Science.gov

Sample records for mercury 193 target

  1. Cavitation in a Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-01

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  2. "Cavitation in a Mercury Target"

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-06

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  3. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Sputtered Target Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-29

    ShirnlU in 1967 to describe the altered layer formation in the binary alloy NiCr . This model assumes an infinitesimally thin layer being sputter ...AD-AL7 456 NEW JERSEY INST OF TECH NEWARK DEPT OP ELECTRICAL EN-ETC FIG 13/8 MERCURY CADMIUM TELLURIDE SPUTTERED TARGET RESEARCH( U) JUN 82 R H...MERCURY CADMIUM TELLURIDE SPUTTERED TARGET RESEARCH TYPE OF REPORT (TECHNICAL, FINAL, ETC.) FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AUTHOR (S) ROY H. CORNELY DATE JUNE 29

  4. Epigenetically altered miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M; Rauhala, Hanna E; Scaravilli, Mauro; Latonen, Leena; Annala, Matti; Vessella, Robert L; Nykter, Matti; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNA) are important regulators of gene expression and often differentially expressed in cancer and other diseases. We have previously shown that miR-193b is hypermethylated in prostate cancer (PC) and suppresses cell growth. It has been suggested that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in several malignancies. Here, our aim was to determine if miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. Our data show that miR-193b is commonly methylated in PC samples compared to benign prostate hyperplasia. We found reduced miR-193b expression (P < 0.05) in stage pT3 tumors compared to pT2 tumors in a cohort of prostatectomy specimens. In 22Rv1 PC cells with low endogenous miR-193b expression, the overexpression of miR-193b reduced CCND1mRNA levels and cyclin D1 protein levels. In addition, the exogenous expression of miR-193b decreased the phosphorylation level of RB, a target of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 pathway. Moreover, according to a reporter assay, miR-193b targeted the 3’UTR of CCND1 in PC cells and the CCND1 activity was rescued by expressing CCND1 lacking its 3’UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclin D1 showed that castration-resistant prostate cancers have significantly (P = 0.0237) higher expression of cyclin D1 compared to hormone-naïve cases. Furthermore, the PC cell lines 22Rv1 and VCaP, which express low levels of miR-193b and high levels of CCND1, showed significant growth retardation when treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. In contrast, the inhibitor had no effect on the growth of PC-3 and DU145 cells with high miR-193b and low CCND1 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. PMID:26129688

  5. Conceptual studies for a mercury target circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, B.

    1996-06-01

    For the now favored target design of the European Spallation Source project, i.e. the version using mercury as target material, a basic concept of the primary system has been worked out. It does not include a detailed design of the various components of the target circuit, but tries to outline a feasible solution for the system. Besides the removal of the thermal power of about 3MW produced in the target by the proton beam, the primary system has to satisfy a number of other requirements related to processing, safety, and operation. The basic proposal uses an electromagnetic pump and a mercury-water intermediate heat excanger, but other alternatives are also being discussed. Basic safety requirements, i.e. protection against radiation and toxic mercury vapours, are satisfied by a design using an air-tight primary system containment, double-walled tubes in the intermediate heat exchanger, a fail-safe system for decay heat removal, and a remote handling facility for the active part of the system. Much engineering work has still to be done, because many details of the design of the mercury and gas processing systems remain to be clarified, the thermal-hydraulic components need further optimisation, the system for control and instrumentation is only known in outline and a through safety analysis will be required.

  6. Mercury Handling for the Target System for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Mcdonald, K; Kirk, H.; Weggel, Robert; Souchlas, Nicholas; Sayed, H; Ding, X

    2012-01-01

    The baseline target concept for a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory is a free-stream mercury jet being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. The target is located within a 20-T magnetic field, which captures the generated pions that are conducted to a downstream decay channel. Both the mercury and the proton beam are introduced at slight downward angles to the magnetic axis. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir for the mercury and a dump for the unexpended proton beam. The impact energy of the remaining beam and jet are substantial, and it is required that splashes and waves be controlled in order to minimize the potential for interference of pion production at the target. Design issues discussed in this paper include the nozzle, splash mitigation in the mercury pool, the mercury containment vessel, and the mercury recirculation system.

  7. Excess of a Rassf1-targeting microRNA, miR-193a-3p, perturbs cell division fidelity.

    PubMed

    Pruikkonen, Sofia; Kallio, Marko J

    2017-05-23

    Several microRNA (miRNA) molecules have emerged as important post-transcriptional regulators of tumour suppressor and oncogene expression. Ras association domain family member 1 (RASSF1) is a critical tumour suppressor that controls multiple aspects of cell proliferation such as cell cycle, cell division and apoptosis. The expression of RASSF1 is lost in a variety of cancers due to the promoter hypermethylation. miR-193a-3p was identified as a RASSF1-targeting miRNA by a dual screening approach. In cultured human cancer cells, immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, luciferase reporter assays, time-lapse microscopy and immunofluorescence methods were used to study the effects of excess miR-193a-3p on RASSF1 expression and cell division. Here, we report a new miRNA-mediated mechanism that regulates RASSF1 expression: miR-193a-3p binds directly to RASSF1-3'UTR and represses the mRNA and protein expression. In human cancer cells, excess of miR-193a-3p causes polyploidy through impairment of the Rassf1-Syntaxin 16 signalling pathway that is needed for completion of cytokinesis. In the next cell cycle the miR-193a-3p-overexpressing cells exhibit multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic delay and elevated frequency of cell death. Our results suggest that besides epigenetic regulation, altered expression of specific miRNAs may contribute to the loss of Rassf1 in cancer cells and cause cell division errors.

  8. Targeting KRas-dependent tumor growth, circulating tumor cells and metastasis in vivo by clinically significant miR-193a-3p

    PubMed Central

    Seviour, Elena G.; Sehgal, Vasudha; Mishra, Dhruva; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Lee, Ju-Seog; Sood, Anil K.; Kim, Min P.; Mills, Gordon B.; Ram, Prahlad T.

    2016-01-01

    KRas is mutated in a significant number of human cancers and so there is an urgent therapeutic need to target KRas signaling. To target KRas in lung cancers we used a systems approach of integrating a genome-wide miRNA screen with patient-derived phospho-proteomic signatures of the KRas downstream pathway, and identified miR-193a-3p which directly targets KRas. Unique aspects of miR-193a-3p biology include two functionally independent target sites in the KRas 3′UTR and clinically significant correlation between miR-193a-3p and KRas expression in patients. Rescue experiments with mutated KRas 3′UTR showed very significantly that the anti-tumor effect of miR-193a-3p is via specific direct targeting of KRas and not due to other targets. Ex vivo and in vivo studies utilizing nanoliposome packaged miR-193a-3p demonstrated significant inhibition of tumor growth, circulating tumor cell viability, and decreased metastasis. These studies show the broader applicability of using miR-193a-3p as a therapeutic agent to target KRas-mutant cancer. PMID:27669434

  9. Cavitation damage prediction for the JSNS mercury target vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Haga, Katsuhiro; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Takada, Hiroshi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The liquid mercury target system for the Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) at the Materials and Life science experimental Facility (MLF) in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is designed to produce pulsed neutrons. The mercury target vessel in this system, which is made of type 316L stainless steel, is damaged by pressure wave-induced cavitation due to proton beam bombardment. Currently, cavitation damage is considered to be the dominant factor influencing the service life of the target vessel rather than radiation damage. In this study, cavitation damage to the interior surface of the target vessel was predicted on the basis of accumulated damage data from off-beam and on-beam experiments. The predicted damage was compared with the damage observed in a used target vessel. Furthermore, the effect of injecting gas microbubbles on cavitation damage was predicted through the measurement of the acoustic vibration of the target vessel. It was shown that the predicted depth of cavitation damage is reasonably coincident with the observed results. Moreover, it was confirmed that the injection of gas microbubbles had an effect on cavitation damage.

  10. Optical diagnostics of mercury jet for an intense proton target.

    PubMed

    Park, H; Tsang, T; Kirk, H G; Ladeinde, F; Graves, V B; Spampinato, P T; Carroll, A J; Titus, P H; McDonald, K T

    2008-04-01

    An optical diagnostic system is designed and constructed for imaging a free mercury jet interacting with a high intensity proton beam in a pulsed high-field solenoid magnet. The optical imaging system employs a backilluminated, laser shadow photography technique. Object illumination and image capture are transmitted through radiation-hard multimode optical fibers and flexible coherent imaging fibers. A retroreflected illumination design allows the entire passive imaging system to fit inside the bore of the solenoid magnet. A sequence of synchronized short laser light pulses are used to freeze the transient events, and the images are recorded by several high speed charge coupled devices. Quantitative and qualitative data analysis using image processing based on probability approach is described. The characteristics of free mercury jet as a high power target for beam-jet interaction at various levels of the magnetic induction field is reported in this paper.

  11. Construction, production, and characterization of humanized anti-Lewis Y monoclonal antibody 3S193 for targeted immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Scott, A M; Geleick, D; Rubira, M; Clarke, K; Nice, E C; Smyth, F E; Stockert, E; Richards, E C; Carr, F J; Harris, W J; Armour, K L; Rood, J; Kypridis, A; Kronina, V; Murphy, R; Lee, F T; Liu, Z; Kitamura, K; Ritter, G; Laughton, K; Hoffman, E; Burgess, A W; Old, L J

    2000-06-15

    The Lewis Y (Ley) antigen is a blood group-related antigen that is expressed in a high proportion of epithelial cancers (including breast, colon, ovary, and lung cancer) and is an attractive target for monoclonal antibody-directed therapy. The murine monoclonal 3S193 (IgG3) was generated in BALB/c mice by immunization with Ley-expressing cells of the MCF-7 breast carcinoma cell-line. The murine 3S193 showed high specificity for Ley in ELISA tests with synthetic Ley and Ley-containing glycoproteins and glycolipids and also reacted strongly in rosetting assays and cytotoxic tests with Ley-expressing cells. We generated a humanized form of the murine 3S193 antibody by linking cDNA sequences encoding the variable region of murine 3S913 with frameworks of the human KOL heavy chain and REI K chain. The genes for the humanized 3S193 monoclonal antibody IgG1 were transfected into mouse myeloma NS0 cells and cloned for the establishment of high antibody-producing colonies. Humanized 3S193 antibody was subsequently produced through in vitro culture and under good manufacturing practice conditions using hollow-fiber bioreactors. The purified humanized 3S193 (hu3S193) was subsequently characterized and validated for use in preliminary immunotherapy investigations. hu3S193 reacted specifically with Ley antigen, with similar avidity to the murine form. hu3S193 demonstrated potent immune effector function, with higher antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity than its murine counterpart and potent complement-dependent cytotoxicity (ED50, 1.0 microg/ml). The in vivo immunotherapeutic potential of hu3S193 was assessed in a human breast xenograft model using MCF-7, Ley-positive cells. Six i.v. doses of up to 1 mg of hu3S193 were administered to animals bearing established tumors (120-130 mm3) with no significant effect on tumor growth. In contrast, in an MCF-7 xenograft preventive model, a 1-mg hu3S193 dosage schedule was able to significantly slow tumor growth compared with

  12. Mercury

    MedlinePlus

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  13. Localized-impact damage caused by proton bombarding in mercury target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, M.; Kogawa, H.; Ishikura, S.; Kyudo, H.; Soyama, H.

    2003-09-01

    A liquid-mercury target system for the MW-scale target is being developed in the world. The moment the proton beams bombard the target, stress waves will be imposed on the beam window and pressure waves will be generated in the mercury by the thermally shocked heat deposition. Provided that the negative pressure generates through its propagation in the mercury target and causes cavitation in the mercury, there is the possibility for the cavitation bubbles collapse to form pits on the interface between the mercury and the target vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion damage off-line tests were performed using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. It was confirrned through the experiments that the pitfing damage is suppressed by surface hardening treatments : Kolsterising, coatings, etc. Relative hardness appears to be a good correlating parameter on impact erosion resistance evaluated by the SHBP and conventional vibratory hone tests.

  14. Mercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002476.htm Mercury To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses poisoning from mercury. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  15. Development of a gas layer to mitigate cavitation damage in liquid mercury spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Felde, David K; Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    Establish of a gas layer between the flowing liquid and container wall is proposed for mitigating the effects of cavitation in mercury spallation targets. Previous work has shown an order of magnitude decrease in damage for a gas layer developed in a stagnant mercury target for an in-beam experiment. This work is aimed at extending these results to the more complex conditions introduced by a flowing mercury target system. A water-loop has been fabricated to provide initial insights on potential gas injection methods into a flowing liquid. An existing full-scale flow loop designed to simulate the Spallation Neutron Source target system will be used to extend these studies to mercury. A parallel analytical effort is being conducted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to provide direction to the experimental effort. Some preliminary simulations of gas injection through a single hole have been completed and show behavior of the models that is qualitatively meaningful.

  16. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics for the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power accelerator-based pulsed spallation source being designed by a multilaboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the SNS design. The liquid-mercury target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Based on the current design, a three-dimensional CFD model has been developed that includes the stainless steel target structure, the liquid-mercury target flow, and the liquid-mercury cooling jacket that wraps around the nose of the target.

  17. Mercury target R&D for the Oak Ridge spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.R.; DiStefano, J.; Farrell, K.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1996-06-01

    The conceptual design for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) incorporates liquid mercury as its reference target material. A flowing liquid target was selected mainly because of the increased power handling capability possible with the convective transport process. The major reasons for choosing mercury as the liquid target material are because it: (1) is a liquid at room temperature, (2) has good heat transport properties, and (3) has a high atomic number and mass density resulting in high neutron yield and source brightness. Since liquid targets are not widely utilized in presently operating accelerator targets and because of the challenges posed by the intense, pulsed thermal energy deposition ({approximately}20-100 kJ deposited during each 1-10 {mu}s pulse), considerable R&D is planned for the mercury target concept. The key feasibility issue that will be addressed in early R&D efforts are the effects of the thermal shock environment, which will include development and testing of approaches to mitigate these effects. Materials compatiblity and ES&H issues associated with the use of liquid mercury are also of major importance in early R&D efforts. A brief description of the mercury target design concept, results of initial evaluations of its performance characteristics, identification of its critical issues, and an outline of the R&D program aimed at addressing these issues will be presented.

  18. Cavitation damage experiments for mercury spallation targets at the LANSCE WNR in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, B.; Haines, J.; Wendel, M.; Bauer, G.; Futakawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Kogawa, H.

    2008-06-01

    In-beam experiments investigating cavitation damage in short pulse mercury spallation targets were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) facility in 2005. Two main areas were investigated. First, damage dependence on three mercury conditions - stagnant, flowing, and flowing with bubble injection - was investigated by employing a small mercury target loop with replaceable damage test specimens. One hundred beam pulses were passed through the loop mercury and specimen pair for each test condition. Damage with flowing mercury ( V = 0.4 m/s) was less than half that which was incurred with stagnant mercury. Gas bubble injection added into the flow further reduced damage to about one-fourth that of stagnant mercury. Acoustic emissions from cavitation bubble collapse were concurrently measured on the exterior of the loop using a laser Doppler vibrometer and were correlated to the observed damage. The second area of experimentation was erosion rate dependence on proton beam intensity. Prior research had indicated that incubation-phase cavitation erosion rate is strongly dependent on beam intensity, by a power law with the exponent perhaps as large as 4. The 2005 results are inconsistent with earlier in-beam test results and do not support the power law dependence. This paper will provide a detailed description of the experiment, present results and discuss the findings.

  19. Transport of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in target tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Christy C; Zalups, Rudolfs K

    2010-01-01

    Owing to the prevalence of mercury in the environment, the risk of human exposure to this toxic metal continues to increase. Following exposure to mercury, this metal accumulates in numerous organs, including brain, intestine, kidneys, liver, and placenta. Although a number of mechanisms for the transport of mercuric ions into target organs were proposed in recent years, these mechanisms have not been characterized completely. This review summarizes the current literature related to the transport of inorganic and organic forms of mercury in various tissues and organs. This review identifies known mechanisms of mercury transport and provides information on additional mechanisms that may potentially play a role in the transport of mercuric ions into target cells.

  20. Cavitation Damage Experiments for Mercury Spallation Targets At the LANSCE WNR in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K

    2010-01-01

    Proton beam experiments investigating cavitation damage in short pulse mercury spallation targets were performed at LANSCE WNR in July of 2008. They included two main areas for investigation: damage dependence on mercury velocity using geometry more prototypic to the SNS target than previously employed and damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity. The flow dependence experiment employed six test targets with mercury velocity in the channel ranging from 0 to more than 4 m/s. Each was hit with 100 WNR beam pulses with peak proton flux equivalent to that of SNS operating at 2.7 MW. Damage dependence on incident proton beam flux intensity was also investigated with three intensity levels used on simple rectangular shaped targets without mercury flow. Intensity variation was imposed by focusing the beam differently while maintaining protons per pulse. This kept total energy deposited in each target constant. A fourth test target was hit with various beams: constant protons and varied spot size; constant spot size and varied protons. No damage will be assessed in this case. Instead, acoustic emissions associated with cavitation collapse were measured by laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) from readings of exterior vessel motions as well as by mercury wetted acoustic transducers. This paper will provide a description of the experiment and present available results. Damage assessment will require several months before surface analysis can be completed and was not available in time for IWSMT-9.

