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Sample records for mercuric chloride hgcl2

  1. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercuric chloride ( HgCl2 ) ; CASRN 7487 - 94 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  2. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  3. Effects of mercury chloride (HgCl2) on Betta splendens aggressive display.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Bruno de Matos; Cavalcante, Caio Neno Silva; dos Santos, Bruno Rodrigues; Gouveia Júnior, Amauri

    2012-03-01

    Mercury chloride (HgCl2) is a toxic mercury salt and a major pollutant, that can be found in soil, water and air, with influences on behavior, physiology and adaptation to the environment. In this study two experiments were designed to examine interactions and effects of HgCl2 on some behavioral patterns of Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens). In the first experiment we tested the effect of a progressive dose (five 0.04 mg) on aggressive display with exposure to a mirror, whereas in the second experiment we tested the effect of an acute dose (0.2 mg) on the aggressive display with exposure to a mirror. The experiments were performed on 5 consecutive sessions at intervals of 18 hours between sessions. Differences of performance were shown by subjects in the acute and progressive treatments when compared with a control treatment in the majority of behaviors evaluated, namely Floating, Slow Swimming, Wavy Swimming, Emerging, Bend, Square Move and Motor Display Components. Acute treatment was different from control only on Show Body, while the progressive group differed on Resting, Horizontal Display and Appropriate Display Components. Differences between Correlate Display Components and Total were also shown. Both the acute and progressive contamination with HgCl2 decrease the motor activity in the aggressive display, mirror-image test of Betta splendens, mainly on the progressive dose. This implies an impairment on feeding behavior, predator avoidance, reproductive behavior, mate choice and territoriality. These results suggest that in this fish species, the progressive dose has a greater effect on behavior in general and that both the acute and progressive contamination with mercury chloride affect many other aspects of behavior.

  4. Effects of mercury chloride (HgCl2) on Betta splendens aggressive display.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Bruno de Matos; Cavalcante, Caio Neno Silva; dos Santos, Bruno Rodrigues; Gouveia Júnior, Amauri

    2012-03-01

    Mercury chloride (HgCl2) is a toxic mercury salt and a major pollutant, that can be found in soil, water and air, with influences on behavior, physiology and adaptation to the environment. In this study two experiments were designed to examine interactions and effects of HgCl2 on some behavioral patterns of Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens). In the first experiment we tested the effect of a progressive dose (five 0.04 mg) on aggressive display with exposure to a mirror, whereas in the second experiment we tested the effect of an acute dose (0.2 mg) on the aggressive display with exposure to a mirror. The experiments were performed on 5 consecutive sessions at intervals of 18 hours between sessions. Differences of performance were shown by subjects in the acute and progressive treatments when compared with a control treatment in the majority of behaviors evaluated, namely Floating, Slow Swimming, Wavy Swimming, Emerging, Bend, Square Move and Motor Display Components. Acute treatment was different from control only on Show Body, while the progressive group differed on Resting, Horizontal Display and Appropriate Display Components. Differences between Correlate Display Components and Total were also shown. Both the acute and progressive contamination with HgCl2 decrease the motor activity in the aggressive display, mirror-image test of Betta splendens, mainly on the progressive dose. This implies an impairment on feeding behavior, predator avoidance, reproductive behavior, mate choice and territoriality. These results suggest that in this fish species, the progressive dose has a greater effect on behavior in general and that both the acute and progressive contamination with mercury chloride affect many other aspects of behavior. PMID:22379732

  5. The effects of mercuric chloride on calmodulin-mediated Ca sup 2+ transport in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, G.G.; Oelsner, D.; Anderson, C.R.; Pearce, C.J.; Wallin, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) inhibits in vitro vasopressin release from the isolated rat neurohypophysis with maximum inhibition occurring with 0.5 mM HgCl2. Associated with the inhibition of hormone release is an increase in 45Ca+2 uptake, an increase in cytosolic 45Ca+2, and a reduction of 45Ca+2 accumulation by mitochondria in the intact gland. In the present series of studies, the effect of HgCl2 on calmodulin (CM) function in neural tissue preparations is reported. Mercuric chloride (0.5 mM) reduced 45Ca+2 binding to CM purified from bovine neurohypophyses by 20% and inhibited endogenous CM-stimulated Ca,Mg-ATPase activity from rat brain mitochondria in a dose-dependent fashion. Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by 50 and 80% with 0.5 and 5.0 mM HgCl2, respectively. CM-stimulation of Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by calmidazolium (CMZ) with maximal inhibition seen with 0.1 mM CMZ. Reversibility of the HgCl2 interaction with CM was demonstrated using CM-stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDEase) activity from rat brain. HgCl2 inhibited both basal and CM-stimulated PDEase activity in a dose-dependent manner with maximum inhibition occurring with 1.0 mM HgCl2. Preexposure of CM to an inhibitory concentration (1.0 mM) of HgCl2 resulted in no loss of stimulatory PDEase enzyme activity. From these results, we conclude that HgCl2 reversibly interferes with 45Ca+2 binding to CM and also inhibits CM-regulated Ca+2 pumping enzyme systems in the neurohypophysis. The inhibition of vasopressin release from the intact gland in the presence of HgCl2 thus, may be associated with a disruption of calcium in the neurohypophysis.

  6. The effects of chronic mercuric chloride ingestion in female Sprague–Dawley rats on fertility and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Heath, J.C.; Abdelmageed, Y.; Braden, T.D.; Nichols, A.C.; Steffy, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-days-old female rats were chronically exposed, for 60 days, to 1or 2 mg/kg/day of mercuric chloride or an equivalent volume of water, via gavage. At 90 days of age they were mated with unexposed males. At approximately day 13 of gestation necropsies were performed on the females. Data were collected on the number of implantations and non-viable implantations in the uterus. No physical signs of Hg intoxication were seen except in weight gain. There were significantly fewer implantations in the high HgCl2 group, with significantly more non-viable implantations in the low and high HgCl2 groups, compared to controls. Lower levels of progesterone and higher levels of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) were found in the high HgCl2 group compared to controls, whereas pituitary follicle stimulating hormone levels (FSH), while not significant, showed a dose–response relationship to HgCl2 levels. No difference was found in the number of corpora lutea. The experiment indicated low level chronic ingestion of mercuric chloride, in female rats, while not effecting ovulation, produced disruption of implantation and fetal viability. Lower progesterone levels, higher LH, and possibly FSH levels, indicate that mercuric chloride may have a disruptive effect in the corpora lutea which manifests itself after ovulation. PMID:19371768

  7. Genotoxic potency of mercuric chloride in gill cells of marine gastropod Planaxis sulcatus using comet assay.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, J; Ingole, B S

    2015-07-01

    In vivo and in vitro exposures were used to investigate the genotoxicity of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) to the marine snail, Planaxis sulcatus. The comet assay protocol was validated on gill cells exposed in vitro to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 0-50 μM). Snails were exposed in vivo for 96 h to HgCl2 (10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/l). Our results showed significant concentration-dependent increase in the tail DNA (TDNA) and olive tail moment (OTM) in exposed snails for all doses compared with controls. In vitro exposure to HgCl2 (10-100 μg/l) resulted in significantly higher values for TDNA at all concentrations. Our results showed that DNA damage increased in the gill cell with increasing exposure time. This study demonstrates the usefulness of comet assay for detection of DNA damage after exposure to HgCl2 and the sensitivity of marine snail P. sulcatus as a good candidate species for metal pollution.

  8. Reproductivity of Japanese quail fed mercuric chloride in the absence of vitamin D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Soares, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was tested at 16 p.p.m. Hg for vitamin D sparing activity by presenting it dietarily in the presence and absence of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-HCC) to Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) for 25 days. No gross signs characteristic of mercury poisoning were observed, but some predictable effects of vitamin D deficiency on avian reproduction were manifested within 10 days. Rate of lay, egg shell thickness, and hatchability of fertile eggs decreased markedly for birds on vitamin D-deficient diets. Shell-less eggs were laid by these birds after 20 days and laying stopped entirely on the 23rd day. Laying resumed within 5 days after diets were refortified with 25-HCC. There was no detectable interaction between HgCl2 and vitamin D.

  9. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  10. Sexual maturation and productivity of Japanese quail fed graded concentrations of mercuric chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) were fed 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 p.p.m. Hg as mercuric chloride (HgCl2) from the time of hatching up to the age of 1 year. None of the birds manifested any gross signs of mercury poisioning. Food consumption, growth rate, and weight maintenance were unaffected. Initial oviposition tended to occur at a younger age as dietary mercuric chloride increased, e.g., the median age at which egg laying began among hens fed 32 p.p.m. Hg was 6 days younger than for controls. The average rate of egg production was positively related to the concentration of mercuric chloride with the most pronounced differences between treatments occurring among young (less than 9-week-old) hens. Beyond 9 weeks of age production was more uniform among the treatments, but even after 1 year hens on 32 p.p.m. Hg were laying an average of 13.5% more eggs than controls. Rate of egg fertilization was generally depressed for all Hg-treatments above 4 p.p.m. Hatchability of fertilized eggs and eggshell thickness appeared unaffected by mercuric chloride.

  11. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium study for removal of mercuric chloride by CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon sorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Liu, Zhouyang; Lee, Joo-Youp

    2013-05-15

    The intrinsic adsorption kinetics of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was studied for raw, 4% and 10% CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl2-AC) sorbents in a fixed-bed system. An HgCl2 adsorption kinetic model was developed for the AC sorbents by taking into account the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium, and internal and external mass transfer. The adsorption kinetic constants determined from the comparisons between the simulation and experimental results were 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5m(3)/(gs) for DARCO-HG, 4%(wt), and 10%(wt) CuCl2-AC sorbents, respectively, at 140 °C. CuCl2 loading was found to slightly increase the adsorption kinetic constant or at least not to decrease it. The HgCl2 equilibrium adsorption data based on the Langmuir isotherm show that high CuCl2 loading can result in high binding energy of the HgCl2 adsorption onto the carbon surface. The adsorption equilibrium constant was found to increase by ~10 times when CuCl2 loading varied from 0 to 10%(wt), which led to a decrease in the desorption kinetic constant (k2) by ~10 times and subsequently the desorption rate by ~50 times. Intraparticle pore diffusion considered in the model showed good accuracy, allowing for the determination of intrinsic HgCl2 adsorption kinetics.

  12. Technical note: Could benzalkonium chloride be a suitable alternative to mercuric chloride for preservation of seawater samples?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloël, J.; Robinson, C.; Tilstone, G. H.; Tarran, G.; Kaiser, J.

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental equipment unsuitable or unavailable for fieldwork as well as lack of ship space can necessitate the preservation of seawater samples prior to analysis in a shore-based laboratory. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is routinely used for such preservation, but its handling and subsequent disposal incur environmental risks and significant expense. There is therefore a strong motivation to find less hazardous alternatives. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has been used previously as microbial inhibitor for freshwater samples. Here, we assess the use of BAC for marine samples prior to the measurement of oxygen-to-argon (O2 / Ar) ratios, as used for the determination of biological net community production. BAC at a concentration of 50 mg dm-3 inhibited microbial activity for at least 3 days in samples tested with chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations up to 1 mg m-3. BAC concentrations of 100 and 200 mg dm-3 were no more effective than 50 mg dm-3. With fewer risks to human health and the environment, and no requirement for expensive waste disposal, BAC could be a viable alternative to HgCl2 for short-term preservation of seawater samples, but is not a replacement for HgCl2 in the case of oxygen triple isotope analysis, which requires storage over weeks to months. In any event, further tests on a case-by-case basis should be undertaken if use of BAC was considered, since its inhibitory activity may depend on concentration and composition of the microbial community.

  13. Technical Note: Could benzalkonium chloride be a suitable alternative to mercuric chloride for preservation of seawater samples?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloël, J.; Robinson, C.; Tilstone, G. H.; Tarran, G.; Kaiser, J.

    2015-08-01

    Instrumental equipment unsuitable or unavailable for fieldwork as well as lack of ship space can necessitate the preservation of seawater samples prior to analysis in a shore-based laboratory. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is routinely used for such preservation, but its handling and subsequent disposal incur significant risks and expense. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has been used previously for freshwater samples. Here, we assess BAC as a less hazardous alternative microbial inhibitor for marine samples prior to the measurement of oxygen-to-argon (O2/Ar) ratios, as used for the determination of plankton net community production. BAC at a concentration of 50 mg dm-3 inhibited microbial activity for at least three days in seawater with chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations up to 1 mg m-3, possibly longer when Chl a concentrations were lower. BAC concentrations of 100 and 200 mg dm-3 were no more effective than 50 mg dm-3. With fewer risks to human health and the environment, and no requirement for expensive waste disposal, BAC could be a viable alternative to HgCl2 for short-term preservation of seawater samples, but is not a replacement for HgCl2 in the case of oxygen triple isotope analysis, which requires storage over weeks to months. In any event, further tests on a case-by-case basis should be undertaken if use of BAC was considered, since its inhibitory activity may depend on concentration and composition of the microbial community.

  14. Effect of mercuric chloride feeding on sexual maturity, egg production and fertility in Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1973-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) were fed 0, 8, 16 or 32 p.p.m. of mercury as mercuric chloride from 3 days of age through 20 weeks of age. The onset of egg production generally occurred earlier for hens fed HgCl2. Average age in days at first oviposition for the control, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m. and 32 p.p.m. was 48.4, 50.9, 46.9 and 44.0 respectively. The average rate of egg productivity from first oviposition to attainment of full growth (9 weeks of age) correlated positively with in increased dietary mercury (controls, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m., 32 p.p.m. ? 75.2, 69.3, 86.1 and 93.3% respectively). By 20 weeks of age productivity was 81.0, 80.6, 87.5 and 92.9% for control, 8, 16 and 32 p.p.m. groups respectively. Fertility was depressed when hens were fed HgCl2. At 9 weeks of age average control fertility was 59% contrasted with 25% for the 32 p.p.m. group. At 12 weeks fertility increased to 89% and 57% for these groups. From this study it is apparent. that the onset and rate of egg production was stimulated by HgCl2, but fertility was adversely affected.

  15. Cytopathology induced by mercuric chloride and methylmercury in cultured renal cells of the Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella plagiodon).

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Pfeiffer, C J

    2001-01-01

    High mercury concentrations have been reported in various tissues of cetaceans, but the toxicological effects of mercury on cetaceans remain unclear. In vivo study is difficult due to the endangered status of these marine mammals and co-exposure to both mercury and selenium (antagonist of mercury) in the oceanic environment. The present data are the first ultrastructural information on dolphin renal cells exposed to mercury in vitro. Multiple organelle changes were observed in Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella plagiodon) renal cells treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) or methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl2). Mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticula were swollen after treatment with HgCl2 or MeHgCl. Mitochondrial dense bodies and small cytoplasmic spherical granules of high electron density were also observed after exposure to MeHgCl. Cytoplasmic vacuoles and myelin-like figures were induced by both HgCl2 and MeHgCl. Nuclear changes included karyolysis, nuclear buds, and a novel observation in mercury-treated cells, vacuolization of (micro-)nucleoli after treatment with HgCl2. These morphological changes (multiple organelle damage and nuclear budding) indicated mercury-treated dolphin renal cells underwent oncosis and necrosis, and supported earlier pathophysiologic findings of diverse toxic actions on genetic, respiratory and other cellular functions. PMID:11686411

  16. Determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury in mercury ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahey, J.J.

    1937-01-01

    A method for the determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury on the same sample is described. The mercury minerals are volatilized in a glass tube and brought into intimate contact with granulated sodium carbonate. The chlorine is fixed as sodium chloride, determined with silver nitrate, and computed to mercurous chloride. The mercury is collected on a previously weighed gold coil and weighed.

  17. Analytical interferences of mercuric chloride preservative in environmental water samples: Determination of organic compounds isolated by continuous liquid-liquid extraction or closed-loop stripping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, W.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Falres, L.M.; Werner, M.G.; Leiker, T.J.; Rogerson, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical interferences were observed during the determination of organic compounds in groundwater samples preserved with mercuric chloride. The nature of the interference was different depending on the analytical isolation technique employed. (1) Water samples extracted with dichloromethane by continuous liquid-liquid extraction (CLLE) and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed a broad HgCl2 'peak' eluting over a 3-5-min span which interfered with the determination of coeluting organic analytes. Substitution of CLLE for separatory funnel extraction in EPA method 508 also resulted in analytical interferences from the use of HgCl2 preservative. (2) Mercuric chloride was purged, along with organic contaminants, during closed-loop stripping (CLS) of groundwater samples and absorbed onto the activated charcoal trap. Competitive sorption of the HgCl2 by the trap appeared to contribute to the observed poor recoveries for spiked organic contaminants. The HgCl2 was not displaced from the charcoal with the dichloromethane elution solvent and required strong nitric acid to achieve rapid, complete displacement. Similar competitive sorption mechanisms might also occur in other purge and trap methods when this preservative is used.

  18. Processing of mercurous chloride in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C.; Singh, N. B.; Thomas, A.; Nelson, A. E.; Rolin, T. O.; Griffin, J.; Haulenbeek, G.; Daniel, N.; Seaquist, J.; Cacioppo, C.; Weber, Jerry; Zugrav, Maria I.; Naumann, R. J.

    1996-07-01

    In a joint experiment between the Northrop-Grumman Science and Technology Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Consortium for Materials Development in Space, single crystals of mercurous chloride were grown in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace that was flown on Spacehab 4 in May 1996. Mercurous chloride is an acousto-optical material with an unusually low acoustic velocity and high acousto-optical figure of merit. Single crystals of this material can be readily grown in normal gravity by closed-tube physical vapor transport, but the crystals generally contain structural inhomogeneities which degrade the optical performance. The nature and cause of these defects are not completely understood, but their degree appears to correlate with the Rayleigh number that characterizes the convective transport during their growth; hence, it is suspected that uncontrolled convection may play a role in the defect structure. The objective of the flight experiment was to reduce the convective flows by several orders of magnitude to see if the structural inhomogeneities can be reduced or eliminated. This paper will describe the physical and thermal properties of the SEF furnace, the ampule design and loading procedure, and the ground testing, and will also present the preliminary flight results.

  19. Processing of mercurous chloride in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C.; Singh, N. B.; Thomas, A.; Nelson, A. E.; Rolin, T. O.; Griffin, J.; Haulenbeek, G.; Daniel, N.; Seaquist, J.; Cacioppo, C.; Weber, Jerry; Zugrav, Maria I.; Naumann, R. J.

    1997-07-01

    Mercurous chloride is an acoustical optical material with an unusually low acoustic velocity and high acousto-optical figure of merit, which makes it an interesting candidate for optical delay lines and Bragg cells for optical signal processors. It also has a broad range of spectral transmissivity which makes it an ideal candidate for wide band acoustically tuned optical filter (ATOF) applications. Single crystals of this material can be readily grown in normal gravity by closed-tube physical vapor transport, but the crystals appear to contain structural inhomogeneities which degrade the optical performance. The nature of these defects is not known, but their degree appears to correlate with the Rayleigh number that characterizes their growth; hence, it is suspected that uncontrolled convection may play a role in the defect structure. This prompted a space flight experiment to determine if these defects could be further reduced by virtually eliminating the buoyancy-driven convective flows which are always present to a degree in normal gravity. Single crystals of mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2) were grown in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace developed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Consortium for Materials Development in Space. The Northrop- Grumman Science and Technology Center provided the highly purified starting material and analyzed the crystals that were grown. This experiment was flown on Spacehab 4 (STS-77) in May 1996. The SEF is a transparent furnace which allowed the progress of the growth to be recorded by video. Extensive furnace profiling and modeling has been carried out to relate the growth front location to the thermal environment and to the crystal quality. The results of the flight experiment as well as the ground control experiments are presented.

  20. Processing of mercurous chloride in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.; Thomas, A.

    1996-12-31

    In a joint experiment between the Northrop-Grumman Science and Technology Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Consortium for Materials Development in Space (UAH/CMDS), single crystals of mercurous chloride (Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) were grown in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace that was flown on Spacelab 4 (STS-77) in May 1996. Single crystals of this material can be readily grown in normal gravity by closed-tube physical vapor transport, but the crystals generally contain structural inhomogeneities which degrade the optical performance. The nature and cause of these defects are not completely understood, but their degree appears to correlate with the Rayleigh number that characterizes the convective transport during their growth; hence, it is suspected that uncontrolled convection may play a role in the defect structure. The objective of the flight experiment was to reduce the convective flows by several orders of magnitude to see if the structural inhomogeneities can be reduced or eliminated. This paper will describe the physical and thermal properties of the SEF furnace, the ampoule design and loading procedure, and the ground testing, and will also present the preliminary flight results.

  1. Low doses of mercuric chloride cause the main features of anti-nucleolar autoimmunity in female outbred CFW mice.

    PubMed

    Arefieva, Alla S; Kamaeva, Alfia G; Krasilshchikova, Marina S

    2016-09-01

    The growth of the influence of anthropogenic factors aimed on the improvement of human life has its side effect, for example, living organisms receive increasing exposure to toxic mercuric compounds. Experimental data show that mercury (Hg) salts are able to induce systemic autoimmunity in rodents. This Hg-induced autoimmune process (HgIA) is characterized by T cell-dependent polyclonal activation of B lymphocytes, increased level of serum immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and immunoglobulin E (IgE), production of antinucleolar autoantibodies (ANoA), and immune complex deposition in multiple organs. HgIA in mice is used as a model of human systemic autoimmune disorders. However, the dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) usually used in laboratory mice to induce HgIA is above the allowable limit for everyday levels of Hg exposure in humans. So, we decided to determine the lowest dose of HgCl2 that is able to trigger autoimmunity in outbred Carworth Farms Swiss Webster (CFW) mice not genetically prone to HgIA development. The lowest dose (50 µg/kg body weight (b.w.)/week) was chosen to match the World Health Organization provisional weekly tolerable intake of total Hg for humans. We also tested HgCl2 at 500 and 1500 µg/kg b.w./week (6.5- and 2-fold less than usually used for induction of HgIA in mice). We found that even the lowest dose of Hg resulted in a statistically significant increase in serum level of IgG1 after 8 weeks of treatment. HgCl2 in doses 500 and 1500 µg/kg b.w./week resulted in a significant increase in serum level of IgG1 after 4 weeks of treatment, followed by ANoA production. Sera of HgCl2-treated mice stained the regions in which the major autoantigen in HgIA, fibrillarin, was revealed. These results suggest that low doses of Hg are able to induce the main features of HgIA in genetically heterozygous mice, and that humans chronically exposed to low doses of Hg may be at risk of autoimmunity induction regardless of their genetic background.

  2. Chronic effects of mercuric chloride ingestion on rat adrenocortical function

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, R.; Chansouria, J.P.N. )

    1989-09-01

    Mercurial contamination of environment has increased. Mercury accumulates in various organs and adversely affects their functions. Some of the most prominent toxic effects of inorganic mercury compounds include neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Besides this, mercury has also been reported to affect various endocrine glands like pituitary, thyroid, gonadal and adrenal glands. There have been no reports on the toxic effects of chronic oral administration of varying doses of mercuric chloride on adrenocortical function in albino rats. The present work was undertaken to study the adrenocortical response to chronic oral administration of mercuric chloride of varying dose and duration in albino rats.

  3. Morphologic and functional alterations induced by low doses of mercuric chloride in the kidney OK cell line: ultrastructural evidence for an apoptotic mechanism of damage.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Cruz-Vega, Delia E; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2005-06-01

    Mercury produces acute renal failure in experimental animal models, but the mechanism of tubular injury has not completely been clarified. There is an increased interest in the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of renal diseases that result primarily from injury to renal tubular epithelial cells. However, detailed studies of morpho-functional alterations induced by mercuric chloride in kidney cell lines are scarce. This work characterizes these alterations in OK cell cultures. Morphological alterations were profiled using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy, as well as mitochondrial functional assays in the cells exposed to low concentrations of HgCl2. At concentrations of 1 and 10 microM of HgCl2 there were no morphological or ultrastructural alterations, but the mitochondrial function (MTT assay) and intracellular ATP content was increased, especially at longer incubation times (6 and 9 h). At 15 microM HgCl2, both the mitochondrial activity and the endogenous ATP decreased significantly. At this concentration the OK cells rounded up, had increased number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, and detached from the cell monolayer. At 15 microM HgCl2 ultrastructural changes were characterized by dispersion of the ribosomes, dilatation of the cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, increase of number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, chromatin condensation, invaginations of the nuclear envelope, presence of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, and alterations in the size and morphology of mitochondria. At 15 microM HgCl2 apoptotic signs included membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial alterations, apoptotic bodies, and nuclear envelope rupture. Using confocal microscopy and the mitochondrial specific dye MitoTracker Red, it was possible to establish qualitative changes induced by mercury on the mitochondrial membrane potential after incubation of the cells for 6 and 9h with 15 microM HgCl2. This effect was not observed at short

  4. DMPS reverts morphologic and mitochondrial damage in OK cells exposed to toxic concentrations of HgCl2.

    PubMed

    Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Guzmán-Delgado, Nancy E; Cruz-Vega, Delia E; Balderas-Rentería, Isaías; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2007-05-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) is a highly toxic compound, which can cause nephrotoxic damage. In the present study effects of HgCl(2) on mitochondria integrity and energy metabolism, as well as antidotal effects of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS) were investigated in the opossum kidney derived cell line (OK). OK cell monolayers were incubated during 0, 1, 3, 6, and 9 h in serum-free culture medium containing 15 microM HgCl(2), either in the absence or in the presence of 60 microM DMPS in a 1:4 ratio. Intracellular ATP content, MTT reduction, and HSP70/HSP90 induction were studied; confocal, transmission electron microscopy, and light microscopy studies were also performed. For confocal analysis, a mitochondrial selective probe (MitoTracker Red CMXH2Ros) was used. Antioxidant activity of DMPS was also studied by the scavenging of the free radical 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) technique. A decrease of ATP content, an impaired ability to reduce tetrazolium, and dramatic changes on cellular and mitochondrial morphology, and energetic levels were found after either 6 or 9 h of HgCl(2) exposure. Increased expression of HSP90 and HSP70 were also seen. When OK cells were co-incubated with HgCl(2) and DMPS, cellular morphology, viability, intracellular ATP, and mitochondrial membrane potential were partially restored; a protective effect on mitochondrial morphology was also seen. DMPS also showed potent antioxidant activity in vitro. Mitochondrial protection could be the cellular mechanism mediated by DMPS in OK cells exposed to a toxic concentration of HgCl(2). PMID:17131097

  5. Effects of gestational and lactational exposure to low dose mercury chloride (HgCl2) on behaviour, learning and hearing thresholds in WAG/Rij rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Deniz; Erdolu, Cem Onur; Karadenizli, Sabriye; Kara, Ahmet; Bayrak, Gunce; Beyaz, Sumeyye; Demir, Buse; Ates, Nurbay

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of inorganic mercury exposure during gestational/lactational periods on the behaviour, learning and hearing functions in a total of 32, 5-week-old and 5-month-old WAG/Rij rats (equally divided into 4 groups as 5-week and 5-month control mercury exposure groups). We evaluated the rats in terms of locomotor activity (LA), the Morris-water-maze (MWM) test and the passive avoidance (PA) test to quantify learning and memory performance; we used distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) tests to evaluate hearing ability. There were no significant differences between the 5-week-old rat groups in LA, and we detected a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the HgCl2-treated group in PA, MWM and DPOAE tests compared with the control group. The HgCl2-treated 5-week-old group exhibited worse emotional memory performance in PA, worse spatial learning and memory performances in MWM. There were no significant differences between the groups of 5-month-old rats in LA, MWM or PA. However, the DPOAE tests worsened in the mid- and high-frequency hearing thresholds. The HgCl2-treated 5-month-old group exhibited the most hearing loss of all groups. Our results convey that mercury exposure in young rats may worsen learning and memory performances as well as hearing at high-frequency levels. While there was no statistically significant difference in the behavior and learning tests in adult rats, the DPOAE test produced poorer results. Early detection of effects of mercury exposure provides medicals team with an opportunity to determinate treatment regimens and mitigate ototoxicity. DPOAE test can be used in clinical and experimental research investigating heavy metal ototoxicity. PMID:27540351

  6. Effects of gestational and lactational exposure to low dose mercury chloride (HgCl2) on behaviour, learning and hearing thresholds in WAG/Rij rats.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Deniz; Erdolu, Cem Onur; Karadenizli, Sabriye; Kara, Ahmet; Bayrak, Gunce; Beyaz, Sumeyye; Demir, Buse; Ates, Nurbay

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of inorganic mercury exposure during gestational/lactational periods on the behaviour, learning and hearing functions in a total of 32, 5-week-old and 5-month-old WAG/Rij rats (equally divided into 4 groups as 5-week and 5-month control mercury exposure groups). We evaluated the rats in terms of locomotor activity (LA), the Morris-water-maze (MWM) test and the passive avoidance (PA) test to quantify learning and memory performance; we used distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) tests to evaluate hearing ability. There were no significant differences between the 5-week-old rat groups in LA, and we detected a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the HgCl2-treated group in PA, MWM and DPOAE tests compared with the control group. The HgCl2-treated 5-week-old group exhibited worse emotional memory performance in PA, worse spatial learning and memory performances in MWM. There were no significant differences between the groups of 5-month-old rats in LA, MWM or PA. However, the DPOAE tests worsened in the mid- and high-frequency hearing thresholds. The HgCl2-treated 5-month-old group exhibited the most hearing loss of all groups. Our results convey that mercury exposure in young rats may worsen learning and memory performances as well as hearing at high-frequency levels. While there was no statistically significant difference in the behavior and learning tests in adult rats, the DPOAE test produced poorer results. Early detection of effects of mercury exposure provides medicals team with an opportunity to determinate treatment regimens and mitigate ototoxicity. DPOAE test can be used in clinical and experimental research investigating heavy metal ototoxicity. PMID:27540351

  7. Effect of mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride exposure on tissue concentrations of six essential minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Kemp, F.W.; Troiano, R.A.; Jortner, B.S.; Timpone, C.; Giuliani, D.

    1980-04-01

    There are few data on the effects of mercury exposure on tissue concentrations of essential minerals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride administered via the drinking water. Subsequently, the kidneys, spleen, liver, and brain were analyzed for mercury, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, and zinc by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant differences from controls were found for brain copper, kidney copper, and kidney zinc in the mercuric chloride-exposed animals; and for brain iron, kidney copper, kidney iron, kidney magnesium, spleen magnesium, and liver manganese in the methylmercury chloride-exposed rats. There was a fivefold higher mean kidney copper concentration in the mercuric chloride-exposed group; this may be related to the induction of renal metallothionein synthesis by mercury. Increased kidney copper may be a manifestation of heavy metal-induced renal toxicity. Both inorganic and methylmercury exposure produce significant changes in tissue concentrations of some essential minerals.

  8. Sodium selenite and vitamin E in preventing mercuric chloride induced renal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Aslanturk, Ayse; Uzunhisarcikli, Meltem; Kalender, Suna; Demir, Filiz

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to investigate improving effects of sodium selenite and/or vitamin E on mercuric chloride-induced kidney impairments in rats. Wistar male rats were exposed either to sodium selenite (0.25mg/kgday), vitamin E (100mg/kgday), sodium selenite+vitamin E, mercuric chloride (1mg/kgday), sodium selenite+mercuric chloride, vitamin E+mercuric chloride and sodium selenite+vitamin E+mercuric chloride for 4weeks. Mercuric chloride exposure resulted in an increase in the uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and a decrease in the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Histopathological changes were detected in kidney tissues in mercuric chloride-treated groups. A significant decrease in the uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and MDA levels and a significant increase in the SOD, CAT and GPx activities were observed in the supplementation of sodium selenite and/or vitamin E to mercuric chloride-treated groups. Conclusively, sodium selenite, vitamin E and vitamin E+sodium selenite significantly reduce mercuric chloride induced nephrotoxicity in rats, but not protect completely.

  9. Modifications in rat testicular morphology and increases in IFN-gamma serum levels by the oral administration of subtoxic doses of mercuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Penna, Salvador; Pocino, Marisol; Marval, Maria Josefina; Lloreta, José; Gallardo, Luis; Vila, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Mercury induces structural and functional damage in several organs, however the effects of subtoxic doses of the metal on the male reproductive system are not well defined. In order to analyze testicular and epididymal morphological alterations and changes in IL-4 or IFN-gamma serum levels, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0.01, 0.05 or 0.1 microg/ml of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) in deionized water for 1 to 7 months by oral route. Controls received deionized water alone. Twenty rats, separated in four groups of five animals each, were used per time of exposure. Progressive degenerative lesions consisting of lack of germ cell cohesion and desquamation, arrest at spermatocyte stage and hypospermatogenesis were observed in seminiferous epithelium by light and electron microscopy. Leydig cells showed cytoplasmic vacuolation and nuclear signs of cell death. Loss of peritubular cell aggregation was evidenced in the epididymis. Mercury accumulation was detected in both organs by mass spectroscopy. Rats showed enhanced IFN-gamma serum levels as compared to controls but only reached significance after 7 months of mercury administration. Subtoxic doses of inorganic mercury could lead to reproductive and immunological alterations. The results demonstrate that sublethal concentrations of mercuric chloride are enough to induce morphological and ultrastructural modifications in male reproductive organs. These contribute to functional alterations of spermatogenesis with arrest at spermatocyte stage, hypospermatogenesis and possibly impaired steroidogenesis which together could affect male fertility. PMID:19462287

  10. Destructive and regenerative changes in the albino rat kidney during mercuric chloride necrotizing nephrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, V.P.

    1985-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a morphological analysis of destructive and regenerative changes observed during a study of serial semithin sections of the kidneys of albino rats with mercuric chloride necrotizing nephrosis. The results of this investigation indicate that injury to the epithelium of the urinary tubules by mercuric chloride is heterogenous in depth, and this has a substantial influence on the viability of the animals and on the subsequent process of repair of the damage.

  11. Improvement of Mercuric Chloride-Induced Testis Injuries and Sperm Quality Deteriorations by Spirulina platensis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Desoky, Gaber E.; Bashandy, Samir A.; Alhazza, Ibrahim M.; Al-Othman, Zeid A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A. M.; Yusuf, Kareem

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of the filamentous cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (S. platensis) on mercury (II) chloride (HgCl2)-induced oxidative damages and histopathological alterations in the testis of Wistar albino rats. The animals were divided into four equal groups, i) control, ii) HgCl2, iii) S. platensis and iv) combination of HgCl2+S. platensis. Oxidative stress, induced by a single dose of HgCl2 (5 mg/kg, bw; subcutaneously, s.c.), substantially decreased (P<0.01) the activity level of testicular key enzymatic antioxidant biomarkers (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT and glutathione peroxidase, GPx), oxidative stress makers (blood hydroperoxide; testicular reduced glutathione, GSH and malondialdehyde, MDA), and testicular mercury levels. Moreover, HgCl2 administration resulted in a significant (P<0.01) increase in the number of sperms with abnormal morphology and decrease in epididymal sperm count, motility, plasma testosterone level and testicular cholesterol. Furthermore, HgCl2 exposure induced histopathological changes to the testis including morphological alterations of the seminiferous tubules, and degeneration and dissociation of spermatogenic cells. Notably, oral pretreatment of animals with Spirulina (300 mg/kg, bw) lowered the extent of the observed HgCl2-mediated toxicity, whereby significantly reducing the resulting lipid peroxidation products, mercury accumulation in the testis, histopathological changes of the testes and spermatozoal abnormalities. In parallel, the pretreatment with Spirulina also completely reverted the observed Hg-Cl2-induced inhibition in enzymatic activities of antioxidant biomarkers (SOD, CAT and GPx) back to control levels. The pretreatment of rats with S. platensis significantly recovered the observed HgCl2-mediated decrease in the weight of accessory sex organs. Taken together, our findings clearly highlight the role of S. platensis as a protective modulator of HgCl2

  12. Autoantibodies to the laminin P1 fragment in HgCl2-induced membranous glomerulopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Aten, J.; Veninga, A.; Coers, W.; Sonnenberg, A.; Timpl, R.; Claessen, N.; van Eendenburg, J. D.; de Heer, E.; Weening, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to mercuric chloride induces the development of a membranous glomerulopathy with high proteinuria in DZB rats, in which immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and IgG2a bound in the glomeruli were previously found to react with laminin of the EHS tumor and several unidentified glomerular basement membrane components. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared by fusing cervical and mandibular lymph node cells from a HgCl2-treated DZB rat with a nonsecreting mouse myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies were screened for reactivity with collagenase-digested glomerular basement membrane and kidney sections; upon subcloning, eight stable hybridomas were obtained, named MEC1 to MEC8. MEC2 (IgG1, kappa), MEC3 (IgM, kappa), and MEC5 (IgG1, kappa), as well as the polyclonal glomerular eluate, reacted preferentially with the P1 fragment of the laminin-1 (alpha 1 beta 1 gamma 1) isoform. MEC8 (IgM, kappa) reacted with the P1 and the E4 fragment of laminin. Both MEC6 (IgM, kappa) and MEC8 bound to actin and to various other, unidentified cellular antigens, indicating that MEC6 and MEC8 are polyreactive antibodies. MEC7 (IgM, kappa) bound to a cytoskeleton-linked cell membrane antigen, present on various epithelial cells and between heart muscle fibers and associated with small peripheral, intramuscular nerves. Several of the MEC monoclonal antibodies bound in vivo along the glomerular capillary wall. Although discrete electron-dense subepithelial immune aggregates were not detected and proteinuria was not induced, MEC3 localization changed from a continuous pattern into a fine granular pattern along the glomerular basement membrane, and focally along the TBM, upon passive transfer into naive DZB rats. These findings suggest a pathogenetic role for the P1 fragment of laminin either in the induction phase of HgCl2-induced membranous glomerulopathy as an immunogen or in the effector phase as a target antigen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7778685

  13. Dose and sex dependent distribution of mercury in rats exposed to mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.T.; Graham, T.C.; Webster, J.E.; Ferguson, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A 14-day study was conducted in young male and female rats (Sprague-Dawley SDTM) with mercuric chloride at daily oral doses of 0, 1.25, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg mercuric chloride to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the distribution of mercury in the target organs. The brains, hearts, kidneys, livers, lungs and spleens of both male and female rats (survived or died during the experiment) were analyzed for mercury content. At all treatments (1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg) groups, mercury level was higher in the kidneys of both sexes, and followed by the livers, spleen, lungs, hearts, and brains, respectively. The mercury level in target organs of females was higher than those of males. All mercury treated rats also showed a reduction in cumulative body weight gained beginning on the third day of treatment.

  14. Mercuric chloride-induced testicular toxicity in rats and the protective role of sodium selenite and vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Suna; Uzun, Fatma Gokce; Demir, Filiz; Uzunhisarcıklı, Meltem; Aslanturk, Ayse

    2013-05-01

    Mercury has been recognized as an environmental pollutant that adversely affects male reproductive systems of animals. This study examined the effects of mercuric chloride on the antioxidant system and histopathological changes and also evaluated the ameliorating effects of sodium selenite and/or vitamin E in the rat testis tissues. Sexually mature male Wistar rats (weighing 300-320g and each group six animals) were given mercuric chloride (1mg/kg bw) and/or sodium selenite (0.25mg/kg bw)+vitamin E (100mg/kg) daily via gavage for 4weeks. In the present study, mercuric chloride exposure resulted in an increase in the TBARS level and a decrease in the SOD, CAT, GPx activities, with respect to the control. Further, light microscopic investigation revealed that mercury exposure induced histopathological alterations in the testis tissues. Supplementation of sodium selenite and/or vitamin E to mercury-induced groups declined lipid peroxidation, increased SOD, CAT, GPx activities. While some histopathological changes were detected in mercuric chloride treated group, milder histopathological changes were observed in animal co-treated with sodium selenite and/or vitamin E supplementation to mercuric chloride-treated rats. As a result, mercuric chloride induced testicular toxicity is reduced by sodium selenite and/or vitamin E, but not ameliorate completely.

  15. Effect of temperature gradient on the optical quality of mercurous chloride crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Davies, D. K.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Mazelsky, R.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystals of mercurous chloride were grown at temperature gradients of 8, 11 and 17 K/cm by the physical vapor transport method. The optical quality of these crystals was evaluated by measuring bulk scattering and inhomogeneity of refractive index by birefringence interferometry. It was observed that a high temperature gradient at the solid-vapor interface induced thermal stresses and crystals showed higher scattering and irregular fringes.

  16. Toxicity of selenium (Na2SeO3) and mercury (HgCl2) on the planarian Dugesia gonocephala.

    PubMed

    Congiu, A M; Casu, S; Ugazio, G

    1989-10-01

    The toxicity of selenium (Na2SeO3) and mercury (HgCl2) was determined by using a freshwater planarian which is particularly sensitive to pollution, and belongs to a fissiparous breed of Dugesia gonocephala. The mortality and fissiparity frequency of the subjects were studied. They were exposed to intense treatments (48 hours) or for medium to long periods of time (21 days) to either the single compounds or a combination of both, and were fed or fasting. The lethal effect of sodium selenite is correlated to the food intake, whereas the toxicity of mercurous chloride is probably the result of a fixative effect which does not depend on feeding. The 21-day treatment with the first compound has a non-negligible lethal effect which is probably due to an accumulation phenomenon. At doses where an antioxidant effect prevails, fissiparity is stimulated. On the other hand, the second compound reduces reproduction frequency to half the base values. Compared to the Paracentrotus lividus, the Dugesia gonocephala offers various advantages concerning toxicological experiments; besides being easier to handle in the laboratory, it is available all year round and is not subject to seasonal cycles. It is also more susceptible to the toxic effect of mercury, which is a common and highly toxic pollutant, than the sea urchin.

  17. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, J.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Arun, V.; Dineshkumar, T.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, M.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months. PMID:27194836

  18. ROLE OF SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN THE CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AND MERCURIC CHLORIDE BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses using a laboratory-scale, fixed bed apparatus to study the role of surface functional groups (SFGs) in the capture of mercuric chloride (HgC12) and elemental mercury (Hgo) in nitrogen (N2) prior to flue gas atmosphere studies. The study focused on two activat...

