Science.gov

Sample records for mercury mission swings

  1. Bepi-Colombo Mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Hajime; Maejima, Hironori

    2012-07-01

    BepiColombo has been defined as the ESA-JAXA joint mission to Mercury with the aim to understand the process of planetary formation and evolution in the hottest part of the proto-planetary nebula as well as to understand similarities and differences between the magnetospheres of the Mercury and the Earth. The baseline mission consists of two spacecraft: the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). The two orbiters will be launched together on one Ariane5. JAXA is responsible for development and operation of MMO while ESA is responsible for development and operation of MPO and Mercury Transfer Module (MTM), launch, cruise phase operation, and Mercury orbit insertion. The main objectives of MPO are to study planet Mercury and planetary formation in the inner solar system. For this purpose, MPO is desgined as a 3-axis stabilized spacecraft and will be placed in a 400 km x 1500 km polar orbit. While the main objectives of MMO are to study Mercury's magnetic field and plasma environment around Mercury. For this purpose, MMO is designed as a spin-stabilized spacecraft and will be placed in a same orbital plane as MPO but has a 400 km x 12000 km. The orbital period of MMO and MPO is designed as 4:1 to achieve cross calibration and cooperative observations. System Critical Design Review (CDR) of MMO has been completed in November 2011 and System CDR for whole BepiColombo mission is scheduled in July 2012. Electrical Interface Check (EIC)/ Mechanical Interface Check (MIC) of MMO FM has been completed in January 2012. MMO Mechanical Test Model is transported to ESA/ESTEC to join Mercury Cruise System (MCS) level Mechianical Test which will be held in this year.

  2. Ballistic mode Mercury orbiter mission opportunity handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbeck, G. R.; Roos, D. G.; Lewis, P. S.

    1973-01-01

    Significant payloads in Mercury orbit can be achieved through use of high-thrust, chemical propulsion systems on ballistic trajectories. Interplanetary trajectory characteristics are presented, for Venus swingbys to Mercury, were multiple revolutions about the sun are allowed on each leg to provide low energy mission in 1977, 1980, 1985 and 1988. Guidance and navigation results are shown for each opportunity. Additionally, the use of midcourse maneuvers and multiple Venus swingbys are explored as means of further reducing the energy requirements.

  3. Bepi-Colombo mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Hajime; Benkhoff, Johannes; Fujimoto, Masaki; Van Casteren, Jan

    BepiColombo is a ESA-JAXA joint mission to Mercury with the aim to understand the process of planetary formation and evolution as well as to understand similarities and differences between the magnetospheres of Mercury and Earth. The baseline mission consists of two spacecraft, i.e. the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). The two orbiters and Mercury Transfer Module (MTM) are conbined into stack configuration. The stack configuration is nemed Mercury Cruise System (MCS). JAXA is responsible for the development and operation of MMO, while ESA is responsible for the development and operation of MPO as well as the launch, cruise, and the insertion of two spacecraft into their dedicated orbits. The main objectives of MMO are to study Mercury’s magnetic field and plasma environment around Mercury while the main objectives of MPO are to study Mercury itself. MMO is designed as a spin-stabilized spacecraft to be placed in a 600 km x 11,800 km polar orbit. The spacecraft will accommodate instruments mostly dedicated to in-situ measurement near Mercury. MPO is designed as 3-axis stabilized spacecraft to be placed in a 400km x 1,500km polar orbit. The spacecraft will accommodate instruments mainly dedicated to remote sensing measurement. CDR for MMO was finished in 2011. Spacecraft CDR for ESA modules was finished in Nov. 2013. Mission CDR is expected in this summer. Each modules of BepiColombo is now in standalone Final AIV phase. Final AIV for MMO is expected to be finished in this autumn while final AIV for MPO and MTM is expected to be finished in early next year. MMO will be transported to ESA/ESTEC in early next year and join final AIV for MCS. After MCS final AIV, The BepiColombo is scheduled to be launched in July 2016 by an Ariane-5 and arrive at Mercury in January 2022. In this paper, we will report the latest information of BepiColombo project.

  4. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: spacecraft and mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Andrew G.; Gold, Robert E.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Ercol, Carl J.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Hartka, Theodore J.; Jenkins, Jason E.; McAdams, James V.; Mosher, Larry E.; Persons, David F.; Artis, David A.; Bokulic, Robert S.; Conde, Richard F.; Dakermanji, George; Goss, Milton E.; Haley, David R.; Heeres, Kenneth J.; Maurer, Richard H.; Moore, Robert C.; Rodberg, Elliot H.; Stern, Theodore G.; Wiley, Samuel R.; Williams, Bobby G.; Yen, Chen-wan L.; Peterson, Max R.

    2001-12-01

    A Mercury orbiter mission is challenging from thermal and mass perspectives. The Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission overcomes these challenges while avoiding esoteric technologies by using an innovative approach with commonly available materials, minimal moving parts, and maximum heritage. This approach yields a spacecraft with good margins in all categories and low technical risk. The key concepts are a ceramic-cloth sunshade, an integrated lightweight structure and high- performance propulsion system, and a solar array incorporating optical solar reflectors (OSRs). The sunshade maintains the spacecraft at room temperature. The integrated structure and propulsion system provides ample mass margin. The solar array with OSRs, which has already undergone significant testing, provides thermal margin even if the panels are inadvertently pointed directly at the Sun at 0.3 AU. 0.3 AU.

  5. Mariner Venus-Mercury 1973 project. Volume 2: Extended mission-Mercury 2 and 3 encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 mission operations Extended Mission is described. The activities are summarized from shortly after Mercury I through the end of mission. The operational activities are reported by Mission Operations Systems functions providing a brief summary from each discipline. Based on these experiences recommendations for future projects are made.

  6. Exploration of Mercury: The MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph

    regular features of Mercury’s magnetosphere, but the causative acceleration mechanism remains a topic of study. MESSENGER is now in a second extended mission. Solar gravitational forces reduce the periapsis altitude between successive orbits. Orbit-correction maneuvers will yield four extended intervals when the periapsis altitude will be 15 to 25 km, and once the remaining propellant is consumed the spacecraft will impact the surface in late March 2015. During this low-altitude campaign, the unprecedented high-resolution views of the surface will help elucidate many of the processes that have shaped Mercury’s surface. MESSENGER’s low-altitude observations will also illuminate the consequences of precipitating ions and energetic electrons at Mercury, the response of the exosphere and magnetosphere to solar wind conditions during the declining phase of the solar cycle, and short-wavelength components of the internal magnetic and gravity fields and their implications for crustal magmatism and the mechanical evolution of Mercury’s lithosphere.

  7. Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Vilas, F.; Chapman, C.R.; Matthews, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury.

  8. Temporal patterns of atmospheric mercury species in northern Mississippi during 2011-2012: influence of sudden population swings.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Cizdziel, James V; Lu, Duanjun

    2013-11-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate bound mercury (PBM) were measured on the University of Mississippi campus from July 2011 to June 2012. It is believed to be the first time that concentrations of atmospheric mercury species have been documented in northern Mississippi, and at a location with relatively large and sudden swings in population. The mean concentration (±1 SD) of GEM was 1.54±0.32 ng m(-3); levels were lower and generally more stable during the winter (1.48±0.22) and spring (1.46±0.27) compared with the summer (1.56±0.32) and fall (1.63±0.42). Mean concentrations for GOM and PBM were 3.87 pg m(-3) and 4.58 pg m(-3), respectively; levels tended to be highest in the afternoon and lowest in the early morning hours. During the fall and spring academic semesters concentrations and variability of GOM and PBM both increased, possibly from vehicle exhaust. There were moderate negative correlations with wind speed (all species) and humidity (GOM and PBM). Backward air mass trajectory modeling for the ten highest peaks for each mercury species revealed that the majority of these events occurred from air masses that passed through the northern continental US region. Overall, this study illustrates the complexity of temporal fluctuations of airborne mercury species, even in a small town environment.

  9. Ballistic mode Mercury orbiter mission opportunity handbook extension. [interplanetary trajectories for Venus swingbys to Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbeck, G. R.; Lewis, P. S.; Rockenbach, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    Interplanetary trajectory characteristics are presented, for Venus swingbys to Mercury, where multiple revolutions about the Sun are permitted. Additional consideration is given to the use of multiple Venus swingbys and/or to midcourse, near perilhelion, propulsive maneuvers to improve the performance of the mission as measured in terms of payload in Mercury orbit. Missions in 1980, 1983, 1985 and 1988 were analyzed with navigation results also developed. An exploratory investigation established the availability of low energy mission opportunities in 1991, 1994, 1996 and 1999.

  10. Mercury: A Synthesis from MESSENGER's Extended Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Nittler, L. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by Mercury three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit the solar system's innermost planet in March 2011. Orbital observations over the subsequent 21 months have provided the first global view of this nearby but heretofore little studied world. MESSENGER's chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction, low in Fe and high in Mg, differs from those of the other inner planets. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the moderately volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most current models for inner planet formation. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, with large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile-bearing magmas. Bright deposits within impact craters host fresh-appearing, rimless depressions or hollows, often with high-reflectance interiors and halos and likely formed through processes involving the geologically recent loss of volatiles. The large-scale deformational history of Mercury, although dominated by near-global contractional deformation as first seen by Mariner 10, is more complex than first appreciated, with numerous examples of extensional deformation that accompanied impact crater and basin modification. Mercury's magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, but the field is axially symmetric and equatorially asymmetric, a geometry that poses challenges to dynamo models for field generation. The interaction between the solar wind and Mercury's magnetosphere, among the most dynamic in the solar system, serves both to replenish the exosphere and space weather the planet's surface. Plasma ions of planetary origin are seen throughout the sampled volume of Mercury's magnetosphere, with maxima in heavy-ion fluxes in the planet's magnetic

  11. The Mercury Laser Altimeter Instrument for the MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, John F.; Smith, James C.; Sun, Xiaoli; Bartels, Arlin E.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Krebs, Danny J.; Novo-Gradac, Anne marie; McGarry, Jan F.; Trunzo, Raymond; Britt, Jamie L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of the payload science instruments on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, which launched on 3 August 2004. The altimeter will measure the round trip time-of-flight of transmitted laser pulses reflected from the surface of the planet that, in combination with the spacecraft orbit position and pointing data, gives a high-precision measurement of surface topography referenced to Mercury's center of mass. The altimeter measurements will be used to determine the planet's forced librations by tracking the motion of large-scale topographic features as a function of time. MLA's laser pulse energy monitor and the echo pulse energy estimate will provide an active measurement of the surface reflectivity at 1064 nm. This paper describes the instrument design, prelaunch testing, calibration, and results of post-launch testing.

  12. CHANG'E-5T1 extended mission: The first lunar libration point flight via a lunar swing-by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Ji-sheng

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces the extended mission of the Chinese circumlunar return and reentry test (i.e., the CHANG'E-5T1 mission), the first Chinese flight in the Earth-Moon libration orbit and the first spacecraft to reach the Earth-Moon libration orbit via a lunar swing-by. The extended mission utilized the remaining propellant from the CHANG'E-5T1 mission. Based on the normal trajectory and satellite state at the end of the CHANG'E-5T1 mission, a lunar return and a flight in the lunar libration orbit were determined to be the flight goals of the extended mission. Two schemes were then proposed for the CHANG'E-5T1 extended mission, including a possible Earth-Moon libration orbit. The methodology for the trajectory design and maneuvering included the direct libration-point orbit transfer and injection method, which is characterized by a reduced calculation burden compared with the prevalent invariant manifold method. The scenarios were compared in terms of flight time, control energy and number of maneuvers, flight distance, and achieved flight goals. The comparison indicated that the scheme, including the Earth-Moon L2 point and return to the Moon, was preferred for the CHANG'E-5T1 extended mission. Furthermore, the actual flight parameters of the CHANG'E-5T1 extended mission are also presented to validate the selected scheme.

  13. The Mercury Electron Analyzers for the Bepi Colombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Aoustin, C.; Seran, H.-C.; Le Comte, E.; Petiot, M.; Rouzaud, J.; Saito, Y.; Dandouras, J.; Jacquey, C.; Louarn, P.; Mazelle, C.; Médale, J.-L.

    2010-11-01

    Bepi Colombo is a joint mission between ESA and JAXA that is scheduled for launch in 2014 and arrival at Mercury in 2020. A comprehensive set of particle sensors will be flown onboard the two probes that form Bepi Colombo. These sensors will allow a detailed investigation of the structure and dynamics of the charged particle environment at Mercury. Onboard the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) the Mercury Electron Analyzers (MEA) sensors constitute the experiment dedicated to fast electron measurements between 3 and 25,500 eV. They consist of two top-hat electrostatic analyzers for angle-energy analysis followed by microchannel plate multipliers and collecting anodes. A notable and new feature of MEA is that the transmission factor of each analyzer can be varied in-flight electronically by a factor reaching up to 100, thus allowing to largely increasing the dynamical range of the experiment. This capability is of importance at Mercury where large changes of electron fluxes are expected from the solar wind to the various regions of the Mercury magnetosphere. While the first models are being delivered to JAXA, an engineering model has been tested and proven to fulfill the expectations about geometrical factor reduction and energy-angular transmission characteristics. Taking advantage of the spacecraft rotation with a 4 s period, MEA will provide fast three-dimensional distribution functions of magnetospheric electrons, from energies of the solar wind and exospheric populations (a few eVs) up to the plasma sheet energy range (some tens of keV). The use of two sensors viewing perpendicular planes allows reaching a ¼ spin period time resolution, i.e., 1 s, to obtain a full 3D distribution.

  14. A mission to Mercury and a mission to the moons of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Two Advanced Design Projects were completed this academic year at Penn State - a mission to the planet Mercury and a mission to the moons of Mars (Phobos and Deimos). At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into six groups and given their choice of missions. Once a mission was chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These designs were then evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into two separate mission scenarios. To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form two mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission team so that communication and exchange of information would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Lewis Research Center Advanced Projects Office. Robotic planetary missions throughout the solar system can be considered valuable precursors to human visits and test beds for innovative technology. For example, by studying the composition of the Martian moons, scientists may be able to determine if their resources may be used or synthesized for consumption during a first human visit.

  15. Qualification of Laser Diode Arrays for Mercury Laser Altimeter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Schafer, John; Allan, Graham R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. The MESSENGER mission is flying the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) which is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser instrument designed to map the topography of Mercury. The environment imposed on the instrument by the orbital dynamics places special requirements on the laser diode arrays. In order to limit the radiative heating of the satellite from the surface of Mercury, the satellite is designed to have a highly elliptical orbit. The satellite will heat near perigee and cool near apogee. The laser power is cycled during these orbits so that the laser is on for only 30 minutes (perigee) in a 12 hour orbit. The laser heats 10 C while powered up and cools while powered down. In order to simulate these operational conditions, we designed a test to measure the LDA performance while being temperature and power cycled. Though the mission requirements are specific to NASA and performance requirements are derived from unique operating conditions, the results are general and widely applicable. We present results on the performance of twelve LDAs operating for several hundred million pulses. The arrays are 100 watt, quasi-CW, conductively-cooled, 808 nm devices. Prior to testing, we fully characterize each device to establish a baseline for individual array performance and status. Details of this characterization can be found in reference. Arrays are divided into four groups and subjected to the temperature and power cycling matrix are shown.

  16. Mercury Ion Clock for a NASA Technology Demonstration Mission.

    PubMed

    Tjoelker, Robert L; Prestage, John D; Burt, Eric A; Chen, Pin; Chong, Yong J; Chung, Sang K; Diener, William; Ely, Todd; Enzer, Daphna G; Mojaradi, Hadi; Okino, Clay; Pauken, Mike; Robison, David; Swenson, Bradford L; Tucker, Blake; Wang, Rabi

    2016-07-01

    There are many different atomic frequency standard technologies but only few meet the demanding performance, reliability, size, mass, and power constraints required for space operation. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is developing a linear ion-trap-based mercury ion clock, referred to as DSAC (Deep-Space Atomic Clock) under NASA's Technology Demonstration Mission program. This clock is expected to provide a new capability with broad application to space-based navigation and science. A one-year flight demonstration is planned as a hosted payload following an early 2017 launch. This first-generation mercury ion clock for space demonstration has a volume, mass, and power of 17 L, 16 kg, and 47 W, respectively, with further reductions planned for follow-on applications. Clock performance with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)*Q limited stability of 1.5E-13/τ(1/2) has been observed and a fractional frequency stability of 2E-15 at one day measured (no drift removed). Such a space-based stability enables autonomous timekeeping of with a technology capable of even higher stability, if desired. To date, the demonstration clock has been successfully subjected to mechanical vibration testing at the 14 grms level, thermal-vacuum operation over a range of 42(°)C, and electromagnetic susceptibility tests. PMID:27019481

  17. Compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for the MESSENGER mission to Mercury.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Danny J; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Li, Steven X; Lindauer, Steven J; Afzal, Robert S; Yu, Anthony W

    2005-03-20

    A compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for the Mercury Laser Altimeter, an instrument on the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging mission to the planet Mercury. The laser achieves 5.4% efficiency with a near-diffraction-limited beam. It passed all space-flight environmental tests at subsystem, instrument, and satellite integration testing and successfully completes a postlaunch aliveness check en route to Mercury. The laser design draws on a heritage of previous laser altimetry missions, specifically the Ice Cloud and Elevation Satellite and the Mars Global Surveyor, but incorporates thermal management features unique to the requirements of an orbit of the planet Mercury. PMID:15813276

  18. Study of ballistic mode Mercury Orbiter missions. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbeck, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A summary is given of the scope, approach, and major results of the study of ballistic mode Mercury orbit missions (the Mariner Venus-Mercury spacecraft). The performance potential of ballistic flight mode is presented along with a study of alternate flight techniques. Orbit selection considerations are discussed in terms of the thermal environment of Mercury. Orbiter science experiments are summarized. Technology assessments were conducted for major subsystems appropriate to spin-stabilized and three-axis-stabilized spacecraft designs. Conclusions from this study are: ballistic mode Mercury orbiter missions offer adequate performance for effective follow-up of the MVM'73 science findings; the existing and programmed technology base is adequate for implementation of Mercury orbit spacecraft design; and when pending MVM flyby has been accomplished and the results analyzed, the data base will be adequate to support detailed orbiter spacecraft design efforts.

  19. MESSENGER, MErcury: Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging; A Mission to Orbit and Explore the Planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    MESSENGER is a scientific mission to Mercury. Understanding this extraordinary planet and the forces that have shaped it is fundamental to understanding the processes that have governed the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the terrestrial planets. MESSENGER is a MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging mission to orbit Mercury for one Earth year after completing two flybys of that planet following two flybys of Venus. The necessary flybys return significant new data early in the mission, while the orbital phase, guided by the flyby data, enables a focused scientific investigation of this least-studied terrestrial planet. Answers to key questions about Mercury's high density, crustal composition and structure, volcanic history, core structure, magnetic field generation, polar deposits, exosphere, overall volatile inventory, and magnetosphere are provided by an optimized set of miniaturized space instruments. Our goal is to gain new insight into the formation and evolution of the solar system, including Earth. By traveling to the inner edge of the solar system and exploring a poorly known world, MESSENGER fulfills this quest.

  20. Mercury's Surface-Bounded Exosphere as Seen from Orbit during the MESSENGER Mission: Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, William E.; Burger, Matthew; Cassidy, Timothy; Killen, Rosemary; Merkel, Aimee; Sarantos, Menelaos; Vervack, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, conducted orbital observations of Mercury's dayside and nightside exosphere from 29 March 2011 to the end of the mission on 30 April 2015. Over slightly more than four Earth-years, MASCS measured emission profiles versus altitude for calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), and magnesium (Mg) at a daily cadence. These species exhibit different spatial distributions, suggesting distinct source processes. MASCS observed seasonal variations in all three species that are remarkably repeatable from one Mercury year to the next, and did so consistently during the entire 17-Mercury-year duration of the orbital phase of the mission. Whereas MASCS has characterized the seasonal variation, it has provided, at best, only weak evidence for the episodic behavior observed in ground-based studies of Na. Joint analyses of MASCS observations and surface precipitation patterns for energetic particles inferred from observations by the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) on MESSENGER have not yielded clear correlations. This lack of correlation may be due in part to the MASCS observational geometries. MASCS has conducted a number of searches for other, weakly emitting species. Hydrogen data from the orbital phase are consistent with profiles observed during MESSENGER's flybys of Mercury. Oxygen detections have proven elusive, and the previously reported observation with a brightness of 4 R may only be an upper limit. Recent analysis of weak species data indicates that manganese (Mn), aluminum (Al), and ionized calcium (Ca+) are present in the exosphere.

  1. A Minimal Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation For a Mercury Orbiter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    The primary thrust of the effort at The University of Iowa for the definition of an orbiter mission to Mercury is a minimum viable radio and plasma wave investigation. While it is simple to add sensors and capability to any payload, the challenge is to do reasonable science within limited resources; and viable missions to Mercury are especially limited in payload mass. For a wave investigation, this is a serious concern, as the sensor mass often makes up a significant fraction of the instrumentation mass.

  2. ESA's Mercury mission named BepiColombo in honour of a space pioneer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    The mission to Mercury, now named after Prof. Colombo, is one of ESA's science programme "cornerstones". In the course of the comprehensive Horizon 2000 Plus review of the programme five years ago, it was identified by Europe's space scientists as one of the most challenging long-term planetary projects. Mercury is the least known of the inner planets. Its orbit close to the Sun makes it difficult to observe from a distance and hard to reach by spaceflight. As a result, big questions raised by the Mariner 10 flybys of a quarter of a century ago remain unanswered. "I am very pleased we have given the name of BepiColombo to our Mercury cornerstone. Bepi was a great scientist, a great European and a great friend; we could do no better than name one of our most challenging and imaginative missions after him" said Roger Bonnet, Director of ESA Science Programme. Scientists cannot claim to fully understand the origin and history of the Earth itself until they can make sense of Mercury. Why is the planet surprisingly dense ? Where does its magnetic field come from ? What were the effects of massive collisions suffered by Mercury, apparent in shattered zones seen by Mariner 10 ? Is Mercury geologically active ? How does its close proximity to the Sun affect its surface, its tenuous atmosphere and the small magnetic bubble, or magnetosphere, which surrounds it ? BepiColombo will seek the answers to these and other questions with three separate sets of scientific instruments. According to preliminary studies completed in April 1999, a Planetary Orbiter will examine the planet from an orbit over the poles, using two cameras and half a dozen other remote-sensing instruments. Seven detectors in a smaller Magnetospheric Orbiter will observe Mercury's magnetic field and its interactions with the solar wind. A Surface Element dropped by BepiColombo will land near one of the poles of Mercury, where the temperature is milder. Here the instruments will include a camera, a seismometer

  3. Current Status of MDM (mercury Dust Monitor) Project in Bepicolombo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiromi

    2012-07-01

    Helios was the first to measure dust fluxes in the inner solar system between 0.3-1.0 AU from the Sun in 1970s. However, the fluxes around perihelion are poorly known, since the measurements were mainly performed near the aphelion around the Earth's orbit. To elucidate the dust environment around Mercury (0.31-0.47 AU), we have been developing Mercury Dust Monitor (MDM) to be installed on the side panel of Mercury Magnetosphere Orbiter (MMO) of the ESA - JAXA joint Mercury exploration mission Bepi-Colombo. MDM will measure the fluxes of interplanetary dust supplied from asteroids and comets, beta meteoroids, interstellar dust, and possibly ejecta from the surface of Mercury as a result of micrometeoritic impacts, which might form the sodium atmosphere of Mercury. MDM consists of four pieces of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic sensors (40mm x 40mm x 2mm) coated with heat resistant white paint to reflect solar light. The PZT sensors generate electric signals corresponding to the impacts of dust particles. We have estimated the number of impacts on the monitor to be 0.5-1 hit/day and the minimum detectable mass of dust particles to be approximately 10 ^{-13} g assuming the dust impact velocity of 30 km/s. We will report on the current status of MDM and discuss the importance of determining the flux and origin of dust near Mercury.

  4. The radio science experiment with BepiColombo mission to Mercury .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, G.; Di Ruzza, S.; De Marchi, F.; Cicalò, S.; Tommei, G.; Milani, A.

    BepiColombo is a joint ESA/JAXA mission to Mercury with challenging objectives regarding geophysics, geodesy and fundamental physics. The Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) is one of the on-board experiments, including three different but linked experiments: gravimetry, rotation and relativity. Using radio observables (range and range-rate) performed with very accurate tracking from ground stations, together with optical observations from the on-board high resolution camera (SIMBIO-SYS) and accelerometer readings from the on-board accelerometer (ISA), MORE will be able to measure with unprecedented accuracy the global gravity field of Mercury and the rotation state of the planet. In this work we present the results of a numerical full-cycle simulation of the gravimetry and rotation experiments of MORE: we discuss the accuracies which can be achieved, focussing in particular on the possible benefits from the use of optical observations in support to the tracking measurements.

  5. BepiColombo - A joint ESA/JAXA mission to explore Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Joe; Benkhoff, Johannes; Futjimoto, Masaki

    2015-04-01

    BepiColombo is a joint project between ESA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The Mission consists of two orbiters, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). The mission scenario foresees a launch of both spacecraft with an ARIANE V in July 2016 and an arrival at Mercury in the first half of 2024. From their dedicated orbits the two spacecrafts will be studying the planet and its environment. The MPO scientific payload comprises eleven instruments/instrument packages; the MMO scientific payload consists of five instruments/instrument packages. Together, the scientific payload of both spacecraft will perform measurements to find clues to the origin and evolution of a planet close to its parent star. The MPO on BepiColombo will focus on a global characterization of Mercury through the investigation of its interior, surface, exosphere and magnetosphere. In addition, it will be testing Einstein's theory of general relativity. The MMO provided by JAXA focuses on investigating the wave and particle environment of the planet from an eccentric orbit. Together, the scientific payload of both spacecraft will provide the detailed information necessary to understand the process of planetary formation and evolution in the hottest part of the proto-planetary nebula as well as the similarities and differences between the magnetospheres of Mercury and the Earth. Most scientific instruments are already integrated into the spacecraft and both spacecraft have undergone successfully the thermal vacuum and thermal balance test (TV/TB) campaigns. The poster will inform about the current status of the mission, spacecraft and payload with emphasis on the expected scientific return.

  6. Inflight calibration technique for onboard high-gain antenna pointing. [of Mariner 10 spacecraft in Venus and Mercury flyby mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtakay, H.; Hardman, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The X-band radio frequency communication system was used for the first time in deep space planetary exploration by the Mariner 10 Venus and Mercury flyby mission. This paper presents the technique utilized for and the results of inflight calibration of high-gain antenna (HGA) pointing. Also discussed is pointing accuracy to maintain a high data transmission rate throughout the mission, including the performance of HGA pointing during the critical period of Mercury encounter.

  7. Mercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the lungs Medicine to remove mercury and heavy metals from the body INORGANIC MERCURY For inorganic mercury ... Baum CR. Mercury: Heavy metals and inorganic agents. In: Shannon MW, ... Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and ...

  8. Compact, Passively Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser for the MESSENGER Mission to the Planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Danny J.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Li, Steven X.; Lindauer, Steven J.; Afzal, Robert S.; Yu, Antony

    2004-01-01

    A compact, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been developed for the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) instrument which is an instrument on the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury. The laser achieves 5.4 percent efficiency with a near diffraction limited beam. It has passed all space flight environmental tests at system, instrument, and satellite integration. The laser design draws on a heritage of previous laser altimetry missions, specifically ISESAT and Mars Global Surveyor; but incorporates thermal management features unique to the requirements of an orbit of the planet Mercury.

  9. Observing Mercury: from Galileo to the stereo camera on the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonese, Gabriele; Da Deppo, Vania; Naletto, Giampiero; Martellato, Elena; Debei, Stefano; Barbieri, Cesare; Bettanini, Carlo; Capria, Maria T.; Massironi, Matteo; Zaccariotto, Mirko

    2010-01-01

    After having observed the planets from his house in Padova using his telescope, in January 1611 Galileo wrote to Giuliano de Medici that Venus is moving around the Sun as Mercury. Forty years ago, Giuseppe Colombo, professor of Celestial Mechanics in Padova, made a decisive step to clarify the rotational period of Mercury. Today, scientists and engineers of the Astronomical Observatory of Padova and of the University of Padova, reunited in the Center for Space Studies and Activities (CISAS) named after Giuseppe Colombo, are busy to realize a stereo camera (STC) that will be on board the European (ESA) and Japanese (JAXA) space mission BepiColombo, devoted to the observation and exploration of the innermost planet. This paper will describe the stereo camera, which is one of the channels of the SIMBIOSYS instrument, aiming to produce the global mapping of the surface with 3D images.

  10. BepiColombo Euro-Japan Joint mission to Mercury: MMO Project Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, H.; Maejima, H.; BepiColombo MMO Project Team

    2011-12-01

    BepiColombo is a ESA-JAXA joint mission to Mercury with the aim to understand the process of planetary formation and evolution in the hottest part of the proto-planetary nebula as well as to understand similarities and differences between the magnetospheres of Mercury and Earth. The baseline mission consists of two spacecraft, i.e. the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). The two orbiters will be launched in 2014 by an Ariane-5 and arrive at Mercury in 2020. JAXA is responsible for the development and operation of MMO, while ESA is responsible for the development and operation of MPO as well as the launch, transport, and the insertion of two spacecraft into their dedicated orbits. JAXA has made conceptual design of the MMO spacecraft system (including the interface with the cruising composite system in collaboration with ESA) with model payload. MMO is designed as a spin-stabilized spacecraft to be placed in a 400 km x 12000 km polar orbit. The spacecraft will accommodate instruments mostly dedicated to the study of the magnetic field, waves, and particles near Mercury. Selection of the PI responsible instruments was finished on 2004. Subsystem level Critical Design Review(CDR) for MMO project was held during Mar. 2010 - May 2011. MMO system level first part of CDR was held on June 2011. ESA BepiColombo project is now working for preparation of CDR which will be held middle of 2012. Stand alone test with Mechanical Test Model(MTM) test and Thermal Test Model(TTM) was successfully finished on Nov. 2010. 10 solar constant thermal test with MOSIF (MMO sunshield interface) was successfully finished on Dec. 2010. MMO TTM is under refurbishing to the MTM for attending the stack level MTM test will be held from early next year. Electrical and Mechanical interface test (EIC/MIC) for MMO flight hardware has been started. MMO stand alone Flight Model (FM) AIV will be started from spring 2012. 8th BepiColombo science working team (SWT

  11. Remote X-ray fluorescence experiments for future missions to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    To date, the only deep space mission to Mercury, Mariner 10, as well as ground-based observations have failed to provide direct measurements of that planet's composition. Such measurements are fundamental for the understanding of Mercury's origin and the inner solar system's history. The spin-stabilized Mercury Orbiter proposed for launch in the first or second decade of the twenty-first century as part of the ESA's Horizon 2000-plus plan could address this problem by including the X-ray spectrometer proposed here. X-ray spectrometers act as detectors for the X-ray emission induced by the solar flux incident on planetary surfaces. This emission is strongly dependent on the chemical composition of the surface as well as on the solar spectrum. Characteristic fluorescent lines, the most prominent being the K-alpha lines, are of sufficient intensity for major elements (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Fe) to allow orbital measurement by remote X-ray detectors. The X-ray spectrometers described here will all have established heritage for space missions by 2000. These instruments have previously flown, are being flown as part of the NASA NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) or Clark SSTI (Small Science and Technology Initiative) missions, or are now under development as part of NASA Facility Instrument Development Program. The instrument package would probably consist of an array of solid state detectors for surface measurements, as well as one which would act as a solar monitor. Calculations of anticipated results have been done for a variety of orbital and instrument configurations, and a variety of lunar soil compositions which could be analogous: anorthositie gabbro bearing soils from lunar highlands (Apollo 16), high-Mg basalt-rich soils from a KREEP-bearing area (Apollo 15), and mare basalt bearing soils (Apollo 12). The mission being considered here should result in maps of abundances of major elements, including Mg, Al, Si, Ca, and Fe, for much of Mercury's surface, with

  12. Venus, Mars, and the ices on Mercury and the moon: astrobiological implications and proposed mission designs.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Dohm, James M; Fairén, Alberto G; Baker, Victor R; Fink, Wolfgang; Strom, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    Venus and Mars likely had liquid water bodies on their surface early in the Solar System history. The surfaces of Venus and Mars are presently not a suitable habitat for life, but reservoirs of liquid water remain in the atmosphere of Venus and the subsurface of Mars, and with it also the possibility of microbial life. Microbial organisms may have adapted to live in these ecological niches by the evolutionary force of directional selection. Missions to our neighboring planets should therefore be planned to explore these potentially life-containing refuges and return samples for analysis. Sample return missions should also include ice samples from Mercury and the Moon, which may contain information about the biogenic material that catalyzed the early evolution of life on Earth (or elsewhere). To obtain such information, science-driven exploration is necessary through varying degrees of mission operation autonomy. A hierarchical mission design is envisioned that includes spaceborne (orbital), atmosphere (airborne), surface (mobile such as rover and stationary such as lander or sensor), and subsurface (e.g., ground-penetrating radar, drilling, etc.) agents working in concert to allow for sufficient mission safety and redundancy, to perform extensive and challenging reconnaissance, and to lead to a thorough search for evidence of life and habitability.