  1. Thermal shock analysis of the BNL/AGS mercury target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Haines, J.R.

    1999-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source is a 1-MW accelerator-based pulsed neutron source facility being designed by several national laboratories and led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Liquid mercury will be used as the target material. Several important issues must be resolved to ensure the feasibility of mercury as a target material. One of the key issues is related to the thermal shock loads caused by rapid energy deposition of the proton beam to the mercury target. The rate of temperature rise is enormous ({approximately}10{sup 7} C/s) during the very brief beam pulse ({approximately}0.5 {micro}s). The pressure waves will interact with the target structure walls and the bulk flow field. Understanding and predicting propagation of pressure pulses are critical for establishing the feasibility of construction and safe operation of the facility. To resolve such issues, a benchmarking database needs to be developed to validate computational models calculating the pressure wave behavior in the mercury target. Collaboration was initiated to conduct experiments wit h a close- to full-scale cylindrical vessel filled with mercury. Specific experiments were conducted at the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) in June of 1997. In these experiments, a high-energy (24-GeV) proton beam deposited {approximately}61% of its energy in the mercury target over a time period of {approximately}0.1 {micro}s. Several optical strain gauges were attached to the surface of the steel target wall. The proton pulse shape was roughly parabolic and was estimated to be of {approximately}0.05 m in radius. Computational models were developed and validated against the AGS data. The ANSYS/Multiphysics code system modeled the test target in Ref. 3, using acoustic elements for mercury fluid and solid elements for the target wall. The authors discuss a two-dimensional model of the ANSYS/Multiphysics code for the same test target. In this effort, solid elements were used

  2. CFD analysis of a liquid mercury target for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, M.W.; Tov, M.S.

    1997-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the design of the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) target. The target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Various design options have been considered in an effort to satisfy these design criteria. Significant improvements to the design have been recommended based on the results. Detailed results are presented for the current target design including a comparison with published pressure-drop data. Comparisons are also made with forced convection heat transfer data for liquid mercury flow in circular tubes.

  3. Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, D. E.; Burns, J. A.; Cassen, P.; Strom, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Prior to the flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft, Mercury was the least investigated and most poorly known terrestrial planet (Kuiper 1970, Devine 1972). Observational difficulties caused by its proximity to the Sun as viewed from Earth caused the planet to remain a small, vague disk exhibiting little surface contrast or details, an object for which only three major facts were known: 1. its bulk density is similar to that of Venus and Earth, much greater than that of Mars and the Moon; 2. its surface reflects electromagnetic radiation at all wavelengths in the same manner as the Moon (taking into account differences in their solar distances); and 3. its rotation period is in 2/3 resonance with its orbital period. Images obtained during the flyby by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 (and the two subsequent flybys on 21 September 1974 and 16 March 1975) revealed Mercury's surface in detail equivalent to that available for the Moon during the early 1960's from Earth-based telescopic views. Additionally, however, information was obtained on the planet's mass and size, atmospheric composition and density, charged-particle environment, and infrared thermal radiation from the surface, and most significantly of all, the existence of a planetary magnetic field that is probably intrinsic to Mercury was established. In the following, this new information is summarized together with results from theoretical studies and ground-based observations. In the quantum jumps of knowledge that have been characteristic of "space-age" exploration, the previously obscure body of Mercury has suddenly come into sharp focus. It is very likely a differentiated body, probably contains a large Earth-like iron-rich core, and displays a surface remarkably similar to that of the Moon, which suggests a similar evolutionary history.

  4. Design of an Intense Muon Source with a Carbon and Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys; Berg, J. Scott; Neuffer, David; Ding, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    In high-intensity sources, muons are produced by firing high energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons which are captured and accelerated. In the present study, we examine the performance of the channel for two different target scenarios: one based on liquid mercury and another one based on a solid carbon target. We produce distributions with the two different target materials and discuss differences in particle spectrum near the sources. We then propagate the distributions through our capture system and compare the full system performance for the two target types.

  5. Design of an intense muon source with a carbon and mercury target

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Berg, J. S.; Neuffer, D.; Ding, X.

    2015-05-03

    In high-intensity sources, muons are produced by firing high energy protons onto a target to produce pions. The pions decay to muons which are captured and accelerated. In the present study, we examine the performance of the channel for two different target scenarios: one based on liquid mercury and another one based on a solid carbon target. We produce distributions with the two different target materials and discuss differences in particle spectrum near the sources. We then propagate the distributions through our capture system and compare the full system performance for the two target types.

  6. The MERIT (nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, A.; Grudiev, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pernegger, Heinz; Steerenberg, R.R.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; /Rutherford /Oak Ridge /Brookhaven /Princeton U. /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  7. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.g.; Tsang, t.; Mokbov, N.; /Fermilab /Oak Ridge /Princeton U. /Rutherford /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam. Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  8. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Ethymiopoulos,I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Tsang, T.; Mokhov, N.; Striganov, S.; Carroll, A.J.; Graves, V.B.; Spampinato, P.T.; McDonald, K.T.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; Park, H.

    2008-06-23

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  10. RESULTS FROM CAVITATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH MERCURY SPALLATION TARGETS AT THE LANSCE WNR IN 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Damage assessment from proton beam induced cavitation experiments on mercury spallation targets done at the LANSCE WNR facility has been completed. The experiments investigated two key questions for the Spallation Neutron Source target, namely, how damage is affected by flow velocity in the SNS coolant channel geometry, and how damage scales with proton beam intensity at a given constant charge per pulse. With regard to the former question, prior in-beam experiments indicated that the coolant channel geometry with stagnant mercury was especially vulnerable to damage which might warrant a design change. Yet other results indicated a reduction in damage with the introduction of flow. Using more prototypic to the SNS, the 2008 experiment damage results show the channel is less vulnerable than the bulk mercury side of the vessel wall. They also show no benefit from increasing channel flow velocity beyond nominal SNS speeds. The second question probed a consensus belief that damage scales with beam intensity (protons per unit area) by a power law dependence with exponent of around 4. Results from a 2005 experiment did not support this power law dependence but some observations were inconsistent and unexplained. These latest results show weaker damage dependence.

  11. Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in zebrafish: in vivo mechanistic insights from transcriptome analysis, phenotype anchoring and targeted gene expression validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mercury is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes detrimental effects to human health. Although the liver has been known to be a main target organ, there is limited information on in vivo molecular mechanism of mercury-induced toxicity in the liver. By using transcriptome analysis, phenotypic anchoring and validation of targeted gene expression in zebrafish, mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated and a number of perturbed cellular processes were identified and compared with those captured in the in vitro human cell line studies. Results Hepato-transcriptome analysis of mercury-exposed zebrafish revealed that the earliest deregulated genes were associated with electron transport chain, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, nuclear receptor signaling and apoptotic pathway, followed by complement system and proteasome pathway, and thereafter DNA damage, hypoxia, Wnt signaling, fatty acid synthesis, gluconeogenesis, cell cycle and motility. Comparative meta-analysis of microarray data between zebrafish liver and human HepG2 cells exposed to mercury identified some common toxicological effects of mercury-induced hepatotoxicity in both models. Histological analyses of liver from mercury-exposed fish revealed morphological changes of liver parenchyma, decreased nucleated cell count, increased lipid vesicles, glycogen and apoptotic bodies, thus providing phenotypic evidence for anchoring of the transcriptome analysis. Validation of targeted gene expression confirmed deregulated gene-pathways from enrichment analysis. Some of these genes responding to low concentrations of mercury may serve as toxicogenomic-based markers for detection and health risk assessment of environmental mercury contaminations. Conclusion Mercury-induced hepatotoxicity was triggered by oxidative stresses, intrinsic apoptotic pathway, deregulation of nuclear receptor and kinase activities including Gsk3 that deregulates Wnt signaling pathway, gluconeogenesis, and

  12. INTERACTION OF A 24 GEV PROTON BEAM IWHT A MUON COLLIDER MERCURY JET TARGET EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; KIRK,H.; FINFROCK,C.; GREENE,G.; LUDEWIG,H.; MCDONALD,K.; MOKHOV,N.

    2001-11-11

    A muon collider or a neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring require intense beams of muons that can be generated by a 1-4 MW proton beam incident on a moving target inside a 20-T solenoid magnet, with a mercury jet as a preferred example. This paper addresses the thermodynamic interaction of the intense proton beam with the proposed mercury jet target, and the consequences of the generated pressure waves on the target integrity. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam with approximately 16 TP (1 TP = 10{sup 12} protons) per pulse and a pulse length of 2 ns will interact with a 1 cm diameter mercury jet within the 20-Tesla magnetic field. In one option, a train of six such proton pulses is to be delivered on target within 2 {micro}s, in which case the state of the mercury jet following the interaction with each pulse is critical. Using the equation of state for mercury from the SESAME library, in combination with the energy deposition rates calculated the by the hadron interaction code MARS, the induced 3-D pressure field in the target is estimated. The consequent pressure wave propagation and attenuation in the mercury jet is calculated using a transient analysis based on finite element modeling, and the state of the mercury jet at the time of arrival of the subsequent pulse is assessed. Issues associated with the use of a liquid metal jet as a target candidate are addressed. Lastly, some experimental results from the BNL E951 experiment are presented and discussed.

  13. Dynamic Strain on Thin Diaphragms of a Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    1999-11-13

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometric fiber optic sensors were used to measure dynamic strains on thin diaphragms of a liquid mercury target, which was subjected to intense 800-MeV proton thermal shock tests. The mercury target is engineered with very thin end plates or diaphragms (either 0.6 mm or 1.9 mm) for studying large strain effects. During thermal shock tests, the mercury in the target interacted with an intense pulsed beam of 2.4x10{sup 13 protons}. The resulting pressure waves lead to large strains exceeding 250 microstrains on a 0.6-mm diaphragm. Significant factors relative to the accuracy of strain measurements are emphasized, such as the sensor air gap, alignment of sensors, and frequency response of the strain instrument. In this paper, dynamic strains measured on thin diaphragms are described and discussed.

  14. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  15. MiR-193a-5p Targets the Coding Region of AP-2α mRNA and Induces Cisplatin Resistance in Bladder Cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Duan, Huaxin; Xie, Yu; Ning, Yichong; Zhang, Xing; Hui, Na; Wang, Chunqing; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor AP-2 alpha (AP-2α or TFAP2A) is a newly identified prognostic marker of chemotherapy; its expression is positively correlated with chemosensitivity and survival of cancer patients. Using computational programs, we predicted that the coding region of AP-2α gene contains a potential miRNA response element (MRE) of miR-193a-5p, and the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site (c.497A>G, rs111681798) resides within the predicted MRE. The results of luciferase assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that miR-193a-5p negatively regulated the expression of AP-2α proteins, but have no influence on the mutant AP-2α (c.497A>G). Infection with lentiviral AP-2α gene or miR-193a-5p inhibitor in the bladder cancer cells decreased migration and cisplatin resistance, while knockdown of AP-2α gene or overexpression of miR-193a-5p in the urothelial cell line SV-HUC-1 increased migration and cisplatin resistances. We concluded that miR-193a-5p induced cisplatin resistance by repressing AP-2α expression in bladder cancer cells.

  16. 49 CFR 193.2103-193.2117 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Materials §§ 193.2103-193.2117 [Reserved] ...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2323-193.2329 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction §§ 193.2323-193.2329 [Reserved]...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2305-193.2319 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction §§ 193.2305-193.2319 [Reserved]...

  19. Ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor for mercury (II) based on target-induced structure-switching DNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Danhong; Zhang, Qing; Chu, Xia; Wang, Haibo; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2010-01-15

    A novel electrochemical sensor has been developed for sensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) based on target-induced structure-switching DNA. A 33-mer oligonucleotide 1 with five self-complementary base pairs separated by seven thymine-thymine mismatches was first immobilized on the electrode via self-assembly of the terminal thiol moiety and then hybridized with a ferrocene-tagged oligonucleotide 2, leading to a high redox current. In the presence of Hg(2+), mercury-mediated base pairs (T-Hg(2+)-T) induced the folding of the oligonucleotide 1 into a hairpin structure, resulting in the release of the ferrocene-tagged oligonucleotide 2 from the electrode surface with a substantially decreased redox current. The response characteristics of the sensor were thoroughly investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of the reaction temperature on the response of the sensor was also studied in detail. The results revealed that the sensor showed sensitive response to Hg(2+) in a concentration range from 0.1 nM to 5 microM with a detection limit of 0.06 nM. In addition, this strategy afforded exquisite selectivity for Hg(2+) against other environmentally related metal ions, which was superior to that of previous anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV)-based techniques. The excellent sensitivity and selectivity signified the potential of the sensor for Hg(2+) detection in real environmental samples.

  20. 49 CFR 193.2163-193.2165 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 193.2163-193.2165 Section 193.2163-193.2165 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2169-193.2171 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 193.2169-193.2171 Section 193.2169-193.2171 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2121-193.2153 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 193.2121-193.2153 Section 193.2121-193.2153 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2157-193.2159 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 193.2157-193.2159 Section 193.2157-193.2159 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2157-193.2159 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 193.2157-193.2159 Section 193.2157-193.2159 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2175-193.2179 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 193.2175-193.2179 Section 193.2175-193.2179 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2163-193.2165 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 193.2163-193.2165 Section 193.2163-193.2165 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2175-193.2179 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 193.2175-193.2179 Section 193.2175-193.2179 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2121-193.2153 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 193.2121-193.2153 Section 193.2121-193.2153 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2169-193.2171 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 193.2169-193.2171 Section 193.2169-193.2171 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2189-193.2233 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 193.2189-193.2233 Section 193.2189-193.2233 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2189-193.2233 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 193.2189-193.2233 Section 193.2189-193.2233 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2189-193.2233 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 193.2189-193.2233 Section 193.2189-193.2233 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2183-193.2185 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 193.2183-193.2185 Section 193.2183-193.2185 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2189-193.2233 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 193.2189-193.2233 Section 193.2189-193.2233 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  15. Measurement of Dynamic Strain on a Mercury Target Vessel During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.

    2001-01-11

    A mercury target vessel, designed to simulate some aspects of the eventual target design for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be built in Oak Ridge by the Department of Energy, was used in a test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to study the strain induced from thermal shock of bombarding protons. In the SNS, intense thermal shock loads are expected to cause an enormous rate of temperature rise ({approximately}10{sup 7} K/s), with resulting pressure waves in the mercury that may lead to large stresses on the thin walls of the mercury target. To guide the mercury target design and to benchmark the computer design codes, transient strain was measured using fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensors. Twenty strain sensors were attached in various axial and transverse orientations to a cylindrical stainless steel target vessel containing mercury. The vessel was 10 cm in diameter, about 15 cm long, and with a 5-cm radius hemispherical shell welded to the forward end. The test was done at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) beam facility on 30-31 January 1999. The sensors were attached with gauge lengths of about two centimeters, and were located in pairs in most areas, for redundancy and facilitation of data analysis. The 800-MeV proton deposition of 0.5--2.3 x 10{sup 13} over a full-width at half maximum beam size of {approximately}25 mm, produced axial strains peaking at a few microstrains, with transverse (hoop) strains more than an order of magnitude higher. We describe the experiments, including the sensors and measurement configuration, and discuss the strain data analysis.

  16. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the liquid mercury target for the national spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Haines, J.R.; Rogers, M.

    1997-04-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is a high-energy, accelerator-based spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The NSNS is proposed to have a 1 MW beam of high-energy ({approximately}1 GeV) protons upgradable to 5 MW and operating at 60 Hz with a pulse duration of 0.5 {mu}s. Peak steady-state power density in the target is about 640 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW, whereas the pulse instantaneous peak power density is as high as 22,000 GW/m{sup 3}. The local peak temperature rise for a single pulse over it`s time-averaged value is only 6{degrees}C, but the rate of this temperature rise during the pulse is extremely fast ({approximately}12 million {degrees}C/s). In addition to the resulting thermal shock and materials compatibility concerns, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. These include proper flow distribution, flow reversals and stagnation zones, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes}, cooling of the beam {open_quotes}window{close_quotes}, and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles. An analytic approach was used on the PC spreadsheet EXCEL to evaluate target design options and to determine the global T/H parameters in the current concept. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX was used to simulate the detailed time-averaged two-dimensional thermal and flow distributions in the liquid mercury. In this paper, an overview of the project and the results of this preliminary work are presented. Heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury under wetting and non-wetting conditions are discussed, and future directions of the program in T/H analysis and R&D are outlined.

  17. Target-induced structure-switching DNA hairpins for sensitive electrochemical monitoring of mercury (II).

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Junyang; Fu, Libing; Tang, Dianping; Xu, Mingdi; Chen, Guonan; Yang, Huanghao

    2013-01-15

    A simple, sensitive and reusable electrochemical sensor was designed for determination of mercury (II) (Hg(2+)) by coupling target-induced conformational switch of DNA hairpins with thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry. The hairpin probe consisted of a stem of 6 base pairs enclosing a 14 nucleotide (nt) loop and an additional 12 nt sticky end at the 3' end. Each hairpin was labeled with ferrocene (Fc) redox tag in the middle of the loop, which was immobilized on the electrode via self-assembly of the terminal thiol moiety at the 5' end. In the presence of target analyte, Hg(2+)-mediated base pairs induced the conformational change from the sticky end to open the hairpins, resulting in the ferrocene tags close to the electrode for the increasing redox current. The strong coordination reaction of T-Hg(2+)-T resulted in a good repeatability and intermediate precision down to 10%. The dynamic concentration range spanned from 5.0nM to 1.0μM Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 2.5nM at the 3s(blank) level. The strategy afforded exquisite selectivity for Hg(2+) against other environmentally related metal ions. Inspiringly, the developed sensor could be reused by introduction of iodide (I(-)).

  18. Gigacycle fatigue behaviour of austenitic stainless steels used for mercury target vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Xiong, Zhihong; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A mercury enclosure vessel for the pulsed spallation neutron source manufactured from a type 316L austenitic stainless steel, a so-called target vessel, suffers the cyclic loading caused by the proton beam induced pressure waves. A design criteria of the JSNS target vessel which is defined based on the irradiation damage is 2500 h at 1 MW with a repetition rate of 25 Hz, that is, the target vessel suffers approximately 109 cyclic loading while in operation. Furthermore, strain rate of the beam window of the target vessel reaches 50 s-1 at the maximum, which is much higher than that of the conventional fatigue. Gigacycle fatigue strength up to 109 cycles for solution annealed 316L (SA) and cold-worked 316L (CW) were investigated through the ultrasonic fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were performed under room temperature and 250 °C which is the maximum temperature evaluated at the beam window in order to investigate the effect of temperature on fatigue strength of SA and CW 316L. The results showed that the fatigue strength at 250 °C is clearly reduced in comparison with room temperature, regardless of cold work level. In addition, residual strength and microhardness of the fatigue tested specimen were measured to investigate the change in mechanical properties by cyclic loading. Cyclic hardening was observed in both the SA and CW 316L, and cyclic softening was observed in the initial stage of cyclic loading in CW 316L. Furthermore, abrupt temperature rising just before fatigue failure was observed regardless of testing conditions.