  19. Inhibitory effects of calmodulin antagonists on urinary enzyme excretion in rats after nephrotoxic doses of mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.D. Jr.; Cox, J.L.; Giles, R.C. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    Prochlorperazine, a phenothiazine antiemetic, has been reported to protect rats against mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/)-induced nephrotoxicity. Mercuric ion and 12 other divalent metal ions of toxicologic importance inhibit the activity of calmodulin, a ubiquitous intracellular calcium receptor and regulatory protein, at physiologically relevant concentrations. Phenothiazines, including prochlorperazine, are reversible calmodulin antagonists, and as such they interact with divalent calcium at the level of calmodulin. It was of interest therefore to evaluate the comparative effects of several phenothiazines on HgCl/sub 2/-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  20. Toxic exposure to ethylene dibromide and mercuric chloride: effects on laboratory-reared octopuses.

    PubMed

    Adams, P M; Hanlon, R T; Forsythe, J W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of acute and chronic exposure to either ethylene dibromide (EDB) or mercuric chloride (MC) were studied in laboratory-reared Octopus joubini, O. maya and O. bimaculoides. The advantages of using octopuses were that the responses were immediate, highly visible and sensitive. All species demonstrated signs of toxicity to acute and chronic exposure to EDB and to MC. A dosage-sensitive relationship for the loss and subsequent recovery of locomotor response and of chromatophore expansion was found for each species after acute exposure. For each species the LC50 for chronic exposure occurred within 12 hr at 100 mg/l for EDB and within 3 hr at 1,000 mg/l for MC. This study demonstrated the potential usefulness of laboratory-reared octopuses in evaluating the toxicity of marine environmental pollutants.

  1. Inhibition of implantation caused by methylmercury and mercuric chloride in mouse embryos in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiwara, Yuji; Inouye, Minoru

    1992-10-01

    Methylmercury, an environmental pollutant, produces a wide spectrum of fetotoxic effects in men and laboratory animals. Experimental studies have shown that the exposure to methylmercury in the gestation period causes fetal death, gross malformation, growth retardation of the fetuses, and stillbirth. Although the effects of methylmercury on fetuses have been well documented, only a few experiments have been performed on the embryo toxicity at the early gestation periods. Because the embryos at preimplantation period are known to be highly sensitive to methylmercury in vitro and in vivo, in the present experiment, the embryonic development after implantation was investigated following treatment with methylmercury during the preimplantation period. Since the previous report showed that methylmercury and inorganic mercury were different in their manifestation of toxicity on preimplantation and mercuric chloride on embryos were investigated in vivo in the present study. 22 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Toxic exposure to ethylene dibromide and mercuric chloride: effects on laboratory-reared octopuses.

    PubMed

    Adams, P M; Hanlon, R T; Forsythe, J W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of acute and chronic exposure to either ethylene dibromide (EDB) or mercuric chloride (MC) were studied in laboratory-reared Octopus joubini, O. maya and O. bimaculoides. The advantages of using octopuses were that the responses were immediate, highly visible and sensitive. All species demonstrated signs of toxicity to acute and chronic exposure to EDB and to MC. A dosage-sensitive relationship for the loss and subsequent recovery of locomotor response and of chromatophore expansion was found for each species after acute exposure. For each species the LC50 for chronic exposure occurred within 12 hr at 100 mg/l for EDB and within 3 hr at 1,000 mg/l for MC. This study demonstrated the potential usefulness of laboratory-reared octopuses in evaluating the toxicity of marine environmental pollutants. PMID:3072470

  3. Reproductive responses of white leghorn hens to graded concentrations of mercuric chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1974-01-01

    White Leghorn hens were maintained on diets containing 0, 4, 12 or 36 p.p.m. Hg as HgCl2 from hatching in an effort to confirm (with a second species) our previously reported effects on Japanese quail reproduction. In the quail study both onset of laying and rate of egg production were accelerated by 16 and 32 p.p.m. Hg as HgCl2, but ferti ity was depressed. After 1 year on diets containing HgCl2 none of the Leghorn hens manifested any observed signs of Hg poisoning. Hens fed 4 or 12 p.p.m. Hg began ovipositing an average of 10 days earlier than the controls (P < 0.05). Young hens (< 9 months old) fed 4 or 12 p.p.m. Hg laid significantly more eggs per hen-day than did either controls or those fed 36 p.p.m. Hg. Beyond 9 months of age there were no perceptible differences in rate of egg production among the treatments. These findings support our quail results. When the hens were inseminated with pooled semen from untreated roosters fertility, embryonic development and hatchability appeared to be unaffected by the treatments. This contrasts with our previous experiment with quail in which both sexes were fed HgCl2.

  4. Effect of mercuric chloride on electrical parameters and anion fluxes in the toad skin.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Graciela; Chanampa, Yolanda; Orce, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The amphibian skin, widely used for studying the transepithelial passage of electrolytes, exhibits anion pathways relatively specific for Cl(-). We studied the effect of HgCl(2), 1.0 x 10(-4) M on its electrical parameters and unidirectional anion fluxes. In the presence of Cl(-), the transepithelial conductance (G) of the isolated skin of the Bufo arenarum toad increased considerably following exposure to HgCl(2), whereas short-circuit current (SCC)--reflecting transepithelial Na(+) transport-underwent only slight stimulation. Following the blockade of Na(+) intake by amiloride, 1.0 x 10(-4) M, the removal of Cl(-) from the solution bathing the epidermal border of the skin brought about a decrease in G, and gave rise to a gradient-induced SCC (SCCg) consistent with transepithelial passage of Cl(-) along its gradient. Addition of mercaptoethanol, 5.0 x 10(-3) M to the bath containing Hg(2+) fully reversed these effects. The increase in G was accompanied by an increase in the unidirectional (epidermal to dermal) fluxes of (36)Cl(-) and (131)I(-), and a decrease in the passage of (99m)TcO(4)(-). These results show the effects of HgCl(2) to be similar to those of theophylline, although exhibiting a different selectivity. Our data suggest that anion passage following exposure to HgCl(2) is, like that stimulated by theophylline, predominantly if not exclusively transcellular, and does not involve a significant opening of the tight junctions.

  5. Mercuric chloride-induced protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) in brown Norway (BN) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Knoflach, P.; Weiser, M.M.; Albini, B.

    1986-03-05

    Prolonged exposure to low doses of mercuric chloride (MC) may induce immunologically mediated kidney disease in man and animals. Mercury compounds are of growing importance as environmental pollutants. Twenty female BN rats were gavaged with 150 microgram MC/100 gm body weight 3x/wk for up to 39 wks. Starting with wk 2, rat intestines demonstrated linear IgG and IgA deposits along the vascular and intestinal basement membranes (VBM and IBM). Serum antibodies to IBM were observed during the first 4 wks of gavage. At wk 11, first granular deposits of IgG and C3 were observed along VBM. Only after wk 35 were granular deposits also seen along the IBM. Using radioactive chromium chloride, 50% of rats with granular deposits along BM showed significantly increased protein loss into the intestines. Thus, granular deposits of IgG and C3 along the IBM, probably representing immune complexes, may lead to PLE. This animal model may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PLE in man described in graft-vrs-host reactions following bone marrow grafts, allergic enteritides, inflammatory bowel disease, and arsenic intoxication, as well as the assessment of biological effects of environmental pollutants.

  6. Mercury speciation analyses in HgCl(2)-contaminated soils and groundwater--implications for risk assessment and remediation strategies.

    PubMed

    Bollen, A; Wenke, A; Biester, H

    2008-01-01

    Since the 19th century, mercury(II)chloride (HgCl(2)) has been used on wood impregnation sites to prevent wooden poles from decay, leaving behind a legacy of highly contaminated soil/aquifer systems. Little is known about species transformation and mobility of HgCl(2) in contaminated soils and groundwater. At such a site the behaviour of HgCl(2) in soils and groundwater was investigated to assist in risk assessment and remediation. The soil is low in organic carbon and contains up to 11,000 mg Hg/kg. Mercury (Hg) concentrations in groundwater decrease from 230 to 0.5 microg/l within a distance of 1.3 km. Hg species transformations in soil and aqueous samples were analysed by means of solid-phase Hg pyrolysis and CV-AAS. In aqueous samples, Hg species were distinguished between ionic/reactive Hg and complex-bound Hg. Potential mobility of Hg in soils was studied through batch experiments. Most Hg in the soil is matrix-bound HgCl(2), whereas in the aquifer secondary formation to Hg(0) could be observed. Aqueous Hg speciation in groundwater and soil solutions shows that an average of 84% of soluble Hg exists as easily reducible, inorganic Hg species (mostly HgCl(2)). The proportion of complex-bound Hg increases with distance due to the transformation of inorganic HgCl(2). The frequent occurrence of Hg(0) in the aquifer suggests the formation and degassing of Hg(0), which is, in addition to dilution, an important process, lowering Hg concentrations in the groundwater. High percentage of mobile Hg (3-26%) and low seepage fluxes will result in continuous Hg release over centuries requiring long-term groundwater remediation. Results of soluble Hg speciation suggest that filtering materials should be adapted to ionic Hg species, e.g. specific resins or amalgamating metal alloys.

  7. Evaluation of the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of mercurous chloride by the micronuclei technique in golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; González-Ramírez, Diego; Zúñiga-Charles, Miguel A; Lazcano-Martínez, Sigifredo; Sampayo-Reyes, Adriana; Leal-Garza, Carlos H

    2004-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the mutagenic and cytotoxic activity of mercurous chloride by the micronucleus technique in vivo on the bone marrow of golden Syrian hamsters after a single i.p. drug administration. Forty male golden Syrian hamsters were classified into eight groups: negative control, positive control and six groups treated with different doses of mercurous chloride (1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg). The negative control was injected with physiological saline i.p. and the positive control with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 80 mg/kg i.p. With respect to mutagenic effect, the average number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPE) in hamsters treated with different doses of mercurous chloride was not significant compared with the negative control. With respect to cytotoxic effect, the average polychromatic erythrocyte/red blood cell ratio showed a significant decrease when the doses were higher than the 2.5 mg/kg dose compared with the negative control. In conclusion, this preliminary study shows a cytotoxic effect but not a mutagenic effect of calomel in vivo at one time point (24 h). PMID:15123785

  8. Simultaneous administration of sodium selenite and mercuric chloride decreases efficacy of DMSA and DMPS in mercury elimination in rats.

    PubMed

    Juresa, Dijana; Blanusa, Maja; Kostial, Krista

    2005-01-15

    Two chelating agents meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and sodium 2,3-dimercapto-propane-1-sulphonate (DMPS) were tested for their efficiency in mercury removal from the body of rats in the presence and in the absence of selenium. Female Wistar rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of mercuric chloride or an equimolar mixture of mercuric chloride and sodium selenite (1.5 micromol/kg body weight). The chelating agents were given orally, in excess (500 micromol DMSA/kg body weight; 300 micromol DMPS/kg body weight), 30 min after the administration of mercury and selenium. The animals were euthanized 24 h after the treatment and mercury in the kidney, liver, and 24 h urine was determined using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The simultaneous administration of mercuric chloride and sodium selenite led to a redistribution of mercury in the organs, so that accumulation of mercury in the kidneys was decreased and in the liver increased. Selenite also caused decrease in the level of urinary mercury excretion. Both chelating agents were effective in mercury removal from the body, by increasing its urinary excretion. However, when animals were simultaneously treated with mercury and selenite, the rise of mercury excreted in the urine due to the treatment with chelating agents was lower when compared to animals receiving mercury without selenite. It is concluded that sodium selenite decreases the efficiency of DMSA and DMPS in mercury removal from the body of rats.

  9. Physical vapor transport of mercurous chloride under a nonlinear thermal profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennetrier, Christophe; Duval, Walter M. B.; Singh, Narsingh B.

    1992-01-01

    Our study investigates numerically the flow field characteristics during the growth of mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2) crystals in a rectangular ampoule under terrestrial and microgravity conditions for a nonlinear thermal gradient. With a residual gas lighter than the nutrient, the solutal Grashof number is dominant. We observe that in tilted configurations, when solutal convection is dominant, the maximum transport rate occurs at approximately 40 percent. For the vertical configurations, we were able to obtain solutions only for the cases either below the critical Rayleigh numbers or the stabilized configurations. The total mass flux decreases exponentially with an increase of pressure of residual gas, but it increases following a power law with the temperature difference driving the transport. The nonlinear thermal gradient appears to destabilize the flow field when thermal convection is dominant for both vertical top-heated and bottom-heated configurations. However, when the solutal Grashof number is dominant, the density gradient resulting from the solutal gradient appears to stabilize the flow for the bottom-heated configuration. The flow field for the top-heated configuration is destabilized for high Grashof numbers. The microgravity environment provides a means for lowering convection. For gravity levels of 10(exp -3) g(0) or less, the Stefan wind drives the flow, and no recirculating cell is predicted.

  10. Effect of mercuric chloride on some biochemical and physiological parameters of the freshwater murrel, Channa punctatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.; Rao, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The freshwater murrel, Channa punctatus, was exposed to a sublethal concentration of mercuric chloride (3 ..mu..g/liter) for 120 days and the following effects were examined: changes in the levels of glucose and lactic acid in blood and of glycogen and lactic acid in liver and muscles; rate of absorption of glucose from the intestine; and changes in the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase), hexokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), L-amino acid oxidase (AO), and xanthine oxidase (XO) in brain, gills, intestine, kidney, liver, and muscles. Mercury-treated fish were hypoglycemic and hypolactemic. The glycogen content of liver and muscles remained unaltered but the muscle lactic acid level decreased significantly. The rate of intestinal absorption of glucose was reduced significantly by exposure to mercury. G-6-Pase activity was decreased in all the tissues. Hexokinase activity also decreased in mercury-exposed fish but it was significant only in intestine, kidney, and liver. The activities of LDH, PDH, SDH, and MDH also were decreased significantly except LDH in brain and MDH in kidney where an insignificant decrease and an insignificant increase, respectively, were recorded. GDH and AO activities were elevated in most of the tissues except GDH in gills, and AO in gills and muscles where a decrease was observed. XO activity in brain, gills, and kidneys was significantly elevated, but no marked alteration was noted in other tissues.

  11. Mechanism of inhibition of rat brain adenosine triphosphatase by mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, C.S.; Rajanna, B.; Rajanna, S. )

    1989-02-09

    Mercuric Chloride (Hg), a neurotoxic compound inhibited ATPase system of rat brain microsomes. Membrane bound enzymes, Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (IC{sub 50} = 2.35 {times} 10{sup {minus}7M}) and K-paranitrophenyl phosphatase (K-PNPPase) (IC{sub 50} = 2.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}7M}) and {sup 3}H-Ouabain binding (IC{sub 50} = 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7M}) were inhibited by Hg at micromolar concentrations in a dose dependent manner. Hydrolysis of ATP was linear with time with or without Hg in the reaction mixtures. Altered pH or temperature versus enzyme activity showed higher inhibition by Hg at basic pH (8.0-9.0) and at lower temperatures (17-32{degree}C). Activation energy ({Delta}E) values were increased at 27-37{degree}C in the presence of Hg. Kinetic studies of cationic-substrate activation of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase and K-PNPPase in the presence of Hg showed significant changes in kinetic constant (K{sub m} and V{sub max}). Inhibition of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase was partially restored by repeated washings of microsomes. Preincubation with sulfhydryl agents protected Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase from Hg inhibition. Cumulative inhibition studies with Hg and ouabain indicated possible interaction between the two inhibitors of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase by interacting at Na{sup +} and K{sup +} sites.

  12. Plasma enzyme activities in coturnix quail fed graded doses of DDE, polychlorinated biphenyl, malathion, and mercuric chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.

    1974-01-01

    Male Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed diets for 12 weeks containing graded levels of DDE, polychlorinated biphenyl (Aroclor 1254), malathion, and mercuric chloride. Birds were bled prior to exposure and at 2, 4 and 12 weeks, and the plasma used to measure the activities of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, cholinesterase, fructose-diphosphate aldolase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Abnormal activity of certain plasma enzymes was noted in birds after 2 and 4 weeks, but these changes were not proportional to dose or exposure time. At 12 weeks increases in each of the activities of plasma enzymes of birds fed organochlorines, and decreases in cholinesterase activity of birds fed malathion or mercuric chloride, were proportional to the log dose of the respective agents. In addition, the pattern of enzyme responses in the 4 experimental groups had changed, and was illustrative of the specific type of substance that had been fed. The data suggest that qualitative and quantitative identification of environmental contaminants in birds, and perhaps a variety of wild animals, may be possible by utilization of multiple plasma enzyme assays. Residue analyses after 12 weeks of feeding showed that DDE accumulated in carcasses and livers at concentrations up to 4-fold higher than those in the diets. In contrast residues of Aroclor 1254 attained in carcasses were identical to, and in livers one-half of, the concentration in the feed. Mercury did not accumulate as much in the tissues; residues attained were one-twentieth or less of those in the feed.

  13. Effects of mercuric chloride on antioxidant system and DNA integrity of the crab Charybdis japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Pan, Luqing; Miao, Jingjing; Xu, Chaoqun

    2009-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the commonly encountered heavy metals, which is widespread in inshore sediments of China. In order to investigate the toxicity of Hg on marine invertebrates, we studied the effects of the divalent mercuricion (Hg2+) (at two final concentrations of 0.0025 and 0.0050 mg L-1, prepared with HgCl2) on metallothionein (MT) content, DNA integrity (DNA strand breaks) and catalase (CAT) in the gills and hepatopancreas, antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), in the hemolymph, gills and hepatopancreas of the portunid crab Charybdis japonica for an experiment period up to 15 d. The results indicated that MT was significantly induced after 3 d, with a positive correlation with Hg2+ dose and time in the hepatopancreas and a negative correlation with Hg2+ dose and time in the gills. While CAT in the hemolymph was not detected, it increased in the hepatopancreas during the entire experiment; SOD and GPx in the three tissues were stimulated after 12 h, both attained peak value and then reduced during the experimental period. Meanwhile, DNA strand breaks were all induced significantly after 12 h. These results suggested the detoxification strategies against Hg2+ in three tissues of C. japonica.

  14. Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate challenge test for mercury in humans. III. Urinary mercury after exposure to mercurous chloride.

    PubMed

    Maiorino, R M; Gonzalez-Ramirez, D; Zuniga-Charles, M; Xu, Z; Hurlbut, K M; Aposhian, M M; Dart, R C; Woods, J S; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Gonsebatt, M E; Aposhian, H V

    1996-05-01

    The sodium salt of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid (Dimaval; DMPS) challenge test has been given previously to humans exposed to elemental mercury (vapor) or mercuric salts, but not mercurous salts. The test (300 mg p.o., after an 11-hr fast) was given to 11 factory workers who make a skin lotion that contains mercurous chloride, eight users of the skin lotion and nine controls. Urines were analyzed for total mercury by using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mercury excreted for 6 hr before and 6 hr after DMPS treatment was 113 micrograms +/- 26 and 5037 micrograms +/- 682 S.E.M. for the skin lotion makers; 16.2 micrograms +/- 3.4 and 1410 micrograms +/- 346 S.E.M. for the skin lotions users; and 0.49 micrograms +/- 0.11 and 18.4 micrograms +/- 7.1 S.E.M. for the controls, respectively. The increases in urinary mercury resulting from the DMPS challenge test were 45-, 87- and 38-fold, respectively. The results demonstrate that, in humans exposed to mercurous chloride, DMPS increases the urinary excretion of mercury and that the DMPS/mercury challenge test is of value for a more realistic estimation of mobilizable mercury. An attempt to associate genotoxicity, as indicated by micronuclei content in buccal cells, with mercury exposure was inconclusive, perhaps because of the small number of subjects.

  15. DMPS (2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate, dimaval) decreases the body burden of mercury in humans exposed to mercurous chloride.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ramirez, D; Zuniga-Charles, M; Narro-Juarez, A; Molina-Recio, Y; Hurlbut, K M; Dart, R C; Aposhian, H V

    1998-10-01

    DMPS (2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate, Na salt), when used as a challenge test for mercury in workers involved in the production of a calomel skin-bleaching lotion and in direct contact with mercurous chloride, elevated urine levels of mercury. A DMPS treatment regimen was devised and initiated. Three days after the challenge test, DMPS was administered p.o. (400 mg per day) for 8 days, followed by a no-treatment period of five days. A new cycle of DMPS treatment for 7 days was initiated and followed by 5 days without treatment. A third period of treatment was begun for 6 days, followed by a 5-day no-treatment period. The urinary mercury greatly increased during those periods when DMPS was administered (1754, 314, and 173 microgram/24 h for the periods 1, 2 and 3, compared with 106, 48 and 53 microgram/24 h on the corresponding no-treatment periods). One of the workers presented signs of drug intolerance and was discharged after receiving the first cycle of treatment. DMPS treatment was effective in lowering the body burden of mercury and in decreasing the urinary mercury concentration to normal levels.

  16. Acute effects of mercuric chloride on intracellular GSH levels and mercury distribution in the fish Oreochromic aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.; Min, S.Y.; Keong, W.M.

    1988-02-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the effects of trace metals on intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH). Most of the research has been performed on rats. As GSH is ubiquitous in living organisms it is of interest to establish a relationship between mercury intoxication and intracellular GSH levels in fish; especially as fish living in rivers and coastal areas are often expose to mercury as an aquatic pollutant. The role of GSH in fish trace metal toxicity has not been thoroughly investigated. The distribution of total glutathione (oxidized + reduced) in selected black sea bass organs seems to follow the established pattern for mammalian organs. Thus, it would appear that teleostian and mammalian glutathione metabolism may have many similarities. There are few reports concerning the effects of mercury during the first few hours of exposure. The aim of this investigation is to establish any changes in organ GSH and mercury levels following just 2 h exposure to mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/).

  17. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel)

    PubMed Central

    Copan, Lori; Fowles, Jeff; Barreau, Tracy; McGee, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users’ homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m3 of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m3. Mercury contamination of cream users’ homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment. PMID:26364641

  18. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel).

    PubMed

    Copan, Lori; Fowles, Jeff; Barreau, Tracy; McGee, Nancy

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users' homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m³ of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m³. Mercury contamination of cream users' homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment.

  19. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel).

    PubMed

    Copan, Lori; Fowles, Jeff; Barreau, Tracy; McGee, Nancy

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users' homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m³ of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m³. Mercury contamination of cream users' homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment. PMID:26364641

  20. Major histocompatibility complex class II antigens are required for both cytokine production and proliferation induced by mercuric chloride in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Möller, G; Abedi-Valugerdi, M

    1997-10-01

    Autoimmune diseases induced by mercuric chloride are genetically determined, at least one gene being major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked. Previously, we showed that in vitro mercury stimulation induced a high proliferative response in lymphocytes from susceptible mice (high-responders) and that the proliferative response could be restored in lymphocytes from low-responders by pretreating the cells with mercury. We also found that the continuous presence of mercury induced IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, while pretreatment with mercury induced IL-4 production. In this study, we showed that anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibodies blocked both the mercury-induced proliferative responses in lymphocytes from high-responders and the restored proliferative responses in low-responders. In addition, anti-MHC class II antibodies also inhibited the mercury-induced IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-4 cytokine production in vitro. The results demonstrate that MHC class II antigens directly participate in mercury-induced cytokine production and cell activation, and are required at the onset of the initiation.

  1. Effects of mercuric chloride on chemiluminescent response of phagocytes and tissue lysozyme activity in Tilapia, Oreochromis aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.W.; Sin, Y.M.

    1995-02-01

    Phagocytosis is an important defense mechanism against foreign pathogenic organisms. The cells involved are phagocytes which are comprised of peripheral blood monocytes (tissue macrophages) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes. These cells can be activated by either particulate or soluble stimuli and undergo a respiratory burst from which several reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be formed. The reactive oxygen species and some hydrolases generated in the cells are the major antibacterial agents released during phagocytosis. Chemiluminescence (CL) is emitted, in vitro, from phagocytizing human PMN neutrophils. A similar CL response was also encountered in fish phagocytes. ROS was the causative agent of the CL emitted during in vitro phagocytosis. Phagocytic activity can be monitored by measuring the CL response of the phagocytes. Lysozyme is one of the potent hydrolases which are involved in the destruction of pathogens during phagocytosis. In fish, it was found predominantly in haematopoietic tissues, PMN leucocytes and moncytes. This enzyme has been shown to have antibacterial activity against several pathogens in fish. A combined oxidative and hydrolytic attack upon the engulfed pathogens allow phagocytes to kill infectious agents effectively. However, severe suppression or enhancement of these two functions caused by some exogenous factors may be detrimental to the host tissues. It has been reported that inorganic mercury could inhibit, in vitro, the respiratory burst and the microbicidal activities of human PMN leucocytes. It was also reported that increased in vitro release of lysozyme was found in mercury-treated human PMN leucocytes. However, such work has not been reported in fish. The aim of this research was to examine whether mercury could exert similar effects on the CL response in phagocytes and tissue lysozyme activity in fish after they were exposed to different concentrations of mercuric chloride over a period of 3 wks. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Effect of mercuric chloride on fertilization and larval development in the River Frog, Rana heckscheri (Wright) (Anura: Ranidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Punzo, F. )

    1993-10-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that heavy metals such as copper, cadmium, lead and mercury can act as systemic toxicants in many species of wildlife. Although numerous studies have emphasized the effects of metals and pesticides on metabolism, growth, survivorship, neural processes and reproduction in a number of taxa, little information is available on the effects of sublethal concentrations of metals on the reproductive physiology of amphibians. Industrial processes and mining activities can release substantial concentrations of heavy metals such as mercury into aquatic habitats. Since most amphibians have obligate aquatic larval stages, they are exposed to pollutants discharged into the aquatic environment. Amphibians can act as accumulators of heavy metals and their larval stages are useful indicators of pollution levels in the field. What little data are available, indicate that metals can significantly reduce viability in amphibians through their actions on metabolism, development and gametogenesis. The recent concerns over worldwide declines in amphibian populations and the susceptibility of amphibian populations to environmental toxicants, led me to assess the effect of mercuric chloride, one of the most common and persistent toxicants in aquatic environments, on fertilization and larval development in the river frog, Rana heckscheri (Wright). Although there is some information on fish, very little data are available on the effects of mercury on fertilization in amphibians generally, and no published data exist for R. heckscheri. This species is a conspicuous component of the aquatic fauna of parts of the southeastern United States where mercury levels have increased significantly over the last two decades. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Ameliorating effect of β-carotene on antioxidant response and hematological parameters of mercuric chloride toxicity in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Elseady, Y; Zahran, E

    2013-08-01

    The impact of different levels of dietary β-carotene to alleviate the effect of mercuric chloride toxicity in Nile tilapia was assessed. Semi-purified diets containing 0, 40, and 100 mg β-carotene kg(-1) dry diet were fed for 21 days, which were subjected to sublethal concentration of mercuric chloride (0.05 ppm). Hematological and biochemical parameters, lipid profile, and antioxidant response were examined. All hematological parameters of tilapia fish starting from second week of toxicity were significantly decreased. A significant increasing trend in liver enzymes (ALT and AST) were observed parallel to the time of toxicity and peroxide radicals (MDA) appearing significantly increased in toxicated group without carotene supplement, although carotene supplementation return all parameters within the control levels. Mercury accumulated significantly in fish liver and white muscles in toxicated group while it showed a significant reduction in dietary β-carotene-treated group. Overall, it can be used as immunostimulant and alleviate the suppression effect resulted from immune depressive stressful condition in farmed Nile tilapia. PMID:23475564

  4. Inorganic and organic mercury chloride toxicity to Coturnix: Sensitivity related to age and quantal assessment of physiologic responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicities of mercuric chloride (HgCl(,2)) and methylmercuric chloride (CH(,3)HgCl) were compared for coturnix (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatching to adulthood. Comparisons were based on: (1) Median lethal dosages (LD50) derived by administering single peroral and single intramuscular dosages of mercury, (2) median lethal concentrations (LC50) derived by feeding mercury for 5 days, (3) median toxic concentrations (TC50) derived by feeding mercury 9 weeks and measuring plasma enzyme activity, plasma electrolytes, and other blood constituents, and (4) transient changes of various blood chemistries following a single peroral dose of mercury. Acute peroral and intramuscular LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl increased by two- to threefold for coturnix chicks from hatching to 4 weeks of age. Concomitantly, the LC50s also increased, but the important difference between test procedures was that with both single dose routes of exposure the toxicity ratios, i.e., HgCl(,2)/CH(,3)HgCl, at each age were about 2 to 2.5 compared to about 100 for the LC50s. For example, at 2 weeks of age the peroral LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl were 42 and 18 mg/kg; the dietary LC50s were 5086 and 47 ppm for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl. The 9 week feeding trial was not associated with gross effects from either HgCl(,2) at 0.5 to 32 ppm or CH(,3)HgCl at 0.125 to 8 ppm. However, subtle responses were detected for the plasma enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase and could be quantified by probit analysis. This quantal procedure was based on establishment of a normal value for each enzyme and classing outliers as respondents. A 'hazard index' based on the TC50 for an enzyme divided by the LD50 or LC50 was introduced. The single oral dosages of HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl showed that ratios of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and orinthine carbamoyl transferase for the liver and kidneys of adult coturnix were opposite from

  5. Inorganic and organic mercury chloride toxicity to Coturnix: sensitivity related to age and quantal assessment of physiologic responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    The toxicities of mercuric chloride (HgCl(,2)) and methylmercuric chloride (CH(,3)HgCl) were compared for coturnix (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatching to adulthood. Comparisons were based on: (1) Median lethal dosages (LD50) derived by administering single peroral and single intramuscular dosages of mercury, (2) median lethal concentrations (LC50) derived by feeding mercury for 5 days, (3) median toxic concentrations (TC50) derived by feeding mercury 9 weeks and measuring plasma enzyme activity, plasma electrolytes, and other blood constituents, and (4) transient changes of various blood chemistries following a single peroral dose of mercury. Acute peroral and intramuscular LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl increased by two- to threefold for coturnix chicks from hatching to 4 weeks of age. Concomitantly, the LC50s also increased, but the important difference between test procedures was that with both single dose routes of exposure the toxicity ratios, i.e., HgCl(,2)/CH(,3)HgCl, at each age were about 2 to 2.5 compared to about 100 for the LC50s. For example, at 2 weeks of age the peroral LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl were 42 and 18 mg/kg; the dietary LC50s were 5086 and 47 ppm for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl. The 9 week feeding trial was not associated with gross effects from either HgCl(,2) at 0.5 to 32 ppm or CH(,3)HgCl at 0.125 to 8 ppm. However, subtle responses were detected for the plasma enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase and could be quantified by probit analysis. This quantal procedure was based on establishment of a normal value for each enzyme and classing outliers as respondents. A 'hazard index' based on the TC50 for an enzyme divided by the LD50 or LC50 was introduced. The single oral dosages of HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl showed that ratios of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and orinthine carbamoyl transferase for the liver and kidneys of adult coturnix were opposite from

  6. HgCl2 disrupts the structure of the human erythrocyte membrane and model phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Ungerer, B; Villena, F; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2000-10-01

    The structural effects of Hg(II) ions on the erythrocyte membrane were studied through the interactions of HgCl2 with human erythrocytes and their isolated resealed membranes. Studies were carried out by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Hg(II) induced shape changes in erythrocytes, which took the form of echinocytes and stomatocytes. This finding means that Hg(II) locates in both the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane. Fluorescence spectroscopy results indicate strong interactions of Hg(II) ions with phospholipid amino groups, which also affected the packing of the lipid acyl chains at the deep hydrophobic core of the membrane. HgCl2 also interacted with bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine, representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction indicated that Hg(II) ions induced molecular disorder to both phospholipid bilayers, while fluorescence spectroscopy of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles confirmed the interaction of Hg(II) ions with the lipid polar head groups. All these findings point to the important role of the phospholipid bilayers in the interaction of Hg(II) on cell membranes. PMID:11065190

  7. Preservation of solid mercuric dithizonate samples with polyvinyl chloride for determination of mercury(II) in environmental waters by photochromism-induced photoacoustic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lai, E P; Wong, B; Vandernoot, V A

    1993-07-01

    A novel sample preparation technique has been developed to preserve solid mercuric dithizonate [Hg(HDz)(2)] in a matrix of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for analysis by photochromism-induced photoacoustic spectrometry (PCPAS). This technique, which begins with the extraction of Hg(2+) from water with dithizone, allows for the determination of Hg(2+) in environmental samples. Inclusion of Hg(HDz)(2) within the polymer matrix enhances the PCPAS signal amplitude over that from the bare Hg(HDz)(2) film by almost sixfold. The standard calibration graph of PCPAS signal amplitude as a function of Hg(2+) concentration is linear in the concentration range of 5-100 mug/ml. A lower detection limit can be achieved by using a laser of higher power tuned to a wavelength closer to the maximum absorptivity of the excited Hg(HDz)(2) complex. A study, conducted to monitor the change in PCPAS signal amplitude obtained for the same sample over an extended storage period of 19 days, demonstrates that the PVC protects the integrity of the solid Hg(HDz)(2) sample. Hence, it is potentially feasible to collect environmental samples from a remote area for analysis at a later date.

  8. Chronic effects of mercuric chloride on the activities of some enzymes in certain tissues of the fresh water murrel, Channa punctatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.; Rao, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in the activities of some enzymes in the brain, gills, intestine, kidney, liver and muscles have been examined in the fresh water mercuric chloride (3 ..mu..g/l) for 15, 30, and 60 days. The results revealed that after 15 days of exposure amino acid oxidase activity was elevated in brain and liver and inhibited in intestine. The activity of xanthine oxidase was increased in gills, and inhibited in kidney. Thirty days exposure in liver, glutamate dehydrogenase in gills and brain, aminoacid oxidase in liver and intestine. In contrast, glutamate dehydrogenase in intestine, kidney and liver and aminoacid oxidase in brain and liver were elevated. After 60 days of treatment, a decrease in the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase was recorded in gills, intestine, kidney and liver. Hexokinase activity in kidney and liver, and malate dehydrogenase in all the six tissues were inhibited. Glutamate dehydrogenase activity in intestine, kidney and liver remained higher than in control fish. In brain, kidney and liver the activity of aminoacid oxidase was elevated, but in gills the enzyme activity decreased. Xanthine oxidase activity was inhibited in intestine and liver.

  9. Toxicometabolomics approach to urinary biomarkers for mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2})-induced nephrotoxicity using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyu-Bong; Um, So Young; Chung, Myeon Woo; Jung, Seung Chul; Oh, Ji Seon; Kim, Seon Hwa; Na, Han Sung; Lee, Byung Mu; Choi, Ki Hwan

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine and characterize surrogate biomarkers that can predict nephrotoxicity induced by mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) using urinary proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectral data. A procedure for {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis using pattern recognition was proposed to evaluate nephrotoxicity induced by HgCl{sub 2} in Sprague-Dawley rats. HgCl{sub 2} at 0.1 or 0.75 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), and urine was collected every 24 h for 6 days. Animals (n = 6 per group) were sacrificed 3 or 6 days post-dosing in order to perform clinical blood chemistry tests and histopathologic examinations. Urinary {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy revealed apparent differential clustering between the control and HgCl{sub 2} treatment groups as evidenced by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS)-discriminant analysis (DA). Time- and dose-dependent separation of HgCl{sub 2}-treated animals from controls was observed by PCA of {sup 1}H NMR spectral data. In HgCl{sub 2}-treated rats, the concentrations of endogenous urinary metabolites of glucose, acetate, alanine, lactate, succinate, and ethanol were significantly increased, whereas the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, allantoin, citrate, formate, taurine, and hippurate were significantly decreased. These endogenous metabolites were selected as putative biomarkers for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity. A dose response was observed in concentrations of lactate, acetate, succinate, and ethanol, where severe disruption of the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, formate, glucose, and taurine was observed at the higher dose (0.75 mg/kg) of HgCl{sub 2}. Correlation of urinary {sup 1}H NMR PLS-DA data with renal histopathologic changes suggests that {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis can be used to predict or screen for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity{sub .}

  10. Mercuric chloride induces a strong immune activation, but does not accelerate the development of dermal fibrosis in tight skin 1 mice.

    PubMed

    Hansson, M; Abedi-Valugerdi, M

    2004-05-01

    In susceptible mice, mercuric chloride induces a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by increased serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 and IgE, production of anti-nucleolar autoantibodies (ANolA) and formation of renal IgG deposits. We have previously hypothesized that mercury confers more adverse immunological effects on those mouse strains, which are genetically prone to develop spontaneous autoimmune diseases than on normal strains. In this study, we tested our hypothesis in tight skin 1 (Tsk1/+) mice, a murine model for human scleroderma. As a support for our hypothesis, we observed that in Tsk1/+ mice, B cells were spontaneously hyperactive and that treatment with mercury induced a strong immune/autoimmune response in these mice, but not in their non-Tsk (+/+) littermates. This response was characterized by the formation of high numbers of splenic IgG1, IgG2b and IgG3 antibody-secreting cells, increased serum levels of IgE, production of IgG1 antibodies against single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), trinitrophenol (TNP) as well as thyroglobulin and the development of renal IgG1 deposits. Neither Tsk1/+ mice nor F1 hybrid crosses between this strain, and mercury susceptible B10.S (H-2(s)) were able to produce IgG1-ANolA in response to mercury. Moreover, mercury-induced immune activation in Tsk1/+ was not able to potentiate the progression of skin fibrosis in this strain. Thus, exposure to mercury accelerates the immune dysregulation, but not the development of skin fibrosis in Tsk1/+ mice.

  11. In vitro lymphoproliferative assays with HgCl2 cannot identify patients with systemic symptoms attributed to dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Cederbrant, K; Gunnarsson, L G; Hultman, P; Norda, R; Tibbling-Grahn, L

    1999-08-01

    Dental amalgam is suspected, by some exposed individuals, to cause various systemic psychological, sensory, and neurological symptoms. Since not all amalgam-bearers experience such reactions, an individual characteristic--for example, a susceptible immune system--might explain these conditions. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of allergy. With HgCl2 as the antigen, however, the test is hampered, because Hg2+ can cause unspecific lymphocyte proliferation, optimal at 1.4 to 9.5 micrograms HgCl2/mL. Recently, the use of suboptimal HgCl2 concentrations (< or = 0.5 microgram/mL) has been suggested to circumvent these problems. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with systemic symptoms alleged to result from the presence of dental amalgam differ from healthy controls, with reference to in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL. Three different test protocols--lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) in micro- and macro-cultures, and the memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA)--were used. Other immune parameters--such as a standard patch test for dental materials, the number of T- and B-lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK cells in peripheral blood, allergic symptoms, and predisposition--were also investigated. Twenty-three amalgam patients, 30 healthy blood donors with amalgam, ten healthy subjects without amalgam, and nine patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) adjacent to dental amalgam and a positive patch test to Hg0 were tested. None of the investigated immune parameters revealed any significant differences between amalgam patients and controls. The sensitivity of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation ranged from 33 to 67%, with the OLP patients as a positive control group, and the specificity from 0 to 70% for healthy controls with a negative patch test to Hg0. Thus, despite the use of HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL, a high frequency of positive results was obtained among healthy subjects with or without dental amalgam. Consequently, in vitro lymphocyte proliferation with HgCl2 cannot be used as an objective marker for mercury allergy in dental amalgam-bearers. PMID:10439033

  12. Immune complex type disease induced by HgCl2 in Brown-Norway rats: genetic control of susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sapin, C; Mandet, C; Druet, E; Gunther, E; Druet, P

    1982-06-01

    Mercuric chloride induces a biphasic autoimmune glomerulonephritis in Brown-Norway (BN) rats but not in Lewis (LEW) rats. The genetic control of susceptibility to both phases was investigated by testing the response of segregants between BN and LEW rats and of congenic LEW.1N rats. It was confirmed that susceptibility to the first phase, characterized by the appearance of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies, depends on several genes one of which is RT1 linked. Susceptibility to the second phase, which is an immune complex type glomerulonephritis, was found to depend on one major RT1 linked gene or cluster of genes with a role for other(s) non-RT1 linked gene(s) controlling the magnitude of the response. However, congenic LEW.1N rats were found to be resistant. This suggests that the disease gene has been lost during the strain derivation. The question of whether both phases are two different diseases or expression of the same process cannot be definitely answered; data however indicate a dissociation of both disease processes.

  13. Effects of zinc against mercury toxicity in female rats 12 and 48 hours after HgCl2 exposure

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Mariana; Pedroso, Taíse F.; Oliveira, Cláudia S.; Oliveira, Vitor A.; do Santos, Rafael Francisco; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Pereira, Maria Ester

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the toxicity of inorganic mercury and zinc preventive effects in female rats sacrificed 12 or 48 h after HgCl2 exposure. Female Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with ZnCl2 (27 mg/kg) or saline (0.9 %), and 24 h later they were exposed to HgCl2 (5 mg/kg) or saline (0.9 %). Rats sacrificed 12 hours after Hg administration presented an increase in kidney weight and a decrease in renal ascorbic acid levels. Zinc pretreatment prevented the renal weight increase. Rats sacrificed 48 h after Hg exposure presented a decrease in body weight gain, an increase in renal weight, a decrease in renal δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, an increase in serum creatinine and urea levels, and a decrease in kidney total thiol levels. Zinc pretreatment partly prevented the decrease in body weight gain and increase in creatinine levels, in addition to totally preventing renal δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase inhibition. Mercury accumulation in the kidney and liver in both periods was observed after Hg administration. These results show the different Hg effects along the time of intoxication, and a considerably preventive effect of zinc against Hg toxicity. PMID:27330529

  14. Polyclonal IgE increase after HgCl2 injections in BN and LEW rats: a genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sapin, C; Hirsch, F; Delaporte, J P; Bazin, H; Druet, P

    1984-01-01

    An autoimmune disease and a dramatic increase in total serum IgE concentration are observed in BN rats that are chronically injected with HgCl2. In contrast, LEW rats do not develop the characteristic glomerulonephritis and are very "low IgE responders". In this study, we examined the genetic control of total serum IgE increase after HgCl2 injection in F1 and F2 hybrids, in both backcrosses between LEW and BN rats, and in LEW.1N congenic rats. Genetic analysis was performed using peak IgE concentrations expressed as log microgram/ml. A high IgE phenotype was found to be dominant. Eighty-five percent of F2 variance was due to genetic factors (VG) while only 15% of this variance was caused by environmental factors (VE). From observations in F2 hybrids and backcrosses, estimations of additive variance (VA) and dominance variance (VD) were made following three different methods. Genetic control by about four loci is demonstrated. One of these genes is RT1-linked. This gene contributes to 25% of the phenotypic difference observed between BN and LEW rats. No correlation was found between the peak total IgE level and autoimmune disease based on IgG deposition in spleen and/or kidney.