  13. Venus, Mars, and the ices on Mercury and the moon: astrobiological implications and proposed mission designs.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Dohm, James M; Fairén, Alberto G; Baker, Victor R; Fink, Wolfgang; Strom, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    Venus and Mars likely had liquid water bodies on their surface early in the Solar System history. The surfaces of Venus and Mars are presently not a suitable habitat for life, but reservoirs of liquid water remain in the atmosphere of Venus and the subsurface of Mars, and with it also the possibility of microbial life. Microbial organisms may have adapted to live in these ecological niches by the evolutionary force of directional selection. Missions to our neighboring planets should therefore be planned to explore these potentially life-containing refuges and return samples for analysis. Sample return missions should also include ice samples from Mercury and the Moon, which may contain information about the biogenic material that catalyzed the early evolution of life on Earth (or elsewhere). To obtain such information, science-driven exploration is necessary through varying degrees of mission operation autonomy. A hierarchical mission design is envisioned that includes spaceborne (orbital), atmosphere (airborne), surface (mobile such as rover and stationary such as lander or sensor), and subsurface (e.g., ground-penetrating radar, drilling, etc.) agents working in concert to allow for sufficient mission safety and redundancy, to perform extensive and challenging reconnaissance, and to lead to a thorough search for evidence of life and habitability. PMID:16379531

  14. Testing General Relativity with the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Giulia; Tommei, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The relativity experiment is part of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) on-board the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. Thanks to very precise radio tracking from the Earth and accelerometer, it will be possible to perform an accurate test of General Relativity, by constraining a number of post-Newtonian and related parameters with an unprecedented level of accuracy. The Celestial Mechanics Group of the University of Pisa developed a new dedicated software, ORBIT14, to perform the simulations and to determine simultaneously all the parameters of interest within a global least squares fit. After highlighting some critical issues, we report on the results of a full set of simulations, carried out in the most up-to-date mission scenario. For each parameter we discuss the achievable accuracy, in terms of a formal analysis through the covariance matrix and, furthermore, by the introduction of an alternative, more representative, estimation of the errors. We show that, for example, an accuracy of some parts in 10^-6 for the Eddington parameter β and of 10^-5 for the Nordtvedt parameter η can be attained, while accuracies at the level of 5×10^-7 and 1×10^-7 can be achieved for the preferred frames parameters α1 and α2, respectively.

  15. Advanced staring Si PIN visible sensor chip assembly for Bepi-Colombo mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. E.; Drab, J. J.; Gin, A.

    2009-08-01

    The planet Mercury, by its near proximity to the sun, has always posed a formidable challenge to spacecraft. The Bepi-Colombo mission, coordinated by the European Space Agency, will be a pioneering effort in the investigation of this planet. Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) has been given the opportunity to develop the radiation hardened, high operability, high SNR, advanced staring focal plane array (FPA) for the spacecraft destined (Fig. 1) to explore the planet Mercury. This mission will launch in 2013 on a journey lasting approximately 6 years. When it arrives at Mercury in August 2019, it will endure temperatures as high as 350°C as well as relatively high radiation environments during its 1 year data collection period from September 2019 until September 2020. To support this challenging goal, RVS has designed and produced a custom visible sensor based on a 2048 x 2048 (2k2) format with a 10 μm unit cell. This sensor will support both the High Resolution Imaging Camera (HRIC) and the Stereo Camera (STC) instruments. This dual purpose sensor was designed to achieve high sensitivity as well as low input noise (<100 e-) for space-based, low light conditions. It also must maintain performance parameters in a total ionizing dose environment up to 70 kRad (Si) as well as immunity to latch-up and singe event upset. This paper will show full sensor chip assembly data highlighting the performance parameters prior to irradiation. Radiation testing performance will be reported by an independent source in a subsequent paper.

  16. Mercury

    MedlinePlus

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  17. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: new insights into geological processes and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James W., III; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Blewett, David T.; Chapman, Clark R.; Domingue, Deborah L.; Evans, Larry G.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Hawkins, S. Edward, III; Helbert, Jörn; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; Izenberg, Noam R.; McClintock, William E.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Merline, William J.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larrz R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Robinson, Mark S.; Sprague, Ann L.; Strom, Robert G.; Vilas, Faith; Watters, Thomas R.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2008-09-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, a part of NASA's Discovery Program, was designed to answer six questions [1]: (1) What planetary formational processes led to Mercury's high ratio of metal to silicate? (2) What is the geological history of Mercury? (3) What are the nature and origin of Mercury's magnetic field? (4) What are the structure and state of Mercury's core? (5) What are the radar-reflective materials at Mercury's poles? (6) What are the important volatile species and their sources and sinks near Mercury? MESSENGER is currently midway through a complex interplanetary cruise phase that involves three flybys of Mercury. The first of these, on 14 January 2008, provided important new information relating to several of the questions above [2-13]. Here we summarize observations made during the flyby that are most relevant to new insights about geological processes that have operated on Mercury and implications for the planet's history [3, 8-13]. The instruments that provided the most direct information on the geological history of Mercury during this first encounter were the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) [14], the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) [15], and the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) [16]. Among the many specific questions remaining following the Mariner 10 mission to Mercury (1974- 1975) were (1) the level of mineralogical and compositional diversity of the crust, which appeared relatively bland in Mariner 10 data, (2) the nature of the rest of the huge Caloris impact basin seen only partially in Mariner 10 images, (3) the origin of the extensive plains observed on the surface (ponded impact ejecta or extrusive lava flows?), (4) the diversity and global distribution of tectonic features that have deformed the crust and their implications for strain as a function of time, and (5) the bombardment chronology and geological history of Mercury [1, 17-19]. The viewing

  18. Geometrical distortion calibration of the stereo camera for the BepiColombo mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simioni, Emanuele; Da Deppo, Vania; Re, Cristina; Naletto, Giampiero; Martellato, Elena; Borrelli, Donato; Dami, Michele; Aroldi, Gianluca; Ficai Veltroni, Iacopo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The ESA-JAXA mission BepiColombo that will be launched in 2018 is devoted to the observation of Mercury, the innermost planet of the Solar System. SIMBIOSYS is its remote sensing suite, which consists of three instruments: the High Resolution Imaging Channel (HRIC), the Visible and Infrared Hyperspectral Imager (VIHI), and the Stereo Imaging Channel (STC). The latter will provide the global three dimensional reconstruction of the Mercury surface, and it represents the first push-frame stereo camera on board of a space satellite. Based on a new telescope design, STC combines the advantages of a compact single detector camera to the convenience of a double direction acquisition system; this solution allows to minimize mass and volume performing a push-frame imaging acquisition. The shared camera sensor is divided in six portions: four are covered with suitable filters; the others, one looking forward and one backwards with respect to nadir direction, are covered with a panchromatic filter supplying stereo image pairs of the planet surface. The main STC scientific requirements are to reconstruct in 3D the Mercury surface with a vertical accuracy better than 80 m and performing a global imaging with a grid size of 65 m along-track at the periherm. Scope of this work is to present the on-ground geometric calibration pipeline for this original instrument. The selected STC off-axis configuration forced to develop a new distortion map model. Additional considerations are connected to the detector, a Si-Pin hybrid CMOS, which is characterized by a high fixed pattern noise. This had a great impact in pre-calibration phases compelling to use a not common approach to the definition of the spot centroids in the distortion calibration process. This work presents the results obtained during the calibration of STC concerning the distortion analysis for three different temperatures. These results are then used to define the corresponding distortion model of the camera.

  19. The determination of Mercury's gravity field and rotational state with the mission BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, L.; Asmar, S. W.; Milani, A.; Tortora, P.; Iafolla, V.

    Gravity field and rotational state provide accurate constraints to geophysical models of planetary interiors and have been therefore a major source of information on the internal structure of solar system bodies. Their determination is particularly important for Mercury, whose interior is the least known among terrestrial planets. Today, planetary gravity fields are best investigated by means of microwave Doppler tracking of orbiting spacecraft. In order to attain precise measurements the radio link (involving a carrier transmitted from ground to the spacecraft and retransmitted back to ground) must preserve the highest phase stability and coherence at each intervening stage. Electronic noise from ground and onboard instrumentation must be minimized and propagation noise (due to plasma and troposphere) must be kept to a minimum. This is especially important for phase instabilities induced by interplanetary plasma and solar corona, which have been the main limitation in past gravity experiments with planetary probes. Both forthcoming space missions to Mercury (NASA's Messenger and ESA's Bepi- Colombo) host radio science investigations devoted to geodesy and geophysics. While Messenger's experiment exploits the onboard telecommunication system, based upon a X-band radio link (7.1-8.4 GHz), the experiment MORE (Mercury Orbiter Radioscience Experiment) of BepiColombo makes use of a Ka-band radio link (32-34 GHz) enabled by dedicated onboard and ground hardware. The use of a Ka-band link in combination with the standard telecommunication system allows a complete cancellation of the plasma noise and two-way range rate measurements as accurate as 3 micron/s over time scales of 1000 s, independently of the solar elongation angle. The radio instrumentation includes also a wide-band ranging system (WBRS, using a 20 MHz tone) with a target two-way accuracy of 20 cm. The ranging system will be used to determine Mercury's orbit in the solar system, carrying out accurate tests

  20. Results of the mission profile life test. [for J-series mercury ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. T.; Trump, G. E.; James, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Seven J series 30-cm diameter thrusters have been tested in segments of up to 5,070 hr, for 14,541 hr in the Mission Profile Life Test facility. Test results have indicated the basic thruster design to be consistent with the lifetime goal of 15,000 hr at 2-A beam. The only areas of concern identified which appear to require additional verification testing involve contamination of mercury propellant isolators, which may be due to facility constituents, and the ability of specially covered surfaces to contain sputtered material and prevent flake formation. The ability of the SCR, series resonant inverter power processor to operate the J series thruster and autonomous computer control of the thruster/processor system were demonstrated.

  1. Mercury Gamma-rays and Neutron Spectrometer for ESA BepiColompo mission: numerical simulation of neutrons and gamma-rays from Mercury subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, S. Alexander; Gunko, Natalya; Gurvits, Leonid; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Shvetsov, Valery; Timoshenko, Genagy; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Tsygan, Anatoly; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    The nuclear instrument MGNS is under development for implementation on the MPO of Bepi-Colombo mission, as the contribution of Federal Space Agency of Russia to this project. In com-parison of gamma-rays spectrometer onboard NASA's Messenger interplanetary probe, which will provide mapping data for northern hemisphere of the planet only because of elliptical orbit, the MGNS onboard MPO will provide global mapping of the planet with similar coverage of southern and northern hemispheres of the Mercury. For analyse chemistry composition of Mercury subsurface we will apply method of as-called remote sensing of neutrons. This method can be use for study celestial body of Solar system without thick atmospheres, like Moon, Mars, Phobos, Mercury etc. by the analysis of induced nuclear gamma-rays and neutron emission. These gamma-rays and neutrons are produced by energetic galactic cosmic rays colliding with nuclei of regolith within a 1-2 meter layer of subsurface. This report will also describe result of numerical simulation flux of neutrons and gamma-rays lines from Mercury subsurface. The simulation was done for four different theoretical models of surface composition (model: ChM, EM, RM and VM) and for four different surface temperature (90 , 300 , 500 and 725 ). We simulate spectrum of neutron flux generated by Mercury surface and flax of gamma-rays for two major line (Al: 7.724 MeV and Si: 3.539 MeV) as function of temperature and subsurface composition.

  2. ISA - An Accelerometer to Detect the Disturbing Accelerations Acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter of the BepiColombo ESA Cornerstone Mission to Mercury: on Ground Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Lucchesi, D. M.; Nozzoli, S.; Santoli, F.; Fois, M.; Persichini, M.

    2006-06-01

    To reach the ambitious goals of the Radio Science Experiment of the BepiColombo space mission to Mercury, among which the planet structure and rotation and test Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) to an unprecedented accuracy, an accelerometer has been selected to fly on-board the MPO (Mercury Planetary Orbiter), the main spacecraft of the two to be placed around the innermost planet of our solar system around 2017. The key role of the on-board accelerometer is to remove from the list of unknowns the non-gravitational accelerations that disturbs the pure gravitational orbit of the MPO spacecraft in the strong radiation environment of Mercury. In this way the ``corrected'' orbit of the MPO may be regarded as a geodesic in the field of Mercury. Then, thanks to the very precise tracking from Earth, the possibility to study Mercury's center-of-mass around the Sun and estimate several parameters related to the planet structure and verify the theory of GR. The selected accelerometer named ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) is an high sensitive instrument with an intrinsic noise of 10-10 g⊕ / Hz (with g⊕ ≅ 9.8 m / s2) in the frequency band 3 . 10-5 -10-1 Hz. ISA is a three axis accelerometer with a characteristic configuration, in order to minimize the disturbing accelerations due to the gravity-gradients and the apparent forces on the Nadir pointing MPO spacecraft. Because of the complex and strong radiation environment of Mercury, the modelling of the non-gravitational acceleration is quite difficult, while, with the use of ISA accelerometer we are able to gain a factor 100 in accuracy. In this brief paper we will focus on the characteristics of the ISA accelerometer, on its positioning on-board the MPO and in particularly to the techniques for on ground calibration, avoiding the effects of the Earth gravity.

  3. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride During the Second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Alexander, H. A.; Jerman, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    As a solid solution semiconductor having, a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  4. The interior of Mercury and what we can learn about it from the upcoming missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, T.

    Present estimates of the Hermean core mass and volume depend mostly on our confidence in cosmochemically constrained values of the average silicate shell and core densities The Messenger and BepiColombo missions will measure very accurately the gravity field, the topography and the rotation parameters of the planet. In addition, BepiColombo will attempt to measure the tidal Love numbers. The moment of inertia C about the rotation axis will be determined from the degree 2 components of the gravity field and from measurements of the obliquity and the libration frequency of the rotation axis (Peale 1988). The ratio Cm/C between the moment of inertia of the solid planet to the moment of inertia of the entire planet, both about the rotation axis, will additionally be obtained. If the core is liquid or if there is a liquid outer core, Cm/C will be around 0.5. In this case, Cm can be identified with the moment of inertia of the silicate shell. If the core is solid, Cm/C will be about 1. The moment of inertia C can be used to test and refine present models although the non-uniqueness of present models cannot be removed entirely, in particular in the likely case that there is a substantial inner core. C and Cm/C can be used to calculate the inner core radius and the outer core density while assuming the silicate shell density and the inner core density. The inner core radius can be estimated if the inner core radius is greater than 0.5 core radii. These values can be checked against the Love numbers of the planet. However, the Love numbers will again show significant effects of an inner core only if the inner core radius is larger than 0.5 core radii. The higher order components of the gravity field can be used to estimate core-mantle boundary undulations and crust thickness variations. The former will dominate the gravity field at long wavelength, while the latter will dominate at short wavelengths. Peale, S.J., 1988. Rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its

  5. Active measurements of the thermal electron density and temperature from the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Beghin, C.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Blomberg, L.; Lebreton, J. P.; Masson, A.; Hamelin, M.; Pottelette, R.

    The thermal component of the Mercury's electron population remains to be investigated. It is one of the scientific objectives of the Plasma Wave Investigation, PWI, consortium to determine its influence on the formation and dynamics of the planetary magnetosphere as a function of the solar activity. The Active Measurement of Mercury's Plasma, AM2P, experiment has therefore been proposed as part of the PWI to measure the density and temperature of the thermal electron population all along the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of the BepiColombo mission. These two aeronomical parameters shall be deduced from the measurements of the self- and mutual-impedances of the MEFISTO (Mercury Electric Field In Situ TOol) double-sphere antenna in a frequency range comprising the expected plasma frequency. The purpose of the current presentation is: 1) to set the AM2P scientific objectives, 2) to give the principle of measurements, 3) to describe the electronics device, and 4) to show the ability of the AM2P to make reliable and accurate measurements of the thermal plasma density and temperature in the Hermean magnetosphere, as well as in the solar wind at 0.31-0.47 AU from the Sun. The latter point has been established from analytical and numerical simulations.

  6. Active measurement of the thermal electron density and temperature on the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Béghin, C.; Lagoutte, D.; Michau, J. L.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Blomberg, L. G.; Lebreton, J. P.; Masson, A.; Hamelin, M.; Pottelette, R.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal component of Mercury's electron population has never been measured. One scientific objective of the Plasma Wave Investigation consortium, PWI, is to determine the influence of the thermal plasma upon the formation and dynamics of the planetary magnetosphere, as a function of solar activity. The Active Measurement of Mercury's Plasma experiment, AM 2P, has been proposed as part of PWI, to monitor the density and temperature of the thermal electron population, during the whole mission of the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter of BepiColombo. These two physical parameters will be deduced from the measurements of the self- and mutual-impedances of the MEFISTO (Mercury Electric Field In Situ TOol) double-sphere antenna, in a frequency range comprising the expected plasma frequency. The in situ measurement of the antenna impedance is also essential for calibrating the electric antenna which measures the natural waves; it will allow, in particular, the effective length of the antenna to be calculated as a function of frequency and plasma conditions. The purpose of this paper is to define the scientific objectives of AM 2P, to explain the principle of the measurement, to describe the electronic device, and to show the ability of AM 2P to make reliable and accurate measurements of the thermal plasma density and temperature in the Hermean magnetosphere, as well as in the solar wind at heliocentric distances of 0.31-0.47 AU. The potential performance of this instrument has been evaluated using both an analytical approach and numerical simulations.

  7. Mercury compositional units inferred by MDIS. A comparison with the geology in support to the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, Francesca; Carli, Cristian; Galluzzi, Valentina; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Giacomini, Lorenza; Massirioni, Matteo; Palumbo, Pasquale

    2016-04-01

    Mercury has been explored by two spatial missions. Mariner 10 acquired 45% of the surface during three Hermean flybys in 1974, giving a first close view of the planet. The recent MESSENGER mission globally mapped the planet and contributed to understand many unsolved issues about Mercury (Solomon et al., 2007). Nevertheless, even after MESSENGER, Mercury surface composition remains still unclear, and the correlation between morphology and compositional heterogeneity is not yet well understood. Thanks to the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS), onboard MESSENGER, a global coverage of Mercury surface with variable spatial resolution has been done. MDIS is equipped with a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC), dedicated to the high-resolution study of the surface morphology and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) with 12 filters useful to investigate the surface composition (Hawkins et al., 2007). Several works were focused on the different terrains present on Mercury, in particular, Denevi et al. (2013) observes that ~27% of Hermean surface is covered by volcanic origin smooth plains. These plains show differences in composition associated to spectral slope variation. High-reflectance red plains (HRP), with spectral slope greater than the average and low-reflectance blue plains (LBP), with spectral slope lesser than the average has been identified. This spectral variations could be correlated with different chemical composition. The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) data show that HRP-type areas are associated with a low-Fe basalt-like composition, while the LBP are also Fe poor but are rich in Mg/Si and Ca/Si and with lower Al/Si and are interpreted as more ultramafic (Nittler et al., 2011; Weider et al., 2012; Denevi at al., 2013, Weider et al., 2014). In these work we produce high resolution multicolor mosaic to found a possible link between morphology and composition. The spectral properties have been used to define the principal units of Mercury's surface or to characterize other globally

  8. Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, D. E.; Burns, J. A.; Cassen, P.; Strom, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Prior to the flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft, Mercury was the least investigated and most poorly known terrestrial planet (Kuiper 1970, Devine 1972). Observational difficulties caused by its proximity to the Sun as viewed from Earth caused the planet to remain a small, vague disk exhibiting little surface contrast or details, an object for which only three major facts were known: 1. its bulk density is similar to that of Venus and Earth, much greater than that of Mars and the Moon; 2. its surface reflects electromagnetic radiation at all wavelengths in the same manner as the Moon (taking into account differences in their solar distances); and 3. its rotation period is in 2/3 resonance with its orbital period. Images obtained during the flyby by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 (and the two subsequent flybys on 21 September 1974 and 16 March 1975) revealed Mercury's surface in detail equivalent to that available for the Moon during the early 1960's from Earth-based telescopic views. Additionally, however, information was obtained on the planet's mass and size, atmospheric composition and density, charged-particle environment, and infrared thermal radiation from the surface, and most significantly of all, the existence of a planetary magnetic field that is probably intrinsic to Mercury was established. In the following, this new information is summarized together with results from theoretical studies and ground-based observations. In the quantum jumps of knowledge that have been characteristic of "space-age" exploration, the previously obscure body of Mercury has suddenly come into sharp focus. It is very likely a differentiated body, probably contains a large Earth-like iron-rich core, and displays a surface remarkably similar to that of the Moon, which suggests a similar evolutionary history.

  9. The Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) for the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Helbert, J.; Mertis Co-I Team

    2010-01-01

    Scheduled for launch on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) in 2014, the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) is an innovative instrument for studying the surface composition and mineralogy of planet Mercury. MERTIS combines an uncooled grating push broom IR-spectrometer (TIS) with a radiometer (TIR), which will operate in the wavelength region of 7-14 and 7-40 μm, respectively. The spatial resolution of the MERTIS observations will be about 500 m globally and better than 500 m for approximately 5-10% of the surface. The thermal infrared range offers unique diagnostic capabilities to study the surface composition of Mercury. In particular, feldspars can easily be detected and characterized, because they show several diagnostic spectral signatures in the 7-14 μm range: the Christiansen feature, reststrahlen bands, and the transparency feature. In addition, MERTIS will allow the identification and mapping of elemental sulfur, pyroxenes, olivines, and other complex minerals. The scientific objectives of MERTIS include: (1) characterization of Mercury's surface composition, (2) identification of rock-forming minerals, (3) mapping of the surface mineralogy, and (4) study of surface temperature variations and the thermal inertia. In preparation for the MERTIS data interpretation, we are performing spectral measurements of appropriate analogue materials in the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) and are building a spectral library (Berlin Emissivity Database (BED)) of these materials for a variety of grain sizes.

  10. Got Mercury?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, Torin J.; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2010-09-01

    Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed by the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may vaporize completely when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. We estimated mercury vapor releases from stowed lamps during missions lasting ≤ 30 days, whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from stowed lamps during missions lasting > 30 days and from operating lamps regardless of mission duration. The toxicity of mercury and its lack of removal have led Johnson Space Center’s Toxicology Group to recommend stringent safety controls and verifications for hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations > 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting ≤ 30 days, or concentrations > 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting > 30 days.

  11. Insights into the Nature of Mercury's Exosphere: Early Results from the MESSENGER Orbital Mission Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, William E.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft has been making routine observations of Mercury's exosphere since March 29, 2011. Correlations of the spatial distributions of Ca, Mg, and Na with MESSENGER magnetic field and energetic particle distribution data provide insight into the processes that populate the neutral exosphere

  12. Planned flight test of a mercury ion auxiliary propulsion system. 1: Objectives, systems descriptions, and mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A planned flight test of an 8 cm diameter, electron-bombardment mercury ion thruster system is described. The primary objective of the test is to flight qualify the 5 mN (1 mlb.) thruster system for auxiliary propulsion applications. A seven year north-south stationkeeping mission was selected as the basis for the flight test operating profile. The flight test, which will employ two thruster systems, will also generate thruster system space performance data, measure thruster-spacecraft interactions, and demonstrate thruster operation in a number of operating modes. The flight test is designated as SAMSO-601 and will be flown aboard the shuttle-launched Air Force space test program P80-1 satellite in 1981. The spacecraft will be 3- axis stabilized in its final 740 km circular orbit, which will have an inclination of approximately greater than 73 degrees. The spacecraft design lifetime is three years.

  13. The BepiColombo mission to Mercury: ISA accelerometer on-ground and in-flight calibration procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Lucchesi, D.; Fiorenza, E.; Lucente, M.; Lefevre, C.; Magnafico, C.; Peron, R.; Santoli, F.; Nozzoli, S.; Argada, A.

    2012-04-01

    The key role of the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) in the radio science measurements of the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury is to remove, aposteriori, the non-gravitational accelerations acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) due to the very strong radiation environment around Mercury. This presentation is devoted to describe the main on-ground and in-flight calibration procedures that are necessary to guarantee the accelerometer performance in order to reach the very ambitious objectives of the Radio Science Experiments (RSE) of the ESA mission: the accelerometer sensitivity has to be 10-8 m/s2/√Hz in the frequency band 3·10-5 -10-1 Hz. ISA is a three axes torsional accelerometer and the calibration procedures are necessary in order to estimate scale factors and axes misalignments and couplings. The on-ground calibration procedures are primarily finalized to the determination of the actuator transducer factor of the proof-masses capacitor plates and to the determination of the proof-masses axes orthogonality and orientation with respect to a reference optical cube. The in-flight calibration procedures are devoted to the determination of the accelerometer pick-up transducer factors, which are different from those determined on-ground during the calibration of ISA's actuators, and to the determination of the axes alignment in order to check if launch shocks have produced possible variations with respect to their nominal orientation in the MPO body-fixed frame as determined during the pre-launch characterization and calibration. A by-product of the in-flight calibration procedures is the determination of ISA proof-masses position with respect to spacecraft effective center-of-mass. This allows to check if the MPO center-of-mass variations are in line with on-ground estimates based on fuel consumption computations and the mass distribution of the spacecraft appendices and movable parts, as in the case of the orientation of the solar array panels and

  14. ANTI-SWING CRANE

    DOEpatents

    Goertz, R.C.

    1957-09-17

    A device that reduces or eliminntes the swing of an object being transported by a traveling crane is described. The supporting cable of the crane extends through a guide and follower positioned below the crane by an electric motor and follow-up circuit. The swing or horizontal motion of the cable is detected by the follower, and a signal is generated that will cause the motor to move the follower in opposition to the motion of the swing thus having a dampening effect on the pendulum action of the supported body. This improvement is particularly valuable when the supported load may be so radioactive that a person could not manually stop the swing.

  15. Slides, Swings and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyer, Kay Jardon; Bryte, Janelle

    1990-01-01

    Described are eight science activities that may take place on a school playground using a parachute, balls, swings, slides, and a balance beam. Procedures and questions for each activity are included. (CW)

  16. Sharing Planetary Exploration: The Education and Public Outreach Program for the NASA MESSENGER Mission to Orbit Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Stockman, S.; Chapman, C. R.; Leary, J. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Program of the MESSENGER mission to the planet Mercury, supported by the NASA Discovery Program, is a full partnership between the project's science and engineering teams and a team of professionals from the EPO community. The Challenger Center for Space Science Education (CCSSE) and the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE) are developing sets of MESSENGER Education Modules targeting grade-specific education levels across K-12. These modules are being disseminated through a MESSENGER EPO Website developed at Montana State University, an Educator Fellowship Program managed by CCSSE to train Fellows to conduct educator workshops, additional workshops planned for NASA educators and members of the Minority University - SPace Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN), and existing inner-city science education programs (e.g., the CASE Summer Science Institute in Washington, D.C.). All lessons are mapped to national standards and benchmarks by MESSENGER EPO team members trained by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061, all involve user input and feedback and quality control by the EPO team, and all are thoroughly screened by members of the project science and engineering teams. At the college level, internships in science and engineering are provided to students at minority institutions through a program managed by MU-SPIN, and additional opportunities for student participation across the country are planned as the mission proceeds. Outreach efforts include radio spots (AAAS), museum displays (National Air and Space Museum), posters and traveling exhibits (CASE), general language books (AAAS), programs targeting underserved communities (AAAS, CCSSE, and MU-SPIN), and a documentary highlighting the scientific and technical challenges involved in exploring Mercury and how the MESSENGER team has been meeting these challenges. As with the educational elements, science and engineering team members

  17. Heat Loads at High Temperature Protection Diodes for a Mercury Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reul, S.; Zimmermann, W.; Strobl, G. F. X.; La Roche, G.; Baur, C.

    2008-09-01

    In the frame of the BepiColombo project (see Fig. 1) the solar generators have to withstand the environment near Mercury. Thus all components must withstand an solar irradiation of 10 solar constants or 13.67 kW/m2;. Due to manoeuvres it can happen, that e.g. solar cells will be shadowed or all cell interconnections can fail. To prevent the solar cells from operating in reverse a high temperature protection shunt diode is foreseen for each GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cell. This paper reports about first computations of the temperature distributions for different load cases with useful assumptions for the generator structure, sizes/shapes, etc. Also the main temperature influencing parameter and some useful consequences for a high temperature design of a solar generator and Si-diodes will be discussed. The work is part of the ESA contract 19739/06/NL/JD. The Si-diode layout is proposed by AZUR SPACE solar power, Heilbronn.

  18. Gas and Shadow Swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chi-Hung; Lai, Mei-Yi; Liu, Che-Wei; Huang, Shiang-Yin; Lin, Che-Yu; Yeh, Jeng-Sheng

    In our digital art, we design a folding fan as an interactive magic device. You can use it to play with gas around the world of illusions. Although gas could not be seen in our real world, we still want to interact with it in our illusions by the element of bubble shadows. Opening and swinging the folding fan can blow the bubble shadows away; closing and swinging it can break bubbles. If the magic fan touches the shadow of gas, the bubble shadows will explode and release colorful particles to surround you. Those actions are controlled and located by our circuits with Arduino board.

  19. Got Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield

  20. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  1. Performance Assessment of the Mercury Laser Altimeter on MESSENGER from Mercury Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John F.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Mazarico, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of seven instruments on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft,a mission in NASA's Discovery Program. MESSENGER was launched on August 3, 2004, and entered into orbit about Mercury on March 29, 2011. As of June 30, 2011 MLA started to collect science Measurements on March 29, 2011. As of June 30, 2011 MLA had accumulated about 3 million laser ranging measurements to the Mercury surface through one Mercury year, i.e ., one complete cycle of the spacecraft thermal environment. The average MLA laser output-pulse energy remained steady despite the harsh thermal environment, in which the laser bench temperature changed by as much as 15 C over a 35 min operating period . The laser beam-collimating telescope experienced a 30 C temperature swing over the same period, and the thermal cycling repeated every 12 hours. Nonetheless, MLA receiver optics appeared to be aligned and in focus throughout these temperature excursions. The maximum ranging distance of MLA was 1500 km at near-zero laser-beam incidence angle (and emission angle) and 600 km at 60 deg incidence angle. The MLA instrument performance in Mercury orbit has been consistent with the performance demonstrated during MESSENGER's Mercury flybys in January and October 2008 and during pre-launch testing. In addition to range measurements, MLA data are being used to estimate the surface reflectance of Mercury at 1064 nm wavelength, including regions of permanent shadow on the floors of polar craters. MLA also provides a measurement of the surface reflectance of sunlight at 1064 nm wavelength by its noise counters, for which output is a monotonic function of the background light.

  2. A Library That Swings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spragens, Thomas A.

    1971-01-01

    The Grace Doherty Library (Centre College, Danville, Kentucky) is a library that "swings," being so designed that a substantial part of its space is used alternately for classroom purposes during the day and for library reading-study space in the peak evening hours. (Author)

  3. Swing beam internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenstein, F.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine having a cylinder, a piston displaceable in the cylinder for executing at least two strokes over an engine cycle, namely, a compression stroke and a power stroke, a crankshaft, and a swing beam. It includes a coupling between one end of the swing beam and the piston; a second coupling between the crankshaft and swing beam; means engaging the swing beam for causing the swing beam to rotate about a pivot point; and means responsive to the piston stroke for varying the pivot point, relative to the cylinder, between each compression stroke and each power stroke.

  4. Hallaran's circulating swing.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghin S

    2010-03-01

    William Saunders Hallaran (c.1765-1825) was physician superintendent at the County and City of Cork Lunatic Asylum for 40 years, where he distinguished between mental insanity and organic (systemic) delirium. In treatment he used emetics and purgatives, digitalis and opium, the shower bath and exercise, and argued that patients should be saved from 'unavoidable sloth' by mental as well as manual occupation. However, it is as an exponent of the circulating swing, proposed by Erasmus Darwin and used by Joseph Cox, that he is remembered. His best results were achieved, as he recorded in An Enquiry in 1810, by inducing sleep in mania of recent onset, but perhaps his most enduring observation was that some of his patients enjoyed the rotatory experience, and he had enough sense to allow the use of the swing as a mode of amusement.

  5. Mercury Mission Control Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    Before one small step for man, and one giant leap for mankind, a team of daring space pioneers and a pair of experimental rocket projects came together and set forth in the nation’s first pursuit...