  19. 49 CFR 193.2183-193.2185 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity §§ 193.2183-193.2185 LNG Storage Tanks...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2189-193.2233 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Lng Storage Tanks §§ 193.2189-193.2233 [Reserved]...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2183-193.2185 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity §§ 193.2183-193.2185 LNG Storage Tanks...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2183-193.2185 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity §§ 193.2183-193.2185 [Reserved] LNG Storage Tanks...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2183-193.2185 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity §§ 193.2183-193.2185 LNG Storage Tanks...

  4. Status of R&D on Mitigating the Effects of Pressure Waves for the Spallation Neutron Source Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Abdou, Ashraf A; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target s beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes

  5. Status of R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves for the Spallation Neutron Source mercury target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, Bernard W.; Wendel, Mark W.; Felde, David K.; Abdou, Ashraf A.; McClintock, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity - and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target's beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes

  6. A Target-Lighted dsDNA-Indicator for High-Performance Monitoring of Mercury Pollution and Its Antagonists Screening.

    PubMed

    Qing, Zhihe; Zhu, Lixuan; Li, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Sheng; Zou, Zhen; Guo, Jingru; Cao, Zhong; Yang, Ronghua

    2017-10-03

    As well-known, the excessive discharge of heavy-metal mercury not only destroys the ecological environment, bust also leads to severe damage of human health after ingestion via drinking and bioaccumulation of food chains, and mercury ion (Hg(2+)) is designated as one of most prevalent toxic metal ions in drinking water. Thus, the high-performance monitoring of mercury pollution is necessary. Functional nucleic acids have been widely used as recognition probes in biochemical sensing. In this work, a carbazole derivative, ethyl-4-[3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridium iodine)-9H-carbazol -9-yl)] butanoate (EBCB), has been synthesized and found as a target-lighted DNA fluorescent indicator. As a proof-of-concept, Hg(2+) detection was carried out based on EBCB and Hg(2+)-mediated conformation transformation of a designed DNA probe. By comparison with conventional nucleic acid indicators, EBCB held excellent advantages, such as minimal background interference and maximal sensitivity. Outstanding detection capabilities were displayed, especially including simple operation (add-and-read manner), ultrarapidity (30 s), and low detection limit (0.82 nM). Furthermore, based on these advantages, the potential for high-performance screening of mercury antagonists was also demonstrated by the fluorescence change of EBCB. Therefore, we believe that this work is meaningful in pollution monitoring, environment restoration and emergency treatment, and may pave a way to apply EBCB as an ideal signal transducer for development of high-performance sensing strategies.

  7. COMPARISON OF MERCURY BLOOD PRESSURE READINGS TO OSCILLOMETRIC AND CENTRAL BLOOD PRESSURE IN PREDICTING TARGET ORGAN DAMAGE IN YOUTH

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Elaine M; Khoury, Philip R; McCoy, Connie E; Daniels, Stephen R; Dolan, Lawrence M; Kimball, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypertension (HT) is an important risk factor for target organ damage (TOD). New methods for measuring BP are replacing mercury sphygmomanometry in many clinics. We examined the utility of different BP measurement techniques in predicting subclinical TOD in adolescents and young adults. Methods Subjects in a study of the CV effects of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were evaluated (N=677, 18 ± 3.3 years, 35% male, 60% non-Caucasian, 30% T2DM). We measured adiposity, lab, left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness & pulse wave. BP was measured 3 times with mercury sphygmomanometery (BPm) an oscillometric device (BPo) and central aortic BP (BPc) was derived with arterial tonometry. Subjects were stratified as normotensive (N), pre-hypertensive (P) or hypertensive (H). Results The prevalence of HT this cohort with mean BMI of 31 was highest with BPo (16%), followed by BPm (11%) and BPc (9%), p≤0.001. BPm was most consistent in differentiating left ventricular mass and pulse wave velocity among subjects in the P group as compared to the N & H groups. Mercury BP was also more sensitive and specific in predicting greater left ventricular mass, pulse wave velocity and carotid thickness than the other BP measurement techniques in logistic regression. Conclusions We conclude that mercury sphygmomanometry should remain the gold standard for evaluation of HT and the risk for TOD in adolescents and young adults. PMID:25647284

  8. Dynamic Pressure of Liquid Mercury Target During 800-MeV Proton Thermal Shock Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Andriulli, J.B.; Cates, M.R.; Earl. D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Morrissey, F.X.; Tsai, C.C.; Wender, S.

    2000-02-01

    Described here are efforts to diagnose transient pressures generated by a short-pulse (about 0.5 microseconds) high intensity proton ({approximately} 2 * 10 14 per pulse) beam. Proton energy is 800-MeV. The tests were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE-WNR). Such capability is required for understanding target interaction for the Spallation Neutron Source project as described previously at this conference.1-4 The main approach to effect the pressure measurements utilized the deflection of a diaphragm in intimate contact with the mercury. There are a wide variety of diaphragm-deflection methods used in scientific and industrial applications. Many deflection-sensing approaches are typically used, including, for instance, capacitive and optical fiber techniques. It was found, however, that conventional pressure measurement using commercial pressure gages with electrical leads was not possible due to the intense nuclear radiation enviro nment. Earlier work with a fiber optic strain gauge demonstrated the viability of using fiber optics for this environment.

  9. Functional and molecular effects of mercury compounds on the human OCTN1 cation transporter: C50 and C136 are the targets for potent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena; Peta, Valentina; Iannì, Maria; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-03-01

    The effect of mercury compounds has been tested on the organic cation transporter, hOCTN1. MeHg(+), Hg(2+), or Cd(2+) caused strong inhibition of transport. 1,4-Dithioerythritol (DTE), cysteine (Cys), and N-acetyl-l-cysteine reversed (NAC) the inhibition at different extents. 2-Aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate hydrobromide (MTSEA), a prototype SH reagent, exerted inhibition of transport similar to that observed for the mercurial agents. To investigate the mechanism of action of mercurials, mutants of hOCTN1 in which each of the Cys residues was substituted by Ala have been constructed, over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) uptake mediated by each mutant in proteoliposomes was comparable to that of wild type (WT). IC50 values of the WT and mutants for the mercury compounds were derived from dose-response analyses. The mutants C50A and C136A showed significant increase of IC50 indicating that the 2 Cys residues were involved in the interaction with the mercury compounds and inhibition of the transporter. The double mutant C50A/C136A was constructed; the lack of inhibition confirmed that the 2 Cys residues are the targets of mercury compounds. MTSEA showed similar behavior with respect to the mercurial reagents with the difference that increased IC50 was observed also in the C81A mutant. Similar results were obtained when transport was measured as acetylcholine uptake. Ethyl mercury (Thimerosal) inhibited hOCTN1 as well. C50A, C50A/C136A and, at very lower extent, C136A showed increased IC50 indicating that C50 was the major target of this mercury compound. The homology model of hOCTN1 was built using as template PiPT and validated by the experimental data on mutant proteins.

  10. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  11. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  12. 40 CFR 19.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 19.3 Section 19.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES FOR INFLATION § 19.3...

  13. 40 CFR 19.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 19.3 Section 19.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES FOR INFLATION § 19.3...

  14. Targeting geothermal exploration sites in the Mount St. Helens area using soil mercury surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.; Waugh, K.

    1983-11-01

    The background mercury level was determined for the areas studied, providing preliminary information for future work. Identification of areas which might merit more intensive sampling was also accomplished. The clusters of samples with high Hg concentrations in both areas may indicate high heat flow and should be investigated further. Problems involving the use of this method in the Cascades were also identified. Both areas north and south of the mountain had approximately the same standard deviation (expressed as a percentage of the mean), even though the sampling horizons seemed much more consistent and less disturbed in the Marble Mountain area than in the Green River Soda Springs area. This may indicate that for these areas, secondary controls are more important, or that Hg anomalies are much smaller than indicated in studies of other areas.

  15. 46 CFR 193.50-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 193.50-1 Section 193.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION... Details § 193.50-1 Application. (a) The provisions of this subpart, with the exception of § 193.50-90...

  16. 46 CFR 193.15-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controls. 193.15-10 Section 193.15-10 Shipping COAST... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-10 Controls. (a) Except as noted in § 193.15-20(b), all controls and valves for the operation of the system shall be outside the...

  17. Signal-Switchable Electrochemiluminescence System Coupled with Target Recycling Amplification Strategy for Sensitive Mercury Ion and Mucin 1 Assay.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinya; Wang, Huijun; Wang, Haijun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2016-09-20

    In the present work, we first found that mercury ion (Hg(2+)) has an efficient quenching effect on the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of N-(aminobutyl)-N-(ethylisoluminol) (ABEI). Since we were inspired by this discovery, an aptamer-based ECL sensor was fabricated based on a Hg(2+) triggered signal switch coupled with an exonuclease I (Exo I)-stimulated target recycling amplification strategy for ultrasensitive determination of Hg(2+) and mucin 1 (MUC1). Concretely, the ECL intensity of ABEI-functionalized silver nanoparticles decorated graphene oxide nanocomposite (GO-AgNPs-ABEI) was initially enhanced by ferrocene labeled ssDNA (Fc-S1) (first signal switch "on" state) in the existence of H2O2. With the aid of aptamer, assistant ssDNA (S2) and full thymine (T) bases ssDNA (S3) modified Au nanoparticles (AuNPs-S2-S3) were immobilized on the sensing surface through the hybridization reaction. Then, via the strong and stable T-Hg(2+)-T interaction, an abundance of Hg(2+) was successfully captured on the AuNPs-S2-S3 and effectively inhibited the ECL reaction of ABEI (signal switch "off" state). Finally, the signal switch "on" state was executed by utilizing MUC1 as an aptamer-specific target to bind aptamer, leading to the large decrease of the captured Hg(2+). To further improve the sensitivity of the aptasensor, Exo I was implemented to digest the binded aptamer, which resulted in the release of MUC1 for achieving target recycling with strong detectable ECL signal even in a low level of MUC1. By integrating the quenching effect of Hg(2+) to reduce the background signal and target recycling for signal amplification, this proposed ECL aptasensor was successfully used to detect Hg(2+) and MUC1 sensitively with a wide linear response.

  18. Mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter, a novel target of mercury toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tonazzi, Annamaria; Giangregorio, Nicola; Console, Lara; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; La Russa, Daniele; Notaristefano, Caterina; Brunelli, Elvira; Barca, Donatella; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-05-18

    The effect of Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) on the mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT) has been studied on the recombinant protein and on the CACT extracted from HeLa cells or Zebrafish and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. Transport was abolished upon treatment of the recombinant CACT in proteoliposomes by Hg(2+) or CH3Hg(+). Inhibition was reversed by the SH reducing agent 1,4-dithioerythritol, GSH, and N-acetylcysteine. IC50 for Hg(2+) and CH3Hg(+) of 90 nM and 137 nM, respectively, were measured by dose-response analyses. Inhibition was abolished in the C-less CACT mutant. Strong reduction of inhibition by both reagents was observed in the C136A and some reduction in the C155A mutants. Inhibition similar to that of the WT was observed in the C23V/C58V/C89S/C155V/C283S mutant, containing only C136. Optimal inhibition by Hg(2+)was found in the four replacement mutants C23V/C58V/C89S/C283S containing both C136 and C155 indicating cross-reaction of Hg(2+) with the two Cys residues. Inhibition kinetic analysis showed mixed inhibition by Hg(2+) or competitive inhibition by CH3Hg(+). HeLa cells or Zebrafish were treated with the more potent inhibitor. Ten micromolar HgCl2 caused clear impairment of viability of HeLa cells. The transport assay in proteoliposomes with CACT extracted from treated cells showed that the transporter was inactivated and that DTE rescued the activity. Nearly identical results were observed with Zebrafish upon extraction of the CACT from the liver of the treated animals that, indeed, showed accumulation of the mercurial compound.

  19. Project Mercury - Monument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-11-11

    S66-59963 (9 Nov. 1966) --- Monument at Pad 14 honoring Project Mercury. The Arabic number seven represents the seven original astronauts. The other figure is the astronomical symbol of the Planet Mercury. In background is the Gemini-12 Agena Target Docking Vehicle atop its Atlas launch vehicle at Cape Kennedy, Florida. Photo credit: NASA

  20. A Rhizosphere-Associated Symbiont, Photobacterium spp. Strain MELD1, and Its Targeted Synergistic Activity for Phytoprotection against Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Dony Chacko; Ho, Ying-Ning; Gicana, Ronnie Gicaraya; Mathew, Gincy Marina; Chien, Mei-Chieh; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Though heavy metal such as mercury is toxic to plants and microorganisms, the synergistic activity between them may offer benefit for surviving. In this study, a mercury-reducing bacterium, Photobacterium spp. strain MELD1, with an MIC of 33 mg . kg-1 mercury was isolated from a severely mercury and dioxin contaminated rhizosphere soil of reed (Phragmites australis). While the whole genome sequencing of MELD1 confirmed the presence of a mer operon, the mercury reductase MerA gene showed 99% sequence identity to Vibrio shilloni AK1 and implicates its route resulted from the event of horizontal gene transfer. The efficiency of MELD1 to vaporize mercury (25 mg . kg-1, 24 h) and its tolerance to toxic metals and xenobiotics such as lead, cadmium, pentachlorophenol, pentachloroethylene, 3-chlorobenzoic acid, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 1,2,3,7,8,9-hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is promising. Combination of a long yard bean (Vigna unguiculata ssp. Sesquipedalis) and strain MELD1 proved beneficial in the phytoprotection of mercury in vivo. The effect of mercury (Hg) on growth, distribution and tolerance was examined in root, shoot, leaves and pod of yard long bean with and without the inoculation of strain MELD1. The model plant inoculated with MELD1 had significant increases in biomass, root length, seed number, and increased mercury uptake limited to roots. Biolog plate assay were used to assess the sole-carbon source utilization pattern of the isolate and Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) productivity was analyzed to examine if the strain could contribute to plant growth. The results of this study suggest that, as a rhizosphere-associated symbiont, the synergistic activity between the plant and MELD1 can improve the efficiency for phytoprotection, phytostabilization and phytoremediation of mercury. PMID:25816328

  1. Two-phase flow model for energetic proton beam induced pressure waves in mercury target systems in the planned European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, I. F.; Imre, A. R.; Rosta, L.; Mezei, F.

    2008-12-01

    Two-phase flow calculations are presented to investigate the thermo-hydraulical effects of the interaction between 2 ms long 1.3 GeV proton pulses with a closed mercury loop which can be considered as a model system of the target of the planned European Spallation Source (ESS) facility. The two-fluid model consists of six first-order partial differential equations that present one dimensional mass, momentum and energy balances for mercury vapor and liquid phases are capable to describe quick transients like cavitation effects or shock waves. The absorption of the proton beam is represented as instantaneous heat source in the energy balance equations. Densities and internal energies of the mercury liquid-vapor system is calculated from the van der Waals equation, but general method how to obtain such properties using arbitrary equation of state is also presented. A second order accurate high-resolution shock-capturing numerical scheme is applied with different kind of limiters in the numerical calculations. Our analysis show that even 75 degree temperature heat shocks cannot cause considerable cavitation effects in mercury.

  2. 32 CFR 193.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability. 193.2 Section 193.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... the Department of Defense. ...

  3. 32 CFR 193.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability. 193.2 Section 193.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... the Department of Defense. ...

  4. Summary of Mercury Compatibility Issues for the Spallation Neutron Source Target Containment and Ancillary Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, SJ

    2003-04-08

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the primary results of the Hg compatibility research in support of the SNS target. In the absence of possible synergisms resulting from beam/irradiation effects, wetting of 316L/316LN stainless steel under SNS conditions by the Hg target is expected to be very limited. As a result, significant interactions such as dissolution, mass transfer, and embrittlement affecting general compatibility are not anticipated. A wide range of experiments on 316L/316LN stainless steel, including thermal convection and pumped loops, confirmed low corrosion/penetration rates in Hg up to 305 C and little or no wetting or mass transfer below about 250 C. A variety of standard mechanical tests comparing behavior of 316L in air and Hg revealed limited wetting and no degradation of mechanical properties such as reduced elongation or development of brittle fracture features. Preliminary fatigue tests indicated a negative effect (reduced cycles to failure and intergranular cracking) at very high loads for 316LN, but little or no effect at more modest loading. Annealed 316LN was found to be somewhat susceptible to cavitation-erosion damage, but significant improvement was realized with a kolsterizing surface treatment or coldworking the material. Within the scope of these test conditions, no compatibility-limited operations were identified for type 316L/316LN stainless steel (and variations thereof) as the Hg target containment material. More limited compatibility data on other materials are also reported.