  15. Mercuric oxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mercuric oxide may be found in some: Button batteries (batteries containing mercury are no longer sold in the ... long-term injury Any person who swallowed a battery will need immediate x-rays to make sure ...

  16. Crystal structures of three mercury(II) complexes [HgCl2 L] where L is a bidentate chiral imine ligand

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Guadalupe; Bernès, Sylvain; Portillo, Oscar; Ruíz, Alejandro; Moreno, Gloria E.; Gutiérrez, René

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of three complexes [HgCl2 L] were determined, namely, (S)-(+)-di­chlorido­[1-phenyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl­methyl­idene)ethyl­amine-κ2 N,N′]mercury(II), [HgCl2(C14H14N2)], (S)-(+)-di­chlorido­[1-(4-methyl­phen­yl)-N-(pyridin-2-yl­methyl­idene)ethyl­amine-κ2 N,N′]mercury(II), [HgCl2(C15H16N2)], and (1S,2S,3S,5R)-(+)-di­chlorido­[N-(pyridin-2-yl­methyl­idene)isopino­camph­eyl­amine-κ2 N,N′]mercury(II), [HgCl2(C16H22N2)]. The complexes consist of a bidentate chiral imine ligand coordinating to HgCl2 and crystallize with four independent mol­ecules in the first complex and two independent mol­ecules in the other two. The coordination geometry of mercury is tetra­hedral, with strong distortion towards a disphenoidal geometry, as a consequence of the imine bite angle being close to 70°. The Cl—Hg—Cl angles span a large range, 116.0 (2)–138.3 (3)°, which is related to the aggregation state in the crystals. For small Cl—Hg—Cl angles, complexes have a tendency to form dimers, via inter­molecular Hg⋯Cl contacts. These contacts become less significant in the third complex, which features the largest intra­molecular Cl—Hg—Cl angles. PMID:26870405

  17. Phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin of Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima protect against HgCl(2)-caused oxidative stress and renal damage.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, R; Ortiz-Butrón, R; Blas-Valdivia, V; Hernández-García, A; Cano-Europa, E

    2012-12-15

    Our objective was to determine if the phycobiliproteins of Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima protect renal cells against mercury-caused oxidative stress and cellular damage in the kidney. We used 40 male mice that were assigned into eight groups: (1) a control group that received 100mM phosphate buffer (PB) ig and 0.9% saline ip, (2) PB+HgCl(2) (5mg/kg ip), (3) PB plus phycobiliproteins (100mg/kg ig), (4) PB plus C-phycocyanin (100mg/kg ig), and four groups receiving HgCl(2)+phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin (50, and 100mg/kg ig). The left kidneys were used to determine lipid peroxidation, quantification of reactive oxygen species, and reduced glutathione and oxidised content. The right kidneys were processed for histology. The HgCl(2) caused oxidative stress and cellular damage. All doses of phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin prevented enhancement of oxidative markers and they protected against HgCl(2)-caused cellular damage.

  18. [Experimental Research of Hg (II) Removal from Aqueous Solutions of HgCl2 with Nano-TiO2].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Jin-yang; Wang, Ding-yong; Qin, Cai-qing; Xu, Feng; Luo Cheng-zhong; Yang, Xi

    2016-01-15

    Mercury removal from aqueous solutions of HgCl2 was studied by indoor simulation experiments, and the effects of three different diameter of particles of Nano-TiO2 ( Nano-Titanium Dioxide) at different dosage, pH, adsorption time and the initial concentration of Hg2+ on the mercury adsorption from simulated wastewater were investigated. The single factor experiments showed that the optimal conditions were: 7.5 g x L(-1) of 5 nm TiO2 or 2.0 g x L(-1) of 100 nm TiO2, pH 8.0, initial concentration of Hg2+ 15 x mg x L(-1) adsorption time 5 min, and under these conditions the adsorption rates reached 99.5% and 99.3%, relatively. When the content of 25 nm TiO2 was 10 g x L(-1), and the other conditions were pH 8.0, initial concentration of Hg2+ 15 mg x L(-1), adsorption time 60 min, the adsorption rate was 62.8%. The Hg(II) removal effects of the TiO2 particles with different diameters followed the order of 100 nm TiO2 > 5 nm TiO2 > 25 nm TiO2. Component adsorption results showed that the 5 nm TiO2 component adsorption effect was superior to its single adsorption effect, while there was little difference between 100 nm TiO2 component adsorption effect and its single adsorption effect. The results of orthogonal experiments indicated that the influencing factors of the adsorption rate followed the order of pH > the initial concentration of Hg2+ > time > dosage. The optimal experiment scheme was: pH 8.0, a dosage of 100 nm Nano-TiO2 of 2.0 g x L(-1) an initial Hg2+ concentration of 25 mg x L(-1) and adsorption time of 10 min. Under the experimental conditions, the maximum adsorption rate reached 99.9%, at the same time, the equilibrium concentration of Hg(II) was 0.033 mg x L(-1) < 0.05 mg x L(-1), below the current enterprise rules of water pollutants in mercury emissions limits. In addition, the maximum adsorptive capacity was 26.95 mg x g(-1). The adsorption isotherm was in line with the Langmuir isotherm equation, indicating that the Hg(II) uptake by 100 nm Nano-TiO2 was typical monolayer adsorption. PMID:27078961

  19. Increased apical targeting of renal ENaC subunits and decreased expression of 11betaHSD2 in HgCl2-induced nephrotic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Wan; de Seigneux, Sophie; Sassen, Martin C; Lee, JongUn; Kim, Jin; Knepper, Mark A; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren

    2006-03-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is often accompanied by sodium retention and generalized edema. We hypothesize that dysregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and/or of sodium (co)transporters may be responsible for the increased sodium retention associated with HgCl(2)-induced nephropathy. In addition, we examined the hypothesis that the expression of type 2 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11betaHSD2) is reduced, contributing to the enhanced mineralocorticoid activity. Membranous nephropathy was induced in Brown Norway rats by repeated injections of HgCl(2) (1 mg/kg sc), whereas the control group received only vehicle. After 13 days of treatment, the abundance of ENaC subunits, sodium (co)transporters, and 11betaHSD2 in the kidney was examined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. HgCl(2) treatment induced marked proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, decreased urinary sodium excretion, and ascites. The protein abundance of alpha-ENaC was increased in the cortex/outer stripe of outer medulla (OSOM) and inner stripe of the outer medulla (ISOM). The protein abundances of beta-ENaC and gamma-ENaC were decreased in the cortex/OSOM while increased in the ISOM. Immunoperoxidase microscopy demonstrated increased targeting of ENaC subunits to the apical plasma membrane in the distal convoluted tubule, connecting tubule, and cortical and medullary collecting duct segments. Moreover, 11betaHSD2 abundance was decreased in cortex/OSOM and ISOM. The protein abundances of type 3 Na/H exchanger (NHE3), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), and thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) were decreased. Moreover, the abundance of the alpha-1 subunit of the Na-K-ATPase was decreased in the cortex/OSOM and ISOM but remained unchanged in the inner medulla. These results suggest that increased apical targeting of ENaC subunits combined with diminished abundance of 11betaHSD2 may contribute to sodium retention associated with HgCl(2)-induced nephrotic syndrome. The decreased abundance of NHE3, NKCC2, NCC, and Na-K-ATPase may play a compensatory role in promoting sodium excretion. PMID:16189294

  20. 60-Day Chronic Exposure to Low Concentrations of HgCl2 Impairs Sperm Quality: Hormonal Imbalance and Oxidative Stress as Potential Routes for Reproductive Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Caroline S.; Torres, João Guilherme D.; Peçanha, Franck M.; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María J.; Wiggers, Giulia A.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and bio-accumulative heavy metal of global concern. While good deals of research have been conducted on the toxic effects of mercury, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of male reproductive dysfunction induced by mercury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effects and underlying mechanisms of chronic mercury exposure at low levels on male reproductive system of rats. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups and treated for 60 days with saline (i.m., Control) and HgCl2 (i.m. 1st dose: 4.6 µg/kg, subsequent doses 0.07 µg/kg/day). We analyzed sperm parameters, hormonal levels and biomarkers of oxidative stress in testis, epididymis, prostate and vas deferens. Mercury treatment decreased daily sperm production, count and motility and increased head and tail morphologic abnormalities. Moreover, mercury treatment decreased luteinizing hormone levels, increased lipid peroxidation on testis and decreased antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase) on reproductive organs. Our data demonstrate that 60-day chronic exposure to low concentrations of HgCl2 impairs sperm quality and promotes hormonal imbalance. The raised oxidative stress seems to be a potential mechanism involved on male reproductive toxicity by mercury. PMID:25368988

  1. Mechanosensitive ion channels in chara: influence of water channel inhibitors, HgCl2 and ZnCl2, on generation of receptor potential.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kosei; Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2008-01-01

    Characean internodal cells generate receptor potential (DeltaE (m)) in response to mechanical stimuli. Upon a long-lasting stimulus, the cells generated DeltaE (m) at the moment of both compression and decompression, and the amplitude of DeltaE (m) at the moment of decompression, (DeltaE (m))(E), was larger than that at compression. The long-lasting stimulus caused a membrane deformation (DeltaD (m)) having two components, a rapid one, (DeltaD (m))(rapid), at the moment of compression and a slower one, (DeltaD (m))(slow), during the long-lasting compression. We assumed that (DeltaD (m))(slow) might have some causal relation with the larger DeltaE (m) at (DeltaE (m))(E). We treated internodal cells with either HgCl(2) or ZnCl(2), water channel inhibitors, to decrease (DeltaD (m))(slow). Both inhibitors attenuated (DeltaD (m))(slow) during compression. Cells treated with HgCl(2) generated smaller (DeltaE (m))(E) compared to nontreated cells. On the other hand, cells treated with ZnCl(2) never attenuated (DeltaE (m))(E) but, rather, amplified it. Thus, the amplitude of (DeltaD (m))(slow) did not always show tight correlation with the amplitude of (DeltaE (m))(E). Furthermore, when a constant deformation was applied to an internodal cell in a medium with higher or lower osmotic value, a cell having higher turgor always showed a larger (DeltaE (m))(E). Thus, we concluded that changes in tension at the membrane may be the most important factor to induce activation of mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channel.

  2. The effect of elemental and hydrocarbon impurities on mercuric iodide gamma ray detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eilene S.; Buffleben, George; Soria, Ed; James, Ralph; Schieber, Michael; Natarajan, Raj; Gerrish, Vern

    Mercuric iodide is a room temperature semiconductor material that is used for gamma ray and x-ray radiation detection. Mercuric iodide is synthesized from mercuric chloride and potassium iodide and is then purified by a series of melts and sublimation steps and by zone refining. The mercuric iodide is grown into crystals and platelets and then fabricated into detectors. Elemental contamination may be a determining factor in the performance of these detectors. These contaminates may be present in the starting material or may be introduced during, or be unaffected by, the purification, growth or fabrication steps. Methods have been developed for the analysis of trace levels of elemental contamination. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma/Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) are used to determine sub ppm levels of many trace elemental impurities. Trace levels of many elemental impurities in the raw mercuric iodide are significantly reduced during the purification and zone refining processes. Though the levels of impurities are reduced, poor performing mercuric iodide detectors have contamination levels remaining or reintroduced which are higher for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb and Zn than detectors with good gamma ray response. This paper will discuss the analytical methodology, the effects of purification on impurity levels, and the correlation between detector performance and impurity levels.

  3. Preventive effect of CuCl₂ on behavioral alterations and mercury accumulation in central nervous system induced by HgCl2 in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Silva, L; Siqueira, L F; Oliveira, V A; Oliveira, C S; Ineu, R P; Pedroso, T F; Fonseca, M M; Pereira, M E

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the benefits of Cu preexposition on Hg effects on behavioral tests, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Hg, and essential metal contents in the cerebrum and cerebellum of neonate rats. Wistar rats received (subcutaneous) saline or CuCl2 ·2H2O (6.9 mg/kg/day) when they were 3 to 7 days old and saline or HgCl2 (5.0 mg/kg/day) when they were 8 to 12 days old. Mercury exposure reduced the performance of rats in the negative geotaxis (3-13 days) and beaker test (17-20 days), inhibited cerebellum AChE activity (13 days), increased cerebrum and cerebellum Hg (13 days), cerebrum Cu (13 days), and cerebrum and cerebellum Zn levels (33 days). The performance of rats in the tail immersion and rotarod tests as well as Fe and Mg levels were not altered by treatments. Copper prevented all alterations induced by mercury. These results are important to open a new perspective of prevention and/or therapy for mercury exposure.

  4. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-08-01

    The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

  5. Oral and intramuscular toxicity of inorganic and organic mercury chloride to growing quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Soares, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The lethal toxicity of inorganic (HgCl2) and organic (CH3HgCl) mercury chloride was compared for Coturnix (Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica) of different ages from hatch through adulthood by single-dose acute oral and intramuscular injections and by a 5-d dietary trial. Sublethal mercury toxicity was studied by evaluation of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity. CH3HgCl was more toxic than HgCl2 in all tests at each age tested. LD50s consistently increased over the first 4 wk for both acute methods and both mercurials and then stabilized. The striking difference between single-dose acute and 5-d dietary tests was that CH3HgCl averaged about twice as toxic as HgCl2 by both acute methods, compared to 100 times as toxic by the dietary method. For example, at 2 wk of age, the oral LD50s for CH3HgCl and HgCl2 were 18 and 42 mg/kg and the dietary LC50s were 47 and 5086 ppm. When birds were fed HgCl2 and developed clinical signs of intoxication, they could recover once treatment was withdrawn; however, on CH3HgCl, clinical signs often commenced after treatment was withdrawn, and then actually intensified for several days and culminated in death.

  6. Neutron Detection with Mercuric Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.A.

    2003-06-17

    Mercuric iodide is a high-density, high-Z semiconducting material useful for gamma ray detection. This makes it convertible to a thermal neutron detector by covering it with a boron rich material and detecting the 478 keV gamma rays resulting from the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li* reaction. However, the 374 barn thermal capture cross section of {sup nat}Hg, makes the detector itself an attractive absorber, and this has been exploited previously. Since previous work indicates that there are no low-energy gamma rays emitted in coincidence with the 368 keV capture gamma from the dominant {sup 199}Hg(n, {gamma}){sup 200}Hg reaction, only the 368 keV capture gamma is seen with any efficiency a relatively thin (few mm) detector. In this paper we report preliminary measurements of neutrons via capture reactions in a bare mercuric iodide crystal and a crystal covered in {sup 10}B-loaded epoxy. The covered detector is an improvement over the bare detector because the presence of both the 478 and 368 keV gamma rays removes the ambiguity associated with the observation of only one of them. Pulse height spectra, obtained with and without lead and cadmium absorbers, showed the expected gamma rays and demonstrated that they were caused by neutrons.

  7. Novel M(II)-Hg(II) coordination polymers generated from metal-containing building blocks M(2-pyrazinecarboxylate) 2 · (H 2O) 2 (M=Cu, Ni, Co) and HgCl 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu-Bin; Smith, Mark D.; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2000-12-01

    A new class of M(II)-Hg(II) (M=Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II)) mixed-metal coordination polymers, Cu(2-pyrazinecarboxylate) 2HgCl 2 ( 4), [Co(2-pyrazinecarboxylate) 2(HgCl 2) 2] · 0.61H 2O ( 5) and [Ni(2-pyrazinecarboxylate) 2(HgCl 2) 2] · 0.77H 2O ( 6), have been prepared by self assembly of metal-containing building blocks, M(2-pyrazinecarboxylate) 2 · (H 2O) 2 (M=Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II)), with HgCl 2. Compounds 4- 6 were characterized fully by IR, elemental analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 4 crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2/ c, with a=17.916(5) Å, b=7.223(2) Å, c=13.335(4) Å, β=128.726(3)°, V=1346.2(6) Å 3, Z=4. It contains alternating Hg(II) and Cu(II) metal centers that are cross-linked by 2-pyrazinecarboxylate spacers and chlorine co-ligands to generate a unique three-dimensional Hg(II)-Cu(II) mixed metal framework. Compound 5 crystallized in the triclinic space group P1¯, with a=6.3879(7) Å, b=6.6626(8) Å, c=13.2286(15) Å, α=96.339(2)°, β=91.590(2)°, γ=113.462(2)°, V=511.71(10) Å 3, Z=1. Compound 6 also crystallized in the triclinic space group P1¯, with a=6.3543(8) Å, b=6.6194(8) Å, c=13.2801(16) Å, α=96.449(2)°, β=92.263(2)°, γ=113.541(2)°, V=506.67(11) Å 3, Z=1. Compounds 5 and 6 are isostructural and in the solid state the Hg(II)⋯M(II)⋯Hg(II) units are connected by Hg 2Cl 2 linkages to produce a novel M(II)-Hg(II) (MCo(II), Ni(II)) zigzag mixed-metal chain, in which a new type of M-M'-M'-M array was observed. The metal containing building blocks, M(2-pyrazinecarboxylate) 2 · (H 2O) 2 (MCu(II), Co(II), Ni(II)), exhibit different connectivities to HgCl 2 depending on the metal cation contained within them.

  8. Effects of photochemical formation of mercuric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Hoffman, J.S.

    1999-12-01

    The photochemistry of elemental mercury and oxygen was examined using quartz flow reactors. Germicidal bulbs were used as the source of 253.7-nm ultraviolet radiation. The formation of mercuric oxide, as visually detected by yellow-brown stains on the quartz walls, was confirmed by both ICP-AES and SEM-EDX analyses. In addition, a high surface area calcium silicate sorbent was used to capture the mercuric oxide in one of the experiments. The implications of mercuric oxide formation with respect to analysis of gases for mercury content, atmospheric reactions, and direct ultraviolet irradiation of flue gas for mercury sequestration are discussed.

  9. Mercuric iodide light detector and related method

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barton, Jeff B.; Dabrowski, Andrzej J.; Schnepple, Wayne F.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting light involve applying a substantially uniform electrical potential difference between first and second spaced surfaces of a body of mercuric iodide, exposing the first surface to light and measuring an electrical current passed through the body in response to the light. The mercuric iodide may be substantially monocrystalline and the potential may be applied between a substantially transparent conductive layer at the first surface and a second conductive layer at the second surface. In a preferred embodiment, the detector is coupled to a scintillator for passage of light to the mercuric iodide in response to ionizing radiation incident on the scintillator.

  10. Enhancing the adsorption of vapor-phase mercury chloride with an innovative composite sulfur-impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ie, Iau-Ren; Chen, Wei-Chin; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Hung, Chung-Hsuang; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Tsai, Hsieh-Hung; Jen, Yi-Shiu

    2012-05-30

    Mercury chloride (HgCl(2)) is the major mercury derivate emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators, which has high risk to the environment and human health. This study investigated the adsorption of vapor-phase HgCl(2) with an innovative composite sulfurized activated carbon (AC), which was derived from the pyrolysis, activation, and sulfurization of waste tires. The composite sulfur-impregnation process impregnated activated carbon with aqueous-phase sodium sulfide (Na(2)S) and followed with vapor-phase elemental sulfur (S(0)). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to investigate the adsorptive capacity of vapor-phase HgCl(2) using the composite sulfurized AC. The operating parameters included the types of composite sulfurized AC, the adsorption temperature, and the influent HgCl(2) concentration. Experimental results indicated that the sulfur-impregnation process could increase the sulfur content of the sulfurized AC, but decreased its specific surface area. This study further revealed that the composite sulfurized AC impregnated with aqueous-phase Na(2)S and followed with vapor-phase S(0) (Na(2)S+S(0) AC) had much higher saturated adsorptive capacity of HgCl(2) than AC impregnated in the reverse sequence (S(0)+Na(2)S AC). A maximum saturated adsorptive capacity of HgCl(2) up to 5236 μg-HgCl(2)/g-C was observed for the composite Na(2)S+S(0) AC, which was approximately 2.00 and 3.17 times higher than those for the single Na(2)S and S(0) ACs, respectively.

  11. Mercuration of alkylcyclopropanes with electron-accepting substituents in the aromatic ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaev, S.G.; Eshnazarov, Yu.K.; Nasyrov, I.M.; Mochalov, S.S.; Shabarov, Yu.S.

    1988-09-10

    The reactions of (nitrophenyl)- and (acetylphenyl)cyclopropanes with mercuric nitrate and acetate in methanol, acetic acid, and formic acid were studied. The arylcyclopropanes are mercurated by mercuric acetate in formic acid or by mercuric nitrate in all the employed solvents without a catalyst (perchloric acid). A relatively high rate of conjugate mercuration of arylcyclopropanes in formic acid was observed.

  12. Study of the resistance of Acinetobacter sp. to mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Lomovskaya, O.L.; Mindlin, S.Z.; Khesin, R.B.

    1986-06-01

    In addition to large plasmids (approx 60 kb) a small plasmid (almost 7.5 kb), plasmid PKL1, has been found in HgCl/sub 2/-resistant strains of Acinetobacter sp. isolated from soil in the vicinity of the Khaidarkan mercury deposit. With the aid of conjugation and transformation studies it was established that plasmid pKL1 is a mobilized plasmid with a broad host range and that this plasmid carries the Hg/sup r/-determinant. A restriction map of plasmid pKL1 was constructed, and the site of the Hg/sup r/-determinant and the regions essential for replication were localized. By comparing the results of the present study and previously-obtained data it was proposed that in a given microbiocoenosis the Hg/sup r/-determinants may occur in plasmids which differ markedly in structure and properties.

  13. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  14. Comparison of mercury sulfides with mercury chloride and methylmercury on hepatic P450, phase-2 and transporter gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, S F; Wu, Q; Zhang, B B; Li, H; Xu, Y S; Du, Y Z; Wei, L X; Liu, J

    2016-09-01

    Zuotai (mainly β-HgS) and Zhusha (also called as cinnabar, mainly α-HgS) are used in traditional medicines in combination with herbs or even drugs in the treatment of various disorders, while mercury chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury (MeHg) do not have known medical values but are highly toxic. This study aimed to compare the effects of mercury sulfides with HgCl2 and MeHg on hepatic drug processing gene expression. Mice were orally administrated with Zuotai (β-HgS, 30mg/kg), α-HgS (HgS, 30mg/kg), HgCl2 (33.6mg/kg), or MeHg (3.1mg/kg) for 7days, and the expression of genes related to phase-1 drug metabolism (P450), phase-2 conjugation, and phase-3 (transporters) genes were examined. The mercurials at the dose and duration used in the study did not have significant effects on the expression of cytochrome P450 1-4 family genes and the corresponding nuclear receptors, except for a slight increase in PPARα and Cyp4a10 by HgCl2. The expressions of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and sulfotransferase were increased by HgCl2 and MeHg, but not by Zuotai and HgS. HgCl2 decreased the expression of organic anion transporter (Oatp1a1), but increased Oatp1a4. Both HgCl2 and MeHg increased the expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein genes (Mrp1, Mrp2, Mrp3, and Mrp4). Zuotai and HgS had little effects on these transporter genes. In conclusion, Zuotai and HgS are different from HgCl2 and MeHg in hepatic drug processing gene expression; suggesting that chemical forms of mercury not only affect their disposition and toxicity, but also affect their effects on the expression of hepatic drug processing genes. PMID:27473830

  15. LOW CONCENTRATION MERCURY SORPTION MECHANISMS AND CONTROL BY CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS; APPLICATION IN COAL-FIRED PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) and mercuric chloride (HgCl2) by three types of calcium (Ca)-based sorbents was examined in this bench-scale study under conditions prevalent in coal fired utilities. Ca-based sorbent performances were compared to that of an activated carbon...

  16. Synthetic and structural investigations of mercurous and mercuric organophosphonates and phenylarsonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalwar, Nitin Balkrushna; Vidyasagar, Kanamaluru

    2016-11-01

    The following twelve mercurous and mercuric organophosphomates, bis/diphosphonates and phenylarsonates have been isolated and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, 13C-and 31P NMR, infrared and Raman spectroscopic methods: Hg2(HO3PC6H5)2(1), Hg2(HO3P(C6H4)PO3H)(2), Hg2(HO3P(C6H4)2PO3H)(3), Hg2(HO3P(CH2)4PO3H)(4), Hg2(O3PC6H5)·H2O(5), (Hg2)2(O3P(CH2)2PO3)(6), (Hg2)2(O3P(CH2)3PO3)(7), Hg(O3PC6H5)·H2O(8), Hg(O3PCH2C6H5)·H2O(9), Hg(O3AsC6H5)·H2O(10), Hg3(O3AsC6H5)2(HO3AsC6H5)2(11) and (Hg2)Hg3(O3P(C6H4)PO3)2·2H2O(12). Compounds 1-7 are the first examples of mercurous phosphonates and di/bisphosphonates. They contain Hg2O6 units, which consist of Hg22+ cations with Hg-Hg bond of ~2.5 Å length. Phenylphosphonates 1 and 5 are layered compounds, whereas bis/diphosphonates 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 have pillared-layered and three-dimensional structures. Compounds 8-11 are layered mercuric phosphonates and phenylarsonates. Compound 12 is a three-dimensional mixed-valent mercury phenylenebisphosphonate.

  17. Sorption of mercuric ion by synthetic nanocrystalline mackinawite (FeS).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Y; Klaue, Bjorn; Blum, Joel D; Hayes, Kim F

    2007-11-15

    Iron sulfides are known to be efficient scavengers of heavy metals. In this study, Hg(II) sorption was investigated using synthetic nanocrystalline mackinawite (a disordered phase) as a function of initial Hg(II) concentration [Hg(II)]0, initial FeS concentration [FeS]0, total chloride concentration CIT, and pH. Hg(II) sorption mechanisms are dependent on relative concentrations of [Hg(II)]0 and [FeS]0 (the molar ratio of [Hg(II)0/[FeS]0). When the molar ratio of [Hg(II)]0/[FeS]o is as low as 0.05, adsorption is mainly responsible for Hg(II) removal, with its contribution to the overall sorption increasing at lower Cl(T). As the molar ratio increases, the adsorption capacity becomes saturated, resulting in precipitation of a sparingly soluble HgS(s). XRD analysis indicates formation of metacinnabar (beta-HgS). Concurrently with HgS(s) precipitation, the released Fe(II) from FeS(s) is resorbed by adsorption at acidic pH and either adsorption or precipitation as Fe (hydr)-oxides at neutral to basic pH. Subsequently, the Fe precipitate formed at neutral to basic pH serves as an adsorbent for Hg(II). Under the conditions where either adsorption or HgS(s) precipitation is dominant, more than 99% of [Hg(II)]0 is immobilized. When the molar ratio of [Hg(II)]0/[FeS]0 exceeds 1, the sulfide concentration is no longer sufficient for HgS(s) precipitation, and formation of chloride salts (Hg2Cl2 at acidic pH and HgCl2 x 3HgO at basic pH) occurs.

  18. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  19. Potentiometric determination of saccharin in dietary products using mercurous nitrate as titrant.

    PubMed

    Fo, O F; Moraes, A J; Dos Santos, G

    1993-05-01

    A rapid, precise and low cost method for saccharin determination in dietary products is proposed. Saccharin in several samples is potentiometrically titrated with mercurous nitrate solution using a silver wire coated with a metallic mercury film as the working electrode, and the end point was found using a Gran's plot. The detection limit of sodium saccharin was 0.5 mg/ml and the best pH range was from 2.0 to 3.5. Sucrose, glucose, aspartame, sodium cyclamate, sorbitol, fructose, benzoic acid, salicylic acid and lactose do not interfere even in significant amounts. The interference due to the presence of chloride and/or phosphate ions can be eliminated by previous solvent extraction of this sweetener. Recovery of saccharin from various dietary products gave from 95.2 to 103.2% of the label claim.

  20. A central role for the mast cell in early phase vasculitis in the Brown Norway rat model of vasculitis: a histological study

    PubMed Central

    Vinen, Catherine S; Turner, David R; Oliveira, David B G

    2004-01-01

    Administration of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) to Brown Norway rats causes Th2-dominated autoimmunity with raised immunoglobulin E concentrations and gut vasculitis, both of which are T-cell dependent, peak at 14 days after starting HgCl2 and then spontaneously resolve. If animals are re-challenged with HgCl2 6 weeks after initial exposure, they are resistant to autoimmunity, developing only attenuated disease. Recently, a separate phase of early caecal vasculitis was described beginning 24 h after initiating HgCl2 and prior to caecal entry of T cells. Previous work suggested this early vasculitis was αβ T-cell independent and implied a role for mast cells. We further tested this hypothesis by performing a histological study during the first 93 h following HgCl2 challenge defining the precise relationship between gut mast cell degranulation and appearing caecal vasculitis. We also studied whether early caecal vasculitis enters a resistant phase upon re-challenge with HgCl2. We show a direct correlation between mast cell degranulation and early caecal vasculitis following initial HgCl2 challenge. We demonstrate resistance to re-challenge in this phase of injury, with results at re-challenge also showing a correlation between mast cell degranulation and early caecal injury. PMID:15255970

  1. Growth of mercuric iodide single crystals from dimethylsulfoxide

    DOEpatents

    Carlston, Richard C.

    1976-07-13

    Dimethylsulfoxide is used as a solvent for the growth of red mercuric iodide (HgI.sub.2) crystals for use in radiation detectors. The hygroscopic property of the solvent allows controlled amounts of water to enter into the solvent phase and diminish the large solubility of HgI.sub.2 so that the precipitating solid collects as well-defined euhedral crystals which grow into a volume of several cc.

  2. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S. . Santa Barbara Operations); Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI[sub 2]) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper will discuss the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI[sub 2], as well as preliminary correlations between HgI[sub 2] detector performance and elemental contamination levels.

  3. Direct vapor/solid synthesis of mercuric iodide using compounds of mercury and iodine

    DOEpatents

    Skinner, Nathan L.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing high purity mercuric iodide by passing a gaseous source of a mercuric compound through a particulate bed of a low vapor pressure iodide compound which is maintained at an elevated temperature which is the lower of either: (a) just below the melting or volatilization temperature of the iodide compound (which ever is lower); or (b) just below the volatilization point of the other reaction product formed during the reaction; to cause the mercuric compound to react with the iodide compound to form mercuric iodide which then passes as a vapor out of the bed into a cooler condensation region.

  4. Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, Jerry A.; Bosuego, Gail P.

    1982-01-01

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  5. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Ariesanti, Elsa; Corcoran, Bridget

    2004-04-30

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers.

  6. MICRURGICAL STUDIES IN CELL PHYSIOLOGY : II. THE ACTION OF THE CHLORIDES OF LEAD, MERCURY, COPPER, IRON, AND ALUMINUM ON THE PROTOPLASM OF AMOEBA PROTEUS.

    PubMed

    Reznikoff, P

    1926-09-20

    I. Plasmalemma. 1. The order of toxicity of the salts used in these experiments on the surface membrane of a cell, taking as a criterion viability of amebae immersed in solutions for 1 day, is HgCl(2), FeCl(3)> AlCl(3)> CuCl(2)> PbCl(2)> FeCl(2). Using viability for 5 days as a criterion, the order of toxicity is PbCl(2)> CuCl(2)> HgCl(2)> AlCl(3)> FeCl(3)> FeCl(2). 2. The rate of toxicity is in the order FeCl(3)> HgCl(2)> AlCl(3)> FeCl(2)> CuCl(2)> PbCl(2). 3. The ability of amebae to recover from a marked tear of the plasmalemma in the solutions of the salts occurred in the following order: AlCl(3)> PbCl(2)> FeCl(2)> CuCl(2)> FeCl(3)> HgCl(2). II. Internal Protoplasm. 4. The relative toxicity of the salts on the internal protoplasm, judged by the recovery of the amebae from large injections and the range over which these salts can cause coagulation of the internal protoplasm, is in the following order: PbCl(2)> CuCl(2)> FeCl(3)> HgCl(2)> FeCl(2)> AlCl(3). 5. AlCl(3) in concentrations between M/32 and M/250 causes a marked temporary enlargement of the contractile vacuole. FeCl(2), FeCl(3), and CuCl(3) produce a slight enlargement of the vacuole. 6. PbCl(2), in concentrations used in these experiments, appears to form a different type of combination with the internal protoplasm than do the other salts. III. Permeability. 7. Using the similarity in appearance of the internal protoplasm after injection and after immersion to indicate that the surface is permeable to a substance in which the ameba is immersed, it is concluded that AlCl(3) can easily penetrate the intact plasmalemma. CuCl(2) also seems to have some penetrating power. None of the other salts studied give visible internal evidence of penetrability into the ameba. IV. Toxicity. 8. The toxic action of the chlorides of the heavy metals used in these experiments, and of aluminum, is exerted principally upon the surface of the cell and is due not only to the action of the metal cation but also to acid which

  7. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies of mercuric-iodide photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Markakis, J. M.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.

    1989-09-01

    Mercuric-iodide (HgI2 ) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photocurrent-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse.

  8. Development of mercuric iodide uncooled x ray detectors and spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained in the development of miniature, lowpower, light weight mercuric iodide, HgI2, x ray spectrometers for future space missions are summarized. It was demonstrated that HgI2 detectors can be employed in a high resolution x ray spectrometer, operating in a scanning electron microscope. Also, the development of HgI2 x ray detectors to augment alpha backscattering spectrometers is discussed. These combination instruments allow for the identification of all chemical elements, with the possible exception of hydrogen, and their respective concentrations. Additionally, further investigations of questions regarding radiation damage effects in the HgI2 x ray detectors are reported.

  9. METHYLMERCURY BUT NOT MERCURIC CHLORIDE INDUCES APOPTOTIC CELL DEATH IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal development of the nervous system requires the process of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, to remove superfluous neurons. Abnormal patterns of apoptosis may be a consequence of exposure to environmental neurotoxicants leading to a disruption in the tightly regul...

  10. Separation of mercury from aqueous mercuric chloride solutions by onion skins

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Konishi, Y.; Tomisaki, H.; Nakanishi, M.

    1986-01-01

    The separation of mercury from aqueous HgCl/sub 2/ solutions by onion skins (outermost coat) was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The distribution equilibria were measured by the batchwise method. The experimental results revealed that onion skin is a useful material for separating mercury from aqueous systems. The distribution data obtained at 25/sup 0/C were analyzed by using the theory based on the law of mass action. The separation of dissolved mercury by onion skins was found to be a process accompanied by an ion-exchange reaction of the cationic complex HgCl/sup +/ and an adsorption of the neutral complex HgCl/sub 2/. The equilibrium constants of the ion-exchange and adsorption processes at 25/sup 0/C and the mercury-binding capacity of onion skins were determined. Further, it was found that the distribution equilibrium of mercury is comparatively insensitive to temperature.

  11. OFT sectorization approach to analysis of optical scattering in mercurous chloride single crystals.

    PubMed

    Pata, Petr; Klima, Milos; Bednar, Jan; Janout, Petr; Barta, Cestmir; Hasal, Radek; Maresi, Luca; Grabarnik, Semen

    2015-08-10

    This paper is devoted to the application of the optical Fourier transform (OFT) for the study and evaluation of optical scattering in the latest generation of calomel single crystals ready for application in several possible devices such as IR polarizers and acoustooptic tunable filters (AOTF). There are numerous effects that are responsible for the scattering of optical wave passing through the crystal sample volume and surface layers because they affect the optical crystal quality. The scattering level is a crucial and limiting parameter in many technical applications of the evaluated crystal. The proposed approach is based upon the high dynamic range optical FT configuration, creating the amplitude spectrum in the focal plane and its spatial angular distribution analysis based on the spectrum sectorization. The optical scattering pattern was tested in nine locations within each crystal sample volume and on numerous crystal samples. The experimental results are presented and discussed.

  12. Nephrotoxic effects on offspring of rats chronically treated with mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Rusk, T.L.

    1983-08-01

    Repeated subcutaneous injections of HgCl/sub 2/ at a dose of either 4.0 or 2.0 mg/kg produced toxic effects in rats when administered during the last 9 days of gestation. Females exhibited diarrhea, anorexia and weight loss of varying severity. Maternal renal function was monitored by urinalysis and was shown to be impaired during the early days of treatment but returned to normal later. Histological evaluation of adult kidneys after 2 days of treatment demonstrated the nephrotoxic effects of HgCl/sub 2/. Evidence of the regenerative process was found in tubules lined with densely packed, flattened cuboidal epithelial cells. Pup birth weight among HgCl/sub 2/-exposed litters was significantly lower than that of control litters. Nephrotoxic effects were not identifiable in pups though the presence of mercury was confirmed in fetal kidneys. 93 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Toxicokinetics of methylmercury and mercuric chloride in mouse embryos in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, Ichiro; Kajiwara, Yuji ); Matsumoto, Nobuo )

    1991-11-01

    Inorganic mercury such as MC is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and transfers inefficiently to the fetus but accumulates in the placenta in the mid and late gestation period. Therefore, it has been suggested that MM has much greater toxicity than MC in general. But, toxicity of MC shows another aspect during very early gestational stages, especially before the formation of the placenta. That is, female mice treated with MC showed abnormal preimplantation embryos with lower doses than those of MM. In the present experiment, the authors examined the embyrotoxicity differences between MM and MC in vitro, and then discussed those results using the data of transfer of MM and MC into the embryo.

  14. VLSI readout for imaging with polycrystalline mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato; Dulinski, Wojtek; Husson, D.; Klein, N.; Riester, J. L.; Schieber, Michael M.; Zuck, A.; Braiman, M.; Melekhov, L.; Nissenbaum, J.; Sanguinetti, S.

    1998-11-01

    Recently polycrystalline mercuric iodide have become available, for room temperature radiation detectors over large areas at low cost. Though the quality of this material is still under improvement, ceramic detectors have been already been successfully tested with dedicated low-noise, low-power mixed signal VLSI electronics which can be used for compact, imaging solutions. The detectors used are of different kinds: microstrips and pixels; of different sizes, up to about 1 square inch; and of different thickness, up to 600 microns. The properties of this first-generation detectors are quite uniform from one detector to another. Also for each single detector the response is quite uniform and no charge loss in the inter-electrode space have been detected. Because of the low cost and of the polycrystallinity, detectors can be potentially fabricated in any size and shape, using standard ceramic technology equipment, which is an attractive feature where low cost and large area applications are needed.

  15. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S.; Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper discusses the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI{sub 2}, as well as preliminary correlations between HgI{sub 2} detector performance and elemental contamination levels. The purified HgI{sub 2} is grown into a single crystal by physical vapor transport. The crystal are cut into slices and they are fabricated into room temperature radiation detectors and photocells. Crystals that produce good resolution gamma detector do not necessarily make good resolution photocells or x-ray detectors. Many factors other than elemental impurities may contribute to these differences in performance.

  16. Mercuric Iodide Photocell Technology for Room Temperature Readout of Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Warnick Kernan et al.

    2007-08-31

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by thickness of the detector, which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We are reporting here preliminary results in using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of various scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Preliminary nuclear response from a HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a Ce3+ :LaBr3 scintillator will also be presented and discussed. Further improvements will be sought by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  17. [A STUDY OF IMPACT OF MERCURY CHLORIDE ON MYOCARDIUM IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Kamynsky, R; Primachenko, V; Sokurenko, L; Chaikovsky, Y

    2016-02-01

    The article is devoted to the study of the myocardium structural reorganization features under the action of 0,01 LD50 of mercury chloride (II) rats when comparing chronic (30 injections) and subchronic (10 injections) exposures. Structural-metabolic reorganization of the myocardium was studied using histological, histochemical and electron microscopic methods. Computer morphometric analysis with subsequent statistical processing was applied. It was established that the main mechanisms of cardiotoxic effect of mercuric chloride are: hypoxia (due to damage to micro vessels; disorder of myogenic regulation at the expense of damage intercalated discs) and the appearance of cell detrits and abnormal proteins as a result of the destruction of cardiomyocytes. Sensitive to the toxic effects of chloride mercuric in low doses are myofibrils, sarcoplasmic network and the energy apparatus of cardiomyocytes - the mitochondria. It was found that chronic exposure to low doses of mercuric chloride causes non-specific qualitative and quantitative changes in all structural components of the heart, damage to the tissue barrier is ongoing and dynamic and resorptive insufficiency hemomicrocirculatory bed of the heart that leads to chronic swelling that causes the development of diffuse fibrosis and enhances cardiac decompensation activities.

