ed.

    The volume is reported to reflect the broad range of National Institute of Mental Health activities in areas of research, development of mental health manpower, and delivery of mental health services. Twenty papers examine, respectively, relationship of life histories and biochemistry of siblings and twins to schizophrenia, training of Navaho…

  1. School mental health resources and adolescent mental health service use.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A; Alegría, Margarita; Costello, E Jane; Gruber, Michael J; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A; Kessler, Ronald C

    2013-05-01

    Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to increase service use. This article examines associations of school resources with past-year mental health service use among students with 12-month DSM-IV mental disorders. Data come from the U.S. National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A), a national survey of adolescent mental health that included 4,445 adolescent-parent pairs in 227 schools in which principals and mental health coordinators completed surveys about school resources and policies for addressing student emotional problems. Adolescents and parents completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and reported mental health service use across multiple sectors. Multilevel multivariate regression was used to examine associations of school mental health resources and individual-level service use. Nearly half (45.3%) of adolescents with a 12-month DSM-IV disorder received past-year mental health services. Substantial variation existed in school resources. Increased school engagement in early identification was significantly associated with mental health service use for adolescents with mild/moderate mental and behavior disorders. The ratio of students to mental health providers was not associated with overall service use, but was associated with sector of service use. School mental health resources, particularly those related to early identification, may facilitate mental health service use and may influence sector of service use for youths with DSM disorders. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegría, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A,; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to increase service use. This paper examines associations of school resources with past-year mental health service use among students with 12-month DSM-IV mental disorders. Method Data come from the U.S. National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A), a national survey of adolescent mental health that included 4,445 adolescent-parent pairs in 227 schools in which principals and mental health coordinators completed surveys about school resources-policies for addressing student emotional problems. Adolescents and parents completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and reported mental health service use across multiple sectors. Multilevel multivariate regression was used to examine associations of school mental health resources and individual-level service use. Results Roughly half (45.3%) of adolescents with a 12-month DSM-IV disorder received past-year mental health services. Substantial variation existed in school resources. Increased school engagement in early identification was significantly associated with mental health service use for adolescents with mild/moderate mental and behavior disorders. The ratio of students-to-mental health providers was not associated with overall service use, but was associated with sector of service use. Conclusions School mental health resources, particularly those related to early identification, may facilitate mental health service use and influence sector of service use for youths with DSM disorders. PMID:23622851

  3. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  4. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  5. Poverty, social stress & mental health.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, A; Jacob, K S

    2007-10-01

    While there is increasing evidence of an association between poor mental health and the experience of poverty and deprivation, the relationship is complex. We discuss the epidemiological data on mental illness among the different socio-economic groups, look at the cause -effect debate on poverty and mental illness and the nature of mental distress and disorders related to poverty. Issues related to individual versus area-based poverty, relative poverty and the impact of poverty on woman's and child mental health are presented. This review also addresses factors associated with poverty and the difficulties in the measurement of mental health and illness and levels/impact of poverty.

  6. Two sides of a coin: Perpetrators and survivors perspectives on the triad of alcohol, intimate partner violence and mental health in South India.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, Veena A; Hebbani, Sudharshan; Hegde, Sudarshan; Krishnan, Suneeta; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2015-06-01

    The present study explored the intersection among alcohol consumption, gender roles, intimate partner violence (IPV) and mental health from the perspective of heavy drinking men who also perpetrate IPV (perpetrators) and their spouses (survivors). Interpretive phenomenological approach was used, and in-depth interviews were conducted with adult married heavy drinking men who reported to have perpetrated IPV (N=10) and their spouses (N=10). These interviews were audio-recorded, and salient themes were generated using the NVivo software. Findings indicated a deeply embedded association among alcohol consumption, IPV, and mental health, with culturally sanctioned gender norms strongly contributing to this association. There was evidence for anxiety and depression in the survivors and emotional-behavioural and academic difficulties in their children. The study provides valuable insight into the intersecting problems of alcohol and IPV, which independently and together signify an emergent public health problem that can have immense ramifications on mental health of individuals and families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Thailand mental health country profile.

    PubMed

    Siriwanarangsan, Porntep; Liknapichitkul, Dusit; Khandelwal, Sudhir K

    2004-01-01

    Thailand, a constitutional monarchy, has undergone a rapid shift in its demography and economy in last two decades. This has put a great burden on the health services, including mental health care of the country. The current emphasis of the Ministry of Public Health is to change its role from health care provider to policymaker and regulator of standards, and to provide technical support to health facilities under its jurisdiction as well as in the private sector. The Department of Mental Health, established in 1994, has laid down a mental health policy that aims to promote mental health care within the community with the help of people's participation in health programmes. Focus has been placed on developing suitable and efficient technology by seeking cooperation both within and outside the Ministry of Public Health. Consequently, the Department of Mental Health has been receiving increasing budgetary allocations. Since there is a paucity of trained manpower, the emphasis is being laid on the utilization of general health care for mental health care. Some of the specific interventions are community services, prison services, psychiatric rehabilitation, and use of media in mental health operations. There have been active efforts towards international cooperation for developing technologies for specific programmes. Private and non-governmental organizations are supported and encouraged to provide mental health care to the marginalized sections of society. Efforts have also been made by the Department of Mental Health to inspect and raise the efficiency of its operations to result in quality service.

  8. Applying social and cultural capital frameworks: understanding employment perspectives of transition age youth with serious mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Vorhies, Vanessa; Davis, Kristin E; Frounfelker, Rochelle L; Kaiser, Susan M

    2012-07-01

    Vulnerable transition age youth, such as those in foster care and with serious mental health conditions, are at increased risk for lower rates of employment. Social capital is empirically linked to employment in the general population, yet little is known about the role of social capital in employment for at-risk transition age youth. Focus groups were conducted with young people with serious mental health conditions and their vocational specialists. Discussions reveal that both social and cultural capital influence employment processes. Those with employment experience value the motivation to work provided through others compared to those with no employment experience. Consistently employed describe strong working relationships with vocational specialists and possession of self-awareness, professionalism, and work-place knowledge as critical for employment success, while inconsistently employed describe worries about controlling emotions or behaviors on the job. Building social and cultural capital are explored as potential service provider goals.

  9. Canadian Rural/Remote Primary Care Physicians Perspectives on Child/Adolescent Mental Health Care Service Delivery.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Richard; Davidson, Brenda; Nadeau, Lucie; Callanan, Terrence S; Fleisher, William; Hope-Ross, Lindsay; Espinet, Stacey; Spenser, Helen R; Lipton, Harold; Srivastava, Amresh; Lazier, Lorraine; Doey, Tamison; Khalid-Khan, Sarosh; McKerlie, Ann; Stretch, Neal; Flynn, Roberta; Abidi, Sabina; St John, Kimberly; Auclair, Genevieve; Liashko, Vitaly; Fotti, Sarah; Quinn, Declan; Steele, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Primary Care Physicians (PCP) play a key role in the recognition and management of child/adolescent mental health struggles. In rural and under-serviced areas of Canada, there is a gap between child/adolescent mental health needs and service provision. From a Canadian national needs assessment survey, PCPs' narrative comments were examined using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Using the phenomenological method, individual comments were drawn upon to illustrate the themes that emerged. These themes were further analyzed using chi-square to identify significant differences in the frequency in which they were reported. Out of 909 PCPs completing the survey, 39.38% (n = 358) wrote comments. Major themes that emerged were: 1) psychiatrist access, including issues such as long waiting lists, no child/adolescent psychiatrists available, no direct access to child/adolescent psychiatrists; 2) poor communication/continuity, need for more systemized/transparent referral processes, and need to rely on adult psychiatrists; and, 3) referral of patients to other mental health professionals such as paediatricians, psychologists, and social workers. Concerns that emerged across sites primarily revolved around lack of access to care and systems issues that interfere with effective service delivery. These concerns suggest potential opportunities for future improvement of service delivery. Although the survey only had one comment box located at the end, PCPs wrote their comments throughout the survey. Further research focusing on PCPs' expressed written concerns may give further insight into child/adolescent mental health care service delivery systems. A comparative study targeting urban versus rural regions in Canada may provide further valuable insights.

  10. Canadian Rural/Remote Primary Care Physicians Perspectives on Child/Adolescent Mental Health Care Service Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Richard; Davidson, Brenda; Nadeau, Lucie; Callanan, Terrence S.; Fleisher, William; Hope-Ross, Lindsay; Espinet, Stacey; Spenser, Helen R.; Lipton, Harold; Srivastava, Amresh; Lazier, Lorraine; Doey, Tamison; Khalid-Khan, Sarosh; McKerlie, Ann; Stretch, Neal; Flynn, Roberta; Abidi, Sabina; St. John, Kimberly; Auclair, Genevieve; Liashko, Vitaly; Fotti, Sarah; Quinn, Declan; Steele, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Primary Care Physicians (PCP) play a key role in the recognition and management of child/adolescent mental health struggles. In rural and under-serviced areas of Canada, there is a gap between child/adolescent mental health needs and service provision. Methods: From a Canadian national needs assessment survey, PCPs’ narrative comments were examined using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Using the phenomenological method, individual comments were drawn upon to illustrate the themes that emerged. These themes were further analyzed using chi-square to identify significant differences in the frequency in which they were reported. Results: Out of 909 PCPs completing the survey, 39.38% (n = 358) wrote comments. Major themes that emerged were: 1) psychiatrist access, including issues such as long waiting lists, no child/adolescent psychiatrists available, no direct access to child/adolescent psychiatrists; 2) poor communication/continuity, need for more systemized/transparent referral processes, and need to rely on adult psychiatrists; and, 3) referral of patients to other mental health professionals such as paediatricians, psychologists, and social workers. Conclusions: Concerns that emerged across sites primarily revolved around lack of access to care and systems issues that interfere with effective service delivery. These concerns suggest potential opportunities for future improvement of service delivery. Implications: Although the survey only had one comment box located at the end, PCPs wrote their comments throughout the survey. Further research focusing on PCPs’ expressed written concerns may give further insight into child/adolescent mental health care service delivery systems. A comparative study targeting urban versus rural regions in Canada may provide further valuable insights. PMID:27047554

  11. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  12. Mental Health, United States, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This document presents timely statistical information on the nation's organized mental health service delivery system. Included are: (1) "Chronic Mental Disorder in the United States" (Howard H. Goldman and Ronald W. Manderscheid); (2) "Specialty Mental Health System Characteristics" (Michael J. Witkin, Joanne E. Atay, Adele S. Fell, and Ronald W.…

  13. Mental Health Systems in Scandinavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, David J.

    The guidebook is introduced by general observations on the Scandinavian countries concerning history, social policy, medicine, mental health, and psychiatric diagnosis. Discussed individually for Norway, Sweden, and Denmark are the following areas: mental health programs and statistics; mental illness programs, regional, hospital, aftercare,…

  14. Improving Mental Health in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Students do not leave their mental health at the front door when they come to school. From wellness to serious illness, a student's mental health status is integral to how they think, feel, interact, behave, and learn. Decades of research and experience have laid a solid foundation and framework for effectively providing mental health…

  15. Improving Mental Health in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Students do not leave their mental health at the front door when they come to school. From wellness to serious illness, a student's mental health status is integral to how they think, feel, interact, behave, and learn. Decades of research and experience have laid a solid foundation and framework for effectively providing mental health…

  16. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  17. Causes and management of aggression and violence in a forensic mental health service: perspectives of nurses and patients.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Geoffrey; Piccirillo, Maria; Alderman, Nick

    2013-12-01

    Nurses' attitudes about the causes and management of aggression affects their choice of intervention. We aimed to compare the attitudes held by patients and staff in a forensic mental health service with the Management of Aggression and Violence Attitudes Scale, and examine the factor validity of the tool in this setting by conducting a prospective comparative questionnaire survey. Staff (n = 72) and patient (n = 98) attitudes differed to a limited extent. Confirmatory factor analysis refuted the previously reported structure of the tool. Exploratory factor analysis suggested three underlying factors related to modifiability of aggression, hands on management, and hands off management. Patients were more optimistic than nurses about the modifiability of aggressive behaviour. Male patients and those with diagnoses other than personality disorder were significantly more likely to agree about modifiability than controls. Forensic inpatients recognize the need for the use of a range of techniques to prevent and manage aggression and violence, but selected groups are most likely to believe that aggression is modifiable. Prevention and management of aggression training should emphasize the modifiability of aggressive behaviour. The development of measures of modifiability and management style would assist in the evaluation of training and would offer new avenues for research. © 2012 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. A file study of refugee children referred to specialized mental health care: from an individual diagnostic to an ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Villanueva O'Driscoll, Julia; Serneels, Geertrui; Imeraj, Lindita

    2017-04-07

    The past years have been characterized by a large refugee crisis across the globe. The exposure to preflight, flight, and resettlement stressors puts refugee children and their families at risk of developing emotional and behavioral disorders. A unique Western-based approach of mental health problems seems to be insufficient to address the complexity of interactions between individual vulnerabilities and more ecological surrounding systems. We looked into (1) the reasons for referral; and (2) the process diagnostic outcomes after ethnopsychiatric and psychological assessment. We conducted a thematic content analysis on 93 files of refugee children. The findings suggest that mental health care professionals need to hold into account the multiplicity and intertwining of ongoing challenges to the well-being of refugee children. The integration of a Western-based psychiatric assessment with a more ecologically based view can lead to a more culturally sensitive approach in refugee children and their families. This way, both under- and overdiagnosis of psychiatric disorders could be avoided to further optimalise mental health care in this population.