  5. 49 CFR 193.2119 - Records

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Records 193.2119 Section 193.2119 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Materials § 193.2119 Records Each operator shall keep a record of all... properties meet the requirements of this part. These records must be maintained for the life of the item...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2119 - Records

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Records 193.2119 Section 193.2119 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Materials § 193.2119 Records Each operator shall keep a record of all... properties meet the requirements of this part. These records must be maintained for the life of the item...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2609 - Support systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Support systems. 193.2609 Section 193.2609 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2609 Support systems. Each support system or foundation of each...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2167 - Covered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Covered systems. 193.2167 Section 193.2167...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2167 Covered systems. A covered impounding system is prohibited except for concrete wall designed tanks where the concrete wall is an outer...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2609 - Support systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Support systems. 193.2609 Section 193.2609 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2609 Support systems. Each support system or foundation of each...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2167 - Covered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Covered systems. 193.2167 Section 193.2167...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2167 Covered systems. A covered impounding system is prohibited except for concrete wall designed tanks where the concrete wall is an outer...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2609 - Support systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Support systems. 193.2609 Section 193.2609 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2609 Support systems. Each support system or foundation of each...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2619 - Control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control systems. 193.2619 Section 193.2619...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2619 Control systems. (a) Each control system must be properly adjusted to operate within design limits. (b) If a control system is out of service for 30 days or more, it...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2609 - Support systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Support systems. 193.2609 Section 193.2609 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2609 Support systems. Each support system or foundation of each...

  15. 40 CFR 408.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true 408.193 Section 408.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CANNED AND PRESERVED SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.193...

  16. 40 CFR 408.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true 408.193 Section 408.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CANNED AND PRESERVED SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.193...

  17. 40 CFR 408.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true 408.193 Section 408.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CANNED AND PRESERVED SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.193...

  18. 40 CFR 408.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 408.193 Section 408.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CANNED AND PRESERVED SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.193...

  19. 40 CFR 408.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false 408.193 Section 408.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS CANNED AND PRESERVED SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY West Coast Mechanized Salmon Processing Subcategory § 408.193...

  20. 32 CFR 193.3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Policy. 193.3 Section 193.3 National Defense... NATIONAL DEFENSE § 193.3 Policy. In order to insure that the national defense is served by adequate, safe and efficient highway transportation, it shall be the policy of the DoD to (a) integrate the highway...

  1. 46 CFR 193.10-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 193.10-1 Section 193.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 193.10-1 Application. (a) The provisions of this subpart, with the...

  2. 46 CFR 193.60-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 193.60-1 Section 193.60-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-1 Application. (a) The provisions of this subpart shall apply to all vessels...

  3. 46 CFR 193.30-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application. 193.30-1 Section 193.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkler Systems § 193.30-1 Application. Automatic sprinkling systems shall comply with...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nondestructive tests. 193.2321 Section 193.2321 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2321 Nondestructive tests. (a) The butt welds in metal...

  5. 7 CFR 4280.193 - Combined funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Combined funding. 4280.193 Section 4280.193... Efficiency Improvements Program Section D. Combined Funding § 4280.193 Combined funding. The requirements for... if the project meets the requirements specified in § 4280.109. (b) Funding. Funding provided under...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or reliability...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or reliability...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or reliability...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine which metallic components could, unless corrosion is controlled, have their integrity or reliability...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2619 - Control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control systems. 193.2619 Section 193.2619...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2619 Control systems. (a) Each control system must be properly adjusted to operate within design limits. (b) If a control system is out of service for 30 days or more, it...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2619 - Control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control systems. 193.2619 Section 193.2619...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2619 Control systems. (a) Each control system must be properly adjusted to operate within design limits. (b) If a control system is out of service for 30 days or more, it...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2619 - Control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control systems. 193.2619 Section 193.2619...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2619 Control systems. (a) Each control system must be properly adjusted to operate within design limits. (b) If a control system is out of service for 30 days or more, it...

  13. 22 CFR 193.3 - Applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applications. 193.3 Section 193.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF BENEFITS FOR HOSTAGES IN IRAQ, KUWAIT, OR LEBANON § 193.3.../Iraq/Lebanon Hostage Benefits Program, room 4817, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520-4818. (e...

  14. 22 CFR 193.3 - Applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applications. 193.3 Section 193.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE HOSTAGE RELIEF BENEFITS FOR HOSTAGES IN IRAQ, KUWAIT, OR LEBANON § 193.3.../Iraq/Lebanon Hostage Benefits Program, room 4817, Department of State, Washington, DC 20520-4818. (e...

  15. 32 CFR 193.3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Policy. 193.3 Section 193.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS HIGHWAYS FOR NATIONAL DEFENSE § 193.3 Policy. In order to insure that the national defense is served by adequate, safe...

  16. 28 CFR 19.3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Policy. 19.3 Section 19.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE USE OF PENALTY MAIL IN THE LOCATION AND RECOVERY OF MISSING CHILDREN § 19.3... the use of inserts printed with missing children photographs and biographical information has been...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of not...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of not...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of not...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of not...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2119 - Records

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Records 193.2119 Section 193.2119 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Materials § 193.2119 Records Each operator shall keep a record of all... properties meet the requirements of this part. These records must be maintained for the life of the...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2911 - Security lighting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security lighting. 193.2911 Section 193.2911...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2911 Security lighting. Where security warning systems are not...) and each protective enclosure must be illuminated with a minimum in service lighting intensity of not...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2619 - Control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control systems. 193.2619 Section 193.2619...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2619 Control systems. (a) Each control system must be properly adjusted to operate within design limits. (b) If a control system is out of service for 30 days or more, it...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2917 - Warning signs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Warning signs. 193.2917 Section 193.2917 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2917 Warning signs. (a) Warning signs must be conspicuously...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2709 - Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security. 193.2709 Section 193.2709 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2709 Security. Personnel having security duties must be qualified to perform their assigned duties by successful completion of the training...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2607 - Foreign material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foreign material. 193.2607 Section 193.2607 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2607 Foreign material. (a) The presence of foreign material...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2607 - Foreign material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foreign material. 193.2607 Section 193.2607 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2607 Foreign material. (a) The presence of foreign material...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2709 - Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security. 193.2709 Section 193.2709 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2709 Security. Personnel having security duties must be qualified to perform their assigned duties by successful completion of the...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2909 - Security communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security communications. 193.2909 Section 193.2909...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2909 Security communications. A means must be provided for: (a) Prompt communications between personnel having supervisory security duties and law enforcement...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2709 - Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Security. 193.2709 Section 193.2709 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2709 Security. Personnel having security duties must be qualified to perform their assigned duties by successful completion of the...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2709 - Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Security. 193.2709 Section 193.2709 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2709 Security. Personnel having security duties must be qualified to perform their assigned duties by successful completion of the...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2709 - Security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security. 193.2709 Section 193.2709 Transportation...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2709 Security. Personnel having security duties must be qualified to perform their assigned duties by successful completion of the...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2909 - Security communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security communications. 193.2909 Section 193.2909...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2909 Security communications. A means must be provided for: (a) Prompt communications between personnel having supervisory security duties and law enforcement...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2909 - Security communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security communications. 193.2909 Section 193.2909...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2909 Security communications. A means must be provided for: (a) Prompt communications between personnel having supervisory security duties and law enforcement...

  19. 46 CFR 193.01-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General. 193.01-1 Section 193.01-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Application § 193.01-1 General. (a) The provisions of this part shall apply to all vessels other than...

  20. 46 CFR 193.01-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General. 193.01-1 Section 193.01-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Application § 193.01-1 General. (a) The provisions of this part shall apply to all vessels other than...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  2. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  3. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2173 Water removal. (a) Impoundment areas must be constructed such that all areas drain completely to prevent water collection....

  4. 27 CFR 41.193 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 38571, June 27, 2013, § 41.193 was revised, effective Aug. 26, 2013 through Aug. 26, 2016. ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41.193 Section 41.193 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2715 - Training: security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training: security. 193.2715 Section 193.2715...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2715 Training: security. (a) Personnel responsible for security at an LNG plant must be trained in accordance with a written plan...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2719 - Training: records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Training: records. 193.2719 Section 193.2719...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2719 Training: records. (a) Each operator shall maintain a system of records which— (1) Provide evidence that the training programs...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2637 Remedial measures. Prompt corrective or remedial action...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2637 Remedial measures. Prompt corrective or remedial action...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2637 Remedial measures. Prompt corrective or remedial action...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2637 Remedial measures. Prompt corrective or remedial action...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2637 - Remedial measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures. 193.2637 Section 193.2637 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2637 Remedial measures. Prompt corrective or remedial action...

  12. 7 CFR 4280.193 - Combined funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combined funding. 4280.193 Section 4280.193 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Efficiency Improvements Program Section D. Combined Funding § 4280.193 Combined funding. The requirements...

  13. Engineering aspects of the application of structural materials in the 5 MW-ESS-mercury-target

    SciTech Connect

    Guttek, B.

    1996-06-01

    A main problem of the ESS-Hg-target development and the design of the components of its primary Hg-circuit is the choice of structural materials. As designing, calculations and experiments with elected materials take time and are very costy, a preview on their successful application has to be done before as detailed as possible. One aspect on this is to have the knowledge of characteristics values of the structural material candidates under the occuring mechanical and thermal loads, irradiation, corrosion and erosion. Another point is the technology of engineering concerning the manufacturing, welding, surface treatment, and quality control of such parts and components under the demand to reach maximum lifetime.

  14. LP/LIF STUDY OF THE FORMATION AND CONSUMPTION OF MERCURY (I) CHLORIDE: KINETICS OF MERCURY CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The laser photolysis/laser induced flourescence (LP/LIF) technique has been applied to studies of gas-phase mercury (Hg) chlorination. Mercury (I) chloride (HgCl) has been detected via LIF at 272 nm from reactions of elemental Hg and Cl atoms generated from the 193 nm photolysis ...

  15. LP/LIF STUDY OF THE FORMATION AND CONSUMPTION OF MERCURY (I) CHLORIDE: KINETICS OF MERCURY CHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The laser photolysis/laser induced flourescence (LP/LIF) technique has been applied to studies of gas-phase mercury (Hg) chlorination. Mercury (I) chloride (HgCl) has been detected via LIF at 272 nm from reactions of elemental Hg and Cl atoms generated from the 193 nm photolysis ...

  16. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 193

    SciTech Connect

    Achterberg, E.; Capurro, O.A.; Marti, G.V.; Vanin, V.R.; Castro, R.M.

    2006-01-15

    The present revision of the properties for the nuclides belonging to the A = 193 mass chain contains many improvements, corrections and additions to the material presented in previous evaluations (1998Ar07, Nucl. Data Sheets 83, 921 (1998); 1990Sh30, Nucl, Data Sheets 61, 519 (1990)). Among these are measurement results for quadrupole moments, angular distribution coefficients, half-lives and g-factors, for both previously known and new transitions and levels. In addition, major changes to the previously known status of this mass chain consist in the inclusion of data for new superdeformed bands in {sup 193}Pb, and the creation of level schemes for {sup 193}Bi, {sup 193}Po and {sup 193}At. The latter were previously unavailable, except for a very limited attempt in the case of {sup 193}Po, which was not confirmed in later work. Furthermore, the {sup 193}Os beta decay was re-evaluated in order to account for new absolute intensity measurements.

  17. Mineralogical Associations of Mercury in FGD Products

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, William Lee; Schroeder, Karl; Beatty, Candace L. Kairies

    2012-06-21

    The natural mode of retention of mercury in flue gas desulfurization gypsum used in wallboard manufacturing has been investigated using a series of phase-targeted reagents. Results indicate that mercury was associated with two distinct phases.

  18. Brain as a critical target of mercury in environmentally exposed fish (Dicentrarchus labrax)--bioaccumulation and oxidative stress profiles.

    PubMed

    Mieiro, C L; Pereira, M E; Duarte, A C; Pacheco, M

    2011-06-01

    Although mercury is recognized as a potent neurotoxicant, information regarding its threat to fish brain and underlying mechanisms is still scarce. In accordance, the objective of this work was to assess vulnerability of fish to mercury neurotoxicity by evaluating brain pro-oxidant status in wild European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) captured in an estuarine area affected by chlor-alkali industry discharges (Laranjo Basin, Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). To achieve this goal, brain antioxidant responses such as catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities and total glutathione (GSHt) content were measured. Additionally, damage was determined as lipid peroxidation. To ascertain the influence of seasonal variables on both mercury accumulation and oxidative stress profiles, surveys were conducted in contrasting conditions-warm and cold periods. In the warm period, brain of fish from mercury contaminated sites exhibited ambivalent antioxidant responses, viz. higher GR activity and lower CAT activity regarded, respectively, as possible signs of protective adaptation and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress challenge. Though the risk of an overwhelming ROS production cannot be excluded, brain appeared to possess compensatory mechanisms and was able to avoid lipid peroxidative damage. The warm period was the most critical for the appearance of oxidative damage as no inter-site alterations on oxidative stress endpoints were detected in the cold period. Since seasonal differences were found in oxidative stress responses and not in mercury bioaccumulation, environmental factors affected the former more than the latter. This work increases the knowledge on mercury neurotoxicity in feral fish, highlighting that the definition of critical tissue concentrations depends on environmental variables.

  19. New antireflective coatings for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Dobson, Norman

    1998-06-01

    New bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) for 193 nm lithography have been recently developed by Brewer Science Inc. Copolymers of benzyl methacrylate (or benzyl acrylate) and hydroxypropyl methacrylate have been synthesized and used as a main component in 193 nm BARCs. The acrylic copolymers have strong absorbance at 193 nm UV light wavelength. The 193 nm BARCs were formulated in safe solvents such as ethyl lactate and formed by spin-on coating process. Thermosetting of the 193 nm BARCs limited their intermixing with photoresists. These 193 nm BARCs had optical density of about 10 micrometers -1, k equals 0.35, and n equals 1.81. Preliminary oxygen plasma etch rates were > 1.5 times DUV resists. Good profiles at small feature sizes (< 0.20 micrometers ) were achieved with tested photoresists.

  20. Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    direct entry through the northern and southern cusps. Although Mariner 10 did not return plasma composition measurements, the Hermean magnetosphere should be ideal for measuring the manner and rate of solar wind plasma entry due to the lack of strong internal atmospheric sources. Finally, the solar wind conditions experienced by Mercury as it orbits the Sun at 0.31 to 0.47 AU are quite different from those typically encountered by the Earth. This may allow for new understanding of the external factors affecting the transfer of mass, momentum and energy from the solar wind to planetary magnetospheres. This article provides a brief overview of what is now known about Mercury's magnetosphere and why it is a priority target for future planetary missions.

  1. Mercury and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  2. [Mercury poisoning].

    PubMed

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication.

  3. Planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10's first image of Mercury acquired on March 24, 1974. During its flight, Mariner 10's trajectory brought it behind the lighted hemisphere of Mercury, where this image was taken, in order to acquire important measurements with other instruments.

    This picture was acquired from a distance of 3,340,000 miles (5,380,000 km) from the surface of Mercury. The diameter of Mercury (3,031 miles; 4,878 km) is about 1/3 that of Earth.

    Images of Mercury were acquired in two steps, an inbound leg (images acquired before passing into Mercury's shadow) and an outbound leg (after exiting from Mercury's shadow). More than 2300 useful images of Mercury were taken, both moderate resolution (3-20 km/pixel) color and high resolution (better than 1 km/pixel) black and white coverage.

  4. 49 CFR 193.2511 - Personnel safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Personnel safety. 193.2511 Section 193.2511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2511 - Personnel safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personnel safety. 193.2511 Section 193.2511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2511 - Personnel safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Personnel safety. 193.2511 Section 193.2511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2511 - Personnel safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Personnel safety. 193.2511 Section 193.2511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  8. 46 CFR 193.15-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-10 Controls. (a) Except as noted in § 193..., a manifold with normally closed stop valves shall be used to direct the carbon dioxide into the...) which contain not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide. (c) One of the stations controlling the system...

  9. 46 CFR 193.15-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-10 Controls. (a) Except as... one hazard, a manifold with normally closed stop valves shall be used to direct the carbon dioxide... § 193.15-5(d) which contain not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide. (c) One of the stations...

  10. 46 CFR 193.15-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-10 Controls. (a) Except as... one hazard, a manifold with normally closed stop valves shall be used to direct the carbon dioxide... § 193.15-5(d) which contain not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide. (c) One of the stations...

  11. 46 CFR 193.15-10 - Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-10 Controls. (a) Except as noted in § 193..., a manifold with normally closed stop valves shall be used to direct the carbon dioxide into the...) which contain not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide. (c) One of the stations controlling the system...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2507 - Monitoring operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Monitoring operations. 193.2507 Section 193.2507 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY..., pressure, vacuum, and flow alarms, or by conducting an inspection or test at intervals specified in the...

  13. 27 CFR 41.193 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41.193 Section 41.193 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES...

  14. 27 CFR 41.193 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corporate documents. 41.193 Section 41.193 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES...

  15. 27 CFR 41.193 - Corporate documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Corporate documents. 41.193 Section 41.193 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS, CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND...

  16. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2401 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment § 193.2401 Scope. After March 31, 2000, each new, replaced, relocated... designed, fabricated, and installed in accordance with requirements of this part and of NFPA 59A. In the event of a conflict between this part and NFPA 59A (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013),...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2401 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment § 193.2401 Scope. After March 31, 2000, each new, replaced, relocated... designed, fabricated, and installed in accordance with requirements of this part and of NFPA 59A. In the event of a conflict between this part and NFPA 59A (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013),...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2401 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment § 193.2401 Scope. After March 31, 2000, each new, replaced, relocated... designed, fabricated, and installed in accordance with requirements of this part and of NFPA 59A. In the event of a conflict between this part and NFPA 59A (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013),...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2401 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment § 193.2401 Scope. After March 31, 2000, each new, replaced, relocated... designed, fabricated, and installed in accordance with requirements of this part and of NFPA 59A. In the event of a conflict between this part and NFPA 59A (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013),...

  1. 46 CFR 108.193 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restrictions. 108.193 Section 108.193 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT... solid, close-fitted doors or hatches. (b) No access, vent, or sounding tube from a fuel or oil tank...

  2. 46 CFR 108.193 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restrictions. 108.193 Section 108.193 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT... solid, close-fitted doors or hatches. (b) No access, vent, or sounding tube from a fuel or oil tank...