  18. Assessment of genotoxicity of inorganic mercury in rats in vivo using both chromosomal aberration and comet assays.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Niladri; Patra, Manomita

    2015-07-01

    The major objective of the present investigation was to assess the genotoxic effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl2), an inorganic mercury (Hg), in rats (Rattus norvegicus) using two different genetic endpoints, namely, chromosomal aberration (CA) and comet assays following both short-term (acute) and long-term (chronic) exposures. The study showed that the acute exposures to HgCl2 at 2 and 5 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) induced nonsignificant effects. HgCl2 at 10 and 12 mg/kg b.w. was significantly toxic and is exhibited by the induction of different types of CAs like chromatid breaks, chromosomal breaks, clumps and damaged cells and types of comets. HgCl2 at 15 mg/kg b.w. was found to be highly toxic, as mitostatic condition of cells were observed in CA assay. Chronic exposure to the lowest dose (2 mg/kg b.w.) of HgCl2 for 15 consecutive days produced a significant genotoxicity. Although Hg was found to induce both DNA strand breakage and chromosomal breaks in a dose-dependent manner, the results of the present investigation showed that the combination of comet and CA assays provided a better choice for assessing the genotoxicity of inorganicHg. PMID:23448859

  19. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  20. Protein method for investigating mercuric reductase gene expression in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Ogunseitan, O A

    1998-02-01

    A colorimetric assay for NADPH-dependent, mercuric ion-specific oxidoreductase activity was developed to facilitate the investigation of mercuric reductase gene expression in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Protein molecules extracted directly from unseeded freshwater and samples seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PU21 (Rip64) were quantitatively assayed for mercuric reductase activity in microtiter plates by stoichiometric coupling of mercuric ion reduction to a colorimetric redox chain through NADPH oxidation. Residual NADPH was determined by titration with phenazine methosulfate-catalyzed reduction of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium to produce visible formazan. Spectrophotometric determination of formazan concentration showed a positive correlation with the amount of NADPH remaining in the reaction mixture (r2 = 0.99). Mercuric reductase activity in the protein extracts was inversely related to the amount of NADPH remaining and to the amount of formazan produced. A qualitative nitrocellulose membrane-based version of the method was also developed, where regions of mercuric reductase activity remained colorless against a stained-membrane background. The assay detected induced mercuric reductase activity from 10(2) CFU, and up to threefold signal intensity was detected in seeded freshwater samples amended with mercury compared to that in mercury-free samples. The efficiency of extraction of bacterial proteins from the freshwater samples was (97 +/- 2)% over the range of population densities investigated (10(2) to 10(8) CFU/ml). The method was validated by detection of enzyme activity in protein extracts of water samples from a polluted site harboring naturally occurring mercury-resistant bacteria. The new method is proposed as a supplement to the repertoire of molecular techniques available for assessing specific gene expression in heterogeneous microbial communities impacted by mercury pollution.

  1. Vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R

    1999-01-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is an important plastic resin for construction, pipe and tubing, siding, and other uses. Exposures to vinyl chloride monomer during the early years of production resulted in an important sentinel health event: the recognition of an excess of a rare liver cancer, hepatic angiosarcoma, at facilities throughout the world. Several other syndromes, including acro-osteolysis, also have been associated with PVC, but less clearly with vinyl chloride. Extensive research ranging from large-scale epidemiologic studies to biomarker research into molecular mechanisms continues to provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of occupational cancer.

  2. Novel semiconductor radiation detector based on mercurous halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Henry; Kim, Joo-Soo; Amarasinghe, Proyanthi; Palosz, Withold; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir; Burger, Arnold; Marsh, Jarrod C.; Litz, Marc S.; Wiejewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Gupta, Neelam; Jensen, Janet; Jensen, James

    2015-08-01

    The three most important desirable features in the search for room temperature semiconductor detector (RTSD) candidate as an alternative material to current commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) material for gamma and/or thermal neutron detection are: low cost, high performance and long term stability. This is especially important for pager form application in homeland security. Despite years of research, no RTSD candidate so far can satisfy the above 3 features simultaneously. In this work, we show that mercurous halide materials Hg2X2 (X= I, Cl, Br) is a new class of innovative compound semiconductors that is capable of delivering breakthrough advances to COTS radiation detector materials. These materials are much easier to grow thicker and larger volume crystals. They can detect gamma and potentially neutron radiation making it possible to detect two types of radiation with just one crystal material. The materials have wider bandgaps (compared to COTS) meaning higher resistivity and lower leakage current, making this new technology more compatible with available microelectronics. The materials also have higher atomic number and density leading to higher stopping power and better detector sensitivity/efficiency. They are not hazardous so there are no environmental and health concerns during manufacturing and are more stable making them more practical for commercial deployment. Focus will be on Hg2I2. Material characterization and detector performance will be presented and discussed. Initial results show that an energy resolution better than 2% @ 59.6 keV gamma from Am-241 and near 1% @ 662 keV from Cs-137 source can be achieved at room temperature.

  3. Vapor growth of mercuric iodide tetragonal prismatic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariesanti, Elsa

    The effect of polyethylene addition on the growth of mercuric iodide (HgI2) tetragonal prismatic crystals is examined. Three types of polyethylene powder are utilized: low molecular weight (Mw ˜ 4 x 103), ultra high molecular weight (Mw ˜ 3-6 x 1066), and spectrophotometric grade polyethylenes. Among these types of polyethylene, the low molecular weight polyethylene produces the most significant change in HgI2 morphology, with {110} being the most prominent crystal faces. Thermal desorption - gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopy (TD-GC/MS) studies show that thermal desorption of the low molecular weight polyethylene at 100°C and 150°C produce isomers of alkynes, odd nalkanes, and methyl (even-n) alkyl ketones. HgI2 growth runs with n-alkanes, with either neicosane, n-tetracosane, or n-hexatriacontane, cannot replicate the crystal shapes produced during growth with the low molecular weight polyethylene, whereas HgI2 growth runs with ketones, with either 3-hexadecanone or 14-heptacosanone, produce HgI2 tetragonal prismatic crystals, similar to the crystals grown with the low molecular weight polyethylene. C-O double bond contained in any ketone is a polar bond and this polar bond may be attracted to the mercury atoms on the top-most layer of the {110} faces through dipoledipole interaction. As a result, the growth of the {110} faces is impeded, with the crystals elongated in the [001] direction and bounded by the {001} faces along with large, prismatic {110} faces.

  4. Mesozoic hydrothermal alteration associated with gold mineralization in the Mercur district, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.N.; Parry, W.T. )

    1990-09-01

    K/Ar dates and chemical data show that a Mesozoic gold-bearing hydrothermal system altered black shales of the Mississippian Great Blue Limestone throughout an area encompassing the Mercur gold district, Utah. K/Ar dates of illite veins and illite-rich, clay-sized separates of altered shales that are enriched in Au, As, Hg, Sc, and other heavy metals indicate that hydrothermal activity occurred from 193 to 122 Ma. Several ages from within the Mercur district cluster near 160 Ma and may date the minimum age of gold mineralization.

  5. Scrubbing of iodine from gas streams with mercuric nitrate-conversion of mercuric iodate product to barium iodate for fixation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.C.; Moore, J.G.; Morgan, M.T.

    1980-06-01

    A bench-scale model of a mercuric nitrate scrubber for removal of iodine from off-gas streams was constructed and operated in conjunction with a mercuric iodate-to-barium iodate conversion system to determine the feasibility of total recycle of all processing solutions. The two main aspects of the system examined were (1) the extent of contamination of the barium iodate product, and (2) the effect of cross-contamination of various process solutions on the efficiency of the process. The experimental evidence obtained indicates that, with appropriate control, all solutions can be recycled without significant contamination of the product that would be harmful to the host concrete or to the environment. Mercury contamination was found to be less than or equal to 0.5 wt % of the barium iodate product. The most significant effect on system efficiency was determined to be barium hydroxide contamination of the sodium hydroxide solution used to convert mercuric iodate to sodium iodate. A mole ratio of barium hydroxide to sodium hydroxide of about 1:225 caused a decrease in conversion efficiency of about 45%.

  6. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  7. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  8. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  9. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  10. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 01 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  11. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  12. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  13. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  14. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  15. Growth of mercuric iodide (HgI2) for nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, L.; Schnepple, W. F.

    1988-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a material used for the fabrication of the sensing element in solid state X-ray and gamma ray detecting instruments. The operation of the devices is determined to a large degree by the density of structural defects in the single crystalline material used in the sensing element. Since there were strong indications that the quality of the material was degraded by the effects of gravity during the growth process, a research and engineering program was initiated to grow one or more crystals of mercuric iodide in the reduced gravity environment of space. A special furnace assembly was designed which could be accommodated in a Spacelab rack, and at the same time made it possible to use the same growth procedures and controls used when growing a crystal on the ground. The space crystal, after the flight, was subjected to the same evaluation methods used for earth-grown crystals, so that comparisons could be made.

  16. Use of mercuric iodide x-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Wang, Y.J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Economou, T.E.; Turkevich, A.L. . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) spectrometer inserted into an Alpha Backscattering Instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos Mission. The results obtained with the HgI{sub 2} ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using a Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. The authors' efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are described.

  17. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Cho, Kyungmin; Cheng, Lei; Keener, Tim C; Jegadeesan, Gautham; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2009-08-01

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2), mercury oxide (HgO), mercury sulfide (HgS), and mercuric sulfate (HgSO4) were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg2Cl2 and HgCl2 could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury.

  18. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Cho, Kyungmin; Cheng, Lei; Keener, Tim C; Jegadeesan, Gautham; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2009-08-01

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2), mercury oxide (HgO), mercury sulfide (HgS), and mercuric sulfate (HgSO4) were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg2Cl2 and HgCl2 could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. PMID:19728491

  19. In vitro effect of mercuric chloride and sodium selenite on chemiluminescent response of pronephros cells isolated from Tilapia, oreochromis aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.W.; Sin, Y.M.

    1995-12-01

    Phagocytosis is a basic immunological function of mononuclear phagocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. This process is a major defence mechanism in fish which involves recognition and killing of pathogenic microorganisms. It has been reported that phagocytic cells consume more oxygen and release several reactive oxygen species (ROS) during phagocytosis. This {open_quote}respiratory burst{close_quote} was first quantified by measuring the chemiluminescence (CL) emitted from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and later in fish phagocytes. The oxygen intermediates responsible for this CL reaction include O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, {center_dot}OH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} which are also the major bactericidal agents in phagocytes{prime} oxygen-dependent killing process. Therefore, CL response can be used as an indicator of phagocytosis. This study is designed to examine the individual effects of mercury and selenium and also their possible interaction on CL response of fish pronephros phagocytes, because a defect in phagocytosis may predispose fish to diseases. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Highly photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals for rapid, label-free and recyclable detection of mercuric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the thiol group, the fluorescence can be fully recovered by biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione, therefore, a regenerative strategy has been proposed and successfully applied to detect Hg2+ by the same sensor for at least five cycles. Endowed with relatively high sensitivity and selectivity, the present sensor holds the potential to be applied for mercuric assay in water.Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the

  1. Growth of single crystals of mercuric iodide on the ground and in space

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, L.

    1993-06-01

    A short review is given of the methods by which mercuric iodide is prepared and purified to obtain material suitable for the growth of single crystals. Method used in our laboratory to grow single crystals up to 1,000 grams in weight from the vapor is discussed. Effects of gravity on the growth process are described. A crystal growth system suitable for operation in the reduced gravity environment of space has been designed and crystal growth experiments have been performed during the flights of Spacelab 3 (April 1985) and the International Microgravity Laboratory (January 1992). Structural quality and electronic properties of ground-based and space-grown crystals are compared.

  2. Protective effects of selenium against mercury toxicity in cultured Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella plagiodon) renal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Barber, D; Pfeiffer, C J

    2001-11-01

    Marine mammals are known for their low susceptibility to mercury toxicity, and selenium may play a role in this protection against mercury intoxication. To gain insight into mechanisms by which selenium might inhibit mercury toxicity in cetacean cells, we investigated the effects of sodium selenite on cell proliferation and cell death (including apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis) of control and mercuric chloride-treated Atlantic spotted dolphin renal cells (Sp1K cells). Concurrent exposure to 80 microM Na2SeO3 provided full protection against the decrease in cell proliferation induced by 20 microM HgCl2. Pretreatment with Na2SeO3 increased the protective effects of selenium administered later in conjunction with mercury, but pretreatment alone did not provide protection against mercury given alone. Furthermore, Na2SeO3 administered after the exposure to HgCl2 did not protect cells. These data suggest that the coexistence of Na2SeO3 and HgCl2 was essential for the protective effects of Na2SeO3 against the toxicity of HgCl2 in Sp1K cells, and may involve selenium-mercury binding. This is supported by the results of an experiment in which earlier premixed mercury and selenium solutions were less cytotoxic than freshly mixed solutions. Furthermore, HgCl2 induced apoptosis in Sp1K cells, as revealed by nuclear specific dye (7-AAD) incorporation and cell flow cytometry, and this was prevented by the concurrent exposure to Na2SeO3. Inhibition of mercury-induced apoptosis in marine mammal cells, provided by selenium, may contribute to the in vivo protection. This study is the first report that addresses the mechanism of mercury-selenium antagonism in cultured cetacean cells at the cellular level. PMID:11598777

  3. Synthesis, characterization, thermolysis and performance evaluation of mercuric-5-nitrotetrazole (MNT).

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Chhabra, J S; Agrawal, A P; Asthana, S N; Rao, K U B; Singh, Haridwar

    2004-09-10

    Mercuric-5-nitrotetrazole (MNT) was synthesized on using a reported method. The product having bulk density of 1.5 g/cm3, was obtained during this work using mercuric nitrate doped with additives such as cephol/dextrin in the process. Synthesized MNT was characterized by metal content analysis, IR and ESCA. The DTA profile indicated the thermal stability of MNT up to 200 degrees C. It revealed its higher thermally sensitive [thermal sensitive figure (S) approximately 0.8] in comparison to that of service lead azide (SLA) [S approximately 0.4]. Percussion sensitivity data also showed higher sensitivity of MNT. However, it was found less friction sensitive than SLA. The chemical stability of MNT in a carbon dioxide environment was evaluated in comparison to SLA by determining mercury (gravimetrically) and lead azide (volumetrically) contents respectively. Results obtained indicated that no discernable changes occurred in MNT, even after storage for 90 days while in case of SLA, drastic change in lead azide content was observed. IR spectra of MNT sample stored in a closed aluminum dish for 5-10 years could be superimposed on that of the freshly prepared MNT sample. The performance of MNT filled detonator no. 27 assessed in terms of extent of damage on a witness plate was found equivalent to that of the standard ASA (azide, styphynate and aluminium) composition filled detonator.

  4. Biochemical and Structural Properties of a Thermostable Mercuric Ion Reductase from Metallosphaera sedula

    PubMed Central

    Artz, Jacob H.; White, Spencer N.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Fugate, Corey J.; Hicks, Danny; Gauss, George H.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Mercuric ion reductase (MerA), a mercury detoxification enzyme, has been tuned by evolution to have high specificity for mercuric ions (Hg2+) and to catalyze their reduction to a more volatile, less toxic elemental form. Here, we present a biochemical and structural characterization of MerA from the thermophilic crenarchaeon Metallosphaera sedula. MerA from M. sedula is a thermostable enzyme, and remains active after extended incubation at 97°C. At 37°C, the NADPH oxidation-linked Hg2+ reduction specific activity was found to be 1.9 μmol/min⋅mg, increasing to 3.1 μmol/min⋅mg at 70°C. M. sedula MerA crystals were obtained and the structure was solved to 1.6 Å, representing the first solved crystal structure of a thermophilic MerA. Comparison of both the crystal structure and amino acid sequence of MerA from M. sedula to mesophillic counterparts provides new insights into the structural determinants that underpin the thermal stability of the enzyme. PMID:26217660

  5. Growth of high quality mercurous halide single crystals by physical vapor transport method for AOM and radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Priyanthi M.; Kim, Joo-Soo; Chen, Henry; Trivedi, Sudhir; Qadri, Syed B.; Soos, Jolanta; Diestler, Mark; Zhang, Dajie; Gupta, Neelam; Jensen, Janet L.; Jensen, James

    2016-09-01

    Single crystals of mercurous halide were grown by physical vapor transport method (PVT). The orientation and the crystalline quality of the grown crystals were determined using high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) technique. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the grown mercurous bromide crystals was measured to be 0.13 degrees for (004) reflection, which is the best that has been achieved so far for PVT grown mercurous halide single crystals. The extended defects of the crystals were also analyzed using high resolution x-ray diffraction topography. Preliminary studies were carried out to evaluate the performance of the crystals on acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and gamma-ray detector applications. The results indicate the grown mercurous halide crystals are excellent materials for acousto-optic modulator device fabrication. The diffraction efficiencies of the fabricated AOM device with 1152 and 1523 nm wavelength lasers polarizing parallel to the acoustic wave were found to be 35% and 28%, respectively. The results also indicate the grown crystals are a promising material for gamma-ray detector application with a very high energy resolution of 1.86% FWHM.

  6. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC: 2005. ...

  7. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  8. An optical sensor for mercuric ion based on immobilization of Rhodamine B derivative in PVC membrane.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lixin; Zhao, Yan; Du, Juan; Xiao, Dan

    2012-03-15

    A novel prepared mercuric ion PVC membrane sensor based on a Rhodamine B derivative (RND) as a selective sensing material was described. The sensor exhibited a specific fluorescent off-on response to Hg(2+), and showed a linear response over the Hg(2+) concentration range from 1.0 × 10(-9) to 2.0 × 10(-3)M with a very low detection limit of 8.1 × 10(-10)M in bulk method. The sensor has also been incorporated into a flow-cell for determination of Hg(2+) in flowing streams with improved sensitivity and detection limit. The sensor shows excellent selectivity toward Hg(2+) with respect to common coexisting cations. The proposed fluorescence optode was successfully applied to detect Hg(2+) in environmental water samples and fish. PMID:22365681

  9. X-ray analysis of alpha mercuric iodide crystal structure and processing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, L.; Wang, E.X.; Cheng, A.Y.

    1993-07-01

    X-ray topography and rocking curve experiments were performed on {alpha}-mercuric iodide samples. As-grown crystals were examined for Intrinsic defects and crystallinity. Orientation of certain defects depends on the direction of crystal growth. The propagation of as-grown crystalline features was documented. The extent of crystal damage Introduced during various steps of device fabrication such as sawing, polishing, etching and contact deposition was explored. Coefficients of linear thermal expansion of {alpha}{sub 33} = 54 {plus_minus} 5{center_dot}10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C along the tetragonal c-axis, [001] direction and {alpha}{sub 11} = 11 {plus_minus} 4{center_dot}10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C in the [100] direction were measured.

  10. Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Of Thin Indium-Tin-Oxide Contacts On Mercuric Iodide Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ralph B.; Bao, Xue J.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.; Markakis, Jeff; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, Carol

    1989-05-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminesence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photo-current-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse. Specimens of HgI2 with evaporated semi-transparent tin and indium films were also investigated. The spectra obtained from points beneath the Sn and In films suggest that the regions having poor photoresponse in the ITO-contacted photodetector contain either free tin or indium metal.

  11. Expressing a bacterial mercuric ion binding protein in plant for phytoremediation of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ju-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chein, Mei-Fang; Chang, Jo-Shu; Endo, Ginro; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2009-01-30

    A specific mercuric ion binding protein (MerP) originating from transposon TnMERI1 of Bacillus megaterium strain MB1 isolated from Minamata Bay displayed good adsorption capability for a variety of heavy metals. In this study, the Gram-positive MerP protein was expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis to create a model system for phytoremediation of heavy metals. Under control of an actin promoter, the transgenic Arabidpsis showed higher tolerance and accumulation capacity for mercury, cadium and lead when compared with the control plant. Results from confocal microscopy analysis also indicate that MerP was localized at the cell membrane and vesicles of plant cells. The developed transgenic plants possessing excellent metal-accumulative ability could have potential applications in decontamination of heavy metals.

  12. Use of mercuric iodide X-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI2) spectrometer inserted into an alpha backscattering instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos mission. The results obtained with the HgI2 ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using an Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. Efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are also described. The results presented indicate that the energy resolution and sensitivity of HgI2 detectors are adequate to meet the performance needs of a number of proposed space applications, particularly those in which cooled silicon X-ray detectors are impractical or even not usable, such as for the target science programs on geoscience opportunities for lunar surface, Mars surface, and other comet and planetary missions being planned by NASA and ESA.

  13. Growth of single crystals of mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) in spacelab III

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Berg, L.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    Continued development of a system designed to grow crystals by physical vapor transport in the environment of Spacelab III will be described, with special emphasis on simulation of expected space conditions, adjustment of crystal growth parameters, and on board observation and control of the experiment by crew members and ground personnel. A critical factor in the use of mercuric iodide for semiconductor detectors of x-rays and gamma-rays is the crystalline quality of the material. The twofold purpose of the Spacelab III experiment is therefore to grow single crystals with superior electronic properties as an indirect result of the greatly reduced gravity field during the growth, and to obtain data which will lead to improved understanding of the vapor transport mechanism. The experiments planned to evaluate the space crystals, including gamma-ray diffractometry and measurements of stoichiometry, lattice dimensions, mechanical strength, luminescense, and detector performance are discussed.

  14. Mercuric iodide composite films using polyamide, polycarbonate and polystyrene fabricated by casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugucioni, J. C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Mulato, M.

    2010-10-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) composite films were obtained by using the casting technique. Insulator polymers such as polyamide, polycarbonate and polystyrene were mixed to HgI2 crystallites forming a final sub-millimeter thick self-standing film. Fabrication temperature varied from 10 to 100 °C, and total fabrication time reached at most 5 min. The larger the fabrication temperature, the thinner the film and the smaller its electrical resistivity. Electrical characterization was performed in the dark, under UV illumination and under mammographic X-ray exposure. The final properties of the films are discussed and related to fabrication conditions. The optimized composite film might be a better candidate for use as X-ray detector for medical imaging, in place of the single HgI2 crystalline device.

  15. Mercury Resistance and Mercuric Reductase Activities and Expression among Chemotrophic Thermophilic Aquificae

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Zachary; Zhu, Chengsheng

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) by the reduction of mercuric to elemental Hg is broadly distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea and plays an important role in Hg detoxification and biogeochemical cycling. MerA is the protein subunit of the homodimeric mercuric reductase (MR) enzyme, the central function of the mer system. MerA sequences in the phylum Aquificae form the deepest-branching lineage in Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions of all known MerA homologs. We therefore hypothesized that the merA homologs in two thermophilic Aquificae, Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 (AAS1) and Hydrogenivirga sp. strain 128-5-R1-1 (R1-1), specified Hg resistance. Results supported this hypothesis, because strains AAS1 and R1-1 (i) were resistant to >10 μM Hg(II), (ii) transformed Hg(II) to Hg(0) during cellular growth, and (iii) possessed Hg-dependent NAD(P)H oxidation activities in crude cell extracts that were optimal at temperatures corresponding with the strains' optimal growth temperatures, 55°C for AAS1 and 70°C for R1-1. While these characteristics all conformed with the mer system paradigm, expression of the Aquificae mer operons was not induced by exposure to Hg(II) as indicated by unity ratios of merA transcripts, normalized to gyrA transcripts for hydrogen-grown AAS1 cultures, and by similar MR specific activities in thiosulfate-grown cultures with and without Hg(II). The Hg(II)-independent expression of mer in the deepest-branching lineage of MerA from bacteria whose natural habitats are Hg-rich geothermal environments suggests that regulated expression of mer was a later innovation likely in environments where microorganisms were intermittently exposed to toxic concentrations of Hg. PMID:22773655

  16. Exposure to mercury alters early activation events in fish leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    MacDougal, K C; Johnson, M D; Burnett, K G

    1996-01-01

    Although fish in natural populations may carry high body burdens of both organic and inorganic mercury, the effects of this divalent metal on such lower vertebrates is poorly understood. In this report, inorganic mercury in the form of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is shown to produce both high-dose inhibition and low-dose activation of leukocytes in a marine teleost fish, Sciaenops ocellatus. Concentrations of inorganic mercury > or = 10 microM suppressed DNA synthesis and induced rapid influx of radiolabeled calcium, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins. Lower concentrations (0.1-1 microM) of HgCl2 that activated cell growth also induced a slow sustained rise in intracellular calcium in cells loaded with the calcium indicator dye fura-2, but did not produce detectable tyrosine phosphorylation of leukocyte proteins. These studies support the possibility that subtoxic doses of HgCl2 may inappropriately activate teleost leukocytes, potentially altering the processes that regulate the magnitude and specificity of the fish immune response to environmental pathogens. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:8930553

  17. Mercury in air and plant specimens in herbaria: a pilot study at the MAF Herbarium in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Oyarzun, R; Higueras, P; Esbrí, J M; Pizarro, J

    2007-11-15

    We present data from a study of mercury concentrations in air and plant specimens from the MAF Herbarium in Madrid (Spain). Hg (gas) emissions from old plant collections treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) in herbaria may pose a health risk for staff working in installations of this type. This is an issue not yet properly addressed. Plants that underwent insecticide treatment with HgCl(2) at the MAF Herbarium until the mid 1970s have persistent high concentrations of Hg in the range 1093-11,967 microg g(-1), whereas untreated specimens are in the range of 1.2-4.3 microg g(-1). The first group induces high concentrations of Hg (gas) in the main herbarium room, with seasonal variations of 404-727 ng m(-3) (late winter) and 748-7797 ng m(-3) (early summer) (baseline for Hg: 8 ng m(-3)). A test survey at another herbarium in Madrid showed even higher concentrations of Hg (gas) above 40,000 ng m(-3). The World Health Organization guidelines for chronic exposure to Hg (gas) are estimated at a maximum of 1000 ng m(-3). While staff was aware of the existence of HgCl(2) treated plants (the plant specimen sheets are labelled as 'poisoned'), they had no knowledge of the presence of high Hg (gas) concentrations in the buildings, a situation that may be relatively common in herbaria. PMID:17590416

  18. Mercuric iodide research and development in support of DOE Historically Black Colleges and University Program. Semiannual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    George, M.A.; Zheng, Y.; Salary, L.; Chen, K.T.; Burger, A.

    1994-10-31

    This report describes the progress achieved during the first six months of the program. The different subjects studied were: zone refining experiments of mercuric iodide to establish optimum refining parameters and produce purified material; development of surface reflection spectroscopy as a method to measure crystal surface temperatures, with emphasis on investigation the potential of using optical multichannel analysis; optical methods for measuring iodine vapor during physical vapor transport of HgI{sub 2}; and atomic force microscopy studies.

  19. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  20. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  1. Structure and dynamics of a compact state of a multidomain protein, the mercuric ion reductase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sharp, Melissa A; Poblete, Simón; Biehl, Ralf; Zamponi, Michaela; Szekely, Noemi; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Winkler, Roland G; Nauss, Rachel E; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M; Yi, Zheng; Cheng, Xiaolin; Liang, Liyuan; Ohl, Michael; Miller, Susan M; Richter, Dieter; Gompper, Gerhard; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-15

    The functional efficacy of colocalized, linked protein domains is dependent on linker flexibility and system compaction. However, the detailed characterization of these properties in aqueous solution presents an enduring challenge. Here, we employ a novel, to our knowledge, combination of complementary techniques, including small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, and all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained simulation, to identify and characterize in detail the structure and dynamics of a compact form of mercuric ion reductase (MerA), an enzyme central to bacterial mercury resistance. MerA possesses metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) tethered to its catalytic core domain by linkers. The NmerA domains are found to interact principally through electrostatic interactions with the core, leashed by the linkers so as to subdiffuse on the surface over an area close to the core C-terminal Hg(II)-binding cysteines. How this compact, dynamical arrangement may facilitate delivery of Hg(II) from NmerA to the core domain is discussed.

  2. Volatilization of fluorescein mercuric acetate by marine bacterial from Minamata Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kunihiko )

    1989-05-01

    Some bacteria that live in a mercury-polluted environment are resistant to mercury compounds. A majority of these mercury-resistant bacterial have been found to volatilize organic as well as inorganic mercury compounds into elemental mercury vapor by means of their enzymes. One compound, fluorescein mercuric acetate (FMA) has long been in use as a disinfectant in hospitals; yet, there has been little definitive information on bacterial resistance to this compound. Minamata Bay has been heavily polluted by mercury, which has caused methylmercury poisoning in humans, called Minamata disease. Sediments from the Bay still contain high concentrations of mercury. The percentage of mercury-resistant bacteria in the total bacterial count is higher in these sediments than in those of other marine environments. FMA-pollution, however, has not been reported. Research into the mechanism of bacterial resistance to FMA will not only add to our general understanding of the ability of certain bacteria to resist mercury, but will also help in defining the role bacteria play in the mercury cycle of a mercury-polluted environment. The purpose of the present study is to determine the mechanism of resistance to FMA of the FMA-resistant bacteria living in the Bay.

  3. Femtomolar detection of mercuric ions using polypyrrole, pectin and graphene nanocomposites modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2016-12-01

    Several nanomaterials and techniques for the detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) have been developed in the past decade. However, simple, low-cost and rapid sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions yet remains an important task. Herein, we present a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the femtomolar detection of Hg(2+) based on polypyrrole, pectin, and graphene (PPy/Pct/GR) which was prepared by one step electrochemical potentiodyanamic method. The effect of concentration of pectin, polypyrrole and graphene were studied for the detection of Hg(2+). The influence of experimental parameters including effect of pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential were also studied. Different pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was chosen to detect Hg(2+) at PPy/Pct/GR/GCE modified electrode. The fabricated sensor achieved an excellent performance towards Hg(2+) detection such as higher sensitivity of 28.64μAμM(-1) and very low detection limit (LOD) of 4 fM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. The LOD of our sensor offered nearly 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of recommended concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water by United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Compared to all previously reported electrochemical sensors towards Hg(2+) detection, our newly fabricated sensor attained a very LOD in the detection of Hg(2+). The practicality of our proposed sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) was successfully demonstrated in untreated tap water.

  4. A study of mercuric oxide and zinc-air battery life in hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, C; Lacey, N K

    1997-09-01

    The requirement to phase out mercuric oxide (mercury) batteries on environmental grounds has led to the widespread introduction of zinc-air technology. The possibility arises that high drain hearing aids may not be adequately catered for by zinc-air cells, leading to poor performance. This study investigated the hearing aid user's ability to perceive differences between zinc-air and mercury cells in normal everyday usage. The data was collected for 100 experienced hearing aid users in field trials. Users report 50 per cent greater life for zinc-air cells in high power aids and 28 per cent in low power aids. The average life of the zinc-air cells range from 15 days in high power to 34 days in low power aids. Users are able to perceive a difference in sound quality in favour of zinc-air cells for low and medium power aids. The hearing aid population is not disadvantaged by phasing out mercury cells. PMID:9373545

  5. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, B.

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide in solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, M.A.; Rafiuddin

    1987-05-01

    The kinetics and the mechanism of the reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide were studied in the solid state by X-ray, chemical analysis, and electrical conductivity measurements. This is a multistep reaction where Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ is formed as an intermediate. In an equimolar mixture of Ag/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ and HgI/sub 2/, AgI an HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed, whereas in a 1:2 molar mixture Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ and HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed. The data for lateral diffusion best fit the equation X/sup n/ = kt, where X is the product thickness, t is time, and k and n are constants. This is a multistep solid state ionic reaction initiated by the diffusion of HgI/sub 2/ molecules as such and not through counterdiffusion of cations.

  7. Femtomolar detection of mercuric ions using polypyrrole, pectin and graphene nanocomposites modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2016-12-01

    Several nanomaterials and techniques for the detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) have been developed in the past decade. However, simple, low-cost and rapid sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions yet remains an important task. Herein, we present a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the femtomolar detection of Hg(2+) based on polypyrrole, pectin, and graphene (PPy/Pct/GR) which was prepared by one step electrochemical potentiodyanamic method. The effect of concentration of pectin, polypyrrole and graphene were studied for the detection of Hg(2+). The influence of experimental parameters including effect of pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential were also studied. Different pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was chosen to detect Hg(2+) at PPy/Pct/GR/GCE modified electrode. The fabricated sensor achieved an excellent performance towards Hg(2+) detection such as higher sensitivity of 28.64μAμM(-1) and very low detection limit (LOD) of 4 fM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. The LOD of our sensor offered nearly 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of recommended concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water by United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Compared to all previously reported electrochemical sensors towards Hg(2+) detection, our newly fabricated sensor attained a very LOD in the detection of Hg(2+). The practicality of our proposed sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) was successfully demonstrated in untreated tap water. PMID:27565958

  8. Perforated monolayers: Design and synthesis of porous and cohesive monolayers from mercurated calix(n)arenes

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, M.A.; Janout, V.; Regen, S.L. ); Castner, D.G. )

    1989-10-11

    Mercuration of a series of O-alkylated calix(n)arenes (produced via reaction of tetrahydroxycalix(4)arene, pentahydroxylcalix(5)arene, hexahydroxycalix(6)arene, and heptahydroxycalix(7)arene with n-bromobutane and with n-bromohexadecane) afford an homologous series of calixarene-based surfactants that form stable monolayers at the air-water interface. Surface pressure-area isotherms, measured for each calixarene, yield limiting areas that are in excellent agreement with values predicted from space-filling models, if it is assumed that the base of each calixarene is parallel and the alkyl chains are perpendicular to the water surface. Introduction of malonic acid to the aqueous subphase results in a substantial increase in the cohesiveness of films derived from calix(4)arene-, calix(5)arene-, and calix(6)arene-based surfactants, as judged by changes in surface viscosity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of a Langmuir-Blodgett film, produced from a malonic acid stabilized calix(6)arene monolayer, shows a carboxylate/mercury ratio of 0.9.

  9. Photochemical reactions of divalent mercury with thioglycolic acid: formation of mercuric sulfide particles.

    PubMed

    Si, Lin; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a key toxic global pollutant. Studies in aquatic environment have suggested that thiols could be important for mercury speciation. Thioglycolic acid has been detected in various natural water systems and used as a model compound to study the complicated interaction between mercury and polyfunctional dissolved organic matter (DOM). We herein presented the first evidence for mercury particle formation during kinetic and product studies on the photochemistry of divalent mercury (Hg(2+)) with thioglycolic acid at near environmental conditions. Mercuric sulfide (HgS) particles formed upon photolysis were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry and select area electron diffraction. Kinetic data were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometry and cold vapour atomic fluorescent spectrometry. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant under our experimental conditions was calculated to be (2.3±0.4)×10(-5) s(-1) at T=296±2 K and pH 4.0. It was found that (89±3)% of the reactants undergo photoreduction to generate elemental mercury (Hg(0)). The effects of ionic strengths, pH and potassium ion were also investigated. The formation of HgS particles pointed to the possible involvement of heterogeneous processes. Our kinetic results indicated the importance of weak binding sites on DOM to Hg in photoreduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0). The potential implications of our data on environmental mercury transformation were discussed.

  10. Class II haplotype differentially regulates immune response in HgCl2-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hanley, G A; Schiffenbauer, J; Sobel, E S

    1997-09-01

    One of the most striking features of exposure to low doses of mercury in mice is the high-titer haplotype-linked anti-nucleolar (ANoA) autoantibody response. Mice of H-2(s) haplotype have been high responders, while H-2(b) mice have been low. This pattern has been attributed to the class II molecule itself, but the poor response of F1 crosses between high and low responders raised the possibility that the anti-fibrillarin specificity was actually due to a closely linked dominant negative gene. To test the role of class II explicitly, F1 crosses between congenic B6.SJL (H-2(s)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice with a targeted deletion of I-AbAbeta were generated, creating mice heterozygous for all MHC loci, but expressing only I-As. In comparison with B6.SJL, no diminution of ANoA titers was found, proving that I-As itself was responsible for susceptibility and I-Ab for downregulation. Unlike I-A, expression of the I-E class II molecule could not downregulate the response in an otherwise susceptible mouse. These results suggest a complicated role for class II in the regulation of a novel, environmentally induced autoimmune response.

  11. Metabolic inhibition of root water flow in red-osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, M; Zwiazek, J J

    2001-04-01

    The short-term effects of sodium azide (NaN(3)) on water flow in red-osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera Michx.) seedlings were examined in excised roots at a constant pressure of 0.3 MPa. NaN(3) significantly decreased root water flow rates (Q(v)). It also induced a significant reduction in root respiration and reduced stomatal conductance to a greater extent in intact seedlings than in excised shoots. Apoplastic flow of water increased with the NaN(3)-induced decreases in Q(v). Mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) was also used to characterize the water flow responses and respiration of dogwood roots. Similarly to NaN(3), 0.1 and 0.3 mM HgCl(2) decreased root respiration rates and Q(v). The lower, 0.05 mM HgCl(2) treatment, reduced Q(v), but had no significant effect on root oxygen uptake. The reduction of Q(v) in HgCl(2)-treated plants was only partly reversed by 50 mM mercaptoethanol. The mercurial inhibition of Q(v) suggested the presence of Hg-sensitive water channels in dogwood roots. The results indicate that root-absorbed NaN(3) metabolically inhibited water channel activities in roots and in shoots and resulted in stomatal closure. It is suggested that the inhibition of respiration that occurs in plants stressed with environmental factors such as flooding, cold soils, and drought may be responsible for the closure of water channels in root cells and inhibition of root water flow.

  12. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  13. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  14. Hydrogen chloride test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Detector uses tertiary amine, which makes reaction fairly specific for relatively small highly polarized hydrogen chloride molecule. Reaction is monitored by any microbalance capable of measuring extremely small mass differences in real time.

  15. Modification of mercury-induced biochemical alterations by Triticum Aestivum Linn in rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, B V S; Sudhakar, M; Nireesha, G

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation has been undertaken to evaluate role of Wheat grass extract in modifying mercury-induced biochemical alterations in albino rats. Mercuric chloride 5 mg/kg body weight i.p. was given on 11, 13 & 15th day of the experiment. Wheat grass extract (400 mg/kg) and Quercetin (10 mg/kg) were administered 10 days before mercuric chloride administration and continued up to 30 days after mercuric chloride administration. The animals were sacrificed on 1, 15 and 30 days, the activity of serum alkaline and acid phosphatase and the iron, calcium, BUN, creatinine, SGPT, SGOT, total bilirubin, total protein levels were measured. Tissue lipid peroxidation content, glutathione (GSH) level, anti-oxidant enzymes- CAT and GR were measured. Hematological indices were also estimated. Mercury intoxication causes significant increase (P < 0.001) in calcium level, acid phosphatase, BUN, creatinine, SGOT, SGPT, total bilirubin, lipid peroxidation content and significant decrease in iron level, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and CAT, GR and glutathione level. Wheat grass extract pre- and post-treatment ameliorated mercury-induced alterations in terms of biochemical and hematological parameters. Concomitant treatment of Wheatgrass extract with Mercury showed prominent recovery and normal architecture with mild residual degeneration in the tissues. Thus from present investigation, it can be concluded that Wheat grass extract pre- and post-treatment with HgCl2 significantly modulate or modify mercury-induced biochemical alteration in albino rats. PMID:26215012

  16. MRP2 and the handling of mercuric ions in rats exposed acutely to inorganic and organic species of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, Christy C. Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2011-02-15

    Mercuric ions accumulate preferentially in renal tubular epithelial cells and bond with intracellular thiols. Certain metal-complexing agents have been shown to promote extraction of mercuric ions via the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2). Following exposure to a non-toxic dose of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), in the absence of complexing agents, tubular cells are capable of exporting a small fraction of intracellular Hg{sup 2+} through one or more undetermined mechanisms. We hypothesize that MRP2 plays a role in this export. To test this hypothesis, Wistar (control) and TR{sup -} rats were injected intravenously with a non-nephrotoxic dose of HgCl{sub 2} (0.5 {mu}mol/kg) or CH{sub 3}HgCl (5 mg/kg), containing [{sup 203}Hg], in the presence or absence of cysteine (Cys; 1.25 {mu}mol/kg or 12.5 mg/kg, respectively). Animals were sacrificed 24 h after exposure to mercury and the content of [{sup 203}Hg] in blood, kidneys, liver, urine and feces was determined. In addition, uptake of Cys-S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+} and methylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}) was measured in inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from either control Sf9 cells or Sf9 cells transfected with human MRP2. The amount of mercury in the total renal mass and liver was significantly greater in TR{sup -} rats than in controls. In contrast, the amount of mercury in urine and feces was significantly lower in TR{sup -} rats than in controls. Data from membrane vesicles indicate that Cys-S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} are transportable substrates of MRP2. Collectively, these data indicate that MRP2 plays a role in the physiological handling and elimination of mercuric ions from the kidney.

  17. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg(2+) transfer between flexibly linked domains of mercuric ion reductase.

    PubMed

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel E; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-10-28

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase MerA is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) that can transfer Hg(2+) to the catalytic core domain (Core) for reduction to Hg(0). These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are susceptible to proteolysis, the latter of which has prevented characterization of the interactions of NmerA and the Core in the full-length protein. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA from the Tn21 mer operon using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structures of full-length wild-type and mutant MerA proteins that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg(2+) from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions, and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations as a result of flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg(2+) from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed the formation of a metal-mediated interaction between NmerA and the Core and the determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg(2+) handoff.

  18. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  19. L-cysteine protected copper nanoparticles as colorimetric sensor for mercuric ions.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Razium A; Nafady, Ayman; Sirajuddin; Memon, Najma; Sherazi, Tufail H; Kalwar, Nazar H

    2014-12-01

    This report demonstrates a novel, simple and efficient protocol for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles in aqueous solution using L-cysteine as capping or protecting agent. UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy was employed to monitor the LSPR band of L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles (Cyst-Cu NPs) based on optimizing various reaction parameters. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provided information about the surface interaction between L-cysteine and Cu NPs. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) confirmed the formation of fine spherical, uniformly distributed Cyst-Cu NPs with average size of 34 ± 2.1 nm. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) illustrated the formation of pure metallic phase crystalline Cyst-Cu NPs. As prepared Cyst-Cu NPs were tested as colorimetric sensor for determining mercuric (Hg(2+)) ions in an aqueous system. Cyst-Cu NPs demonstrated very sensitive and selective colorimetric detection of Hg(2+) ions in the range of 0.5 × 10(-6)-3.5 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) based on decrease in LSPR intensity as monitored by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The developed sensor is simple, economic compared to those based on precious metal nanoparticles and sensitive to detect Hg(2+) ions with detection limit down to 4.3 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The sensor developed in this work has a high potential for rapid and on-site detection of Hg(2+) ions. The sensor was successfully applied for assessment of Hg(2+) ions in real water samples collected from various locations of the Sindh River.