  6. Got Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.; McCoy, Torin; Garcia, Hector

    2010-01-01

    Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed through the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may be completely vaporized when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. Using an existing study, we estimated mercury vapor releases from lamps that are not in operation during missions lasting less than or equal to 30 days; whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from lamps that are operating or being used during missions lasing more than 30 days. Based on mercury toxicity, the Johnson Space Center's Toxicology Group recommends stringent safety controls and verifications for any hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting less than or equal to 30 days, or concentrations greater than 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting more than 30 days.

  7. Proper swing technique and biomechanics of golf.

    PubMed

    Adlington, G S

    1996-01-01

    Golf is an alluring sport because there are many different ways for an individual to create good, effective golf swings. The key for teachers and players is to design good swings that are not physically debilitating. The human body certainly was not designed with golf in mind. That does not mean, however, that golf must be physically damaging. The current fixation on injury has more to do today with the type of player than the game itself. Many of the new players in golf today are older, generally between 30 and 55 years. They come to golf from other sports, such as tennis, jogging, basketball, baseball, and so on. The injuries we see today in golf have probably been brewing in other sports for many years. Golf is simply the current sport of choice, but it often is seen as the culprit for injury. This is all the more reason for continuing to educate players and teachers in the hope that they can create pain-free and injury-free golf swings. If injury prevention moves to the forefront of modern-day teaching, there will be an opportunity to change the way golf is taught and played. That is a mission well worth undertaking. PMID:8903706

  8. Proper swing technique and biomechanics of golf.

    PubMed

    Adlington, G S

    1996-01-01

    Golf is an alluring sport because there are many different ways for an individual to create good, effective golf swings. The key for teachers and players is to design good swings that are not physically debilitating. The human body certainly was not designed with golf in mind. That does not mean, however, that golf must be physically damaging. The current fixation on injury has more to do today with the type of player than the game itself. Many of the new players in golf today are older, generally between 30 and 55 years. They come to golf from other sports, such as tennis, jogging, basketball, baseball, and so on. The injuries we see today in golf have probably been brewing in other sports for many years. Golf is simply the current sport of choice, but it often is seen as the culprit for injury. This is all the more reason for continuing to educate players and teachers in the hope that they can create pain-free and injury-free golf swings. If injury prevention moves to the forefront of modern-day teaching, there will be an opportunity to change the way golf is taught and played. That is a mission well worth undertaking.

  9. Mechanics of swinging a bat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2009-01-01

    Measurements on the swing of a baseball bat are analyzed to extract the basic mechanics of the swing. The force acting on the bat is determined from the velocity of the center of mass, and the angular velocity of the bat provides additional information on the couple exerted by the two hands. The motion of the bat was calculated for other force-couple combinations to determine their effects on the swing of the bat. It was found that a couple is needed to start the swing, and a large opposing couple is required near the end of the swing to prevent the bat rotating through an excessive angle before it impacts with the ball.

  10. Selection of new innovation crystal for Mercury Gamma-ray and Neutron Spectrometer on-board MPO/BepiColombo mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Alexander; Mitrofanov, Igor; Benkhoff, Johannes; Litvak, Maxim; McAuliffe, Jonathan; Mokrousov, Maxim; Owens, Alan; Quarati, Francesco; Shvetsov, Valery; Timoshenko, Gennady

    2015-04-01

    The Mercury Gamma-ray and Neutron Spectrometer (MGNS) was developed in Space Research Institute for detection the flux of neutron and gamma-ray from the Mercury subsurface on-board Mercury Polar Orbiter of ESA BepiColombo mission. The instrument consists of 3He proportional counters and organic scintillator for detection of neutron and also gamma-spectrometer based on scintillation crystal for detection of gamma-ray. For the gamma-ray spectrometer the LaBr3 crystal was selected, the best choice at the time of the instrument proposal in 2004. However, quite recently the European industry has developed the new crystal CeBr3, which could be much better than LaBr3 crystal for planetology. Such crystal with the necessary size of 3 inch became available in the stage of manufactory of Flight Spare Module of MGNS instrument. New CeBr3 crystal has much better signal-to-noise ratio than LaBr3 crystal in the energy band up to 3 MeV. Also, in the LaBr3 crystal, the important for planetology gamma-ray line of potassium at 1461 keV is overlapping with the background gamma-ray line of 138La isotope at 1473 keV. This CeBr3 crystal was integrated to MGNS instrument. We present the results of gamma-ray performance and environment tests of MGNS with CeBr3 crystal, and also comparison between LaBr3 and new CeBr3 crystals in context of space application for this instrument.

  11. Testing of the Qinetiq T6 Thruster in Support of the ESA BepiColombo Mercury Mission for the ESA BepiColombo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, N.

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the results of two test programmes. The first involved a series of simultaneous thruster firing tests performed at QinetiQ in the QinetiQ LEEP 2 (2nd Large European Electric Propulsion) vacuum test facility using 2 T6 thrusters operating between 50 and 230 mN at a specific impulse above 4500s. The test configuration allowed the simultaneous operation of 2 thrusters at a range of thrust levels and thruster spacings. The spacing between thrusters could be varied between 800 mm and 10 mm with the thrusters operating. One of the thrusters, designated the Primary, was suspended from a pendulum thrust balance and was aligned with a large diameter ion beam probe array. These diagnostics allowed the thrust to be directly measured and the ion beam plume to be characterised, allowing comparisons to be made between single and simultaneous operation at different thruster spacings. Testing was also performed with different combinations of neutralisers to determine the potential effects of dual thruster operation with a single neutraliser. The second series of tests involved the operation of a single T6 thruster at a thrust level of 208 mN at the elevated thermal conditions predicted for Mercury. Thermal and mechanical analyses of the T6 (including additional thrusters in close proximity) indicated the worst case thermal conditions occur when the thruster assembly was illuminated from the side, producing the most severe temperatures and thermal gradients across the thruster structure. A 500 hour test was performed in which thruster performance was assessed using electrical operating parameters, thrust balance and beam probe array measurements taken with the thruster operating at both nominal and simulated Mercury thermal conditions. The latter was produced using a metal collar equipped with electrical heaters, placed in close proximity to the thruster structure. The heater collar could be positioned and withdrawn without the need to vent the chamber and

  12. Interplanetary mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A long range plan for solar system exploration is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) science payload for first Jupiter orbiters, (2) Mercury orbiter mission study, (3) preliminary analysis of Uranus/Neptune entry probes for Grand Tour Missions, (4) comet rendezvous mission study, (5) a survey of interstellar missions, (6) a survey of candidate missions to explore rings of Saturn, and (7) preliminary analysis of Venus orbit radar missions.

  13. Gaining Confidence in Navigating Rosetta at Mars Swing-By

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crammn, Ruediger; Budnik, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The Mars swing-by in the early morning of the 25th of February 2007 was one of the most critical events the Rosetta mission has experienced so far on its way to the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The closest approach took place at a distance of only 250 km from the planet s surface. Missing the optimal target would have translated into considerable fuel cost. In order to achieve confidence in operating through this highly critical mission phase, a navigation analysis exercise was carried out beforehand. This paper describes the purpose and the chosen approach for this preparatory Flight Dynamics activity. It presents and discusses results of the analysis. Emphasis is put on the question of what is needed to simulate a valuable data set representative for operations. The results of the navigation analysis are compared with real data obtained during swing-by operations.

  14. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  15. Swing-beds: the Arizona experience.

    PubMed

    Williams, F G; Netting, F E

    1991-06-01

    Swing-beds are acute-care hospital beds temporarily used for long-term care. A demonstration program was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of using swing-beds as catalysts for the expansion of rural hospitals into community health centers to respond better to the needs of older persons in their respective communities. We examined the background and implementation issues of the swing-bed demonstration program in six rural Arizona hospitals.

  16. Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Among the major discoveries made by the Mariner 10 mission to the inner planets was the existence of an intrinsic magnetic field at Mercury with a dipole moment of approx. 300 nT R(sup 3, sub M). This magnetic field is sufficient to stand off the solar wind at an altitude of about 1 R(sub M) (i.e. approx. 2439 km). Hence, Mercury possesses a 'magnetosphere' from which the so]ar wind plasma is largely excluded and within which the motion of charged particles is controlled by the planetary magnetic field. Despite its small size relative to the magnetospheres of the other planets, a Mercury orbiter mission is a high priority for the space physics community. The primary reason for this great interest is that Mercury unlike all the other planets visited thus far, lacks a significant atmosphere; only a vestigial exosphere is present. This results in a unique situation where the magnetosphere interacts directly with the outer layer of the planetary crust (i.e. the regolith). At all of the other planets the topmost regions of their atmospheres become ionized by solar radiation to form ionospheres. These planetary ionospheres then couple to electrodynamically to their magnetospheres or, in the case of the weakly magnetized Venus and Mars, directly to the solar wind. This magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is mediated largely through field-aligned currents (FACs) flowing along the magnetic field lines linking the magnetosphere and the high-latitude ionosphere. Mercury is unique in that it is expected that FACS will be very short lived due to the low electrical conductivity of the regolith. Furthermore, at the earth it has been shown that the outflow of neutral atmospheric species to great altitudes is an important source of magnetospheric plasma (following ionization) whose composition may influence subsequent magnetotail dynamics. However, the dominant source of plasma for most of the terrestrial magnetosphere is the 'leakage'of solar wind across the magnetopause and more

  17. Mercury: Exploration of a Planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft to Venus and Mercury is detailed in animation and photography. Views of Mercury are featured. Also included is animation on the origin of the solar system. Dr. Bruce C. Murray, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, comments on the mission.

  18. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  19. Automatically closing swing gate closure assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Chih; Schuck, William J.; Gilmore, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    A swing gate closure assembly for nuclear reactor tipoff assembly wherein the swing gate is cammed open by a fuel element or spacer but is reliably closed at a desired closing rate primarily by hydraulic forces in the absence of a fuel charge.

  20. 49 CFR 236.743 - Dog, swing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dog, swing. 236.743 Section 236.743 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.743 Dog, swing. A locking dog mounted in such a manner that it is free to rotate on a trunnion which is riveted to a...

  1. 49 CFR 236.743 - Dog, swing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dog, swing. 236.743 Section 236.743 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.743 Dog, swing. A locking dog mounted in such a manner that it is free to rotate on a trunnion which is riveted to a...

  2. 49 CFR 236.743 - Dog, swing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dog, swing. 236.743 Section 236.743 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.743 Dog, swing. A locking dog mounted in such a manner that it is free to rotate on a trunnion which is riveted to a...

  3. 49 CFR 236.743 - Dog, swing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dog, swing. 236.743 Section 236.743 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.743 Dog, swing. A locking dog mounted in such a manner that it is free to rotate on a trunnion which is riveted to a...

  4. 49 CFR 236.743 - Dog, swing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dog, swing. 236.743 Section 236.743 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.743 Dog, swing. A locking dog mounted in such a manner that it is free to rotate on a trunnion which is riveted to a...

  5. Contributing factors for increased bat swing velocity.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; DeRenne, Coop; Spaniol, Frank J

    2009-07-01

    Bat swing velocity is an important characteristic of successful hitters in baseball and softball. The purpose of this literature review is threefold. First, before describing what components and training methods have been investigated to improve bat swing velocity, it is necessary to discuss the importance of bat swing velocity and batted-ball velocity. The second purpose is to discuss bat weight during on-deck circle warm-up, bat weight during resistance training, resistance training with an overload of force, performance of additional supplemental resistance exercises, the relationship between strength, power, lean body mass, and angular velocity and bat swing velocity, and the relationship between improvements in strength, power, lean body mass, and angular velocity and improvements in bat swing velocity. The third purpose of this review is to recommend some practical applications based on research results. PMID:19528868

  6. Contributing factors for increased bat swing velocity.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; DeRenne, Coop; Spaniol, Frank J

    2009-07-01

    Bat swing velocity is an important characteristic of successful hitters in baseball and softball. The purpose of this literature review is threefold. First, before describing what components and training methods have been investigated to improve bat swing velocity, it is necessary to discuss the importance of bat swing velocity and batted-ball velocity. The second purpose is to discuss bat weight during on-deck circle warm-up, bat weight during resistance training, resistance training with an overload of force, performance of additional supplemental resistance exercises, the relationship between strength, power, lean body mass, and angular velocity and bat swing velocity, and the relationship between improvements in strength, power, lean body mass, and angular velocity and improvements in bat swing velocity. The third purpose of this review is to recommend some practical applications based on research results.

  7. Semicontinuous, pressure-swing distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Phimister, J.R.; Seider, W.D.

    2000-01-01

    The merits of semicontinuous, pressure-swing, azeotropic distillation are examined. In continuous operation, two columns at different pressures are fed streams having compositions on opposite sides of the azeotropic compositions. The distillates, which approach the azeotropic compositions at high and low pressure, are cycled between the columns. In contrast, semicontinuous operation involves only a single distillation column, which has lower investment costs and, when the mixture to be separated is changed, shorter downtimes. An optimal-control algorithm is employed to determine desirable campaigns, and to schedule pressure switch-over policies. Simulation results for the dehydration of tetrahydrofuran, involving a pressure-sensitive azeotrope, indicate that switch-over between steady states occurs quickly with on-spec product removed during 93% of the campaign. The column achieves production rates near 89% of the maximum throughput of a single column in the continuous process and shows superior performance when compared to reverse-batch operation.

  8. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  9. [Effects of swing on music appreciation: a study on perceived impressions of various swing ratios].

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Shimpei; Shigeno, Sumi

    2013-06-01

    Swing is a musical performance technique, whose magnitude is indicated by the swing ratio. This study examines the effects of swing on music-listening appreciation. In Experiment 1, 21 participants were presented with synthesized performances with three swing ratios, and were asked to rate their impressions using the semantic differential method. The results show that there exists a certain relationship between swing and the affective evaluation of music and tempo. Experiment 2 explored the relationship between swing and melody, another dimension of music, in perceived dynamism and preference for swing. Two musical instruments were used: piano and drums. Twenty-two participants were presented with synthesized performances and were asked to rate the degree of dynamism and their preference using Scheffé's paired comparison method. The evaluations for five swing conditions were similar for those performed by the piano and by the drums. The discussion looks at the swing ratio and its psychological attributes as well as the relationships of perceived impressions of swing to tempo and musical instruments.

  10. Effects of swing-weight on swing speed and racket power.

    PubMed

    Cross, Rod; Bower, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the speed at which six different rods could be swung by four male students. Three of the rods had the same mass but their swing-weight (i.e. moment of inertia) differed by large factors. The other three rods had the same swing-weight but different masses. Our primary objective was to quantify the effects of mass and swing-weight on swing speed. The result has a direct bearing on whether baseball, tennis, cricket and golf participants should choose a heavy or light implement to impart maximum speed to a ball. When swinging with maximum effort, swing speed (V) was found to decrease as swing-weight (Io) increased, according to the relation V = C/Ion, where C is a different constant for each participant and n = 0.27 when Io > 0.03 kg x m2. Remarkably similar results were obtained previously with softball bats (where n = 0.25) and golf clubs (where n = 0.26). Swing speed remained approximately constant as swing mass increased (when keeping swing-weight fixed). The implications for racket power are discussed. PMID:16368611

  11. Effects of swing-weight on swing speed and racket power.

    PubMed

    Cross, Rod; Bower, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the speed at which six different rods could be swung by four male students. Three of the rods had the same mass but their swing-weight (i.e. moment of inertia) differed by large factors. The other three rods had the same swing-weight but different masses. Our primary objective was to quantify the effects of mass and swing-weight on swing speed. The result has a direct bearing on whether baseball, tennis, cricket and golf participants should choose a heavy or light implement to impart maximum speed to a ball. When swinging with maximum effort, swing speed (V) was found to decrease as swing-weight (Io) increased, according to the relation V = C/Ion, where C is a different constant for each participant and n = 0.27 when Io > 0.03 kg x m2. Remarkably similar results were obtained previously with softball bats (where n = 0.25) and golf clubs (where n = 0.26). Swing speed remained approximately constant as swing mass increased (when keeping swing-weight fixed). The implications for racket power are discussed.

  12. Mood Swings: An Affective Interactive Art System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S. S.; Westerink, Joyce H. D. M.; van den Broek, Egon L.

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective consumer products, affective games, and affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective movements and a color model. This enables Mood Swings to recognize affective movement characteristics as expressed by a person and display a color that matches the expressed emotion. With that, a unique interactive system is introduced, which can be considered as art, a game, or a combination of both.

  13. 17. END OF SWING SPAN (LEFT) AND SOUTH END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. END OF SWING SPAN (LEFT) AND SOUTH END OF NORTH STATIONARY. CLOSE UP REVAEALS DETAILS OF THE IRON SKID AND SWING BALANCED SUPPORT WHEEL. ALSO ROD AND PINTON LOCK (NOT OPERATING). NOTE CHAIN TO HOLD SWING SPAN IN POSITION, - Maurice River Pratt Through-Truss Swing Bridge, Spanning Maurice River, Mauricetown, Cumberland County, NJ

  14. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges. Each... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the...

  15. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges. Each... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the...

  16. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on swing bridges. 118.70... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.70 Lights on swing bridges. (a) Swing span lights on through bridges. Each... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the...

  17. Swinging into Pendulums with a Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Cook, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Explains reasons why students have misconceptions concerning pendulum swings. Presents a series of 10 pendulum task cards to provide middle-school students with a solid mental scaffolding upon which to build their knowledge of kinetic energy and pendulums. (PR)

  18. Swing Weights of Baseball and Softball Bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Dan

    2010-10-01

    Baseball and softball bats are sold according to length in inches and weight in ounces. Much to the consternation of players buying new bats, however, not all bats that weigh the same swing the same. The reason for this has to do with moment of inertia of the bat about a pivot point on the handle, or what the sporting goods industry refers to as swing weight.2-3 A number of recent field studies4-7 have confirmed that the speed with which a player can swing a baseball or softball bat depends more on the bat's moment of inertia than on its mass. In this paper we investigate the moment of inertia (swing weight) of a variety of baseball and softball bats.

  19. Myths of Teaching the Golf Swing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    This article dispells 11 myths about common teaching practices and misconceptions about the modern golf swing. Each myth is counterbalanced by facts presented by researchers about appropriate movements, skills, and practices. (CB)

  20. Mechanical demands of kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Lauder, Mike A

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish mechanical demands of kettlebell swing exercise and provide context by comparing them to mechanical demands of back squat and jump squat exercise. Sixteen men performed 2 sets of 10 swings with 16, 24, and 32 kg, 2 back squats with 20, 40, 60, and 80% 1-repetition maximum (1RM), and 2 jump squats with 0, 20, 40, and 60% 1RM. Sagittal plane motion and ground reaction forces (GRFs) were recorded during swing performance, and GRFs were recorded during back and jump squat performances. Net impulse, and peak and mean propulsion phase force and power applied to the center of mass (CM) were obtained from GRF data and kettlebell displacement and velocity from motion data. The results of repeated measures analysis of variance showed that all swing CM measures were maximized during the 32-kg condition but that velocity of the kettlebell was maximized during the 16-kg condition; displacement was consistent across different loads. Peak and mean force tended to be greater during back and jump squat performances, but swing peak and mean power were greater than back squat power and largely comparable with jump squat power. However, the highest net impulse was recorded during swing exercise with 32 kg (276.1 ± 45.3 N·s vs. 60% 1RM back squat: 182.8 ± 43.1 N·s, and 40% jump squat: 231.3 ± 47.1 N·s). These findings indicate a large mechanical demand during swing exercise that could make swing exercise a useful addition to strength and conditioning programs that aim to develop the ability to rapidly apply force.

  1. To Mercury dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    Present significance of the study of rotation of Mercury considered as a core-mantle system arises from planned Mercury missions. New high accurate data on Mercury's structure and its physical fields are expected from BepiColombo mission (Anselmi et al., 2001). Investigation of resonant rotation of Mercury, begun by Colombo G. (1966), will play here main part. New approaches to the study of Mercury dynamics and the construction of analytical theory of its resonant rotation are suggested. Within these approaches Mercury is considered as a system of two non-spherical interacting bodies: a core and a mantle. The mantle of Mercury is considered as non-spherical, rigid (or elastic) layer. Inner shell is a liquid core, which occupies a large ellipsoidal cavity of Mercury. This Mercury system moves in the gravitational field of the Sun in resonant traslatory-rotary regime of the resonance 3:2. We take into account only the second harmonic of the force function of the Sun and Mercury. For the study of Mercury rotation we have been used specially designed canonical equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincare variables (Barkin, Ferrandiz, 2001), more convenient for the application of mentioned methods. Approximate observational and some theoretical evaluations of the two main coefficients of Mercury gravitational field J_2 and C22 are known. From observational data of Mariner-10 mission were obtained some first evaluations of these coefficients: J_2 =(8± 6)\\cdot 10-5(Esposito et al., 1977); J_2 =(6± 2)\\cdot 10-5and C22 =(1.0± 0.5)\\cdot 10-5(Anderson et al., 1987). Some theoretical evaluation of ratio of these coefficients has been obtained on the base of study of periodic motions of the system of two non-spherical gravitating bodies (Barkin, 1976). Corresponding values of coefficients consist: J_2 =8\\cdot 10-5and C22 =0.33\\cdot 10-5. We have no data about non-sphericity of inner core of Mercury. Planned missions to Mercury (BepiColombo and Messenger) promise to

  2. Where do golf driver swings go wrong? Factors influencing driver swing consistency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Shan, G

    2014-10-01

    One of the challenging skills in golfing is the driver swing. There have been a large number of studies characterizing golf swings, yielding insightful instructions on how to swing well. As a result, achieving a sub-18 handicap is no longer the top problem for golfers. Instead, players are now most troubled by a lack of consistency during swing execution. The goal of this study was to determine how to consistently execute good golf swings. Using 3D motion capture and full-body biomechanical modeling, 22 experienced golfers were analysed. For characterizing both successful and failed swings, 19 selected parameters (13 angles, 4 time parameters, and 2 distances) were used. The results showed that 14 parameters are highly sensitive and/or prone to motor control variations. These parameters sensitized five distinct areas of swing to variation: (a) ball positioning, (b) transverse club angle, (c) transition, (d) wrist control, and (e) posture migration between takeaway and impact. Suggestions were provided for how to address these five distinct problem areas. We hope our findings on how to achieve consistency in golf swings will benefit all levels of golf pedagogy and help maintain/develop interests to involve more golf/physical activity for a healthy lifestyle.

  3. Mercury and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  4. Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 navigation strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinley, E. L.; Jones, J. B.; Bantell, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the navigational aspects of the Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 mission. Principal emphasis is on the development of the trajectory correction strategy, propellant costs, and delivery accuracies at Venus and Mercury. Key error sources and mission constraints are discussed. Of particular interest are the statistics of the first, post-Venus, maneuver which must correct for the magnification of errors in the Venus encounter. Finally, although not a primary objective of the mission, the analysis is extended to include a second Mercury encounter.

  5. [Mercury poisoning].

    PubMed

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication.

  6. Do tidal or swing waves roughen planetary surfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, Gennady G.

    2010-05-01

    Surfaces of the terrestrial planets and their moons are far from being smooth. They are warped by several wavelengths and show a remarkable regularity: their roughness increases with the solar distance. Thus, if for Mercury the surface relief range does not exceed several km, for Mars it is already about 30 km. Earth's range is 20 km, Venus' one 14 km. Recently it was shown that this row of ranges reflects ratios of the tectonic granules radii of terrestrial planets [1, 2]. These radii related to unity of reduced planetary globes (in a geometrical model all planets are represented by even circles [2]) are as follows: Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2. It means that in the great planetary circles (equators) there are 32, 12, 8, and 4 tectonic granules (now they all are mapped by remote methods) and their numbers are inversely proportional to the orbital frequencies of the planets: higher frequency - smaller granule, and, vice versa, lower frequency - larger granule. In this planetary law is a firm confirmation of the main conceptual point of the wave planetology: "Orbits make structures" [3]. But how this happens? A basic reason lies in the keplerian elliptical orbits implying periodical changes of planetary bodies accelerations. Periodical slowing down and speeding up produce inertia-gravity waves warping any celestial body. In rotating bodies this wave warping is divided in four directions: two orthogonal and two diagonal. An interference of these directions produces tectonic blocks of three kinds: uplifting, subsiding, and neutral. Sizes and amplitudes of the blocks (granules) depend on the warping wavelengths and increase with the solar distance. Thus, a relief-forming potential and the actual relief range observed on the planets increase in this direction [1, 2, 4]. But the tidal forces diminish in this direction. That is why they cannot be a reason for the relief-forming potential. Having in mind a swinging action of planetary orbits on

  7. Platform for a swing root turbomachinery blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravenhall, R. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotor apparatus, comprising a blade having a root adapted to swing laterally within a supporting spindle under impact loading, is provided with a flow path defining platform. The platform comprises an inner shroud extending generally laterally of the blade airfoil portion and adapted to swing laterally. In one embodiment, wherein the blade primarily comprises a laminate of composite filament plies, the inner shroud is bonded to the laminate. An outer shroud, fixed with respect to the supporting spindle, forms a lateral extension of the inner shroud with the blade in its normal operating position. The inner and outer shrouds are provided with a pair of complementary adjacent surfaces contoured to pass in relatively close-fitting relationships to each other when the blade swings under impact loadings.

  8. Effects of atmospheric drag in swing-by trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Almeida Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini; Broucke, Roger

    In this paper, we study the effects of the atmospheric drag in swing-by maneuvers. Our goal is to simulate a large variety of initial conditions for those orbits and study them according to the effects caused by this close approach. The practical importance of this topic is to allow mission designers to explore close approaches with planets, as well as to take advantage of the atmospheric effects, when it is possible. We use the well-known planar restricted circular three-body problem plus atmospheric drag as our model. We integrate numerically the equations of motion forward and backward in time, until the spacecraft is in a distance that we can neglect the planet's effect and consider the system formed by the Sun and the spacecraft as a two-body system. At these two points we can use the two body celestial mechanics to compute energy, angular momentum and the Jacobian constant before and after the close approach.

  9. LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD NORTHERN AVE. SWING BRIDGE. BOSTON TEA PARTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD NORTHERN AVE. SWING BRIDGE. BOSTON TEA PARTY SHIP AT ANCHOR IN FOREGROUND. - Northern Avenue Swing Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at boundary between Boston & South Boston, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  10. SWING BRIDGE AT CENTER OF SPAN. DRUM, ALTHOUGH NOT VISIBLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SWING BRIDGE AT CENTER OF SPAN. DRUM, ALTHOUGH NOT VISIBLE, IS AT CENTER OF PICTURE. - Northern Avenue Swing Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at boundary between Boston & South Boston, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  11. The Stunning Highs and Lows of Mercury

    NASA Video Gallery

    Data from NASA’s MESSENGER mission have been used to create this animation of the first global digital elevation model (DEM) of Mercury, revealing in stunning detail the topography across the entir...

  12. Messsenger: Return To Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.; Gold, Robert E.; Santo, Andrew G.; MESSENGER Team

    MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is a competitively-selected NASA Discovery mission to reach Mercury and orbit that planet for one Earth year, gathering data with a miniaturized scientific payload. The spacecraft will fly by Mercury in 2007 and 2008 prior to entering Mercury orbit in April 2009. The status of the mission, spacecraft, and payload at the time of the May 2001 Preliminary Design Review are documented in Solomon et al. (2001), Gold et al. (2001), and Santo et al. (2001). Following confimation for development by NASA in June 2001, the mission design, spacecraft, and payload have continued to mature. The thermal environment, instrument co-alignment requirements, propellant requirements, and mass budget dictated by launch vehicle constraints have led to the implementa- tion of a number of innovations in the thermal design of both the payload instru- mentation and the spacecraft itself. The design for the gamma-ray spectrometer has been shifted from a scintillator detector to a cooled-germanium detector to increase the expected signal to noise ratio, and the neutron spectrometer detector has been en- larged as well. Detailed planning for an integrated data-collection strategy combines the required measurements for mission success with downlink and onboard recorder management. Work on the telecommunications subsystem during spacecraft develop- ment has also led to higher expected data rates. Following the Critical Design Review in March 2002, MESSENGER enters the fabrication phase. Flight instruments will be delivered in early 2003 as integration and test begin. The project remains on schedule and on budget for launch in March 2004.

  13. The Pendulum Swings: Transforming School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Discontent with failed, top-down reform and the immediate prospect of political change have created a rare opportunity to reinvent education policy and to think afresh about how teachers and children should be encouraged to develop their full potential. "The Pendulum Swings" explores alternative, genuinely transformative conceptions of leadership…

  14. Physics of Swinging a Striking Implement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    The act of swinging an object such as a hammer or a tennis racket involves the application of forces and torques in a manner that is intuitively obvious to the person performing the task, but is probably much less obvious to the average physics student. This article describes the basic mechanics of the problem.

  15. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  16. Designing a Table both Swinging and Stable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederickson, Greg N.

    2008-01-01

    Howard Eves captured people's imagination by proposing a hinged table whose top could swing around to be either an equilateral triangle or a square. But is Eves's mathematically motivated design actually good furniture design? This paper identifies potential design flaws in that hinged table and proposes an intriguing new design. Both the original…

  17. Physics of swinging a striking implement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-03-01

    The act of swinging an object such as a hammer or a tennis racket involves the application of forces and torques in a manner that is intuitively obvious to the person performing the task, but is probably much less obvious to the average physics student. This article describes the basic mechanics of the problem.

  18. 16. DETAIL OF END OF SWING SPAN (LEFT) AND SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF END OF SWING SPAN (LEFT) AND SOUTH END OF NORTH STATIONARY SPAN REVEALING IRON SKID AND SWING BALANCE SUPPORT WHEEL. NOTE CHAIN USED TO HOLD BRIDGE IN PLACE - Maurice River Pratt Through-Truss Swing Bridge, Spanning Maurice River, Mauricetown, Cumberland County, NJ

  19. Detail of center of swing span rotation. Forty (40) rods ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of center of swing span rotation. Forty (40) rods radiate out from a center cap stand (like spokes on a bicycle) and hold 40 20-inch diameter wheels onto a rim bearing circular track on which they roll when swing span is opened and closed. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  20. Mercury's Interior Structure and Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoolst, T.

    2004-12-01

    Interior structure models of Mercury have been calculated with particular focus on the core. Mercury has a very large core, compared to the other terrestrial planets, thought to consist mainly of iron and an unknown amount of sulfur. Thermal evolution models, high pressure data on iron alloys, and the magnetic measurements of Mariner 10 point to a core structure as for the Earth, with a solid inner core and a liquid outer core. We have considered a plausible range in sulfur concentration for the core and constructed Mercury models in different phases of its core evolution, from entirely liquid to entirely solid cores. Data on core material relevant for the pressures and temperatures in Mercury's core is used, and we investigate the effects of sulfur dissolving in the solid inner core. Several geodesy experiments have the potential of providing insight into Mercury's deep interior. Precise measurements of Mercury's obliquity and libration in longitude, along with the harmonic degree 2 gravitational field coefficients will determine both the polar principal moment of inertia of the entire planet and of the mantle, C and Cm, respectively. On the other hand, Mercury's solid body tides, which are the largest of the solar system planets, are very sensitive to the core properties, and will be observed by the MESSENGER and BepiColombo missions. We calculated the moments of inertia C and Cm and the tidal reaction of our Mercury models, and studied their sensitivity to several core parameters.

  1. Mariner Venus-Mercury 1973 Project. Volume 1: Venus and Mercury 1 Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The primary mission report includes the Venus encounter and the first Mercury encounter. Plans and activities undertaken to successfully achieve the mission objectives are described. Operational activities are identified by mission operation system functions, providing a brief summary of each discipline. Spacecraft performance is summarized by subsystems.

  2. a New Golf-Swing Robot Model Utilizing Shaft Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Inooka, H.

    1998-10-01

    The performance of golf clubs and balls is generally evaluated by using golf-swing robots that conventionally have two or three joints with completely interrelated motion. This interrelation allows the user of this robot to specify only the initial posture and swing velocity of the robot and therefore the swing motion of this type of robot cannot be subtly adjusted to the specific characteristics of individual golf clubs. Consequently, golf-swing robots cannot accurately emulate advanced golfers, and this causes serious problems for the evaluation of golf club performance. In this study, a new golf-swing robot that can adjust its motion to both a specified value of swing velocity and the specific characteristics of individual golf clubs was analytically investigated. This robot utilizes the dynamic interference force produced by its swing motion and by shaft vibration and can therefore emulate advanced golfers and perform highly reliable evaluations of golf clubs.

  3. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Levi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. The characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short and kinetic and fluid modes may be coupled. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury s interior. In addition, Mercury s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, - 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury s proximity to the sun, 0.3 - 0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and re-cycling of neutrals and ions between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and in the tail, and the pick-up of planetary ions all

  4. On the efficiency of the golf swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rod

    2006-12-01

    A non-driven double pendulum model is used to explain the principle underlying the surprising efficiency of the golf swing. The principle can be described as a parametric energy transfer between the arms and the club head due to the changing moment of inertia of the club. The transfer is a consequence of conservation of energy and angular momentum. Because the pendulum is not driven by an external force, it shows that the golfer need do little more than accelerate the arms with the wrists cocked and let the double pendulum transfer kinetic energy to the club head. A driven double pendulum model is used to study factors affecting the efficiency of a real golf swing. It is concluded that the wrist-cock angle is the most significant efficiency-determining parameter under the golfer's control and that improvements in golf technology have had a significant impact on driving distance.