  19. European strategies for mental health.

    PubMed

    Di Fiandra, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The most recent developments of strategies and policies in the mental health field in Europe are related to the World Health Organization (WHO) Declaration and Action Plan on Mental Health signed by all the Ministers of Health of all Member States in the European Region (2005). The Action Plan proposes ways and means of developing comprehensive mental health policies, listing 12 areas in which challenges are indicated and detailed actions are required. Afterwards the Green Paper on Mental Health has been launched by the European Commission for the definition of an European strategy. The more precise European Pact for Mental Health and Well-being has been presented in 2008. Many other international bodies (OECD, Council of Europe, etc.) have actively worked to stress the mental health issue. All are clearly referring to the Italian model, started 30 years ago.

  20. The Mexican American Woman and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Guadalupe

    For a long time Chicanas have been self-denying, self sacrificing. Well, it is time that Mexican American women began thinking of themselves. It follows that if women love and cherish others, they must begin by loving and cherishing themselves. From the mental health perspective it is essential that they do so, not only for their sake, but for…

  1. Directions in Mental Health Counseling, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Frederic, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    A collection of 12 lessons, this volume covers a wide range of concerns in mental health counseling. The lessons, which may be applied toward continuing education credits, are: (1) "Perspectives on the Essentials of Clinical Supervision" (Stephen A. Anderson); (2) "Adlerian Group Psychotherapy: A Brief Therapy Approach"…

  2. Brazil's mental health adventure.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This is an account of my trips to Brazil in 2001 where I worked on a series of mental health projects with Brazilian colleagues. I first got interested in Brazil after I graduated from college when I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Northeast Brazil (Bahia state). After I got out of the Peace Corps I moved to Rio de Janeiro and went to work for United Press International (UPI) in their Rio bureau. I was UPI foreign news correspondent for a year and a half. Those years in Brazil were probably the happiest years of my life. Later on, after I became ill in the U.S., my Brazilian connection played an important role in my recovery. Raised in a Victorian family in a small town in the Midwest, and schooled in a traditional boarding school for boys and then at an all men's college, Brazil's lively Latino culture served as a healthy antidote for my tendency to be reserved and often depressed. My contact with Brazilians and Brazilian culture always beckoned me on. I maintained contact with my friends in Brazil and they stuck by me through my illness years. What seemed like my emotional and intellectual "excess" to me, was easily accepted by my Brazilian friends. I felt much more myself interacting with Brazilians and connected to a larger sense of self I developed in Brazil. I traveled to Brazil at every opportunity and made friends with Brazilians I met in the States. I initiated Portuguese classes at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio in the early 1990s and then was invited to teach Brazilian culture to undergraduates. These appointments and my own resilience moved me past one depression and a dysthymia condition and into the wider community. I regained my confidence as a teacher, a role I had before and during the years of my illness. From this position, I organized a club for Brazilian students studying in the Cleveland area. After this teaching stint, I felt ready to pursue full time employment and began a job search that would eventually land me in New Haven at

  3. Chile mental health country profile.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Carmen López

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes main facts about Chile starting with key socio-demographic, socio-economic, political, environmental, epidemiological, social support and social pathology aspects that characterize the context in which current mental and neurological policy and programmes have been put in place since 2000, as part of the National Health Plan and Health Sector Strategy Plan. The 'National Plan for Mental Health and Psychiatry', using a community psychiatry approach, has been partially implemented for people covered by the Public Health Insurance, which comprises 62% of the Chilean population (people with lower income). This paper also describes: the management, population needs and demands, financial resources, human resources in primary care, mental health specialist care and community-based care, physical capital, social capital, provision and processes, and outcomes of the plan. Strengths are analyzed, like the health reform, including its values and principles, the active participation of consumer and family groups as well as mental health NGOs, access to mental health services through primary care, quality assurance of the mental health services delivered to the population and progressive development of a culture of respect for human rights, including those of people with mental illnesses. Finally, difficulties for the advance of mental health care are also enumerated: the low priority still given to mental health compared with physical health by the country's leaders, the insufficient emphasis on mental health in both undergraduate and postgraduate professional training, the strong stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness in the general population and the advocacy by some mental health professionals of the traditional model of care (role of the psychiatric hospital).

  4. Public school teachers’ perceptions about mental health

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Amanda Gonçalves Simões; Estanislau, Gustavo; Brietzke, Elisa; Lefèvre, Fernando; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine public school teachers’ perceptions about general health and mental health, and the way in which they obtained this information. METHODS Qualitative research was conducted with 31 primary and secondary school teachers at a state school in the municipality of Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The teachers responded to a questionnaire containing open-ended questions about mental health and general health. The following aspects were evaluated: Teachers’ understanding of the terms “health and “mental health,” the relevance of the need for information on the subject, the method preferred for obtaining information, their experience with different media regarding such matters, and perceptions about the extent to which this available information is sufficient to support their practice. The data were processed using the Qualiquantisoft software and analyzed according to the Discourse of the Collective Subject technique. RESULTS From the teachers’ perspective, general health is defined as the proper physiological functioning of the body and mental health is related to the balance between mind and body, as a requirement for happiness. Most of the teachers (80.6%) showed great interest in acquiring knowledge about mental health and receiving educational materials on the subject. For these teachers, the lack of information creates insecurity and complicates the management of everyday situations involving mental disorders. For 61.3% of the teachers, television is the medium that provides the most information on the topic. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that there is little information available on mental health for teachers, showing that strategies need to be developed to promote mental health in schools. PMID:26039397

  5. Mental health and disorders. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and mental disorders pose a tremendous challenge to the societal, health, and research policies in Europe, and sound advice is needed on a potential strategy for mental health research investment. Toward this goal, the ROAMER initiative ("Roadmap for Mental Health Research in Europe") was launched to map the current state of the art, to identify gaps and to delineate advances needed in various areas and domains of mental health research in Europe. To further stimulate discussions among the scientific community and stakeholders on how to improve mental health research and to promote an improved research agenda for the next decade, this IJMPR topic issue presents the overall ROAMER methodology as well as a series of selected papers highlighting critical issues of psychological approaches and interventions as outcomes of the ROAMER work package 5 "Psychological research and treatments". Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Perspectives of emergency department staff on the triage of mental health-related presentations: Implications for education, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Gerdtz, Marie F; Weiland, Tracey J; Jelinek, George A; Mackinlay, Claire; Hill, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    To explore ED staff perceptions of the factors that influence accuracy of triage for people with mental health problems. This qualitative learning needs analysis used a descriptive exploratory design. Participants were Australian emergency nurses and doctors. We used a criterion-based sampling approach. Recruitment was facilitated by the College of Emergency Nursing Australasia and the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine. A semi-structured interview schedule was developed. Telephone interviews were conducted, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to identify factors perceived to affect triage outcomes and to explore strategies to optimise the accuracy of triage assessments. Thirty-six staff participated (16 nurses and 20 doctors). Four major factors were perceived to influence accuracy. These were: environmental factors (physical structure, time pressures, activity levels, and interruptions), policy and education (guidelines, training and resources), staff factors (knowledge, experience, attitudes) and patient factors (police presence, patient behaviour, clinical condition). Differences of opinion were expressed by emergency doctors about the validity of the time to treatment objectives included in the Australasian Triage Scale for mental health presentations, and the utility of the scale to differentiate urgency for psychiatric conditions. Clinical guidelines and training have been developed to support the use of the Australasian Triage Scale. Further evaluation of the application of this scale to assess mental health problems is indicated. Additional work is also required to reduce variance in urgency assignment based on staff knowledge and attitudes about the causes, assessment and early management of psychiatric disorders. © 2012 The Authors. EMA © 2012 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. Spirituality and mental health clients.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Mary Linda

    2004-07-01

    Spirituality is an important part of human existence but is often overlooked in the conceptualization of the person as a biopsychosocial entity. This article examines spirituality as a concept, relates it to the experience of mental health clients, proposes spiritual assessments and interventions within the role of advanced practice mental health nurses, and discusses the necessity of including spiritual interventions to support healing and wholeness for mental health clients.

  8. Mental Health & the Career Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Marty

    This supplement to ninth grade mental health units relates mental health to the following occupational clusters: agribusiness and natural resources, environment, health, marine science, communications and media, business and office, marketing and distribution, public service, transportation, personnel services, consumer and homemaking education,…

  9. Historical perspectives of the role of Spain and Portugal in today's status of psychiatry and mental health in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Baca, Enrique; Lázaro, José; Hernández-Clemente, Juan C

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows how the community of Latin-American and Spanish psychiatry represents a solid platform for the so-called 'continental thought' to meet the analytical Anglo-Saxon thought. It reviews what both Latin America and the Spanish and Portuguese languages represent in the American continent; the relation between Spanish psychiatry and Spanish-speaking psychiatry in America during the twentieth century; the reality of psychiatric research and profession in Latin America; the evolution of Spanish psychiatry in the twentieth century from the post civil war diaspora to the beginning of the twenty-first century, and research on mental health in Spain and the foreseeable future.

  10. Mental Health of Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Malavika

    Children constitute nearly 40% of India's population, a significant portion of whom suffer mental ailments. Ways to sensitize those who work with children to various aspects associated with child mental health are explored in this book. The focus is not on mental handicap but on the internal or external distress which warps the psychosocial…

  11. Mental health as rational autonomy.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1981-08-01

    Rather than eliminate the terms "mental health and illness" because of the grave moral consequences of psychiatric labeling, conservative definitions are proposed and defended. Mental health is rational autonomy, and mental illness is the sustained loss of such. Key terms are explained, advantages are explored, and alternative concepts are criticized. The value and descriptive components of all such definitions are consciously acknowledged. Where rational autonomy is intact, mental hospitals and psychotherapists should not think of themselves as treating an illness. Instead, they are functioning as applied axiologists, moral educators, spiritual mentors, etc. They deal with what Szasz has called "personal, social, and ethical problems in living." But mental illness is real.

  12. Mental resilience, perceived immune functioning, and health

    PubMed Central

    Van Schrojenstein Lantman, Marith; Mackus, Marlou; Otten, Leila S; de Kruijff, Deborah; van de Loo, Aurora JAE; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Verster, Joris C

    2017-01-01

    Background Mental resilience can be seen as a trait that enables an individual to recover from stress and to face the next stressor with optimism. People with resilient traits are considered to have a better mental and physical health. However, there are limited data available assessing the relationship between resilient individuals and their perspective of their health and immune status. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the relationship between mental resilience, perceived health, and perceived immune status. Methods A total of 779 participants recruited at Utrecht University completed a questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics, the brief resilience scale for the assessment of mental resilience, the immune function questionnaire (IFQ), and questions regarding their perceived health and immune status. Results When correcting for gender, age, height, weight, smoker status, amount of cigarettes smoked per week, alcohol consumption status, amount of drinks consumed per week, drug use, and frequency of past year drug use, mental resilience was significantly correlated with perceived health (r=0.233, p=0.0001), perceived immune functioning (r=0.124, p=0.002), and IFQ score (r=−0.185, p=0.0001). Conclusion A significant, albeit modest, relationship was found between mental resilience and perceived immune functioning and health. PMID:28356753

  13. Mental resilience, perceived immune functioning, and health.

    PubMed

    Van Schrojenstein Lantman, Marith; Mackus, Marlou; Otten, Leila S; de Kruijff, Deborah; van de Loo, Aurora Jae; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Verster, Joris C

    2017-01-01

    Mental resilience can be seen as a trait that enables an individual to recover from stress and to face the next stressor with optimism. People with resilient traits are considered to have a better mental and physical health. However, there are limited data available assessing the relationship between resilient individuals and their perspective of their health and immune status. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the relationship between mental resilience, perceived health, and perceived immune status. A total of 779 participants recruited at Utrecht University completed a questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics, the brief resilience scale for the assessment of mental resilience, the immune function questionnaire (IFQ), and questions regarding their perceived health and immune status. When correcting for gender, age, height, weight, smoker status, amount of cigarettes smoked per week, alcohol consumption status, amount of drinks consumed per week, drug use, and frequency of past year drug use, mental resilience was significantly correlated with perceived health (r=0.233, p=0.0001), perceived immune functioning (r=0.124, p=0.002), and IFQ score (r=-0.185, p=0.0001). A significant, albeit modest, relationship was found between mental resilience and perceived immune functioning and health.

  14. Mental health of deaf people.

    PubMed

    Fellinger, Johannes; Holzinger, Daniel; Pollard, Robert

    2012-03-17

    Deafness is a heterogeneous condition with far-reaching effects on social, emotional, and cognitive development. Onset before language has been established happens in about seven per 10,000 people. Increased rates of mental health problems are reported in deaf people. Many regard themselves as members of a cultural minority who use sign language. In this Review, we describe discrepancies between a high burden of common mental health disorders and barriers to health care. About a quarter of deaf individuals have additional disabilities and a high probability of complex mental health needs. Research into factors affecting mental health of deaf children shows that early access to effective communication with family members and peers is desirable. Improved access to health and mental health care can be achieved by provision of specialist services with professionals trained to directly communicate with deaf people and with sign-language interpreters.