  20. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg2+ transfer between flexibly-linked domains of mercuric ion reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase, MerA, is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess a metallochaperone-like N-terminal domain, NmerA, that can transfer Hg2+ to the catalytic core (Core) for reduction to Hg0. These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are subject to proteolysis, which has limited structural and functional characterization of the interactions of these domains. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structure of constructs that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg2+ from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations resulting from flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg2+ from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg2+ handoff. The small buried surface area at the site of interaction suggests molecular recognition may be of less importance for the integrity of metal ion transfers between tethered domains than for transfers between separate proteins in metal trafficking pathways.

  1. Multigram-scale synthesis of l,d-heptoside using a Fleming-Tamao oxidation promoted by mercuric trifluoroacetate.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianlei; Tikad, Abdellatif; Durka, Maxime; Pan, Weidong; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2016-09-01

    An efficient multigram-scale synthesis of methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-l-glycero-α-d-manno-heptopyranoside from methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-α-d-mannopyranoside is reported. It involves a sequence of Swern oxidation, Grignard addition and Fleming-Tamao reactions. The resulting scaffold was used as a precursor to design a small library of clickable l-heptosides. This study shows that the use of mercuric bistrifluoroacetate is required both to accelerate and to cleanly perform the Fleming-Tamao oxidation, without side-reactions. PMID:27450667

  2. Improved COD Measurements for Organic Content in Flowback Water with High Chloride Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Isabel; Park, Ho Il; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-01

    An improved method was used to determine chemical oxygen demand (COD) as a measure of organic content in water samples containing high chloride content. A contour plot of COD percent error in the Cl(-)-Cl(-):COD domain showed that COD errors increased with Cl(-):COD. Substantial errors (>10%) could occur in low Cl(-):COD regions (<300) for samples with low (<10 g/L) and high chloride concentrations (>25 g/L). Applying the method to flowback water samples resulted in COD concentrations ranging in 130 to 1060 mg/L, which were substantially lower than the previously reported values for flowback water samples from Marcellus Shale (228 to 21 900 mg/L). It is likely that overestimations of COD in the previous studies occurred as result of chloride interferences. Pretreatment with mercuric sulfate, and use of a low-strength digestion solution, and the contour plot to correct COD measurements are feasible steps to significantly improve the accuracy of COD measurements. PMID:26931531

  3. Improved COD Measurements for Organic Content in Flowback Water with High Chloride Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Isabel; Park, Ho Il; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-01

    An improved method was used to determine chemical oxygen demand (COD) as a measure of organic content in water samples containing high chloride content. A contour plot of COD percent error in the Cl(-)-Cl(-):COD domain showed that COD errors increased with Cl(-):COD. Substantial errors (>10%) could occur in low Cl(-):COD regions (<300) for samples with low (<10 g/L) and high chloride concentrations (>25 g/L). Applying the method to flowback water samples resulted in COD concentrations ranging in 130 to 1060 mg/L, which were substantially lower than the previously reported values for flowback water samples from Marcellus Shale (228 to 21 900 mg/L). It is likely that overestimations of COD in the previous studies occurred as result of chloride interferences. Pretreatment with mercuric sulfate, and use of a low-strength digestion solution, and the contour plot to correct COD measurements are feasible steps to significantly improve the accuracy of COD measurements.

  4. A mercuric detector system for X-ray astronomy. 2. Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, Texas. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 O.7 x 10-5 counts/sec cm keV over the energy range of 40 to 80 keV. This measurement was within 50% of the predicted value. The measured rate is approx 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range. The prediction was based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the detector assembly in the radiation environment at float altitude.

  5. EXAFS study of mercury(II) sorption to Fe- and Al-(hydr)oxides. II. Effects of chloride and sulfate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher S; Rytuba, James J; Brown, Gordon E

    2004-02-01

    Common complexing ligands such as chloride and sulfate can significantly impact the sorption of Hg(II) to particle surfaces in aqueous environmental systems. To examine the effects of these ligands on Hg(II) sorption to mineral sorbents, macroscopic Hg(II) uptake measurements were conducted at pH 6 and [Hg](i)=0.5 mM on goethite (alpha-FeOOH), gamma-alumina (gamma-Al(2)O(3)), and bayerite (beta-Al(OH)(3)) in the presence of chloride or sulfate, and the sorption products were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The presence of chloride resulted in reduced uptake of Hg(II) on all three substrates over the Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)]) range 10(-5) to 10(-2) M, lowering Hg surface coverages on goethite, gamma-alumina, and bayerite from 0.42 to 0.07 micromol/m(2), 0.06 to 0.006 micromol/m(2), and 0.55 to 0.39 micromol/m(2) ([Cl(-)]=10(-5) to 10(-3) M only), respectively. This reduction in Hg(II) uptake is primarily a result of the formation of stable, nonsorbing aqueous HgCl(2) complexes in solution, limiting the amount of free Hg(II) available to sorb. At higher [Cl(-)] beam reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(I) was observed, resulting in the possible formation of aqueous Hg(2)Cl(2) species and the precipitation of calomel, Hg(2)Cl(2(s)). The presence of sulfate caused enhanced Hg(II) uptake over the sulfate concentration ([SO(4)(2-)]) range 10(-5) to 0.9 M, increasing Hg surface coverages on goethite, gamma-alumina, and bayerite from 0.39 to 0.45 micromol/m(2), 0.11 to 0.38 micromol/m(2), and 0.36 to 3.33 micromol/m(2), respectively. This effect is likely due to the direct sorption or accumulation of sulfate ions at the substrate interface, effectively reducing the positive surface charge that electrostatically inhibits Hg(II) sorption. Spectroscopic evidence for ternary surface complexation was observed in isolated cases, specifically in the Hg-goethite-sulfate system at high [SO(4)(2-)] and in the Hg-goethite-chloride system.

  6. EXAFS study of mercury(II) sorption to Fe- and Al-(hydr)oxides - II. Effects of chloride and sulfate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2004-01-01

    Common complexing ligands such as chloride and sulfate can significantly impact the sorption of Hg(II) to particle surfaces in aqueous environmental systems. To examine the effects of these ligands on Hg(II) sorption to mineral sorbents, macroscopic Hg(II) uptake measurements were conducted at pH 6 and [Hg]i=0.5 mM on goethite (??-FeOOH), ??-alumina (??-Al2O3), and bayerite (??-Al(OH)3) in the presence of chloride or sulfate, and the sorption products were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The presence of chloride resulted in reduced uptake of Hg(II) on all three substrates over the Cl- concentration ([Cl-]) range 10-5 to 10-2 M, lowering Hg surface coverages on goethite, ??-alumina, and bayerite from 0.42 to 0.07 ??mol/m2, 0.06 to 0.006 ??mol/m2, and 0.55 to 0.39 ??mol/m2 ([Cl -]=10-5 to 10-3 M only), respectively. This reduction in Hg(II) uptake is primarily a result of the formation of stable, nonsorbing aqueous HgCl2 complexes in solution, limiting the amount of free Hg(II) available to sorb. At higher [Cl-] beam reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(I) was observed, resulting in the possible formation of aqueous Hg2Cl2 species and the precipitation of calomel, Hg 2Cl2(s). The presence of sulfate caused enhanced Hg(II) uptake over the sulfate concentration ([SO42-]) range 10-5 to 0.9 M, increasing Hg surface coverages on goethite, ??-alumina, and bayerite from 0.39 to 0.45 ??mol/m2, 0.11 to 0.38 ??mol/m2, and 0.36 to 3.33 ??mol/m2, respectively. This effect is likely due to the direct sorption or accumulation of sulfate ions at the substrate interface, effectively reducing the positive surface charge that electrostatically inhibits Hg(II) sorption. Spectroscopic evidence for ternary surface complexation was observed in isolated cases, specifically in the Hg-goethite-sulfate system at high [SO42-] and in the Hg-goethite-chloride system. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  8. Toxicological significance of renal Bcrp: Another potential transporter in the elimination of mercuric ions from proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, Christy C. Zalups, Rudolfs K.; Joshee, Lucy

    2015-06-01

    Secretion of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) from proximal tubular cells into the tubular lumen has been shown to involve the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2). Considering similarities in localization and substrate specificity between Mrp2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), we hypothesize that Bcrp may also play a role in the proximal tubular secretion of mercuric species. In order to test this hypothesis, the uptake of Hg{sup 2+} was examined initially using inside-out membrane vesicles containing Bcrp. The results of these studies suggest that Bcrp may be capable of transporting certain conjugates of Hg{sup 2+}. To further characterize the role of Bcrp in the handling of mercuric ions and in the induction of Hg{sup 2+}-induced nephropathy, Sprague–Dawley and Bcrp knockout (bcrp{sup −/−}) rats were exposed intravenously to a non-nephrotoxic (0.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}), a moderately nephrotoxic (1.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}) or a significantly nephrotoxic (2.0 μmol·kg{sup −1}) dose of HgCl{sub 2}. In general, the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} was greater in organs of bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in Sprague–Dawley rats, suggesting that Bcrp may play a role in the export of Hg{sup 2+} from target cells. Within the kidney, cellular injury and necrosis was more severe in bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in controls. The pattern of necrosis, which was localized in the inner cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla, was significantly different from that observed in Mrp2-deficient animals. These findings suggest that Bcrp may be involved in the cellular export of select mercuric species and that its role in this export may differ from that of Mrp2. - Highlights: • Bcrp may mediate transport of mercury out of proximal tubular cells. • Hg-induced nephropathy was more severe in Bcrp knockout rats. • Bcrp and Mrp2 may differ in their ability to transport Hg.

  9. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  10. A mercuric ensemble based on a cycloruthenated complex as a visual probe for iodide in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianlong; Guo, Lieping; Ma, Yajuan; Li, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    A new water-soluble cycloruthenated complex Ru(bthiq)(dcbpy)2+ (1, Hbthiq = 1-(2-benzo[b]thiophenyl)isoquinoline, dcbpy = 4,4‧-dicarboxylate-2,2‧-bipyridine) was designed and synthesized to form its mercuric ensemble (1-Hg2+) to achieve visual detection of iodide anions. The binding constant of 1-Hg2+ is calculated to be 2.40 × 104 M-1, which is lower than that of HgI2. Therefore, the addition of I- to the aqueous solution of 1-Hg2+lead to significant color changes from yellow to deep-red by the release of 1. The results showed that iodide anions could be easily detected by the naked eyes. The detection limit of iodide anion is calculated as 0.77 μM. In addition, an easily-prepared test strip of 1-Hg2+ was obtained successfully to detect iodide anions.

  11. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  12. Structure/Function Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Role of Dynamic Motions in Mercuric Ion Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the activities and findings of our structure/function studies of the bacterial detoxification enzyme mercuric ion reductase. The objectives of the work were to obtain crystal structure information for the catalytic core of this enzyme, use the information to investigate the importance of specific parts of the enzyme to its function, and investigate the role of one domain of the enzyme in its function within cells. We describe the accomplishments towards these goals including many structures of the wild type and mutant forms of the enzyme that highlight its interactions with its Hg(II) substrate, elucidation of the role of the N-terminal domain in vitro and in vivo, and elucidation of the roles of at two conserved residues in the core in the mechanism of catalysis.

  13. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  14. Effect of Selenium on the Levels of Cytokines and Trace Elements in Toxin-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Ansar, S

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is an essential cofactor in the key enzymes involved in cellular antioxidant defense. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of selenium on mercury chloride (HgCl2)-induced toxicity. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of six animals each. The first group was control; the second group was treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2: 50 mg/kg/bw). The third group was treated with sodium selenite (Se 0.2 mg/kg/bw), and the fourth group received Se (0.2 mg/kg/bw) plus HgCl2 (50 mg/kg for 24 h). The influence of Se on mercury induced levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and zinc, copper, and iron in serum of rats were observed. The serum MDA, SOD, zinc, and iron concentrations were found to be statistically different among the control and toxin-treated group. The serum levels of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α were also measured. There was a significant decrease in the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in toxin-treated group II compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05). A significant increase in the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 after administration of Se seemed to counteract some of the damage, as indicated by differences in the serum concentrations of major elements. PMID:26089086

  15. Exposure to Low Dose of Cinnabar (a Naturally Occurring Mercuric Sulfide (HgS)) Caused Neurotoxicological Effects in Offspring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Fa; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn

    2012-01-01

    Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS), has long been used in Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years. Although mercury is well-known for its toxicity, whether cinnabar induces neurotoxicity, especially in infants and children, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore the neurotoxic effects of low-dose of cinnabar (10 mg/kg/day) on developing mice. The results revealed neurobehavioral defects in F1-C-Cin group, which were associated with Hg accumulation, increased NOx levels in whole blood, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities in brain tissues. F1- and F2-Cin-V groups were found to increase brain Hg contents and prominent neurobehavioral defects compared with F1-C-V group, suggesting that the fetal brain was more susceptible to irreversible effects for cinnabar-induced damage. Moreover, F1- and F2-Cin-Cin groups had severely neurobehavioral dysfunctions, closely correlated with the further alteration of NOx levels and Na+/K+-ATPase activities than F1- and F2-C-Cin groups. Effects in F2-Cin-Cin group were more significant than those in F1-Cin-Cin group. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exposure to low-dose of cinnabar during the perinatal and developmental stages results in irreversible and severe injuries of the neurotoxicity in offspring, and NOx and Na+/K+-ATPase activities may exist potential and useful biomarkers for neurotoxicity-induced by low-doses of mercuric compounds. PMID:22888198

  16. Hg0 removal from flue gas over different zeolites modified by FeCl3.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hao; Xu, Wenqing; Wang, Jian; Tong, Li; Zhu, Tingyu

    2015-02-01

    The elemental mercury removal abilities of three different zeolites (NaA, NaX, HZSM-5) impregnated with iron(III) chloride were studied on a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) analyses were used to investigate the physicochemical properties. Results indicated that the pore structure and active chloride species on the surface of the samples are the key factors for physisorption and oxidation of Hg0, respectively. Relatively high surface area and micropore volume are beneficial to efficient mercury adsorption. The active Cl species generated on the surface of the samples were effective oxidants able to convert elemental mercury (Hg0) into oxidized mercury (Hg2+). The crystallization of NaCl due to the ion exchange effect during the impregnation of NaA and NaX reduced the number of active Cl species on the surface, and restricted the physisorption of Hg0. Therefore, the Hg0 removal efficiencies of the samples were inhibited. The TPD analysis revealed that the species of mercury on the surface of FeCl3-HZSM-5 was mainly in the form of mercuric chloride (HgCl2), while on FeCl3-NaX and FeCl3-NaA it was mainly mercuric oxide (HgO). PMID:25662245

  17. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The pure... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  1. Benzalkonium Chloride and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Paul L.; Kiland, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma patients routinely take multiple medications, with multiple daily doses, for years or even decades. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most common preservative in glaucoma medications. BAK has been detected in the trabecular meshwork (TM), corneal endothelium, lens, and retina after topical drop installation and may accumulate in those tissues. There is evidence that BAK causes corneal and conjunctival toxicity, including cell loss, disruption of tight junctions, apoptosis and preapoptosis, cytoskeleton changes, and immunoinflammatory reactions. These same effects have been reported in cultured human TM cells exposed to concentrations of BAK found in common glaucoma drugs and in the TM of primary open-angle glaucoma donor eyes. It is possible that a relationship exists between chronic exposure to BAK and glaucoma. The hypothesis that BAK causes/worsens glaucoma is being tested experimentally in an animal model that closely reflects human physiology. PMID:24205938

  2. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  3. Enhanced dissolution of cinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, M.; Ryan, J.N.; Aiken, G.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    1998-11-01

    Organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades caused a dramatic increase in mercury release from cinnabar (HgS), a solid with limited solubility. Hydrophobic (a mixture of both humic and fulvic) acids dissolved more mercury than hydrophilic acids and other nonacid fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Cinnabar dissolution by isolated organic matter and natural water samples was inhibited by cations such as Ca{sup 2+}. Dissolution was independent of oxygen content in experimental solutions. Dissolution experiments conducted in Dl water had no detectable dissolved mercury. The presence of various inorganic (chloride, sulfate, or sulfide) and organic ligands (salicylic acid, acetic acid, EDTA, or cysteine) did not enhance the dissolution of mercury from the mineral. Aromatic carbon content in the isolates correlated positively with enhanced cinnabar dissolution. {zeta}-potential measurements indicated sorption of negatively charged organic matter to the negatively charged cinnabar at pH 6.0. Possible mechanisms of dissolution include surface complexation of mercury and oxidation of surface sulfur species by the organic matter.

  4. Aging and the disposition and toxicity of mercury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Christy C; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K

    2014-05-01

    Progressive loss of functioning nephrons, secondary to age-related glomerular disease, can impair the ability of the kidneys to effectively clear metabolic wastes and toxicants from blood. Additionally, as renal mass is diminished, cellular hypertrophy occurs in functional nephrons that remain. We hypothesize that these nephrons are exposed to greater levels of nephrotoxicants, such as inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), and thus are at an increased risk of becoming intoxicated by these compounds. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of aging on the disposition and renal toxicity of Hg(2+) in young adult and aged Wistar rats. Paired groups of animals were injected (i.v.) with either a 0.5μmol·kg(-1) non-nephrotoxic or a 2.5μmol·kg(-1) nephrotoxic dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Plasma creatinine and renal biomarkers of proximal tubular injury were greater in both groups of aged rats than in the corresponding groups of young adult rats. Histologically, evidence of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis were significant features of kidneys from aged animals. In addition, proximal tubular necrosis, especially along the straight segments in the inner cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla was a prominent feature in the renal sections from both aged and young rats treated with the nephrotoxic dose of HgCl2. Our findings indicate 1) that overall renal function is significantly impaired in aged rats, resulting in chronic renal insufficiency and 2) the disposition of HgCl2 in aging rats is significantly altered compared to that of young rats. PMID:24548775

  5. Mercury volatilization by R factor systems in Escherichia coli isolated from aquatic environments of India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neerja; Ali, Arif

    2004-02-01

    Ten Escherichia coli strains isolated from five different aquatic environments representing three distinct geographical regions of India showed significantly high levels of tolerance to the inorganic form of mercury, i.e., mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)). MRD14 isolated from the Dal Lake (Kashmir) could tolerate the highest concentration of HgCl(2), i.e., 55 microg/mL, and MRF1 from the flood water of the Yamuna River (Delhi) tolerated the lowest concentration, i.e., 25 microg/mL. All ten strains revealed the presence of a plasmid of approximately 24 kb, and transformation of the isolated plasmids into the mercury-sensitive competent cells of E. coli DH5alpha rendered the transformants resistant to the same concentration of mercury as the wild-type strains. Mating experiments were performed to assess the self-transmissible nature of these promiscuous plasmids. The transfer of mercury resistance from these wild-type strains to the mercury-sensitive, naladixic acid-resistant E. coli K12 (F(-) lac(+)) strain used as a recipient was observed in six of the nine strains tested. Transconjugants revealed the presence of a plasmid of approximately 24 kb. An evaluation of the mechanism of mercury resistance in the three most efficient strains (MRG12, MRD11, and MRD14) encountered in our study was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS), and it was noted that resistance to HgCl(2) was conferred by conversion of the toxic ionic form of mercury (Hg(++)) to the nontoxic elemental form (Hg(0)) in all three strains. MRD14 volatilized mercury most efficiently. PMID:15057474

  6. Confounding effects of aqueous-phase impinger chemistry on apparent oxidation of mercury in flue gases.

    PubMed

    Cauch, Brydger; Silcox, Geoffrey D; Lighty, JoAnn S; Wendt, Jost O L; Fry, Andrew; Senior, Constance L

    2008-04-01

    Gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and chlorine are a possible pathway to producing oxidized mercury species such as mercuric chloride in combustion systems. This study examines the effect of the chemistry of a commonly used sample conditioning system on apparent and actual levels of mercury oxidation in a methane-fired, 0.3 kW, quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, Cl2, NOx, SO2) and quench rate were varied. The sample conditioning system included two impingers in parallel: one containing an aqueous solution of KCl to trap HgCl2, and one containing an aqueous solution of SnCl2 to reduce HgCl2 to elemental mercury (Hg0). Gas-phase concentrations of Cl2 as low as 1.5 ppmv were sufficient to oxidize a significant fraction of the elemental mercury in the KCl impinger via the hypochlorite ion. Furthermore, these low, but interfering levels of Cl2 appeared to persist in flue gases from several doped rapidly mixed flames with varied post flame temperature quench rates. The addition of 0.5 wt% sodium thiosulfate to the KCl solution completely prevented the oxidation from occurring in the impinger. The addition of thiosulfate did not inhibit the KCl impinger's ability to capture HgCl2. The effectiveness of the thiosulfate was unchanged by NO or SO2. These results bring into question laboratory scale experimental data on mercury oxidation where wet chemistry was used to partition metallic and oxidized mercury without the presence of sufficient levels of SO2.

  7. Aging and the Disposition and Toxicity of Mercury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Christy C.; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive loss of functioning nephrons, secondary to age-related glomerular disease, can impair the ability of the kidneys to effectively clear metabolic wastes and toxicants from blood. Additionally, as renal mass is diminished, cellular hypertrophy occurs in functional nephrons that remain. We hypothesize that these nephrons are exposed to greater levels of nephrotoxicants, such as inorganic mercury (Hg2+), and thus are at an increased risk of becoming intoxicated by these compounds. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of aging on the disposition and renal toxicity of Hg2+ in young adult and aged Wistar rats. Paired groups of animals were injected (i.v.) with either a 0.5 μmol • kg−1 non-nephrotoxic or a 2.5 μmol • kg−1 nephrotoxic dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Plasma creatinine and renal biomarkers of proximal tubular injury were greater in both groups of aged rats than in the corresponding groups of young adult rats. Histologically, evidence of glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis were significant features of kidneys from aged animals. In addition, proximal tubular necrosis, especially along the straight segments in the inner cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla was a prominent feature in the renal sections from both aged and young rats treated with the nephrotoxic dose of HgCl2. Our findings indicate 1) that overall renal function is significantly impaired in aged rats, resulting in chronic renal insufficiency and 2) the disposition of HgCl2 in aging rats is significantly altered compared to that of young rats. PMID:24548775

  8. Mercury volatilization by R factor systems in Escherichia coli isolated from aquatic environments of India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neerja; Ali, Arif

    2004-02-01

    Ten Escherichia coli strains isolated from five different aquatic environments representing three distinct geographical regions of India showed significantly high levels of tolerance to the inorganic form of mercury, i.e., mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)). MRD14 isolated from the Dal Lake (Kashmir) could tolerate the highest concentration of HgCl(2), i.e., 55 microg/mL, and MRF1 from the flood water of the Yamuna River (Delhi) tolerated the lowest concentration, i.e., 25 microg/mL. All ten strains revealed the presence of a plasmid of approximately 24 kb, and transformation of the isolated plasmids into the mercury-sensitive competent cells of E. coli DH5alpha rendered the transformants resistant to the same concentration of mercury as the wild-type strains. Mating experiments were performed to assess the self-transmissible nature of these promiscuous plasmids. The transfer of mercury resistance from these wild-type strains to the mercury-sensitive, naladixic acid-resistant E. coli K12 (F(-) lac(+)) strain used as a recipient was observed in six of the nine strains tested. Transconjugants revealed the presence of a plasmid of approximately 24 kb. An evaluation of the mechanism of mercury resistance in the three most efficient strains (MRG12, MRD11, and MRD14) encountered in our study was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS), and it was noted that resistance to HgCl(2) was conferred by conversion of the toxic ionic form of mercury (Hg(++)) to the nontoxic elemental form (Hg(0)) in all three strains. MRD14 volatilized mercury most efficiently.

  9. Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide /HgI2/ detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, A. J.; Barton, J. B.; Huth, G. C.; Whited, R.; Ortale, C.; Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    1981-02-01

    Experiments have been done to study the performance of mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region. Energy resolution values of 245 eV (FWHM) for the Mg K-alpha X-ray line at 1.25 keV and 225 eV (FWHM) for the electronic noise linewidth have been obtained for an HgI2 detector with painted carbon contacts using a pulsed-light feedback preamplifier; the whole system was operated at room temperature. The resolution values in the ultralow-energy region are still limited by electronic noise of the system. In an attempt to minimize X-ray attenuation in the front contact, detectors were prepared with thin evaporated Pd contacts. These detectors show a pronounced low-energy tailing of the photopeak below a few keV, in contrast to the spectra obtained by detectors with carbon contact. An attempt has been made to explain the tailing effect starting with models wich have been proposed to describe similar effects in Ge detectors.

  10. Mercuric reductase genes (merA) and mercury resistance plasmids in High Arctic snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine.

    PubMed

    Møller, Annette K; Barkay, Tamar; Hansen, Martin A; Norman, Anders; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren J; Boyd, Eric S; Kroer, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial reduction in Hg(2+) to Hg(0) , mediated by the mercuric reductase (MerA), is important in the biogeochemical cycling of Hg in temperate environments. Little is known about the occurrence and diversity of merA in the Arctic. Seven merA determinants were identified among bacterial isolates from High Arctic snow, freshwater and sea-ice brine. Three determinants in Bacteriodetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria showed < 92% (amino acid) sequence similarity to known merA, while one merA homologue in Alphaproteobacteria and 3 homologues from Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were > 99% similar to known merA's. Phylogenetic analysis showed the Bacteroidetes merA to be part of an early lineage in the mer phylogeny, whereas the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria merA appeared to have evolved recently. Several isolates, in which merA was not detected, were able to reduce Hg(2+) , suggesting presence of unidentified merA genes. About 25% of the isolates contained plasmids, two of which encoded mer operons. One plasmid was a broad host-range IncP-α plasmid. No known incompatibility group could be assigned to the others. The presence of conjugative plasmids, and an incongruent distribution of merA within the taxonomic groups, suggests horizontal transfer of merA as a likely mechanism for High Arctic microbial communities to adapt to changing mercury concentration.

  11. Phenyl mercuric acetate (PMA): mercury-bearing flexible gymnasium floors in schools--evaluation of hazards and controlled abatement.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Harry J; Beaulieu, Serrita; Brown, Chris

    2008-06-01

    Phenyl mercuric acetate (PMA) historically has been used as a catalyst in polyurethane systems. In the 1950s-1970s, PMA was used as a catalyst in the 3M Tartan brand polyurethane flexible floors that were installed commonly in school gymnasiums. Mercury vapor is released into air above the surface of these floors. Sampling mercury in bulk flooring material and mercury vapor in air was conducted in nine Idaho schools in the spring of 2006. These evaluations were conducted in response to concerns by school officials that the floors could contain mercury and could release the mercury vapor into the air, presenting a potential health hazard for students, staff, and visitors. Controlled abatement was conducted in one school where remodeling would impact the mercury-bearing flexible gym floors ( approximately 9,000 ft(2) total). The controlled abatement consisted of containment of the work area with negative air technology; worker protection, including mercury-specific training, use of personal protective equipment, and biological and exposure monitoring; and environmental protection, including proper disposal of mercury-bearing hazardous waste material. PMID:18365889

  12. Phenyl mercuric acetate (PMA): mercury-bearing flexible gymnasium floors in schools--evaluation of hazards and controlled abatement.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Harry J; Beaulieu, Serrita; Brown, Chris

    2008-06-01

    Phenyl mercuric acetate (PMA) historically has been used as a catalyst in polyurethane systems. In the 1950s-1970s, PMA was used as a catalyst in the 3M Tartan brand polyurethane flexible floors that were installed commonly in school gymnasiums. Mercury vapor is released into air above the surface of these floors. Sampling mercury in bulk flooring material and mercury vapor in air was conducted in nine Idaho schools in the spring of 2006. These evaluations were conducted in response to concerns by school officials that the floors could contain mercury and could release the mercury vapor into the air, presenting a potential health hazard for students, staff, and visitors. Controlled abatement was conducted in one school where remodeling would impact the mercury-bearing flexible gym floors ( approximately 9,000 ft(2) total). The controlled abatement consisted of containment of the work area with negative air technology; worker protection, including mercury-specific training, use of personal protective equipment, and biological and exposure monitoring; and environmental protection, including proper disposal of mercury-bearing hazardous waste material.

  13. Measurement of the characteristic X ray of oxygen and other ultrasoft X rays using mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Economou, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    This letter reports the detection and resolution of the characteristic X-ray of oxygen at 523 eV and other ultrasoft X-rays (photons energy less than 1 keV) using radiation detectors fabricated from the compound semi-insulator mercuric iodide (HgI2). These detectors are capable of operation at room ambient but in these experiments were slightly cooled using a Peltier element to 0 C. A pulsed light feedback preamplifier with a Peltier element cooled (to -30 deg) first stage field-effect transistor was used to amplify signals from the detector. Overall system noise level was 185 eV (full width at half-maximum) limited by the temperature of the first stage field-effect transistor. With optimal cooling of this element the characteristic X-ray of carbon at 282 eV should be measurable. These results would seem to be important in measurement of biological samples in electron column instruments.

  14. Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide /HgI2/ detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabrowski, A. J.; Barton, J. B.; Huth, G. C.; Whited, R.; Ortale, C.; Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments have been done to study the performance of mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region. Energy resolution values of 245 eV (FWHM) for the Mg K-alpha X-ray line at 1.25 keV and 225 eV (FWHM) for the electronic noise linewidth have been obtained for an HgI2 detector with painted carbon contacts using a pulsed-light feedback preamplifier; the whole system was operated at room temperature. The resolution values in the ultralow-energy region are still limited by electronic noise of the system. In an attempt to minimize X-ray attenuation in the front contact, detectors were prepared with thin evaporated Pd contacts. These detectors show a pronounced low-energy tailing of the photopeak below a few keV, in contrast to the spectra obtained by detectors with carbon contact. An attempt has been made to explain the tailing effect starting with models wich have been proposed to describe similar effects in Ge detectors.

  15. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  16. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  17. Mercury toxicity in beluga whale lymphocytes: limited effects of selenium protection.

    PubMed

    Frouin, H; Loseto, L L; Stern, G A; Haulena, M; Ross, P S

    2012-03-01

    Increasing emissions of anthropogenic mercury represents a growing concern to the health of high trophic level marine mammals. In its organic form, this metal bioaccumulates, and can be toxic to several physiological endpoints, including the immune system. In this study, we (1) evaluated the effects of inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride, HgCl2) and organic mercury (methylmercuric chloride, MeHgCl) on the in vitro function of lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas); (2) characterized the potential protective effects of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) on cell proliferation of HgCl2 or MeHgCl-treated beluga whale lymphocytes; and (3) compared these dose-dependent effects to measurements of blood Hg in samples collected from traditionally harvested beluga whales in the western Canadian Arctic. Lymphocyte proliferative responses were reduced following exposure to 1 μM of HgCl2 and 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Decreased intracellular thiol levels were observed at 10 μM of HgCl2 and 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Metallothionein induction was noted at 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Concurrent exposure of Se provided a degree of protection against the highest concentrations of inorganic Hg (3.33 and 10 μM) or organic Hg (10 μM) for T-lymphocytes. This in vitro protection of Se against Hg toxicity to lymphocytes may contribute to the in vivo protection in beluga whales exposed to high Hg concentrations. Current Hg levels in free-ranging beluga whales from the Arctic fall into the range of exposures which elicited effects on lymphocytes in our study, highlighting the potential for effects on host resistance to disease. The implications of a changing Arctic climate on Hg fate in beluga food webs and the consequences for the health of beluga whales remain pressing research needs.

  18. Synergistic effects of H2O2 with components of dental restorative materials on gluconeogenesis in rat kidney tubules.

    PubMed

    Franz-Xaver, Reichl; Jürgen, Durner; Kai, Kehe; Matthias, Folwaczny; Norbert, Kleinsasser; Markus, Schwarz; El-Mahdy, Karim; Reinhard, Hickel

    2003-05-01

    No data are available about (toxic) effects of dental materials administered in combination with H(2)O(2) from dental bleaching compounds. The effect of dental composite components triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as well as mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) and methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl), each in combination with H(2)O(2), was investigated on gluconeogenesis in kidney cells. From rats kidney tubules were prepared. Every 10 min up to 60 min 1-ml samples were drawn from the cell suspension for quantitating the glucose content. Glucose formation in controls was 3.5+/-0.3 nmol/mg.per min (mean+/-SEM, n=21). Relative rates of glucose formation were obtained by expressing individual rates as percentage of the corresponding control. X-Y concentration curves (effective concentration, EC) of the substances were calculated by fitting a four-parametric sigmoid function to the relative rates of the glucose formation at various test concentrations. At the end of the incubation period cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion. Cell viability decreased within the 60 min interval from 90% to approx. 80% (controls), <25 (HEMA), <20 (TEGDMA), <20 (H(2)O(2)) <10 (MeHgCl), and <10 (HgCl(2)). Values of 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) were calculated from fitted curves. EC(50) values were (mmol/l; mean+/-SEM; n=4): HEMA, 17.2+/-2.8; TEGDMA, 1.9+/-0.2; H(2)O(2) 0.22+/-0.03, MeHgCl, 0.016+/-0.0005; and HgCl(2), 0.0017+/-0.0005. No significant decrease of the EC(50) values was found when kidney cells were exposed to HEMA, HgCl(2), or MeHgCl in addition with H(2)O(2) (1-100 microM), compared to those EC(50) values of each compound without H(2)O(2) addition. A significant decrease of the TEGDMA EC(50) values to about 0.25 or 0.04 (mmol/l) was found when cells were exposed to TEGDMA in combination with H(2)O(2) (75 or 100 microM), compared to that TEGDMA EC(50) value without H(2)O(2) addition. The addition of H(2)O(2) (75 and 100

  19. Mercury toxicity in beluga whale lymphocytes: limited effects of selenium protection.

    PubMed

    Frouin, H; Loseto, L L; Stern, G A; Haulena, M; Ross, P S

    2012-03-01

    Increasing emissions of anthropogenic mercury represents a growing concern to the health of high trophic level marine mammals. In its organic form, this metal bioaccumulates, and can be toxic to several physiological endpoints, including the immune system. In this study, we (1) evaluated the effects of inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride, HgCl2) and organic mercury (methylmercuric chloride, MeHgCl) on the in vitro function of lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas); (2) characterized the potential protective effects of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) on cell proliferation of HgCl2 or MeHgCl-treated beluga whale lymphocytes; and (3) compared these dose-dependent effects to measurements of blood Hg in samples collected from traditionally harvested beluga whales in the western Canadian Arctic. Lymphocyte proliferative responses were reduced following exposure to 1 μM of HgCl2 and 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Decreased intracellular thiol levels were observed at 10 μM of HgCl2 and 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Metallothionein induction was noted at 0.33 μM of MeHgCl. Concurrent exposure of Se provided a degree of protection against the highest concentrations of inorganic Hg (3.33 and 10 μM) or organic Hg (10 μM) for T-lymphocytes. This in vitro protection of Se against Hg toxicity to lymphocytes may contribute to the in vivo protection in beluga whales exposed to high Hg concentrations. Current Hg levels in free-ranging beluga whales from the Arctic fall into the range of exposures which elicited effects on lymphocytes in our study, highlighting the potential for effects on host resistance to disease. The implications of a changing Arctic climate on Hg fate in beluga food webs and the consequences for the health of beluga whales remain pressing research needs. PMID:22018916

  20. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g)...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in chlorine is dissolved in water and then... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is...

  9. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  11. CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-11-30

    Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

  12. One-step green synthesis and characterization of plant protein-coated mercuric oxide (HgO) nanoparticles: antimicrobial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amlan Kumar; Marwal, Avinash; Sain, Divya; Pareek, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    The present study demonstrates the bioreductive green synthesis of nanosized HgO using flower extracts of an ornamental plant Callistemon viminalis. The flower extracts of Callistemon viminalis seem to be environmentally friendly, so this protocol could be used for rapid production of HgO. Till date, there is no report of synthesis of nanoparticles using flower extract of Callistemon viminalis. Mercuric acetate was taken as the metal precursor in the present experiment. The flower extract was found to act as a reducing as well as a stabilizing agent. The phytochemicals present in the flower extract act as reducing agent which include proteins, saponins, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, and flavonoids. FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed that the extract had the ability to act as a reducing agent and stabilizer for HgO nanoparticles. The formation of the plant protein-coated HgO nanoparticles was first monitored using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed the formation of HgO nanoparticles by exhibiting the typical surface plasmon absorption maxima at 243 nm. The average particle size formed ranges from 2 to 4 nm. The dried form of synthesized nanoparticles was further characterized using TGA, XRD, TEM, and FTIR spectroscopy. FT-IR spectra of synthesized HgO nanoparticles were performed to identify the possible bio-molecules responsible for capping and stabilization of nanoparticles, which confirm the formation of plant protein-coated HgO nanoparticles that is further corroborated by TGA study. The optical band gap of HgO nanoparticle was measured to be 2.48 eV using cutoff wavelength which indicates that HgO nanoparticles can be used in metal oxide semiconductor-based photovoltaic cells. A possible core-shell structure of the HgO nanobiocomposite has been proposed.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food...

  14. A study of low-noise preamplifier systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide /HgI2/ X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Huth, G. C.; Del Duca, A.; Schnepple, W.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of different preamplification systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide X-ray detectors has been performed. Resistor-, drain-, and light-feedback preamplifiers have been studied. Energy resolution values of 295 eV (FWHM) for an Fe-55 source (5.9 keV) and 225 eV (FWHM) for a pulser have been obtained with both the detector and the input FET at room temperature using a pulsed-light feedback preamplifier. Improvement in energy resolution by cooling the input FET using a small Peltier element has been discussed.

  15. A study of low-noise preamplifier systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide /HgI2/ X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Huth, G. C.; del Duca, A.; Schnepple, W.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1981-02-01

    An analysis of different preamplification systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide X-ray detectors has been performed. Resistor-, drain-, and light-feedback preamplifiers have been studied. Energy resolution values of 295 eV (FWHM) for an Fe-55 source (5.9 keV) and 225 eV (FWHM) for a pulser have been obtained with both the detector and the input FET at room temperature using a pulsed-light feedback preamplifier. Improvement in energy resolution by cooling the input FET using a small Peltier element has been discussed.

  16. Study of low noise preamplifier systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Del Duca, A.; Schenpple, W.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of different preamplification systems for use with room temperature mercuric iodide x-ray detectors has been performed. Resistor-, drain-, and light-feedback preamplifiers have been studied. Energy resolution of 295 eV (FWHM) for Fe-55 source (5.9 keV) and 225 eV (FWHM) for the pulser have been obtained with both the detector and the input FET at room temperature using the pulsed-light feedback preamplifier. It has been shown that cooling the input FET using a small Peltier element allows the energy resolution to be improved up to 25%.

  17. Worker exposure to vinyl chloride and poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Jones, J H

    1981-10-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in early 1974 began industrial hygiene studies of vinyl chloride exposed workers. Three VC monomer plants, three VC polymerization plants, and seven PVC fabrication plants were surveyed. V polymerization plant workers and workers in one job category in VC monomer plants were exposed to average levels above 1 ppm. The highest average exposure was 22 ppm. NIOSH health hazard evaluation studies since these initial surveys have primarily shown nondetectable levels of vinyl chloride. A NIOSH control technology study in 1977 showed that exposure levels in VC polymerization plants had been drastically reduced but exposure levels above 1 ppm were still found in several cases.

  18. l-Nebiviololinium chloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Tuchalski, Gisbert; Hänsicke, Andre; Reck, Günther; Emmerling, Franziska

    2008-01-01

    The hydro­chloride salt of chiral l-nebivolol {systematic name: (+)−(R,S,S,S)-bis­[2-(6-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl)-2-hydroxy­ethyl]ammonium chloride dihydrate}, C22H26F2NO4 +·Cl−·2H2O, was obtained by chiral liquid chromatography as a dihydrate. The pyran rings adopt half-chair conformations. Hydrogen bonds between the cation, anions and water mol­ecules contribute to the formation of layers parallel to the ac plane. PMID:21200930

  19. Phenoxyethanol absorption by polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lee, M G

    1984-12-01

    Phenoxyethanol was found to be absorbed by polyvinyl chloride administration sets during continuous irrigation therapy. Depending upon the conditions of administration up to 20% loss of potency could occur. Absorption of the drug by the rigid plastic luer-lock fitting of the set caused softening and decreased rigidity of the plastic.