  3. 46 CFR 108.193 - Restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions. 108.193 Section 108.193 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT... solid, close-fitted doors or hatches. (b) No access, vent, or sounding tube from a fuel or oil tank...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2905 - Protective enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protective enclosures. 193.2905 Section 193.2905 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2603 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General. 193.2603 Section 193.2603 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2617 - Repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repairs. 193.2617 Section 193.2617 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nondestructive tests. 193.2321 Section 193.2321 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2003 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 193.2003 Section 193.2003 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2303 - Construction acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction acceptance. 193.2303 Section 193.2303 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2401 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2401 Section 193.2401 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2905 - Protective enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protective enclosures. 193.2905 Section 193.2905 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2015 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 193.2015 Section 193.2015 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2517 - Purging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purging. 193.2517 Section 193.2517 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  14. 27 CFR 28.193 - Export marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export marks. 28.193... Drawback Filing of Notice and Removal § 28.193 Export marks. In addition to the marks and brands required... chapter, the exporter shall mark the word “Export” on the Government side of each case or Government head...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2701 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2701 Section 193.2701 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... requirements for personnel qualifications and training. [45 FR 9219, Feb. 11, 1980] ...

  16. 37 CFR 1.93 - Specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specimens. 1.93 Section 1.93 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE....93 Specimens. When the invention relates to a composition of matter, the applicant may be required to...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2633 - Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2633 Interference currents. (a) Each component that is subject to electrical current interference must be protected by a continuing program to minimize the... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interference currents. 193.2633 Section...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2167 - Covered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Covered systems. 193.2167 Section 193.2167 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2161 - Dikes, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dikes, general. 193.2161 Section 193.2161 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2161 - Dikes, general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dikes, general. 193.2161 Section 193.2161 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2167 - Covered systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Covered systems. 193.2167 Section 193.2167 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2719 - Training: records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Training: records. 193.2719 Section 193.2719 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2155 - Structural requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Structural requirements. 193.2155 Section 193.2155 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2605 - Maintenance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maintenance procedures. 193.2605 Section 193.2605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2501 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope. 193.2501 Section 193.2501 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2639 - Maintenance records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maintenance records. 193.2639 Section 193.2639 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2301 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope. 193.2301 Section 193.2301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2719 - Training: records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Training: records. 193.2719 Section 193.2719 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2051 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2051 Section 193.2051 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2715 - Training: security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Training: security. 193.2715 Section 193.2715 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2901 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope. 193.2901 Section 193.2901 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2011 - Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reporting. 193.2011 Section 193.2011 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2611 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire protection. 193.2611 Section 193.2611 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2607 - Foreign material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foreign material. 193.2607 Section 193.2607 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2007 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definitions. 193.2007 Section 193.2007 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2011 - Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting. 193.2011 Section 193.2011 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2601 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2601 Section 193.2601 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2067 - Wind forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wind forces. 193.2067 Section 193.2067 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2521 - Operating records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating records. 193.2521 Section 193.2521 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2605 - Maintenance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maintenance procedures. 193.2605 Section 193.2605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2903 - Security procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security procedures. 193.2903 Section 193.2903 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2301 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope. 193.2301 Section 193.2301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2605 - Maintenance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maintenance procedures. 193.2605 Section 193.2605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2913 - Security monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security monitoring. 193.2913 Section 193.2913 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2715 - Training: security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Training: security. 193.2715 Section 193.2715 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2611 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire protection. 193.2611 Section 193.2611 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2051 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope. 193.2051 Section 193.2051 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2715 - Training: security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Training: security. 193.2715 Section 193.2715 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2501 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2501 Section 193.2501 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2901 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope. 193.2901 Section 193.2901 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2501 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope. 193.2501 Section 193.2501 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2067 - Wind forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wind forces. 193.2067 Section 193.2067 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2901 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope. 193.2901 Section 193.2901 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2519 - Communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Communication systems. 193.2519 Section 193.2519 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2005 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability. 193.2005 Section 193.2005 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2301 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope. 193.2301 Section 193.2301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2155 - Structural requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Structural requirements. 193.2155 Section 193.2155 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2051 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope. 193.2051 Section 193.2051 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2051 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope. 193.2051 Section 193.2051 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2067 - Wind forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wind forces. 193.2067 Section 193.2067 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2605 - Maintenance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maintenance procedures. 193.2605 Section 193.2605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2155 - Structural requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Structural requirements. 193.2155 Section 193.2155 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2301 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope. 193.2301 Section 193.2301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2611 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire protection. 193.2611 Section 193.2611 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2501 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope. 193.2501 Section 193.2501 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2601 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope. 193.2601 Section 193.2601 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2011 - Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting. 193.2011 Section 193.2011 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2067 - Wind forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wind forces. 193.2067 Section 193.2067 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2155 - Structural requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Structural requirements. 193.2155 Section 193.2155 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2719 - Training: records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Training: records. 193.2719 Section 193.2719 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2007 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definitions. 193.2007 Section 193.2007 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2801 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire protection. 193.2801 Section 193.2801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2607 - Foreign material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foreign material. 193.2607 Section 193.2607 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2521 - Operating records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operating records. 193.2521 Section 193.2521 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2903 - Security procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security procedures. 193.2903 Section 193.2903 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2501 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope. 193.2501 Section 193.2501 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2903 - Security procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security procedures. 193.2903 Section 193.2903 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2601 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope. 193.2601 Section 193.2601 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2155 - Structural requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Structural requirements. 193.2155 Section 193.2155 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2101 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2101 Section 193.2101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transfer procedures. 193.2513 Section 193.2513 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2901 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope. 193.2901 Section 193.2901 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2913 - Security monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security monitoring. 193.2913 Section 193.2913 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2601 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope. 193.2601 Section 193.2601 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2601 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scope. 193.2601 Section 193.2601 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2719 - Training: records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Training: records. 193.2719 Section 193.2719 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2913 - Security monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Security monitoring. 193.2913 Section 193.2913 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2051 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope. 193.2051 Section 193.2051 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2913 - Security monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security monitoring. 193.2913 Section 193.2913 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2441 - Control center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control center. 193.2441 Section 193.2441 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2611 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire protection. 193.2611 Section 193.2611 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2067 - Wind forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wind forces. 193.2067 Section 193.2067 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2605 - Maintenance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maintenance procedures. 193.2605 Section 193.2605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2715 - Training: security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Training: security. 193.2715 Section 193.2715 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2521 - Operating records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operating records. 193.2521 Section 193.2521 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2011 - Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting. 193.2011 Section 193.2011 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2509 - Emergency procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency procedures. 193.2509 Section 193.2509 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2901 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2901 Section 193.2901 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2301 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 193.2301 Section 193.2301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2011 - Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reporting. 193.2011 Section 193.2011 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2913 - Security monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Security monitoring. 193.2913 Section 193.2913 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2521 - Operating records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating records. 193.2521 Section 193.2521 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2611 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire protection. 193.2611 Section 193.2611 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2711 - Personnel health.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Personnel health. 193.2711 Section 193.2711 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2521 - Operating records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operating records. 193.2521 Section 193.2521 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2007 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitions. 193.2007 Section 193.2007 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2511 - Personnel safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personnel safety. 193.2511 Section 193.2511 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2173 - Water removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water removal. 193.2173 Section 193.2173 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2801 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire protection. 193.2801 Section 193.2801 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES...

  3. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  4. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, Jr., one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-9 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas launch vehicle, was the last flight of the Mercury Project. The Faith 7 spacecraft orbited the Earth 22 times in 1-1/2 days.

  5. Got Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield

  6. Got Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF THE CHEMICAL FORMS OF MERCURY AND OTHER TARGET POLLUTANTS IN COAL-FIRED BOILER FLUE GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Terence J. McManus, Ph.D.

    1999-06-30

    Since approximately 55% of the electrical power produced in the U. S. is generated by coal-based power utility plants, there is serious concern about the massive amounts of coal combustion products emitted into the atmosphere annually. Furthermore, Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) requires the measurement and inventory of a possible 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from any stationary source producing more than 10 tons per year of any one pollutant or more than 25 tons per year of total pollutants. Although power utilities are not presently included on the list of source categories, the CAAA requires the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency to carry out a study of emissions from electricity generation using fossil fuels. Since many of these HAPs are known to be present in coal derived flue gas, coal-fired electric power utilities may be subject to regulation following these studies if Congress considers it necessary. In a cooperative effort with the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) initiated such a study in 1991. DOE-FETC commissioned five primary contractors to conduct emission studies at eight different coal-fired electric utilities. The eight sites represented a cross section of feed coal type, boiler designs, and particulate and gaseous pollutant control technologies. The major goal of these studies was to determine the sampling and analytical methodologies that could be used efficiently to perform these emission tests while producing representative and reliable emission data. The successful methodology could then be recommended to the EPA for use in compliance testing in the event the regulation of air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants is implemented. A secondary purpose of the testing was to determine the effectiveness of the control technologies in reducing target hazardous air pollutants. Advanced Technology Systems, Inc

  8. 49 CFR 193.2705 - Construction, installation, inspection, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... testing. 193.2705 Section 193.2705 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2705 Construction, installation, inspection, and testing. (a) Supervisors and other...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2705 - Construction, installation, inspection, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing. 193.2705 Section 193.2705 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2705 Construction, installation, inspection, and testing. (a) Supervisors and other...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2303 - Construction acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2303 Construction acceptance. No person may place in service any component until it passes all applicable inspections and tests prescribed by this subpart and...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2303 - Construction acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2303 Construction acceptance. No person may place in service any component until it passes all applicable inspections and tests prescribed by this subpart and...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2303 - Construction acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2303 Construction acceptance. No person may place in service any component until it passes all applicable inspections and tests prescribed by this subpart and...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2303 - Construction acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2303 Construction acceptance. No person may place in service any component until it passes all applicable inspections and tests prescribed by this subpart and...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2503 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2503 Operating procedures. Each operator shall follow one...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2503 - Operating procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2503 Operating procedures. Each operator shall follow one...

  16. Recent progress in 193-nm antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meador, James D.; Guerrero, Douglas J.; Xu, Gu; Shao, Xie; Dobson, Norman; Claypool, James B.; Nowak, Kelly A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the chemistries and properties of organic, spin-on, bottom antireflective coatings (BARCs) that are designed for 193 nm lithography. All of the BARCs are thermosetting and use dye-attached/incorporated polymers. A first generation product, NEXT, will soon be commercialized. NEXT is built form i-line and deep-UV chemistries with the polymeric constituent being a substitute novolac. This product provide outstanding resolution of 0.16 micrometers L/S with several 193 nm photoresists. Second generation chemical platforms under study include acrylics, polyesters, and polyethers with the 193 nm absorbing chromophore being an aromatic function. The performance of selected BARCs from the four platforms is described, including: optical properties, 193 nm litho, plasma etch rates, Prolith modeling data, spin-bowl and waste line compatibility, and ambient stability.

  17. 49 CFR 193.2519 - Communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2519 Communication systems. (a) Each LNG plant must have a... their work stations in the LNG plant. (b) Each LNG plant in excess of 70,000 gallons (265,000...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2519 - Communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2519 Communication systems. (a) Each LNG plant must have a... their work stations in the LNG plant. (b) Each LNG plant in excess of 70,000 gallons (265,000...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2519 - Communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2519 Communication systems. (a) Each LNG plant must have a... their work stations in the LNG plant. (b) Each LNG plant in excess of 70,000 gallons (265,000...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2519 - Communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2519 Communication systems. (a) Each LNG plant must have a... their work stations in the LNG plant. (b) Each LNG plant in excess of 70,000 gallons (265,000...

  1. Got Mercury?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, Torin J.; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2010-09-01

    Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed by the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may vaporize completely when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. We estimated mercury vapor releases from stowed lamps during missions lasting ≤ 30 days, whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from stowed lamps during missions lasting > 30 days and from operating lamps regardless of mission duration. The toxicity of mercury and its lack of removal have led Johnson Space Center’s Toxicology Group to recommend stringent safety controls and verifications for hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations > 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting ≤ 30 days, or concentrations > 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting > 30 days.

  2. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-07-21

    Astronaut Virgil Gus Grissom awaits America's second marned space mission, Mercury-Redstone 4 (MR-4) on July 21, 1961. During the 15-minute suborbital flight, the Liberty Bell 7 Mercury spacecraft reached an altitude of 118 miles and traveled 303 miles downrange. It was the fourth flight of the Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle (MR-4), developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team in Huntsville, Alabama.

  3. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    Ham, a three-year-old chimpanzee, in the spacesuit he would wear for the second Mercury- Redstone (MR-2) suborbital test flight in January, 1961. NASA used chimpanzees and other primates to test the Mercury capsule before launching the fisrt American astronaut, Alan Shepard, in May 1961. The Mercury capsule rode atop a modified Redstone rocket, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the German Rocket Team in Huntsville, Alabama.

  4. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, poses with the original Mercury astronauts in ABMA's Fabrication Laboratory during a 1959 visit. Inspecting Mercury-Redstone hardware are from left to right, Alan Shepard, Donald Deke Slayton, Virgil Gus Grissom, von Braun, Gordon Cooper, Wally Schirra, John Glenn, and Scott Carpenter. Project Mercury officially began October 7, 1958 as the United States' first manned space program.

  5. S193 radiometer brightness temperature precision/accuracy for SL2 and SL3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounds, D. J.; Krishen, K.

    1975-01-01

    The precision and accuracy with which the S193 radiometer measured the brightness temperature of ground scenes is investigated. Estimates were derived from data collected during Skylab missions. Homogeneous ground sites were selected and S193 radiometer brightness temperature data analyzed. The precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the radiometer acquired brightness temperature. Precision was determined to be 2.40 K or better depending on mode and target temperature.

  6. MicroRNA-193b Represses Cell Proliferation and Regulates Cyclin D1 in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiamin; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Paré, Geneviève C.; Zhang, Xiao; Pemberton, Joshua G.W.; Garady, Cherif; Lai, Dulcie; Yang, Xiaolong; Tron, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive form of human skin cancer characterized by high metastatic potential and poor prognosis. To better understand the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in melanoma, the expression of 470 miRNAs was profiled in tissue samples from benign nevi and metastatic melanomas. We identified 31 miRNAs that were differentially expressed (13 up-regulated and 18 down-regulated) in metastatic melanomas relative to benign nevi. Notably, miR-193b was significantly down-regulated in the melanoma tissues examined. To understand the role of miR-193b in melanoma, functional studies were undertaken. Overexpression of miR-193b in melanoma cell lines repressed cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling identified 314 genes down-regulated by overexpression of miR-193b in Malme-3M cells. Eighteen of these down-regulated genes, including cyclin D1 (CCND1), were also identified as putative miR-193b targets by TargetScan. Overexpression of miR-193b in Malme-3M cells down-regulated CCND1 mRNA and protein by ≥50%. A luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-193b directly regulates CCND1 by binding to the 3′untranslated region of CCND1 mRNA. These studies indicate that miR-193b represses cell proliferation and regulates CCND1 expression and suggest that dysregulation of miR-193b may play an important role in melanoma development. PMID:20304954

  7. MiR-193a-3p and miR-193a-5p suppress the metastasis of human osteosarcoma cells by down-regulating Rab27B and SRR, respectively.

    PubMed

    Pu, Youguang; Zhao, Fangfang; Cai, Wenjing; Meng, Xianghui; Li, Yinpeng; Cai, Shanbao

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs have been identified as key players in the development and progression of osteosarcoma, which is the most common primary malignancy of bone. Sequencing-based miR-omic and quantitative real-time PCR analyses suggested that the expression of miR-193a-3p and miR-193a-5p was decreased by DNA methylation at their promoter region in a highly metastatic osteosarcoma cell line (MG63.2) relative to their expression in the less metastatic MG63 cell line. Further wound-healing and invasion assays demonstrated that both miR-193a-3p and miR-193a-5p suppressed osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion. Moreover, introducing miR-193a-3p and miR-193a-5p mimics into MG63.2 cells or antagomiRs into MG63 cells confirmed their critical roles in osteosarcoma metastasis. Additionally, bioinformatics prediction along with biochemical assay results clearly suggested that the secretory small GTPase Rab27B and serine racemase (SRR) were direct targets of miR-193a-3p and miR-193a-5p, respectively. These two targets are indeed involved in the miR-193a-3p- and miR-193a-5p-induced suppression of osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion. MiR-193a-3p and miR-193a-5p play important roles in osteosarcoma metastasis through down-regulation of the Rab27B and SRR genes and therefore may serve as useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma and as potential candidates for the treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma.

  8. Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H.

    2013-04-08

    Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

  9. Chemical form matters: differential accumulation of mercury following inorganic and organic mercury exposures in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Korbas, Malgorzata; Macdonald, Tracy C; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N; Krone, Patrick H

    2012-02-17

    Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versusl-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of l-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with l-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-l-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

  10. Arm Selection Preference of MicroRNA-193a Varies in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Leung, Chung-Man; Lo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chan, Wen-Ching; Yu, Shou-Yu; Tu, Ya-Ting; Lam, Hing-Chung; Li, Sung-Chou; Ger, Luo-Ping; Liu, Wen-Shan; Chang, Hong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs derived from the 3′ and 5′ ends of the same precursor. However, the biological function and mechanism of miRNA arm expression preference remain unclear in breast cancer. We found significant decreases in the expression levels of miR-193a-5p but no significant differences in those of miR-193a-3p in breast cancer. MiR-193a-3p suppressed breast cancer cell growth and migration and invasion abilities, whereas miR-193a-5p suppressed cell growth but did not influence cell motility. Furthermore, NLN and CCND1, PLAU, and SEPN1 were directly targeted by miR-193a-5p and miR-193a-3p, respectively, in breast cancer cells. The endogenous levels of miR-193a-5p and miR-193a-3p were significantly increased by transfecting breast cancer cells with the 3′UTR of their direct targets. Comprehensive analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas database revealed significant differences in the arm expression preferences of several miRNAs between breast cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Our results collectively indicate that the arm expression preference phenomenon may be attributable to the target gene amount during breast cancer progression. The miRNA arm expression preference may be a means of modulating miRNA function, further complicating the mRNA regulatory network. Our findings provide a new insight into miRNA regulation and an application for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27307030

  11. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-01-01

    In this 1959 photograph, technicians prepare tail sections for Mercury-Redstone vehicles in Building 4706 at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone, the Mercury-Redstone launched the first two marned U.S. missions.