  15. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. VI; Programming School Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, William G.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this guide deals with programming school mental health in Vance and Franklin counties. Detailing both successes and failures, this booklet presents the following program activities: (1)…

  16. Bringing meaning to user involvement in mental health care planning: a qualitative exploration of service user perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grundy, A C; Bee, P; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Beatty, S; Olleveant, N; Lovell, K

    2016-02-01

    Service users wish to be involved in care planning but typically feel marginalized in this process. Qualitative explorations of the barriers and enablers of user involvement in mental health care planning are limited. How is user involvement in care planning conceptualized by service users and how can meaningful involvement be instilled in the care planning process? In 2013, we conducted five focus groups (n = 27) and 23 individual interviews with current or recent adult users of secondary care mental health services (n = 27) in England. Eight users participated in both. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis. Results Ten themes emerged from the data: these themes encompassed procedural elements (connection; contribution; currency; care consolidation; and consequence), service user characteristics (capacity and confidence) and professional enablers (consultation; choice; and clarity of expression). Procedural elements were discussed most frequently in service user discourse. The process of care planning, centred on the user-clinician relationship, is key to user involvement. Users describe a common model of meaningful involvement in care planning. Their requests, summarized through a 10C framework of care planning involvement, provide clear direction for improving service users satisfaction with care planning and enhancing the culture of services. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Protective factors for mental health and well-being in a changing climate: Perspectives from Inuit youth in Nunatsiavut, Labrador.

    PubMed

    Petrasek MacDonald, Joanna; Cunsolo Willox, Ashlee; Ford, James D; Shiwak, Inez; Wood, Michele

    2015-09-01

    The Canadian Arctic is experiencing rapid changes in climatic conditions, with implications for Inuit communities widely documented. Youth have been identified as an at-risk population, with likely impacts on mental health and well-being. This study identifies and characterizes youth-specific protective factors that enhance well-being in light of a rapidly changing climate, and examines how climatic and environmental change challenges these. In-depth conversational interviews were conducted with youth aged 15-25 from the five communities of the Nunatsiavut region of Labrador, Canada: Nain, Hopedale, Postville, Makkovik, and Rigolet. Five key protective factors were identified as enhancing their mental health and well-being: being on the land; connecting to Inuit culture; strong communities; relationships with family and friends; and staying busy. Changing sea ice and weather conditions were widely reported to be compromising these protective factors by reducing access to the land, and increasing the danger of land-based activities. This study contributes to existing work on Northern climate change adaptation by identifying factors that enhance youth resilience and, if incorporated into adaptation strategies, may contribute to creating successful and effective adaptation responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Consumer and carer participation in mental health care: the carer's perspective: part 1 - the importance of respect and collaboration.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Val; Happell, Brenda

    2007-06-01

    The role of family carers in the delivery of mental health services in Australia has become more than an advantage over not having this sort of participation. Increasingly the involvement of non-paid carers (family members and significant others) has been recognised as central to the smooth delivery of care and treatment. Notwithstanding this acknowledgment, there is very little discussion of carer participation in mental health care delivery within the literature. The limited research in this area suggests that carers recognize very little opportunity for genuine participation, even less than is available to consumers. This paper presents part 1 of the findings of an exploratory, qualitative study seeking an in-depth understanding of the attitudes of carers from rural Victoria, Australia toward opportunities for participation with specific emphasis on the role of psychiatric nurses in encouraging or discouraging participation. The themes of respect and communication will be described in this paper. These findings demonstrate the variable experiences of carers in their opportunities to participate and the important role nurses can assume in supporting both carers and consumers through this process.

  19. Beyond integration: challenges for children's mental health.

    PubMed

    Knitzer, Jane; Cooper, Janice

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews access, outcomes, and quality in the children's mental health system. We contend that a major focal point of future reforms should be at the organization level of care delivery. We identify five areas for intentional policy action to better infuse quality into the system. We also call for building upon the momentum of recent high-visibility reform proposals and for renewed advocacy to advance quality-linked perspectives into the children's mental health system beyond its focus on children with severe emotional disturbances.

  20. Observation of influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influences of mental health promotion and mental intervention on mental health status of professionals. Method: 2878 professionals for physical examination were selected and randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 1443 professionals and 1435 professionals, respectively. Then, the difference of mental health status before and after mental intervention between two groups was compared. Results: In treatment group, the proportion of people with healthy mental and modest pressure after mental intervention was higher than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.01); the proportion of people with psychological sub-heath and moderate pressure after mental intervention was significantly lower than that before mental intervention and that in control group after mental intervention (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in mental health status in control group before and after mental intervention (P>0.05). Mental health consciousness, health status, self pressure-relief capability, job satisfaction, and happiness index of professionals were up to 63.3%~78.8%. Conclusions: Mental health promotion and mental intervention may significantly improve mental health status of professionals. PMID:26221385

  1. [A framework to support action in population mental health].

    PubMed

    Mantoura, Pascale; Roberge, Marie-Claude; Fournier, Louise

    2017-01-01

    In Quebec, like elsewhere in the world, we are witnessing a growing concern for the population's mental health and for the importance of concentrating efforts on prevention and promotion. In this context, public health actors are invited to adopt a leadership role in advancing mental health promotion and mental disorder prevention goals, and establish the required partnerships with actors from the health and social services and from other sectors who are indispensable to the population mental health agenda. In Canada, public heath actors are not yet sufficiently supported in this role. They express the need to access structuring frameworks which can clarify their action in mental health. This article first presents the momentum for change at the policy level within the field of mental health. A framework to support population mental health action is then presented. The framework identifies the various dimensions underlying the promotion of population mental health as well as the reduction of mental health inequalities. The article finally illustrates how the application of a populational (the application of a populational responsibility perspective) responsibility perspective, as it is defined in the context of Quebec, facilitates the implementation of the various elements of this framework. In the end, public health actors are better equipped to situate their practice in favour of the population's mental health.

  2. Mental health services at selected private schools.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Sherwin, Tierney E; Baggish, Rosemary C; Tacy, Peter B; Meehan, Thomas P

    2004-04-01

    Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism for addressing their students' mental health needs. Understanding that need requires data to guide the services and programs a school may put in place. Having data helps inform those services, and comparative data from other schools provides feedback and perspective. This project surveyed type and frequency of mental health problems experienced by students who received a formal evaluation at 11 private schools in Connecticut during academic year 2001-2002.

  3. [Anomie and public mental health].

    PubMed

    Parales-Quenza, Carlos J

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the concept of anomie for understanding public mental-health issues and constructing strategies aimed at promoting health and preventing disease. Studying anomie involves many definitions and approaches; this article conceptualises anomie as dérréglement or derangement and as a total social fact as its effects and consequences are pervasive across all areas of human experience. The article suggests the pertinence of the concept to public health based on several authors' observations depicting Latin-America as being a set of anomic societies and Colombia as the extreme case. Current definitions of mental health in positive terms (not just as being the absence of mental illness) validate the need for considering anomie as an indicator of public mental health. The article proposes that if anomie expresses itself through rules as basic social structure components, then such rules should also be considered as the point of intervention in promoting mental health.

  4. Cultural diversity and mental health.

    PubMed

    Gopalkrishnan, Narayan; Babacan, Hurriyet

    2015-12-01

    Cultural diversity and its impact on mental health has become an increasingly important issue in a globalised world where the interactions between cultures continue to grow exponentially. This paper presents critical areas in which culture impacts on mental health, such as how health and illness are perceived, coping styles, treatment-seeking patterns, impacts of history, racism, bias and stereotyping, gender, family, stigma and discrimination. While cultural differences provide a number of challenges to mental health policy and practice they also provide a number of opportunities to work in unique and effective ways towards positive mental health. Ethno-specific approaches to mental health that incorporate traditional and community-based systems can provide new avenues for working with culturally diverse populations. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  5. From Mental Health to Mental Wealth in Athletes: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Uphill, Mark; Sly, Dan; Swain, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Considerations of athletes’ mental health are typically framed in the language of mental illness (Hughes and Leavey, 2012), a situation that contributes to stigmatization, denial, and the prevention of effective care. In this article, we provide a critical, narrative review of the extant literature on athlete mental health. Specifically, we begin by providing a brief synopsis of the extant literature on athletes’ mental health, illustrating both what we know about (i) the prevalence of mental health issues in sport and (ii) variables contributing to help-seeking behaviors in athletes. Against, this backdrop, we outline Keyes’ (2002) two-continuum model of mental health as a theoretical framework that has considerable promise in understanding, talking-about, and intervening to enhance, athletes’ mental health. This model posits two related, but distinct dimensions: one continuum indicates the presence or absence of mental health, the other the presence or absence of mental illness. From this perspective, a number of possibilities emerge. For instance, athletes could simultaneously have both positive mental health and experience of mental illness. Alternatively, athletes could be free from mental illness, but in Keyes’ terms be “languishing” (i.e., experiencing low levels of mental health). Implications for interventions based on the two-continuum model are discussed, particularly drawing on assets-based approaches to enhance flourishing (Theokas et al., 2005). We conclude the review by considering limitations in our understanding of how to promote flourishing and suggest avenues for further research. PMID:27445903

  6. Sufism and mental health

    PubMed Central

    Nizamie, S. Haque; Katshu, Mohammad Zia Ul Haq; Uvais, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    Human experience in, health and disease, always has a spiritual dimension. pirituality is accepted as one of the defining determinants of health and it no more remains a sole preserve of religion and mysticism. In recent years, pirituality has been an area of research in neurosciences and both in the nderstanding of psychiatric morbidity and extending therapeutic interventions it seems to be full of promises. Sufism has been a prominent spiritual tradition in Islam deriving influences from major world religions, such as, Christianity and Hinduism and contributing substantially toward spiritual well-being of a large number of people within and outside Muslim world. Though Sufism started in early days of Islam and had many prominent Sufis, it is in the medieval period it achieved great height culminating in many Sufi orders and their major proponents. The Sufism aims communion with God through spiritual realization; soul being the agency of this communion, and propounding the God to be not only the cause of all existence but the only real existence. It may provide a vital link to understand the source of religious experience and its impact on mental health. PMID:23858257

  7. Sufism and mental health.

    PubMed

    Nizamie, S Haque; Katshu, Mohammad Zia Ul Haq; Uvais, N A

    2013-01-01

    Human experience in, health and disease, always has a spiritual dimension. pirituality is accepted as one of the defining determinants of health and it no more remains a sole preserve of religion and mysticism. In recent years, pirituality has been an area of research in neurosciences and both in the nderstanding of psychiatric morbidity and extending therapeutic interventions it seems to be full of promises. Sufism has been a prominent spiritual tradition in Islam deriving influences from major world religions, such as, Christianity and Hinduism and contributing substantially toward spiritual well-being of a large number of people within and outside Muslim world. Though Sufism started in early days of Islam and had many prominent Sufis, it is in the medieval period it achieved great height culminating in many Sufi orders and their major proponents. The Sufism aims communion with God through spiritual realization; soul being the agency of this communion, and propounding the God to be not only the cause of all existence but the only real existence. It may provide a vital link to understand the source of religious experience and its impact on mental health.

  8. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Maternal Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Selix, Nancy; Henshaw, Erin; Barrera, Alinne; Botcheva, Luba; Huie, Erin; Kaufman, Gabrielle

    2017-03-15

    One out of every five to seven births is affected by postpartum depression, making it the most common maternal health problem in the first year after childbirth. Early identification and treatment are essential, though screening and treatment rates are low. Factors that inhibit effective screening and treatment include lack of uniform screening policies in all maternal health settings, poor coordination of care between primary care and mental health services, coordination of community education efforts and resources, social stigma surrounding mental health treatment, and ineffective application of research and technology in the clinical setting. An interdisciplinary model that includes primary care providers, mental health professionals, community resources, policy makers, researchers, and technological innovators addresses these gaps in care and enhances screening and treatment efforts that improve overall maternal and child health. We present a promising interdisciplinary cross-organizational approach coalescing diverse perspectives from those working across policy, research, training, primary care, and mental health in various disciplines to practice collaboratively to improve perinatal mental healthcare.

  9. Mental Health Screening in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weist, Mark D.; Rubin, Marcia; Moore, Elizabeth; Adelsheim, Steven; Wrobel, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Background: This article discusses the importance of screening students in schools for emotional/behavioral problems. Methods: Elements relevant to planning and implementing effective mental health screening in schools are considered. Screening in schools is linked to a broader national agenda to improve the mental health of children and…

  10. International Collaboration in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

    Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects…

  11. Mental Health, United States, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderscheid, Ronald W., Ed.; Henderson, Marilyn J., Ed.

    In recent years, the mental health community has made great strides in understanding more about the delivery of mental health services, improving efficiency and quality in services, and also about how to build strengths and resilience in the face of lifes stresses. This volume adds to the knowledge base so that the important task of system change…

  12. International Collaboration in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

    Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects…

  13. Tips for Mental Health Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitsett, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers tips for working with interpreters in mental health settings. These tips include: (1) Using trained interpreters, not bilingual staff or community members; (2) Explaining "interpreting procedures" to the providers and clients; (3) Addressing the stigma associated with mental health that may influence interpreters; (4) Defining…

  14. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  15. Mental Health in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rural Health Association, Kansas City, MO.

    Recent national data suggests that there is a similarity between the prevalence of clinically defined mental health problems, as well as comorbidity including substance abuse, among rural and urban adult populations. However, due to the lack of a mental health and substance abuse infrastructure in rural areas, many times these disorders go…

  16. International Students and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  17. A roadmap for mental health.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2016-09-21

    The Five Year Forward View could be a turning point in the battle to get mental health parity with physical health, address long waiting times and unmet need, and ensure people get care close to home.