  5. The Mercury-Redstone Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammack, Jerome B.; Heberlig, Jack C.

    1961-01-01

    The Mercury-Redstone program is reviewed as to its intended mission and its main results. The progressive results of unmanned, animal, and manned flights of this over-all Project Mercury ballistic training program are presented. A technical description of the major spacecraft systems is presented with some analysis of flight performance. Performance of the spacecraft with and without pilot input is discussed. The influence of the astronaut as an operating link in the over-all system is presented, and relative difficulties of manned versus unmanned flight are briefly commented upon. The program provided information on man as an integral part of a space flight system, demonstrating that man can assume a primary role in space as he does in other realms of flight. The Mercury-Redstone program demonstrated that the Mercury spacecraft was capable of manned space flight, and succeeded in partially qualifying the spacecraft for orbital flight.

  6. Swing Weights of Baseball and Softball Bats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Baseball and softball bats are sold according to length in inches and weight in ounces. Much to the consternation of players buying new bats, however, not all bats that weigh the same swing the same. The reason for this has to do with moment of inertia of the bat about a pivot point on the handle, or what the sporting goods industry refers to as…

  7. Movement variability in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Langdown, Ben L; Bridge, Matt; Li, Francois-Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, golf biomechanics has focused upon achieving consistency in swing kinematics and kinetics, whilst variability was considered to be noise and dysfunctional. There has been a growing argument that variability is an intrinsic aspect of skilled motor performance and plays a functional role. Two types of variability are described: 'strategic shot selection' and 'movement variability'. In 'strategic shot selection', the outcome remains consistent, but the swing kinematics/kinetics (resulting in the desired ball flight) are free to vary; 'movement variability' is the changes in swing kinematics and kinetics from trial to trial when the golfer attempts to hit the same shot. These changes will emerge due to constraints of the golfer's body, the environment, and the task. Biomechanical research has focused upon aspects of technique such as elite versus non-elite kinematics, kinetics, kinematic sequencing, peak angular velocities of body segments, wrist function, ground reaction forces, and electromyography, mainly in the search for greater distance and clubhead velocity. To date very little is known about the impact of variability on this complex motor skill, and it has yet to be fully researched to determine where the trade-off between functional and detrimental variability lies when in pursuit of enhanced performance outcomes. PMID:22900407

  8. Mercury's South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Mercury's south pole was photographed by one of Mariner 10's TV cameras as the spacecraft made its second close flyby of the planet September 21. The pole is located inside the large crater (180 kilometers, 110 miles) on Mercury's limb (lower center). The crater floor is shadowed and its far rim, illuminated by the sun, appears to de disconnected from the edge of the planet. Just above and to the right of the South Pole is a double ring basin about 100 kilometers (125 miles) in diameter. A bright ray system, splashed out of a 50 kilometer (30 mile) crater is seen at upper right. The stripe across the top is an artifact introduced during computer processing. The picture (FDS 166902) was taken from a distance of 85,800 kilometers (53,200 miles) less than two hours after Mariner 10 reached its closest point to the planet.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  9. Development of Pressure Swing Adsorption Technology for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; Paul, Heather; Thomas, Gretchen

    2006-01-01

    Metabolically produced carbon dioxide (CO2) removal in spacesuit applications has traditionally been accomplished utilizing non-regenerative Lithium Hydroxide (LiOH) canisters. In recent years, regenerative Metal Oxide (MetOx) has been developed to replace the Extravehicular Mobility Unity (EMU) LiOH canister for extravehicular activity (EVA) missions in micro-gravity, however, MetOx may carry a significant weight burden for potential use in future Lunar or planetary EVA exploration missions. Additionally, both of these methods of CO2 removal have a finite capacity sized for the particular mission profile. Metabolically produced water vapor removal in spacesuits has historically been accomplished by a condensing heat exchanger within the ventilation process loop of the suit life support system. Advancements in solid amine technology employed in a pressure swing adsorption system have led to the possibility of combining both the CO2 and humidity control requirements into a single, lightweight device. Because the pressure swing adsorption system is regenerated to space vacuum or by an inert purge stream, the duration of an EVA mission may be extended significantly over currently employed technologies, while markedly reducing the overall subsystem weight compared to the combined weight of the condensing heat exchanger and current regenerative CO2 removal technology. This paper will provide and overview of ongoing development efforts evaluating the subsystem size required to manage anticipated metabolic CO2 and water vapor generation rates in a spacesuit environment.

  10. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  11. Method for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  12. Apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  13. Revolutionary Materials for NASA's Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Nealy, J. E.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Kim, M.-H. Y.

    2002-03-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space missions. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. Studies have been made for L2, Lunar, Mars and Mars/Venus swing-by reference missions. For all these missions, material trades have been studied. And, as an example, a crew age trade for Mars/Venus swing-by mission has been done. The career blood forming organ (BFO) constraints are more stringent and play a critical role in the optimization procedure. The short missions to L2 and the Moon mainly need to deal with the possibility of solar particle events. It is found that improved shield materials will be required to enable a Mars mission in which middle-aged astronauts can participate. If the age of the astronauts are allowed to be 55 and older then more options are available. Revolutionary materials need to be developed to have younger crewmembers on board to Mars and other long duration missions. The details of this new method and its impact on space missions and other technologies will be discussed.

  14. Abort Options for Potential Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, P. V.; Striepe, S. A.; Powell, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Mars trajectory design options were examined that would accommodate a premature termination of a nominal manned opposition class mission for opportunities between 2010 and 2025. A successful abort must provide a safe return to Earth in the shortest possible time consistent with mission constraints. In this study, aborts that provided a minimum increase in the initial vehicle mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) were identified by locating direct transfer nominal missions and nominal missions including an outbound or inbound Venus swing-by that minimized IMLEO. The ease with which these missions could be aborted while meeting propulsion and time constraints was investigated by examining free return (unpowered) and powered aborts. Further reductions in trip time were made to some aborts by the addition or removal of an inbound Venus swing-by. The results show that, although few free return aborts met the specified constraints, 85% of each nominal mission could be aborted as a powered abort without an increase in propellant. Also, in many cases, the addition or removal of a Venus swing-by increased the number of abort opportunities or decreased the total trip time during an abort.

  15. General closeup view of the swing span bridge in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General close-up view of the swing span bridge in the close position, looking upriver. The pivot/center pier is positioned in the center of Tennessee River. Note: Each arm of the continuous swing span acts as simple spans. The total span over four (4) supports is partially continuous-- the middle panel at the center pier is continuous for bending moments, but discontinuous for shears. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  16. Swing beds: an approach to hospital utilization.

    PubMed

    Henderson, D R; Moomaw, A

    1986-11-01

    The need to use every available space for productive purposes is becoming a major concern for hospitals, especially rural hospitals. This need, coupled with the decline in the building of nursing homes, has given rise to the concept of the swing bed, a hospital bed that can be used to provide care to either acute or long-term care patients. This ability allows an acute care hospital to provide care to patients who might traditionally receive care in a nursing home. PMID:10301065

  17. 77 FR 66703 - Safety Standard for Infant Swings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Swings, with several modifications to strengthen the standard. 77 FR 7011. In this document, the... JPMA- certified infant swings. ] C. Incident Data 1. Introduction The preamble to the NPR (77 FR 7012... strengthen the voluntary standard. See 77 FR 12182. Since the publication of this notice, ASTM has...

  18. 77 FR 7011 - Safety Standard for Infant Swings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... intended for use with infants from birth until a child is able to sit up unassisted.'' ASTM F 2088-11b also... unassisted; and Never place travel swings on an elevated surface. D. Incident Data 1. Introduction There have... until infant can hold head up unassisted.'' Infant swings with a seat back angle greater than 50...

  19. Detailed view of one (1) arm of the swing bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detailed view of one (1) arm of the swing bridge cantilevering out from the center/pivot pier on which the entire span is balanced at its center when in the open position. Both arms of the span have equal length. Note that the members are pin-connected at their connections (joints). - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  20. Uncratered Area on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A dark, smooth, relatively uncratered area on Mercury was photographed (FDS 226) two hours after Mariner 10 flew by the planet on March 29 from a range of 86,000 kilometers (54,000 miles). Above and to the left of center is a surface similar to the mane material of Earth's moon. It embays and covers rougher, older, heavily cratered topography like that, which can be seen in both upper corners of this picture. The history of heavy cratering seems to be followed by volcanic filling, similar to the process on the Moon. The prominent, sharp crater with a central peak (center) is 30 kilometers (19 miles) across. It is located on the upper left edge of a very bright surface area. The bright crater, to its right is 10 kilometers (6 miles) in diameter. The sun is from the right.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  1. After-effects of using a weighted bat on subsequent swing velocity and batters' perceptions of swing velocity and heaviness.

    PubMed

    Otsuji, Tamiki; Abe, Masafu; Kinoshita, Hiroshita

    2002-02-01

    In baseball and softball, warm-up swings with a weighted bat have been believed to increase swing velocity when an ordinary bat is used in the subsequent competitive situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the after-effects of using a weighted bat on subsequent swing velocity and batters' perceptions of swing velocity and heaviness. Eight men in varsity softball and baseball hit a ball suspended from the ceiling 45 times (3 sets of 15 trials). For each set, the initial 5 trials were done using an ordinary 920-g wooden bat (Control condition), and the following 5 trials by a bat with an 800-g bat ring (Weighted condition), and the final 5 trials again by the ordinary bat (post-Weighted condition). Analysis of variance showed a significant decrease of 3.3% in the measured linear velocity of the bat prior to impact with the ball for the first swing of the post-Weighted condition compared with the Control condition. From the second swing the velocity returned to the level of the Control condition. Subjective judgment of the heaviness and velocity of swings for the Weighted and post-Weighted conditions by each participant showed that the ordinary bat felt lighter and swing speed felt faster for the post-Weighted condition. The advantage of the warm-up with a weighted bat was thus psychological and not biomechanical. PMID:11883550

  2. After-effects of using a weighted bat on subsequent swing velocity and batters' perceptions of swing velocity and heaviness.

    PubMed

    Otsuji, Tamiki; Abe, Masafu; Kinoshita, Hiroshita

    2002-02-01

    In baseball and softball, warm-up swings with a weighted bat have been believed to increase swing velocity when an ordinary bat is used in the subsequent competitive situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the after-effects of using a weighted bat on subsequent swing velocity and batters' perceptions of swing velocity and heaviness. Eight men in varsity softball and baseball hit a ball suspended from the ceiling 45 times (3 sets of 15 trials). For each set, the initial 5 trials were done using an ordinary 920-g wooden bat (Control condition), and the following 5 trials by a bat with an 800-g bat ring (Weighted condition), and the final 5 trials again by the ordinary bat (post-Weighted condition). Analysis of variance showed a significant decrease of 3.3% in the measured linear velocity of the bat prior to impact with the ball for the first swing of the post-Weighted condition compared with the Control condition. From the second swing the velocity returned to the level of the Control condition. Subjective judgment of the heaviness and velocity of swings for the Weighted and post-Weighted conditions by each participant showed that the ordinary bat felt lighter and swing speed felt faster for the post-Weighted condition. The advantage of the warm-up with a weighted bat was thus psychological and not biomechanical.

  3. STS-95 Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The STS-95 patch, designed by the crew, is intended to reflect the scientific, engineering, and historic elements of the mission. The Space Shuttle Discovery is shown rising over the sunlit Earth limb, representing the global benefits of the mission science and the solar science objectives of the Spartan Satellite. The bold number '7' signifies the seven members of Discovery's crew and also represents a historical link to the original seven Mercury astronauts. The STS-95 crew member John Glenn's first orbital flight is represented by the Friendship 7 capsule. The rocket plumes symbolize the three major fields of science represented by the mission payloads: microgravity material science, medical research for humans on Earth and in space, and astronomy.

  4. Planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, William I.

    1989-01-01

    The scientific and engineering aspects of near-term missions for planetary exploration are outlined. The missions include the Voyager Neptune flyby, the Magellan survey of Venus, the Ocean Topography Experiment, the Mars Observer mission, the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter and Probe, the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby mission, the Mars Rover Sample Return mission, the Cassini mission to Saturn and Titan, and the Daedalus probe to Barnard's star. The spacecraft, scientific goals, and instruments for these missions are noted.

  5. Swimming versus swinging effects in spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Gueron, Eduardo; Maia, Clovis A. S.; Matsas, George E. A.

    2006-01-15

    Wisdom has recently unveiled a new relativistic effect, called 'spacetime swimming', where quasirigid free bodies in curved spacetimes can 'speed up', 'slow down' or 'deviate' their falls by performing local cyclic shape deformations. We show here that for fast enough cycles this effect dominates over a nonrelativistic related one, named here 'space swinging', where the fall is altered through nonlocal cyclic deformations in Newtonian gravitational fields. We expect, therefore, to clarify the distinction between both effects leaving no room to controversy. Moreover, the leading contribution to the swimming effect predicted by Wisdom is enriched with a higher order term and the whole result is generalized to be applicable in cases where the tripod is in large redshift regions.

  6. A simple model of a swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents a simple model of a swing meant for undergraduates’ educational experiments. The purpose of these experiments is the experimental study of physical principles of self-oscillations, free, forced and parametric oscillations. The model contains a pendulum. A coil with a movable steel core serves as its load. A neodymium magnet is placed at the lower end of the core. A magnetically operated sealed switch is stationed under the magnet at the equilibrium position of the pendulum. The switch is connected in series with the coil and a battery. If we displace the pendulum from the equilibrium position, the pendulum makes undamped oscillations. The system receives energy every time the core is drawn into the coil at the lower position of the pendulum.

  7. The effects of baseball bat mass properties on swing mechanics, ground reaction forces, and swing timing.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Walter A; Fleisig, Glenn S; Aune, Kyle T; Diffendaffer, Alek Z

    2016-01-01

    Swing trajectory and ground reaction forces (GRF) of 30 collegiate baseball batters hitting a pitched ball were compared between a standard bat, a bat with extra weight about its barrel, and a bat with extra weight in its handle. It was hypothesised that when compared to a standard bat, only a handle-weighted bat would produce equivalent bat kinematics. It was also hypothesised that hitters would not produce equivalent GRFs for each weighted bat, but would maintain equivalent timing when compared to a standard bat. Data were collected utilising a 500 Hz motion capture system and 1,000 Hz force plate system. Data between bats were considered equivalent when the 95% confidence interval of the difference was contained entirely within ±5% of the standard bat mean value. The handle-weighted bat had equivalent kinematics, whereas the barrel-weighted bat did not. Both weighted bats had equivalent peak GRF variables. Neither weighted bat maintained equivalence in the timing of bat kinematics and some peak GRFs. The ability to maintain swing kinematics with a handle-weighted bat may have implications for swing training and warm-up. However, altered timings of kinematics and kinetics require further research to understand the implications on returning to a conventionally weighted bat.

  8. The effects of baseball bat mass properties on swing mechanics, ground reaction forces, and swing timing.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Walter A; Fleisig, Glenn S; Aune, Kyle T; Diffendaffer, Alek Z

    2016-01-01

    Swing trajectory and ground reaction forces (GRF) of 30 collegiate baseball batters hitting a pitched ball were compared between a standard bat, a bat with extra weight about its barrel, and a bat with extra weight in its handle. It was hypothesised that when compared to a standard bat, only a handle-weighted bat would produce equivalent bat kinematics. It was also hypothesised that hitters would not produce equivalent GRFs for each weighted bat, but would maintain equivalent timing when compared to a standard bat. Data were collected utilising a 500 Hz motion capture system and 1,000 Hz force plate system. Data between bats were considered equivalent when the 95% confidence interval of the difference was contained entirely within ±5% of the standard bat mean value. The handle-weighted bat had equivalent kinematics, whereas the barrel-weighted bat did not. Both weighted bats had equivalent peak GRF variables. Neither weighted bat maintained equivalence in the timing of bat kinematics and some peak GRFs. The ability to maintain swing kinematics with a handle-weighted bat may have implications for swing training and warm-up. However, altered timings of kinematics and kinetics require further research to understand the implications on returning to a conventionally weighted bat. PMID:26836969

  9. Mercury Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Marcella R.

    2013-01-01

    IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

  10. Brain networks governing the golf swing in professional golfers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Han, Joung Kyue; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Golf, as with most complex motor skills, requires multiple different brain functions, including attention, motor planning, coordination, calculation of timing, and emotional control. In this study we assessed the correlation between swing components and brain connectivity from the cerebellum to the cerebrum. Ten female golf players and 10 age-matched female controls were recruited. In order to determine swing consistency among participants, the standard deviation (SD) of the mean swing speed time and the SD of the mean swing angle were assessed over 30 swings. Functional brain connectivity was assessed by resting state functional MRI. Pro-golfers showed greater positive left cerebellum connectivity to the occipital lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe and both frontal lobes compared to controls. The SD of play scores was positively correlated with the SD of the impact angle. Constant swing speed and back swing angle in professional golfers were associated with functional connectivity (FC) between the cerebellum and parietal and frontal lobes. In addition, the constant impact angle in professional golfers was associated with improved golf scores and additional FC of the thalamus.

  11. Brain networks governing the golf swing in professional golfers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Han, Joung Kyue; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Golf, as with most complex motor skills, requires multiple different brain functions, including attention, motor planning, coordination, calculation of timing, and emotional control. In this study we assessed the correlation between swing components and brain connectivity from the cerebellum to the cerebrum. Ten female golf players and 10 age-matched female controls were recruited. In order to determine swing consistency among participants, the standard deviation (SD) of the mean swing speed time and the SD of the mean swing angle were assessed over 30 swings. Functional brain connectivity was assessed by resting state functional MRI. Pro-golfers showed greater positive left cerebellum connectivity to the occipital lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe and both frontal lobes compared to controls. The SD of play scores was positively correlated with the SD of the impact angle. Constant swing speed and back swing angle in professional golfers were associated with functional connectivity (FC) between the cerebellum and parietal and frontal lobes. In addition, the constant impact angle in professional golfers was associated with improved golf scores and additional FC of the thalamus. PMID:25761601

  12. Optical System Design and Integration of the Mercury Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Schmidt, Stephen; Britt, Jamie; Mamakos, William; Trunzo, Raymond; Cavanaugh, John; Miller, Roger

    2005-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA). developed for the 2004 MESSENGER mission to Mercury, is designed to measure the planet's topography via laser ranging. A description of the MLA optical system and its measured optical performance during instrument-level and spacecraft-level integration and testing are presented.

  13. Astronaut Gordon Cooper assisted into his Mercury Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9) earth-orbital space mission, is assisted into his 'Faith 7' Mercury Spacecraft during the prelaunch countdown. MA-9 was launched on May 15, 1963, and the flight lasted for 34 hours and 20 minutes.

  14. Design and Performance Measurement of the Mercury Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiao-Li; Cavanaugh, John F.; Smith, James C.; Bartels, Arlin E.

    2004-01-01

    We report the design and test results of the Mercury Laser Altimeter on MESSENGER mission to be launched in May 2004. The altimeter will provide planet surface topography measurements via laser pulse time of flight.

  15. Detailed view of one (1) end of the swing span, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detailed view of one (1) end of the swing span, supported on a rest pier, with the span in the closed position and in the train operational mode. Note the end truss bearing where a steel wedge is in the driven position to complete the end bearing arrangement. The wedges are power-driven through the machinery crank arms shown, thus forcing the ends of the swing span truss upward. Note: The top of the old stone pies has been encased with a concrete collar to hold stone masonry together and strengthen truss bearing points. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  16. Showing partial side view of swing bridge in open position. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Showing partial side view of swing bridge in open position. The operator's house is in the center of the truss bridge, directly over the center/pivot stone masonry pier. Note the two (2) center supports with the truss loads being delivered to the drum by a system of distributing girders. The swing bridge revolved on a cylindrical drum supported by rollers running on a circular track on the center/pivot pier. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  17. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  18. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  19. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early orbital operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.; MESSENGER Team

    2014-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  20. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Slavin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission angles

  1. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Philips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, M. T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  2. Swing-Free Cranes via Input Shaping of Operator Commands

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, Kenneth N.; Parker, Gordon G.; Robinett, Rush D.; Leban, Frank

    1999-08-25

    This paper presents an open-loop control method for suppressing payload oscillation or swing caused by operator commanded maneuvers in rotary boom cranes and the method is experimentally verified on a one-sixteenth scale model of a Hagglunds shipboard crane. The crane configuration consists of a payload mass that swings like a spherical pendulum on the end of a lift-line which is attached to a boom capable of hub rotation (slewing) and elevation (luffing). Positioning of the payload is accomplished through the hub and boom angles and the load-line length. Since the configuration of the crane affects the excitation and response of the payload, the swing control scheme must account for the varying geometry of the system. Adaptive forward path command filters are employed to remove components of the command signal which induce payload swing.

  3. 2. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING PIER OF EARLIER SWING BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING PIER OF EARLIER SWING BRIDGE - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Niantic Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  4. 12. STATIC TEST TOWER SOUTHEAST SIDE CLOSEUP OF SWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. STATIC TEST TOWER - SOUTHEAST SIDE CLOSE-UP OF SWING ARM AMD PLATFORM FOR FLAME DEFLECTOR PIT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Major Ups and Downs: Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Major Ups and Downs Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings Most people feel happy ... Strike Out Stroke Wise Choices Links Dealing with Bipolar Disorder If you have bipolar disorder, get treatment and ...

  6. Susquehanna River Bridge swing span. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Susquehanna River Bridge swing span. Havre de Grace, Hareford Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 60.07. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  7. 8. 320 FOOT LEVEL, SWING ARM NINE SHOWING BACK SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. 320 FOOT LEVEL, SWING ARM NINE SHOWING BACK SIDE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHAMBER (WHITE ROOM). WHITE ROOM MADE CONNECTION WITH CAPSULE ON LAUNCH VEHICLE. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  8. Pendular model of paraplegic swing-through crutch ambulation.

    PubMed

    Rovick, J S; Childress, D S

    1988-01-01

    Kinematics of swing-through crutch ambulation for an individual with complete T11-T12 spinal cord injury was examined and quantitative aspects of the body-swing phase used to formulate and evaluate a 3-link pendular model. Model simulation parallels measured kinematics when shoulder motion is forced to follow the measured motion while hips and crutch tips are free pivots. Shoulder control contributes to increased ground clearance, influences timing and stride length, and gives flowing gait. Results indicate that mechanical work requirements during the body-swing phase are low. Metabolic energy demands exceed mechanical work requirements, due particularly to support of the body by the arms and shoulders. Exploiting low mechanical work requirements of the body-swing phase might be achieved through alternative mechanisms to assist ground clearance and to stabilize the wrists, arms, and shoulders while weight bearing.

  9. 14. View of swing truss apex with major sway bracing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of swing truss apex with major sway bracing and bottom latticed strut members, with knee braces below. (Nov. 25, 1988) - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York County, NY

  10. Mercury's South Polar Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows 89 wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury’s south polar region acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) over one complete Mercury solar day (176 Earth days). Thi...

  11. Kinetic constrained optimization of the golf swing hub path.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Steven M; McGinnis, Ryan S

    2014-12-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key PointsThe hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer.It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer.It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories.Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact.The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory.

  12. Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Showing partial side view of swing span in closed position. The two (2) arms act as simple spans, a small amount of negative bending is accommodated by the continous top and bottom truss chords due to a continuous condition. Note the inclined end post of each of the simple spans, the operator's house, center/pivot pier and the pivotal pole-line pole placed atop of bridge. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  13. Kinetic constrained optimization of the golf swing hub path.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Steven M; McGinnis, Ryan S

    2014-12-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key PointsThe hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer.It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer.It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories.Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact.The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory. PMID:25435779

  14. Kinetic Constrained Optimization of the Golf Swing Hub Path

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven M.; McGinnis, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key Points The hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer. It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer. It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories. Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact. The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory. PMID:25435779

  15. CFD Analysis of Swing of Cricket Ball and Trajectory Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Jithin; Tom, Josin; Ruishikesh, Kamat; Jose, Jyothish; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-11-01

    This work aims to understand the aerodynamics associated with the flight and swing of a cricket ball and predict its flight trajectory over the course of the game: at start (smooth ball) and as the game progresses (rough ball). Asymmetric airflow over the ball due to seam orientation and surface roughness can cause flight deviation (swing). The values of Drag, Lift and Side forces which are crucial for determining the trajectory of the ball were found with the help of FLUENT using the standard K- ɛ model. Analysis was done to study how the ball velocity, spin imparted to be ball and the tilt of the seam affects the movement of the ball through air. The governing force balance equations in 3 dimensions in combination a MATLAB code which used Heun's method was used for obtaining the trajectory of the ball. The conditions for the conventional swing and reverse swing to occur were deduced from the analysis and found to be in alignment with the real life situation. Critical seam angle for maximum swing and transition speed for normal to reverse swing were found out. The obtained trajectories were compared to real life hawk eye trajectories for validation. The analysis results were in good agreement with the real life situation.

  16. Swing-free transport of suspended loads. Summer research report

    SciTech Connect

    Basher, A.M.H.

    1996-02-01

    Transportation of large objects using traditional bridge crane can induce pendulum motion (swing) of the object. In environments such as factory the energy contained in the swinging mass can be large and therefore attempts to move the mass onto target while still swinging can cause considerable damage. Oscillations must be damped or allowed to decay before the next process can take place. Stopping the swing can be accomplished by moving the bridge in a manner to counteract the swing which sometimes can be done by skilled operator, or by waiting for the swing to damp sufficiently that the object can be moved to the target without risk of damage. One of the methods that can be utilized for oscillation suppression is input preshaping. The validity of this method depends on the exact knowledge of the system dynamics. This method can be modified to provide some degrees of robustness with respect to unknown dynamics but at the cost of the speed of transient response. This report describes investigations on the development of a controller to dampen the oscillations.

  17. Effects of moment of inertia on restricted motion swing speed.

    PubMed

    Schorah, David; Choppin, Simon; James, David

    2015-06-01

    In many sports, the maximum swing speed of a racket, club, or bat is a key performance parameter. Previous research in multiple sports supports the hypothesis of an inverse association between the swing speed and moment of inertia of an implement. The aim of this study was to rigorously test and quantify this relationship using a restricted swinging motion. Eight visually identical rods with a common mass but variable moment of inertia were manufactured. Motion capture technology was used to record eight participants' maximal effort swings with the rods. Strict exclusion criteria were applied to data that did not adhere to the prescribed movement pattern. The study found that for all participants, swing speed decreased with respect to moment of inertia according to a power relationship. However, in contrast to previous studies, the rate of decrease varied from participant to participant. With further analysis it was found that participants performed more consistently at the higher end of the moment of inertia range tested. The results support the inverse association between swing speed and moment of inertia but only for higher moment of inertia implements.

  18. Effects of moment of inertia on restricted motion swing speed.

    PubMed

    Schorah, David; Choppin, Simon; James, David

    2015-06-01

    In many sports, the maximum swing speed of a racket, club, or bat is a key performance parameter. Previous research in multiple sports supports the hypothesis of an inverse association between the swing speed and moment of inertia of an implement. The aim of this study was to rigorously test and quantify this relationship using a restricted swinging motion. Eight visually identical rods with a common mass but variable moment of inertia were manufactured. Motion capture technology was used to record eight participants' maximal effort swings with the rods. Strict exclusion criteria were applied to data that did not adhere to the prescribed movement pattern. The study found that for all participants, swing speed decreased with respect to moment of inertia according to a power relationship. However, in contrast to previous studies, the rate of decrease varied from participant to participant. With further analysis it was found that participants performed more consistently at the higher end of the moment of inertia range tested. The results support the inverse association between swing speed and moment of inertia but only for higher moment of inertia implements. PMID:25895860

  19. Mercury after three MESSENGER flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    distinguishable by color and composition enforce the significance of the largely volcanic smooth plains, which occupy ˜40% of the surface area, and of low-reflectance material, occupying ˜15% of the surface area and located primarily in deposits excavated by impact, consistent with having originated at depth. Reflectance spectra show no evidence for FeO in surface silicates, and reflectance and color imaging observations support earlier inferences that Mercury's surface material consists dominantly of iron-poor, calcium-magnesium silicates with an admixture of spectrally neutral opaque minerals. In support of the hypothesis that those opaque minerals are iron-titanium oxides, MESSENGER's neutron spectrometer showed that the surface abundance of iron plus titanium is comparable to that of some lunar mare regions. MESSENGER's three flybys re-vealed that Mercury's magnetosphere is more dynamic and responsive to imposed solar wind conditions than that of any other solar system body, and they showed that the planet of-ten experiences conditions favorable to direct impact of solar wind plasma onto the surface, an important contributor to Mercury's exosphere and space weathering of surface materials. MESSENGER is now on course for insertion into orbit about Mercury in March 2011, and one Earth-year of orbital observations is planned for the remainder of the nominal mission.

  20. How is Mercury's dynamo powered?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. A.; Delbridge, B. G.; Irving, J. C. E.; Matsui, H.; McDonough, W. F.; Rose, I.; Shahar, A.; Wahl, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the more surprising findings of the MESSENGER spacecraft is the confirmation that the smallest terrestrial planet has an internally generated, dipolar magnetic field, which is likely driven by a combination of thermal and compositional buoyancy sources. This observation places constraints on the thermal and energetic state of Mercury's large iron core and on mantle dynamics because dynamo operation is strongly dependent on the amount of heat extracted from the core by the mantle. However, other observations point to several factors that should inhibit a present-day dynamo. These include physical constraints on a thin, possibly non-convecting mantle, as well as properties of liquid iron alloys that promote compositional stratification in the core. We consider a range of self-consistent internal structures, core compositions and thermal evolution models that are also consistent with observational constraints, and assess the circumstances under which a dynamo is permitted to operate in Mercury's core. We present the thermal evolution models, 1D parameterized convection models and planetary entropy calculations. We attempt to account for the large uncertainties on some parameters by considering various end member cases. We examine the thermal and magnetic implications of a long-lived lateral temperature difference resulting from Mercury's orbital resonance and how it may play a role in driving the planetary dynamo. We compare simulations of mantle heat flow using the ASPECT convection code to predictions from the parameterized models and produce heat flow maps at the CMB. To represent fluid dynamics and magnetic field generation inside Mercury's core, a numerical dynamo model is performed by using the obtained heat flux maps. Lastly, we also investigate the seismic observability of the different structural models of Mercury to determine the extent to which any future single-seismometer mission will be able to provide alternative insights into Mercury's internal

  1. Temperature Swings in a Hot Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Weather variations in the atmosphere of a planet on a highly eccentric orbit are naturally expected to be extreme. Now, a study has directly measured the wild changes in the atmosphere of a highly eccentric hot Jupiter as it passes close to its host star.Diagram of the HD 80606 system. The inset images labeled AH show the temperature distribution of the planet at different stages as it swings around its star. [de Wit et al. 2016]Eccentric OpportunityFor a hot Jupiter a gas giant that orbits close to its host star the exoplanet HD 80606 b exhibits a fairly unusual path. Rather than having a circularized orbit, HD 80606 b travels on an extremely elliptic 111-day orbit, with an eccentricity of e ~ 0.93. Since the amount of flux HD 80606 b receives from its host varies by a factor of ~850 over the course of its orbit, it stands to reason that this planet must have extreme weather swings!Now a team of scientists led by Julien de Wit (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) has reanalyzed old observations of HD 80606 and obtained new ones using the Spitzer Space Telescope. The longer observing time and new data analysis techniques allowed the team to gain new insights into how the exoplanets atmosphere responds to changes in the stellar flux it receives during its orbit.Extreme VariationsBy measuring the infrared light coming from HD 80606, de Wit and collaborators modeled the planets temperature during 80 hours of its closest approach to its host star. This period of time included the ~20 hours in which most of the planets temperature change is expected to occur, as it approaches to a distance a mere 6 stellar radii from its host.The authors find that the layer of the atmosphere probed by Spitzer heats rapidly from 500K to 1400K (thats ~440F to a scalding 2000+F!) as the planet approaches periastron.The atmosphere then cools similarly quickly as the planet heads away from the star once more.Relative infrared brightness of HD 80606 b at 4.5 and 8 m. The dip marks where

  2. Testing and Results of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, Summer D.; Broerman, Craig D.; Swickrath, Michael; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A principal concern for extravehicular activity (EVA) spacesuits is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O) for the crewmember. The release of CO2 in a confined or unventilated area is dangerous for human health and leads to asphyxiation; therefore, CO2 and H2O control become leading factors in the design and development of the spacesuit. An amine-based CO2 and H2O vapor sorbent for use in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand. The application of solidamine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to concurrently manage CO2 and H2O levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with nonregenerative technologies. Two prototype solid amine-based systems, known as rapid cycle amine (RCA), were designed to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a flowing ventilation stream through the use of a two-bed amine based, vacuum-swing adsorption system. The Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG) RCA implements radial flow paths, whereas the Hamilton Sundstrand RCA was designed with linear flow paths. Testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment and a reduced-pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads in a closed-loop configuration. This paper presents the experimental results of laboratory testing for a full-size and a sub-scale test article. The testing described here characterized and evaluated the performance of each RCA unit at the required Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) operating conditions. The test points simulated a range of crewmember metabolic rates. The experimental results demonstrated the ability of each RCA unit to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O from a closed loop ambient or sub-ambient atmosphere.