  12. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    The recovery operation of the Faith 7 spacecraft after the completion of the 1-1/2 day orbital flight (MA-9 mission) with Astronaut Gordon Cooper. Navy frogmen attach the flotation collar to the spacecraft. The MA-9 mission was the last flight of the Mercury Project and launched on May 15, 1963 boosted by The Mercury-Atlas launch vehicle.

  13. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-09-09

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The Freedom 7 spacecraft boosted by Mercury-Redstone vehicle for the MR-3 mission made the first marned suborbital flight and Astronaut Shepard became the first American in space.

  14. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut Walter M. "Wally" Schirra, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-8 (Mercury-Atlas) mission with Sigma 7 spacecraft was the third marned orbital flight by the United States, and made the six orbits in 9-1/4 hours.

  15. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MR-4 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Redstone vehicle, made the second marned suborbital flight. The capsule, Liberty Bell 7, sank into the sea after the splashdown.

  16. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    Astronaut John H. Glenn, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-6 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, was the first manned orbital launch by the United States, and carried Astronaut Glenn aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft to orbit the Earth.

  17. 49 CFR 193.2915 - Alternative power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternative power sources. 193.2915 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2915 Alternative power sources. An alternative source of power that meets the requirements of § 193.2445 must be provided for security lighting...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2915 - Alternative power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternative power sources. 193.2915 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Security § 193.2915 Alternative power sources. An alternative source of power that meets the requirements of § 193.2445 must be provided for security lighting and...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2017 - Plans and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plans and procedures. 193.2017 Section 193.2017...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2017 Plans and procedures. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR... every 2 calendar years. Effective Date Note: At 78 FR 58915, Sept. 25, 2013, § 193.2017 was amended...

  20. Human exposure and health effects of inorganic and elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Duck; Zheng, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety.

  1. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  2. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps. 193.10-5 Section 193.10-5 Shipping COAST... EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 193.10-5 Fire pumps. (a) Vessels shall be equipped with independently driven fire pumps in accordance with Table 193.10-5(a). Table 193.10-5(a) Gross tons Over Not...

  3. Mercury toxicity. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Because mercury has several forms and because it produces subtle effects at chronic low-level exposures, mercury toxicity can be a difficult diagnosis to establish. Elemental mercury vapor accounts for most occupational and many accidental exposures. The main source of organic methyl mercury exposure in the general population is fish consumption. Children are at increased risk of exposure to elemental mercury vapor in the home because it tends to settle to the floor. The chemical and physical forms of mercury determine its absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion pathways. The central nervous system and kidneys are key targets of mercury toxicity. Chelation therapy has been used successfully in treating patients who have ingested mercury salts or inhaled elemental mercury. There is no antidote for patients poisoned with organic mercury.7 references.

  4. Colorimetric detection of mercury ion based on unmodified gold nanoparticles and target-triggered hybridization chain reaction amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Yang, Xiaohan; Yang, Xiaohai; Liu, Pei; Wang, Kemin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Jianbo; Song, Chunxia; Wang, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    A novel unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based colorimetric strategy for label-free, specific and sensitive mercury ion (Hg2+) detection was demonstrated by using thymine-Hg2+-thymine (T-Hg2+-T) recognition mechanism and hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification strategy. In this protocol, a structure-switching probe (H0) was designed to recognize Hg2+ and then propagated a chain reaction of hybridization events between two other hairpin probes (H1 and H2). In the absence of Hg2+, all hairpin probes could stably coexist in solution, the exposed sticky ends of hairpin probes were capable of stabilizing AuNPs. As a result, salt-induced AuNPs aggregation could be effectively prevented. In the presence of Hg2+, thymine bases of H0 could specifically interact with Hg2+ to form stable T-Hg2+-T complex. Consequently, the hairpin structure of H0 probe was changed. As H1/H2 probes were added, the HCR process could be triggered and nicked double-helixes were formed. Since it was difficult for the formed nicked double-helixes to inhibit salt-induced AuNPs aggregation, a red-to-blue color change was observed in the colloid solution as the salt concentration increased. With the elegant amplification effect of HCR, a detection limit of around 30 nM was achieved (S/N = 3), which was about 1-2 orders of magnitudes lower than that of previous unmodified AuNPs-based colorimetric methods. By using the T-Hg2+-T recognition mechanism, high selectivity was also obtained. As an unmodified AuNPs-based colorimetric strategy, the system was simple in design, convenient in operation, and eliminated the requirements of separation processes, chemical modifications, and sophisticated instrumentations.

  5. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-31

    A three-year-old chimpanzee, named Ham, in the biopack couch for the MR-2 suborbital test flight. On January 31, 1961, a Mercury-Redstone launch from Cape Canaveral carried the chimpanzee "Ham" over 640 kilometers down range in an arching trajectory that reached a peak of 254 kilometers above the Earth. The mission was successful and Ham performed his lever-pulling task well in response to the flashing light. NASA used chimpanzees and other primates to test the Mercury Capsule before launching the first American astronaut Alan Shepard in May 1961. The successful flight and recovery confirmed the soundness of the Mercury-Redstone systems.

  6. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    A three-year-old chimpanzee, named Ham, in the biopack couch for the MR-2 suborbital test flight. On January 31, 1961, a Mercury-Redstone launch from Cape Canaveral carried the chimpanzee "Ham" over 640 kilometers down range in an arching trajectory that reached a peak of 254 kilometers above the Earth. The mission was successful and Ham performed his lever-pulling task well in response to the flashing light. NASA used chimpanzees and other primates to test the Mercury Capsule before launching the first American astronaut Alan Shepard in May 1961. The successful flight and recovery confirmed the soundness of the Mercury-Redstone systems.

  7. Mercury in the Pelagic Food Web of Lake Champlain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Celia; Kamman, Neil; Shanley, James; Chalmers, Ann; Jackson, Brian; Taylor, Vivien; Smeltzer, Eric; Stangel, Pete; Shambaugh, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lake Champlain continues to experience mercury contamination resulting in public advisories to limit human consumption of top trophic level fish such as walleye. Prior research suggested that mercury levels in biota could be modified by differences in ecosystem productivity as well as mercury loadings. We investigated relationships between mercury in different trophic levels in Lake Champlain. We measured inorganic and methyl mercury in water, seston, and two size fractions of zooplankton from 13 sites representing a range of nutrient loading conditions and productivity. Biomass varied significantly across lake segments in all measured ecosystem compartments in response to significant differences in nutrient levels. Local environmental factors such as alkalinity influenced the partitioning of mercury between water and seston. Mercury incorporation into biota was influenced by the biomass and mercury content of different ecosystem strata. Pelagic fish tissue mercury was a function of fish length and the size of the mercury pool associated with large zooplankton. We used these observations to parameterize a model of mercury transfers in the Lake Champlain food web that accounts for ecosystem productivity effects. Simulations using the mercury trophic transfer model suggest that reductions of 25 to 75% in summertime dissolved eplimnetic total mercury will likely allow fish tissue mercury concentrations to drop to the target level of 0.3 µg g−1 in a 40-cm fish in all lake segments. Changes in nutrient loading and ecosystem productivity in eutrophic segments may delay any response to reduced dissolved mercury and may result in increases in fish tissue mercury. PMID:22193540

  8. 46 CFR 193.15-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-1 Application. (a) The... requirements of this subpart are based on a “high pressure system,” i.e., one in which the carbon dioxide is... which the carbon dioxide is stored in liquid form at a continuously controlled low temperature, may be...

  9. 46 CFR 193.15-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-1 Application. (a) The provisions of this... this subpart are based on a “high pressure system,” i.e., one in which the carbon dioxide is stored in... carbon dioxide is stored in liquid form at a continuously controlled low temperature, may be specifically...

  10. 46 CFR 193.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2) The piping from the cylinders to the..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-15 Piping. (a) The piping, valves, and...

  11. 46 CFR 193.15-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-1 Application. (a) The... requirements of this subpart are based on a “high pressure system,” i.e., one in which the carbon dioxide is... which the carbon dioxide is stored in liquid form at a continuously controlled low temperature, may be...

  12. 46 CFR 193.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are connected, a pressure test shall be applied as set forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-15 Piping. (a) The piping, valves, and fittings shall have...

  13. 46 CFR 193.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2) The piping from the cylinders to the..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-15 Piping. (a) The piping, valves, and...

  14. 46 CFR 193.15-1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-1 Application. (a) The provisions of this... this subpart are based on a “high pressure system,” i.e., one in which the carbon dioxide is stored in... carbon dioxide is stored in liquid form at a continuously controlled low temperature, may be specifically...

  15. 46 CFR 193.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... are connected, a pressure test shall be applied as set forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-15 Piping. (a) The piping, valves, and fittings shall have...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2119 - Records

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Materials § 193.2119 Records Each operator shall keep a record of all materials for components, buildings, foundations, and support systems, as necessary to verify that material... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...

  17. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  18. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  19. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  20. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  1. 46 CFR 193.60-10 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-10 Location. (a) Fire axes shall be distributed throughout the spaces available to persons on board so as to be most readily available in the event of emergency. (b) If fire axes...

  2. 46 CFR 193.60-10 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-10 Location. (a) Fire axes shall be distributed throughout the spaces available to persons on board so as to be most readily available in the event of emergency. (b) If fire axes...

  3. 46 CFR 193.50-10 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Space Classification (see § 193.50-5) Quantity and location Safety Areas 1 Wheelhouse or fire control... stations None required. Radio room C-I 2 2 in vicinity of exit. 2 Accommodations 1 Staterooms, toilet spaces, public spaces, offices, lockers, isolated storerooms, and pantries open decks, etc None...

  4. 46 CFR 193.50-10 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Space Classification (see § 193.50-5) Quantity and location Safety Areas 1 Wheelhouse or fire control... stations None required. Radio room C-I 2 2 in vicinity of exit. 2 Accommodations 1 Staterooms, toilet spaces, public spaces, offices, lockers, isolated storerooms, and pantries open decks, etc None...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of storage tanks with internal design pressure above 15 psig must be nondestructively examined in... cryogenic temperatures must be nondestructively examined in accordance with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Section VIII Division 1) (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013). (b) For storage...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2321 - Nondestructive tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of storage tanks with internal design pressure above 15 psig must be nondestructively examined in... cryogenic temperatures must be nondestructively examined in accordance with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Section VIII Division 1) (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013). (b) For storage...

  7. 22 CFR 19.3 - Participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.3 Participants. The following persons are participants in the System: (a) Members of the Service serving under a career appointment or as a career... determined by the Director of Personnel of USICA, or under any other appointment under the Foreign Service...

  8. 22 CFR 19.3 - Participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.3 Participants. The following persons are participants in the System: (a) Members of the Service serving under a career appointment or as a career... determined by the Director of Personnel of USICA, or under any other appointment under the Foreign Service...

  9. 46 CFR 193.50-5 - Classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Hand Portable Fire Extinguishers and Semiportable Fire Extinguishing Systems, Arrangements and Details § 193.50-5 Classification. (a) Hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire... will start with “I” for the smallest to “V” for the largest. Sizes I and II are considered...

  10. 46 CFR 193.50-10 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EQUIPMENT Hand Portable Fire Extinguishers and Semiportable Fire Extinguishing Systems, Arrangements and Details § 193.50-10 Location. (a) Approved hand portable fire extinguishers and semiportable fire... systems shall be located in the open so as to be readily seen. (c) If hand portable fire extinguishers...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2119 - Records

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Materials § 193.2119 Records Each operator shall keep a record of all materials for components, buildings, foundations, and support systems, as necessary to verify that...

  12. 28 CFR 19.3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE USE OF PENALTY MAIL IN THE LOCATION AND RECOVERY OF MISSING CHILDREN § 19.3 Policy. (a) The Department of Justice will supplement and expand the national effort to assist in the... use by DOJ organizational units. When printing missing children information, DOJ will select...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2513 Transfer procedures. (a) Each transfer of LNG or other... warming will not result in overfilling or overpressure; (4) When making bulk transfer of LNG into a... gravity between the LNG being transferred and the LNG already in the container and, if necessary,...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2513 Transfer procedures. (a) Each transfer of LNG or other... warming will not result in overfilling or overpressure; (4) When making bulk transfer of LNG into a... gravity between the LNG being transferred and the LNG already in the container and, if necessary,...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2513 Transfer procedures. (a) Each transfer of LNG or other... warming will not result in overfilling or overpressure; (4) When making bulk transfer of LNG into a... gravity between the LNG being transferred and the LNG already in the container and, if necessary,...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2101 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design § 193.2101 Scope. (a) Each LNG facility designed after March 31, 2000 must..., all references to NFPA 59A in this Part are to the 2001 edition. (b) Stationary LNG storage tanks must... design of field fabricated tanks. All other LNG storage tanks must comply with API Standard...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2513 Transfer procedures. (a) Each transfer of LNG or other... warming will not result in overfilling or overpressure; (4) When making bulk transfer of LNG into a... gravity between the LNG being transferred and the LNG already in the container and, if necessary,...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2101 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design § 193.2101 Scope. (a) Each LNG facility designed after March 31, 2000 must..., all references to NFPA 59A in this Part are to the 2001 edition. (b) Stationary LNG storage tanks must... design of field fabricated tanks. All other LNG storage tanks must comply with API Standard...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2801 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... maintain fire protection at LNG plants according to sections 9.1 through 9.7 and section 9.9 of NFPA 59A (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013). However, LNG plants existing on March 31, 2000, need not...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2101 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design § 193.2101 Scope. (a) Each LNG facility designed after March 31, 2000 must..., all references to NFPA 59A in this Part are to the 2001 edition. (b) Stationary LNG storage tanks must... design of field fabricated tanks. All other LNG storage tanks must comply with API Standard...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2801 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... maintain fire protection at LNG plants according to sections 9.1 through 9.7 and section 9.9 of NFPA 59A (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013). However, LNG plants existing on March 31, 2000, need not...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2101 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design § 193.2101 Scope. (a) Each LNG facility designed after March 31, 2000 must..., all references to NFPA 59A in this Part are to the 2001 edition. (b) Stationary LNG storage tanks must... design of field fabricated tanks. All other LNG storage tanks must comply with API Standard...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2801 - Fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... maintain fire protection at LNG plants according to sections 9.1 through 9.7 and section 9.9 of NFPA 59A (incorporated by reference, see § 193.2013). However, LNG plants existing on March 31, 2000, need not...

  4. 46 CFR 193.10-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... required discharge from two fire pumps operating simultaneously. This requirement is in addition to § 193.10-5(c). The discharge of this quantity of water through hoses and nozzles at a sufficient number of adjacent hydrants must be at a minimum Pitot tube pressure of 50 pounds per square inch....

  5. 46 CFR 193.10-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... required discharge from two fire pumps operating simultaneously. This requirement is in addition to § 193.10-5(c). The discharge of this quantity of water through hoses and nozzles at a sufficient number of adjacent hydrants must be at a minimum Pitot tube pressure of 50 pounds per square inch....

  6. 46 CFR 193.10-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... required discharge from two fire pumps operating simultaneously. This requirement is in addition to § 193.10-5(c). The discharge of this quantity of water through hoses and nozzles at a sufficient number of adjacent hydrants must be at a minimum Pitot tube pressure of 50 pounds per square inch....

  7. 46 CFR 193.50-10 - Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Space Classification (see § 193.50-5) Quantity and location Safety Areas 1 Wheelhouse or fire control... stations None required. Radio room C-I 2 2 in vicinity of exit. 2 Accommodations 1 Staterooms, toilet spaces, public spaces, offices, lockers, isolated storerooms, and pantries open decks, etc None required...

  8. New supersymmetric quartet of nuclei: {sup 192,193}Os-{sup 193,194}Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, R.; Frank, A.; Barea, J.; Graw, G.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Jolie, J.

    2009-01-28

    We present evidence for the existence of a new supersymmetric quartet of nuclei in the A{approx}190 mass region. The analysis is based on new experimental information on the odd-odd nucleus {sup 194}Ir from transfer and neutron capture reactions. The new data allow the identification of a new supersymmetric quartet, consisting of the {sup 192,193}Os and {sup 193,194}Ir nuclei. We make explicit predictions for {sup 193}Os, and suggest that its spectroscopic properties be measured in dedicated experiments. Finally, we study correlations between different transfer reactions.

  9. Mercury: The Kuiper Melt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Date acquired: April 05, 2013 This striking image of Kuiper shows the crater in a new perspective. This image highlights the crater's smooth impact melt and central peaks. Kuiper, first seen by Mariner 10, is an easily identifiable feature on Mercury's surface due to its bright rays, similar to Hokusai. This image was acquired as a high-resolution targeted observation. Targeted observations are images of a small area on Mercury's surface at resolutions much higher than the 200-meter/pixel morphology base map. It is not possible to cover all of Mercury's surface at this high resolution, but typically several areas of high scientific interest are imaged in this mode each week. The MESSENGER spacecraft is the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury, and the spacecraft's seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation are unraveling the history and evolution of the Solar System's innermost planet. During the first two years of orbital operations, MESSENGER acquired over 150,000 images and extensive other data sets. MESSENGER is capable of continuing orbital operations until early 2015. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

  10. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    Dr. von Braun addresses a crowd celebrating in front of the Madison County Alabama Courthouse following the successful launch of Astronaut Alan Shepard (America's first astronaut in space) into space on a Mercury-Redstone Launch Vehicle, Freedom 7. Shepard's Mercury Spacecraft, was launched from Cape Canaveral. He reached a speed of 5200 mph. His flight lasted 15-1/2 minutes. May 5, 1961 (Photo: Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  11. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1950-01-01

    A Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle awaits test-firing in the Redstone Test Stand during the late 1950s. Between 1953 and 1960, the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama performed hundreds of test firings on the Redstone rocket, over 200 on the Mercury-Redstone vehicle configuration alone. It was this configuration which launched America's first two marned space missions, Freedom 7 and Liberty Bell 7,in 1961.