  18. Child Mental Health - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Child Mental Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/childmentalhealth.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  19. Neurophysiological correlates of various mental perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hinterberger, Thilo; Zlabinger, Milena; Blaser, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    A common view of consciousness is that our mind presents emotions, experiences, and images in an internal mental (re-)presentation space which in a state of wakefulness is triggered by the world outside. Consciousness can be defined as the observation of this inner mental space. We propose a new model, in which the state of the conscious observer is defined by the observer's mental position and focus of attention. The mental position of the observer can either be within the mental self (intrapersonal space), in the mental outer world (extrapersonal space) or in an empathic connection, i.e., within the intrapersonal space of another person (perspective taking). The focus of attention can be directed toward the self or toward the outside world. This mental space model can help us to understand the patterns of relationships and interactions with other persons as they occur in social life. To investigate the neurophysiological correlates and discriminability of the different mental states, we conducted an EEG experiment measuring the brain activity of 16 subjects via 64 electrodes while they engaged in different mental positions (intrapersonal, extrapersonal, perspective taking) with different attentional foci (self, object). Compared to external mental locations, internal ones showed significantly increased alpha2 power, especially when the observer was focusing on an object. Alpha2 and beta2 were increased in the empathic condition compared to the extrapersonal perspective. Delta power was significantly higher when the attentional focus was directed toward an object in comparison to the participant's own self. This exploratory study demonstrates highly significant differences between various mental locations and foci, suggesting that the proposed categories of mental location and intra- and interpersonal attentional foci are not only helpful theoretical concepts but are also physiologically relevant and therefore may relate to basic brain processing mechanisms.

  20. Adolescent Girls' and Boys' Perceptions of Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Agneta; Brunnberg, Elinor; Eriksson, Charli

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study are to analyse the concept of mental health from the perspective of adolescent girls and boys and to describe what adolescent girls and boys regard as important determinants of mental health. Interviews with 48 children, 13 and 16 years old, in Sweden were held individually or in focus groups. The adolescents perceived…

  1. Parents' conceptualization of adolescents' mental health problems: who adopts a psychiatric perspective and does it make a difference?

    PubMed

    Moses, Tally

    2011-02-01

    How parents give meaning to the problems of adolescents diagnosed with mental disorders and receiving treatment is likely related to important outcomes including parental well-being and commitment to treatment, as well as their own behaviors and reactions to their child. The aim of this cross-sectional, mixed-method study of 70 parents of adolescents receiving wraparound mental health services is to examine: (1) how parents conceptualize their child's MH problems; (2) factors related to parents' conceptualization of youths' problems using medical model terms; and (3) associations between parents' problem conceptualization and their emotional or coping responses to their child having psychiatric problem(s). Content analysis indicated that 54.3% of parents definitively conceptualized adolescents' problems using psychiatric terms, 37.1% reported uncertainty about the nature of their child's problems, and 8.6% gave alternative, non-psychiatric explanations for their child's problems. We found significant relationships between parents' problem conceptualization and their attitudes and experience with MH treatment, demographics, as well as with adolescents' clinical characteristics. Parents who conceptualized problems using psychiatric terminology were more likely to express sadness and pessimism relative to other parents, though there were no differences in expressions of worry, guilt, pragmatism and optimism by problem conceptualization.

  2. Smartphone Applications for Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Vona, Pamela L.; Santostefano, Antonella M.; Ciaravino, Samantha; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many adolescents and adults do not seek treatment for mental health symptoms. Smartphone applications (apps) may assist individuals with mental health concerns in alleviating symptoms or increasing understanding. This study seeks to characterize apps readily available to smartphone users seeking mental health information and/or support. Ten key terms were searched in the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores: mental health, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar, trauma, trauma in schools, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), child trauma, and bullying. A content analysis of the first 20 application descriptions retrieved per category was conducted. Out of 300 nonduplicate applications, 208 (70%) were relevant to search topic, mental health or stress. The most common purported purpose for the apps was symptom relief (41%; n = 85) and general mental health education (18%; n = 37). The most frequently mentioned approaches to improving mental health were those that may benefit only milder symptoms such as relaxation (21%; n = 43). Most app descriptions did not include information to substantiate stated effectiveness of the application (59%; n = 123) and had no mention of privacy or security (89%; n = 185). Due to uncertainty of the helpfulness of readily available mental health applications, clinicians working with mental health patients should inquire about and provide guidance on application use, and patients should have access to ways to assess the potential utility of these applications. Strategic policy and research developments are likely needed to equip patients with applications for mental health, which are patient centered and evidence based. PMID:27428034

  3. Smartphone Applications for Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Radovic, Ana; Vona, Pamela L; Santostefano, Antonella M; Ciaravino, Samantha; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D

    2016-07-01

    Many adolescents and adults do not seek treatment for mental health symptoms. Smartphone applications (apps) may assist individuals with mental health concerns in alleviating symptoms or increasing understanding. This study seeks to characterize apps readily available to smartphone users seeking mental health information and/or support. Ten key terms were searched in the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores: mental health, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar, trauma, trauma in schools, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), child trauma, and bullying. A content analysis of the first 20 application descriptions retrieved per category was conducted. Out of 300 nonduplicate applications, 208 (70%) were relevant to search topic, mental health or stress. The most common purported purpose for the apps was symptom relief (41%; n = 85) and general mental health education (18%; n = 37). The most frequently mentioned approaches to improving mental health were those that may benefit only milder symptoms such as relaxation (21%; n = 43). Most app descriptions did not include information to substantiate stated effectiveness of the application (59%; n = 123) and had no mention of privacy or security (89%; n = 185). Due to uncertainty of the helpfulness of readily available mental health applications, clinicians working with mental health patients should inquire about and provide guidance on application use, and patients should have access to ways to assess the potential utility of these applications. Strategic policy and research developments are likely needed to equip patients with applications for mental health, which are patient centered and evidence based.

  4. Competencies for disaster mental health.

    PubMed

    King, Richard V; Burkle, Frederick M; Walsh, Lauren E; North, Carol S

    2015-03-01

    Competencies for disaster mental health are essential to domestic and international disaster response capabilities. Numerous consensus-based competency sets for disaster health workers exist, but no prior study identifies and discusses competency sets pertaining specifically to disaster mental health. Relevant competency sets were identified via MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EBSCO, and Google Scholar searches. Sixteen competency sets are discussed, some providing core competencies for all disaster responders and others for specific responder groups within particular professions or specialties. Competency sets specifically for disaster mental health professionals are lacking, with the exception of one set that focused only on cultural competence. The identified competency sets provide guidance for educators in developing disaster mental health curricula and for disaster health workers seeking education and training in disaster mental health. Valid, criterion-based competencies are required to guide selection and training of mental health professionals for the disaster mental health workforce. In developing these competencies, consideration should be given to the requirements of both domestic and international disaster response efforts.

  5. Economic Stress and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Hugh F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper correlates economic stress with minority status, resource allocations for mental health programs, and vulnerability to mental disability. Several hypotheses are advanced: 1. A major and recurring psychological pattern of the American national character is prowhite, antiblack paranoia. 2. Mental health fiscal allocations and programmatic determinations in ghetto, lower socioeconomic, minority-populated urban areas are predicated on political and racist considerations, the underlying motivation being to keep minorities at greater risk of mental disability. 3. Economic privation and stress increase vulnerability to mental illness, especially in a minority population for whom health, mental health, educational, and social services are grossly inadequate. 4. Poverty and economic stress combine with health systems that are unresponsive to the needs of blacks and other minorities, resulting in the perpetuation of disabilities and other conditions in blacks that are potentially preventable. 5. Health and mental health resources should be increased rather than diminished during periods of economic stress, especially in the public sector. 6. In order to provide each citizen with access to quality health and mental health care regardless of race and/or economic status, there must be enacted a national health insurance program based on tax-levy monies that will cover all aspects of health and mental health care. 7. Racism and social status will continue to be powerful determinants of the quality of service that white professionals render to black patients and to poor white patients, unless our training institutions mount a massive campaign to train appropriately and to include significant numbers of minority candidates and trainees in the effort. To date this effort is virtually nonexistent. PMID:439171

  6. Juvenile justice mental health services.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher R; Penn, Joseph V

    2002-10-01

    As the second century of partnership begins, child psychiatry and juvenile justice face continuing challenges in meeting the mental health needs of delinquents. The modern juvenile justice system is marked by a significantly higher volume of cases, with increasingly complicated multiproblem youths and families with comorbid medical, psychiatric, substance abuse disorders, multiple family and psychosocial adversities, and shrinking community resources and alternatives to confinement. The family court is faced with shrinking financial resources to support court-ordered placement and treatment programs in efforts to treat and rehabilitate youths. The recognition of high rates of mental disorders for incarcerated youth has prompted several recommendations for improvement and calls for reform [56,57]. In their 2000 annual report, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice advocated increased access to mental health services that provide a continuum of care tailored to the specific problems of incarcerated youth [58]. The specific recommendations of the report for mental health providers include the need for wraparound services, improved planning and coordination between agencies, and further research. The Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has set three priorities in dealing with the mental health needs of delinquents: further research on the prevalence of mental illness among juvenile offenders, development of mental health screening assessment protocols, and improved mental health services [59]. Other programs have called for earlier detection and diversion of troubled youth from juvenile justice to mental health systems [31,56]. Most recently, many juvenile and family courts have developed innovative programs to address specific problems such as truancy or substance use and diversionary or alternative sentencing programs to deal with first-time or nonviolent delinquents. All youths who come in contact with the juvenile justice system

  7. Nutritional Factors Affecting Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Lim, So Young; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Arang; Lee, Hee Jae; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals are important factors affecting mental health and the development of psychiatric disorders. Majority of scientific evidence relating to mental health focuses on depression, cognitive function, and dementia, and limited evidence is available about other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. As life span of human being is increasing, the more the prevalence of mental disorders is, the more attention rises. Lists of suggested nutritional components that may be beneficial for mental health are omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids, cholesterol, niacin, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Saturated fat and simple sugar are considered detrimental to cognitive function. Evidence on the effect of cholesterol is conflicting; however, in general, blood cholesterol levels are negatively associated with the risk of depression. Collectively, the aims of this review are to introduce known nutritional factors for mental health, and to discuss recent issues of the nutritional impact on cognitive function and healthy brain aging. PMID:27482518

  8. Teachers' and Parents' Perspectives on a Curricular Subject of "Religion and Spirituality" for Indian Schools: A Pilot Study Toward School Mental Health Program.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Parameshwaran; Baccari, Andrew; Ramachandran, Uma; Ahmed, Syed Faiz; Koenig, Harold G

    2017-08-17

    Religious-spiritual (R/S) education helps medical students cope with caregiving stress and gain skills in interpersonal empathy needed for clinical care. Such R/S education has been introduced into K-12 and college curricula in some developed nations and has been found to positively impact student's mental health. Such a move has not yet been seen in the Indian education system. This paper aimed to examine perspectives of teachers and parents in India on appropriateness, benefits, and challenges of including R/S education into the school curriculum and also to gather their impressions on how a R/S curriculum might promote students' health. A cross-sectional study of religiously stratified sample of teachers and parents was initiated in three preselected schools in India and the required sample size (N = 300) was reached through snowballing technique. A semi-structured questionnaire, with questions crafted from "Religion and Spirituality in Medicine, Physicians Perspective" (RSMPP) and "American Academy of Religion's (AAR) Guidelines for Religious Literacy," was used to determine participants' perspectives. Findings revealed that teachers' and parents' "comfort in integrating R/S into school curriculum" was associated with their gender (OR 1.68), education status (OR 1.05), and intrinsic religiosity (OR 1.05). Intrinsic religiosity was significantly (p = 0.025) high among parents while "intrinsic spirituality" was high (p = 0.020) among teachers. How participants' R/S characteristics influence their support of R/S education in school is discussed. In conclusion, participants believe R/S education will fosters students' emotional health and interpersonal skills needed for social leadership. A curriculum that incorporates R/S education, which is based on AAR guidelines and clinically validated interpersonal spiritual care tools would be acceptable to both teachers and parents.

  9. Development of Mental Health Indicators in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeree; Ahn, Dong Hyun; Song, Jinhee; Hwang, Tae Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Objective Promoting mental health and preventing mental health problems are important tasks for international organizations and nations. Such goals entail the establishment of active information networks and effective systems and indicators to assess the mental health of populations. This being said, there is a need in Korea develop ways to measure the state of mental health in Korea. Methods This paper reviews the mental health indicator development policies and practices of seven organizations, countries, and regions: WHO, OECD, EU, United States, Australia, UK, and Scotland. Using Delphi method, we conducted two surveys of mental health indicators for experts in the field of mental health. The survey questionnaire included 5 domains: mental health status, mental health factor, mental health system, mental health service, and quality of mental health services. We considered 124 potential mental health indicators out of more than 600 from indicators of international organizations and foreign countries. Results We obtained the top 30 mental health indicators from the surveys. Among them, 10 indicators belong to the mental health system. The most important five mental health indicators are suicide rate, rate of increase in mental disorder treatment, burden caused by mental disorders, adequacy of identifying problems of mental health projects and deriving solutions, and annual prevalence of mental disorders. Conclusion Our study provides information about the process for indicator development and the use of survey results to measure the mental health status of the Korean population. The aim of mental health indicator development is to improve the mental health system by better grasping the current situation. We suggest these mental health indicators can monitor progress in efforts to implement reform policies, provide community services, and involve users, families and other stakeholders in mental health promotion, prevention, care and rehabilitation. PMID:23251193

  10. Mental health nursing and stress: maintaining balance.

    PubMed

    Ward, Louise

    2011-04-01

    The recruitment and retention of mental health nurses within acute inpatient mental health facilities continues to be an ongoing issue. Literature and current research highlight an environment fraught with pressure and stress, identifying several key factors contributing to job dissatisfaction. These factors include greater patient acuity, unpredictable and challenging workspaces, violence, increased paperwork, and reduced managerial support. This qualitative, critical, feminist exploration investigated the lived experiences of 13 female mental health nurses working in inpatient services. They were asked about their practice and perceptions of workplace culture, and they shared their thoughts on stress management and professional well-being. Positive workplace practice was highlighted, and the participants revealed an environment they were proud to be a part of. Individual interviews, focus groups, and reflective practice were all used to collect data. The findings from the investigation unanimously support current literature that clearly confirms mental health nursing to be stressful. Interestingly, however, the findings also clearly identified that the way in which the nurse participants managed their stress was intrinsically linked to their job satisfaction. The major theme identified throughout the present study revealed that the female participants' ability to manage an at times complex workspace through the notions of teamwork, diversity, and creativity. All of the participants considered these elements as significant to providing a high standard in patient care. This research might provide an opportunity for others to view mental health nursing from a different perspective, and through the lived experiences of the participants, embrace the positive and rewarding aspects of the role. © 2011 The Author. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. Mental health in the foreclosure crisis.