  20. Precipitation of nanoscale mercuric sulfides in the presence of natural organic matter: Structural properties, aggregation, and biotransformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Morris, Amanda; Zhang, Tong; Ticknor, Jonathan; Levard, Clément; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2014-05-01

    Mercuric sulfide species are likely the predominant forms of mercury (Hg) in anoxic environments where the bioavailability of Hg is a key factor for the production of methylmercury (MeHg) by microorganisms. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to affect the formation, aggregation, and dissolution of HgS particles; however the connection of these processes to Hg bioavailability is not well understood. The objectives of this study were to gain insights into the molecular structure and aggregation properties of nanoscale HgS particles that were formed and aged in the presence of DOM and to link this information to bioavailability for methylating bacteria. Characterization of nanoscale HgS was performed with a series of techniques including transmission electron microscopy, photon scattering, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The characterization results indicated that the HgS precipitates formed were metacinnabar-like spherical nanoparticles that were 3-5 nm in diameter. Over the course of the aging process, HgS nanoparticles (nano-HgS) agglomerated to form mass-fractal aggregates, although the size of each primary particle within the aggregates remained unchanged. Furthermore, the crystallinity of nano-HgS increased as the particles aged. The methylation potential of nano-HgS by sulfate-reducing bacteria decreased during the aging process. No clear correlation was observed between the net productions of MeHg and the concentrations of dissolved Hg(II) in the culture media, suggesting that the decrease in the methylation potential of aged nano-HgS was not simply because of the slower supply of dissolved Hg(II) by nano-HgS. While the link between the aging of nano-HgS and decrease of methylation potential is not fully understood, the results of our study indicate that freshly formed HgS particles in DOM-rich water will include a variety of nanoscale structures that have a wide range of methylation potentials. This knowledge provides a basis for

  1. Transmembrane water influx via aquaporin-1 is inhibited by barbiturates and propofol in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Voigtlaender, Julia; Heindl, Bernhard; Becker, Bernhard F

    2002-09-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is known to be expressed at a high level in endothelial cell membranes and participates in water transfer into or across these cells. To evaluate possible effects of anesthetics on AQP1, a model assessing water permeability of erythrocytes was used, AQP1 being the exclusive water channel in red blood cells (RBC). RBC were suspended in hypertonic (1.35%) or hypotonic (0.45%) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Optical density was measured continuously in an aggregometer before and during subsequent addition of hypotonic (0.45%) or hypertonic (9%) PBS, respectively. Rates of change of optical density corresponded to the rate of volume change due to osmotic effects on net water flux across the RBC membrane. We compared actions of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2), definitive AQP1-blocker, 0.2 microM), and different anesthetic drugs, such as thiopental (50-200 microg/ml), phenobarbital (30-220 microg/ml), propofol (15-25 microg/ml), ketamine (3.5-11 microg/ml), midazolam (0.2-32.5 microg/ml), halothane (1.5 vol%), and isoflurane (2.3 vol%); the concentrations being in the one- to threefold range of clinically relevant plasma levels. Water transport into RBC (swelling) was inhibited by HgCl(2), thiopental, phenobarbital and propofol while ketamine, midazolam, halothane, and isoflurane had no effect. Efflux of water (shrinking) was also inhibited by HgCl(2), confirming a significant role of AQP1 in this model. In contrast, none of the tested anesthetic substances had any influence on water efflux. Comparison to chemically related drugs suggested oxidation of a strategic SH-group to be the mode of action. The anesthetics thiopental, phenobarbital, and propofol significantly inhibited influx of water into RBC, while water efflux remained unaffected in distinction to HgCl(2). These anesthetics thus acted as vectorial inhibitors, a hitherto undescribed phenomenon. Accordingly, some anesthetics may indeed affect transport of water via aquaporins. PMID:12172703

  2. Transmembrane water influx via aquaporin-1 is inhibited by barbiturates and propofol in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Voigtlaender, Julia; Heindl, Bernhard; Becker, Bernhard F

    2002-09-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is known to be expressed at a high level in endothelial cell membranes and participates in water transfer into or across these cells. To evaluate possible effects of anesthetics on AQP1, a model assessing water permeability of erythrocytes was used, AQP1 being the exclusive water channel in red blood cells (RBC). RBC were suspended in hypertonic (1.35%) or hypotonic (0.45%) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Optical density was measured continuously in an aggregometer before and during subsequent addition of hypotonic (0.45%) or hypertonic (9%) PBS, respectively. Rates of change of optical density corresponded to the rate of volume change due to osmotic effects on net water flux across the RBC membrane. We compared actions of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2), definitive AQP1-blocker, 0.2 microM), and different anesthetic drugs, such as thiopental (50-200 microg/ml), phenobarbital (30-220 microg/ml), propofol (15-25 microg/ml), ketamine (3.5-11 microg/ml), midazolam (0.2-32.5 microg/ml), halothane (1.5 vol%), and isoflurane (2.3 vol%); the concentrations being in the one- to threefold range of clinically relevant plasma levels. Water transport into RBC (swelling) was inhibited by HgCl(2), thiopental, phenobarbital and propofol while ketamine, midazolam, halothane, and isoflurane had no effect. Efflux of water (shrinking) was also inhibited by HgCl(2), confirming a significant role of AQP1 in this model. In contrast, none of the tested anesthetic substances had any influence on water efflux. Comparison to chemically related drugs suggested oxidation of a strategic SH-group to be the mode of action. The anesthetics thiopental, phenobarbital, and propofol significantly inhibited influx of water into RBC, while water efflux remained unaffected in distinction to HgCl(2). These anesthetics thus acted as vectorial inhibitors, a hitherto undescribed phenomenon. Accordingly, some anesthetics may indeed affect transport of water via aquaporins.

  3. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, S.J.; Thomas, T.R.

    1975-11-14

    A method is described for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel, and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  4. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Steven J.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  5. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a pink... manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore in hydrochloric acid. The...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  2. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Mannheim, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Angeles, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2014-02-11

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  3. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M.; Muller, Jochen A.; Rosner, Bettina M.; Von Abendroth, Gregory; Meshulam-Simon, Galit; McCarty, Perry L

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b)...

  10. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  11. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  14. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  15. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  16. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  17. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  10. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  11. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  12. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  16. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  20. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  1. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  2. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  3. An XAFS Study of Tantalum Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/ aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Tantalum chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs). Anhydrous Ta2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution and the X-ray absorption data shows that the coordination shell of chlorides around the tantalum is larger in the basic solution. In the acidic solution, tantalum has five chlorides in its coordination shell while in the basic solution; the tantalum is coordinated by seven chlorides. This indicates that the Lewis acidity of the tantalum chloride causes the Ta to coordinate differently in the acidic and the basic solutions.

  4. Bioavailability study of arsenic and mercury in traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) using an animal model after a single dose exposure.

    PubMed

    Tinggi, Ujang; Sadler, Ross; Ng, Jack; Noller, Barry; Seawright, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) are increasingly being used as alternative medicines in many countries, and this has caused concern because of adverse health effects from toxic metal bioavailability such as mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As). The aim of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of As and Hg from TCM after a single exposure dose using an animal model of female Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were divided into 6 groups which included four groups treated with sodium arsenite (NaAsO2), arsenic sulfide (As2S3), mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercuric sulfide (HgS), and two groups treated with TCM containing high Hg or As (Liu Shen Wan: As 7.7-9.1% and Hg 1.4-5.0%; Niuhang Jie du Pian: As 6.2-7.9% and Hg <0.001%). The samples of urine, faeces, kidney and liver were collected for analysis and histological assay. The results indicated that relatively low levels of As and Hg from these TCM were retained in liver and kidney tissues. The levels of As in these tissues after TCM treatment were consistent with the levels from the As sulphide treated group. With the exception of the mercuric chloride treated group, the levels of Hg in urine from other groups were very low, and high levels of As and Hg from TCM were excreted in faeces. The study showed poor bioavailability of As and Hg from TCM as indicated by low relative bioavailability of As (0.60-1.10%) and Hg (<0.001%). Histopathological examination of rat kidney and liver tissues did not show toxic effects from TCM.

  5. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  6. Mercuric iodine imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ortale, C.; Padgett, L.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    Linear and two-dimensional monolithic arrays of different configurations have been fabricated using photolithographic techniques. The fabrication technology, electronic setup, and pinhole imaging experiments are described. Spatial resolutions of 1 to 2 mm have been achieved.

  7. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  8. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  9. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  10. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury.

  11. Chloride Transporting CLC Proteins1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Michael

    In the early 1980s, Chris Miller and colleagues described a curious "double-barreled" chloride channel from the electric organ of Torpedo fish reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers (Miller and White, 1980). Single-channel openings occurred in "bursts" separated by long closures. A single burst was characterized by the presence of two open conductance levels of equal size and the gating (i.e., openings and closings) during a burst could be almost perfectly described as a superposition of two identical and independent conductances that switched between open and closed states with voltage-dependent rates α and β (Hanke and Miller, 1983) (Fig. 8.1).

  12. An XAFS Study of Niobium chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Niobium chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Although anhydrous Nb2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic melt than in the acidic melt, the EXAFS data shows that the coordination shell around the niobium does not change in the different ionic liquids. Both the acidic and basic melts show a coordination of five chlorides in the first shell. This indicates that in this series of ionic liquids, the Nb2Cl10 breaks up into two NbCl5 entities in both the acidic and the basic melts.

  13. Identical flow injection spectrophotometric manifold for determination of protein, phosphorus, calcium, chloride, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc in feeds or premixes.

    PubMed

    Liu, J F; Feng, Y D; Jiang, G B

    2001-01-01

    A simple procedure using an identical manifold was developed for determination of nitrogen (protein) phosphorus, calcium, chloride, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc in feeds and feedstuffs. By changing appropriate reagents and detection wavelength, these 8 elements were determined successively with a simple identical double-line flow injection (FI) manifold. Fl spectrophotometric determinations were made by the blue indophenol reaction for ammonium, the molybdenum blue method for phosphate, the cresolphthalein complexone procedure for calcium, and the mercuric thiocyanate procedure for chloride. The chromogenic reagents for copper, iron, manganese, and zinc determination were bis(cyclohexanone)oxalydihydrazone (Cuprizone), 1,10-phenanthroline, formaldoxime, and xylenol orange, respectively. Sample digestion catalyst, Fl manifold, and some chemical parameters were optimized. The proposed procedure had a sampling rate of 90/h for each analyte. The determination ranges (mg/L) were 10-60 for N, 1-15 for P and Ca, 540 for Cl, and 0.5-15 for Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn, respectively. Results of the analyses of animal feed and feedstuff samples by this procedure did not differ significantly from those obtained by proven manual methods.

  14. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOEpatents

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  15. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:26999998

  16. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7786-30-3) is a... prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution...

  18. Metal chloride cathode for a battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of fabricating a rechargeable battery is disclosed which includes a positive electrode which contains a chloride of a selected metal when the electrode is in its active state. The improvement comprises fabricating the positive electrode by: providing a porous matrix composed of a metal; providing a solution of the chloride of the selected metal; and impregnating the matrix with the chloride from the solution.

  19. Irreversible gettering of thionyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    LeRoy Whinnery; Steve Goods; George Buffleben; Tim Sheppodd

    1999-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated the irreversible gettering of SOCl{sub 2} by ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon over a modest temperature range. While thionyl chloride decomposition was slow below {minus}20 C, lower temperatures are expected to be less of a problem than at higher temperatures. The approximately 30 cc of thionyl chloride in a typical D-cell would require 50 g of ZnO and 107 g of ASZMTEDA carbon. Fortunately, since it is unlikely to happen at all, it is common practice to assume only one cell will fail (leak) in a given battery pack. So, one charge of getter can protect the whole battery pack. In summary, ZnO/ASZMTEDA carbon fulfills all of the requirements of an ideal getter including: irreversible binding or reaction with SOCl{sub 2}, high volumetric uptake capacity, high efficiency, non-volatile, air stable, insensitive to poisoning, non-toxic, cheap, non-corrosive, and the gettering product is not a liquid or oil that could block further flow or accessibility. Future work in this area includes incorporation of the ZnO and carbon into a structural open-celled porous monolith, as well as, gettering for other types of batteries (e.g., Li/MnO{sub 2}).

  20. Enrofloxacin hydro-chloride dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-04-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 (+)·Cl(-)·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb-oxy-1-cyclo-propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di-hydro-quin-o-lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl-piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol-ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo-propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O-H⋯Cl, N-H⋯Cl and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π-π inter-action between the benzene rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array.

  1. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  2. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  3. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  4. XAFS Studies of Ni Ta and Nb Chlorides in the Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl Imidazolium Chloride / Aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    W OGrady; D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek

    2011-12-31

    The structures of anhydrous nickel, niobium, and tantalum chlorides have been investigated in situ in acidic and basic ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (EMIC)/AlCl{sub 3} with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The coordination of NiCl{sub 2} changes from tetrahedral in basic solution to octahedral in acidic solution. The NiCl{sub 2} is a strong Lewis acid in that it can induce the AlCl{sub 3} to share its chlorides in the highly acidic IL, forming a structure with six near Cl{sup -} ions and eight further distant Al ions which share the chloride ions surrounding the Ni{sup 2+}. When Nb{sub 2}Cl{sub 10}, a dimer, is added to the acidic or basic solution, the dimer breaks apart and forms two species. In the acid solution, two trigonal bipyramids are formed with five equal chloride distances, while in the basic solution, a square pyramid with four chlorides forming a square base and one shorter axial chloride bond. Ta{sub 2}Cl{sub 10} is also a dimer and divides into half in the acidic solution and forms two trigonal bipyramids. In the basic solution, the dimer breaks apart but the species formed is sufficiently acidic that it attracts two additional chloride ions and forms a seven coordinated tantalum species.

  5. Reaction of unsaturated uronic acid residues with mercuric salts. Cleavage of the hyaluronic acid disaccharide 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-(beta-D-gluco-4-enepyranosyluronic acid)-D-glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwigs, U; Elgavish, A; Esko, J D; Meezan, E; Rodén, L

    1987-01-01

    Degradation of connective-tissue polysaccharides with bacterial or fungal eliminases and subsequent characterization of the reaction products are now part of standard methodology for the analysis of these compounds. However, the scope of preparative and analytical work based on the use of eliminases has been limited by the lack of procedures for specific removal of the unsaturated uronic acid residues generated in the eliminase reactions. In the present investigation, we have shown that these residues are cleaved by mercuric salts under mild conditions that are not likely to affect other structures in an oligo- or poly-saccharide molecule. Thus the disaccharide generated from hyaluronic acid by digestion with chondroitinase AC or ABC was cleaved into a keto acid and free N-acetylglucosamine within 10 min at room temperature upon exposure to 14 mM-mercuric acetate at pH 5. The reaction of the disaccharide with mercuric salts was used for ready determination of the distribution of radioactivity between the glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine moieties in radioactive hyaluronic acid that had been synthesized by IMR-90 fibroblasts from 3H-labelled monosaccharides. When the precursor was [3H]galactose, over 95% of the incorporated radioactivity was found in the glucuronic acid moiety. In contrast, cells grown in the presence of [3H]glucosamine synthesized a polysaccharide in which almost all of the label was located in the N-acetylglucosamine units. It is apparent from these experiments that the reaction of unsaturated uronic acid residues with mercuric salts provides a new tool with potential for many applications in the study of the structure and metabolism of connective-tissue polysaccharides. PMID:3663191

  6. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-15

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

  7. Chloride Analysis of RFSA Second Campaign Dissolver Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    2001-05-17

    The dissolver solution from the second RFSA campaign was analyzed for chloride using the recently-developed turbidimetric method. Prior to chloride removal in head end, the solution contained 1625 ppm chloride. After chloride removal with Hg(I) and prior to feeding to solvent extraction, the solution contained only 75 ppm chloride. This report discusses those analysis results.

  8. Sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that rapid development in the technology of sodium metal chloride batteries has been achieved in the last decade mainly due to the: expertise available with sodium sulfur system; safety; and flexibility in design and fabrication. Long cycle lives of over 1000 and high energy densities of approx. 100 Wh/kg have been demonstrated in both Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 cells. Optimization of porous cathode and solid electrolyte geometries are essential for further enhancing the battery performance. Fundamental studies confirm the capabilities of these systems. Nickel dichloride emerges as the candidate cathode material for high power density applications such as electric vehicle and space.

  9. Process for synthesis of beryllium chloride dietherate

    DOEpatents

    Bergeron, Charles; Bullard, John E.; Morgan, Evan

    1991-01-01

    A low temperature method of producing beryllium chloride dietherate through the addition of hydrogen chloride gas to a mixture of beryllium metal in ether in a reaction vessel is described. A reflux condenser provides an exit for hydrogen produced form the reaction. A distillation condenser later replaces the reflux condenser for purifying the resultant product.

  10. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Commission found that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (74 FR 31757... COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of... chloride from China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will proceed with a full...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS... dichloride. It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS... dichloride. It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  13. Hydrocracking with molten zinc chloride catalyst containing 2-12% ferrous chloride

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.; Bagshaw, Gary H.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. by contacting the feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten zinc chloride catalyst and thereafter separating at least a major portion of the hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten zinc chloride catalyst, an improvement comprising: adjusting the FeCl.sub.2 content of the molten zinc chloride to from about 2 to about 12 mol percent based on the mixture of ferrous chloride and molten zinc chloride.

  14. Chloride transport in the cystic fibrosis enterocyte.

    PubMed

    Bijman, J; Veeze, H; Kansen, M; Tilly, B; Scholte, B; Hoogeveen, A; Halley, D; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, H

    1991-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of intestinal chloride channel regulation and potential abnormalities in electrogenic chloride secretion in intestinal epithelium from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were investigated by a combination of Ussing chamber, vesicle transport and off-cell patch-clamp analysis. Short circuit current (Isc) measurements in normal and CF rectal biopsies provided evidence for i) a defect in the cAMP-provoked activation of chloride secretion and a (hyper)expression of cAMP-dependent potassium secretion in all CF patients examined (n = 11); ii) a defect in the carbachol-provoked chloride secretion and a (hyper)expression of carbachol-induced potassium secretion in 6/11 patients; iii) a residual (but still impaired) carbachol-induced chloride secretion in 5/11 CF patients (including 2 sibs). The latter class of CF patients appeared to consist genetically of compound heterozygotes for the major delta-F508 deletion, suggesting a correlation between the nature of the mutation in the CF gene and the severity of the chloride secretory defect in CF intestine. In our search for a regulatory function of GTP-binding (G-) proteins detected previously in the luminal membrane of rat and human intestinal epithelial cells, evidence was found for the presence of a GTP[S]-activatable- and GDP[S]-inhibitable chloride conductance in the apical membrane of rat enterocytes and human colonocytes. In excised patches of human colonocyt membranes, this G-proteine-sensitive chloride conductance was identified further as a novel type of chloride channel (20pS; inwardly rectifying) that was different from the 33pS outwardly rectifying chloride channel activatable by cAMP-dependent proteinkinase (PK-A) and voltage depolarization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Inhibition of precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravichandran, M.; Aiken, G.R.; Ryan, J.N.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (???3 mg C/L) of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations (??? x 10-8 M), DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations (5 x 10-5 M), DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar (Hg passed through a 0.1 ??m filter but was removed by centrifugation). At Hg concentrations greater than 5 x 10-4 M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 ??m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moleties was preferentially removed with the solid. Hydrophobic organic acids (humic and fulvic acids) inhibited aggregation better than hydrophilic organic acids. The presence of chloride, acetate, salicylate, EDTA, and cysteine did not inhibit the precipitation or aggregation of metacinnabar. Calcium enhanced metacinnabar aggregation even in the presence of DOM, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on the concentrations of DOM, Hg, and Ca. Inhibition of metacinnabar precipitation appears to be a result of strong DOM-Hg binding. Prevention of aggregation of colloidal particles appears to be caused by adsorption of DOM and electrostatic repulsion.Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (???3 mg C/L) of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations (???5??10-8 M), DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations (5??10-5 M), DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar (Hg passed through a 0.1 ??m filter but was removed by centrifugation). At Hg concentrations greater than 5??10-4 M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 ??m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moieties was preferentially

  16. Factors influencing electrochemical removal of chloride from concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Arya, C.; Sa`id-Shawqi, Q.; Vassie, P.R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Electrochemical chloride removal was studied using prisms made from concrete containing various levels of chlorides derived from sodium chloride added during mixing. The amount of chloride removed during the treatment was assessed by analyzing the anolyte. Chloride removal increased with increasing applied potential, number of reinforcing bars at a particular depth and initial chloride content of the concrete. A greater percentage of chloride was removed from prisms where the thickness of the chloride bearing layer of concrete was less than the depth of cover to the reinforcement. Where the thickness of the chloride bearing layer exceeded the cover to the reinforcement, the use of an external cathode significantly increased the total amount of chloride removed. Chloride removal from a face remote from the source of the chloride contamination (soffit desalination) was shown to be feasible.

  17. Embedded chloride detectors for roadways and bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhr, Peter L.; Huston, Dryver R.; McPadden, Adam P.; Cauley, Robert F.

    1996-04-01

    The problems associated with the application of chloride-based deicing agents to roadways and specifically bridges include chemical pollution and accelerated corrosion of strength members (especially rebar) within the structure. In many instances, local ordinances are attempting to force state agencies to reduce, if not eliminate, the use of these chlorides (typically at the cost of increased driving hazards). With respect to the corrosion aspects of chloride application, cracks that occur in the roadway/bridge pavement allow water to seep into the pavement carrying the chloride to the rebar with the resultant increase in corrosion. In response to this problem, particularly in high roadsalt usage areas, a chloride/water impermeable membrane is placed above the rebar matrix so if/when roadway cracking occurs, the roadsalts won't be able to damage the rebar. Such a membrane is costly -- and the question of its in-service performance is questionable. In a joint effort between the University of Vermont and the Vermont Agency of Transportation, we are developing fiber optic chloride detectors which are capable of being embedded into the rebar-concrete roadway under this membrane. The sensing mechanism relies on spectroscopic analysis of a chemical reaction of chloride and reagents (which have been coated onto the ends of fibers). Laboratory results of these detectors and a usable system configuration are presented.

  18. Materials for Conoco zinc chloride hydrocracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Use of zinc chloride to augment hydrogenation of coal and yield a high-octane gasoline product is the most significant feature of a coal liquefaction process being developed by Conoco Coal Development Company. The zinc chloride catalyst is regenerated in a fluidized sand bed, where the spent melt is mixed with air and hydrogen chloride at about 1000/sup 0/C. Recovery is completed at 370/sup 0/C in a condenser, where the zinc chloride is collected and the oxygen and sulfur are separated as H/sub 2/O and SO/sub 2/. The economic viability of the entire process is highly dependent on almost complete recovery of the zinc chloride. The severe environmental conditions of this recovery process cause unique materials problems. Although high-temperature oxidation and sulfidation are being studied in related programs, suitable materials to resist their combined effects along with those of chlorides have not yet been specifically addressed. Common engineering materials, such as the austenitic stainless steels and many nickel-base alloys, are unsuitable because of their inability to tolerate the elevated temperatures and sulfidation, respectively. The objectives of this task are to screen various metallic and ceramic materials for resistance to the zinc chloride recovery system environment and to determine the nature of the attack by exposing coupons to the simulated environment in the laboratory.

  19. Total organic carbon and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy methods to determine total carbon and hydrocarbons in mercuric iodide single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, S.; Kaplan, I.; Schieber, M.; Ortale, C.; Skinner, N.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Total organic carbon was determined by measuring the CO2 produced by combustion in a sealed quartz vessel. The CO2 was quantified by nondispersive IR and by titration using commercial detectors. The total organic carbon was found to be around 10-100 μg/g in both starting materials and in single crystals. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) measurements were made on hexane extracts of mercuric iodide (HgI2) dissolved in potassium iodide solution. Hydrocarbons starting with C10 (DIENE) and up to C26 were found. In addition, phthalates, such as diethyl and dioctyl phthalate were also found. Some of the organic compounds, for example, such hydrocarbons as branched nC16, nC20, nC21, nC22, nC23, and nC24, were present in some HgI2 materials in quantities of the order of weight ppm, but were eliminated in the purification process and were not found in the single crystals. Other organic compounds such as the phthalates were not always eliminated and were identified in the single crystals. In general, the GC/MS could identify only hydrocarbons of C10 and higher which account for only a few percent of the total organic carbon determined by oxidation.

  20. Enzymatic detection of mercuric ions in ground-water from vegetable wastes by immobilizing pumpkin (Cucumis melo) urease in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Talat, Mahe; Hasan, Syed Hadi; Pandey, Rajesh K

    2008-07-01

    Present report describes a quick and simple test based on enzyme inhibition for the detection of mercury in aqueous medium by urease immobilized in alginate beads. Urease was extracted from the discarded seeds of pumpkin (Cucumis melo) and was purified to apparent homogeneity (5.2-fold) by heat treatment at 48+/-0.1 degrees C and gel filtration through Sephadex G-200. The homogeneous enzyme preparation (Sp activity 353 U/mg protein, A(280)/A(260)=1.12) was immobilized in 3.5% alginate leading to 86% immobilization. Effect of mercuric ion on the activity of soluble as well as immobilized enzyme was investigated. Hg(2+) exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition both in the presence and absence of the substrate. The alginate immobilized enzyme showed less inhibition. There was no leaching of the enzyme over a period of 15 days at 4 degrees C. The inhibition was non-competitive and the K(i) was found to be 1.26x10(-1)microM. Time-dependent interaction of urease with Hg(2+) exhibited a biphasic inhibition behavior in which approximately half of the initial activity was lost rapidly (within 10 min) and reminder in a slow phase. Binding of Hg(2+) with the enzyme was largely irreversible, as the activity could not be restored by dialysis. The significance of the observations is discussed.

  1. Phenomics of Cardiac Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetic studies have identified several chloride (Cl−) channel genes, including CFTR, ClC-2, ClC-3, CLCA, Bestrophin, and Ano1, in the heart. Recent reverse genetic studies using gene targeting and transgenic techniques to delineate the functional role of cardiac Cl− channels have shown that Cl− channels may contribute to cardiac arrhythmogenesis, myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure, and cardioprotection against ischemia reperfusion. The study of physiological or pathophysiological phenotypes of cardiac Cl− channels, however, is complicated by the compensatory changes in the animals in response to the targeted genetic manipulation. Alternatively, tissue-specific conditional or inducible knockout or knockin animal models may be more valuable in the phenotypic studies of specific Cl− channels by limiting the effect of compensation on the phenotype. The integrated function of Cl− channels may involve multiprotein complexes of the Cl− channel subproteome. Similar phenotypes can be attained from alternative protein pathways within cellular networks, which are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The phenomics approach, which characterizes phenotypes as a whole phenome and systematically studies the molecular changes that give rise to particular phenotypes achieved by modifying the genotype under the scope of genome/proteome/phenome, may provide more complete understanding of the integrated function of each cardiac Cl− channel in the context of health and disease. PMID:23720326

  2. Binary Nucleation of Water and Sodium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, Thomas; Marsik, Frantisek; Palmer, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation processes in the binary water-sodium chloride system are investigated in the sense of the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The CNT is modified to be able to handle the electrolytic nature of the system and is employed to investigate the acceleration of the nucleation process due to the presence of sodium chloride in the steam. This phenomenon, frequently observed in the Wilson zone of steam turbines, is called early condensation. Therefore, the nucleation rates of the water-sodium chloride mixture are of key importance in the power cycle industry.

  3. Murine genotype influences the specificity, magnitude and persistence of murine mercury-induced autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hultman, P; Turley, S J; Eneström, S; Lindh, U; Pollard, K M

    1996-04-01

    Genetic factors are major contributors in determining the susceptibility to systemic autoimmune diseases. We studied the influence of genotype on systemic autoimmunity by treating female mice of the H-2s strains SJL/N, SJL/J, A.SW, and B10.S with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) for 10 weeks and then following autoantibody and tissue immune deposits during the subsequent 12 months. All strains developed antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) of the IgG class which reacted in immunoblotting with a 34-kDa nucleolar protein identified as fibrillarin. The titre of ANoA attained after 10 weeks' treatment varied from 1:1,280 to 1:20,480 in the order: A.SW > SJL > > B10.S. Following cessation of HgCl2 treatment ANoA and antifibrillarin antibodies (AFA) persisted for up to 12 months, although some B10.S mice showed pronounced reduction not only of their autoantibody titres, but also systemic immune deposits when compared to other H-2s strains. A second set of autoantibodies targeted chromatin and in some mice specifically histones, and were distinguished from the ANoA by a rapid decline after treatment and a susceptibility linked to the non-H-2 genes of the SJL. Tissue levels of mercury remained elevated above untreated controls throughout the study period, suggesting that the mercury detected in lymphoid tissues may provide stimulation of lymphoid cells specific for fibrillarin for a considerable period after exposure has ceased. We conclude that H-2 as well as non-H-2 genetic factors distinctly influence not only the susceptibility to induction of autoimmunity, but also the specificity and magnitude of the response.

  4. Vinyl chloride-associated liver disease.

    PubMed

    Berk, P D; Martin, J F; Young, R S; Creech, J; Selikoff, I J; Falk, H; Watanabe, P; Popper, H; Thomas, L

    1976-06-01

    Although polyvinyl chloride has been produced from vinyl chlride monomer for more than 40 years, recognition of toxicity among vinyl chloride polymerization workers is more recent. In the mid 1960s, workers involved in cleaning polymerization tanks were found to have acro-osteolysis. In 1974, the same population of workers was found to be at risk for an unusual type of hepatic fibrosis and angiosarcoma of the liver. We describe two cases of vinyl chloride-associated liver injury, one of hepatic fibrosis and one of angiosarcoma. Histologic features of these lesions are similar to the hepatic fibrosis and angiosarcomas resulting from chronic exposure to inorganic arsenicals. Preliminary studies suggest that the toxicity of vinyl chloride may result from formation, during high-dose exposure, of active metabolites by mixed function oxidases of the liver. Epidemiologic studies indicate an increased incidence not only of liver disease, but also of cancers of the brain, lung, and possibly other organs.

  5. Catastrophic event modeling. [lithium thionyl chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the catastrophic failures (venting or explosion of the cell) in lithium thionyl chloride batteries is presented. The phenomenology of the various processes leading to cell failure is reviewed.

  6. Lithium thionyl chloride high rate discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinedinst, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements in high rate lithium thionyl chloride power technology achieved by varying the electrolyte composition, operating temperature, cathode design, and cathode composition are discussed. Discharge capacities are plotted as a function of current density, cell voltage, and temperature.

  7. Crystal structure of 4-carbamoylpyridinium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Simon M; Prior, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    The hydro-chloride salt of isonicotinamide, C6H7N2O(+)·Cl(-), has been synthesized from a dilute solution of hydro-chloric acid in aceto-nitrile. The compound displays monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) at 150 K, similar to the related hydro-chloride salt of nicotinamide. The asymmetric unit contains one protonated isonicotinamide mol-ecule and a chloride anion. An array of hydrogen-bonding inter-actions, including a peculiar bifurcated pyridinium-chloride inter-action, results in linear chains running almost perpendicularly in the [150] and [1-50] directions within the structure. A description of the hydrogen-bonding network and comparison with similar compounds are presented. PMID:27375858

  8. Crystal structure of 4-carbamoylpyridinium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Simon M.; Prior, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The hydro­chloride salt of isonicotinamide, C6H7N2O+·Cl−, has been synthesized from a dilute solution of hydro­chloric acid in aceto­nitrile. The compound displays monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) at 150 K, similar to the related hydro­chloride salt of nicotinamide. The asymmetric unit contains one protonated isonicotinamide mol­ecule and a chloride anion. An array of hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, including a peculiar bifurcated pyridinium–chloride inter­action, results in linear chains running almost perpendicularly in the [150] and [1-50] directions within the structure. A description of the hydrogen-bonding network and comparison with similar compounds are presented. PMID:27375858

  9. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  10. The 5-(4-Ethynylophenoxy) isophthalic chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Sulfone-ester polymers containing pendent ethynyl groups and a direct and multistep process for preparing them are disclosed. The multistep process involves the conversion of a pendent bromo group to the ethynyl group while the direct route involves reating hydroxy-terminated sulfone oligomer or polymers with a stoichiometric amount of 5-(4-ethynylphenoxy) isophthaloyl chloride. The 5-(4-ethynylphenoxy) isophthaloyl chloride and the process for preparing it are also disclosed.

  11. Copper chloride cathode for a secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Higher energy and power densities are achieved in a secondary battery based on molten sodium and a solid, ceramic separator such as a beta alumina and a molten catholyte such as sodium tetrachloroaluminate and a copper chloride cathode. The higher cell voltage of copper chloride provides higher energy densities and the higher power density results from increased conductivity resulting from formation of copper as discharge proceeds.

  12. Structure of complexes between aluminum chloride and other chlorides, 2: Alkali-(chloroaluminates). Gaseous complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargittai, M.

    1980-01-01

    The structural chemistry of complexes between aluminum chloride and other metal chlorides is important both for practice and theory. Condensed-phase as well as vapor-phase complexes are of interest. Structural information on such complexes is reviewed. The first emphasis is given to the molten state because of its practical importance. Aluminum chloride forms volatile complexes with other metal chlorides and these vapor-phase complexes are dealt with in the second part. Finally, the variations in molecular shape and geometrical parameters are summarized.

  13. Membrane potential, chloride exchange, and chloride conductance in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E K; Simonsen, L O; Sjøholm, C

    1979-11-01

    1. The steady-state tracer exchange flux of chloride was measured at 10-150 mM external chloride concentration, substituting either lactate or sucrose for chloride. The chloride flux saturates in both cases with a K 1/2 about 50 and 15 mM, respectively. 2. The inhibitory effect of other monovalent anions on the chloride transport was investigated by measuring the 36Cl- efflux into media where either bromide, nitrate, or thiocyanate had been substituted for part of the chloride. The sequence of increasing affinity for the chloride transport system was found to be: Br- less than Cl- less than SCN- = NO3-. 3. The chloride steady-state exchange flux in the presence of nitrate can be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with nitrate as a competitive inhibitor of the chloride flux. 4. The apparent activation energy (EA) was determined to be 67 +/- 6.2 kJ/mole, and was constant between 7 and 38 degrees C. 5. The membrane potential (Vm) was measured as a function of the concentration of external K+, substituting K+ for Na+. The transference number of K+ (tK) was estimated from the slope of Vm vs. log10 (K+)e, and tCl and tNa were calculated, neglecting current carried by ions other than Cl-, K+, and Na+. The diffusional net flux of K+ was calculated from the steady-state exchange flux of 42K+, assuming the flux ratio equation to be valid. From this value the K+ conductance and the Na+ and Cl- conductances were calculated. The experiments showed that GCl, GNa, and GK are all about 14 muS/cm2. 6. The net (conductive) chloride permeability derived from the chloride conductance was 4 x 10(-8) cm/sec compared with the apparent permeability of 6 x 10(-7) cm/sec as calculated from the chloride tracer exchange flux. These data suggest that about 95% of the chloride transport is mediated by an electrically silent exchange diffusion. 7. Comparable effects of phloretin (0.25 mM) on the net (conductive) permeability and the apparent permeability to chloride (about 80% inhibition

  14. Limitation of Cell Elongation in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Leaves Through Mechanical and Tissue-Hydraulic Properties.

    PubMed

    Touati, Mostefa; Knipfer, Thorsten; Visnovitz, Tamás; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Fricke, Wieland

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the mechanical and hydraulic limitation of growth in leaf epidermal cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in response to agents which affect cellular water (mercuric chloride, HgCl(2)) and potassium (cesium chloride, CsCl; tetraethylammonium, TEA) transport, pump activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and wall acidification (fusicoccin, FC). Cell turgor (P) was measured with the cell pressure probe, and cell osmotic pressure (π) was analyzed through picoliter osmometry of single-cell extracts. A wall extensibility coefficient (M) and tissue hydraulic conductance coefficient (L) were derived using the Lockhart equation. There was a significant positive linear relationship between relative elemental growth rate and P, which fit all treatments, with an overall apparent yield threshold of 0.368 MPa. Differences in growth between treatments could be explained through differences in P. A comparison of L and M showed that growth in all except the FC treatment was co-limited through hydraulic and mechanical properties, though to various extents. This was accompanied by significant (0.17-0.24 MPa) differences in water potential (ΔΨ) between xylem and epidermal cells in the leaf elongation zone. In contrast, FC-treated leaves showed ΔΨ close to zero and a 10-fold increase in L.

  15. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17...) § 179.102-17 Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-0969-091) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-0969-091) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  20. 21 CFR 178.3290 - Chromic chloride complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chromic chloride complexes. 178.3290 Section 178... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3290 Chromic chloride complexes. Myristo chromic chloride complex and stearato chromic chloride complex may be safely used as release agents in the...

  1. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  2. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  3. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  4. 49 CFR 179.102-17 - Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. 179.102-17... Hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid. Each tank car used to transport hydrogen chloride, refrigerated... on or after March 16, 2009 used for the transportation of hydrogen chloride, refrigerated...

  5. Maturation of rat proximal tubule chloride permeability.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michel; Quigley, Raymond

    2005-12-01

    We have previously shown that neonate rabbit tubules have a lower chloride permeability but comparable mannitol permeability compared with adult proximal tubules. The surprising finding of lower chloride permeability in neonate proximals compared with adults impacts net chloride transport in this segment, which reabsorbs 60% of the filtered chloride in adults. However, this maturational difference in chloride permeability may not be applicable to other species. The present in vitro microperfusion study directly examined the chloride and mannitol permeability using in vitro perfused rat proximal tubules during postnatal maturation. Whereas there was no maturational change in mannitol permeability, chloride permeability was 6.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in neonate rat proximal convoluted tubule and 16.1 +/- 2.3 x 10(-5) cm/s in adult rat proximal convoluted tubule (P < 0.01). There was also a maturational increase in chloride permeability in the rat proximal straight tubule (5.1 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s vs. 9.3 +/- 0.6 x 10(-5) cm/s, P < 0.01). There was no maturational change in bicarbonate-to-chloride permeabilities (P(HCO3)/P(Cl)) in the rat proximal straight tubules (PST) and proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) or in the sodium-to-chloride permeability (P(Na)/P(Cl)) in the proximal straight tubule; however, there was a significant maturational decrease in proximal convoluted tubule P(Na)/P(Cl) with postnatal development (1.31 +/- 0.12 in neonates vs. 0.75 +/- 0.06 in adults, P < 0.001). There was no difference in the transepithelial resistance measured by current injection and cable analysis in the PCT, but there was a maturational decrease in the PST (7.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 4.6 +/- 0.1 ohms x cm2, P < 0.05). These studies demonstrate there are maturational changes in the rat paracellular pathway that impact net NaCl transport during development. PMID:16051720

  6. Atmospheric chloride: Its implication for foliar uptake and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, E. L.; Sealy, R. L.

    Atmospheric chloride is inversely related to distance from the Texas coast; r2 = 0.86. Levels of atmospheric chloride are higher in the early summer than in the winter because of salt storms. Leaf chloride l'evels of Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) reflect the atmospheric chloride levels; r2 = 0.78. The importance of considering the effect of atmospheric chloride on leaf damage to horticultural crops is discussed.

  7. Thermoluminescence of ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Louis

    2003-05-01

    Ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride (10 -30 g cm -3) have been irradiated by X- and γ-rays at 77 K, then progressively rewarmed to room temperature. During that phase, their thermoluminescence has been studied and it was found that, despite their dilution beyond the Avogadro number, the emitted light was specific of the original salts dissolved initially.

  8. Fermentation of cucumbers brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generation of waste water containing sodium chloride from cucumber fermentation tank yards could be eliminated if cucumbers were fermented in brines that did not contain this salt. To determine if this is feasible, cucumbers were fermented in brines that contained only calcium chloride to maintain f...

  9. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  10. Commercial scale cucumber fermentations brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate cucumber fermentation brined with calcium chloride instead of NaCl...

  11. Congenital Chloride Diarrhea: Diagnosis by Easy-Accessible Chloride Measurement in Feces

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, M.-C.; Nielsen, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding the intestinal Cl−/HCO3− exchanger and is clinically characterized by watery, profound diarrhea, electrolyte disturbances, and metabolic alkalosis. The CCD diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and measurement of high chloride concentration in feces (>90 mmol/L) and is confirmed by DNA testing. Untreated CCD is lethal, while long-term clinical outcome improves when treated correctly. Case Presentation. A 27-year-old woman had an emergency caesarian due to pain and discomfort in gestational week 36 + 4. The newborn boy had abdominal distension and yellow fluid per rectum. Therapy with intravenous glucose and sodium chloride decreased his stool frequency and improved his clinical condition. A suspicion of congenital chloride diarrhea was strongly supported using blood gas analyzer to measure an increased chloride concentration in the feces; the diagnosis was confirmed by DNA testing. Discussion. Measurement of chloride in feces using an ordinary blood gas analyzer can serve as a preliminary analysis when congenital chloride diarrhea is suspected. This measurement can be easily performed with a watery feces composition. An easy-accessible chloride measurement available will facilitate the diagnostics and support the initial treatment if CCD is suspected. PMID:27635272

  12. Congenital Chloride Diarrhea: Diagnosis by Easy-Accessible Chloride Measurement in Feces.

    PubMed

    Gils, C; Eckhardt, M-C; Nielsen, P E; Nybo, M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding the intestinal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger and is clinically characterized by watery, profound diarrhea, electrolyte disturbances, and metabolic alkalosis. The CCD diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and measurement of high chloride concentration in feces (>90 mmol/L) and is confirmed by DNA testing. Untreated CCD is lethal, while long-term clinical outcome improves when treated correctly. Case Presentation. A 27-year-old woman had an emergency caesarian due to pain and discomfort in gestational week 36 + 4. The newborn boy had abdominal distension and yellow fluid per rectum. Therapy with intravenous glucose and sodium chloride decreased his stool frequency and improved his clinical condition. A suspicion of congenital chloride diarrhea was strongly supported using blood gas analyzer to measure an increased chloride concentration in the feces; the diagnosis was confirmed by DNA testing. Discussion. Measurement of chloride in feces using an ordinary blood gas analyzer can serve as a preliminary analysis when congenital chloride diarrhea is suspected. This measurement can be easily performed with a watery feces composition. An easy-accessible chloride measurement available will facilitate the diagnostics and support the initial treatment if CCD is suspected. PMID:27635272

  13. Low-level 14C methane oxidation rate measurements modified for remote field settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, M. A.; Pohlman, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation limits atmospheric methane emissions from degraded subsea permafrost and dissociated methane hydrates in high latitude oceans. Methane oxidation rate measurements are a crucial tool for investigating the efficacy of this process, but are logistically challenging when working on small research vessels in remote settings. We modified a low-level 14C-CH4 oxidation rate measurement for use in the Beaufort Sea above hydrate bearing sediments during August 2012. Application of the more common 3H-CH4 rate measurement that uses 106 times more radioactivity was not practical because the R/V Ukpik cannot accommodate a radiation van. The low-level 14C measurement does not require a radiation van, but careful isolation of the 14C-label is essential to avoid contaminating natural abundance 14C measurements. We used 14C-CH4 with a total activity of 1.1 μCi, which is far below the 100 μCi permitting level. In addition, we modified field procedures to simplify and shorten sample processing. The original low-level 14C-CH4 method requires 6 steps in the field: (1) collect water samples in glass serum bottles, (2) inject 14C-CH4 into bottles, (3) incubate for 24 hours, (4) filter to separate the methanotrophic bacterial cells from the aqueous sample, (5) kill the filtrate with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and (6) purge with nitrogen to remove unused 14C-CH4. Onshore, the 14C-CH4 respired to carbon dioxide or incorporated into cell material by methanotrophic bacteria during incubation is quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We conducted an experiment to test the possibility of storing samples for purging and filtering back onshore (steps 4 and 6). We subjected a series of water samples to steps 1-3 & 5, and preserved with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) instead of NaOH because HgCl2 is less likely to break down cell material during storage. The 14C-content of the carbon dioxide in samples preserved with HgCl2 and stored for up to 2 weeks was stable

  14. Mechanism for forming hydrogen chloride and sodium sulfate from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A molecular orbital study of sodium sulfate and hydrogen chloride formation from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride shows no activation barrier, in agreement with recent experimental work of Kohl, Fielder, and Stearns. Two overall steps are found for the process. First, gas-phase water reacts with sulfur trioxide along a pathway involving a linear O-H-O transition state yielding closely associated hydroxyl and bisulfite which rearrange to become a hydrogen sulfate molecule. Then the hydrogen sulfate molecule transfers a hydrogen atom to a surface chloride in solid sodium chloride while an electron and a sodium cation simultaneously transfer to yield sodium bisulfate and gas-phase hydrogen chloride. This process repeats. Both of these steps represent well-known reactions for which mechanisms have not been previously determined.