  3. Testing and Results of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig; Swickrath, Mike; Anderson, Molly

    2010-01-01

    A principal concern for extravehicular activity (EVA) space suits is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O) for the crewmember. The release of CO2 in a confined or unventilated area is dangerous for human health and leads to asphyxiation; therefore, CO2 and H2O become leading factors in the design and development of the spacesuit. An amine-based CO2 and H2O vapor sorbent for use in pressure-swing re-generable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand. The application of solid-amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to concurrently manage CO2 and H2O levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with non-regenerative technologies. Two prototype solid amine-based systems, known as rapid cycle amine (RCA), were designed to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a flowing ventilation stream through the use of a two-bed amine based, vacuum-swing adsorption system. The Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG) RCA is the first RCA unit implementing radial flow paths, whereas the Hamilton Sundstrand RCA was designed with linear flow paths. Testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment and a reduced-pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads in a closed-loop configuration. This paper presents the experimental results of laboratory testing for a full-size and a sub-scale test article. The testing described here characterized and evaluated the performance of each RCA unit at the required Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) operating conditions. The test points simulated a range of crewmember metabolic rates. The experimental results demonstrate the ability of each RCA unit to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O from a closed loop ambient or subambient atmosphere.

  4. Mercury orbiter transport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Feingold, H.

    1977-01-01

    A data base and comparative performance analyses of alternative flight mode options for delivering a range of payload masses to Mercury orbit are provided. Launch opportunities over the period 1980-2000 are considered. Extensive data trades are developed for the ballistic flight mode option utilizing one or more swingbys of Venus. Advanced transport options studied include solar electric propulsion and solar sailing. Results show the significant performance tradeoffs among such key parameters as trip time, payload mass, propulsion system mass, orbit size, launch year sensitivity and relative cost-effectiveness. Handbook-type presentation formats, particularly in the case of ballistic mode data, provide planetary program planners with an easily used source of reference information essential in the preliminary steps of mission selection and planning.

  5. An prediction and explanation of 'climatic swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    Introduction. In works of the author [1, 2] the mechanism has been offered and the scenario of formation of congelations and warming of the Earth and their inversion and asymmetric displays in opposite hemispheres has been described. These planetary thermal processes are connected with gravitational forced oscillations of the core-mantle system of the Earth, controlling and directing submission of heat in the top layers of the mantle and on a surface of the Earth. It is shown, that action of this mechanism should observed in various time scales. In particular significant changes of a climate should occur to the thousand-year periods, with the periods in tens and hundred thousand years. Thus excitation of system the core-mantle is caused by planetary secular orbital perturbations and by perturbations of the Earth rotation which as is known are characterized by significant amplitudes. But also in a short time scale the climate variations with the interannual and decade periods also should be observed, how dynamic consequences of the swing of the core-mantle system of the Earth with the same periods [3]. The fundamental phenomenon of secular polar drift of the core relatively to the viscous-elastic and changeable mantle [4] in last years has obtained convincing confirmations various geosciences. Reliable an attribute of influence of oscillations of the core on a variation of natural processes is their property of inversion when, for example, activity of process accrues in northern hemisphere and decreases in a southern hemisphere. Such contrast secular changes in northern and southern (N/S) hemispheres have been predicted on the base of geodynamic model [1] and revealed according to observations: from gravimetry measurements of a gravity [5]; in determination of a secular trend of a sea level, as global, and in northern and southern hemispheres [6, 7]; in redistribution of air masses [6, 8]; in geodetic measurements of changes of average radiuses of northern and

  6. MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's ORD is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001-2005 time frame. ORD will use it to prepare a multi-year mercury research implementation plan in 2001. The Mercury R...

  7. Mercury contamination extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fuhrmann, Mark; Heiser, John; Kalb, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  8. A comprehensive study of Mercury and MESSENGER orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Rowlands, David D.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-10-01

    The MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury for more than 4 years. The probe started its science mission in orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system were the instruments dedicated to geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury. X-band radio-tracking range-rate data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2.The extensive range data acquired in orbit around Mercury during the science mission (from April 2011 to April 2015), and during the three flybys of the planet in 2008 and 2009, provide a powerful dataset for the investigation of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession attributable to the gravitational flattening of the Sun (J2) and the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β, which describe the space curvature produced by a unit rest mass and the nonlinearity in superposition of gravity, respectively. Therefore, the estimation of Mercury's ephemeris can provide crucial information on the interior structure of the Sun and Einstein's general theory of relativity. However, the high correlation among J2, γ, and β complicates the combined recovery of these parameters, so additional assumptions are required, such as the Nordtvedt relationship η = 4β - γ - 3.We have modified our orbit determination software, GEODYN II, to enable the simultaneous integration of the spacecraft and central body trajectories. The combined estimation of the MESSENGER and Mercury orbits allowed us to determine a more accurate gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, and the values of GM and J2 for the Sun, where G is the gravitational constant and M is the solar mass

  9. Pre-swing deficits in forward propulsion, swing initiation and power generation by individual muscles during hemiparetic walking.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carrie L; Hall, Allison L; Kautz, Steven A; Neptune, Richard R

    2010-08-26

    Clinical studies of hemiparetic walking have shown pre-swing abnormalities in the paretic leg suggesting that paretic muscle contributions to important biomechanical walking subtasks are different than those of non-disabled individuals. Three-dimensional forward dynamics simulations of two representative hemiparetic subjects with different levels of walking function classified by self-selected walking speed (i.e., limited community=0.4-0.8 m/s and community walkers = or > 0.8m/s) and a speed-matched control were generated to quantify individual muscle contributions to forward propulsion, swing initiation and power generation during the pre-swing phase (i.e., double support phase proceeding toe-off). Simulation analyses identified decreased paretic soleus and gastrocnemius contributions to forward propulsion and power generation as the primary impairment in the limited community walker compared to the control subject. The non-paretic leg did not compensate for decreased forward propulsion by paretic muscles during pre-swing in the limited community walker. Paretic muscles had the net effect to absorb energy from the paretic leg during pre-swing in the community walker suggesting that deficits in swing initiation are a primary impairment. Specifically, the paretic gastrocnemius and hip flexors (i.e., iliacus, psoas and sartorius) contributed less to swing initiation and the paretic soleus and gluteus medius absorbed more power from the paretic leg in the community walker compared to the control subject. Rehabilitation strategies aimed at diminishing these deficits have much potential to improve walking function in these hemiparetic subjects and those with similar deficits.

  10. Pressure swing permeation: Novel process for gas separation by membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Pan, C.Y.; Ivory, J.

    2000-04-01

    A novel process for gas separation, called pressure swing permeation, was investigated to elevate the relatively low permeate pressure by pressurization with high-pressure feed gas, thereby reducing or eliminating additional permeate compression costs where a pressurized permeate is required. This process uses two or more membrane modules and operates in a cyclic fashion, with each module repeatedly undergoing the sequential steps of feed admission and permeation, residual removal, permeate reception, permeate pressurization, and product withdrawal. The unsteady-state permeation associated with pressure swing permeation was studied parametrically, and a bench-scale unit compromising two hollow-fiber membrane modules in parallel was tested for H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation to demonstrate the effectiveness of the process. The permeate product at a pressure as high as the feed pressure can be produced without using a compressor. This is impossible with traditional steady-state processes where a pressure differential across the membrane must be maintained. The pressure swing permeation is analogous to pressure swing adsorption and has the potential to be synergistically integrated with the pressure swing adsorption process for enhanced separation of gases.

  11. Mercury and health care.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-08-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries' health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now.

  12. Mercury and health care

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

  13. Space Weathering Processes on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Like the Moon, Mercury has no atmosphere to protect it from the harsh space environment and therefore it is expected that it will incur the effects of space weathering. These weathering processes are capable of both creating regolith and altering its optical properties. However, there are many important differences between the environments of Mercury and the Moon. These environmental differences will almost certainly affect the weathering processes as well as the products of those processes. It should be possible to observe the effects of these differences in Vis/NIR spectra of the type expected to be returned by MESSENGER. More importantly, understanding these weathering processes and their consequences is essential for evaluating the spectral data returned from MESSENGER and other missions in order to determine the mineralogy and the iron content of the Mercurian surface. Theoretical and experimental work has been undertaken in order to better understand these consequences.

  14. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    Mercury Quick Facts Health Effects of Mercury Exposure What is Elemental Mercury? Elemental (metallic) mercury is the shiny, silver-gray metal found in thermometers, barometers, and thermostats and other ...

  15. Lumbar corsets can decrease lumbar motion in golf swing.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key pointsRotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back painWearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity.Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  16. Lumbar Corsets Can Decrease Lumbar Motion in Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key points Rotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back pain Wearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity. Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  17. First Spacecraft Orbit of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    After a 7.9-billion-kilometer flight since its launch on 3 August 2004—which included flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury—NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered a planned, highly elliptical orbit around the closest planet to our Sun on 17 March. Engineers in the mission operations center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in Laurel, Md., which manages the mission for NASA, received radiometric signals indicating a successful orbit insertion at 9:10 P.M. local time. "Tonight we will have orbited the fifth planet in the solar system. This is a major accomplishment," Ed Weiler, NASA assistant administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, said at a 17 March public forum at JHU/APL, noting that spacecraft have previously entered orbit around several other planets. "You only go into orbit for the first time around Mercury once in human history, and that is what was accomplished tonight."

  18. Dynamics of magnetospheric ions at Mercury : some open questions awaiting Bepi Colombo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Saito, Y.; Seki, K.; Terada, N.

    2009-06-01

    The Bepi Colombo mission to Mercury is a joint mission between ESA and JAXA that is scheduled for launch in 2013 and arrival at Mercury in 2019. A comprehensive set of ion sensors will be flown onboard the two Bepi Colombo probes which, in addition to electron sensors, will allow in-depth analysis of the charged particle environment of Mercury. We review some features of ion transport at Mercury, from their solar wind or exospheric source until injection into the inner magnetotail. We also briefly describe the various Bepi Colombo sensors dedicated to their analysis.

  19. Early Improper Motion Detection in Golf Swings Using Wearable Motion Sensors: The First Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a golf swing to detect improper motion in the early phase of the swing. Led by the desire to achieve a consistent shot outcome, a particular golfer would (in multiple trials) prefer to perform completely identical golf swings. In reality, some deviations from the desired motion are always present due to the comprehensive nature of the swing motion. Swing motion deviations that are not detrimental to performance are acceptable. This analysis is conducted using a golfer's leading arm kinematic data, which are obtained from a golfer wearing a motion sensor that is comprised of gyroscopes and accelerometers. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to the reference observations of properly performed swings, the PCA components of acceptable swing motion deviations are established. Using these components, the motion deviations in the observations of other swings are examined. Any unacceptable deviations that are detected indicate an improper swing motion. Arbitrarily long observations of an individual player's swing sequences can be included in the analysis. The results obtained for the considered example show an improper swing motion in early phase of the swing, i.e., the first part of the backswing. An early detection method for improper swing motions that is conducted on an individual basis provides assistance for performance improvement. PMID:23752563

  20. Early improper motion detection in golf swings using wearable motion sensors: the first approach.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a golf swing to detect improper motion in the early phase of the swing. Led by the desire to achieve a consistent shot outcome, a particular golfer would (in multiple trials) prefer to perform completely identical golf swings. In reality, some deviations from the desired motion are always present due to the comprehensive nature of the swing motion. Swing motion deviations that are not detrimental to performance are acceptable. This analysis is conducted using a golfer's leading arm kinematic data, which are obtained from a golfer wearing a motion sensor that is comprised of gyroscopes and accelerometers. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to the reference observations of properly performed swings, the PCA components of acceptable swing motion deviations are established. Using these components, the motion deviations in the observations of other swings are examined. Any unacceptable deviations that are detected indicate an improper swing motion. Arbitrarily long observations of an individual player's swing sequences can be included in the analysis. The results obtained for the considered example show an improper swing motion in early phase of the swing, i.e., the first part of the backswing. An early detection method for improper swing motions that is conducted on an individual basis provides assistance for performance improvement. PMID:23752563

  1. The Plasma Environment at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raines, James M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gloeckler, George; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menalos; Sprague, Anne L.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is the least explored terrestrial planet, and the one subjected to the highest flux of solar radiation in the heliosphere. Its highly dynamic, miniature magnetosphere contains ions from the exosphere and solar wind, and at times may allow solar wind ions to directly impact the planet's surface. Together these features create a plasma environment that shares many features with, but is nonetheless very different from, that of Earth. The first in situ measurements of plasma ions in the Mercury space environment were made only recently, by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) during the MESSENGER spacecraft's three flybys of the planet in 2008-2009 as the probe was en route to insertion into orbit about Mercury earlier this year. Here. we present analysis of flyby and early orbital mission data with novel techniques that address the particular challenges inherent in these measurements. First. spacecraft structures and sensor orientation limit the FIPS field of view and allow only partial sampling of velocity distribution functions. We use a software model of FIPS sampling in velocity space to explore these effects and recover bulk parameters under certain assumptions. Second, the low densities found in the Mercury magnetosphere result in a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio for many ions. To address this issue, we apply a kernel density spread function to guide removal of background counts according to a background-signature probability map. We then assign individual counts to particular ion species with a time-of-flight forward model, taking into account energy losses in the carbon foil and other physical behavior of ions within the instrument. Using these methods, we have derived bulk plasma properties and heavy ion composition and evaluated them in the context of the Mercury magnetosphere.

  2. Rosetta Navigation at its Mars Swing-By

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budnik, Frank; Morley, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the navigation activities during Rosetta s Mars swing-by. It covers the Mars approach phase starting after a deterministic deep-space maneuver in September 2006, the swing-by proper on 25 February 2007, and ends with another deterministic deep-space maneuver in April 2007 which was also foreseen to compensate any navigation error. Emphasis is put on the orbit determination and prediction set-up and the evolution of the targeting estimates in the B-plane and their adjustments by trajectory correction maneuvers.

  3. Simulation and Optimization of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity levels in a spacesuit is critical to ensuring both the safety and comfort of an astronaut during extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Traditionally, this has been accomplished utilizing non-regenerative lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or regenerative metal oxide (MetOx) canisters which pose a significant weight burden. Although such technology enables air revitalization, the volume requirements to store the waste canisters as well as the mass to transport multiple units become prohibitive as mission durations increase. Consequently, motivation exists toward developing a fully regenerative technology for environmental control. The application of solid amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to control CO2 and concomitantly manage humidity levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with non-regenerative technologies. Experimental results for full-size and sub-scale test articles have been collected and are described herein. In order to accelerate the developmental efforts, an axially-dispersed plug ow model with an accompanying energy balance has been established and correlated with the experimental data. The experimental and simulation results display good agreement for a variety of ow rates (110-170 SLM), replicated metabolic challenges (100-590 Watts), and atmosphere pressures under consideration for the spacesuit (248 and 760 mm Hg). The relationship between swing adsorption cycles for an outlet criterion of 6.0 mm Hg of CO2 partial pressure has been established for each metabolic challenge. In addition, variable metabolic profiles were imposed on the test articles in order to assess the ability of the technology to transition to new operational constraints. The advent of the model provides the capacity to apply computer-aided engineering practices to support the ongoing efforts to optimize and mature this technology for future application to space

  4. In This Decade, Mission to the Moon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The development and accomplishments of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from its inception in 1958 to the final preparations for the Apollo 11 mission in 1969 are traced in this brochure. A brief account of the successes of projects Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo is presented and many color photographs and drawings of the…

  5. Shuttle/IUS performance for planetary missions. [Interim Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cork, M. J.; Driver, J. M.; Wright, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Potential requirements for planetary missions in the 1980s, capabilities of the Interim Upper Stage (IUS) candidates to perform those missions, and Shuttle/IUS mission profile options for performance enhancement are examined. The most demanding planetary missions are the Pioneer Saturn/Uranus/Titan Probe and the Mariner-class orbiters of Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn. Options available to designers of these missions will depend on the specific IUS selected for development and the programmatic phasing of the IUS and the NASA Tug. Use of Shuttle elliptic orbits as initial conditions for IUS ignition offers significant performance improvements; specific values are mission dependent.

  6. Cassini Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Robert

    2005-08-10

    The Cassini/Huygens mission is a joint NASA/European Space Agency/Italian Space Agency project which has a spacecraft currently in orbit about Saturn, and has successfully sent an atmospheric probe through the atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon Titan and down to its previously hidden surface. This presentation will describe the overall mission, how it got a rather massive spacecraft to Saturn, and will cover some of the scientific results of the mission to date.

  7. 41. Reconstruction of roadway; view of swing span looking northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Reconstruction of roadway; view of swing span looking northwest from Bronx approach, showing new apron under construction-concrete foundation partly built. Note trolley in background and broken asphalt in roadway bed. December 15, 1925 photograph. - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York County, NY

  8. Expert Baseball Batters Have Greater Sensitivity in Making Swing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rob

    2010-01-01

    This study used signal detection theory to conceptualize the problem a baseball batter faces when deciding whether or not to swing at a pitch. It examined the launch angle (LA) criteria used by expert (college players) and less experienced (recreational league players) batters using a baseball batting simulation. This study showed that, although…

  9. Periodic orbits of the integrable swinging Atwood's machine

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, A. ); Casasayas, J. ); Tufillaro, N. )

    1995-02-01

    We identify [ital all] the periodic orbits of the integrable swinging Atwood's machine by calculating the rotation number of each orbit on its invariant tori in phase space, and also providing explicit formulas for the initial conditions needed to generate each orbit.

  10. 17. CONTROL ROOM, NORTH SIDE, WITH BRIDGE SWING CONTROLS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. CONTROL ROOM, NORTH SIDE, WITH BRIDGE SWING CONTROLS ON LEFT, SIGNAL CONTROLS ON RIGHT, WHISTLE PULL TOP. RADIO TELEPHONE IN CENTER BACK (Fred Small) - Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at River Mile 6.9, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  11. JAVA SWING-BASED PLOTTING PACKAGE RESIDING WITHIN XAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Chu, Paul; Pelaia II, Tom

    2007-01-01

    A data plotting package residing in the XAL tools set is presented. This package is based on Java SWING, and therefore it has the same portability as Java itself. The data types for charts, bar-charts, and color-surface plots are described. The algorithms, performance, interactive capabilities, limitations, and the best usage practices of this plotting package are discussed.

  12. 8. East portal of 1898 swing span of Bridge Number ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. East portal of 1898 swing span of Bridge Number 210.52, view to east, 210mm lens. Note the difference in the latticed portal strut as compared to that of the 1929 approach span in the previous photo. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  13. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the span... two lights. Each lantern shall show through alternate red and green horizontal arcs of 60° each, the... closed will display one red light at each end, and when open to navigation will display two green...

  14. 33 CFR 118.70 - Lights on swing bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an approaching vessel the swing span when closed will display three red lights on top of the span... two lights. Each lantern shall show through alternate red and green horizontal arcs of 60° each, the... closed will display one red light at each end, and when open to navigation will display two green...

  15. Stance and swing phase costs in human walking

    PubMed Central

    Umberger, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Leg swing in human walking has historically been viewed as a passive motion with little metabolic cost. Recent estimates of leg swing costs are equivocal, covering a range from 10 to 33 per cent of the net cost of walking. There has also been a debate as to whether the periods of double-limb support during the stance phase dominate the cost of walking. Part of this uncertainty is because of our inability to measure metabolic energy consumption in individual muscles during locomotion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the metabolic cost of walking using a modelling approach that allowed instantaneous energy consumption rates in individual muscles to be estimated over the full gait cycle. At a typical walking speed and stride rate, leg swing represented 29 per cent of the total muscular cost. During the stance phase, the double-limb and single-limb support periods accounted for 27 and 44 per cent of the total cost, respectively. Performing step-to-step transitions, which encompasses more than just the double-support periods, represented 37 per cent of the total cost of walking. Increasing stride rate at a constant speed led to greater double-limb support costs, lower swing phase costs and no change in single-limb support costs. Together, these results provide unique insight as to how metabolic energy is expended over the human gait cycle. PMID:20356877

  16. Global Trends in Mercury Management

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyunghee

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

  17. Global trends in mercury management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Seon; Choi, Kyunghee

    2012-11-01

    The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

  18. Towards a More Realistic Description of Swing Pumping Due to the Exchange of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roura, P.; Gonzalez, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The pumping mechanism of a swing in a playground is due to the exchange of angular momentum from the rocking movement of the swinger to the swing oscillation around the point from which the swing is suspended. We describe the rocking events as square pulses of short duration. This choice, together with a simplified mechanical model for the…

  19. New Jersey mercury regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, D.F.; Corbin, W.E.

    1996-12-31

    Mercury, or quicksilver, and its major ore cinnabar (HgS) have been known for thousands of years. Health effects from mercury such as dementia were known as early as the late 19th century ({open_quotes}mad as a hatter{close_quotes}). In the 1960`s and 1970`s, reported levels of mercury in tuna reawakened public awareness of mercury pollution. In the 1970`s, major epidemics of acute mercury poisoning were reported in Japan and Iraq. These incidents highlighted the extreme health risks, such as kidney damage, birth defects, and death, associated with severe mercury poisoning. Fetuses and young children are particularly vulnerable since mercury poisoning can damage growing neural tissues. Recently, the perception of mercury as a dangerous pollutant has been on the rise. Advisories warning the public to avoid or reduce the consumption of freshwater fish caught in specific waterbodies due to mercury contamination have been issued in numerous states. The discovery of mercury in {open_quotes}pristine{close_quotes} lakes in the United States, Canada, and Scandinavia, remote from industry and any known mercury sources, has focused attention on atmospheric emissions of mercury as potential significant sources of mercury.

  20. MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby: A summary of scientific observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Head, James W.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott; Phillips, Roger J.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, Maria T.

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, will be the first probe to orbit the planet Mercury in March 2011. Launched in August 2004, MESSENGER successfully completed the first of three flybys of Mercury in January 2008. The Mercury Dual Imaging System acquired an 11-color mosaic of part of the hemisphere not seen by Mariner 10, including the entire Caloris basin; several large monochrome mosaics at a range of resolutions; a series of color frames designed for photometric analysis; and inbound and outbound movies. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer obtained the first high-resolution spectral reflectance measurements (at ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths) of surface composition, conducted limb scans of exospheric species, and mapped the composition and structure of the tail region. The Magnetometer measured Mercury's internal field at low latitudes and documented the major plasma boundaries of Mercury's magnetosphere. The Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer made the first measurements of low-energy ions in Mercury's magnetosphere. The Mercury Laser Altimeter carried out the first space altimetric profile of the planet. Other instruments in the payload provided baseline measurements that will aid in the interpretation of data from the mission orbital phase. Together, the MESSENGER flyby observations have begun to advance our understanding of the innermost planet.

  1. MESSENGER's First Mercury Flyby: A Summary of Scientific Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Boynton, W. V.; Domingue, D. L.; Evans, L. G.; Gold, R. E.; Head, J. W.; Krimigis, S. M.; Murchie, S. L.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    2008-05-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, will be the first probe to orbit the planet Mercury in March 2011. Launched in August 2004, MESSENGER successfully completed the first of three flybys of Mercury in January 2008. The Mercury Dual Imaging System acquired an 11-color mosaic of part of the hemisphere not seen by Mariner 10, including the entire Caloris basin; several large monochrome mosaics at a range of resolutions; a series of color frames designed for photometric analysis; and inbound and outbound movies. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer obtained the first high-resolution spectral reflectance measurements (at ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths) of surface composition, conducted limb scans of exospheric species, and mapped the composition and structure of the tail region. The Magnetometer measured Mercury's internal field at low latitudes and documented the major plasma boundaries of Mercury's magnetosphere. The Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer made the first measurements of low-energy ions in Mercury's magnetosphere. The Mercury Laser Altimeter carried out the first space altimetric profile of the planet. Other instruments in the payload provided baseline measurements that will aid in the interpretation of data from the mission orbital phase. Together, the MESSENGER flyby observations have begun to advance our understanding of the innermost planet.

  2. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuña, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Livi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2007-08-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet’s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury’s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only ˜1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere, allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury’s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury’s interior. In addition, Mercury’s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted beneath the solid surface as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, ˜1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury’s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury’s proximity to the sun, 0.3-0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and recycling of neutrals and ions among the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury’s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection, and pick-up of planetary ions all playing roles in the generation of field-aligned electric currents. However, these field

  3. Mpo - the Bepicolombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhoff, J.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: BepiColombo is an interdisciplinary mission to explore the planet Mercury through a partnership between ESA and Japan's Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). From their dedicated orbits two spacecrafts, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), will be studying the planet and its environment Both orbiter will be launched together on an ARIANE 5. The launch is foreseen for Summer 2014 with arrival in Summer 2020. Solar electric propulsion will be used for the journey to Mercury. In November 2004, the BepiColombo scientific payload has been officially approved. Payload of BepiColombo: The MPO scientific payload comprises eleven instruments/instrument packages; the MMO scientific payload consists of five instruments/instrument packages. Together, the scientific payload of both spacecraft will provide the detailed information necessary to understand Mercury and its magnetospheric environment and to find clues to the origin and evolution of a planet close to its parent star. The MPO will focus on a global characterization of Mercury through the investigation of its interior, surface, exosphere and magnetosphere. In addition, it will be testing Einstein's theory of general relativity. Major effort was put into optimizing the scientific return by defining the payload complement such that individual measurements can be interrelated and complement each other. A detailed overview of the status of BepiColombo will be given with special emphasis on the MPO and its payload complement. BepiColombo factsheet BepiColombo is Europe's first mission to Mercury, the innermost planet of the Solar System, and ESA's first science mission in collaboration with Japan. A satellite 'duo' - consisting of an orbiter for planetary investigation and one for magnetospheric studies - Bepi- Colombo will reach Mercury after a six-year journey towards the inner Solar System, to make the most extensive and detailed study of the planet ever performed

  4. Mercury Sample Return using Solar Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Roy; Montgomery, E.; Adams, C.

    2006-12-01

    Over the previous three years NASA’s In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program has matured solar sail technology from laboratory components to full systems, demonstrated in as relevant a space environment as could be simulated on the ground. Solar sail propulsion uses sunlight to propel vehicles through space by reflecting solar photons from a large sails made of a lightweight, reflective material. With photonic pressure providing continuous thrust, sailcraft can conduct missions not available with conventional propulsion: • high-inclination plane changes • flyby or rendezvous missions to outer solar system objects • non-Keplarian orbits (e.g. above the pole of a planet) • hovering indefinitely near a Lagrange point in space To illustrate the capabilities of solar sails, the results of an European Space Agency Mercury Sample Return study using solar sails is described and compared with a mission using conventional propulsion. A conventional Mercury sample return mission requires significant launch mass due to the large Δv required for the outbound and return trips, and the large mass of a planetary lander and ascent vehicle. Solar sailing can reduce mass by delivering the lander to a low, orbit close to the terminator and providing the Δv for the return flight. The mission concept calls for a 275 m sail to deliver a lander, cruise stage and science payload to a Sun-synchronous orbit at Mercury in 2.85 years. The lander acquires samples, and conducts limited surface exploration. An ascent vehicle delivers a small vehicle containing the samples for transfer to the solar sail. The solar sail then spirals back to Earth in 1 year. Solar sailing reduces launch mass by 60% and trip time by 40%, relative to conventional mission concepts. Results of technology development activities sponsored by the ISPT Program will be provided to demonstrate the level of technology readiness for such missions.

  5. Mechanisms of mercury bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Essa, A M M; Macaskie, L E; Brown, N L

    2002-08-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic heavy metals, and has significant industrial and agricultural uses. These uses have led to severe localized mercury pollution. Mercury volatilization after its reduction to the metallic form by mercury-resistant bacteria has been reported as a mechanism for mercury bioremediation [Brunke, Deckwer, Frischmuth, Horn, Lunsdorf, Rhode, Rohricht, Timmis and Weppen (1993) FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 11, 145-152; von Canstein, Timmis, Deckwer and Wagner-Dobler (1999) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65, 5279-5284]. The reduction/volatilization system requires to be studied further, in order to eliminate the escape of the metallic mercury into the environment. Recently we have demonstrated three different mechanisms for mercury detoxification in one organism, Klebsiella pneumoniae M426, which may increase the capture efficiency of mercury.

  6. Mercury-Atlas Test Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    A NASA Project Mercury spacecraft was test launched at 11:15 AM EST on April 25, 1961 from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in a test designed to qualify the Mercury Spacecraft and all systems, which must function during orbit and reentry from orbit. The Mercury-Atlas vehicle was destroyed by Range Safety Officer about 40 seconds after liftoff. The spacecraft was recovered and appeared to be in good condition. Atlas was designed to launch payloads into low Earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. NASA first launched Atlas as a space launch vehicle in 1958. Project SCORE, the first communications satellite that transmitted President Eisenhower's pre-recorded Christmas speech around the world, was launched on an Atlas. For all three robotic lunar exploration programs, Atlas was used. Atlas/ Centaur vehicles launched both Mariner and Pioneer planetary probes. The current operational Atlas II family has a 100% mission success rating. For more information about Atlas, please see Chapter 2 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  7. IMP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The program requirements and operations requirements for the IMP mission are presented. The satellite configuration is described and the missions are analyzed. The support equipment, logistics, range facilities, and responsibilities of the launching organizations are defined. The systems for telemetry, communications, satellite tracking, and satellite control are identified.

  8. Seasonal Variations in Mercury's Dayside Calcium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MESSENGER spacecraft has observed calcium emission in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis since March 2011. During MESSENGER's primary and first extended missions (March 2011 - March 2013) the dayside calcium exosphere was measured over eight Mercury years. We have simulated these data with a Monte Carlo model of exospheric source processes to show that (a) there is a persistent source of energetic calcium located in the dawn equatorial region, (b) there is a seasonal dependence in the calcium source rate, and (c) there are no obvious year-to-year variations in the near-surface dayside calcium exosphere. Although the precise mechanism responsible for ejecting the calcium has not yet been determined, the most likely process is the dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules produced in micrometeoroid impact plumes to form energetic, escaping calcium atoms.

  9. Dental amalgam and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Mackert, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

  10. Mercury Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on mercury exposure is presented including forms, sources, permissible exposure limits, and physiological effects. The purpose of the Mercury Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Mercury Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  11. The Evolution Of Mercury'S Exosphere Through Four Years Of Observation With Themis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doressoundiram, Alain; Leblanc, F.

    2010-10-01

    Almost twenty years of ground based observations have highlighted several features of Mercury's exosphere which will further explore by two forthcoming space missions to Mercury, MESSENGER to be inserted in 2011 and Bepi-Colombo to be inserted in 2020. Long and short term evolutions of the exosphere, local and global spatial distributions, its sources and sinks and its coupling with both surface and magnetosphere are among the characteristics of Mercury's exosphere that begin to be more clearly understood. Actually, ground based observations provide a view of Mercury's exosphere that will be only poorly seen by these two space missions. As an example, the global annual cycle of Mercury's exosphere, its energetic characteristics and its large scale structure will be poorly or not at all observed by these space missions. In this presentation, we will summarize these points and will describe our most recent observations using THEMIS Solar Telescope.

  12. Discovery of sodium in the atmosphere of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A.; Morgan, T.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of Mercury at the Fraunhofer sodium D lines shows strong emission features that are attributed to resonant scattering of sunlight from sodium vapor in the atmosphere of the planet. The total column abundance of sodium was estimated to be 8.1 x 10 to the 11th atoms per square centimeter which corresponds to a surface density at the subsolar point of about 150,000 atoms per cubic centimeter. The most abundant atmospheric species found by the Mariner 10 mission to Mercury was helium, with a surface density of 4500 atoms per cubic centimeter. It now appears that sodium vapor is a major constituent of Mercury's atmosphere.

  13. The Deep Space Atomic Clock Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.; Koch, Timothy; Kuang, Da; Lee, Karen; Murphy, David; Prestage, John; Tjoelker, Robert; Seubert, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) mission will demonstrate the space flight performance of a small, low-mass, high-stability mercury-ion atomic clock with long term stability and accuracy on par with that of the Deep Space Network. The timing stability introduced by DSAC allows for a 1-Way radiometric tracking paradigm for deep space navigation, with benefits including increased tracking via utilization of the DSN's Multiple Spacecraft Per Aperture (MSPA) capability and full ground station-spacecraft view periods, more accurate radio occultation signals, decreased single-frequency measurement noise, and the possibility for fully autonomous on-board navigation. Specific examples of navigation and radio science benefits to deep space missions are highlighted through simulations of Mars orbiter and Europa flyby missions. Additionally, this paper provides an overview of the mercury-ion trap technology behind DSAC, details of and options for the upcoming 2015/2016 space demonstration, and expected on-orbit clock performance.