  12. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard, Jr. awaits liftoff in the Freedom 7 Mercury spacecraft on May 5, 1961. This third flight of the Mercury-Redstone (MR-3) vehicle, developed by D. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team in Huntsville, Alabama, was the first marned space mission for the United States. During the 15-minute suborbital flight, Shepard reached an altitude of 115 miles and traveled 302 miles downrange.

  13. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    Alan B. Shepard, Jr., America's first astronaut, stands in front of the Freedom 7 spacecraft shortly after completion of the third flight of the Mercury-Redstone (MR-3) vehicle, May 5, 1961. During the 15-minute suborbital flight, the Freedom 7 Mercury spacecraft, launched atop a modified Redstone rocket developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team in Huntsville, Alabama, reached an altitude of 115 miles and traveled 302 miles downrange.

  14. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, L.; Skala, K.

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  15. Got Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.; McCoy, Torin; Garcia, Hector

    2010-01-01

    Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed through the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may be completely vaporized when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. Using an existing study, we estimated mercury vapor releases from lamps that are not in operation during missions lasting less than or equal to 30 days; whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from lamps that are operating or being used during missions lasing more than 30 days. Based on mercury toxicity, the Johnson Space Center's Toxicology Group recommends stringent safety controls and verifications for any hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting less than or equal to 30 days, or concentrations greater than 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting more than 30 days.

  16. Effects of miR-193a and sorafenib on hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a challenging malignancy of global importance, it is the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the last years the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib has been used for advanced HCC, but some patients do not benefit from this therapy; thus, novel therapeutic options based on molecular approaches are urgently needed. microRNAs are short non coding RNAs involved in several physiological and pathological conditions including HCC and increasing evidence describes miRs as good tools for the molecular targeted therapies in HCC. The purpose of this study was to identify novel approaches to sensitize the HCC cells to sorafenib by microRNAs targeting urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Methods The miR-193a was validated as negative regulator of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in 2 HCC undifferentiated cell lines by transient transfection of miR and anti-miR molecules. The molecular interaction between miR-193a and uPA mRNA target was verified by luciferase reporter assay. The miR-193a expression level was evaluated by stem-loop real time PCR in tumoral tissues from 39 HCC patients. The HCC cells were co-treated with sorafenib and miR-193a and the effects on cellular proliferation, apoptosis were tested. The effect of sorafenib on c-met expression levels was assessed by western blotting. Results The miR-193a has resulted a negative regulator of uPA in both the HCC cell lines tested. The miR-193a expression has resulted dysregulated in tumoral tissues from 39 HCC patients. We found miR-193a down-regulation in HCC respect to peritumoral (PT) tissues and more in the cirrhotic HCCs than in non-cirrhotic ones. Transfection of HA22T/VGH HCC cells with miR-193a decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis, and combined treatment with miR-193a and sorafenib led to further proliferation inhibition. Conclusions Our results present new advances in the post-transcriptional miR-mediated mechanisms

  17. Mars at Ls 193o: Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    19 April 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 193o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 193o occurred in mid-April 2005. The picture shows the Syrtis Major face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern summer.

    Season: Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  18. Mars at Ls 193o: Tharsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    5 April 2005 This picture is a composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired at Ls 193o during a previous Mars year. This month, Mars looks similar, as Ls 193o occurs in mid-April 2005. The picture shows the Tharsis face of Mars. Over the course of the month, additional faces of Mars as it appears at this time of year are being posted for MOC Picture of the Day. Ls, solar longitude, is a measure of the time of year on Mars. Mars travels 360o around the Sun in 1 Mars year. The year begins at Ls 0o, the start of northern spring and southern autumn.

    Season: Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  19. STAT5-regulated microRNA-193b controls haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion by modulating cytokine receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Haetscher, Nadine; Feuermann, Yonatan; Wingert, Susanne; Rehage, Maike; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Weiser, Christian; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Jung, Klaus; Schroeder, Timm; Serve, Hubert; Oellerich, Thomas; Hennighausen, Lothar; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) require the right composition of microRNAs (miR) for proper life-long balanced blood regeneration. Here we show a regulatory circuit that prevents excessive HSC self-renewal by upregulation of miR-193b upon self-renewal promoting thrombopoietin (TPO)-MPL-STAT5 signalling. In turn, miR-193b restricts cytokine signalling, by targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase c-KIT. We generated a miR-193b knockout mouse model to unravel the physiological function of miR-193b in haematopoiesis. MiR-193b−/− mice show a selective gradual enrichment of functional HSCs, which are fully competent in multilineage blood reconstitution upon transplantation. The absence of miR-193b causes an accelerated expansion of HSCs, without altering cell cycle or survival, but by decelerating differentiation. Conversely, ectopic miR-193b expression restricts long-term repopulating HSC expansion and blood reconstitution. MiR-193b-deficient haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells exhibit increased basal and cytokine-induced STAT5 and AKT signalling. This STAT5-induced microRNA provides a negative feedback for excessive signalling to restrict uncontrolled HSC expansion. PMID:26603207

  20. 46 CFR 193.60-5 - Number required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Number required. 193.60-5 Section 193.60-5 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-5 Number required. (a) All vessels shall carry at least the minimum number of... necessary for the proper protection of the vessel. Table 193.60-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Number of axes...

  1. 46 CFR 193.60-5 - Number required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Number required. 193.60-5 Section 193.60-5 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-5 Number required. (a) All vessels shall carry at least the minimum number of... necessary for the proper protection of the vessel. Table 193.60-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Number of axes...

  2. 46 CFR 193.60-5 - Number required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Number required. 193.60-5 Section 193.60-5 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-5 Number required. (a) All vessels shall carry at least the minimum number of... necessary for the proper protection of the vessel. Table 193.60-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Number of axes...

  3. 46 CFR 193.60-5 - Number required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Number required. 193.60-5 Section 193.60-5 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-5 Number required. (a) All vessels shall carry at least the minimum number of... necessary for the proper protection of the vessel. Table 193.60-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Number of axes...

  4. 46 CFR 193.60-5 - Number required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Number required. 193.60-5 Section 193.60-5 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Axes § 193.60-5 Number required. (a) All vessels shall carry at least the minimum number of... necessary for the proper protection of the vessel. Table 193.60-5(a) Gross tons Over Not over Number of axes...

  5. [Mercury loading from amalgam fillings].

    PubMed

    Wirz, J; Ivanović, D; Schmidli, F

    1990-01-01

    Recently, the dental filling material amalgam has again been a target of criticism, especially within the mass media. The controversy has been further fueled by the combination of the patients' desire for fillings to match tooth colouring and this latest wave of artificially created fear of the poison mercury. The investigation submitted here is seen as a contribution toward clearing up the issue of any risk. Using flameless atom absorption spectroscopy, blood and urine samples were taken from four test groups and examined for their mercury content. Two of the participating groups tested (dentists and assistants) were actively processing mercury while the other two, one with and one without amalgam fillings, served as control groups. In the daily preparation of amalgam, dental staff working in the dental office were subject to greater exposure to mercury vapours. Their blood readings, therefore, were double those of the control group, while their urine readings were much higher than those for people not working with mercury. The two control groups (with and without amalgam fillings) showed no significant difference in mercury levels, which implies that these slight traces of mercury can be attributed to food and the environment. Although the mercury readings of the dental office personnel were twice as high as that of the control group, there was no threat of mercury poisoning for any of the four groups. The continued use of amalgam fillings in teeth can be recommended without reservation and at no risk to the patient. Particular measures must be taken to guarantee the safety of office staff.

  6. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide...-5(d), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within...

  7. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a...), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within the space...

  8. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide...-5(d), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within...

  9. 46 CFR 193.15-25 - Discharge outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discharge outlets. 193.15-25 Section 193.15-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-25 Discharge outlets. (a...

  10. 46 CFR 193.15-25 - Discharge outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discharge outlets. 193.15-25 Section 193.15-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-25 Discharge outlets. (a) Discharge outlets...

  11. 46 CFR 193.15-25 - Discharge outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discharge outlets. 193.15-25 Section 193.15-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-25 Discharge outlets. (a...

  12. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide...-5(d), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within...

  13. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a...), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within the space...

  14. 46 CFR 193.15-25 - Discharge outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge outlets. 193.15-25 Section 193.15-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-25 Discharge outlets. (a) Discharge outlets...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by—...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved...

  18. 50 CFR 19.3 - Relation to other laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conservation or protection of wildlife, including those laws prohibiting the shooting or harassing of bald and... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Relation to other laws. 19.3 Section 19.3... PLANTS (CONTINUED) AIRBORNE HUNTING Introduction § 19.3 Relation to other laws. The exemptions to...

  19. 50 CFR 19.3 - Relation to other laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conservation or protection of wildlife, including those laws prohibiting the shooting or harassing of bald and... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Relation to other laws. 19.3 Section 19.3... PLANTS (CONTINUED) AIRBORNE HUNTING Introduction § 19.3 Relation to other laws. The exemptions to...

  20. 28 CFR 115.193 - Audits of standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audits of standards. 115.193 Section 115.193 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Audits § 115.193 Audits of standards. The agency shall conduct audits...

  1. 28 CFR 115.193 - Audits of standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Audits of standards. 115.193 Section 115.193 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Audits § 115.193 Audits of standards. The agency shall conduct audits...

  2. 28 CFR 115.193 - Audits of standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audits of standards. 115.193 Section 115.193 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Audits § 115.193 Audits of standards. The agency shall conduct audits...

  3. 46 CFR 193.15-50 - Clean agent systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clean agent systems. 193.15-50 Section 193.15-50... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-50 Clean agent systems. A clean agent system complying with 46 CFR subpart 95.16 may be used as an alternative to...

  4. 46 CFR 193.15-50 - Clean agent systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clean agent systems. 193.15-50 Section 193.15-50... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-50 Clean agent systems. A clean agent system complying with 46 CFR subpart 95.16 may be used as an alternative to...

  5. 46 CFR 193.15-50 - Clean agent systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clean agent systems. 193.15-50 Section 193.15-50... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-50 Clean agent systems. A clean agent system complying with 46 CFR subpart 95.16 may be used as an alternative to...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2703 - Design and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... have demonstrated competence by training or experience in the design of comparable components. (b) With... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design and fabrication. 193.2703 Section 193.2703...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2703 Design and fabrication. For the...

  7. 49 CFR 193.2703 - Design and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... have demonstrated competence by training or experience in the design of comparable components. (b) With... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design and fabrication. 193.2703 Section 193.2703...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2703 Design and fabrication. For the...

  8. 49 CFR 193.2703 - Design and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... have demonstrated competence by training or experience in the design of comparable components. (b) With... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design and fabrication. 193.2703 Section 193.2703...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Personnel Qualifications and Training § 193.2703 Design and fabrication. For the...

  9. 49 CFR 193.2707 - Operations and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... completion of the training required by §§ 193.2713 and 193.2717; and (2) Experience related to the assigned.... (c) Corrosion control procedures under § 193.2605(b), including those for the design, installation..., a person qualified by experience and training in corrosion control technology. ...

  10. 46 CFR 193.15-40 - Pressure relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure relief. 193.15-40 Section 193.15-40 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-40 Pressure relief. (a... be provided with suitable means for relieving excessive pressure accumulating within the...

  11. 46 CFR 193.15-40 - Pressure relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure relief. 193.15-40 Section 193.15-40 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-40 Pressure relief. (a... be provided with suitable means for relieving excessive pressure accumulating within the...

  12. 46 CFR 193.15-40 - Pressure relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure relief. 193.15-40 Section 193.15-40 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide and Clean Agent Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-40 Pressure relief. (a... be provided with suitable means for relieving excessive pressure accumulating within the...

  13. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  14. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give early...

  15. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give early...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by— (a...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2304 - Corrosion control overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion control overview. 193.2304 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Construction § 193.2304 Corrosion control overview. (a... materials specifications from a corrosion control viewpoint and determines that the materials involved will...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give early...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by— (a...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2635 - Monitoring corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Monitoring corrosion control. 193.2635 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2635 Monitoring corrosion control. Corrosion protection provided as required by this subpart must be periodically monitored to give early...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by— (a...

  4. 49 CFR 193.2631 - Internal corrosion control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Internal corrosion control. 193.2631 Section 193... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2631 Internal corrosion control. Each component that is subject to internal corrosive attack must be protected from internal corrosion by— (a...

  5. 46 CFR 193.05-5 - Fire main system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire main system. 193.05-5 Section 193.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Fire Detecting and Extinguishing Equipment, Where Required § 193.05-5 Fire main system. (a)...

  6. 49 CFR 193.2445 - Sources of power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sources of power. 193.2445 Section 193.2445...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2445 Sources of power. (a) Electrical... two sources of power which function so that failure of one source does not affect the capability...

  7. 40 CFR 98.193 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calculating GHG emissions. 98.193 Section 98.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.193 Calculating GHG emissions. You...

  8. 40 CFR 98.193 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calculating GHG emissions. 98.193 Section 98.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.193 Calculating GHG emissions. You...

  9. 40 CFR 98.193 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculating GHG emissions. 98.193 Section 98.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.193 Calculating GHG emissions. You...

  10. 40 CFR 98.193 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Calculating GHG emissions. 98.193 Section 98.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lime Manufacturing § 98.193 Calculating GHG emissions. You...

  11. 40 CFR 421.192-421.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true 421.192-421.193 Section 421.192-421.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory §§ 421.192-421.193 ...

  12. 40 CFR 421.192-421.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true 421.192-421.193 Section 421.192-421.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory §§ 421.192-421.193 ...

  13. 40 CFR 421.192-421.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true 421.192-421.193 Section 421.192-421.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory §§ 421.192-421.193 ...

  14. 40 CFR 421.192-421.193 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 421.192-421.193 Section 421.192-421.193 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory §§ 421.192-421.193 ...

  15. 30 CFR 19.3 - Application procedures and requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application procedures and requirements. 19.3 Section 19.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC CAP LAMPS § 19.3 Application procedures and requirements...

  16. 49 CFR 193.2613 - Auxiliary power sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Auxiliary power sources. 193.2613 Section 193.2613...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2613 Auxiliary power sources. Each auxiliary power source must... would have to be served by that power source in an emergency. ...

  17. 49 CFR 193.2445 - Sources of power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sources of power. 193.2445 Section 193.2445...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Equipment Vaporization Equipment § 193.2445 Sources of power. (a) Electrical... two sources of power which function so that failure of one source does not affect the capability of...

  18. 49 CFR 193.2017 - Plans and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plans and procedures. 193.2017 Section 193.2017 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2017 Plans and procedures. (a) Each operator shall maintain at...

  19. 49 CFR 193.2017 - Plans and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plans and procedures. 193.2017 Section 193.2017 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2017 Plans and procedures. (a) Each operator shall maintain at...

  20. 49 CFR 193.2017 - Plans and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plans and procedures. 193.2017 Section 193.2017 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2017 Plans and procedures. (a) Each operator shall maintain at...

  1. 13 CFR 120.193 - Reconsideration after denial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reconsideration after denial. 120.193 Section 120.193 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Policies Applying to All Business Loans Loan Applications § 120.193 Reconsideration after denial....

  2. 49 CFR 193.2623 - Inspecting LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inspecting LNG storage tanks. 193.2623 Section 193.2623 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2623 Inspecting LNG storage tanks. Each...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2623 - Inspecting LNG storage tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inspecting LNG storage tanks. 193.2623 Section 193.2623 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2623 Inspecting LNG storage tanks. Each...

  4. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84.193 Section 84.193 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color and...

  5. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84.193 Section 84.193 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color and...

  6. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84.193 Section 84.193 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color and...

  7. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84.193 Section 84.193 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color and...

  8. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84.193 Section 84.193 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color and...

  9. Momument at Pad 14 honoring Project Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Momument at Pad 14 honoring Project Mercury. The Arabic number 7 represents the seven original astronauts. The other figure is the astronomical symbol of the Planet Mercury. In background is the Gemini 12 Agena Target Docking Vehicle atop its Atlas launch vehicle at Cape Kennedy, Florida.

  10. Mercury emission from crematories in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, M.; Oshita, K.; Takeda, N.; Morisawa, S.

    2009-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of mercury emissions have a significant impact on global pollution. Therefore, finding uncharacterised sources and assessing the emissions from these sources are important. However, limited data are available worldwide on mercury emissions from crematories. In Japan, 99.9% of dead bodies are cremated, which is the highest percentage in the world, and more than 1600 crematories are in operation. We thus focused on emissions from crematories in Japan. The number of targeted facilities was seven, and we used continuous emission monitoring to measure the mercury concentrations and investigate mercury behaviour. The total mercury concentrations in stack gases were a few μg/Nm3 (normal cubic meters). Considering the time profile of mercury and its species in cremations, the findings confirmed that the mercury in stack gas originated from dental amalgam. The amount of mercury emissions was calculated using the total concentration and gas flow rate. Furthermore, the annual amount of mercury emission from crematories in Japan was estimated by using the total number of corpses. The emission amount was considerably lower than that estimated in the UK. From statistical analyses on population demographics and measurements, future total emissions from crematories were also predicted. As a result, the amount of mercury emitted by crematories will likely increase by 2.6-fold from 2007 to 2037.