    PubMed

    Houle, Jason N

    2014-10-01

    Current evidence suggests that the rise in home foreclosures that began in 2007 created feelings of stress, vulnerability, and sapped communities of social and economic resources. Minority and low SES communities were more likely to be exposed to predatory lending and hold subprime mortgages, and were the hardest hit by the foreclosure crisis. Little research has examined whether and how the foreclosure crisis has undermined population mental health. I use data from 2245 counties in 50 U.S. states to examine whether living in high foreclosure areas is associated with residents' mental health and whether the foreclosure crisis has the potential to exacerbate existing disparities in mental health during the recessionary period. I use county-level data from RealtyTrac and other data sources, and individual-level data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey from 2006 to 2011. I find that - net of time invariant unobserved between-county differences, national time trends, and observed confounders - a rise in a county's foreclosure rate is associated with a decline in residents' mental health. This association is especially pronounced in counties with a high concentration of low SES and minority residents, which supports the perspective that the foreclosure crisis has the potential to exacerbate existing social disparities in mental health.

  12. Prevalence, Motivations, and Social, Mental Health and Health Consequences of Cyberbullying Among School-Aged Children and Youth: Protocol of a Longitudinal and Multi-Perspective Mixed Method Study

    PubMed Central

    McInroy, Lauren B; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Bhole, Payal; Van Wert, Melissa; Schwan, Kaitlin; Birze, Arija; Daciuk, Joanne; Beran, Tanya; Craig, Wendy; Pepler, Debra J; Wiener, Judith; Khoury-Kassabri, Mona; Johnston, David

    2016-01-01

    Background While the online environment may promote important developmental and social benefits, it also enables the serious and rapidly growing issue of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying constitutes an increasing public health problem – victimized children and youth experience a range of health and mental health concerns, including emotional and psychosomatic problems, maladaptive behaviors, and increased suicidality. Perpetrators demonstrate a lack of empathy, and may also struggle with health and mental health issues. Objective This paper describes the protocols applied in a longitudinal and multi-perspective mixed-methods study with five objectives: (1) to explore children/youth’s experiences, and children/youth’s, parents’, and teachers’ conceptions, definitions, and understanding of cyberbullying; (2) to explore how children/youth view the underlying motivations for cyberbullying; (3) to document the shifting prevalence rates of cyberbullying victimization, witnessing, and perpetration; (4) to identify risk and protective factors for cyberbullying involvement; and (5) to explore social, mental health, and health consequences of cyberbullying. Methods Quantitative survey data were collected over three years (2012-2014) from a stratified random baseline sample of fourth (n=160), seventh (n=243), and tenth (n=267) grade children/youth, their parents (n=246), and their teachers (n=103). Quantitative data were collected from students and teachers during in-person school visits, and from parents via mail-in surveys. Student, parent, and teacher surveys included questions regarding: student experiences with bullying/cyberbullying; student health, mental health, and social and behavioral issues; socio-demographics; and information and communication technology use. In-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted twice with a sub-sample of students (n=57), purposively selected based on socio-demographics and cyberbullying experience, twice with

  13. Efficiency in mental health practice and research.

    PubMed

    Lagomasino, Isabel T; Zatzick, Douglas F; Chambers, David A

    2010-01-01

    Limited financial resources, escalating mental health-related costs and opportunities for capitalizing on advances in health information technologies have brought the theme of efficiency to the forefront of mental health services research and clinical practice. In this introductory article to the journal series stemming from the 20th NIMH Mental Health Services Research Conference, we first delineate the need for a new focus on efficiency in both research and clinical practice. Second, we provide preliminary definitions of efficiency for the field and discuss issues related to measurement. Finally, we explore the interface between efficiency in mental health services research and practice and the NIMH strategic objectives of developing improved interventions for diverse populations and enhancing the public health impact of research. Case examples illustrate how perspectives from dissemination and implementation research may be used to maximize efficiencies in the development and implementation of new service delivery models. Allowing findings from the dissemination and implementation field to permeate and inform clinical practice and research may facilitate more efficient development of interventions and enhance the public health impact of research.

  14. The mental health of veterans.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D; Iversen, A; Greenberg, N

    2008-06-01

    For the majority service in the Armed Forces is beneficial and, in the main, military veterans have successful lives. However, a minority have a bleaker outlook as a result of on-going ill health and social exclusion. Whilst the media focuses on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, in reality the most frequent mental health problems for veterans are alcohol problems, depression and anxiety disorders. These difficulties are difficult to manage as veterans, particularly those who are unwell, demonstrate a reticence to seek help for mental health problems. Another issue is that many veterans are now reserve personnel who have been found to be at greater risk of developing mental health problems than their regular counterparts. Steps to improve the knowledge and expertise of primary care services about veteran's mental health issues and increasing the availability of treatment options are important and are underway.

  15. Islamic Values and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassir, Balkis

    Mental well-being is as important as physical well-being for sound life of man, and perhaps even more important, since physical illnesses are related in varying degrees to psychological problems. Modern psychology emphasizes essential criteria for mental health and well-being. These include positive relationships with others, productivity and…

  16. Facts About: College Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    Facts about college mental health are presented in response to frequently asked questions. Areas of concern include common conditions interfering with student effectiveness, why students seek help and where they can get it, the frequency of severe mental illness in college students, the suicide problem, the limitations of nonprofessional help, the…

  17. Poor Pre-Pregnancy and Antepartum Mental Health Predicts Postpartum Mental Health Problems among US Women: A Nationally Representative Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Whitney P.; Wisk, Lauren E.; Cheng, Erika R.; Hampton, John M.; Creswell, Paul; Hagen, Erika W.; Spear, Hilary A.; Maddox, Torsheika; DeLeire, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Mental health problems disproportionately affect women, particularly during childbearing years. However, there is a paucity of research on the determinants of postpartum mental health problems using representative US populations. Taking a life course perspective, we determined the potential risk factors for postpartum mental health problems, with a particular focus on the role of mental health before and during pregnancy. Methods We examined data on 1,863 mothers from eleven panels of the 1996-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Poor postpartum mental health was defined using self-reports of mental health conditions, symptoms of mental health conditions, or global mental health ratings of “fair” or “poor.” Results 9.5% of women reported experiencing postpartum mental health problems, with over half of these women reporting a history of poor mental health. Poor pre-pregnancy mental health and poor antepartum mental health both independently increased the odds of having postpartum mental health problems. Staged multivariate analyses revealed that poor antepartum mental health attenuated the relationship between pre-pregnancy and postpartum mental health problems. Additionally, significant disparities exist in women's report of postpartum mental health status. Conclusions While poor antepartum mental health is the strongest predictor of postpartum mental health problems, pre-pregnancy mental health is also important. Accordingly, health care providers should identify, treat, and follow women with a history of poor mental health, as they are particularly susceptible to postpartum mental health problems. This will ensure that women and their children are in the best possible health and mental health during the postpartum period and beyond. PMID:21349740

  18. Changing Roles of Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garai, Josef E.

    The roles that mental health professionals must play to facilitate the prevention of mental illness and the introduction of mentally healthy attitudes in our society is discussed. Mental health professionals must re-examine the meaning of mental health in the context of the current world situation and ask themselves to what extent they are…

  19. Meaning and barriers to quality care service provision in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services: Qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Svirydzenka, Nadzeya; Ronzoni, Pablo; Dogra, Nisha

    2017-02-20

    Defining quality in health presents many challenges. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) defined quality clinical care as care that is equitable, timely, safe, efficient, effective and patient centred. However, it is not clear how different stakeholders within a child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) understand and/or apply this framework. This project aims to identify key stakeholders" understanding of the meaning of quality in the context of CAMHS. The study sample comprised of three groups: (i) patients and carers, (ii) CAMHS clinical staff, and (iii) commissioners (Total N = 24). Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data and thematic analysis was applied to explore participant's views on the meaning and measurement of quality and how these might reflect the IOM indicators and their relevance in CAMHS. An initial barrier to implementing quality care in CAMHS was the difficulty and limited agreement in defining the meaning of quality care, its measurement and implementation for all participants. Clinical staff defined quality as personal values, a set of practical rules, or clinical discharge rates; while patients suggested being more involved in the decision-making process. Commissioners, while supportive of adequate safeguarding and patient satisfaction procedures, did not explicitly link their view on quality to commissioning guidelines. Identifying practical barriers to implementing quality care was easier for all interviewees and common themes included: lack of meaningful measures, recourses, accountability, and training. All interviewees considered the IOM six markers as comprehensive and relevant to CAMHS. No respondent individually or within one stakeholder group identified more than a few of the indicators or barriers of a quality CAMHS service. However, the composite responses of the respondents enable us to develop a more complete picture of how to improve quality care in practice and guide future research in the area.

  20. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology.

  1. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chats with Experts Clinical Trials Share Child and Adolescent Mental Health Overview Teen Depression Study: Understanding Depression ... Continue reading Recruitment Begins for Landmark Study of Adolescent Brain Development September 13, 2016 • Press Release The ...

  2. FastStats: Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography ... outpatient and emergency departments) with mental disorders as primary diagnosis: 63.3 million Sources: Selected patient and ...

  3. Mental health beliefs and barriers to accessing mental health services in youth aging out of foster care.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Christina; Mackie, Thomas I; Shetgiri, Rashmi; Franzen, Sara; Partap, Anu; Flores, Glenn; Leslie, Laurel K

    2014-01-01

    To examine the perspectives of youth on factors that influence mental health service use after aging out of foster care. Focus groups were conducted with youth with a history of mental health needs and previous service use who had aged out of foster care. Questions were informed by the Health Belief Model and addressed 4 domains: youth perceptions of the "threat of mental health problems," treatment benefits versus barriers to accessing mental health services, self-efficacy, and "cues to action." Data were analyzed using a modified grounded-theory approach. Youth (N = 28) reported ongoing mental health problems affecting their functioning; however, they articulated variable levels of reliance on formal mental health treatment versus their own ability to resolve these problems without treatment. Past mental health service experiences influenced whether youth viewed treatment options as beneficial. Youth identified limited self-efficacy and insufficient psychosocial supports "cueing action" during their transition out of foster care. Barriers to accessing mental health services included difficulties obtaining health insurance, finding a mental health provider, scheduling appointments, and transportation. Youths' perceptions of their mental health needs, self-efficacy, psychosocial supports during transition, and access barriers influence mental health service use after aging out of foster care. Results suggest that strategies are needed to 1) help youth and clinicians negotiate shared understanding of mental health treatment needs and options, 2) incorporate mental health into transition planning, and 3) address insurance and other systemic barriers to accessing mental health services after aging out of foster care. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mental health in Tamil cinema.

    PubMed

    Mangala, R; Thara, R

    2009-06-01

    Tamil cinema is a vibrant part of the lives of many in south India. A chequered history and a phenomenal growth have made this medium highly influential not only in Tamil Nadu politics, but also in the social lives of the viewers. This paper provides an overview of the growth of Tamil cinema, and discusses in detail the way mental health has been handled by Tamil films. Cinema can be used very effectively to improve awareness about mental health issues.

  5. Mental Health: What's Normal, What's Not?

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is a guide published by the American Psychiatric ... mental health conditions. Mental health providers use the DSM to diagnose everything from anorexia to voyeurism and, ...

  6. No Mental Health without Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The poor physical health faced by people with mental illness has been the subject of growing attention, but there has been less focus on the issue of oral health even though it is an important part of physical health. This article discusses the two-way association between oral and mental health. In one direction, the prospect of dental treatment can lead to anxiety and phobia. In the other, many psychiatric disorders, such as severe mental illness, affective disorders, and eating disorders, are associated with dental disease: These include erosion, caries, and periodontitis. Left untreated, dental diseases can lead to teeth loss such that people with severe mental illness have 2.7 times the likelihood of losing all their teeth, compared with the general population. Possible interventions include oral health assessments using standard checklists that can be completed by nondental personnel, help with oral hygiene, management of iatrogenic dry mouth, and early dental referral. PMID:27254802

  7. Medicalization of global health 2: the medicalization of global mental health.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jocalyn

    2014-12-01

    Once an orphan field, 'global mental health' now has wide acknowledgement and prominence on the global health agenda. Increased recognition draws needed attention to individual suffering and the population impacts, but medicalizing global mental health produces a narrow view of the problems and solutions. Early framing by advocates of the global mental health problem emphasised biological disease, linked psychiatry with neurology, and reinforced categories of mental health disorders. Universality of biomedical concepts across culture is assumed in the globalisation of mental health but is strongly disputed by transcultural psychiatrists and anthropologists. Global mental health movement priorities take an individualised view, emphasising treatment and scale-up and neglecting social and structural determinants of health. To meet international targets and address the problem's broad social and cultural dimensions, the global mental health movement and advocates must develop more comprehensive strategies and include more diverse perspectives.