  14. The Prospector mission

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B. ); Pieters, C. ); Ulmer, M. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Henrikson, C. )

    1992-09-07

    The Prospector mission combines high resolution visual/near-infrared(IR) imaging spectroscopy with moderately high resolution K- and L-line X-ray fluorescence mapping. These combined capabilities can be used to map the composition of virtually all solar-system objects, ranging from those that lack atmospheres (Mercury, the Earth's Moon, asteroids, and Martian satellites) to the upper atmosphere of Venus. For the purpose of mission definition and development, we have focused here on a mapping, mission to the moons of Mars-specifically Phobos, which is an easily accessible small body of the Solar System and has long been an object of intense speculation. Phobos is variously interpreted as a captured asteroid, a captured but disrupted basaltic achondrite body with anomalously low density, a comet nucleus, a body of reassembled Mars material ejected into orbit during a large impact event, a body of unknown origin but covered by an accumulation of cosmic dust and/or material ejected from Deimos, or none of the above. Multispectral observations of Phobos by instruments on the Phobos 2 spacecraft indicate that the surface of the moon is spectrally heterogeneous, with at least four units based on extended visible color. Distribution of color ratio units are most likely caused by compositional heterogeneity and surficial processes. The composition and structure of Phobos remains a stimulating scientific question, but Phobos is much more than a cipher among planetary phenomena. The low [Delta]V requirements for missions to Phobos make it readily accessible-much more so than the Martian surface. The low orbital height of Phobos make it an attractive platform for staging Mars observation and exploration. Furthermore, the possible chondritic nature of Phobos may provide a valuable reservoir of extractable H, C, N, 0, and S.

  15. The Prospector mission

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.; Pieters, C.; Ulmer, M.; Henrikson, C.

    1992-09-07

    The Prospector mission combines high resolution visual/near-infrared(IR) imaging spectroscopy with moderately high resolution K- and L-line X-ray fluorescence mapping. These combined capabilities can be used to map the composition of virtually all solar-system objects, ranging from those that lack atmospheres (Mercury, the Earth`s Moon, asteroids, and Martian satellites) to the upper atmosphere of Venus. For the purpose of mission definition and development, we have focused here on a mapping, mission to the moons of Mars-specifically Phobos, which is an easily accessible small body of the Solar System and has long been an object of intense speculation. Phobos is variously interpreted as a captured asteroid, a captured but disrupted basaltic achondrite body with anomalously low density, a comet nucleus, a body of reassembled Mars material ejected into orbit during a large impact event, a body of unknown origin but covered by an accumulation of cosmic dust and/or material ejected from Deimos, or none of the above. Multispectral observations of Phobos by instruments on the Phobos 2 spacecraft indicate that the surface of the moon is spectrally heterogeneous, with at least four units based on extended visible color. Distribution of color ratio units are most likely caused by compositional heterogeneity and surficial processes. The composition and structure of Phobos remains a stimulating scientific question, but Phobos is much more than a cipher among planetary phenomena. The low {Delta}V requirements for missions to Phobos make it readily accessible-much more so than the Martian surface. The low orbital height of Phobos make it an attractive platform for staging Mars observation and exploration. Furthermore, the possible chondritic nature of Phobos may provide a valuable reservoir of extractable H, C, N, 0, and S.

  16. Mercury pollution in China

    SciTech Connect

    Gui-Bin Jiang; Jian-Bo Shi; Xin-Bin Feng

    2006-06-15

    With a long history of mercury mining and use and a rapidly growing economy that relies heavily on coal for heat and energy, China faces an enormous challenge to reduce pollution from this toxic metal. The authors delineate what is known about the extent of the problem, regulatory steps are being taken to reduce mercury pollution, and next steps for environmental researchers. It addresses issues of mercury pollution from mercury and gold mining, coal combustion and the chemical industry. Data on dietary intake of mercury is also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 photos.

  17. Mission scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspin, Christine

    1989-01-01

    How a neural network can work, compared to a hybrid system based on an operations research and artificial intelligence approach, is investigated through a mission scheduling problem. The characteristic features of each system are discussed.

  18. Space food systems - Mercury through Apollo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, N. G.; Smith, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    Major achievements which characterized the development of food systems used by American astronauts in manned space flight are reviewed throughout a period spanning the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs up to and including the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Lists of food types are accompanied by information on packaging, storage, preparation, consumption, and quality of particular products. Experience gained from development efforts for the Manned Orbiting Laboratory Program is also discussed.

  19. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  20. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  1. FES Gait Re-education: The Swing Phase Estimation.

    PubMed

    Cikajlo, Imre; Bajd, Tadej

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents the use of multiple sensors for walking assessment and provision of cognitive feedback during early re-education of incomplete spinal cord injured (SCI) humans. The paper is focused on the swing phase estimation as an important part of the Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) gait re-education system for incomplete spinal cord injured persons. The proposed sensory system comprises four accelerometers, one gyro placed at the shank of the paretic leg, and two goniometers placed at the knee and ankle joints, respectively. The data from the sensors are input in the mathematical algorithm applied for swing quality estimation. The output from the algorithm is a numerical value. The calculated output is divided into three levels, each defining the swing quality in terms of good, sufficient, and poor. This information is provided to the patient as an auditory signal. The patient is taught to maximize his efforts to improve the quality of walking, that is, to move the more affected leg in a way that will generate the auditory output corresponding to the level "good".  The preliminary measurements were performed in healthy subjects walking on even terrain and in an incomplete SCI person with C6 lesion during walking on the treadmill. FES in the latter case was triggered manually by a physiotherapist. The results showed that the timing of FES triggering played an important role in sensory-supported FES-assisted walking, that is, the auditory feedback was also a cue to the therapist controlling the FES. The swing quality estimation enabled patients to voluntarily improve their walking, consequently the intensity of FES assistance was decreased. This suggests that the use of an FES multisensor system for cognitive feedback is efficient rehabilitative method in early stage of rehabilitation of walking.

  2. Balance Devices Train Golfers for a Consistent Swing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    As part of the effort to understand the effects of spaceflight on astronauts, NASA funded research that resulted in a commercial product to treat balance disorders. West Palm Beach, Florida-based Sports Therapy Inc. worked with the inventor to modify the technology, creating the Dynamic Balance System (DBS) for sports applications. DBS is now used by Professional Golfers' Association-owned facilities and golf academies to help players achieve an effective, balanced swing.

  3. UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

  4. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent.

  5. Regulation of reaction forces during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    McNitt-Gray, J L; Munaretto, J; Zaferiou, A; Requejo, P S; Flashner, H

    2013-06-01

    During the golf swing, the reaction forces applied at the feet control translation and rotation of the body-club system. In this study, we hypothesized that skilled players using a 6-iron would regulate shot distance by scaling the magnitude of the resultant horizontal reaction force applied to the each foot with minimal modifications in force direction. Skilled players (n = 12) hit golf balls using a 6-iron. Shot distance was varied by hitting the ball as they would normally and when reducing shot distance using the same club. During each swing, reaction forces were measured using dual force plates (1200 Hz) and three-dimensional kinematics were simultaneously captured (110 Hz). The results indicate that, on average, the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces of the target leg were significantly less than normal (5%, p < 0.05) when reducing shot distance. No significant differences in the orientation of the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces were observed. Resultant horizontal reaction force-angle relationships within leg and temporal relationships between target and rear legs during the swing were consistent within player across shot conditions. Regulation of force magnitude with minimal modification in force direction is expected to provide advantages from muscle activation, coordination, and performance points of view.

  6. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  7. Regulation of reaction forces during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    McNitt-Gray, J L; Munaretto, J; Zaferiou, A; Requejo, P S; Flashner, H

    2013-06-01

    During the golf swing, the reaction forces applied at the feet control translation and rotation of the body-club system. In this study, we hypothesized that skilled players using a 6-iron would regulate shot distance by scaling the magnitude of the resultant horizontal reaction force applied to the each foot with minimal modifications in force direction. Skilled players (n = 12) hit golf balls using a 6-iron. Shot distance was varied by hitting the ball as they would normally and when reducing shot distance using the same club. During each swing, reaction forces were measured using dual force plates (1200 Hz) and three-dimensional kinematics were simultaneously captured (110 Hz). The results indicate that, on average, the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces of the target leg were significantly less than normal (5%, p < 0.05) when reducing shot distance. No significant differences in the orientation of the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces were observed. Resultant horizontal reaction force-angle relationships within leg and temporal relationships between target and rear legs during the swing were consistent within player across shot conditions. Regulation of force magnitude with minimal modification in force direction is expected to provide advantages from muscle activation, coordination, and performance points of view. PMID:23898685

  8. Rotational biomechanics of the elite golf swing: benchmarks for amateurs.

    PubMed

    Meister, David W; Ladd, Amy L; Butler, Erin E; Zhao, Betty; Rogers, Andrew P; Ray, Conrad J; Rose, Jessica

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine biomechanical factors that may influence golf swing power generation. Three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were examined in 10 professional and 5 amateur male golfers. Upper-torso rotation, pelvic rotation, X-factor (relative hip-shoulder rotation), O-factor (pelvic obliquity), S-factor (shoulder obliquity), and normalized free moment were assessed in relation to clubhead speed at impact (CSI). Among professional golfers, results revealed that peak free moment per kilogram, peak X-factor, and peak S-factor were highly consistent, with coefficients of variation of 6.8%, 7.4%, and 8.4%, respectively. Downswing was initiated by reversal of pelvic rotation, followed by reversal of upper-torso rotation. Peak X-factor preceded peak free moment in all swings for all golfers, and occurred during initial downswing. Peak free moment per kilogram, X-factor at impact, peak X-factor, and peak upper-torso rotation were highly correlated to CSI (median correlation coefficients of 0.943, 0.943, 0.900, and 0.900, respectively). Benchmark curves revealed kinematic and kinetic temporal and spatial differences of amateurs compared with professional golfers. For amateurs, the number of factors that fell outside 1-2 standard deviations of professional means increased with handicap. This study identified biomechanical factors highly correlated to golf swing power generation and may provide a basis for strategic training and injury prevention. PMID:21844613

  9. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent. PMID:23816264

  10. Lumbar spinal loads and muscle activity during a golf swing.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Tae; Chow, John W; Chae, Woen-Sik

    2012-06-01

    This study estimated the lumbar spinal loads at the L4-L5 level and evaluated electromyographic (EMG) activity of right and left rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi muscles during a golf swing. Four super VHS camcorders and two force plates were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics of golf swings performed by five male collegiate golfers. Average EMG levels for different phases of golf swing were determined. An EMG-assisted optimization model was applied to compute the contact forces acting on the L4-L5. The results revealed a mean peak compressive load of over six times the body weight (BW) during the downswing and mean peak anterior and medial shear loads approaching 1.6 and 0.6 BW during the follow-through phases. The peak compressive load estimated in this study was high, but less than the corresponding value (over 8 BW) reported by a previous study. Average EMG levels of different muscles were the highest in the acceleration and follow-through phases, suggesting a likely link between co-contractions of paraspinal muscles and lumbar spinal loads. PMID:22900401

  11. Swings of Science: From Complexity to Simplicity and Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pismen, L. M.

    Science brings order into unfathomable complexity of nature, exposing its simple underlying laws. New insights and new means of observation bring about, however, new questions, and the world picture becomes more complex again, until simplified on a still deeper level of understanding. The swinging motion from complexity to simplicity and back can be discerned in the evolution of religions, in the search for basic elements, in cosmology. We will follow this motion in more detail taking as examples more specific problems of contemporary science: turbulence, pattern formation and biological morphogenesis. In all cases, simplicity achieved by discerning simplified laws and generic scenarios at the heart of complex phenomena is broken again as they are studied in minute detail. In our time, the swing moves with staggering speed toward ever increased complexity. This does not mean that the reductionist scientific paradigm is abandoned: even simple laws can engender complex phenomenology; metaphysical offshoots appear, however, on fringes of science. We do not know whether the swing will ever turn around toward simplicity again.

  12. Mercury's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    In determining Mercury's core structure from its rotational properties, the location of Cassini state 1 is crucial. Convincing radar evidence indicates that the mantle rests on a liquid layer (Margot et al. 2005), but there are no empirical constraints on the moment of inertia C/MR2, which constraints must wait for the determination of the gravitational coefficients J2 and C22 from the MESSENGER orbiting spacecraft, and an accurate determination of the obliquity of the Cassini state. Tidal and core-mantle dissipation drive the spin to the Cassini state with a time scale O(105) years, so the spin should occupy the Cassini state and thereby define its obliquity---unless there has been a recent excitation of a free precession of the spin. Another way the spin might be displaced from the Cassini state is if the variations in the orbital elements, which change the position of the Cassini state, cause the spin axis to lag behind as it attempts to follow the state. Fortunately, the solid angle the spin axis encloses as it precesses around the Cassini state is an adiabatic invariant, and it is conserved if the orbital element variations are slow compared to the precession rate. As the precession period is O(1000) years, and the time scales of orbital parameter variations are O(105) years, the spin axis should remain very close to the Cassini state if it were ever close. But how close is close? The increasing precision of the radar and eventual spacecraft measurements warrants a check on the likely proximity of the spin axis to the Cassini state. By numerically following the positions of the spin axis and Cassini state with orbital parameters varying with time scales and amplitudes comparable to the real variations, we show that the spin should remain within 1″ of the Cassini state once dissipative torques bring it there. The current spin axis position should thus define the Cassini state sufficiently to put reasonably tight constraints on the core structure

  13. Mercury Report-Children's exposure to elemental mercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF - 781KB] En Español [PDF - 6.6MB] What did ATSDR find? For children, most elemental mercury exposures ... that exposed children to elemental mercury. The report did not include a review of mercury exposures from ...

  14. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  15. Can toe-ground footwear margin alter swing-foot ground clearance?

    PubMed

    Nagano, Hanatsu; Sparrow, W A; Begg, Rezaul K

    2015-07-01

    Falls are an important healthcare concern in the older population and tripping is the primary cause. Greater swing foot-ground clearance is functional for tripping prevention. Trips frequently occur due to the lowest part of the shoe contacting the walking surface. Shoe design effects on swing foot-ground clearance are, therefore, important considerations. When a shoe is placed on a flat surface, there usually is small vertical margin (VM) between the walking surface and the minimum toe point (MTP). The current study examined the effects of VM on swing foot-ground clearance at a critical gait cycle event, minimum foot clearance (MFC). 3D coordinates of the swing foot (i.e. MTP and heel) were obtained during the swing phase. MTP represented the swing foot-ground clearance and various MTPs were modelled based on a range of VMs. The sagittal orientation of the toe and heel relative to the walking surface was also considered to evaluate effects of VM and swing foot angle on foot-ground clearance. Greater VM increased the swing foot-ground clearance. At MFC, for example, 0.09 cm increase was estimated for every 0.1cm VM. Foot angle throughout the swing phase was typically -30° and 70°. Increasing swing ankle dorsiflexion can maximise VM, which is effective for tripping prevention. Further research will be needed to determine the maximum thresholds of VM to be safely incorporated into a shoe.

  16. The metabolic cost of human running: is swinging the arms worth it?

    PubMed

    Arellano, Christopher J; Kram, Rodger

    2014-07-15

    Although the mechanical function is quite clear, there is no consensus regarding the metabolic benefit of arm swing during human running. We compared the metabolic cost of running using normal arm swing with the metabolic cost of running while restricting the arms in three different ways: (1) holding the hands with the arms behind the back in a relaxed position (BACK), (2) holding the arms across the chest (CHEST) and (3) holding the hands on top of the head (HEAD). We hypothesized that running without arm swing would demand a greater metabolic cost than running with arm swing. Indeed, when compared with running using normal arm swing, we found that net metabolic power demand was 3, 9 and 13% greater for the BACK, CHEST and HEAD conditions, respectively (all P<0.05). We also found that when running without arm swing, subjects significantly increased the peak-to-peak amplitudes of both shoulder and pelvis rotation about the vertical axis, most likely a compensatory strategy to counterbalance the rotational angular momentum of the swinging legs. In conclusion, our findings support our general hypothesis that swinging the arms reduces the metabolic cost of human running. Our findings also demonstrate that arm swing minimizes torso rotation. We infer that actively swinging the arms provides both metabolic and biomechanical benefits during human running.

  17. The effects of the arm swing on biomechanical and physiological aspects of roller ski skating.

    PubMed

    Hegge, Ann Magdalen; Ettema, Gertjan; de Koning, Jos J; Rognstad, Asgeir Bakken; Hoset, Martin; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2014-08-01

    This study analyzed the biomechanical and physiological effects of the arm swing in roller ski skating, and compared leg-skating (i.e. ski skating without poles) using a pronounced arm swing (SWING) with leg-skating using locked arms (LOCKED). Sixteen elite male cross-country skiers performed submaximal stages at 10, 15 and 20kmh(-1) on a 2% inclined treadmill in the two techniques. SWING demonstrated higher peak push-off forces and a higher force impulse at all speeds, but a longer cycle length only at the highest speed (all P<.05), indicating a lower force effectiveness with SWING at the two lowest speeds. Additionally, the flexion-extension movement in the lower limbs was more pronounced for SWING. Oxygen uptake was higher for SWING at the two lowest speeds (both P<.05) without any differences in blood lactate. At the highest speed, oxygen uptake did not differ between SWING and LOCKED, but the RER, blood lactate and ventilation were lower with SWING (all P<.05). Taken together, these results demonstrate that utilizing the arm swing in roller ski skating increases the ski forces and aerobic energy cost at low and moderate speeds, whereas the greater forces at high speed lead to a longer cycle length and smaller anaerobic contribution.

  18. Wind Prelaunch Mission Operations Report (MOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wind mission is the first mission of the Global Geospace Science (GGS) initiative. The Wind laboratory will study the properties of particles and waves in the region between the Earth and the Sun. Using the Moon s gravity to save fuel, dual lunar swing-by orbits enable the spacecraft to sample regions close to and far from the Earth. During the three year mission, Wind will pass through the bow shock of Earth's magnetosphere to begin a thorough investigation of the solar wind. Mission objectives require spacecraft measurements in two orbits: lunar swing- by ellipses out to distances of 250 Earth radii (RE) and a small orbit around the Lagrangian point L-l that remains between the Earth and the Sun. Wind will be placed into an initial orbit for approximately 2 years. It will then be maneuvered into a transition orbit and ultimately into a halo orbit at the Earth-Sun L-l point where it will operate for the remainder of its lifetime. The Wind satellite development was managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center with the Martin Marietta Corporation, Astro-Space Division serving as the prime contractor. Overall programmatic direction was provided by NASA Headquarters, Office of Space Science. The spacecraft will be launched under a launch service contract with the McDonnell Douglas Corporation on a Delta II Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) within a November l-l4, 1994 launch window. The Wind spacecraft carries six U.S. instruments, one French instrument, and the first Russian instrument ever to fly on an American satellite. The Wind and Polar missions are the two components of the GGS Program. Wind is also the second mission of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. The first ISTP mission, Geotail, is a joint project of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science of Japan and NASA which launched in 1992. The Wind mission is planned to overlap Geotail by six months and Polar by one year

  19. Mercury: The World Closest to the Sun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordell, Bruce M.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various topics related to the geology of Mercury including the origin of Mercury's magnetism, Mercury's motions, volcanism, scarps, and Mercury's violent birth and early life. Includes a table comparing Mercury's orbital and physical data to that of earth's. (JN)

  20. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  1. Mercury in the National Parks: Current Status and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, C.; Blett, T. F.; Morris, K.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is a globally distributed contaminant that can harm human and wildlife health, and threaten resources the National Park Service (NPS) is charged with protecting. Due in part to emissions and long-range transport from coal burning power plants, even remote national park environments receive mercury deposition from the atmosphere. Given the concern regarding mercury, there are and have been many mercury monitoring initiatives in national parks to determine the risk from mercury contamination. This includes the study of litter fall at Acadia National Park (Maine), snow at Mount Rainier National Park (Washington), heron eggs at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (Indiana), bat hair at Mammoth Cave National Park (Kentucky), and panthers at Everglades National Park (Florida). Wet deposition is also measured at 16 national parks as part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Network / Mercury Deposition Network. Results from these studies indicate that mercury deposition is increasing or is elevated in many national parks, and fish and other biota have been found to contain levels of mercury above toxicity thresholds for impacts to both humans and wildlife. Current research coordinated by the NPS Air Resources Division (ARD) in Denver, Colorado, on the effects of mercury includes broad-scale assessments of mercury in fish, dragonfly larvae, and songbirds across 30+ national parks. Fish provide the trophic link to human and wildlife health, dragonfly larvae can describe fine-scale differences in mercury levels, and songbirds shed light on the risk to terrestrial ecosystems. External project partners include the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Maine, and the Biodiversity Research Institute. In addition, the dragonfly project engages citizen scientists in the collection of dragonfly larvae, supporting the NPS Centennial Initiative by connecting people to parks and advancing the educational mission, and increasing public awareness about mercury impacts. Much of

  2. Near Global Mosaic of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Becker, T. L.; Weller, L. A.; Turner, S.; Nguyen, L.; Selby, C.; Denevi, B. W.; Murchie, S. L.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008 the MESSENGER spacecraft made two close flybys (M1 and M2) of Mercury and imaged about 74% of the planet at a resolution of 1 km per pixel, and at higher resolution for smaller portions of the planet. The Mariner 10 spacecraft imaged about 42% of Mercury’s surface more than 30 years ago. Combining image data collected by the two missions yields coverage of about 83% of Mercury’s surface. MESSENGER will perform its third and final flyby of Mercury (M3) on 29 September 2009. This will yield approximately 86% coverage of Mercury, leaving only the north and south polar regions yet to be imaged by MESSENGER after orbit insertion in March 2011. A new global mosaic of Mercury was constructed using 325 images containing 3566 control points (8110 measures) from M1 and 225 images containing 1465 control points (3506 measures) from M2. The M3 flyby is shifted in subsolar longitude only by 4° from M2, so the added coverage is very small. However, this small slice of Mercury fills a gore in the mosaic between the M1 and M2 data and allows a complete cartographic tie around the equator. We will run a new bundle block adjustment with the additional images acquired from M3. This new edition of the MESSENGER Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) global mosaic of Mercury includes many improvements since the M2 flyby in October 2008. A new distortion model for the NAC camera greatly improves the image-to-image registration. Optical distortion correction is independent of pointing error correction, and both are required for a mosaic of high quality. The new distortion model alone reduced residual pointing errors for both flybys significantly; residual pixel error improved from 0.71 average (3.7 max) to 0.13 average (1.7 max) for M1 and from 0.72 average (4.8 max.) to 0.17 average (3.5 max) for M2. Analysis quantifying pivot motor position has led to development of a new model that improves accuracy of the pivot platform attitude. This model improves

  3. Process for low mercury coal

    DOEpatents

    Merriam, N.W.; Grimes, R.W.; Tweed, R.E.

    1995-04-04

    A process is described for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal. 4 figures.

  4. Process for low mercury coal

    DOEpatents

    Merriam, Norman W.; Grimes, R. William; Tweed, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

  5. Hermes Global Orbiter: a Discovery mission in gestation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Horn, L. J.; Weiss, J. R.; Smythe, W. D.

    The Hermes Global Orbiter (HGO) is a Discovery class mission under study, which is investigating the possibility of placing a small spacecraft in highly elliptical polar orbit about Mercury. The purpose of the mission is to conduct observations of the planet's surface, atmosphere and magnetosphere. The prospective mission calls for the spacecraft to be in Mercury orbit for one Earth year. The payload contains four subsystems: a multispectral imaging camera, an ultraviolet spectrometer, a lidar, and a magnetic field and plasma, experiment. The first three subsystems are mounted on a single axis scan platform and the magnetic field and plasma experiment is boom deployed. This payload is capable of making observations that address a number of fundamental questions about Mercury and its role as the planet which condensed in the hottest region of the solar nebula.

  6. Substorms on Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Ness, N. F.; Yeates, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative similarities between some of the variations in the Mercury encounter data and variations in the corresponding regions of the earth's magnetosphere during substorms are pointed out. The Mariner 10 data on Mercury show a strong interaction between the solar wind and the plant similar to a scaled down version of that for the earth's magnetosphere. Some of the features observed in the night side Mercury magnetosphere suggest time dependent processes occurring there.

  7. Mercury's interior from MESSENGER geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed more than 4 years of operations in orbit about Mercury. One of the main mission goals was the determination of the interior structure of Mercury enabled by geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, rotation, and tides by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system. MLA acquired over 25 million individual measurements of Mercury's shape that are mostly limited to the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. However, the lack of laser altimetry in the southern hemisphere has been partly compensated by ˜400 occultations of spacecraft radio signals. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2. The combination of altimetry and radio measurements provides a powerful tool for the investigation of Mercury's orientation and tides, which enable a better understanding of the interior structure of the planet. The MLA measurements have been assembled into a digital elevation model (DEM) of the northern hemisphere. We then used individual altimetric measurements from the spacecraft for orbit determination, together with the radio tracking, over a continuous span of time using a batch least-squares filter. All observations were combined to recover directly the gravity field coefficients, obliquity, librations, and tides by minimizing the discrepancies between the computed observables and actual measurements. We will present the estimated 100×100 gravity field model, the obliquity, the Love number k2, and, for the first time, the tidal phase lag φ and the amplitude of the longitudinal libration from radio and altimetry data. The k2 phase provides information on Mercury's dissipation and mantle viscosity and allows a determination of the Q factor. A refinement of

  8. Peru Mercury Inventory 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in

  9. A 15degree sideview of the swing span bridge in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A 15-degree sideview of the swing span bridge in the open position, with the 364' - 0-1/2' swing span balanced on the center/pivot pier where the two (2) center supports deliver their loads onto a system of distributing girders, circular drum and rim bearing support wheels. The pier is circular and of stone masonry construction. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  10. Mission Possible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Penny, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    As teachers, our most important mission is to turn our students into readers. It sounds so simple, but it's hard work, and we're all on a deadline. Kittle describes a class in which her own expectations that students would become readers combined with a few impassioned strategies succeeded ... at least with a young man named Alan.

  11. MESSENGER's Low-Altitude Campaign: Mercury at Unprecedented Close Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Nittler, L. R.; Byrne, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    In March 2013, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft began its Second Extended Mission (XM2) to acquire observations of Mercury's surface and interior at unprecedented spatial resolution and measurements of the planet's dynamic magnetosphere and exosphere at high temporal resolution during the peak and declining phase of the current solar cycle. XM2 is framed by six science questions, each motivated by discoveries and observations made during MESSENGER's Primary and First Extended Missions: (1) What active and recent processes have affected Mercury's surface? (2) How has the state of stress in Mercury's crust evolved over time? (3) How have compositions of volcanic materials on Mercury evolved over time? (4) What are the characteristics of volatile emplacement and sequestration in Mercury's north polar region? (5) What are the consequences of precipitating ions and energetic electrons at Mercury? (6) How do Mercury's exosphere and magnetosphere respond to both extreme and stable solar wind conditions during solar maximum and the declining phase of the solar cycle? Also since March 2013, the periapsis altitude, or closest approach distance to Mercury's surface, has declined progressively with each orbit, in response to the gravitational attraction of the Sun, although the rate of that decline depends on the angle between the Mercury-Sun line and MESSENGER's orbit plane. For the first year of XM2, no propulsive orbit-correction maneuvers (OCMs) were conducted to change the evolution of the spacecraft's orbital parameters. Because sufficient propellant remained at the end of that year to complete four periapsis-raising OCMs, a low-altitude campaign was designed to use those maneuvers to maximize the number of orbits for which the periapsis altitude is as low as 15-25 km. The periapsis altitude passed below 200 km altitude for the first time on 20 April 2014 and below 100 km altitude for the first time on 25 July 2014

  12. Intelligent Power Swing Detection Scheme to Prevent False Relay Tripping Using S-Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Nor Z.; Abidin, Ahmad F.; Musirin, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Distance relay design is equipped with out-of-step tripping scheme to ensure correct distance relay operation during power swing. The out-of-step condition is a consequence result from unstable power swing. It requires proper detection of power swing to initiate a tripping signal followed by separation of unstable part from the entire power system. The distinguishing process of unstable swing from stable swing poses a challenging task. This paper presents an intelligent approach to detect power swing based on S-Transform signal processing tool. The proposed scheme is based on the use of S-Transform feature of active power at the distance relay measurement point. It is demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to detect and discriminate the unstable swing from stable swing occurring in the system. To ascertain validity of the proposed scheme, simulations were carried out with the IEEE 39 bus system and its performance has been compared with the wavelet transform-based power swing detection scheme.

  13. Experiments out of the solar system ecliptic plane: An introduction to the ecliptic mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mission planning by NASA and ESA for the 1980 timeframe to observe the sun from an angle other than the solar ecliptic plane is discussed. Such missions will aid in a more thorough understanding of the sun, interplanetary space, and their influence on the earth. Jupiter swing-by techniques (first achieved by Pioneer 10) are proposed as a means of achieving an out-of-the-ecliptic mission for solar studies. Spacecraft trajectories are illustrated for a dual Pioneer spacecraft mission to observe the sun.

  14. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs. PMID:24714543

  15. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs.

  16. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  17. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  18. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  19. A swing arm profilometer for large telescope mirror element metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, M. J.; Efstathiou, A.; King, C. W.; Walker, D. D.; Gee, A. E.; Lewis, A. J.; Oldfield, S.; Steel, R. M.

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of ground-based extremely large telescopes of 30 m to 100 m aperture calls for the manufacture of several hundred sub-aperture segments of 1 m to 2 m diameter. Each annulus of the overall aperture is formed from separate elements of the appropriate off-axis conic section (usually a paraboloid). Manufacture of these segments requires a systematic approach to in- and post-process metrology for all stages of manufacture, including the grinding stage, despite the fact that the resulting ground surface is generally not amenable to optically reflective measurement techniques. To address the need for measurements on such 1 m to 2 m telescope segments, a swing arm profilometer has been constructed as part of a collaborative project between University College London (UCL) and the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The current swing-arm profilometer is intended as a proof-of-concept device and has the capability to measure concave and convex surfaces of up to 1 m in diameter with a minimum radius of curvature of 1.75 m for concave and 1.25 m for convex surfaces. Results will be traceable to national length standards. Principles of the swing-arm instrument will be described together with the mechanics of the arm design, its bearing and adjustment arrangements and surface probe options. We assess the performance requirements of 20 nm RMS form measurement accuracy in the context of the tolerances of the selected profilometer components, the error budget, and preliminary system measurements. Initial results are presented with a Solartron linear encoder. We also plan to mount optical sensors on the end of the arm as an alternative to traditional contact probes. Initially these will include an Arden AWS-50 wavefront curvature sensor and a Fisba μ-phase interferometer. The method of attachment of the Arden AWS-50 is outlined. The swing arm profilometer is to be located at a specialised facility, the OPtiC Technium, Denbigh, North Wales, where it will form

  20. Analysis of Human Swing Movement and Transferring into Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimodaira, Jun; Amaoka, Yuki; Hamatani, Shinsuke; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Hirai, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Fumio

    Based on Generalized Motor Program, we analyzed the skill of human's table-tennis movement We hypothesized that it can be divided into arm swing and translational movements by upper and lower body movements, respectively. We expressed 3D position of the racket by only one parameter resulted from the analysis using Principal Component Analysis. Body trunk position measurement attested the lower body plays the role of keeping fixed relative-position between the ball and the body trunk at any hitting time. By applying human skills in upper and lower body movements, we could make the robot properly play table-tennis with a human.

  1. Astronaut Gordon Cooper assisted into his Mercury Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., is assisted into his 'Faith 7' Mercury Spacecraft early Tuesday (May 14, 1963) morning. Cooper remained in the spacecraft for approximately 5 hours and then climbed out again as the mission was delayed because of trouble at a tracking station.

  2. Mariner Venus Mercury, 1973. [close flyby investigation of mercury after Venus-flyby, and observation of Kohoutek comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The Mariner Venus Mercury 1973 unmanned mission is discussed, which is designed to conduct a close flyby investigation of the planet Mercury after using the gravity-turn technique in a Venus flyby. Its scientific purposes include photographic, thermal, and spectral surveys, radio occulation, and charged particle/magnetic measurements at each planet, observation of solar-system fields and particles from 1.0 a.u. down to 0.4 a.u., and comparative planetary surveys between the Earth, the Moon, Venus, and Mercury. It is also intended to observe Kohoutek's comet. The trajectory permits establishment of a solar orbit in phase with Mercury's, permitting repeated encounters with that planet.