  11. Mercury emission from crematories in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, M.; Oshita, K.; Takeda, N.; Morisawa, S.

    2010-04-01

    Anthropogenic sources of mercury emissions have a significant impact on global pollution. Therefore, finding uncharacterised sources and assessing the emissions from these sources are important. However, limited data are available worldwide on mercury emissions from crematories. In Japan, 99.9% of dead bodies are cremated, which is the highest percentage in the world, and more than 1600 crematories are in operation. We thus focused on emissions from crematories in Japan. The number of targeted facilities was seven, and we used continuous emission monitoring to measure the mercury concentrations and investigate mercury behaviour. The total mercury concentrations in stack gases were a few μg/Nm3 (normal cubic meters). Considering the time profile of mercury and its species in cremations, the findings confirmed that the mercury in stack gas originated from dental amalgam. The amount of mercury emissions was calculated using the total concentration and gas flow rate. Furthermore, the annual amount of mercury emission from crematories in Japan was estimated by using the total number of corpses. The emission amount was considerably lower than that estimated in the United Kingdom. From statistical analyses on population demographics and measurements, future total emissions from crematories were also predicted. As a result, the amount of mercury emitted by crematories will likely increase by 2.6-fold from 2007 to 2037.

  12. Inorganic mercury prevents the differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells: Amyloid precursor protein, microtubule associated proteins and ROS as potential targets.

    PubMed

    Chan, Miguel Chin; Bautista, Elizabeth; Alvarado-Cruz, Isabel; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Segovia, José

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to mercury (Hg) occurs through different pathways and forms including methylmecury (MeHg) from seafood and rice, ethylmercury (EtHg), and elemental Hg (Hg(0)) from dental amalgams and artisanal gold mining. Once in the brain all these forms are transformed to inorganic Hg (I-Hg), where it bioaccumulates and remains for long periods. Hg is a well-known neurotoxicant, with its most damaging effects reported during brain development, when cellular key events, such as cell differentiation take place. A considerable number of studies report an impairment of neuronal differentiation due to MeHg exposure, however the effects of I-Hg, an important form of Hg found in brain, have received less attention. In this study, we decided to examine the effects of I-Hg exposure (5, 10 and 20μM) on the differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells induced by retinoic acid (RA, 10μM). We observed extension of neuritic processes and increased expression of neuronal markers (MAP2, tubulin-βIII, and Tau) after RA stimulation, all these effects were decreased by the co-exposure to I-Hg. Interestingly, I-Hg increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) accompanied with increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDHA1). Remarkably I-Hg decreased levels of nitric oxide synthase neuronal (nNOS). Moreover I-Hg reduced the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) a protein recently involved in neuronal differentiation. These data suggest that the exposure to I-Hg impairs cell differentiation, and point to new potential targets of Hg toxicity such as APP and NO signaling.

  13. Ecological effects, transport, and fate of mercury: a general review.

    PubMed

    Boening, D W

    2000-06-01

    Mercury at low concentrations represents a major hazard to microorganisms. Inorganic mercury has been reported to produce harmful effects at 5 microg/l in a culture medium. Organomercury compounds can exert the same effect at concentrations 10 times lower than this. The organic forms of mercury are generally more toxic to aquatic organisms and birds than the inorganic forms. Aquatic plants are affected by mercury in water at concentrations of 1 mg/l for inorganic mercury and at much lower concentrations of organic mercury. Aquatic invertebrates widely vary in their susceptibility to mercury. In general, organisms in the larval stage are most sensitive. Methyl mercury in fish is caused by bacterial methylation of inorganic mercury, either in the environment or in bacteria associated with fish gills or gut. In aquatic matrices, mercury toxicity is affected by temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and water hardness. A wide variety of physiological, reproductive and biochemical abnormalities have been reported in fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of mercury. Birds fed inorganic mercury show a reduction in food intake and consequent poor growth. Other (more subtle) effects in avian receptors have been reported (i.e., increased enzyme production, decreased cardiovascular function, blood parameter changes, immune response, kidney function and structure, and behavioral changes). The form of retained mercury in birds is more variable and depends on species, target organ and geographical site. With few exceptions, terrestrial plants (woody plants in particular) are generally insensitive to the harmful effects of mercury compounds.

  14. Mercury toxicity and neurodegenerative effects.

    PubMed

    Carocci, Alessia; Rovito, Nicola; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic heavy metals and has no known physiological role in humans. Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic. Mercury has been used by man since ancient times. Among the earliest were the Chinese and Romans, who employed cinnabar (mercury sulfide) as a red dye in ink (Clarkson et al. 2007). Mercury has also been used to purify gold and silver minerals by forming amalgams. This is a hazardous practice, but is still widespread in Brazil's Amazon basin, in Laos and in Venezuela, where tens of thousands of miners are engaged in local mining activities to find and purify gold or silver. Mercury compounds were long used to treat syphilis and the element is still used as an antiseptic,as a medicinal preservative and as a fungicide. Dental amalgams, which contain about 50% mercury, have been used to repair dental caries in the U.S. since 1856.Mercury still exists in many common household products around the world.Examples are: thermometers, barometers, batteries, and light bulbs (Swain et al.2007). In small amounts, some organo mercury-compounds (e.g., ethylmercury tiosalicylate(thimerosal) and phenylmercury nitrate) are used as preservatives in some medicines and vaccines (Ballet al. 2001).Each mercury form has its own toxicity profile. Exposure to Hg0 vapor and MeHg produce symptoms in CNS, whereas, the kidney is the target organ when exposures to the mono- and di-valent salts of mercury (Hg+ and Hg++, respectively)occur. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury produces stomatitis, erethism and tremors. Chronic MeHg exposure induced symptoms similar to those observed in ALS, such as the early onset of hind limb weakness (Johnson and Atchison 2009).Among the organic mercury compounds, MeHg is the most biologically available and toxic (Scheuhammer et a!. 2007). MeHg is neurotoxic, reaching high levels of accumulation in the CNS; it can impair physiological function by disrupting endocrine glands (Tan et a!. 2009).The most

  15. Downregulation of microRNA-193-3p inhibits tumor proliferation migration and chemoresistance in human gastric cancer by regulating PTEN gene.

    PubMed

    Jian, Bin; Li, Zhongfu; Xiao, Dachun; He, Gan; Bai, Lian; Yang, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the functional mechanisms of microRNA-193-3p (miR-193-3p) in human gastric cancer. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to assess whether miR-193-3p was aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer cells and clinical samples from gastric cancer patients. Gastric cancer cell line AGS and MKN-45 cells were stably transduced with lentivirus to downregulate endogenous miR-193-3p. The modulation of miR-193-3p downregulation on gastric cancer proliferation, migration, chemo-drug responses, and tumor explant were assessed by MTT, wound-healing, 5-FU chemoresistance and in vivo tumorigenicity assays, respectively. Downstream target of miR-193-3p, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in gastric cancer, was assessed by dual-luciferase reporter assay, qRT-PCR, and western blot. PTEN was knocked down by siRNA in AGS and MKN-45 cells to assess its direct impact on miR-193-3p modulation in gastric cancer. MiR-193-3p was aberrantly upregulated in both gastric cell lines and human gastric tumors. In AGS and MKN-45 cells, miR-193-3p downregulation reduced cancer proliferation, migration and 5-FU chemoresistance in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo. PTEN was confirmed to be targeted by miR-193-3p in gastric cancer. PTEN inhibition in AGS and MKN-45 cells directly reversed the anti-tumor modulations of miR-193-3p downregulation on gastric cancer proliferation, migration, and 5-FU chemoresistance. We presented clear evidence showing miR-193-3p played critical role in regulating human gastric cancer through direct targeting on PTEN gene.

  16. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  17. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-20

    Astronaut John Glenn in the Friendship 7 capsule during the first manned orbital flight, the MA-6 mission. Boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas (intercontinental ballistic missile), the MA-6 mission lasted for 5 hours and orbited the Earth three times.

  18. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-20

    The launch of the MA-6, Friendship 7, on February 20, 1962. Boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM), Friendship 7 was the first U.S. marned orbital flight and carried Astronaut John H. Glenn into orbit. Astronaut Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth.

  19. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-09-01

    An Atlas launch vehicle carrying the Big Joe capsule leaves its launching pad on a 2,000-mile ballistic flight to the altitude of 100 miles. The Big Joe capsule is a boilerplate model of the marned orbital capsule under NASA's Project Mercury. The capsule was recovered and studied for the effect of re-entry heat and other flight stresses.

  20. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-04-27

    The group portrait of the original seven astronauts for the Mercury Project. NASA selected its first seven astronauts on April 27, 1959. Left to right at front: Walter M. Wally Schirra, Donald K. Deke Slayton, John H. Glenn, Jr., and Scott Carpenter. Left to right at rear: Alan B. Shepard, Virgil I. Gus Grissom, and L. Gordon Cooper, Jr.

  1. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    Astronaut Gordon Cooper leaves the Faith 7 (MA-9) spacecraft after a successful recovery operation. The MA-9 mission, the last flight of the Mercury Project, was launched on May 15, 1963, orbited the Earth 22 times, and lasted for 1-1/2 days.

  2. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-15

    Astronaut Gordon Cooper leaves the Faith 7 (MA-9) spacecraft after a successful recovery operation. The MA-9 mission, the last flight of the Mercury Project, was launched on May 15, 1963, orbited the Earth 22 times, and lasted for 1-1/2 days.

  3. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The original seven astronauts for the Mercury Project pose in front of an Air Force Jet. From left to right: Scott Carpenter, L. Gordon Cooper, John H. Glenn, Virgil I. Gus Grissom, Walter M. Wally Schirra, Alan B. Shepard, and Donald K. Deke Slayton.

  4. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-01-21

    The launch of the Little Joe booster for the LJ1B mission on the launch pad from the wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, on January 21, 1960. This mission achieved the suborbital Mercury capsule test, testing of the escape system, and biomedical tests by using a monkey, named Miss Sam.

  5. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-01-21

    The Little Joe launch vehicle for the LJ1 mission on the launch pad at the wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, on January 21, 1960. This mission achieved the suborbital Mercury cupsule test, testing of the escape system, and biomedical tests by using a monkey, named Miss Sam.

  6. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    Astronaut Alan Shepard underwent a physical examination prior to the first marned suborbital flight. Freedom 7 carrying Astronaut Alan Shepard, boosted by the Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle, lifted off on May 5, 1961. Astronaut Shepard became the first American in space.

  7. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Alan Shepard fitted with space suit prior to the first marned suborbital flight. Freedom 7, carrying Astronaut Alan Shepard, boosted by the Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle, lifted off on May 5, 1961. Astronaut Shepard became the first American in space.

  8. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard, Jr. during suiting for the first manned suborbital flight, MR-3 mission. The Freedom 7 spacecraft, carrying the first American, Astronaut Shepard and boosted by the Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle, lifted off on May 5, 1961.

  9. Mercury Project

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    This photo depicts the recovery operations of the MR-3 mission. Astronaut Alan Shepard was picked up by a U.S. Marine helicopter after the completion of the first marned suborbital flight by MR-3 (Mercury-Redstone) with the Freedom 7 capsule.

  10. Spectroscopy of {sup 193,195,197}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiades, N.; Cizewski, J.A.; McNabb, D.P.; Ding, K.Y.; Davids, C.N.; Janssens, R.V.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Amro, H.; Decrock, P.; Reiter, P.; Nisius, D.; Brown, L.T.; Fischer, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Wauters, J.; Bingham, C.R.; Huyse, M.; Andreyev, A.; Seweryniak, D.; Conticchio, L.F.; Brown, L.T.

    1997-08-01

    Excited states built on the 13/2{sup +} isomers of the odd-mass {sup 193,195,197}Po isotopes have been observed via in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The {alpha} radioactivity of these isotopes has been used to tag {gamma}-ray transitions following the {sup A}Er+164 MeV {sup 32}S reactions, where A=164, 166, 167, 168, and 170. Prompt {gamma} radiation was measured by ten Compton-suppressed Ge detectors at the target position and the Fragment Mass Analyzer was used to select evaporation residues. The results are compared with the first excited states of the heavier odd-mass polonium isotopes and of the even-mass cores. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Indicators: Sediment Mercury

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment mercury is mercury that has become embedded into the bottom substrates of aquatic ecosystems. Mercury is a common pollutant of aquatic ecosystems and it can have a substantial impact on both human and wildlife health.

  12. Mercury's South Polar Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows 89 wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury’s south polar region acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) over one complete Mercury solar day (176 Earth days). Thi...

  13. Parametric testing of FGD mercury control

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.P.; Nolan, P.S.; Freeley, T.J.

    1998-07-01

    In cooperation with the US Department of Energy, the Ohio Department of Development's Ohio Coal Development Office, and Babcock and Wilcox, McDermott Technology, Inc. has characterized trace element emissions from the combustion of Ohio bituminous coals and control of these emissions using conventional particulate and SO{sub 2} emissions control equipment. In response to industry concern over potential regulation of mercury emissions from utility boilers, testing in Phase II of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program has targeted the measurement of the quantity and species distribution of mercury downstream of the boiler and emissions control equipment. The wide variation in reported commercial FGD mercury emissions control efficiency and the continuing development of mercury speciation measurement methods suggest that additional research is required to understand the observed performance variation and the mercury emissions control potential of FGD systems. Recent AECDP tests were designed to characterize wet scrubber mercury performance as a function of key operating conditions selected to cover a range of commercial wet scrubber practice. The data clearly shows that higher total mercury control efficiency can be achieved with a wet FGD scrubber than reported in the interim USEPA report on hazardous air pollutant from fossil-fired electric utility steam generating units. A minimum average baseline wet FGD system mercury removal level of 50% is suggested as representative of existing scrubbers with a realization that significantly higher mercury control efficiency has been observed.

  14. RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin M. Stewart

    1999-09-29

    Mercury was widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities, resulting in a broad range of mercury-contaminated wastes and wastewaters. Some of the mercury contamination has escaped to the local environment, particularly at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where approximately 330 metric tons of mercury were discharged to the environment between 1953 and 1963 (TN & Associates, 1998). Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury in the environment is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, an effective sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. ADA Technologies, Inc. has developed four new sorbents to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have been successfully demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, reducing mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system to less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant targeted colloidal mercury not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a

  15. Altered miR-193a-5p expression in children with cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    D'Argenio, V; Del Monaco, V; Paparo, L; De Palma, F D E; Nocerino, R; D'Alessio, F; Visconte, F; Discepolo, V; Del Vecchio, L; Salvatore, F; Berni Canani, R

    2017-08-30

    Cow's milk allergy (CMA) is one of the most common food allergies in children. Epigenetic mechanisms have been suggested to play a role in CMA pathogenesis. We have shown that DNA methylation of Th1/Th2 cytokine genes and FoxP3 affects CMA disease course. Preliminary evidence suggests that also the miRNome could be implicated in the pathogenesis of allergy. Main study outcome was to comparatively evaluate miRNome in children with CMA and in healthy controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from children aged 4-18 months: 10 CMA patients, 9 CMA patients who outgrew CMA, and 11 healthy controls. Small RNA libraries were sequenced using a next-generation sequencing-based approach. Functional assessment of IL-4 expression was also performed. Among the miRNAs differently expressed, 2 were upregulated and 14 were downregulated in children with active CMA compared to healthy controls. miR-193a-5p resulted the most downregulated miRNA in children with active CMA compared to healthy controls. The predicted targets of miR-193a-5p resulted upregulated in CMA patients compared to healthy controls. Peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells transfected with a miR193a-5 inhibitor showed a significant upregulation of IL-4 mRNA and its protein expression. Children who outgrew CMA showed miRNA-193a-5p level, and its related targets expression, similar to that observed in healthy controls. Our results suggest that miR-193a-5p is a post-transcriptional regulator of IL-4 expression and could have a role in IgE-mediated CMA. This miRNA could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for this common form of food allergy in childhood. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  16. Mercury contamination extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fuhrmann, Mark [Silver Spring, MD; Heiser, John [Bayport, NY; Kalb, Paul [Wading River, NY

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  17. MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's ORD is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001-2005 time frame. ORD will use it to prepare a multi-year mercury research implementation plan in 2001. The Mercury R...

  18. MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's ORD is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001-2005 time frame. ORD will use it to prepare a multi-year mercury research implementation plan in 2001. The Mercury R...

  19. miR-193b Regulates Mcl-1 in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiamin; Zhang, Xiao; Lentz, Cindy; Abi-Daoud, Marie; Paré, Geneviève C.; Yang, Xiaolong; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Tron, Victor A.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in gene regulation, and their expression is frequently dysregulated in cancer cells. In a previous study, we reported that miR-193b represses cell proliferation and regulates cyclin D1 in melanoma cells, suggesting that miR-193b could act as a tumor suppressor. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-193b also down-regulates myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in melanoma cells. MicroRNA microarray profiling revealed that miR-193b is expressed at a significantly lower level in malignant melanoma than in benign nevi. Consistent with this, Mcl-1 is detected at a higher level in malignant melanoma than in benign nevi. In a survey of melanoma samples, the level of Mcl-1 is inversely correlated with the level of miR-193b. Overexpression of miR-193b in melanoma cells represses Mcl-1 expression. Previous studies showed that Mcl-1 knockdown cells are hypersensitive to ABT-737, a small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w. Similarly, overexpression of miR-193b restores ABT-737 sensitivity to ABT-737–resistant cells. Furthermore, the effect of miR-193b on the expression of Mcl-1 seems to be mediated by direct interaction between miR-193b and seed and seedless pairing sequences in the 3′ untranslated region of Mcl-1 mRNA. Thus, this study provides evidence that miR-193b directly regulates Mcl-1 and that down-regulation of miR-193b in vivo could be an early event in melanoma progression. PMID:21893020

  20. Mercury and health care

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080