  8. Medicalization of global health 2: The medicalization of global mental health.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jocalyn

    2014-01-01

    Once an orphan field, 'global mental health' now has wide acknowledgement and prominence on the global health agenda. Increased recognition draws needed attention to individual suffering and the population impacts, but medicalizing global mental health produces a narrow view of the problems and solutions. Early framing by advocates of the global mental health problem emphasised biological disease, linked psychiatry with neurology, and reinforced categories of mental health disorders. Universality of biomedical concepts across culture is assumed in the globalisation of mental health but is strongly disputed by transcultural psychiatrists and anthropologists. Global mental health movement priorities take an individualised view, emphasising treatment and scale-up and neglecting social and structural determinants of health. To meet international targets and address the problem's broad social and cultural dimensions, the global mental health movement and advocates must develop more comprehensive strategies and include more diverse perspectives.

  9. Malaysia mental health country profile.

    PubMed

    Parameshvara Deva, M

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be

  10. Smoking, Mental Illness, and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Judith J; Das, Smita; Young-Wolff, Kelly C

    2016-12-16

    Tobacco remains the leading preventable cause of death worldwide. In particular, people with mental illness are disproportionately affected with high smoking prevalence; they account for more than 200,000 of the 520,000 tobacco-attributable deaths in the United States annually and die on average 25 years prematurely. Our review aims to provide an update on smoking in the mentally ill. We review the determinants of tobacco use among smokers with mental illness, presented with regard to the public health HAVE framework of "the host" (e.g., tobacco user characteristics), the "agent" (e.g., nicotine product characteristics), the "vector" (e.g., tobacco industry), and the "environment" (e.g., smoking policies). Furthermore, we identify the significant health harms incurred and opportunities for prevention and intervention within a health care systems and larger health policy perspective. A comprehensive effort is warranted to achieve equity toward the 2025 Healthy People goal of reducing US adult tobacco use to 12%, with attention to all subgroups, including smokers with mental illness. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Public Health Volume 38 is March 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  11. Integrating mental health and social development in theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Plagerson, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    In many low and middle income countries, attention to mental illness remains compartmentalized and consigned as a matter for specialist policy. Despite great advances in global mental health, mental health policy and practice dovetail only to a limited degree with social development efforts. They often lag behind broader approaches to health and development. This gap ignores the small but growing evidence that social development unavoidably impacts the mental health of those affected, and that this influence can be both positive and negative. This article examines the theoretical and practical challenges that need to be overcome for a more effective integration of social development and mental health policy. From a theoretical perspective, this article demonstrates compatibility between social development and mental health paradigms. In particular, the capability approach is shown to provide a strong framework for integrating mental health and development. Yet, capability-oriented critiques on 'happiness' have recently been applied to mental health with potentially detrimental outcomes. With regard to policy and practice, horizontal and vertical integration strategies are suggested. Horizontal strategies require stronger devolution of mental health care to the primary care level, more unified messages regarding mental health care provision and the gradual expansion of mental health packages of care. Vertical integration refers to the alignment of mental health with related policy domains (particularly the social, economic and political domains). Evidence from mental health research reinforces aspects of social development theory in a way that can have tangible implications on practice. First, it encourages a focus on avoiding exclusion of those affected by or at risk of mental illness. Secondly, it underscores the importance of the process of implementation as an integral component of successful policies. Finally, by retaining a focus on the individual, it seeks to

  12. Mental health aspects of disasters.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Disaster preparations and responses are incomplete without addressing the mental health aspects of disasters. Unpleasant mental states can be a natural and even adaptive human response following a disaster; however, disasters also can contribute to the development of mental illnesses and substance use disorders or exacerbate existing disorders for disaster survivors, response personnel, and even families and close contacts of survivors and responders. Disaster-related psychopathology can mimic or negatively affect other disaster-related illnesses and can impair health professionals and others who must respond to catastrophic events; however, disasters also can encourage tremendous human coping, perseverance, and resilience and can even enhance personal and collective feelings of purpose, connection, and meaning. Integrating mental health promotion and care into disaster planning and response has the potential to mitigate psychiatric and medical consequences of a disaster and may preserve the mission readiness of disaster response personnel and promote healing among communities traumatized by disaster.

  13. Seclusion experienced by mental health professionals.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, L; Makkonen, P; Lehtila, H; Salminen, H

    2015-06-01

    Seclusion in psychiatric inpatient care means confining service users in a locked room. Service users and staff seem to have different opinions on the usefulness of seclusion. This is possibly the first time when two mental health nurses went voluntarily into seclusion and reported their experiences. The nurses felt that the seclusion room was inhumane and proposed improvements to seclusion in general and to the seclusion facilities in particular. Seclusion in psychiatric hospital care refers to isolating a service user from other service users and staff, most often in a locked and unfurnished room. Service users' experiences of seclusion are mostly negative, and although some have seen a rationale for its use, mental health nurses should be encouraged to evaluate current seclusion practices from the service user's perspective. In this small-scale experiment, two mental health nurses were voluntarily secluded for 24 h. The aim was to explore the experience of being secluded, to understand and evaluate the impact of seclusion in greater detail, and to encourage discussion on one of the controversies in mental health nursing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate the impact of seclusion based on mental health nurses' firsthand experiences. The nurses received usual seclusion treatment and described their experiences of this every 6 h. Based on the nurses' experiences, seclusion, even in voluntary, safe and planned circumstances, may increase anxiety and frustration. Seclusion was viewed negatively and the physical environment was considered inhumane. The nurses offered some practical suggestions for updating seclusion practices and re-designing seclusion facilities. Mental health nurses, who frequently decide on and invariably implement seclusion, are key to improving seclusion practices. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Me and Thee. Symposium: Some Perspectives on Working with the Disadvantaged in an Urban Mental Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Don

    This paper first presents a historical perspective of the disadvantaged minority, using black people as an example. The following section presents a clinical perspective of the psycho-social characteristics of this group. These characteristics are laden with some accuracies and many fallacies: (1) the fallacy of wisdom belonging to whites; (2) the…

  15. The Nevada mental health courts.

    PubMed

    Palermo, George B

    2010-01-01

    The deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill which started in the 1960s greatly contributed to the overcrowding of judicial systems throughout the world. In the ensuing years, the actors involved in the adversarial system present in United States courts, a system that is primarily interested in assessing the culpability of the offender, have come to realize that the system is lacking therapeutic and reintegrative approaches to offenders, especially those who are mentally ill. Therapeutic jurisprudence, an interdisciplinary science, addresses this problematic situation of the mentally ill. It offers a fresh insight into the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of legal decisions and views one of the roles of law as that of a healing agent. At present, many states have instituted mental health courts based on these concepts, incorporating previous drug court experiences. Their goal is to avoid the criminalization of the mentally ill and their recidivism through the creation of special programs. This article describes the mental health court programs of Washoe County and Clark County, Nevada, their organization, their therapeutic goals, and their success in keeping mentally ill offenders out of the correctional system, while improving their mental condition. In so doing, the program has lightened the load of the overburdened courts and has greatly diminished the financial burden incurred for court trials and jail and prison stays.

  16. Discrimination, poor mental health, and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2016-08-01

    Discrimination is a major public health issue. Discrimination is known and well recognized to be associated with poor physical and mental health, as well as creating social divisions and fear that undermines the success of society and economic progress. Policies to eradicate discrimination and prejudice in the public sphere, and in public life, need thoughtful and careful planning and engagement by all public institutions and in the way they conduct their business. This forms the basis of social justice. Employers, politicians, and public servants, as well as other stakeholders, irrespective of their professional status, all have ethical responsibilities to uphold such actions and policies, values, and supporting behaviours, as a core principle of successful societies.

  17. Understanding the unconscious mind: Jungian psychology and mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alan; Cross, Wendy

    2014-04-01

    How might the unconscious part of the mind affect mental health patients' emotions or behaviour? How might the unconscious motivations of mental health nurses affect their patients? The discovery of "the unconscious" two centuries ago has allowed philosophers and scientists, such as C. G. Jung, to explore the field. Contemporary mental health care subscribes to a dominance of neurobiological approaches, neglecting the unconscious or relegating it to that of a merely biological process. Approaching this subject from the perspective of Jung, we make a case for the inclusion of theoretical concepts about the unconscious in the discourse of mental health nursing. Such awareness may help mental health nurses to better understand the mental disease, disorder, and distress found in patients. It also may help them understand their own conflicts and motivations that, in turn, can have an affect on their patients.

  18. Immigrant and refugee health: mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Rew, Karl T; Clarke, S Lindsey; Gossa, Weyinshet; Savin, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Immigrants leave their homes for unfamiliar destinations in search of better lives for themselves and their families. Many immigrants experience profound loss and emotional distress as they adjust to life in different societies. Despite these challenges, the prevalence of mental health conditions among immigrants is low, whereas children of immigrants have rates equal to those of native populations. The prevalence of mental health conditions is high among refugees, who comprise a specific subgroup of immigrants who have been displaced forcibly and often have experienced severe trauma. Cultural factors, such as stigma and somatization of emotional symptoms, make it less likely that immigrants and refugees from certain groups will ever present to mental health subspecialists. Strong therapeutic relationships, cultural sensitivity, involvement of family members, judicious use of medications, and knowledge of available community resources are important tools that can aid clinicians who treat immigrants and refugees with mental health conditions.

  19. Mental health emergencies.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Anita

    I gained experience of psychiatric assessment in previous roles when working in a secure psychiatric ward and within the prison service. Although I have often performed mental state assessments and assessments of suicidal intent as part of my work, I read the CPD article to refresh my knowledge in this area.

  20. Medicalization of global health 2: the medicalization of global mental health

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jocalyn

    2014-01-01

    Once an orphan field, ‘global mental health’ now has wide acknowledgement and prominence on the global health agenda. Increased recognition draws needed attention to individual suffering and the population impacts, but medicalizing global mental health produces a narrow view of the problems and solutions. Early framing by advocates of the global mental health problem emphasised biological disease, linked psychiatry with neurology, and reinforced categories of mental health disorders. Universality of biomedical concepts across culture is assumed in the globalisation of mental health but is strongly disputed by transcultural psychiatrists and anthropologists. Global mental health movement priorities take an individualised view, emphasising treatment and scale-up and neglecting social and structural determinants of health. To meet international targets and address the problem's broad social and cultural dimensions, the global mental health movement and advocates must develop more comprehensive strategies and include more diverse perspectives. PMID:24848660

  1. Urban mental health services in India : how complete or incomplete?

    PubMed

    Desai, Nimesh G; Tiwari, S C; Nambi, S; Shah, Bela; Singh, R A; Kumar, Deepak; Trivedi, J K; Palaniappan, V; Tripathi, Animesh; Pali, Chitra; Pal, Neeraj; Maurya, Amit; Mathew, Miriam

    2004-07-01

    The information about Urban Mental Health Services has been nearly nonexistent in India, although the developed countries have been focusing on programmes for "Healthy Cities". The initiative taken as part of the WHO-ICMR Pilot Project on Urban Mental Health Services, with a public health perspective is being shared. The objectives of the Health Services Research (HSR) Arm of the project were to study the distribution and the availability of tertiary Mental Health Services, availability of human resources, average service load, mental health service gap, and perceptions of the users and the service providers, regarding the barriers in accessibility of mental health services, unmet service needs and strategies for improvement.The Research Methods involved Mapping Exercises with estimation of Service Loads and Qualitative Research Methods (QRM) like In-Depth Interviews (IDIs), Key Informant Interviews (KIIs), Free Listing and Focused Group Discussions (FGDs). The results indicate uneven availability of mental health services, human resource deficit specially for non-medical mental health professionals and mental health service gap (82% to96%). The average service load in the specialist mental health services is largely carried by the Govt. sector (half to two thirds), followed by the private sector (one third to half), with only a small portion by the NGO sector. The average mental health service load in the primary care general health services is largely carried by the private sector, with significant contribution from the non-formal service providers. The barriers to access, unmet needs and possible strategies as perceived by the community, users and service providers have been identified. The findings are discussed in the context of the mental health programmes and the public policy issues. The implications of the conclusions which suggest that Urban Mental Health Services are far from complete are highlighted.

  2. Gender-sensitive mental health care.

    PubMed

    Judd, Fiona; Armstrong, Sue; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine aspects of mental health and mental health care through a gender lens. Gender differences have an impact on mental health and the experience and course of women's mental illness. Comprehensive gender-sensitive mental health care requires the planning, delivery, monitoring and quality improvement initiatives of mental health care to be informed by a knowledge and understanding of gender differences in women and men and their inter-relationship with respect to childhood and adult life experiences (e.g. violence and abuse); day-to-day social, cultural, and family realities; expression and experience of mental ill health and treatment needs and responses.