  3. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned. PMID:17183319

  4. Dynamic duo captures mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.; Adams, B.

    2006-02-15

    There is strong evidence that the combination of wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) scrubbers and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) can prove a viable and formidable combination for knocking out mercury. This article analyzes the capabilities and limitations of the SCR-FGD combination for mercury compliance, including applicability to different types of coal and issues with scrubber by-products. 3 figs.

  5. Mercury in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

    2008-08-06

    Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

  6. Mercury and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... made when mercury in the air gets into water. The mercury in the air comes from natural sources (such as volcanoes) and man-made sources (such as burning coal and other pollution). You can get methylmercury in your body by ...

  7. Mercury in the environment

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

    2016-07-12

    Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

  8. Mercury's rotational state from combined MESSENGER laser altimeter and image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Preusker, Frank; Margot, Jean-Luc; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    With orbital data from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, we measured the rotational state of Mercury. We developed a novel approach that combined digital terrain models from stereo images (stereo DTMs) and laser altimeter data, and we applied it to 3 years of MESSENGER observations. We find a large libration amplitude, which in combination with the measured obliquity confirms that Mercury possesses a liquid outer core. Our results confirm previous Earth-based observations of Mercury's rotational state. However, we measured a rotation rate that deviates significantly from the mean resonant rotation rate. The larger rotation rate can be interpreted as the signature of a long-period libration cycle. From these findings we derived new constraints on the interior structure of Mercury. The measured rotational parameters define Mercury's body-fixed frame and are critical for the coordinate system of the planet as well as for planning the future BepiColombo spacecraft mission.

  9. Core Muscle Activation in One-Armed and Two-Armed Kettlebell Swing.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Vidar; Fimland, Marius S; Gunnarskog, Aril; Jungård, Georg-Andrè; Slåttland, Roy-Andrè; Vraalsen, Øyvind F; Saeterbakken, Atle H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the electromyographic activity of rectus abdominis, oblique external, and lower and upper erector spinae at both sides of the truncus in 1-armed and 2-armed kettlebell swing. Sixteen healthy men performed 10 repetitions of both exercises using a 16-kg kettlebell in randomized order. For the upper erector spinae, the activation of the contralateral side during 1-armed swing was 24% greater than that of the ipsilateral side during 1-armed swing (p < 0.001) and 11% greater during 2-armed swing (p = 0.026). Furthermore, the activation in 2-armed swing was 12-16% greater than for the ipsilateral side in 1-armed swing (p < 0.001). For rectus abdominis, however, 42% lower activation of the contralateral side was observed during 1-armed swing compared with ipsilateral sides during 2-armed swing (p = 0.038) and 48% compared with the ipsilateral side during 1-armed swing (p = 0.044). Comparing the different phases of the swing, most differences in the upper erector spinae were found in the lower parts of the movement, whereas for the rectus abdominis, the differences were found during the hip extension. In contrast, similar muscle activity in the lower erector spinae and external oblique between the different conditions was observed (p = 0.055-0.969). In conclusion, performing the kettlebell swing with 1 arm resulted in greater neuromuscular activity for the contralateral side of the upper erector spinae and ipsilateral side of the rectus abdominis, and lower activation of the opposite side of the respective muscles.

  10. A Three-Dimensional Kinematic and Kinetic Study of the College-Level Female Softball Swing

    PubMed Central

    Milanovich, Monica; Nesbit, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper quantifies and discusses the three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the female softball swing as performed by fourteen female collegiate amateur subjects. The analyses were performed using a three-dimensional computer model. The model was driven kinematically from subject swings data that were recorded with a multi-camera motion analysis system. Each subject used two distinct bats with significantly different inertial properties. Model output included bat trajectories, subject/bat interaction forces and torques, work, and power. These data formed the basis for a detailed analysis and description of fundamental swing kinematic and kinetic quantities. The analyses revealed that the softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. In addition, the potential effects of bat properties on swing mechanics are discussed. The paths of the hands and the centre-of-curvature of the bat relative to the horizontal plane appear to be important trajectory characteristics of the swing. Descriptions of the swing mechanics and practical implications are offered based upon these findings. Key Points The female softball swing is a highly coordinated and individual three-dimensional motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant in all kinematic and kinetic quantities. The paths of the grip point, bat centre-of-curvature, CG, and COP are complex yet reveal consistent patterns among subjects indicating that these patterns are fundamental components of the swing. The most important mechanical quantity relative to generating bat speed is the total work applied to the bat from the batter. Computer modeling of the softball swing is a viable means for study of the fundamental mechanics of the swing motion, the interactions between the batter and the bat, and the energy transfers between the two. PMID:24570623

  11. Mercury poisoning in wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Fairbrother, Anne; Locke, Louis N.; Hoff, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    Mercury is an intriguing contaminant because it has complex chemical properties, a wide range of harmful effects, and an infinite persistence in the environment. Die-offs of wildlife due to mercury have occurred in many countries, especially before mercury seed dressings were banned. Today, most mercury problems are associated with aquatic environments. Methylmercury, the most toxic chemical form, attacks many organ systems, but damage to the central nervous system is most severe. Harmful wet-weight concentrations of mercury, as methylmercury, in the tissues of adult birds and mammals range from about 8-30 ppm in the brain, 20-60 ppm in liver, 20-60 ppm in kidney, and 15-30 ppm in muscle. Young animals may be more sensitive.

  12. A study of the effects of the atmospheric drag in swing-bay trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertachinidealmeidaprado, Antonio Fernando; Broucke, Roger A.

    In this paper, we study the effects of the atmospheric drag in Swing-By maneuvers. Our goal is to simulate a large variety of initial conditions for those orbits and study them according to the effects caused by this close approach. The practical importance of this topic is to allow mission designers to explore close approaches with planets in a more realistic model, as well as to take advantage of the atmospheric effects, when it is possible. We use the well-known planar restricted circular three-body problem plus atmospheric drag as our model. We integrate numerically the equations of motion forward and backward in time, until the spacecraft is in a distance that we can consider far enough from the planet, such that we can neglect the planet's effect and consider the system formed by the Sun and the spacecraft as a two-body system. At these two points we can use the two-body celestial mechanics to compute energy, angular momentum and the Jacobian constant before and after the close approach.

  13. A study of the effects of the atmospheric drag in swing-by trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertachini de Almeida Prado, Antonio Fe; Broucke, Roger

    In this paper, we study the effects of the atmospheric drag in swing-by maneuvers. Our goal is to simulate a large variety of initial conditions for those orbits and study them according to the effects caused by this close approach. The practical importance of this topic is to allow mission designers to explore close approaches with planets in a more realistic model, as well as to take advantages of the atmospheric effects, when it is possible. We use the well-known planar restricted circular three-body problem plus atmospheric drag as our model. We integrate numerically the equations of motion forward and backward in time, until the spacecraft is in a distance that we can consider far enough from the planet, such that we can neglect the planet's effect and consider the system formed by the Sun and the spacecraft as a two-body system. At these two points we can use the two-body celestial mechanics to compute energy, angular momentum and the Jacobian constant before and after the close approach.

  14. Planetary mission summaries. Volume 1: Introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Tabular synopses of twelve missions are presented along with the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 mission for comparison. Mission definitions considered include: Mars Polar Orbiter; Mars Surface Sample Return; Mars Rover; Marine Jupiter/Uranus 1979 with Uranus Entry Probe; Mariner Jupiter Orbiter; Mariner Mercury Orbiter 1978; Early Mariner Comet Flyby Solar Electric Encke Slow Flyby; Mariner Encke Ballistic Flyby; Solar Electric Encke Rendezvous 1981; Venus Orbital Imaging Radar; Solar Electric Out-of-the-Eliptic Probe 1979. Technical conclusions of mission studies are given in order that these results may interact with the broader questions of scope, pace, and priorities in the planetary exploration program.

  15. Cyclical swings: The bête noire of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Decker, Hannah S

    2016-02-01

    Progress in psychiatry in the West has been retarded by the proclivity of the discipline to swing violently between 2 approaches to viewing mental illness; that is, emphasizing-to the exclusion of the other-the material-somatic vs the psychical-experiential avenues to knowledge. Each time a shift occurs, the leaders of the new dominant approach emotionally denounce the principles and ideas that came before. We can examine this phenomenon historically by looking at Romantic psychiatry, mid-/late-19th century empirical psychiatry, psychoanalysis, and modern biological psychiatry. Looking at the 2 approaches in treatment today, the gold standard of patient care involves combining empirical/psychological care in 1 person (the psychiatrist) or shared between 2 clinicians working intimately with each other (psychiatrist with psychologist or social worker.) Yet as regards psychiatrists, they are discouraged from paying full attention to the psychological side by the way managed care and third-party payment have combined to remunerate them. Finally, how do we account for the intense swings and denunciations in psychiatry? The author speculates on possible explanations but leaves the question open for her readers. PMID:26844651

  16. Jupiter Swing-By trajectories passing near the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, Roger A.; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.

    We study and classify the Swing-By maneuvers that use the planet Jupiter as the body for the close approach. Our goal is to simulate a large variety of initial conditions for these orbits and classify them according to the effects caused by the close approach in the orbit of the spacecraft. We use the well-known regularized (Lamaitre regularization) planar-restricted-circular-three-body problem as our model. We especially check which ones of those orbits have a passage near the Earth. This is very important, because only those orbits have a potential use for transfers from the Earth. We show our results in letter-plots, where one letter describing the effects of the Swing-By is plotted in a two-dimensional graph that has in the horizontal axis the angle Psi (the angle between the perigee vector and the Sun-Jupiter line) and in the vertical axis the Jacobian constant of the spacecraft. We make one plot for each value of the perigee distance (the distance between the spacecraft and Jupiter during the close encounter).

  17. Jupiter swing-by trajectories passing near the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broucke, Roger A.; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.

    1993-01-01

    We study and classify the Swing-By maneuvers that use the planet Jupiter as the body for the close approach. Our goal is to simulate a large variety of initial conditions for these orbits and classify them according to the effects caused by the close approach in the orbit of the spacecraft. We use the well-known regularized (Lamaitre regularization) planar-restricted -circular-three-body problem as our model. We especially check which ones of those orbits have a passage near the Earth. This is very important, because only those orbits have potential use for transfers from the Earth. We show our results in letter-plots, where one letter describing the effects of the Swing-By is plotted in a two-dimensional graph that has in the horizontal axis the angle psi (the angle between the perigee vector and the Sun-Jupiter line) and in the vertical axis the Jacobian constant of the spacecraft. We make one plot for each value of the perigee distance (the distance between the spacecraft and Jupiter during the close encounter).

  18. Angular Impulse and Balance Regulation During the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Travis J; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to determine how skilled players regulate linear and angular impulse while maintaining balance during the golf swing. Eleven highly-skilled golf players performed swings with a 6-iron and driver. Components contributing to linear and angular impulse generated by the rear and target legs (resultant horizontal reaction force [RFh], RFh-angle, and moment arm) were quantified and compared across the group and within a player (α = .05). Net angular impulse generated by both the rear and target legs was greater for the driver than the 6-iron. Mechanisms used to regulate angular impulse generation between clubs varied across players and required coordination between the legs. Increases in net angular impulse with a driver involved increases in target leg RFh. Rear leg RFh-angle was maintained between clubs whereas target leg RFh became more aligned with the target line. Net linear impulse perpendicular to the target line remained near zero, preserving balance, while net linear impulse along the target line decreased in magnitude. These results indicate that the net angular impulse was regulated between clubs by coordinating force generation of the rear and target legs while sustaining balance throughout the task. PMID:26958870

  19. Electromyography variables during the golf swing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Cabri, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to review systematically the literature available on electromyographic (EMG) variables of the golf swing. From the 19 studies found, a high variety of EMG methodologies were reported. With respect to EMG intensity, the right erector spinae seems to be highly activated, especially during the acceleration phase, whereas the oblique abdominal muscles showed moderate to low levels of activation. The pectoralis major, subscapularis and latissimus dorsi muscles of both sides showed their peak activity during the acceleration phase. High muscle activity was found in the forearm muscles, especially in the wrist flexor muscles demonstrating activity levels above the maximal voluntary contraction. In the lower limb higher muscle activity of the trail side was found. There is no consensus on the influence of the golf club used on the neuromuscular patterns described. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies on average golf players, since most studies were executed on professional or low handicap golfers. Further EMG studies are needed, especially on lower limb muscles, to describe golf swing muscle activation patterns and to evaluate timing parameters to characterize neuromuscular patterns responsible for an efficient movement with lowest risk for injury.

  20. Motor abundance and control structure in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Morrison, A; McGrath, D; Wallace, E S

    2016-04-01

    Variability and control structure are under-represented areas of golf swing research. This study investigated the use of the abundant degrees of freedom in the golf swing of high and intermediate skilled golfers using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The variance parallel to (VUCM) and orthogonal to (VOrth) the UCM with respect to the orientation and location of the clubhead were calculated. The higher skilled golfers had proportionally higher values of VUCM than lower skilled players for all measured outcome variables. Motor synergy was found in the control of the orientation of the clubhead and the combined outcome variables but not for clubhead location. Clubhead location variance zeroed-in on impact as has been previously shown, whereas clubhead orientation variance increased near impact. Both skill levels increased their control over the clubhead location leading up to impact, with more control exerted over the clubhead orientation in the early downswing. The results suggest that to achieve higher skill levels in golf may not lie simply in optimal technique, but may lie more in developing control over the abundant degrees of freedom in the body.

  1. Extension - Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2008-08-11

    The need for cost effective technologies for upgrading coal mine methane to pipeline quality natural gas is becoming ever greater. The current work presents and investigates a new approach to reduce the impact of the most costly step in the conventional technology, nitrogen rejection. The proposed approach is based on the Velocys microchannel platform, which is being developed to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this separation, ultra fast thermal swing sorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat and mass transfer inherent in microchannel processing. In a first phase of the project solid adsorbents were explored. Feasibility of ultrafast thermal swing was demonstrated but the available adsorbents had insufficient differential methane capacity to achieve the required commercial economics. In a second phase, ionic liquids were adopted as absorbents of choice, and experimental work and economic analyses, performed to gauge their potential, showed promise for this novel alternative. Final conclusions suggest that a combination of a required cost target for ionic liquids or a methane capacity increase or a combination of both is required for commercialization.

  2. Energy harvesting from human motion: exploiting swing and shock excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Becker, P.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Modern compact and low power sensors and systems are leading towards increasingly integrated wearable systems. One key bottleneck of this technology is the power supply. The use of energy harvesting techniques offers a way of supplying sensor systems without the need for batteries and maintenance. In this work we present the development and characterization of two inductive energy harvesters which exploit different characteristics of the human gait. A multi-coil topology harvester is presented which uses the swing motion of the foot. The second device is a shock-type harvester which is excited into resonance upon heel strike. Both devices were modeled and designed with the key constraint of device height in mind, in order to facilitate the integration into the shoe sole. The devices were characterized under different motion speeds and with two test subjects on a treadmill. An average power output of up to 0.84 mW is achieved with the swing harvester. With a total device volume including the housing of 21 cm3 a power density of 40 μW cm-3 results. The shock harvester generates an average power output of up to 4.13 mW. The power density amounts to 86 μW cm-3 for the total device volume of 48 cm3. Difficulties and potential improvements are discussed briefly.

  3. Hip Rotational Velocities During the Full Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key points Lead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip. Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip. Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers. PMID:24149541

  4. Electromyography variables during the golf swing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Cabri, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to review systematically the literature available on electromyographic (EMG) variables of the golf swing. From the 19 studies found, a high variety of EMG methodologies were reported. With respect to EMG intensity, the right erector spinae seems to be highly activated, especially during the acceleration phase, whereas the oblique abdominal muscles showed moderate to low levels of activation. The pectoralis major, subscapularis and latissimus dorsi muscles of both sides showed their peak activity during the acceleration phase. High muscle activity was found in the forearm muscles, especially in the wrist flexor muscles demonstrating activity levels above the maximal voluntary contraction. In the lower limb higher muscle activity of the trail side was found. There is no consensus on the influence of the golf club used on the neuromuscular patterns described. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies on average golf players, since most studies were executed on professional or low handicap golfers. Further EMG studies are needed, especially on lower limb muscles, to describe golf swing muscle activation patterns and to evaluate timing parameters to characterize neuromuscular patterns responsible for an efficient movement with lowest risk for injury. PMID:22542769

  5. Motor abundance and control structure in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Morrison, A; McGrath, D; Wallace, E S

    2016-04-01

    Variability and control structure are under-represented areas of golf swing research. This study investigated the use of the abundant degrees of freedom in the golf swing of high and intermediate skilled golfers using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The variance parallel to (VUCM) and orthogonal to (VOrth) the UCM with respect to the orientation and location of the clubhead were calculated. The higher skilled golfers had proportionally higher values of VUCM than lower skilled players for all measured outcome variables. Motor synergy was found in the control of the orientation of the clubhead and the combined outcome variables but not for clubhead location. Clubhead location variance zeroed-in on impact as has been previously shown, whereas clubhead orientation variance increased near impact. Both skill levels increased their control over the clubhead location leading up to impact, with more control exerted over the clubhead orientation in the early downswing. The results suggest that to achieve higher skill levels in golf may not lie simply in optimal technique, but may lie more in developing control over the abundant degrees of freedom in the body. PMID:26784706

  6. Hollow-fiber membrane-based rapid pressure swing absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaumik, S.; Majumdar, S.; Sirkar, K.K.

    1996-02-01

    A novel gas purification technique called rapid pressure swing absorption (RAPSAB) was developed by integrating the best features of membrane contacting, gas-liquid absorption, and pressure swing adsorption (PSA). In this cyclic separation process, a well-packed microporous hydrophobic hollow-fiber module was used to achieve nondispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by desorption of absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. The total cycle time varies between 20 s and upwards. Separation of mixtures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} (around 10%) where CO{sub 2} is the impurity to be removed was studied using absorbent liquids such as pure water and a 19.5% aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA). Three RAPSAB cycles studied differ in the absorption part. Virtually pure N{sub 2} streams were obtained with DEA as absorbent demonstrating the capability of bulk separation to very high levels of purification. Numerical models developed predict the extent of purification for pure water and the DEA solution for one of the simpler cycles. Model simulations describe the observed behavior well.

  7. Socioeconomic interaction and swings in business confidence indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohnisch, Martin; Pittnauer, Sabine; Solomon, Sorin; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model of interactive formation of individual expectations regarding the business climate in an industry. Our model is motivated by a business climate survey conducted since 1960 in Germany by the Ifo-institute ( www.ifo.de). In accordance with the data structure of this survey, in our model there is associated to each economic agent (business manager) a random variable with a three-element state space representing her possible types of expectations. The evolution of individual expectations in a finite population is then modeled as a spatio-temporal stochastic process with local interaction between agents. An appropriate structure of the interaction between agents in our setting turns out to be provided by a Festinger function (in physics called energy function or Hamiltonian) of the Blume-Capel type. Time series of the fractions of agents holding each type of expectations are obtained for the model by Monte Carlo simulations. We find that our model reproduces some generic features of the empirical time series obtained from the German business-climate data, in particular the occurrence of abrupt large but rare swings. In our model, such swings occur as spontaneous phase changes between macroscopic states.

  8. Hierarchical Porous Zeolite Structures for Pressure Swing Adsorption Applications.

    PubMed

    Besser, Benjamin; Tajiri, Henrique Akira; Mikolajczyk, Gerd; Möllmer, Jens; Schumacher, Thomas C; Odenbach, Stefan; Gläser, Roger; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-02-10

    Porous adsorbents with hierarchical structured macropores ranging from 1 to 100 μm are prepared using a combination of freeze casting and additional sacrificial templating of polyurethane foams, with a zeolite 13X powder serving as adsorbent. The pore system of the prepared monoliths features micropores assigned to the zeolite 13X particle framework, interparticular pores of ∼1-2 μm, lamellar pores derived from freeze casting of ∼10 μm, and an interconnected pore network obtained from the sacrificial templates ranging from around 100 to 200 μm with a total porosity of 71%. Gas permeation measurements show an increase in intrinsic permeability by a factor of 14 for monoliths prepared with an additional sacrificial templated foam compared to monoliths solely providing freeze casting pores. Cyclic CO2 adsorption and desorption tests where pressure swings between 8 and 140 kPa reveal constant working capacities over multiple cycles. Furthermore, the monoliths feature a high volumetric working capacity of ∼1.34 mmol/cm(3) which is competitive to packed beds made of commercially available zeolite 13X beads (∼1.28 mmol/cm(3)). Combined with the faster CO2 uptake showing an adsorption of 50% within 5-8 s (beads ∼10 s), the monoliths show great potential for pressure swing adsorption applications, where high volumetric working capacities, fast uptakes, and low pressure drops are needed for a high system performance. PMID:26760054

  9. Getting Mercury out of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

  10. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). 447.280 Section 447.280 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers...

  11. 78 FR 37706 - Safety Standards for Infant Walkers and Infant Swings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... for Infant Walkers, with 22 modifications to make the standard more stringent. 75 FR 35266. ASTM... assessment bodies for testing infant walkers (75 FR 35282 (June 21, 2010)) and infant swings (78 FR 15836... COMMISSION 16 CFR Parts 1216 and 1223 Safety Standards for Infant Walkers and Infant Swings AGENCY:...

  12. Movement Variability in the Golf Swing: Theoretical, Methodological, and Practical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazier, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Movement variability in the golf swing has recently been identified as a priority for future research in golf science. Although this ubiquitous aspect of golf performance has featured in previous empirical investigations of the golf swing, it has tended to be subordinate and studied as an adjunct to other more conventional research questions.…

  13. Public Playground Equipment: Suggested Safety Requirements and Supporting Rationale for Swing Assemblies and Straight Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajan, Bal; And Others

    This memorandum report proposes a safety standard to reduce the frequency and severity of children's impacts with the suspended members of swing assemblies and falls from slide surfaces, under conditions of normal use and reasonably foreseeable misuse. The standard applies to swings and straight slides intended for use as public playground…

  14. The Effect of Restricted Arm Swing on Energy Expenditure in Healthy Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yizhar, Ziva; Boulos, Spiro; Inbar, Omri; Carmeli, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Arm swing in human walking is an active natural motion involving the upper extremities. Earlier studies have described the interrelationship between arms and legs during walking, but the effect of arm swing on energy expenditure and dynamic parameters during normal gait, is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of…

  15. How Do Batters Use Visual, Auditory, and Tactile Information about the Success of a Baseball Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Bat/ball contact produces visual (the ball leaving the bat), auditory (the "crack" of the bat), and tactile (bat vibration) feedback about the success of the swing. We used a batting simulation to investigate how college baseball players use visual, tactile, and auditory feedback. In Experiment 1, swing accuracy (i.e., the lateral separation…

  16. What Research Tells the Golf Instructor about the Golf Swing and Putting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    The purpose of this survey was to clarify some misconceptions and challenge some common practices in teaching golf skills. Over 100 research studies in golf have been reviewed and summarized. The following categories relating to the golf swing were examined: (1) grip; (2) videotape; (3) electronic golf swing analyzer; (4) teaching methods; (5)…

  17. Swinging: What Young Children Begin To Learn about Physics during Outdoor Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jill Englebright

    1997-01-01

    Identifies behaviors of young children during play on swings that may be consistently observed as evidence of their construction of the physics principles related to pendulums. Findings indicate that children's activities on swings demonstrate their interest in experimenting with balance, force, gravity, resistance, and resonance. Discusses…

  18. The Effects of an Ergogenic Aid on Golf Swing Consistency and Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John O.; Beitel, Patricia A.

    Golf experts suggest that a performer should attempt to swing the same way during each shot, changing clubs to alter the flight trajectory and distance of the ball. This study sought to determine if there was a difference in the development of golf skill and swing consistency between a control group and an experimental group using an ergogenic…

  19. Mercury Sample Return using Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Young, Roy M.; Adams, Charles L.

    2006-01-01

    A conventional Mercury sample return mission requires significant launch mass due to the large deltav required for the outbound and return trips, and the large mass of a planetary lander and ascent vehicle. Solar sailing can be used to reduce lander mass allocation by delivering the lander to a low, thermally safe orbit close to the terminator. Propellant mass is not an issue for solar sails so a sample can be returned relatively easily, without resorting to lengthy, multiple gravity assists. The initial Mercury sample return studies reported here were conducted under ESA contract ESTEC/16534/02/NL/NR, PI Colin McInnes, Technical Officer Peter Falkner. Updated solar sail capabilities were developed under the Ground System Demonstration program, funded by the NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program.

  20. Mercury in the ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.

    1986-01-01

    This treatise on the environmental dispersion of mercury emphasizes the importance of ''mercury-consciousness'' in the present-day world, where rapidly expanding metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial developments are causing widespread contamination of the atmosphere, soil, and water by this metal and its toxic organic derivatives. Concepts concerning the mechanism of mercury dispersion and methyl-mercury formation in the physico-biological ecosystem are discussed in detail and a substantial body of data on the degree and nature of the mercury contamination of various plants, fish, and land animals by industrial and urban effluents is presented. Various analytical methods for the estimation of mercury in inorganic and organic samples are presented. These serve as a ready guide to the selection of the correct method for analyzing environmental samples. This book is reference work in mercury-related studies. It is written to influence industrial policies of governments in their formulation of control measures to avoid the recurrence of human tragedies such as the well-known Minamata case in Japan, and the lesser known cases in Iraq, Pakistan, and Guatamala.

  1. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  2. Mercury Metadata Toolset

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source software and software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was originally developed for NASA, and the Mercury development consortium now includes funding from NASA, USGS, and DOE. A major new version of Mercury (version 3.0) was developed during 2007 and released in early 2008. This Mercury 3.0 version provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS delivery of search results, and ready customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects which use Mercury. For the end users, Mercury provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data.

  3. Mercury Metadata Toolset

    2009-09-08

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source software and software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was originally developed for NASA, and the Mercury development consortium now includes funding from NASA, USGS, and DOE. A major new version of Mercury (version 3.0) was developed during 2007 and released in early 2008. This Mercury 3.0 version provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additionalmore » metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS delivery of search results, and ready customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects which use Mercury. For the end users, Mercury provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data.« less

  4. International Assistance in Naming Craters on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Edmonds, J.; Hallau, K.; Hirshon, B.; Goldstein, J.; Hamel, J.; Hamel, S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's robotic MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft made history in March 2011 by becoming the first to orbit Mercury. During the mission, MESSENGER acquired more than 250,000 images and made many other kinds of measurements. Names are often given to surface features that are of special scientific interest, such as craters. To draw international attention to the achievements of the spacecraft and engineers and scientists who made the MESSENGER mission a success, the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team initiated a Name a Crater on Mercury Competition.Five craters of particular geological interest were chosen by the science team. In accordance with International Astronomical Union (IAU) rules for Mercury, impact craters are named in honor of those who have made outstanding or fundamental contributions to the arts and humanities. He or she must have been recognized as a historically significant figure in the arts for at least 50 years and deceased for the last three years. We were particularly interested in entries honoring people from nations and cultural groups underrepresented in the current list of crater names. From more than 3600 entries received from around the world, the EPO team was able to reduce the number of entries to about 1200 names of 583 different artists who met the contest eligibility criteria. Next, the proposed individuals were divided into five artistic field groups and distributed to experts in that respective field. Each expert reviewed approximately100 artists with their biographical information. They narrowed down their list to a top ten, then to a top five by applying a rubric. The final selection was based on the reviewer lists and scores, with at least three finalist names selected from each artistic field. Of the 17 finalists provided to the IAU, the following names were selected: Carolan crater, Enheduanna crater, Karsh crater, Kulthum crater, and Rivera crater. For more

  5. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials.

  6. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials. PMID:18044248

  7. A springy pendulum could describe the swing leg kinetics of human walking.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunggwi; Park, Heewon; Park, Sukyung

    2016-06-14

    The dynamics of human walking during various walking conditions could be qualitatively captured by the springy legged dynamics, which have been used as a theoretical framework for bipedal robotics applications. However, the spring-loaded inverted pendulum model describes the motion of the center of mass (CoM), which combines the torso, swing and stance legs together and does not explicitly inform us as to whether the inter-limb dynamics share the springy legged dynamics characteristics of the CoM. In this study, we examined whether the swing leg dynamics could also be represented by springy mechanics and whether the swing leg stiffness shows a dependence on gait speed, as has been observed in CoM mechanics during walking. The swing leg was modeled as a spring-loaded pendulum hinged at the hip joint, which is under forward motion. The model parameters of the loaded mass were adopted from body parameters and anthropometric tables, whereas the free model parameters for the rest length of the spring and its stiffness were estimated to best match the data for the swing leg joint forces. The joint forces of the swing leg were well represented by the springy pendulum model at various walking speeds with a regression coefficient of R(2)>0.8. The swing leg stiffness increased with walking speed and was correlated with the swing frequency, which is consistent with previous observations from CoM dynamics described using the compliant leg. These results suggest that the swing leg also shares the springy dynamics, and the compliant walking model could be extended to better present swing leg dynamics.

  8. A springy pendulum could describe the swing leg kinetics of human walking.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunggwi; Park, Heewon; Park, Sukyung

    2016-06-14

    The dynamics of human walking during various walking conditions could be qualitatively captured by the springy legged dynamics, which have been used as a theoretical framework for bipedal robotics applications. However, the spring-loaded inverted pendulum model describes the motion of the center of mass (CoM), which combines the torso, swing and stance legs together and does not explicitly inform us as to whether the inter-limb dynamics share the springy legged dynamics characteristics of the CoM. In this study, we examined whether the swing leg dynamics could also be represented by springy mechanics and whether the swing leg stiffness shows a dependence on gait speed, as has been observed in CoM mechanics during walking. The swing leg was modeled as a spring-loaded pendulum hinged at the hip joint, which is under forward motion. The model parameters of the loaded mass were adopted from body parameters and anthropometric tables, whereas the free model parameters for the rest length of the spring and its stiffness were estimated to best match the data for the swing leg joint forces. The joint forces of the swing leg were well represented by the springy pendulum model at various walking speeds with a regression coefficient of R(2)>0.8. The swing leg stiffness increased with walking speed and was correlated with the swing frequency, which is consistent with previous observations from CoM dynamics described using the compliant leg. These results suggest that the swing leg also shares the springy dynamics, and the compliant walking model could be extended to better present swing leg dynamics. PMID:27020749

  9. Global change and mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabbenhoft, David P.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2013-01-01

    More than 140 nations recently agreed to a legally binding treaty on reductions in human uses and releases of mercury that will be signed in October of this year. This follows the 2011 rule in the United States that for the first time regulates mercury emissions from electricity-generating utilities. Several decades of scientific research preceded these important regulations. However, the impacts of global change on environmental mercury concentrations and human exposures remain a major uncertainty affecting the potential effectiveness of regulatory activities.

  10. Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first step in discovering, the extent of life in our galaxy is to determine the number of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (HZ). The Kepler Mission is a 0.95 m aperture photometer scheduled to be launched in 2006. It is designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-like stars to detect the transits of Earth-size and larger planets. The depth and repetition time of transits provide the size of the planet relative to the star and its orbital period. When combined with ground-based spectroscopy of these stars to fix the stellar parameters, the true planet radius and orbit scale, hence the relation to the HZ are determined. These spectra are also used to discover the relationships between the characteristics of planets and the stars they orbit. In particular, the association of planet size and occurrence frequency with stellar mass and metallicity will be investigated. Based on the results of the current Doppler - velocity discoveries, over a thousand giant planets will be found. Information on the albedos and densities of those giants showing transits will be obtained. At the end of the four year mission, hundreds of terrestrial planets should be discovered in and near the HZ of their stars if such planets are common. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets in the HZ occur in less than 1% of the stars and that life might be quite rare.

  11. Payload missions integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R. A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Highlights of the Payload Missions Integration Contract (PMIC) are summarized. Spacelab Missions no. 1 to 3, OSTA partial payloads, Astro-1 Mission, premission definition, and mission peculiar equipment support structure are addressed.

  12. "Speaking a Secret Language:" West Coast Swing as a Community of Practice of Informal and Incidental Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jamie L.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the findings of a qualitative study of competitive West Coast Swing dancers that incorporated both ethnographic and phenomenological techniques. A modern variation of the original Lindy Hop, West Coast Swing is typically learned in dance studios and non-profit clubs. The West Coast Swing community can be considered a community…

  13. Polarization swings reveal magnetic energy dissipation in blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polarization signatures of blazar emissions are known to be highly variable. In addition to small fluctuations of the polarization angle around a mean value, large (≳ 180°) polarization angle swings are observed. We suggest that such phenomena can be interpreted as arising from light-travel-time effects within an underlying axisymmetric emission region. We present the first simultaneous fitting of the multi-wavelength spectrum, variability, and time-dependent polarization features of a correlated optical and gamma-ray flaring event of the prominent blazar 3C279, which was accompanied by a drastic change in its polarization signatures. This unprecedented combination of spectral, variability, and polarization information in a coherent physical model allows us to place stringent constraints on the particle acceleration and magnetic-field topology in the relativistic jet of a blazar, strongly favoring a scenario in which magnetic energy dissipation is the primary driver of the flare event.