  15. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  16. Vinyl chloride loss during laboratory holding time.

    PubMed

    Soule, R; Symonik, D; Jones, D; Turgeon, D; Gerbec, B

    1996-06-01

    Because vinyl chloride is a potent human carcinogen, it is important that analytical results from groundwater samples accurately reflect levels of exposure to groundwater users. This study investigated the current allowable holding time of 14 days to determine if vinyl chloride is lost from samples during this time. Samples containing an initial concentration of 2 microg/liter of vinyl chloride showed progressive, increasing losses when held for 1, 2, 7, and 14 days. Due to the inherent variability of low-level laboratory results, the most statistically significant loss (alpha = 0.05) was seen for samples held for 14 days. No statistically significant differences in degradation pattern were noted between analytical detectors used (PID versus Hall) or sample type (lab versus field). There also was a loss of vinyl chloride observed during sample collection and handling. These results suggest that analytical variability at low concentrations and the establishment of health-based guidelines near the analytical detection limit require multiple samples be collected from a single location when highly accurate results are needed. These findings should be considered in public health exposure assessments and the implementation of health-based recommendations at sites with vinyl chloride groundwater contamination.

  17. Dynamic Electrochemical Measurement of Chloride Ions.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, Derk B; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-02-05

    This protocol describes the dynamic measurement of chloride ions using the transition time of a silver silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode. Silver silver chloride electrode is used extensively for potentiometric measurement of chloride ions concentration in electrolyte. In this measurement, long-term and continuous monitoring is limited due to the inherent drift and the requirement of a stable reference electrode. We utilized the chronopotentiometric approach to minimize drift and avoid the use of a conventional reference electrode. A galvanostatic pulse is applied to an Ag/AgCl electrode which initiates a faradic reaction depleting the Cl- ions near the electrode surface. The transition time, which is the time to completely deplete the ions near the electrode surface, is a function of the ion concentration, given by the Nernst equation. The square root of the transition time is in linear relation to the chloride ion concentration. Drift of the response over two weeks is negligible (59 µM/day) when measuring 1 mM [Cl-]using a current pulse of 10 Am(-2). This is a dynamic measurement where the moment of transition time determines the response and thus is independent of the absolute potential. Any metal wire can be used as a pseudo-reference electrode, making this approach feasible for long-term measurement inside concrete structures.

  18. Dynamic Electrochemical Measurement of Chloride Ions.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, Derk B; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the dynamic measurement of chloride ions using the transition time of a silver silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode. Silver silver chloride electrode is used extensively for potentiometric measurement of chloride ions concentration in electrolyte. In this measurement, long-term and continuous monitoring is limited due to the inherent drift and the requirement of a stable reference electrode. We utilized the chronopotentiometric approach to minimize drift and avoid the use of a conventional reference electrode. A galvanostatic pulse is applied to an Ag/AgCl electrode which initiates a faradic reaction depleting the Cl- ions near the electrode surface. The transition time, which is the time to completely deplete the ions near the electrode surface, is a function of the ion concentration, given by the Nernst equation. The square root of the transition time is in linear relation to the chloride ion concentration. Drift of the response over two weeks is negligible (59 µM/day) when measuring 1 mM [Cl-]using a current pulse of 10 Am(-2). This is a dynamic measurement where the moment of transition time determines the response and thus is independent of the absolute potential. Any metal wire can be used as a pseudo-reference electrode, making this approach feasible for long-term measurement inside concrete structures. PMID:26889572

  19. Combining sulfate electrowinning with chloride leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, A. W.; Sudderth, R. B.; Olafson, S. M.

    1991-08-01

    Although the chloride leaching of copper sulfide concentrates has proved highly efficient, electrowinning from chloride solutions presents many difficulties, notably in cell design and the handling of the powder product. Sulfate electrowinning,on the other hand, continues to improve and has played a significant part in the widespread adoption of the solvent extraction-electrowinning process for copper recovery from low-grade ores. It has been found that the two steps can be combined by introducing a novel solvent extraction process after chloride leaching. This article presents the results of laboratory tests to prove the feasibility of this approach and discusses how it can be integrated into a commercially viable flow sheet.

  20. Is sodium chloride worth its salt?

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Euan; Andrews, Peter J

    2013-06-11

    The choice of fluid for resuscitation of the brain-injured patient remains controversial, and the 'ideal' resuscitation fluid has yet to be identified. Large volumes of hypotonic solutions must be avoided because of the risk of cerebral swelling and intracranial hypertension. Traditionally, 0.9% sodium chloride has been used in patients at risk of intracranial hypertension, but there is increasing recognition that 0.9% saline is not without its problems. Roquilly and colleagues show a reduction in the development of hyperchloremic acidosis in brain-injured patients given 'balanced' solutions for maintenance and resuscitation compared with 0.9% sodium chloride. In this commentary, we explore the idea that we should move away from 0.9% sodium chloride in favor of a more 'physiological' solution.

  1. Reactivity of vinyl chloride ionic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martrenchard, S.; Dedonder-Lardeux, C.; Dimicoli, I.; Grégoire, G.; Jouvet, C.; Mons, M.; Solgadi, D.

    1998-12-01

    The reactivity of vinyl chloride ionic clusters has been investigated by the Threshold PhotoElectron PhotoIon COincidences technique. In the case of the dimer, the competition between the three reactive channels (HCl, Cl ṡ and CH 2Cl elimination) has been studied. The main reactive channel is HCl elimination which proceeds through a 0.2 eV barrier. This elimination reaction is still observed in the trimer but not in larger clusters. For these clusters, cooling by evaporation of neutral vinyl chloride monomers seems to be the favored channel that hinders the HCl elimination step.

  2. Alkyl Chlorides as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nadas, Janos I; Vukovic, Sinisa; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the role of an alkyl chloride as a hydrogen bond acceptor, geometries and interaction energies were calculated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory for complexes between ethyl chloride and representative hydrogen donor groups. The results establish that these donors, which include hydrogen cyanide, methanol, nitrobenzene, pyrrole, acetamide, and N-methylurea, form X-H {hor_ellipsis} Cl hydrogen bonds (X = C, N, O) of weak to moderate strength, with {Delta}E values ranging from -2.8 to -5.3 kcal/mol.

  3. Measuring Sodium Chloride Contents of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Amount of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles measured in real time by analyzer that includes mass spectrometer. Analyzer used to determine mass distributions of active agents in therapeutic or diagnostic aerosols derived from saline solutions and in analyzing ocean spray. Aerosol particles composed of sodium chloride introduced into oven, where individually vaporized on hot wall. Vapor molecules thermally dissociated, and some of resulting sodium atoms ionized on wall. Ions leave oven in burst and analyzed by spectrometer, which is set to monitor sodium-ion intensity.

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  7. Absorption media for irreversibly gettering thionyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Buffleben, George; Goods, Steven H.; Shepodd, Timothy; Wheeler, David R.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy

    2002-01-01

    Thionyl chloride is a hazardous and reactive chemical used as the liquid cathode in commercial primary batteries. Contrary to previous thinking, ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon (Calgon Corporation) reversibly absorbs thionyl chloride. Thus, several candidate materials were examined as irreversible getters for thionyl chloride. The capacity, rate and effect of temperature were also explored. A wide variety of likely materials were investigated through screening experiments focusing on the degree of heat generated by the reaction as well as the material absorption capacity and irreversibility, in order to help narrow the group of possible getter choices. More thorough, quantitative measurements were performed on promising materials. The best performing getter was a mixture of ZnO and ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. In this example, the ZnO reacts with thionyl chloride to form ZnCl.sub.2 and SO.sub.2. The SO.sub.2 is then irreversibly gettered by ASZM-TEDA.RTM. carbon. This combination of ZnO and carbon has a high capacity, is irreversible and functions effectively above -20.degree. C.

  8. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252...

  10. 75 FR 20625 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... established a schedule for the conduct of this review (74 FR 62587, November 30, 2010). Subsequently, counsel... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  11. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chloride. The additive may contain residues of isopropyl alcohol not in excess of 18 percent by weight when... 1990, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, and from the American Oil Chemists' Society,...

  12. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chloride. The additive may contain residues of isopropyl alcohol not in excess of 18 percent by weight when... 1990, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, and from the American Oil Chemists' Society,...

  13. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chloride. The additive may contain residues of isopropyl alcohol not in excess of 18 percent by weight when... 1990, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, and from the American Oil Chemists' Society,...

  14. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chloride. The additive may contain residues of isopropyl alcohol not in excess of 18 percent by weight when... 1990, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, and from the American Oil Chemists' Society,...

  15. CLC chloride channels in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schriever, A M; Friedrich, T; Pusch, M; Jentsch, T J

    1999-11-26

    The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans encodes six putative chloride channels (CeCLC-1 through CeCLC-6) that represent all three known branches of the mammalian CLC gene family. Using promoter fragments to drive the expression of the green fluorescent protein, CeCLC-2, -3, and -4 expression was studied in transgenic C. elegans. CeCLC-4 was specifically expressed in the large H-shaped excretory cell, where it was co-expressed with CeCLC-3, which is also expressed in other cells, including neurons, muscles, and epithelial cells. Also, CeCLC-2 was expressed in several cells of the nervous system, intestinal cells, and vulval muscle cells. Similar to mammalian CLC proteins, only two nematode CLC channels elicited detectable plasma membrane currents in Xenopus oocytes. CeCLC-3 currents were inwardly rectifying and were activated by positive prepulses. Its complex gating behavior can be explained by two gates, at least one of which depends on extracellular anions. In this respect it resembles some mammalian chloride channels with which it also shares a preference of chloride over iodide. C. elegans thus provides new opportunities to understand common mechanisms underlying structure and function in CLC channels and will allow for a genetic dissection of chloride channels in this simple model organism. PMID:10567397

  16. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives §...

  17. Controlling chloride ions diffusion in concrete.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lunwu; Song, Runxia

    2013-11-28

    The corrosion of steel in concrete is mainly due to the chemical reaction between the chloride ions and iron ions. Indeed, this is a serious threaten for reinforced concrete structure, especially for the reinforced concrete structure in the sea. So it is urgent and important to protect concrete against chloride ions corrosion. In this work, we report multilayer concrete can cloak chloride ions. We formulated five kinds of concrete A, B, C, D and E, which are made of different proportion of cement, sand and glue, and fabricated six-layer (ABACAD) cylinder diffusion cloak and background media E. The simulation results show that the six-layer mass diffusion cloak can protect concrete against chloride ions penetration, while the experiment results show that the concentration gradients are parallel and equal outside the outer circle in the diffusion flux lines, the iso-concentration lines are parallel outside the outer circle, and the concentration gradients in the inner circle are smaller than those outside the outer circle.

  18. Controlling chloride ions diffusion in concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lunwu; Song, Runxia

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of steel in concrete is mainly due to the chemical reaction between the chloride ions and iron ions. Indeed, this is a serious threaten for reinforced concrete structure, especially for the reinforced concrete structure in the sea. So it is urgent and important to protect concrete against chloride ions corrosion. In this work, we report multilayer concrete can cloak chloride ions. We formulated five kinds of concrete A, B, C, D and E, which are made of different proportion of cement, sand and glue, and fabricated six-layer (ABACAD) cylinder diffusion cloak and background media E. The simulation results show that the six-layer mass diffusion cloak can protect concrete against chloride ions penetration, while the experiment results show that the concentration gradients are parallel and equal outside the outer circle in the diffusion flux lines, the iso-concentration lines are parallel outside the outer circle, and the concentration gradients in the inner circle are smaller than those outside the outer circle. PMID:24285220

  19. Solvothermal synthesis of strontium phosphate chloride nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, W. M.; Wong, C. T.; Li, Z. Y.; Luk, K. D. K.; Chan, W. K.; Yang, C.; Chiu, K. Y.; Xu, B.; Lu, W. W.

    2007-08-01

    Strontium phosphate chloride nanowire was synthesized via a solvothermal treatment of strontium tri-polyphosphate and Collin salt in 1,4-dioxane at 150 °C. The effects of 1,4-dioxane concentration on particle morphology, crystallinity and phase purity were investigated in this study. The specimen morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the concentration of 1,4-dioxane was below 10%, micron-sized whisker was the dominant form. At 20-25% concentration of 1,4-dioxane, strontium phosphate chloride single-crystalline nanowire was 31±12 nm in diameter and 1.43±0.6 μm in length with an aspect ratio of 52.28±29.41. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this nanowire matched with that of strontium phosphate chloride (JCPDS #083-0973). When 1,4-dioxane concentration exceeded 25%, nanorod aggregate was the dominant form instead of nanowire. At 20-25% 1,4-dioxane concentration suitable strontium concentration combine with high chemical potential environment favors the formation of nanowires. By adding 1,4-dioxane impure phase such as β-strontium hydrogen phosphate, nanorod formation was suppressed. This method provides an efficient way to synthesize high aspect ratio strontium phosphate chloride nanowire. It has potential bioactive nanocomposite, high mechanical performance bioactive bone cement filler and fluorescent material applications.

  20. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives §...

  1. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.180...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives §...

  3. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives §...

  4. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives §...

  5. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  6. Process for drying calcium chloride generated in high chloride flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, R.J.; Sui, C.T.

    1982-03-30

    Some flue gas desulfurization processes applied to fuels containing high chloride concentrations are utilizing, or plan to utilize, by-product gypsum from the process stream. The utilization of such a process results in a calcium chloride buildup in the flue gas desulfurization system from fuels or water resource containing significant chlorides which interferes with the absorption and utilization of the lime or limestone reagent. In this invention, a method is used to convert the calcium chloride to a dry material by utilizing flue gas at elevated temperatures, normally found before an air preheater on steam generators used to produce power or any other conventional large size steam boilers. The monohydrate is produced at temperatures above 3500 F. By applying this drying process with a power plant system, energy consumed for this drying operation is very efficient.

  7. Investigation of factors influencing chloride extraction efficiency during electrochemical chloride extraction from reinforcing concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Stephen R.

    2005-11-01

    Electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE) is an accelerated bridge restoration method similar to cathodic protection, but operates at higher current densities and utilizes a temporary installation. Both techniques prolong the life of a bridge by reducing the corrosion rate of the reinforcing bar when properly applied. ECE achieves this by moving chlorides away from the reinforcement and out of the concrete while simultaneously increasing the alkalinity of the electrolyte near the reinforcing steel. Despite the proven success, significant use of ECE has not resulted in part due to an incomplete understanding in the following areas: (1) An estimation of the additional service life that can be expected following treatment when the treated member is again subjected to chlorides; (2) The cause of the decrease in current flow and, therefore, chloride removal rate during treatment; (3) Influence of water-to-cement (w/c) ratio and cover depth on the time required for treatment. This dissertation covers the research that is connected to the last two areas listed above. To begin examining these issues, plain carbon steel reinforcing bars (rebar) were embedded in portland cement concrete slabs of varying water-to-cement (w/c) ratios and cover depths, and then exposed to chlorides. A fraction of these slabs had sodium chloride added as an admixture, with all of the slabs subjected to cyclical ponding with a saturated solution of sodium chloride. ECE was then used to remove the chlorides from these slabs while making electrical measurements in the different layers between the rebar (cathode) and the titanium mat (anode) to follow the progress of the ECE process. During this study, it was revealed that the resistance of the outer concrete surface layer increases during ECE, inevitably restricting current flow, while the resistance of the underlying concrete decreases or remains constant. During ECE treatment, a white residue formed on the surface of the concrete. Analyses of the

  8. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either...) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains two molecules of water. It is prepared...

  9. Making Positive Electrodes For Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    High coulombic yields provided by sodium/metal chloride battery in which cathode formed by impregnating sintered nickel plaque with saturated solution of nickel chloride. Charge/discharge cycling of nickel chloride electrode results in very little loss of capacity. Used in spacecraft, electric land vehicles, and other applications in which high-energy-density power systems required.

  10. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all completely assembled respirators which are designed for use as respiratory protection during entry into...

  11. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all completely assembled respirators which are designed for use as respiratory protection during entry into...

  12. Electronic structure calculations of mercury mobilization from mineral phases and photocatalytic removal from water and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Fabiana; Stankowski, Martin; Hogan, Conor

    2014-09-15

    Mercury is a hazardous environmental pollutant mobilized from natural sources, and anthropogenically contaminated and disturbed areas. Current methods to assess mobility and environmental impact are mainly based on field measurements, soil monitoring, and kinetic modelling. In order to understand in detail the extent to which different mineral sources can give rise to mercury release it is necessary to investigate the complexity at the microscopic level and the possible degradation/dissolution processes. In this work, we investigated the potential for mobilization of mercury structurally trapped in three relevant minerals occurring in hot spring environments and mining areas, namely, cinnabar (α-HgS), corderoite (α-Hg3S2Cl2), and mercuric chloride (HgCl2). Quantum chemical methods based on density functional theory as well as more sophisticated approaches are used to assess the possibility of a) direct photoreduction and formation of elemental Hg at the surface of the minerals, providing a path for ready release in the environment; and b) reductive dissolution of the minerals in the presence of solutions containing halogens. Furthermore, we study the use of TiO2 as a potential photocatalyst for decontamination of polluted waters (mainly Hg(2+)-containing species) and air (atmospheric Hg(0)). Our results partially explain the observed pathways of Hg mobilization from relevant minerals and the microscopic mechanisms behind photocatalytic removal of Hg-based pollutants. Possible sources of disagreement with observations are discussed and further improvements to our approach are suggested.

  13. Purification and characterization of a liver-derived beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase from marine mammal Sotalia fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Gomes Júnior, J E; Souza, D S L; Nascimento, R M; Lima, A L M; Melo, J A T; Rocha, T L; Miller, R N G; Franco, O L; Grossi-de-Sa, M F; Abreu, L R D

    2010-04-01

    A beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52) was purified from hepatic extracts of Sotalia fluviatilis, order Cetacea. The protein was purified by using ammonium sulfate fractionation and four subsequent chromatographies (Biogel A 1.5 m, Chitin, Deae-Biogel and hydroxyapatite resins). After these purification steps, the enzyme was purified 380.5-fold with an 8.4% yield. The molecular mass (10 kDa) was estimated by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. A Km of 2.72 mM and Vmax 9.5 x 10(-6) micromol/(min x mg) were found for this enzyme, determined by p-nitrophenyl-beta-D: -hexosaminide substrate digestion. Optimal pH and temperature for beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase activity were 5.0 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Enzyme activity was inhibited by sodium selenate (Na(2)SeO(4)), mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (C(12)H(25)SO(4)Na), and activated by zinc, calcium, barium and lithium ions. Characterization of the beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase in Sotalia fluviatilis can be a basis for physiological studies in this species.

  14. Purification and characterization of a liver-derived beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase from marine mammal Sotalia fluviatilis.

    PubMed

    Gomes Júnior, J E; Souza, D S L; Nascimento, R M; Lima, A L M; Melo, J A T; Rocha, T L; Miller, R N G; Franco, O L; Grossi-de-Sa, M F; Abreu, L R D

    2010-04-01

    A beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52) was purified from hepatic extracts of Sotalia fluviatilis, order Cetacea. The protein was purified by using ammonium sulfate fractionation and four subsequent chromatographies (Biogel A 1.5 m, Chitin, Deae-Biogel and hydroxyapatite resins). After these purification steps, the enzyme was purified 380.5-fold with an 8.4% yield. The molecular mass (10 kDa) was estimated by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF analysis. A Km of 2.72 mM and Vmax 9.5 x 10(-6) micromol/(min x mg) were found for this enzyme, determined by p-nitrophenyl-beta-D: -hexosaminide substrate digestion. Optimal pH and temperature for beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase activity were 5.0 and 60 degrees C, respectively. Enzyme activity was inhibited by sodium selenate (Na(2)SeO(4)), mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (C(12)H(25)SO(4)Na), and activated by zinc, calcium, barium and lithium ions. Characterization of the beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidase in Sotalia fluviatilis can be a basis for physiological studies in this species. PMID:20349205

  15. Benzalkonium chloride. Health hazard evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholc, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Health hazards associated with the use of benzalkonium chlorides (BAC) are reviewed. Benzalkonium chloride is extensively used as a cationic disinfectant. It is found in a great many over-the-counter and prescription eye products, disinfectants, shampoos, and deodorants, and is used in concentrations that range from 0.001 to 0.01% in eyedrops, up to 2.5% in concentrated liquid disinfectants. Solutions of 0.03 to 0.04% BAC may cause temporary eye irritation in humans but are unlikely to cause any skin response except in persons allergic to quaternary ammonium compounds. Inhalation of a vaporized 10% solution of BAC produced a bronchospasmodic reaction in a previously sensitized individual. At present no other human health effects from BAC have been documented or inferred from exposure to such dilute concentrations.

  16. Liver fibrosis in asymptomatic polyvinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Wang, Jung-Der; Yang, Pei-Ming; Yang, Pei-Cheng; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2004-09-01

    This study was designed to determine whether vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure is associated with liver fibrosis. A total of 347 workers with occupational exposure to VCM were systemically examined using liver ultrasonography and routine liver function tests. Vinyl chloride monomer cumulative dose (ppm-month) was estimated by summing the products of air VCM concentration levels and months of employment. Liver fibrosis was defined in subjects with precirrhosis and cirrhosis of liver diagnosed using ultrasonography. Significantly increased risks of developing liver fibrosis were found in workers who had history of high exposure jobs (odds ratio 5.5, 95% confidence interval 1.7-25.4) when compared with workers who did not have history of high exposure jobs. We concluded that there was an increased risk of developing liver fibrosis in PVC workers who had high exposure to VCM.

  17. Calcium chloride rhenate(VII) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Jarek, Urszula; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Rlepokura, Katarzyna; Lis, Tadeusz

    2007-09-01

    The crystal structure of calcium chloride rhenate(VII) dihydrate, CaCl(ReO4).2H2O, investigated at 85 K, consists of calcium cations, chloride anions, rhenate(VII) anions and water molecules. In the nearly tetrahedral rhenate(VII) anion, all constituent atoms lie on special positions of m2m (Re) and m (O) site symmetries. The Cl- anion and water O atom lie on special positions of m2m and 2 site symmetries, respectively. The Ca2+ ion, also on a special position (m2m), is eight-coordinated in a distorted square-antiprismatic coordination mode. The crystal has a layered structure stabilized by Ca-O coordination bonds and O-H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  18. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  19. Study on removal of elemental mercury from simulated flue gas over activated coke treated by acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinfeng; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Zhang, Jie; Song, Jingke; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Xunan; Xie, Yine

    2015-02-01

    This work addressed the investigation of activated coke (AC) treated by acids. Effects of AC samples, modified by ether different acids (H2SO4, HNO3 and HClO4) or HClO4 of varied concentrations, on Hg0 removal were studied under simulated flue gas conditions. In addition, effects of reaction temperature and individual flue gas components including O2, NO, SO2 and H2O were discussed. In the experiments, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied to explore the surface properties of sorbents and possible mechanism of Hg0 oxidation. Results showed that AC sample treated by HClO4 of 4.5 mol/L exhibited maximum promotion of efficiency on Hg0 removal at 160 °C. NO was proved to be positive in the removal of Hg0. And SO2 displayed varied impact in capturing Hg0 due to the integrated reactions between SO2 and modified AC. The addition of O2 could improve the advancement further to some extent. Besides, the Hg0 removal capacity had a slight declination when H2O was added in gas flow. Based on the analysis of XPS and FTIR, the selected sample absorbed Hg0 mostly in chemical way. The reaction mechanism, deduced from results of characterization and performance of AC samples, indicated that Hg0 could firstly be absorbed on sorbent and then react with oxygen-containing (Csbnd O) or chlorine-containing groups (Csbnd Cl) on the surface of sorbent. And the products were mainly in forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and mercuric oxide (HgO).

  20. Gasometric titration for dimethylaluminum chloride analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Maligres, Peter; Eckenroad, Kyle; Simmons, Bryon

    2016-06-01

    A gasometric titration method was developed to quantitate active alkylaluminum content in dimethylaluminum chloride solution to perform the stoichiometry calculation for the reaction charge. The procedure was reproducible with good precision, and the results showed good correlation with ICP-MS method. The gasometric titration is a simple, inexpensive alternative to analysis via ICP-MS which provides more selective analysis of methylaluminum species without the need for inertion.

  1. Radio-Purification of Neodymium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hans, S.; Yeh, M.; Cumming, J. B.; Hahn, R. L.

    2011-04-27

    Organometallic liquid scintillator becomes one of the man detection mediums for neutrino experiment. Liquid-liquid extraction is the method of choice for loading metallic ions of interest into the organic solvents at BNL. High purity of all starting materials is essential for the optimization of synthesis. A newly developed 'self-scavenging' technique was applied to purify undesired radioisotopes from the starting metal compound and found to effectively remove thorium and such containments from the neodymium chloride for SNO+.

  2. Removing Chlorides From Metallurgical-Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, W. C.; Coleman, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Process for making low-cost silicon for solar cells is further improved. Silane product recycled to feed stripper column converts some of heavy impurities to volatile ones that pass off at top of column with light wastes. Impurities--chlorides of arsenic, phosphorus, and boron-would otherwise be carried to subsequent distillations where they would be difficult to remove. Since only a small amount of silane is recycled, silicon production efficiency remains high.

  3. Method for the regeneration of spent molten zinc chloride

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.; Rosenhoover, William A.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for regenerating spent molten zinc chloride which has been used in the hydrocracking of coal or ash-containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous materials derived therefrom and which contains zinc chloride, zinc oxide, zinc oxide complexes and ash-containing carbonaceous residue, by incinerating the spent molten zinc chloride to vaporize the zinc chloride for subsequent condensation to produce a purified molten zinc chloride: an improvement comprising the use of clay in the incineration zone to suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc. Optionally water is used in conjunction with the clay to further suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc.

  4. Boldine action against the stannous chloride effect.

    PubMed

    Reiniger, I W; Ribeiro da Silva, C; Felzenszwalb, I; de Mattos, J C; de Oliveira, J F; da Silva Dantas, F J; Bezerra, R J; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-12-15

    Peumus boldus extract has been used in popular medicine in the treatment of biliar litiase, hepatic insufficiency and liver congestion. Its effects are associated to the substance boldine that is present in its extract. In the present work, we evaluated the influence of boldine both in: (i) the structural conformation of a plasmid pUC 9.1 through gel electrophoresis analysis; and in (ii) the survival of the strain of Escherichia coli AB1157 submitted to reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by a Fenton like reaction, induced by stannous chloride. Our results show a reduction of the lethal effect induced by stannous chloride on the survival of the E. coli culture in the presence of boldine. The supercoiled form of the plasmid is not modified by stannous chloride in the presence of boldine. We suggest that the protection induced by boldine could be explained by its anti-oxidant mechanism. In this way, the boldine could be reacting with stannous ions, protecting them against the oxidation and, consequently, avoiding the generation of ROS. PMID:10624900

  5. Understanding microwave vessel contamination by chloride species.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Sandro; Spanu, Davide; Bianchi, Davide; Dossi, Carlo; Pozzi, Andrea; Monticelli, Damiano

    2016-10-01

    Microwaves are widely used to assist digestion, general sample treatment and synthesis. The use of aqua regia is extensively adopted for the closed vessel mineralization of samples prior to trace element detection, leading to the contamination of microwave vessels by chlorine containing species. The latter are entrapped in the polymeric matrix of the vessels, leading to memory effects that are difficult to remove, among which the risk of silver incomplete recoveries by removal of the sparingly soluble chloride is the predominant one. In the present paper, we determined by mass spectrometry that hydrogen chloride is the species entrapped in the polymeric matrix and responsible for vessel contamination. Moreover, several decontamination treatments were considered to assess their efficiency, demonstrating that several cleaning cycles with water, nitric acid or silver nitrate in nitric acid were inefficient in removing chloride contamination (contamination reduction around 90%). Better results (≈95% decrease) were achieved by a single decontamination step in alkaline environment (sodium hydroxide or ammonia). Finally, a thermal treatment in a common laboratory oven (i.e. without vacuum and ventilation) was tested: a one hour heating at 150°C leads to a 98.5% decontamination, a figure higher than the ones obtained by wet treatments which requires comparable time. The latter treatment is a major advancement with respect to existing treatments as it avoids the need of a vacuum oven for at least 17h as presently proposed in the literature. PMID:27474275

  6. Understanding microwave vessel contamination by chloride species.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Sandro; Spanu, Davide; Bianchi, Davide; Dossi, Carlo; Pozzi, Andrea; Monticelli, Damiano

    2016-10-01

    Microwaves are widely used to assist digestion, general sample treatment and synthesis. The use of aqua regia is extensively adopted for the closed vessel mineralization of samples prior to trace element detection, leading to the contamination of microwave vessels by chlorine containing species. The latter are entrapped in the polymeric matrix of the vessels, leading to memory effects that are difficult to remove, among which the risk of silver incomplete recoveries by removal of the sparingly soluble chloride is the predominant one. In the present paper, we determined by mass spectrometry that hydrogen chloride is the species entrapped in the polymeric matrix and responsible for vessel contamination. Moreover, several decontamination treatments were considered to assess their efficiency, demonstrating that several cleaning cycles with water, nitric acid or silver nitrate in nitric acid were inefficient in removing chloride contamination (contamination reduction around 90%). Better results (≈95% decrease) were achieved by a single decontamination step in alkaline environment (sodium hydroxide or ammonia). Finally, a thermal treatment in a common laboratory oven (i.e. without vacuum and ventilation) was tested: a one hour heating at 150°C leads to a 98.5% decontamination, a figure higher than the ones obtained by wet treatments which requires comparable time. The latter treatment is a major advancement with respect to existing treatments as it avoids the need of a vacuum oven for at least 17h as presently proposed in the literature.

  7. An autopsy case of zinc chloride poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Takahashi, Motonori; Watanabe, Seiya; Ebina, Masatomo; Mizu, Daisuke; Ariyoshi, Koichi; Asano, Migiwa; Nagasaki, Yasushi; Ueno, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Ingestion of large amounts of zinc chloride causes corrosive gastroenteritis with vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Some individuals experience shock after ingesting large amounts of zinc chloride, resulting in fatality. Here, we present the results of an administrative autopsy performed on a 70-year-old man who ingested zinc chloride solution and died. After drinking the solution, he developed vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, and called for an ambulance. Except for tachycardia, his vital signs were stable at presentation. However, he developed hypotension and severe metabolic acidosis and died. The patient's blood zinc concentration on arrival was high at 3030μg/dL. Liver cirrhosis with cloudy yellow ascites was observed, however, there were no clear findings of gastrointestinal perforation. The gastric mucosa was gray-brown, with sclerosis present in all gastric wall layers. Zinc staining was strongly positive in all layers. There was almost no postmortem degeneration of the gastric mucosal epithelium, and hypercontracture of the smooth muscle layer was observed. Measurement of the zinc concentration in the organs revealed the highest concentration in the gastric mucosa, followed by the pancreas and spleen. Clinically, corrosive gastroenteritis was the cause of death. However, although autopsy revealed solidification in the esophagus and gastric mucosa, there were no findings in the small or large intestine. Therefore, metabolic acidosis resulting from organ damage was the direct cause of death. PMID:27497327

  8. Watershed scale chloride storage across a gradient of urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellen, C. C.; Oswald, C. J.; Oni, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Sodium chloride is the main de-icing agent used during the winter in Canada and the northern United States. However, little is known about the long term fate, residence time, and ecological effects of chloride. This talk integrates work taking place across three sites in Southern Ontario, Canada: Hamilton Harbour, the Toronto lakeshore, and Lake Simcoe. We quantify chloride inputs, outputs, and changes in storage for a number of watersheds across a gradient of urbanization. For the three winter months (January, February, March), we show that stream water chloride concentrations approach those of brackish waters for urban watersheds. Chloride is also highly persistent, with stream water chloride concentrations decreasing from the winter months and approaching baseline levels only in July. These baseline levels are greater than 100 mg Cl/l in the urban watersheds, suggesting high levels of chloride storage in soil and groundwater. Using road salt application rates and groundwater levels and chloride concentrations, we estimate the magnitude and residence time of the chloride pools in a number of watersheds across a gradient of urbanization. Our results suggest that the magnitude and residence time of chloride storage varies with urbanization and other factors. We show that summer baseflow concentrations do approach the EPA's chronic exposure guideline of 230 mg Cl/l, implying more work is needed to understand the in stream and downstream ecological effects of chloride.

  9. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  10. Properties of a new liquid desiccant solution - Lithium chloride and calcium chloride mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ertas, A.; Anderson, E.E.; Kiris, I. )

    1992-09-01

    Desiccants, broadly classified as solid and liquid desiccants, have the property of extracting and retaining moisture from air brought into contact with them. By using either type, moisture in the air is removed and the resulting dry air can be used for air-conditioning or drying purposes. Because of its properties, lithium chloride is the most stable liquid desiccant and has a large dehydration concentration (30% to 45%), but its cost is relatively high ($9.00-13.00 per kg). It is expected that lithium chloride will reduce the relative humidity to as low as 15%. Calcium chloride is the cheapest (45 cents per kg) and most readily available desiccant, but it has the disadvantage of being unstable depending on the air inlet conditions and the concentration of the desiccant in the solution. To stabilize calcium chloride and to decrease the high cost of lithium chloride, the two can be mixed in different weight combinations. The main objective of this research is to measure the physical properties of different combinations of this mixture such as density, viscosity, and vapor pressure which are necessary for analysis of heat and mass transfer in a packed tower desiccant-air contact system. The solubility of this new liquid desiccant under certain temperature-concentrations will also be studied.

  11. Solution-Derived, Chloride-Containing Minerals as a Waste Form for Alkali Chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Lepry, William C.

    2012-10-01

    Sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2] and cancrinite [(Na,K)6Ca2Al6Si6O24Cl4] are environmentally stable, chloride-containing minerals and are a logical waste form option for the mixed alkali chloride salt waste stream that is generated from a proposed electrochemical separations process during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to the volatility of chloride salts at moderate temperatures, the ideal processing route for these salts is a low-temperature approach such as the sol-gel process. The sodalite structure can be easily synthesized by the sol-gel process; however, it is produced in the form of a fine powder with particle sizes on the order of 1–10 µm. Due to the small particle size, these powders require additional treatment to form a monolith. In this study, the sol-gel powders were pressed into pellets and fired to achieve > 90% of theoretical density. The cancrinite structure, identified as the best candidate mineral form in terms of waste loading capacity, was only produced on a limited basis following the sol-gel process and converted to sodalite upon firing. Here we discuss the sol-gel process specifics, chemical durability of select waste forms, and the steps taken to maximize chloride-containing phases, decrease chloride loss during pellet firing, and increase pellet densities.

  12. Identification of the different sources of chlorides in streams by regression analysis using chloride-discharge relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Albek, E.

    1999-12-01

    Chloride-discharge relationships at several stations on Turkish streams are investigated, both qualitatively and quantitatively, to identify natural and anthropogenic sources of chloride. Simple expressions are used to distinguish among sources. Linear regression analysis is conducted to estimate parameters of the models. Five groups of stations are distinguished respective to different sources of chloride and change of chloride concentration with stream discharge. Emphasis is placed on the identification of anthropogenic sources of chloride to aid in water pollution control strategies. The polluted Sakarya River and its primary tributary, the Porsuk Stream, are studied in detail to trace chloride behavior along the waterway and to assess the level of pollution from cities discharging to the streams. Among natural sources of chloride, evaporite sediment sources are examined in detail.

  13. Crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride and its copper(II) and cobalt(III) chloride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M. Tsapkov, V. I.; Bocelli, G.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Shova, S. G.; Gulea, A. P.

    2006-01-15

    The crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride hydrate hemiethanol solvate (I), salicylideneguanylhydrazinium trichloroaquacuprate(II) (II), and bis(salicylideneguanylhydrazino)cobalt(III) chloride trihydrate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. The structures of compounds I, II, and III are solved by direct methods and refined using the least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms to the final factors R = 0.0597, 0.0212, and 0.0283, respectively. In the structure of compound I, the monoprotonated molecules and chlorine ions linked by hydrogen bonds form layers aligned parallel to the (010) plane. In the structure of compound II, the salicylaldehyde guanylhydrazone cations and polymer chains consisting of trichloroaquacuprate(II) anions are joined by an extended three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds. In the structure of compound III, the [Co(LH){sub 2}]{sup +} cations, chloride ions, and molecules of crystallization water are linked together by a similar network.

  14. Substituent effects on ferrocenes in aluminum chloride-butylpyridinium chloride molten-salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Edgecombe, A.L.; Fowler, J.S.; Gibbard, H.F. ); Slocum, D.W. ); Phillips, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The visible absorption spectra and reduction potentials of 11 ferrocenes containing electron-withdrawing substituents were determined in an N-n-butylpyridinium chloride-aluminum chloride molten salt. When the substituent(s) on the cyclopentadienyl ring(s) of ferrocene were varied, the reduction potential was caused to range over 1.25 V, and the wavelength for maximum absorption of visible light was varied by nearly 200 nm. These changes are greater than have been observed for similar ferrocenes in other nonaqueous solvents. Evidence is presented for specific interactions of particular ferrocenes with the molten salt.

  15. Chloride Fluxes in Isolated Dialyzed Barnacle Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    DiPolo, R.

    1972-01-01

    Chloride outflux and influx has been studied in single isolated muscle fibers from the giant barnacle under constant internal composition by means of a dialysis perfusion technique. Membrane potential was continually recorded. The chloride outfluxes and influxes were 143 and 144 pmoles/cm2-sec (mean resting potential: 58 mv, temperature: 22°–24°C) with internal and external chloride concentrations of 30 and 541 mM, respectively. The chloride conductance calculated from tracer measurements using constant field assumptions is about fourfold greater than that calculated from published electrical data. Replacing 97% of the external chloride ions by propionate reduces the chloride efflux by 51%. Nitrate ions applied either to the internal or external surface of the membrane slows the chloride efflux. The external pH dependence of the chloride efflux follows the external pH dependence of the membrane conductance, in the range pH 3.9–4.7, increasing with decreasing pH. In the range pH 5–9, the chloride efflux increased with increasing pH, in a manner similar to that observed in frog muscle fibers. The titration curve for internal pH changes in the range 4.0–7.0 was quantitatively much different from that for external pH change, indicating significant asymmetry in the internal and external pH dependence of the chloride efflux. PMID:5074810

  16. Twenty years of fluorescence imaging of intracellular chloride

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Daniele; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloride homeostasis has a pivotal role in controlling neuronal excitability in the adult brain and during development. The intracellular concentration of chloride is regulated by the dynamic equilibrium between passive fluxes through membrane conductances and the active transport mediated by importers and exporters. In cortical neurons, chloride fluxes are coupled to network activity by the opening of the ionotropic GABAA receptors that provides a direct link between the activity of interneurons and chloride fluxes. These molecular mechanisms are not evenly distributed and regulated over the neuron surface and this fact can lead to a compartmentalized control of the intracellular concentration of chloride. The inhibitory drive provided by the activity of the GABAA receptors depends on the direction and strength of the associated currents, which are ultimately dictated by the gradient of chloride, the main charge carrier flowing through the GABAA channel. Thus, the intracellular distribution of chloride determines the local strength of ionotropic inhibition and influences the interaction between converging excitation and inhibition. The importance of chloride regulation is also underlined by its involvement in several brain pathologies, including epilepsy and disorders of the autistic spectra. The full comprehension of the physiological meaning of GABAergic activity on neurons requires the measurement of the spatiotemporal dynamics of chloride fluxes across the membrane. Nowadays, there are several available tools for the task, and both synthetic and genetically encoded indicators have been successfully used for chloride imaging. Here, we will review the available sensors analyzing their properties and outlining desirable future developments. PMID:25221475

  17. The Structure of Nickel Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/Aluminum Chloride: X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    The structure of anhydrous nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride and aluminum chloride has been investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in both Lewis acid and Lewis base solutions. The EXAFS data of NiCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O crystals were also recorded and analyzed to demonstrate the difference file technique. The difference file technique is used to obtain the structural information for the very closely spaced coordination shells of chloride and oxygen in NiCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O and they are found to agree very closely with the X-ray diffraction data. The difference file technique is then used to analyze the nickel chloride in the ionic liquid solutions. Even though anhydrous NiCl{sub 2} is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution, the EXAFS data show a single coordination of four chlorides in a tetrahedron around the nickel atom in the basic solution. In a weak acid solution, there are six chlorides in a single octahedral coordination shell around the nickel. However, in a strong acid solution, in addition to the octahedral chloride-coordination shell, there is a second coordination shell of eight aluminum atoms in the form of a simple cube.

  18. [Experimental chronic phenylmercuric chloride poisoning in pigs].