  3. Bridging two worlds: Māori mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Denise; Baker, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Building an Indigenous mental health workforce is a strategy used to develop culturally responsive and effective mental health services in New Zealand. However, researchers know little about Indigenous (Māori) mental health nursing. We undertook a Māori-centered methodology and grounded theory using focus groups to collect data from 10 Māori mental health nurses. We then analyzed the data using constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling until saturation of the core category and subcategories emerged. "Bridging two worlds," together with two subcategories, "going beyond" and "practicing differently," explains the process Māori mental health nurses used to resolve the tensions they encountered working in the worlds of mainstream and Māori health services. This research provides insight into the tensions Indigenous and minority nurses experience when attempting to integrate cultural perspectives and practices to meet the needs of their patients.

  4. Participation in planning and evaluating mental health services: building capacity.

    PubMed

    Restall, Gayle; Strutt, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    The participation of people who use mental health services in service planning and evaluation has become increasingly important in recent years. Health planners and people who use services are seeking information about how to enable participation that is meaningful and impacts positively on service delivery. This qualitative study explored the perspectives of people who use mental health services on participation in mental health service planning and evaluation. Sixty-three people from diverse backgrounds participated in either a focus group or interview. Themes were extracted from the data and resulted in a conceptual framework that can be used to guide the development and evaluation of participation.

  5. The Mental Health Status of California Veterans.

    PubMed

    Tran, Linda Diem; Grant, David; Aydin, May

    2016-04-01

    Data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) from 2011--2013 showed approximately 90,000 veterans had mental health needs and 200,000 reported serious thoughts of suicide during the 12 months prior to participating in CHIS. Although the proportion of veterans reporting mental health need or serious psychological distress was no higher than the general population, California veterans were more likely to report lifetime suicide ideation. This policy brief uses CHIS data to examine the mental health status, needs, and barriers to care among veterans in California. Veterans were more likely to receive mental health or substance use treatment than nonveterans, yet three of four veterans with mental health needs received either inadequate or no mental health care. Integrating mental and physical health services, increasing access to care, retaining veterans who seek mental health treatment, and reducing stigma are among the strategies that might improve the mental health of California's veterans.

  6. European comparisons between mental health services.

    PubMed

    Wahlbeck, K

    2011-03-01

    When developing accessible, affordable and effective mental health systems, exchange of data between countries is an important moving force towards better mental health care. Unfortunately, health information systems in most countries are weak in the field of mental health, and comparability of data is low. Special international data collection exercises, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) Atlas Project and the WHO Baseline Project have provided valuable insights in the state of mental health systems in countries, but such single-standing data collections are not sustainable solutions. Improvements in routine data collection are urgently needed. The European Commission has initiated major improvements to ensure harmonized and comprehensive health data collection, by introducing the European Community Health Indicators set and the European Health Interview Survey. However, both of these initiatives lack strength in the field of mental health. The neglect of the need for relevant and valid comparable data on mental health systems is in conflict with the importance of mental health for European countries and the objectives of the 'Europe 2020' strategy. The need for valid and comparable mental health services data is today addressed only by single initiatives, such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development work to establish quality indicators for mental health care. Real leadership in developing harmonized mental health data across Europe is lacking. A European Mental Health Observatory is urgently needed to lead development and implementation of monitoring of mental health and mental health service provision in Europe.

  7. Making mental health a priority in Belize.

    PubMed

    Killion, Cheryl; Cayetano, Claudina

    2009-04-01

    Belize, Central America, the most sparsely populated country in Central America, has taken gigantic steps to improve the mental health of its citizens. This article profiles mental health in this country and explicates contextual factors circumscribing manifestations, treatment, and care of mental illness. An overview of mental health services is provided, with particular focus on the role of psychiatric nurse practitioners. Other innovative approaches in promoting mental health and providing care to the those who are mentally ill are highlighted. Current and future challenges for nursing care and mental health services are presented. Recommendations for future action are offered.

  8. Autism and mental health: your guide to today's mental health issues.

    PubMed

    Gould, Judith

    Autism is not a mental health disorder, but it sometimes is misdiagnosed as one--and can bring its own mental health issues. Dr Judith Gould explains how a mental health problem may mask an undiagnosed autistic spectrum disorder.

  9. [Expanding the boundaries of clinics. Development of a community mental health program for children and teenagers from a rights perspective in the City of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Barcala, Alejandra; Torricelli, Flavia

    2013-01-01

    There are forms of severe suffering in contemporary life that are not accommodated within the mechanisms offered by the mental health care system or that are not described on diagnostics handbooks, which need an appropriate response. This paper deals with the development of a community mental health program that provided care to children and teenagers with severe mental disorders and with a significant subjective suffering in the City of Buenos Aires from 2006 until the beginning of 2012. Pursuant to international standards in force in terms of mental health and human rights, this community, collective and territorial mental health practice suggested an inter-discipline and cross-sector approach that took into consideration the multi-dimension of social health determiners to provide comprehensive care. In order to offer a reply to fragmentation and the repeated traumas to which a large number of these children and teenagers have been exposed to, the program designed individual clinical-community strategies for each child or teenager, based on a network of continuous and reliable institutional supports. Conceived from a psychoanalytical approach, this praxis intended to benefit subjectification processes and the building of social bonds aiming at preventing the growing trends of administering medication and admitting children and teenagers as patients in mental health facilities.

  10. Medicines management in mental health.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Austyn; Barron, Derek

    This article provides evidence to suggest that mental health nurses may not be as competent in medicines management as they believe themselves to be. A psychological model of skills awareness is used throughout the article to offer a theoretical explanation of this putative deficit and provide discussion of the possible causes. Training directed towards improving medicines management skills will be introduced. Training such as this is essential if mental health nurses are to offer the best care to those in receipt of their services and make best use of the opportunities provided by prescribing legislation.

  11. Mental Health and Social Networks After Disaster.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Gallagher, H Colin; Gibbs, Lisa; Pattison, Philippa; MacDougall, Colin; Harms, Louise; Block, Karen; Baker, Elyse; Sinnott, Vikki; Ireton, Greg; Richardson, John; Forbes, David; Lusher, Dean

    2017-03-01

    Although disasters are a major cause of mental health problems and typically affect large numbers of people and communities, little is known about how social structures affect mental health after a disaster. The authors assessed the extent to which mental health outcomes after disaster are associated with social network structures. In a community-based cohort study of survivors of a major bushfire disaster, participants (N=558) were assessed for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and probable depression. Social networks were assessed by asking participants to nominate people with whom they felt personally close. These nominations were used to construct a social network map that showed each participant's ties to other participants they nominated and also to other participants who nominated them. This map was then analyzed for prevailing patterns of mental health outcomes. Depression risk was higher for participants who reported fewer social connections, were connected to other depressed people, or were connected to people who had left their community. PTSD risk was higher if fewer people reported being connected with the participant, if those who felt close to the participant had higher levels of property loss, or if the participant was linked to others who were themselves not interconnected. Interestingly, being connected to other people who in turn were reciprocally close to each other was associated with a lower risk of PTSD. These findings provide the first evidence of disorder-specific patterns in relation to one's social connections after disaster. Depression appears to co-occur in linked individuals, whereas PTSD risk is increased with social fragmentation. These patterns underscore the need to adopt a sociocentric perspective of postdisaster mental health in order to better understand the potential for societal interventions in the wake of disaster.

  12. Promotion of Wellness and Mental Health Awareness Among Physicians in Training: Perspective of a National, Multispecialty Panel of Residents and Fellows.

    PubMed

    Daskivich, Timothy J; Jardine, Dinchen A; Tseng, Jennifer; Correa, Ricardo; Stagg, Brian C; Jacob, Kristin M; Harwood, Jared L

    2015-03-01

    Physicians in training are at high risk for depression, and physicians in practice have a substantially elevated risk of suicide compared to the general population. The graduate medical education community is currently mobilizing efforts to improve resident wellness. We sought to provide a trainee perspective on current resources to support resident wellness and resources that need to be developed to ensure an optimal learning environment. The ACGME Council of Review Committee Residents, a 29-member multispecialty group of residents and fellows, conducted an appreciative inquiry exercise to (1) identify existing resources to address resident wellness; (2) envision the ideal learning environment to promote wellness; and (3) determine how the existing infrastructure could be modified to approach the ideal. The information was aggregated to identify consensus themes from group discussion. National policy on resident wellness should (1) increase awareness of the stress of residency and destigmatize depression in trainees; (2) develop systems to identify and treat depression in trainees in a confidential way to reduce barriers to accessing help; (3) enhance mentoring by senior peers and faculty; (4) promote a supportive culture; and (5) encourage additional study of the problem to deepen our understanding of the issue. A multispecialty, national panel of trainees identified actionable goals to broaden efforts in programs and sponsoring institutions to promote resident wellness and mental health awareness. Engagement of all stakeholders within the graduate medical education community will be critical to developing a comprehensive solution to this important issue.

  13. [Narratives in the study of mental health care practices: contributions of the perspectives of Paul Ricoeur, Walter Benjamin and of medical anthropology].

    PubMed

    Onocko-Campos, Rosana Teresa; Palombini, Analice de Lima; Leal, Erotildes; de Serpa, Octavio Domont; Baccari, Ivana Oliveira Preto; Ferrer, Ana Luiza; Diaz, Alberto Giovanello; Xavier, Maria Angélica Zamora

    2013-10-01

    Narratives are ever more frequent in qualitative studies seeking to interpret experiences and the different viewpoints of individuals in a given context. Starting from this concept, the tradition that addresses narrative is reexamined, including the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur, the historical perspective of Walter Benjamin and the field of medical anthropology grounded in phenomenology. In Ricoeur, with hermeneutics as a variation derived from phenomenology, narrative is linked to temporality. In Benjamin, narrative comprised of bits and pieces, always inconclusive, emerges in spite of the official stories. If Ricoeur retrieves tradition from Gadamer as a fundamental component for the construction of the world of a text that makes imitation of life possible, Benjamin, faced with the collapse of tradition, suggests the invention of narrative forms outside the traditional canons, making it possible to hark to the past in order to change the present. Assumptions of medical anthropology are also presented, as they consider narrative a dimension of life and not its abstraction, namely an embodied and situated narrative. Lastly, three distinct research projects in mental health that use narrative linked to the theoretical concepts cited with their differences and similarities are presented.

  14. Disparities in mental health care provision to immigrants with severe mental illness in Italy.

    PubMed

    Rucci, P; Piazza, A; Perrone, E; Tarricone, I; Maisto, R; Donegani, I; Spigonardo, V; Berardi, D; Fantini, M P; Fioritti, A

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether disparities exist in mental health care provision to immigrants and Italian citizens with severe mental illness in Bologna, Italy. Records of prevalent cases on 31/12/2010 with severe mental illness and ≥1 contact with Community Mental Health Centers in 2011 were extracted from the mental health information system. Logistic and Poisson regressions were carried out to estimate the probability of receiving rehabilitation, residential or inpatient care, the intensity of outpatient treatments and the duration of hospitalisations and residential care for immigrant patients compared to Italians, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. The study population included 8602 Italian and 388 immigrant patients. Immigrants were significantly younger, more likely to be married and living with people other than their original family and had a shorter duration of contact with mental health services. The percentages of patients receiving psychosocial rehabilitation, admitted to hospital wards or to residential facilities were similar between Italians and immigrants. The number of interventions was higher for Italians. Admissions to acute wards or residential facilities were significantly longer for Italians. Moreover, immigrants received significantly more group rehabilitation interventions, while more social support individual interventions were provided to Italians. The probability of receiving any mental health intervention is similar between immigrants and Italians, but the number of interventions and the duration of admissions are lower for immigrants. Data from mental health information system should be integrated with qualitative data on unmet needs from the immigrants' perspective to inform mental health care programmes and policies.

  15. Mental Health. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This comprehensive course from the Practical Nursing series of competency-based curricula is designed to prepare students for employment by systematically guiding the students' learning activities from the simple to the complex. These materials prepare health care practitioners to function effectively in the rapidly changing health care industry.…

  16. Mental health and itch in burns patients: Potential associations.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Sarah; Burrows, Sally; Ashoorian, Tanya; Pallathil, Trisha; Ong, Katherine; Edgar, Dale W; Wood, Fiona

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mental health and self-reported itch in patients with burns across a 6 month time period and to test the hypothesis that poorer mental health outcomes are associated with increased severity of itch. A quantitative study with three time points for data collection was conducted. Participants (232) completed assessments at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after burn injury. The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to report itch and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) provided an assessment of mental health across time. Only data from the itch and mental health subscales were used in the analysis. To analyze the data a quantile regression model was used. Mental health is significantly associated with itch after adjusting for variation in itch over time (p=0.001). The regression coefficient indicates that as mental health increases by one unit, itch decreases by 0.03. Of importance, the relationship remained significant after adjusting for total burn surface area (p<0.001). These findings suggest there is a relationship between mental health and itch. Given the powerful impact itch can have on an individual's wellbeing health professionals can begin to further investigate itch from a bio-psychosocial perspective. Further research to investigate causal relationships between mental health and itch is important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Mental health nurses' attitudes towards severe perinatal mental illness.

    PubMed

    McConachie, Susan; Whitford, Heather

    2009-04-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the experiences and attitudes of generic mental health nurses towards care of women with severe mental illness during the perinatal period. Severe mental disorder in the perinatal period is a global public health concern. However, there are concerns that mental health nurses other than dedicated perinatal mental health teams may lack knowledge, skills and experience in caring for such disorders, because of their low prevalence. Sixteen generic Registered Mental Nurses working in public adult mental health services participated in three focus groups during 2007. Participants did not perceive any difference between symptoms during perinatal and non-perinatal periods. There were mixed attitudes towards caring for women with severe mental illness in the perinatal period. Fear and anxiety was expressed by the nurses when caring or feeling responsible for the babies of clients. Lack of communication between professional groups and decreased clinical decision-making following the introduction of the Edinburgh Post Natal Depression Scale caused frustration. Confidence was displayed when working with known and trusted colleagues. Generic mental health nurses would benefit from more education on perinatal mental health and there may be a need for them to be supported by specialist perinatal mental health practitioners.