    PubMed

    Raszyk, J; Docekalová, H; Rubes, J; Navrátil, S; Masek, J; Rodák, L

    1992-07-01

    Four gilts, sisters from one litter, aged 70 days and weighing 20-24 kg, were used for a trial. Two experimental gilts (P) were administered an experimental feed mixture containing phenylmercury chloride (40 mg/kg). Two control gilts (K) were fed the same mixture but without phenylmercury chloride. P gilts began to lag behind in their growth from day 60 of the experiment, they manifested nonphysiological postures (dog's sitting posture), paresis of hind limbs and uncoordinated movements. P gilts had cloudy, orange-brown urine from day 70 and from day 75 they began to suffer from diarrhoea. Mercury (Hg) contents in urine and blood serum of P gilts were irregularly variable: urine 0.58-2.15 mg/l, blood serum 0.02-0.37 mg/l. Hg content in excrements of P gilts fluctuated from 23 to 26 mg/kg. Vitamin A concentrations in blood serum and liver decreased in P gilts. Phenylmercury chloride feeding caused mutagenic changes in peripheral lymphocytes of P gilts (an increase in the number of aberrant cells from 2-3% to 8-9%) and reduced IgA, IgM and IgG immunoglobulin levels in blood serum. Pathological lesions were observed in the colon, kidneys and liver. None of the above-mentioned changes were observed in K gilts. Increased resistance to the negative effects of Hg was found in one experimental gilt. In comparison with K gilts, Hg concentrations in P gilts after 130 days of the experiment increased as follows: 427 times in kidneys, 333 times in liver, 106 times in guts, 71 times in pancreas, 53 times in ovaries, 50 times in muscles, 47 times in bristles and 16 times in the brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Active lithium chloride cell for spacecraft power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischmann, C. W.; Horning, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An active thionyl chloride high rate battery is under development for spacecraft operations. It is a 540kC (150 Ah) battery capable of pulses up to 75A. This paper describes the design and initial test data on a 'state-of-the-art' cell that has been selected to be the baseline for the prototype cell for that battery. Initial data indicate that the specification can be met with fresh cells. Data for stored cells and additional environmental test data are in the process of being developed.

  20. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, M.L.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-01-01

    A method is given for dissolving reactor fuel elements in which the uranium is associated with a relatively inert chromium-containing alloy such as stainless steel. An aqueous mixture of acids comprising 2 to 2.5 molar hydrochloric acid and 4 to 8 molar nitric acid is employed in dissolving the fuel element. In order io reduce corrosion in subsequent processing of the resulting solution, chloride values are removed from the solution by contacting it with concentrated nitric acid at an elevated temperature.

  1. Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22 in Calcium Chloride and in Calcium Chloride Plus Calcium Nitrate Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K J; Day, S D; Ilevbare, G O; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-05-13

    Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is a nickel-based alloy, which is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in concentrated calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) brines and to evaluate the inhibitive effect of nitrate, especially to localized corrosion. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion potential of Alloy 22 was approximately -360 mV in the silver-silver chloride (SSC) scale and independent of the tested temperature. Cyclic polarization tests showed that Alloy 22 was mainly susceptible to localized attack in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} at 75 C and higher temperatures. The addition of nitrate in a molar ratio of chloride to nitrate equal to 10 increased the onset of localized corrosion to approximately 105 C. The addition of nitrate to the solution also decreased the uniform corrosion rate and the passive current of the alloy.

  2. 40 CFR 61.65 - Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...(d), there is to be no discharge to the atmosphere from any relief valve on any equipment in vinyl... emissions from loading and unloading lines in vinyl chloride service which are opened to the atmosphere... unloading operation and before opening a loading or unloading line to the atmosphere, the quantity of...

  3. 40 CFR 61.65 - Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...(d), there is to be no discharge to the atmosphere from any relief valve on any equipment in vinyl... emissions from loading and unloading lines in vinyl chloride service which are opened to the atmosphere... unloading operation and before opening a loading or unloading line to the atmosphere, the quantity of...

  4. Enrofloxacin hydro­chloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Calderón, Jorge E.; Gutiérrez, Lilia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; García-Gutiérrez, Ponciano; Sumano, Héctor

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C19H23FN3O3 +·Cl−·2H2O [systematic name: 4-(3-carb­oxy-1-cyclo­propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di­hydro­quin­o­lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl­piperazin-1-ium chloride dihydrate], consists of two independent monocations of the protonated enrofloxacin, two chloride anions and four water mol­ecules. In the cations, the piperazinium rings adopt chair conformations and the dihedral angles between the cyclo­propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring system are 56.55 (2) and 51.11 (2)°. An intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed in each cation. In the crystal, the components are connected via O—H⋯Cl, N—H⋯Cl and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a π–π inter­action between the benzene rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.6726 (13) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional array. PMID:24826167

  5. Radiolytic preparation of anhydrous tin (2) chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Anhydrous tin (2) chloride (SnCl2) is prepared by radiolysis with high energy electrons of a tin (4) chloride (SnCl4) solution in heptane. The SnCl4 is reduced to insoluble SNCl2. The energy yield, G(SnCl2), molecules of SnCl2, produced per 100 eV, increases with SnCl4 concentration from 1.6 at 0.15 M SnCl4 to 3.1 at 3.0 M SnCl4. Other parameters such as temperature total dose and beam current have little influence on G(SnCl2). The method may be used to prepare other metal halides if the higher valence, more covalent metal halide is soluble in aliphatic hydrocarbons and the lower more ionic metal halide is insoluble. The reaction mechanism is discussed; the radiolysis of both heptane and SnCl4 is involved. At high SnCl4 concentration G(SnCl2) appears to be limited by the yield of SnC13 radicals.

  6. Vinyl chloride-induced hepatic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Falk, H

    1987-01-01

    In early 1974, an alert plant physician reported the occurrence of several cases of the otherwise rare hepatic angiosarcoma (HAS) at a single polyvinyl chloride (PVC) production facility in Louisville, Kentucky (U.S.A.). Upon further investigation, the relative risk for HAS at this plant appeared to be approximately 5,000, strongly indicating a causal relationship with some factor at the plant. Epidemiologic studies at this and other PVC polymerization plants identified vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) as the causative agent. Experimental studies reported in early 1974 confirmed VCM as a hepatic carcinogen capable of producing HAS and other tumors. Follow-up epidemiologic studies revealed that: 1) HAS is the end stage of a progressive liver disease consisting of hepatocytic and sinusoidal cell hyperplasia, sinusoidal dilatation, and hepatic fibrosis; 2) over 100 cases of VCM-induced HAS have occurred worldwide; and 3) an increased risk of lung cancer has been reported in some cohort studies of PVC polymerization workers, although this outcome may be related to PVC dust or factors other than VCM. A national study of HAS in the United States identified 3 other causes of HAS: Thorotrast, inorganic arsenic, and androgenic-anabolic steroids. Of 168 cases found to occur during 1964 through 1974, 42 cases (25%) were associated with the 4 known etiologic agents, while 126 cases (75%) were of unknown etiology.

  7. Open cycle lithium chloride cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, T. G.; Loef, G. O. G.; Iyer, R.; Wenger, J.

    1983-05-01

    A lithium chloride open cycle absorption chiller has been designed, built and tested. Solution reconcentration takes place in a small counter current packed column supplied with solar heated air. Removal of noncondensable gases that enter the chiller dissolved in the strong solution and the make-up refrigerant streams is accomplished by a liquid-jet ejector and a small vacuum pump. Cooling capacities approaching 1.4 tons and COP levels of 0.58 have been achieved at non-optimum operating conditions. Test results from preliminary system operation suggest that mass transfer processes in both the packed column reconcentrator and the absorber are controlled by concentration gradients in the lithium chloride solution. Liquid phase controlled mass transfer dictates an operating strategy different from the previously assumed gas phase controlled process to obtain maximum rates of evaporation in the packed column. Determination of optimal operating conditions leading to decreased electrical power consumption and improved cooling capacity and coefficient of performance will require further analysis and testing.

  8. Antagonists for acute oral cadmium chloride intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Basinger, M.A.; Jones, M.M.; Holscher, M.A.; Vaughn, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    An examination has been carried out on the relative efficacy of a number of chelating agents when acting as antagonists for oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice. The compounds were administered orally after the oral administration of cadmium chloride at 1 mmol/kg. Of the compounds examined, several were useful in terms of enhancing survival, but by far the most effective in both enhancing survival and leaving minimal residual levels of cadmium in the liver and the kidney, was meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Several polyaminocarboxylic acids also enhanced survival. The most effective of these in reducing liver and kidney levels of cadmium were diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), and triethylenetetraminehexaacetic acid (TTHA). D-Penicillamine (DPA) was found to promote survival but also led to kidney cadmium levels higher than those found in the controls. Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS) was as effective in promoting survival as DMSA but left levels of cadmium in the kidney and liver that were approximately four times greater than those found with DMSA.

  9. The sodium chloride primary pressure gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.; Chhabildas, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The failure of a central force model for sodium chloride is discussed. It is noted that it does not closely satisfy the Cauchy conditions at low temperatures, and that it fails the central force requirement of the Love condition. The available shock data for sodium chloride and its analysis is examined, and two reasons why the Hugoniot transformation pressure is likely to be less than 231 kbar are discussed. The important (but unjustified) theoretical assumptions made in converting Hugoniot to isothermal data is discussed; it is noted that serious error can enter for very large pressures for a given material and that at such high pressures the isothermal data should thus be considered only semiquantitative even if the Hugoniot data itself is accurate. An alternate method of estimating the isothermal transformation pressure from the Hugoniot transformation pressure is used. This method is based on the temperature derivative of the transformation pressure. On this basis it is concluded that an upper bound for the isothermal transformation of NaCl (to a CsCl-type structure) at room temperature is 257 kbar; it is noted that the actual value may be considerably less than this.

  10. Cesium chloride compatibility testing program: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, G.H.

    1989-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering the geologic disposal of the doubly encapsulated cesium chloride (CsCl) produced at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). Reliable estimates of long-term corrosion of the inner capsule material by the CsCl under repository storage conditions are needed to assess the hazards associated with geologic disposal of the fission product Cs. The Cesium Chloride Compatibility Program was carried out at PNL to obtain the short-term corrosion data required to accurately estimate long-term attack. In the compatibility tests six standard WESF CsCl capsules were placed vertically in individual insulated containers and allowed to self-heat to a nominal maximum 316L SS/CsCl interface temperature of 450{degree}C. The capsules were held at temperature for times ranging from 0.25 to 6 years. When a test was completed, the capsule was removed from the container and sectioned. Four samples were cut from the inner capsule at prescribed locations and subjected to metallographic examination. Corrosion was determined from photomicrographs of the samples. 16 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. The DELTA 181 lithium thionyl chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Ralph M.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Leigh, A. P.

    In 1986, the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) undertook the development of a sensor module for the DELTA 181 spacecraft, a low earth orbit (LEO) mission of less than two months duration. A large lithium thionyl chloride battery was developed as the spacecraft's primary power source, the first known such use for this technology. The exceptionally high energy density of the lithium thionyl chloride cell was the primary driver for its use, resulting in a completed battery with a specific energy density of 120 Wh/lb. Safety requirements became the primary driver shaping all aspects of the power system design and development due to concerns about the potential hazards of this relatively new, high-energy technology. However, the program was completed without incident. The spacecraft was launched on February 8, 1988, from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) with over 60,000 Wh of battery energy. It reentered on April 2, 1988, still operating after 55 days, providing a successful, practical, and visible demonstration of the use of this technology for spacecraft applications.

  12. Picosecond dynamics from lanthanide chloride melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalampounias, Angelos G.

    2012-12-01

    The picosecond dynamics of molten lanthanide chlorides is studied by means of vibrational spectroscopy. Polarized Raman spectra of molten LaCl3, NdCl3, GdCl3, DyCl3, HoCl3 and YCl3 are fitted to a model enabling to obtain the times of vibrational dephasing, tν and vibrational frequency modulation tω. Our aim is to find possible sensitive indicators of short-time dynamics. It has been found that all lanthanide chlorides exhibit qualitative similarities in the vibrational relaxation and frequency modulation times in the molten state. It appears that the vibrational correlation functions of all melts comply with the Rothschild approach assuming that the environmental modulation is described by a stretched exponential decay. The evolution of the dispersion parameter α indicates the deviation of the melts from the model simple liquid and the similar local environment in which the oscillator is placed and with which it is coupled. The "packing" of the anions around central La3+ cation seems to be the key factor for the structure and the dynamics of the melts. The results are discussed in the framework of the current phenomenological status of the field.

  13. 21 CFR 522.1862 - Sterile pralidoxime chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Before administration of the sterile pralidoxime chloride, atropine is administered intravenously at a... milligram of atropine per pound of body weight administered intramuscularly. Then the appropriate dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 522.1862 - Sterile pralidoxime chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Before administration of the sterile pralidoxime chloride, atropine is administered intravenously at a... milligram of atropine per pound of body weight administered intramuscularly. Then the appropriate dosage...

  15. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  16. On Barium Oxide Solubility in Barium-Containing Chloride Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Korzun, Iraida V.

    2016-08-01

    Oxide solubility in chloride melts depends on temperature and composition of molten solvent. The solubility of barium oxide in the solvents with barium chloride content is essentially higher than that in molten alkali chlorides. Spectral data demonstrate the existence of oxychloride ionic groupings in such melts. This work presents the results of the BaO solubility in two molten BaCl2-NaCl systems with different barium chloride content. The received data together with earlier published results revealed the main regularities of BaO solubility in molten BaO-BaCl2-MCl systems.

  17. VOLATILE CHLORIDE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF METAL VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Hanley, W.R.

    1959-01-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium, iron, and aluminum from centain shale type ores which contain uranium in minute quantities. The ore is heated wiih a chlorinating agent. such as chlorine, to form a volatilized stream of metal chlorides. The chloride stream is then passed through granular alumina which preferentially absorbs the volatile uranium chloride and from which the uranium may later be recovered. The remaining volatilized chlorides, chiefly those of iron and aluminum, are further treated to recover chlorine gas for recycle, and to recover ferric oxide and aluminum oxide as valuable by-products.

  18. Interpretation of postmortem vitreous concentrations of sodium and chloride.

    PubMed

    Zilg, B; Alkass, K; Berg, S; Druid, H

    2016-06-01

    Vitreous fluid can be used to analyze sodium and chloride levels in deceased persons, but it remains unclear to what extent such results can be used to diagnose antemortem sodium or chloride imbalances. In this study we present vitreous sodium and chloride levels from more than 3000 cases. We show that vitreous sodium and chloride levels both decrease with approximately 2.2mmol/L per day after death. Since potassium is a well-established marker for postmortem interval (PMI) and easily can be analyzed along with sodium and chloride, we have correlated sodium and chloride levels with the potassium levels and present postmortem reference ranges relative the potassium levels. We found that virtually all cases outside the reference range show signs of antemortem hypo- or hypernatremia. Vitreous sodium or chloride levels can be the only means to diagnose cases of water or salt intoxication, beer potomania or dehydration. We further show that postmortem vitreous sodium and chloride strongly correlate and in practice can be used interchangeably if analysis of one of the ions fails. It has been suggested that vitreous sodium and chloride levels can be used to diagnose drowning or to distinguish saltwater from freshwater drowning. Our results show that in cases of freshwater drowning, vitreous sodium levels are decreased, but that this mainly is an effect of postmortem diffusion between the eye and surrounding water rather than due to the drowning process, since the decrease in sodium levels correlates with immersion time. PMID:27105154

  19. Ion chromatographic determination of chloride in mustard sauces.

    PubMed

    López Agüero, E; Bosch Bosch, N; Barrera Vázquez, C; López Ruiz, B

    1999-11-01

    A new, simple, precise, and rapid ion chromatography (IC) method has been developed to determine chloride in mustard sauces using a mixture of phthalic acid, acetone, and water adjusted to pH 5.0 as eluent. Conductometric detection was carried out. The retention time for chloride was 1.5 min. Linearity was obtained up to a concentration level of 100 mg/L NaCl. The method was statistically evaluated for accuracy and precision after being used to assay the chloride from mustard sauces. Within the same samples, the chloride levels obtained by IC were compared with the sodium concentrations quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  20. Developmental toxicity of copper chloride, methylene chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide to embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.R.; Fisher, W.S.

    1999-05-01

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide, three known teratogenic chemicals. Two exposure periods were used, 4 d and 12 d, and both periods extended through hatching. The average 4-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.071% v/v, 1.82 mg/L, and 0.21 mg/ml, respectively. The average 12-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.031% v/v, 1.44 mg/L, and 0.057 mg/ml, respectively. Eye malformations were observed with embryos exposed to concentrations greater than 3 mg/L copper chloride or greater than 0.07% v/v methylene chloride. Very few abnormalities were observed in embryos exposed to 6-aminonicotinamide. Abnormal larval development was found with exposure to copper chloride at concentrations greater than 1 mg/L. The sensitivity and low variability found here further supports the development of these relatively simple methods using grass shrimp embryos. Establishment of sublethal developmental endpoints warrants further investigation because of their potential correspondence to mechanisms of toxic action.

  1. [Gustatory sensitivity to sodium chloride and potassium chloride and certain parameters of sodium metabolism in patients with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Mineev, V N; Suparnovich, I Iu

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine threshold gustatory sensitivity (TGS) to sodium chloride and potassium chloride in patients with bronchial asthma (BA) taking into account a number of factors responsible for the enhanced risk of development and progress of this disease. Forty five practically healthy subjects were compared with 139 asthmatic patients; a separate group comprised patients treated permanently with oral glucocorticoids and those having non-pulmonary allergy. Chemically pure solutions of sodium and potassium chlorides were used in the dripping test to assess TGS. Asthmatic patients had enhanced TGS to sodium chloride compared with healthy subjects. TGS values were especially high in non-allergic bronchial asthma and minimal in allergic asthma when they were unrelated to the phase of the disease. TGS to potassium chloride in asthmatic patients also differed from that in healthy subjects; more patients were bitter-insensitive or sensitive only to high concentrations of potassium chloride. Patients treated with systemic glucocorticoids had the highest TGS to sodium chloride. Patients with non-pulmonary allergy and allergic BA had very similar TGS to potassium chloride. TGS to sodium chloride in the former was lower than in healthy subjects and patients with allergic BA. Asthmatic patients had a higher sodium ion concentration in erythrocytes than normal subjects; it reached maximum values in persons used to add salt to fully cooked food.

  2. Lead electrowinning in an acid chloride medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Expósito, E.; Iniesta, J.; González-García, J.; Montiel, V.; Aldaz, A.

    The results of an investigation of the electrowinning of lead employing a chloride medium are reported. The electro-deposition lead reaction was studied by voltammetric methods and scanning electron microscope (SEM) microphotographs of the electro-deposited lead were taken. The effects of current density, temperature, catholyte flow and H + concentration were investigated at laboratory scale to optimise operating conditions in order to found adequate values for industrial purposes of the parameters energetic cost and production. For a working current density of 100 mA/cm 2 the current efficiency, energy consumption and production were 90%, 1.32 kW h/kg Pb and 83.4 kg Pb/m 2 per day, respectively.

  3. [Survey of plasticizers in polyvinyl chloride toys].

    PubMed

    Abe, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Miku; Mutsuga, Motoh; Hirahara, Yoshichika; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Plasticizers in 101 samples of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) toys on the Japanese market were surveyed. No phthalates were detected in designated toys, though bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, diisodecyl phthalate and benzyl butyl phthalate were detected in more than half of other toys. 2,2,4-Tributyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutylate, o-acetyl tributyl citrate, adipates and diacetyl lauroyl glycerol, which are alternative plasticizers to phthalates, were detected. The results of structural analysis confirmed the presence of di(2-ethylhexyl)terephthalate, tributyl citrate, diisononyl 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylate and neopentyl glycol esters; these have not previonsly been reported in Japan. There appears to be a shift in plasticizers used for designated toys from phthalates to new plasticizers, and the number of different plasticizers is increasing.

  4. Poly(vinyl chloride) processes and products.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R N

    1981-10-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) resins are produced by four basic processes: suspension, emulsion, bulk and solution polymerization. PVC suspensions resins are usually relatively dust-free and granular with varying degrees of particle porosity. PVC emulsion resins are small particle powders containing very little free monomer. Bulk PVC resins are similar to suspension PVC resins, though the particles tend to be more porous. Solution PVC resins are smaller in particle size than suspension PVC with high porosity particles containing essentially no free monomer. The variety of PVC resin products does not lend itself to broad generalizations concerning health hazards. In studying occupational hazards the particular PVC process and the product must be considered and identified in the study.

  5. Unsteady growth of ammonium chloride dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Terentiev, P. S.; Soboleva, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of ammonium chloride dendrites from aqueous solution is experimentally investigated. The growth rate υ and the radius ρ of curvature of branches are measured as a function of the relative supersaturation Δ for steady and unsteady growth conditions. It is shown that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the dependences ρ=a/Δ+b, υ=сΔ2, where the factors for primary branches are a=(1.3±0.2)·10-7 m, b=(2.5±0.4)·10-7 m, and c=(2.2±0.3)·10-4 m/s. The factor c is found to be approximately 7 times smaller for the side branches than that for the primary branches.

  6. Unsteady growth of ammonium chloride dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Terentiev, P. S.; Soboleva, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of ammonium chloride dendrites from aqueous solution is experimentally investigated. The growth rate υ and the radius ρ of curvature of branches are measured as a function of the relative supersaturation Δ for steady and unsteady growth conditions. It is shown that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the dependences ρ=a/Δ+b, υ=cΔ2, where the factors for primary branches are a=(1.3±0.2)·10-7 m, b=(2.5±0.4)·10-7 m, and c=(2.2±0.3)·10-4 m/s. The factor c is found to be approximately 7 times smaller for the side branches than that for the primary branches.

  7. Dynamics of vitreous and molten zinc chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.L.; Susman, S.; Volin, K.J. ); Wright, A.C. . J.J. Thomson Physical Lab.)

    1991-09-01

    The dynamics of vitreous and molten zinc chloride have been studied with inelastic neutron scattering at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. The results are analyzed in terms of the scattering function S(Q,E) and the effective vibrational density of states G(E). The vibrational spectra of both glass and liquid are dominated by broad features centered at 15 and 35 MeV which are identified with F{sub 2} modes of ZnCl{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} tetrahedra. The other two normal modes are not observed because of inadequate resolution and broadening and overlap resulting from coupling between tetrahedra. The behavior of ZnCl{sub 2} is contrasted with other tetrahedrally coordinated glasses that have been studied with the same technique. 15 refs,. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Unexpected Stable Stoichiometries of Sodium Chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Zhu, Qiang; Boulfelfel, Salah Eddine; Lyakhov, Andriy O.; Stavrou, Elissaios; Somayazulu, Maddury; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Konôpková, Zuzana

    2013-12-01

    Sodium chloride (NaCl), or rocksalt, is well characterized at ambient pressure. As a result of the large electronegativity difference between Na and Cl atoms, it has highly ionic chemical bonding (with 1:1 stoichiometry dictated by charge balance) and B1-type crystal structure. By combining theoretical predictions and diamond anvil cell experiments, we found that new materials with different stoichiometries emerge at high pressures. Compounds such as Na3Cl, Na2Cl, Na3Cl2, NaCl3, and NaCl7 are theoretically stable and have unusual bonding and electronic properties. To test this prediction, we synthesized cubic and orthorhombic NaCl3 and two-dimensional metallic tetragonal Na3Cl. These experiments establish that compounds violating chemical intuition can be thermodynamically stable even in simple systems at nonambient conditions.

  9. Pharmacodynamics of benzyl chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Abdel-Rahman, M S

    1989-09-01

    In today's world of high industrialization, toxicity and pollution have become common terms of references. Both laymen and experts are becoming increasingly concerned about various health hazards created by occupational and industrial wastes dumped in and around public places. Benzyl chloride (BCl) was one of the chemicals dumped by Hooker Chemicals in Love Canal, N.Y. Benzyl chloride (BCl) is extensively used in industry in the manufacture of dyes, perfumes, resins, and synthetic tannins. It has been found at various dump sites and industrial wastes, which has led to potential hazards to health. This study was conducted to investigate the pharmacodynamics of BCl in rats. Rats were given 14C-BCl in corn oil by gavage. The peak plasma level was reached at 30 min and began to decline. BCl elimination pattern follows a two compartment model. The distribution half-life (alpha-phase) was 1.3 hr while the half-life of elimination (beta-phase) was 58.53 hr. Distribution studies after 48 hr of BCl administration revealed that the concentration of radioisotopes was highest in the stomach, gastric content, ileum, and duodenum followed by liver, adrenal, bone marrow, whole blood, pancreas, lung, esophagus, skin, kidney, heart, thymus, fat, testes, spleen, brain, and carcass. Approximately 76% of the initial dose was excreted by kidney during the 72 hr studies. About 7% was detected in expired air as 14CO2, while less than 1.3% was present as 14C-BCl or 14C-BCl metabolites in expired air during 72 hr. Metabolism studies revealed that S-benzyl-N-acetyl cysteine, benzyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde were the metabolites present in the urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2802671

  10. The electrowinning of copper from a cupric chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Wu, X. J.; Rao, P. D.

    1991-08-01

    In this work, the Eh pCl diagram of the CuCl-H2O system was established, and the kinetics of copper dissolution in cupric chloride solution were studied with an emphasis on possible difficulties that may occur during copper electrowinning. The results were used to guide an investigation of copper electrowinning from cupric chloride solution.

  11. TOXICOLOGY OF MONO- AND DI-ALKYLTIN CHLORIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mono- and di-alkyltin chlorides are reactive compounds used in the production of stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics, primarily used for water distribution pipes. Health effects data were compiled or developed by the manufacturers for the EPA's HPV Challenge progra...

  12. TOXICOLOGY OF MONO- AND DI-ALKYLTIN CHLORIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mono- and di-alkyltin chlorides are reactive compounds used in the production of stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics, primarily used for water distribution pipes. Health effects data were compiled or developed by the manufacturers for the EPA's HPV Challenge progra...

  13. Calcium chloride: a new solution for frozen coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Proved in emergency situations as fast and economical, calcium chloride can be used in conjunction with other techniques for effective prevention of coal freezing. Calcium chloride solution depresses the freezing point, and should the temperature drop below this point, the ice that does form has a far lower compressive strength than ice normally exhibits.

  14. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  15. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution... solution must be lined with rubber, corrosion resistant plastic, or a material approved by the...

  17. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution... solution must be lined with rubber, corrosion resistant plastic, or a material approved by the...

  18. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  19. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  20. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  1. 21 CFR 172.165 - Quaternary ammonium chloride combination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.165 Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. The food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quaternary ammonium chloride combination. 172.165 Section 172.165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  2. Behavior and products of mechano-chemical dechlorination of polyvinyl chloride and poly (vinylidene chloride).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Zeng, Zigao; Xiao, Songwen

    2008-02-28

    The mechano-chemical (MC) dechlorination of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) was performed by mechanical milling PVC/PVDC powder with zinc powder in a planetary ball mill, and the products of dechlorination were characterized by Infrared spectra (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The experimental results show that PVC/PVDC can be easily dechlorinated by milling with zinc powder, and formed various kinds of inorganic and organic products. Inorganic compounds included Zn2OCl(2).2H2O, Zn5(OH)8Cl2.H2O etc., and organic products involved diamond-like carbon, carbyne fragment, polyacetylene etc. Organic products formed following the paths of dechlorination, dehydrochlorination, crosslink, and oxidation. The mechano-chemical dechlorination process of PVC/PVDC may be an effective approach for carbyne synthesizing in the appropriate condition.

  3. Review of pulmonary effects of poly(vinyl chloride) and vinyl chloride exposure.

    PubMed

    Lilis, R

    1981-10-01

    The contributions of several recent reports to the definition of pulmonary effects of PVC dust inhalation are reviewed. Granulomatous reaction, with inclusion of PVC particles in macrophages and histocytes, and associated interstitial pulmonary fibrosis have been found to lead to exertional dyspnoea, diffuse micronodular chest radiographic opacities and restrictive pulmonary dysfunction. The effects of vinyl chloride (VC) monomer (gas) on proteins and the immunologic mechanisms triggered by the altered protein are possible mechanisms for the development in some cases of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis secondary to VC exposure. Vinyl chloride, a confirmed carcinogen, has been associated with, among other malignant tumors, a significant increase in the incidence of lung cancer. The magnitude of this effect has not yet been completely evaluated.

  4. Measurements of the partial electronic conductivity in lithium chloride - potassium chloride molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, G.J.; Huggins, R.A.; Lee, M.C.Y.

    1983-05-01

    The partial electronic conductivity of the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic molten salt electrolyte has been studied as a function of lithium activity, temperature and melt composition using the Wagner asymmetric d-c polarization technique. Measurements were made over the temperature range 383-465/sup 0/C and at lithium activities extending from 1.95 X 10/sup -7/ to unity. The results confirmed the applicability of this technique to molten salt systems. The partial electronic conductivity was shown to be much greater than the partial hole conductivity over the range of lithium activities investigated, and was found to increase monotonically with temperature and lithium activity, but decreased on addition of excess LiCl to the eutectic composition. Approximate values of self-discharge currents for cells utilizing an ''Al/LiAl'' negative electrode and a LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte have been calculated.

  5. Determination of the heat capacities of Lithium/BCX (bromide chloride in thionyl chloride) batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubow, Stephen A.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1989-01-01

    Heat capacities of twelve different Lithium/BCX (BrCl in thionyl chloride) batteries in sizes AA, C, D, and DD were determined. Procedures and measurement results are reported. The procedure allowed simple, reproducible, and precise determinations of heat capacities of industrially important Lithium/BCX cells, without interfering with performance of the cells. Use of aluminum standards allowed the accuracy of the measurements to be maintained. The measured heat capacities were within 5 percent of calculated heat capacity values.

  6. [Properties of benzethonium chloride in micellar solutions and the effect of added sodium chloride].

    PubMed

    Kopecký, F; Kopecká, B; Kaclík, P

    2006-07-01

    Aqueous solutions of the antimicrobially effective quaternary ammonium salt benzethonium chloride (hyamine 1622) were studied using UV spectrophotometry and partially conductometry. The spectra of micellar solutions of benzethonium chloride revealed a concentration-dependent bathochromic and hyperchromic shift of a weak UV absorption band in the region 250-300 nm. This served to elaborate the spectrophotometric determination of the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of benzethonium chloride and the concentration of free benzethonium cations in micellar solutions without an addition of NaCl and with a constant addition of NaCl 0.003, 0.1 and 0.15 mol/l. Premicellar associations were not observed and in NaCl-free solutions CMC 0.0028 mol/l was spectrophotometrically determined. An addition of NaCl resulted in an increased hyperchromic effect and strengthening of micellization, manifested by a more than ten-times decrease in the CMC as well as the concentration of free benzethonium cations in micellar solutions. The courses of the determined concentrations of free benzethonium cations in the solutions both without and with the presence of NaCl were quite similar; their maximal values were always just a little higher than the corresponding CMC and with a further growth of the total concentration of benzethonium chloride there was, on the other hand, a marked decrease in the concentration of its free cations in micellar solution. Possible effects of a decreased concentration of free benzethonium cations due to an added electrolyte on antimicrobial activity and formation of ionic pairs are discussed.

  7. Conversion of bacteriorhodopsin into a chloride ion pump

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, J.; Chon, Y.S.; Kandori, H.

    1995-07-07

    In the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to aspartate-85 is the crucial reaction of the transport cycle. In halorhodopsin, a light-driven chloride ion pump, the equivalent of residue 85 is threonine. When aspartate-85 was replaced with threonine, the mutated bacteriorhodopsin became a chloride ion pump when expressed in Halobacterium salinarium and, like halorhodopsin, actively transported chloride ions in the direction opposite from the proton pump. Chloride was bound to it, as revealed by large shifts of the absorption maximum of the chromophore, and its photointermediates included a red-shifted state in the millisecond time domain, with its amplitude and decay rate dependent on chloride concentration. Bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin thus share a common transport mechanism, and the interaction of residue 85 with the retinal Schiff base determines the ionic specificity. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOEpatents

    Pereira, Candido

    1999-01-01

    A method for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700.degree. C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite.

  9. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOEpatents

    Pereira, C.

    1999-02-23

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700 C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite. 3 figs.

  10. Atmospheric corrosion and chloride deposition on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Matthes, Steven A.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion and chloride deposition on metal surfaces was studied at an unpolluted coastal (marine) site, an unpolluted rural inland site, and a polluted urban site. Chloride deposition by both wet (precipitation) and dry deposition processes over a multi-year period was measured using ion chromatography analysis of incident precipitation and precipitation runoff from the surface of metal samples. Chloride deposition was measured on zinc, copper, lead, mild steel, and non-reactive blank panels, as well as two panels coated with thermal-sprayed zinc alloys. Chloride deposition measured by runoff chemistry was compared with chloride deposition measurements made by the ASTM wet candle technique. Corrosion mass loss as a function of distance from the ocean is presented for copper and mild steel in bold exposures on the west coast.

  11. Apparatus and method for making metal chloride salt product

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Richmann, Michael K.

    2007-05-15

    A method of producing metal chlorides is disclosed in which chlorine gas is introduced into liquid Cd. CdCl.sub.2 salt is floating on the liquid Cd and as more liquid CdCl.sub.2 is formed it separates from the liquid Cd metal and dissolves in the salt. The salt with the CdCl.sub.2 dissolved therein contacts a metal which reacts with CdCl.sub.2 to form a metal chloride, forming a mixture of metal chloride and CdCl.sub.2. After separation of bulk Cd from the salt, by gravitational means, the metal chloride is obtained by distillation which removes CdCl.sub.2 and any Cd dissolved in the metal chloride.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Apical Chloride Channel in Necturus Gallbladder Inhibit the Chloride Conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Arthur L.; Tsai, Lih-Min; Falk, Ronald J.

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised by injecting Necturus gallbladder cells into mice were tested for their ability to inhibit the apical chloride conductance induced by elevation of cellular cAMP. Five of these monoclonal antibodies bound to the apical cells, as shown by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and inhibited the chloride conductance; one antibody that bound only to subepithelial smooth muscle, by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, showed no inhibition of chloride transport. The channel or a closely related molecule is present in the membrane whether or not the pathway is open, since, in addition to inhibiting the conductance of the open channel, the antibody also bound to the membrane in the resting state and prevented subsequent opening of the channel. The antibody was shown to recognize, by ELISA, epitopes from the Necturus gallbladder and small intestine. Finally, by Western blot analysis of Necturus gallbladder homogenates, the antibody was shown to recognize two protein bands of Mr 219,000 and Mr 69,000. This antibody should permit isolation and characterization of this important ion channel.

  13. 27 CFR 21.78 - Formula No. 42.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Eighty grams of potassium iodide, U.S.P., and 109 grams of red mercuric iodide, N.F. XI; or (2) Ninety... nitrate, N.F.; phenyl mercuric chloride, N.F. IX; or phenyl mercuric benzoate. (b) Authorized uses. (1)...

  14. 27 CFR 21.78 - Formula No. 42.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Eighty grams of potassium iodide, U.S.P., and 109 grams of red mercuric iodide, N.F. XI; or (2) Ninety... nitrate, N.F.; phenyl mercuric chloride, N.F. IX; or phenyl mercuric benzoate. (b) Authorized uses. (1)...

  15. 27 CFR 21.78 - Formula No. 42.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Eighty grams of potassium iodide, U.S.P., and 109 grams of red mercuric iodide, N.F. XI; or (2) Ninety... nitrate, N.F.; phenyl mercuric chloride, N.F. IX; or phenyl mercuric benzoate. (b) Authorized uses. (1)...

  16. Acute lethal and teratogenic effects of tributyltin chloride and copper chloride on mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) eggs and larvae.

    PubMed

    Adema-Hannes, Rachel; Shenker, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    Acute and chronic bioassays were used to evaluate the lethal and sublethal effects of copper chloride and tributyltin chloride on mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos, a pelagic life stage often found in the surface microlayer where anthropogenic contaminants can accumulate. Acute bioassay testing determined the median lethal concentration (LC50) for the test organism after 48 h of exposure. Chronic toxicity tests were used to determine the measurement of sublethal parameters, such as developmental abnormalities after 72-h exposures to the toxicants. Embryos were collected 4 h postfertilization and subsequently exposed to 1, 5, 25, 50, and 100 microg/L of copper chloride and 3, 10, 20, 30, and 50 microg/L of tributyltin chloride. Analysis of hatch rate percentage determined that the mean 48-h LC50 of copper chloride and tributyltin chloride was 32.8 and 16.7 microg/L, respectively, based on the pooled data of four experiments with four replicates for each metal. Consistent abnormalities, such as yolk sac swelling, spinal deformities, and decreased hatch rates, were observed for each metal. Teratogenic responses to copper chloride and tributyltin chloride demonstrate the need to investigate further the impacts of pollution in the open oceans to a species indigenous to, and commercially important to, the Florida (USA) coasts. This information could then lead to the future development of a surface microlayer bioassay using mahi mahi embryos. PMID:18419170

  17. Acetogenic microbial degradation of vinyl chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Under methanogenic conditions, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) resulted in significant (14 ?? 3% maximum recovery) but transient recovery of radioactivity as 14C-acetate. Subsequently, 14C- acetate was degraded to 14CH4 and 14CO2 (18 ?? 2% and 54 ?? 3% final recoveries, respectively). In contrast, under 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) amended conditions, 14C-acetate recovery remained high (27 ?? 1% maximum recovery) throughout the study, no 14CH4 was produced, and the final recovery of 14CO2 was only 35 ?? 4%. These results demonstrate that oxidative acetogenesis may be an important mechanism for anaerobic VC biodegradation. Moreover, these results (1) demonstrate that microbial degradation of VC to CH4 and CO2 may involve oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis and (2) suggest that oxidative acetogenesis may be the initial step in the net oxidation of VC to CO2 reported previously under Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and humic acids- reducing conditions.Under methanogenic conditions, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) resulted in significant (14 ?? 3% maximum recovery) but transient recovery of radioactivity as 14C-acetate. Subsequently, 14C-acetate was degraded to 14CH4 and 14CO2 (18 ?? 2% and 54 ?? 3% final recoveries respectively). In contrast, under 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BES) amended conditions, 14C-acetate recovery remained high (27 ?? 1% maximum recovery) throughout the study, no 14CH4 was produced, and the final recovery of 14CO2 was only 35 ?? 4%. These results demonstrate that oxidative acetogenesis may be an important mechanism for anaerobic VC biodegradation. Moreover, these results (1) demonstrate that microbial degradation of VC to CH4 and CO2 may involve oxidative acetogenesis followed by acetotrophic methanogenesis and (2) suggest that oxidative acetogenesis may be the initial step in the net oxidation of VC to CO2 reported previously under Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and

  18. Fate and effects of methylene chloride in activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Klecka, G M

    1982-01-01

    Activated sludge obtained from a municipal wastewater treatment plant was acclimated to methylene chloride at concentrations between 1 and 100 mg/liter by continuous exposure to the compound for 9 to 11 days. Acclimated cultures were shown to mineralize methylene chloride to carbon dioxide and chloride. Rates of methylene chloride degradation were 0.14, 2.3, and 7.4 mg of CH2Cl2 consumed per h per g of mixed-liquor suspended solids for cultures incubated in the presence of 1, 10, and 100 mg/liter, respectively. Concentrations of methylene chloride between 10 and 1,000 mg/liter had no significant effect on O2 consumption or glucose metabolism by activated sludge. A hypothetical model was developed to examine the significance of volatilization and biodegradation for the removal of methylene chloride from an activated sludge reactor. Application of the model indicated that the rate of biodegradation was approximately 12 times greater than the rate of volatilization. Thus, biodegradation may be the predominant process determining the fate of methylene chloride in activated sludge systems continuously exposed to the compound. PMID:7138008

  19. Chlormequat chloride retards rat embryo growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiagedeer, Bayindala; Wu, Shuang; Liu, Yingjuan; Hao, Weidong

    2016-08-01

    Chlormequat chloride is the most widely used plant growth regulator in agriculture to promote sturdier growth of grain crops by avoidance of lodging. Therefore, human exposure to chlormequat chloride is very common, but its developmental toxicity has not been studied. Thus, we investigated the developmental toxicity of chlormequat chloride by applying rat whole embryo culture (WEC) model, limb bud micromass culture and 3T3 fibroblast cytotoxicity test. Chlormequat chloride at 150μg/ml (0.93mM) retarded the rat embryo growth without causing significant morphological malformations and at 500μg/ml (3.1mM) caused both retardation and morphological malformation of the embryos. However, the proliferation and differentiation of limb bud cells were not affected by chlormequat chloride at as high as up to 1000μg/ml (6.2mM) applied. This concentration of chlormequat chloride did not affect the cell viability as examined by 3T3 fibroblast cytotoxicity test either, suggesting that cellular toxicity may not play a role in chlormequat induced inhibition of rat embryo growth. Collectively, our results demonstrated that chlormequat chloride may affect embryo growth and development without inhibiting cell viability.

  20. Strong emission of methyl chloride from tropical plants.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Yoko; Ikeda, Masumi; Inuzuka, Yoko; Yukawa, Tomohisa

    2002-03-14

    Methyl chloride is the largest natural source of ozone-depleting chlorine compounds, and accounts for about 15 per cent of the present atmospheric chlorine content. This contribution was likely to have been relatively greater in pre-industrial times, when additional anthropogenic sources-such as chlorofluorocarbons-were absent. Although it has been shown that there are large emissions of methyl chloride from coastal lands in the tropics, there remains a substantial shortfall in the overall methyl chloride budget. Here we present observations of large emissions of methyl chloride from some common tropical plants (certain types of ferns and Dipterocarpaceae), ranging from 0.1 to 3.7 microg per gram of dry leaf per hour. On the basis of these preliminary measurements, the methyl chloride flux from Dipterocarpaceae in southeast Asia alone is estimated at 0.91 Tg yr-1, which could explain a large portion of missing methyl chloride sources. With continuing tropical deforestation, natural sources of chlorine compounds may accordingly decrease in the future. Conversely, the abundance of massive ferns in the Carboniferous period may have created an atmosphere rich in methyl chloride.