  18. Women and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment from a health professional. Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment of Depression This video describes the causes, symptoms, and treatments of depression. Eating Disorders Myths Busted These series of videos ...

  19. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and treatment issues. Recovery from depression takes time, but treatment can improve the quality of life even if you have a medical illness. Treatments for depression include: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or talk therapy, ...

  20. Managing risk: clinical decision-making in mental health services.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Gerace, Adam; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Debra; Barkway, Patricia; Curren, David; Oster, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment and management is a major component of contemporary mental health practice. Risk assessment in health care exists within contemporary perspectives of management and risk aversive practices in health care. This has led to much discussion about the best approach to assessing possible risks posed by people with mental health problems. In addition, researchers and commentators have expressed concern that clinical practice is being dominated by managerial models of risk management at the expense of meeting the patient's health and social care needs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the risk assessment practices of a multidisciplinary mental health service. Findings indicate that mental health professionals draw on both managerial and therapeutic approaches to risk management, integrating these approaches into their clinical practice. Rather than being dominated by managerial concerns regarding risk, the participants demonstrate professional autonomy and concern for the needs of their clients.

  1. Effects of Mental Health Benefits Legislation

    PubMed Central

    Sipe, Theresa Ann; Finnie, Ramona K.C.; Knopf, John A.; Qu, Shuli; Reynolds, Jeffrey A.; Thota, Anilkrishna B.; Hahn, Robert A.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Hennessy, Kevin D.; McKnight-Eily, Lela R.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Anderson, Clinton W.; Azrin, Susan; Abraido-Lanza, Ana F.; Gelenberg, Alan J.; Vernon-Smiley, Mary E.; Nease, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Context Health insurance benefits for mental health services typically have paid less than benefits for physical health services, resulting in potential underutilization or financial burden for people with mental health conditions. Mental health benefits legislation was introduced to improve financial protection (i.e., decrease financial burden) and to increase access to, and use of, mental health services. This systematic review was conducted to determine the effectiveness of mental health benefits legislation, including executive orders, in improving mental health. Evidence acquisition Methods developed for the Guide to Community Preventive Services were used to identify, evaluate, and analyze available evidence. The evidence included studies published or reported from 1965 to March 2011 with at least one of the following outcomes: access to care, financial protection, appropriate utilization, quality of care, diagnosis of mental illness, morbidity and mortality, and quality of life. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Evidence synthesis Thirty eligible studies were identified in 37 papers. Implementation of mental health benefits legislation was associated with financial protection (decreased out-of-pocket costs) and appropriate utilization of services. Among studies examining the impact of legislation strength, most found larger positive effects for comprehensive parity legislation or policies than for less-comprehensive ones. Few studies assessed other mental health outcomes. Conclusions Evidence indicates that mental health benefits legislation, particularly comprehensive parity legislation, is effective in improving financial protection and increasing appropriate utilization of mental health services for people with mental health conditions. Evidence is limited for other mental health outcomes. PMID:25998926

  2. [Mental health and women's work: images and representations of nurses].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Josicelia Dumêt; Ferreira, Silvia Lúcia; Albergaria, Aurenice Karine; da Conceição, Flávia Matos

    2002-01-01

    This investigation advances on the perspective of the construction of knowledge on the relation between mental health and nursing work. It is a descriptive study based on a qualitative approach and on the Social Representations Theory as well as studies on Psychopathology and Work Psychodynamics. The analysis indicated that nurses representations on the relation between mental health and nursing work are influenced by the individual and collective-organizational levels, showing these professionals as a product and producers of their personal history and of the mental health regarding the work environment, understanding them as a manifestation of the social totality.

  3. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Larson, Satu; Chapman, Susan; Spetz, Joanne; Brindis, Claire D

    2017-09-01

    Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) may be one strategy to decrease health disparities. Empirical studies between 2003 and 2013 of US pediatric populations and of US SBHCs were included if research was related to childhood trauma's effects, mental health care disparities, SBHC mental health services, or SBHC impact on academic achievement. Eight studies show a significant risk of mental health disorders and poor academic achievement when exposed to childhood trauma. Seven studies found significant disparities in pediatric mental health care in the US. Nine studies reviewed SBHC mental health service access, utilization, quality, funding, and impact on school achievement. Exposure to chronic childhood trauma negatively impacts school achievement when mediated by mental health disorders. Disparities are common in pediatric mental health care in the United States. SBHC mental health services have some showed evidence of their ability to reduce, though not eradicate, mental health care disparities. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  4. Proband Mental Health Difficulties and Parental Stress Predict Mental Health in Toddlers at High-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Crea, Katherine; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Hudry, Kristelle

    2016-10-01

    Family-related predictors of mental health problems were investigated among 30 toddlers at familial high-risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 28 controls followed from age 2- to 3-years. Parents completed the self-report Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and the parent-report Behavior Assessment System for Children. High-risk toddlers were assessed for ASD at 3-years. Parent stress and proband mental health difficulties predicted concurrent toddler mental health difficulties at 2-years, but only baseline proband internalising problems continued to predict toddler internalising problems at 3-years; high-risk status did not confer additional risk. Baseline toddler mental health difficulties robustly predicted later difficulties, while high-risk status and diagnostic outcome conferred no additional risk. A family systems perspective may be useful for understanding toddler mental health difficulties.

  5. Mental Health and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Henry C.

    1982-01-01

    Briefly reviews historical development of mental health and the law as a multidisciplinary field and considers variety of information seekers addressing certain topics of special importance. Pertinent information sources and services are outlined. Fifteen references and a recommended core library for fellowship programs in forensic psychiatry are…

  6. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    MedlinePlus

    ... degree in social work (M.S.W.); Licensed Clinical Social Workers (L.C.S.W.) have additional supervised training and clinical work experience. Licensed Professional Counselor: Master’s degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: ...

  7. Mental health care in Cambodia.

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, D. J.; van de Put, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization. PMID:10212521

  8. Poverty and Women's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the prevalence and rise of poverty in the United States, which is found particularly among women, children, and those from minority groups. Discusses the positive association between poverty and mental health problems. Describes the impact of poverty on women, and the need for research to discover the psychological impact of poverty. (JS)

  9. Toward Explaining Mental Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aneshensel, Carol S.

    2009-01-01

    Mental health disparities refer to the disproportionate amount of psychopathology found among persons of disadvantageous social standing, such as persons of low socioeconomic status (SES). Although social and self selection cannot entirely be ruled out as explanations for these differences, the accumulation of evidence supports a social causation…

  10. Barometer. Mental health January 2005.

    PubMed

    2005-02-24

    Mental health trust chief executives are increasingly confident about recruiting crisis resolution and early intervention teams, according to the new HSJ Barometer survey. However, very few expect to gain foundation status in the next two years. The survey also shows that bed occupancy rates are increasing, with about a fifth of trusts showing rates above 100 per cent.

  11. Learning disability and mental health.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-01

    Essential facts [Figure: see text] Learning disabilities affect about 1.5 million people in the UK. The prevalence of mental health problems is considerably higher for those with learning disabilities than for the general population; estimates suggest 30-50% of adults are affected.

  12. Ethnic Lifestyles and Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia-Weber, Gloria, Ed.

    This document presents two overview essays (one on the ethnic history of the United States and one on multicultural society) and seven articles on various aspects of the relationship between ethnic values and mental health. Articles were originally presented as papers at a series of seminars convened to encourage humanists from four ethnic groups…

  13. Media and mental health in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kigozi, F; Ssebunnya, J; Kizza, D; Ndyanabangi, S

    2010-05-01

    The media is largely regarded as an important stakeholder in health service delivery, with a great influence on public attitudes. However, little is known about its interest in mental health and the guiding factors that influence media coverage of mental health issues. This article describes the importance accorded to mental health by the media and the factors that influence media coverage of mental health issues in Uganda. Semi-structured interviews were held with representatives from six prominent media houses as part of the situational analysis of the mental health system in Uganda. Data was analyzed using Nvivo 7 qualitative data analysis software. The media was found to be interested and actively involved in health initiatives, but with little attention devoted to mental health. Coverage and interest in mental health was noted to be mainly dependent on the individual journalists' interests, and mostly for personal reasons. Low interest was largely attributed to mental health being perceived as a non-priority area, and the fact that mental illness is not a major contributor to mortality. Media coverage and reporting is guided by prioritization of the Health Department. The media in Uganda is an important stakeholder in the health care system with a key role of advocacy, publicity and mass education. Media houses however are less interested in mental health as evidenced by low coverage of mental health issues. This calls for advocacy and sensitization as a way of persuading media for more involvement in mental health initiatives.

  14. Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Decia Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

  15. European military mental health research: benefits of collaboration.

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Willmund, G D; Wesemann, U; Jones, N; Fear, N T

    2017-06-01

    Despite joint participation in international military operations, few collaborative military mental health research projects have been undertaken by European countries. From a common perspective of military mental health researchers from Germany and the UK, the lack of shared research might be related not only to the use of different languages but also the different ways in which the two militaries provide mental health and medical support to operations and differences in military institutions. One area that is suitable for military health research collaboration within UK and German forces is mental health and well-being among military personnel. This could include the study of resilience factors, the prevention of mental disorder, mental health awareness, stigma reduction and the treatment of mental disorder. Military mental health research topics, interests and the studies that have been conducted to date in the UK and Germany have considerable overlap and commonality of purpose. To undertake the investigation of the long-term consequences of operational deployment, the specific burdens placed on military families and to further the understanding of the role of factors such as biomarkers for use in military mental health research, it seems advisable to forge international research alliances across European nations, which would allow for researchers to draw transcultural and generalisable conclusions from their work. Such an enterprise is probably worthwhile given the shared research interests of Germany and the UK and the common perspectives on military mental health in particular. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Forest health from different perspectives

    Treesearch

    T. E. Kolb; M. R. Wagner; W. W. Covington

    1995-01-01

    Forest health is an increasingly important concept in natural resource management. However, definition of forest health is difficult and dependent on human perspective. From a utilitarian perspective, forest health has been defined by the production of forest conditions which directly satisfy human needs. From an ecosystem-centered perspective, forest health has been...

  17. Malayalam cinema and mental health.

    PubMed

    Menon, Koravangattu Valsraj; Ranjith, Gopinath

    2009-06-01

    There is a tradition of using films to teach various aspects of psychiatry and we feel that Malayalam cinema can also be used suitably to teach effectively. These films can be an invaluable resource in cultural competency training as they depict the effects of culture on psychopathology and cultural and regional influences on attitudes to mental illness and stigma. We also note that the portrayal is often far from reality but this is not a barrier for using the films as an effective alternative to traditional and didactic teaching methods. This method of teaching can stimulate interest and discussion and demystify the myths of novice students and others about mental health.

  18. Striving for better maternal mental health.

    PubMed

    Steen, Mary; Steen, Scott

    2014-03-01

    Mental health is an integral part of health and a state of wellbeing. The concept of 'parity of esteem' increases awareness that mental health needs to be treated as seriously as physical health. During the childbirth continuum, women and their partners can be at increased risk of mental health problems; therefore it is important to embrace the 'parity of esteem' concept. This article highlights links between mental and physical health problems and discusses the vital role that midwives can play in promoting better maternal mental health. It considers the challenges this can present to midwives and maternity services.

  19. Promoting Teen Mothers' Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Freed, Patricia; SmithBattle, Lee

    2016-01-01

    In this second article in a two-part series, we call for the integration of strengths-based and trauma-informed care into services for teen mothers. Nurses working with teen mothers in health clinics, schools and home visiting programs can play a pivotal role in promoting their mental health. Many teen mothers have high levels of psychological distress and histories of adverse experiences that cannot be ignored, and cannot solely be addressed by referral to mental health services. Nurses must be prepared to assess for trauma and be open to listening to teen mothers' experiences. Principles of strengths-based and trauma-informed care are complementary and can be integrated in clinical services so that teen mothers' distress is addressed and their strengths and aspirations are supported. Potential screening tools, interviewing skills and basic strategies to alleviate teen mothers' distress are discussed.

  20. [Conscience, psychic phenomenons and mental health.].

    PubMed

    Leduc, F

    1982-01-01

    The position of the mental health practitioner remains fundamentally uncomfortable confronted with a testimony of experienced facts which contredict or surpass our understanding of common sense. Neither scientific rationalism, institutional religion, orthodox freudian psychiatry, or orthodox behaviourism permits one to openly receive this type of experience without its being subject to excessive deformation by their analytical or reading-based framewords. Recent work in the psychology of consciousness, based on psychophysiological, neuro psychological and psychobiological approaches reconstitute the limits of ordinary consciousness and the consensual perception of sensory reality. They also identify the physiological substrata and the cognitive mechanisms which ally themselves to another, equally as valuable, apprehension of reality. According to this latter, psi phenomena become exceptional, but normal, experiences. It is a question from then on not to discredit but to recognize their place in personal experience, and to assist, if need be, their harmonization. Having said this, much remains to be done to soundly evaluate these experiences and to attempt to understand their real physical substrata. This does not negate the need for mental health professionals to have the courage not to abuse psychopathological frameworks or pharmacological treatment, and to give ourselves perspectives founded truly on human development and mental health.