  14. AIR SEPARATION BY PRESSURE SWING ADSORPTION USING SUPERIOR ADSORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph T. Yang

    2001-08-31

    Li-X zeolite (Si/Al = 1.0) is currently the best sorbent for use in the separation of air by adsorption processes. In particular, pressure swing adsorption (PSA) using zeolite sorbents is being increasingly used for air separation. Silver is also known to strongly affect the adsorptive properties of zeolites; and it is known that thermal vacuum dehydration of silver zeolites leads to the formation of silver clusters within the zeolite. In this work we have synthesized type X zeolites containing Ag and also varying mixtures of Li and Ag. In this project, we developed the Ag-containing zeolite as the best sorbent for air separation. We have also studied Co-ligand compounds as oxygen-selective sorbents. Syntheses, structural characterization and adsorption properties have been performed on all sorbents. The results are described in detail in 5 chapters.

  15. Polarization swings reveal magnetic energy dissipation in blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polarization signatures of blazar emissions are known to be highly variable. In addition to small fluctuations of the polarization angle around a mean value, large (≳ 180°) polarization angle swings are observed. We suggest that such phenomena can be interpreted as arising from light-travel-time effects within an underlying axisymmetric emission region. We present the first simultaneous fitting of the multi-wavelength spectrum, variability, and time-dependent polarization features of a correlated optical and gamma-ray flaring event of the prominent blazar 3C279, which was accompanied by a drastic change in its polarization signatures. This unprecedented combination of spectral, variability, and polarization informationmore » in a coherent physical model allows us to place stringent constraints on the particle acceleration and magnetic-field topology in the relativistic jet of a blazar, strongly favoring a scenario in which magnetic energy dissipation is the primary driver of the flare event.« less

  16. POLARIZATION SWINGS REVEAL MAGNETIC ENERGY DISSIPATION IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polarization signatures of blazar emissions are known to be highly variable. In addition to small fluctuations of the polarization angle around a mean value, large (≳180°) polarization angle swings are sometimes observed. We suggest that such phenomena can be interpreted as arising from light travel time effects within an underlying axisymmetric emission region. We present the first simultaneous fitting of the multi-wavelength spectrum, variability, and time-dependent polarization features of a correlated optical and gamma-ray flaring event of the prominent blazar 3C279, which was accompanied by a drastic change in its polarization signatures. This unprecedented combination of spectral, variability, and polarization information in a coherent physical model allows us to place stringent constraints on the particle acceleration and magnetic field topology in the relativistic jet of a blazar, strongly favoring a scenario in which magnetic energy dissipation is the primary driver of the flare event.

  17. DTC genetic testing: pendulum swings and policy paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, T

    2012-01-01

    After decades of optimistic portrayals, there has been a shift in the way that the popular press represents genomic research. A skeptical view has become more common. The central reason for this pendulum swing away from popular support is the harsh truth that most genetic risk information just isn't that predictive. This reality has created a fascinating policy paradox. If, as many in the scientific community are now saying, genetic information is not the oracle of our future health as we were once led to believe, and if access does not, for most, cause harm, why regulate the area? Why worry about shoddy direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies? One primary justification, and one endorsed by the recent Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) Policy Statement on DTC Genetics Testing, is that information that is conveyed to the public about genetics via marketing and to those who access DTC tests should, at a minimum, be accurate.

  18. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  19. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  20. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1991-06-18

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

  1. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-11-07

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

  2. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  3. S-IV-B Aft Swing Arm Umbilical Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s. Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets. Affectionately nicknamed 'The Arm Farm', the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions. The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a general view of the S-IV-B aft swing arm umbilical carrier.

  4. Mercury exposure and children's health.

    PubMed

    Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; McCarty, Kathleen M; Steckling, Nadine; Lettmeier, Beate

    2010-09-01

    Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause adverse effects during any period of development. Mercury is a highly toxic element; there is no known safe level of exposure. Ideally, neither children nor adults should have any mercury in their bodies because it provides no physiological benefit. Prenatal and postnatal mercury exposures occur frequently in many different ways. Pediatricians, nurses, and other health care providers should understand the scope of mercury exposures and health problems among children and be prepared to handle mercury exposures in medical practice. Prevention is the key to reducing mercury poisoning. Mercury exists in different chemical forms: elemental (or metallic), inorganic, and organic (methylmercury and ethyl mercury). Mercury exposure can cause acute and chronic intoxication at low levels of exposure. Mercury is neuro-, nephro-, and immunotoxic. The development of the child in utero and early in life is at particular risk. Mercury is ubiquitous and persistent. Mercury is a global pollutant, bio-accumulating, mainly through the aquatic food chain, resulting in a serious health hazard for children. This article provides an extensive review of mercury exposure and children's health.

  5. Mercury cycling in terrestrial watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.; Bishop, Kevin; Banks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses mercury cycling in the terrestrial landscape, including inputs from the atmosphere, accumulation in soils and vegetation, outputs in streamflow and volatilization, and effects of land disturbance. Mercury mobility in the terrestrial landscape is strongly controlled by organic matter. About 90% of the atmospheric mercury input is retained in vegetation and organic matter in soils, causing a buildup of legacy mercury. Some mercury is volatilized back to the atmosphere, but most export of mercury from watersheds occurs by streamflow. Stream mercury export is episodic, in association with dissolved and particulate organic carbon, as stormflow and snowmelt flush organic-rich shallow soil horizons. The terrestrial landscape is thus a major source of mercury to downstream aquatic environments, where mercury is methylated and enters the aquatic food web. With ample organic matter and sulfur, methylmercury forms in uplands as well—in wetlands, riparian zones, and other anoxic sites. Watershed features (topography, land cover type, and soil drainage class) are often more important than atmospheric mercury deposition in controlling the amount of stream mercury and methylmercury export. While reductions in atmospheric mercury deposition may rapidly benefit lakes, the terrestrial landscape will respond only over decades, because of the large stock and slow turnover of legacy mercury. We conclude with a discussion of future scenarios and the challenge of managing terrestrial mercury.

  6. Mercury Orbiter: Report of the Science Working Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, John W.; Slavin, James A.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Akasofu, Syun I.; Baker, Daniel N.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Chupp, Edward L.; Clark, Pamela E.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the Mercury Orbiter Science Working Team which held three workshops in 1988 to 1989 under the auspices of the Space Physics and Planetary Exploration Divisions of NASA Headquarters. Spacecraft engineering and mission design studies at the Jet Propulsion Lab were conducted in parallel with this effort and are detailed elsewhere. The findings of the engineering study, summarized herein, indicate that spin stabilized spacecraft carrying comprehensive particles and fields experiments and key planetology instruments in high elliptical orbits can survive and function in Mercury orbit without costly sun shields and active cooling systems.

  7. Ecosystem conceptual model- Mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, Charles N.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Foe, Chris; Klasing, Susan; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Slotton, Darell G.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2008-01-01

    Mercury has been identified as an important contaminant in the Delta, based on elevated concentrations of methylmercury (a toxic, organic form that readily bioaccumulates) in fish and wildlife. There are health risks associated with human exposure to methylmercury by consumption of sport fish, particularly top predators such as bass species. Original mercury sources were upstream tributaries where historical mining of mercury in the Coast Ranges and gold in the Sierra Nevada and Klamath-Trinity Mountains caused contamination of water and sediment on a regional scale. Remediation of abandoned mine sites may reduce local sources in these watersheds, but much of the mercury contamination occurs in sediments stored in the riverbeds, floodplains, and the Bay- Delta, where scouring of Gold-Rush-era sediment represents an ongoing source.Conversion of inorganic mercury to toxic methylmercury occurs in anaerobic environments including some wetlands. Wetland restoration managers must be cognizant of potential effects on mercury cycling so that the problem is not exacerbated. Recent research suggests that wettingdrying cycles can contribute to mercury methylation. For example, high marshes (inundated only during the highest tides for several days per month) tend to have higher methylmercury concentrations in water, sediment, and biota compared with low marshes, which do not dry out completely during the tidal cycle. Seasonally inundated flood plains are another environment experiencing wetting and drying where methylmercury concentrations are typically elevated. Stream restoration efforts using gravel injection or other reworking of coarse sediment in most watersheds of the Central Valley involve tailings from historical gold mining that are likely to contain elevated mercury in associated fines. Habitat restoration projects, particularly those involving wetlands, may cause increases in methylmercury exposure in the watershed. This possibility should be evaluated.The DRERIP

  8. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  9. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  10. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  11. Effect of swing phase load on metal-on-metal hip lubrication, friction and wear.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sophie; Jalali-Vahid, Davood; Brockett, Claire; Jin, Zhongmin; Stone, Martin H; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2006-01-01

    There is renewed interest in metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip replacements (THRs), however, variable wear rates have been observed clinically. It is hypothesised that changes in soft tissue tensioning during surgery may alter loading of THRs during the swing phase of gait leading to changes in fluid film lubrication, friction and wear. This study aimed to assess the effect of swing phase load on the lubrication, friction and wear of MOM hip replacements. Theoretical lubrication modelling was carried out using elastohydrodynamic theory. All the governing equations were solved numerically for the lubricant film thickness between the articulating surfaces under the transient dynamic conditions with low and high swing phase loads. Friction testing was completed using a single axis pendulum simulator, simplified loading cycles were applied with low and high swing phase loads. MOM hip replacements were tested in a hip simulator, modified to provide different swing phase loading regimes; a low (100 N) and a high load (as per ISO 14242-1; 280 N). Results demonstrated that the performance of MOM bearings is highly dependent on swing phase load. Hence, changes in the tension of the tissues at surgery and variations in muscle forces may increase swing phase load, reduce lubrication, increase friction and accelerate wear. This may explain some of the variations that have been observed with clinical wear rates.

  12. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed.

  13. Using swing resistance and assistance to improve gait symmetry in individuals post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sheng-Che; Schmit, Brian D; Wu, Ming

    2015-08-01

    A major characteristic of hemiplegic gait observed in individuals post-stroke is spatial and temporal asymmetry, which may increase energy expenditure and the risk of falls. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of swing resistance/assistance applied to the affected leg on gait symmetry in individuals post-stroke. We recruited 10 subjects with chronic stroke who demonstrated a shorter step length with their affected leg in comparison to the non-affected leg during walking. They participated in two test sessions for swing resistance and swing assistance, respectively. During the adaptation period, subjects counteracted the step length deviation caused by the applied swing resistance force, resulting in an aftereffect consisting of improved step length symmetry during the post-adaptation period. In contrast, subjects did not counteract step length deviation caused by swing assistance during adaptation period and produced no aftereffect during the post-adaptation period. Locomotor training with swing resistance applied to the affected leg may improve step length symmetry through error-based learning. Swing assistance reduces errors in step length during stepping; however, it is unclear whether this approach would improve step length symmetry. Results from this study may be used to develop training paradigms for improving gait symmetry of stroke survivors.

  14. The effect of pitch type on ground reaction forces in the baseball swing.

    PubMed

    Fortenbaugh, Dave; Fleisig, Glenn; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Asfour, Shihab

    2011-11-01

    Coaches have identified the batter's weight shift as a critical component for promoting proper timing and balance in a baseball swing. Analysing the weight shift through maximum horizontal (Fx) and vertical (Fz) ground reaction forces (GRFs) of professional batters (N = 29; height = 185 +/- 6 cm; mass = 92 +/- 9 kg), the purpose of this study was to compare GRFs among swings against fastballs and changeups. General linear models were used to compare three conditions of interest: successful results against fastballs, successful results against changeups, and unsuccessful results against changeups. Batters had a similar loading mechanism and initial weight transfer from back foot to front foot regardless of pitch type, but peak front foot GRFx and GRFz occurred with significantly different magnitudes and at significantly different times, depending on the pitch type and hit result. Peak front foot GRFs were greater for successful swings against fastballs compared to both successful and unsuccessful swings against changeups. Peak front foot GRFs of unsuccessful swings against changeups occurred, on average, 15-20 ms earlier than successful swings against changeups and 30-35 ms earlier than successful swings against fastballs, quantifying how a changeup can disrupt the coordination of a hitter's weight shift. PMID:22303780

  15. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed. PMID:25995553

  16. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joong-chul; Lee, Sung-wan; Yeo, Yun-ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed. PMID:25995553

  17. Electromyographic analysis of the hip and knee during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Bechler, J R; Jobe, F W; Pink, M; Perry, J; Ruwe, P A

    1995-07-01

    As golf increases in popularity, more golfers seek the proper mechanics necessary for the perfect golf swing. Surprisingly little scientific work has been published on the contribution of the hip and knee muscles during the golf swing even though most professionals have recognized their vital contribution. Recent studies have described the electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the shoulder, back, and trunk during the golf swing. The purpose of this study was to describe the electrical muscle activity in seven hip and knee muscles of both the left (lead) and right (trail) leg in competitive golfers while performing the golf swing. Sixteen golfers were studied with indwelling electrodes and high-speed cinematography. The EMG was synchronized with the film to discern five phases of the golf swing. Means, SDs, and t-tests were done. The results revealed that the trail hip extensors and abductors in conjunction with the lead adductor magus initiated pelvic rotation during forward swing. The lead hamstrings maintained a flexed knee and provided a stable base on which pelvic rotation took place. The peak EMG muscle activity recorded in the hips and knees occurred in an earlier phase than that measured previously in the trunk and shoulder. This confirmed the sequential firing pattern of the hip and knee muscles that takes place during the competitive golf swing. Information gained from this study can be used by players and coaches to optimize performance and to minimize injury. PMID:7670971

  18. Normative data for arm swing asymmetry: how (a)symmetrical are we?

    PubMed

    Plate, A; Sedunko, D; Pelykh, O; Schlick, C; Ilmberger, J R; Bötzel, K

    2015-01-01

    Arm swing asymmetry during gait may be a sensitive sign for early Parkinson's disease. There is only very limited information about how much asymmetry can be considered to be physiological. To assess the normal range of arm swing asymmetry, we investigated 60 healthy subjects. The influence of age, gender, and additional mental tasks (dual-tasking) on arm swing asymmetry was assessed. Limb kinematics of 60 healthy persons in three age groups (between 40 and 75 years) were measured with an ultrasound motion capture system while subjects walked on a treadmill. Treadmill velocity was varied (3 steps) and mental loads (2 different tasks) were applied in different trials. Additionally, a group of 7 patients with early Parkinson's disease was investigated. Arm swing amplitude as well as arm swing asymmetry varied considerably in the healthy subjects. Elderly subjects swung their arms more than younger participants. Only the more demanding mental load caused a significant asymmetry, i.e., arm swing was reduced on the right side. In the patient group, asymmetry was considerably higher and even more enhanced by mental loads. Our data indicate that an asymmetry index above 50 (i.e., one side has twice the amplitude of the other) may be considered abnormal. Evaluation of arm swing asymmetry may be used as part of a test battery for early Parkinson's disease. Such testing may become even more important when disease-modifying drugs become available for Parkinson's disease.

  19. Does arm swing emphasized deliberately increase the trunk stability during walking in the elderly adults?

    PubMed

    Nakakubo, Sho; Doi, Takehiko; Sawa, Ryuichi; Misu, Shogo; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Ono, Rei

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether trunk stability while walking changes when arm swing is deliberately altered in elderly individuals. Participants included 21 community-dwelling elderly individuals (7 men and 14 women; age, 81.8 ± 5.0 years). We measured trunk acceleration by using a wireless miniature sensor unit containing a tri-axial linear accelerometer under 3 walking conditions: normal walking (normal condition), deliberately walking without any arm swing (no swing condition), and walking with a deliberately emphasized arm swing (over swing condition). To evaluate trunk stability during walking, we calculated harmonic ratios (HRs) based on trunk tri-axial acceleration signals (anteroposterior: AP, vertical: VT, and mediolateral: ML). HR-AP and HR-VT were not significantly different across the 3 conditions, but HR-ML in the over swing condition was significantly higher than that in the other 2 conditions by generalized estimating equations (GEE) adjusted for walking speed (p<0.05). These findings indicate that trunk stability in the ML direction increased when the elderly individuals walked with a deliberately emphasized arm swing.

  20. The effect of pitch type on ground reaction forces in the baseball swing.

    PubMed

    Fortenbaugh, Dave; Fleisig, Glenn; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Asfour, Shihab

    2011-11-01

    Coaches have identified the batter's weight shift as a critical component for promoting proper timing and balance in a baseball swing. Analysing the weight shift through maximum horizontal (Fx) and vertical (Fz) ground reaction forces (GRFs) of professional batters (N = 29; height = 185 +/- 6 cm; mass = 92 +/- 9 kg), the purpose of this study was to compare GRFs among swings against fastballs and changeups. General linear models were used to compare three conditions of interest: successful results against fastballs, successful results against changeups, and unsuccessful results against changeups. Batters had a similar loading mechanism and initial weight transfer from back foot to front foot regardless of pitch type, but peak front foot GRFx and GRFz occurred with significantly different magnitudes and at significantly different times, depending on the pitch type and hit result. Peak front foot GRFs were greater for successful swings against fastballs compared to both successful and unsuccessful swings against changeups. Peak front foot GRFs of unsuccessful swings against changeups occurred, on average, 15-20 ms earlier than successful swings against changeups and 30-35 ms earlier than successful swings against fastballs, quantifying how a changeup can disrupt the coordination of a hitter's weight shift.

  1. Comparing predictive validity of four ballistic swing phase models of human walking.

    PubMed

    Selles, R W; Bussmann, J B; Wagenaar, R C; Stam, H J

    2001-09-01

    It is unclear to what extent ballistic walking models can be used to qualitatively predict the swing phase at comfortable walking speed. Different study findings regarding the accuracy of the predictions of the swing phase kinematics may have been caused by differences in (1) kinematic input, (2) model characteristics (e.g. the number of segments), and (3) evaluation criteria. In the present study, the predictive validity of four ballistic swing phase models was evaluated and compared, that is, (1) the ballistic walking model as originally introduced by Mochon and McMahon, (2) an extended version of this model in which heel-off of the stance leg is added, (3) a double pendulum model, consisting of a two-segment swing leg with a prescribed hip trajectory, and (4) a shank pendulum model consisting of a shank and rigidly attached foot with a prescribed knee trajectory. The predictive validity was evaluated by comparing the outcome of the model simulations with experimentally derived swing phase kinematics of six healthy subjects. In all models, statistically significant differences were found between model output and experimental data. All models underestimated swing time and step length. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the output of the different models. The present study shows that although qualitative similarities exist between the ballistic models and normal gait at comfortable walking speed, these models cannot adequately predict swing phase kinematics. PMID:11506787

  2. The nature of albedo features on Mercury, with maps for the telescopic observer. Part I: Mercury, the enigmatic planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. L.

    1995-02-01

    Bright and dark markings have been regularly recorded by visual observers of Mercury since the nineteenth century. Following the Mariner 10 mission, topographic maps of the hemisphere imaged by the spacecraft were produced. Part One of this paper reviews the classical telescopic observations of albedo markings on Mercury and the definitive albedo map is reproduced to assist visual observers of the planet. In Part Two, an investigation into the relationship between albedo and physiography is conducted and the significance of the historical observations is discussed.

  3. The Bepi Colombo Mercury Transfer Module And Mercury Planetary Orbiter Solar Array Design And Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petry, D.; Grunwald, C.; Lohberg, A.; Brandi, A.; Oxynos-Lauschke, C.; Andreev, T.; Van Der Ven, R.; Schuhmacher, U.; Fugger, S.; Caon, A.; Fiebrich, H. K.

    2011-10-01

    The Bepi Colombo Mercury Transfer Module (MTM) and Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) solar arrays are being designedto guaranteethe operational requirements in a very severe environment, mainly characterized by high temperatures (up to 215°C including qualification margin) and high light intensity (up to 11 solar constants). Furthermore, the qualification of the MPO solar array requires 5000 thermal cycles between -165°C and 215°C. The final configurations of the solar arrays are the result of a very complex system analysis aiming at reducing the solar array operative temperatures. The outcome of these specific developments performed on the photovoltaic assembly and panel substrate materials are essential drivers of the solar array design activity. The MTM solar array is composed by two wings of five solar panels and provides a peak power of about 13000W during the 6-years cruise phase to Mercury. The MPO solar generator is composed of one wing of three panels and provides an average power up to about 1600W during the nominal 1 earth year mission around Mercury. The photovoltaic assembly of both solar arrays is based on newly designed GaAs triple-junction solar cells. New carbon fibre reinforced Cyanate structures are applied as substrates.

  4. Effects of training with a dynamic moment of inertia bat on swing performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiang; Liu, Ya-Chen; Kao, Ying-Chieh; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the 8-week dynamic moment of inertia (DMOI) bat training on swing velocity, batted-ball speed, hitting distance, muscle power, and grip force. The DMOI bat is characterized in that the bat could be swung more easily by reducing the moment of inertia at the initial stage of swing without decreasing the bat weight and has a faster swing velocity and lower muscle activity. Seventeen varsity baseball players were randomly assigned to the DMOI bat training group (n = 9) and the normal bat training group (n = 8). The training protocol was 7 swings each set, 5-8 sets each time, 3 times each week, and 8 weeks' training period. The results showed that the swing training with the DMOI bat for 8 weeks significantly increased swing velocity by about 6.20% (96.86 ± 8.48 vs. 102.82 ± 9.93 km·h(-1)), hitting distance by about 6.69% (80.06 ± 9.16 vs. 84.99 ± 7.26 m), muscle power of the right arm by about 12.04% (3.34 ± 0.41 vs. 3.74 ± 0.61 m), and muscle power of the left arm by about 8.23% (3.36 ± 0.46 vs. 3.61 ± 0.39 m) (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the DMOI bat training group had a significantly better change percentage in swing velocity, hitting distance, and grip force of the left hand than did the normal bat training group (p < 0.05). The findings suggested that the swing training with the DMOI bat has a positive benefit on swing performance and that the DMOI bat could be used as a new training tool in baseball. PMID:21993041

  5. The effects of age on stabilization of the mediolateral trajectory of the swing foot.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vennila; Rosenblatt, Noah J; Latash, Mark L; Grabiner, Mark D

    2013-09-01

    To ensure stability during gait, mediolateral placement of the swinging foot must be actively regulated. Logically this occurs through end-point control of the swing limb trajectory, the precision of which is quantified as step-width variability (SWV). Increased SWV with age may reflect reduced precision of this control, but cannot describe if, and how, age-related changes in lower limb kinematic synergies account for reduced precision. We analyzed joint configuration variance across steps within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis, which assumes that redundant sets of elemental variables are organized by the central nervous system to stabilize important performance variables. We tested whether: (1) regardless of age, the swing limb trajectory would be stabilized by a kinematic synergy of the lower limbs, and (2) the strength of the synergy would be weaker in older adults. Ten younger and ten older adults (65+ years) walked on a laboratory walkway at their preferred speed while kinematic data were collected. UCM analysis of segmental configuration variance was performed with respect to the mediolateral trajectory of the swing-limb ankle joint center. Throughout most of swing, the trajectory was stabilized by a kinematic synergy. Despite the greater segmental configuration variance of older adults, the strength of the synergy was not significantly different between groups. Moreover, the synergy index became negative during terminal swing and was not significantly correlated with SWV. Accordingly, co-variation among individual segmental trajectories is more important for stabilization of the swing trajectory during mid-swing, and, throughout swing, aging does not appear to affect this stabilization. PMID:23711985

  6. Effects of training with a dynamic moment of inertia bat on swing performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiang; Liu, Ya-Chen; Kao, Ying-Chieh; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the 8-week dynamic moment of inertia (DMOI) bat training on swing velocity, batted-ball speed, hitting distance, muscle power, and grip force. The DMOI bat is characterized in that the bat could be swung more easily by reducing the moment of inertia at the initial stage of swing without decreasing the bat weight and has a faster swing velocity and lower muscle activity. Seventeen varsity baseball players were randomly assigned to the DMOI bat training group (n = 9) and the normal bat training group (n = 8). The training protocol was 7 swings each set, 5-8 sets each time, 3 times each week, and 8 weeks' training period. The results showed that the swing training with the DMOI bat for 8 weeks significantly increased swing velocity by about 6.20% (96.86 ± 8.48 vs. 102.82 ± 9.93 km·h(-1)), hitting distance by about 6.69% (80.06 ± 9.16 vs. 84.99 ± 7.26 m), muscle power of the right arm by about 12.04% (3.34 ± 0.41 vs. 3.74 ± 0.61 m), and muscle power of the left arm by about 8.23% (3.36 ± 0.46 vs. 3.61 ± 0.39 m) (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the DMOI bat training group had a significantly better change percentage in swing velocity, hitting distance, and grip force of the left hand than did the normal bat training group (p < 0.05). The findings suggested that the swing training with the DMOI bat has a positive benefit on swing performance and that the DMOI bat could be used as a new training tool in baseball.

  7. Arm Swing Magnitude and Asymmetry During Gait in the Early Stages of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Poole, Roxanne; Johnson, Julia; Halawa, Omar; Huang, Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    The later stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by altered gait patterns. Although decreased arm swing during gait is the most frequently reported motor dysfunction in individuals with PD, quantitative descriptions of gait in early PD have largely ignored upper extremity movements. This study was designed to perform a quantitative analysis of arm swing magnitude and asymmetry that might be useful in the assessment of early PD. Twelve individuals with early PD (in “off” state) and eight controls underwent gait analysis using an optically-based motion capture system. Participants were instructed to walk at normal and fast velocities, and then on heels (to minimize push-off). Arm swing was measured as the excursion of the wrist with respect to the pelvis. Arm swing magnitude for each arm, and inter-arm asymmetry, were compared between groups. Both groups had comparable gait velocities (p=0.61), and there was no significant difference between the groups in the magnitude of arm swing in all walking conditions for the arm that swung more (p=0.907) or less (p=0.080). Strikingly, the PD group showed significantly greater arm swing asymmetry (asymmetry angle: 13.9±7.9%) compared to the control group (asymmetry angle: 5.1±4.0%; p=0.003). Unlike arm swing magnitude, arm swing asymmetry unequivocally differs between people with early PD and controls. Such quantitative evaluation of arm swing, especially its asymmetry, may have utility for early and differential diagnosis, and for tracking disease progression in patients with later PD. PMID:19945285

  8. GEOCHEMICAL FACTORS GOVERNING METHYL MERCURY PRODUCTION IN MERCURY CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of aquatic mercury transformation processes (biotic and abiotic), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) in sedimentary environments. The greatest cause for concern regar...

  9. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  10. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  11. Swing-free movement of simply suspended objects employing parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, J.C.; Robinett, R.D.; Petterson, B.J.

    1990-06-01

    An adaptive, swing-free trajectory planner for a gantry robot has been analytically developed and experimentally implemented on a commercial robot. A batch, nonlinear least square estimator (differential correction) is used to predict the initial conditions, mass, and frequency of the simply suspended object from a set of force sensor measurements. These parameters, in turn, are supplied to the swing-free trajectory planner to perform the maneuver. These algorithms have been implemented on a CIMCORP XR6100 gantry robot, and swing-free trajectories have been performed by the robot using the adaptive trajectory planner. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Detailed view top of center/pivot pier. The swing span revolves ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detailed view top of center/pivot pier. The swing span revolves on a cylindrical drum, supported by 40 20-inch diameter steel wheels running on a circular track, the truss loads being delivered to the drum by a system of distributing girder. Note the circular gear anchored to the top pier. Two (2) powered pinion gears, electric driven, turn the swing span bridge on the 25'-5' diameter circular track as the wheels and drum rotate. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  13. Mood swings associated with the 'on-off' phenomenon in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, H; Quinn, N P; Brown, R G; Toone, B; Gotham, A M; Marsden, C D

    1987-11-01

    Mood swings accompanying the motor fluctuations of patients with Parkinson's disease on chronic levodopa treatment frequently occur, but are poorly recognized. Occasionally, their functional impact may be greater than that caused by the motor disability itself. In this study we have assessed the nature of, and relationship between, mood and motor fluctuations in nine Parkinsonian patients with 'on-off' motor swings. The results of an additional questionnaire survey confirm that 'on-off' mood swings occur in approximately two thirds of patients with Parkinson's disease experiencing motor fluctuations on dopaminergic treatment. Aetiological and therapeutic implications are discussed.

  14. Determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury in mercury ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahey, J.J.

    1937-01-01

    A method for the determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury on the same sample is described. The mercury minerals are volatilized in a glass tube and brought into intimate contact with granulated sodium carbonate. The chlorine is fixed as sodium chloride, determined with silver nitrate, and computed to mercurous chloride. The mercury is collected on a previously weighed gold coil and weighed.

  15. Low Cost Mission Operations Workshop. [Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The presentations given at the Low Cost (Space) Mission Operations (LCMO) Workshop are outlined. The LCMO concepts are covered in four introductory sections: Definition of Mission Operations (OPS); Mission Operations (MOS) Elements; The Operations Concept; and Mission Operations for Two Classes of Missions (operationally simple and complex). Individual presentations cover the following topics: Science Data Processing and Analysis; Mis sion Design, Planning, and Sequencing; Data Transport and Delivery, and Mission Coordination and Engineering Analysis. A list of panelists who participated in the conference is included along with a listing of the contact persons for obtaining more information concerning LCMO at JPL. The presentation of this document is in outline and graphic form.

  16. Conceptual design for a Mercury relativity satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, P. L.; Ashby, N.; Wahr, J. M.; Vincent, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    It was shown earlier that 1 x 10 to the -14th Doppler data and 3 cm accuracy range measurements to a small Mercury Relativity Satellite in a polar orbit with four-hour period can give high-accuracy tests of gravitational theory. A particular conceptual design has been developed for such a satellite, which would take less than 10 percent of the approach mass for a possible future Mercury Orbiter Mission. The spacecraft is similar to the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, but scaled down by about a factor four in linear dimensions. A despun antenna 30 cm in diameter is used for tracking. The transmitted power is roughly 0.2 watts at K-band and 0.5 watts at X-band. The orbit parameters for individual eight-hour arcs and the gravity field of Mercury through degree and order 10 are determined mainly from the Doppler data. A 50 MHz K-band sidetone system provides the basic ranging accuracy. The spacecraft mass is 50 kg or less.

  17. Changing Perspectives on Mercury and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denevi, Brett W.

    2015-11-01

    Airless, cratered, and not so different in size, the Moon and Mercury form a natural pair in the inner Solar System. For decades after the 1974 and 1975 Mariner 10 flybys of Mercury, with little compositional information, no concrete evidence for volcanism, and images of less than half of the planet, it was thought that Mercury’s surface may be similar to the lunar highlands: an ancient anorthositic flotation crust subsequently shaped mainly by impact cratering. However, observations from the recently completed MESSENGER mission to Mercury have upended our view of the innermost planet, revealing, for example, a crust that may be rich in graphite and that has been extensively resurfaced by volcanic activity, and geologic activity that may continue today to produce enigmatic “hollows” - a crust very different from that of the Moon. Meanwhile, the Moon has undergone its own revolution, as data from recent spacecraft such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal sites of silicic volcanism indicative of complex differentiation in the mantle, tectonic activity that may be ongoing, recent volcanic activity that alters the paradigm that volcanism died on the Moon over a billion years ago, and evidence that the early chronology of the inner Solar System may not be as well known as once thought. As our views of these two bodies evolve, a new understanding of their differences informs our knowledge of the variety of processes and styles of planetary evolution, and their similarities point to commonalities among all airless bodies.

  18. Report of the Terrestrial Bodies Science Working Group. Volume 2: Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Malin, M. C.; Sonett, C. P.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives and rationale for scientific investigation of Mercury are explored. Knowledge already obtained by astronomical observations and Mariner 10 spacecraft is reviewed and measurements required for the principal scientific goals are described. The use of low thrust propulsion systems is recommended so that maximum scientific return may be achieved and the reconnaissance phase of Mercury exploration may be completed in a single mission. Accelerated development is recommended on solar electric propulsion, solar sails, passive and active cooling mechanisms, and single rough landers.

  19. Kilometer-scale topographic roughness of Mercury: Correlation with geologic features and units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.

    2014-12-01

    We present maps of the topographic roughness of the northern circumpolar area of 30 Mercury at kilometer scales. The maps are derived from range profiles obtained by the 31 Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) instrument onboard the MErcury Surface, Space 32 ENvironment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. As measures of 33 roughness, we used the interquartile range of profile curvature at three baselines: 0.7 km, 34 2.8 km, and 11 km. The maps provide a synoptic overview of variations of typical 35 topographic textures. They show a dichotomy between the smooth northern plains and 36 rougher, more heavily cratered terrains. Analysis of the scale dependence of roughness 37 indicates that the regolith on Mercury is thicker than on the Moon by approximately a 38 factor of three. Roughness contrasts within northern volcanic plains of Mercury indicate a 39 younger unit inside Goethe basin and inside another unnamed stealth basin. These new 40 data permit interplanetary comparisons of topographic roughness.

  20. Circular polarization of light by planet Mercury and enantiomorphism of its surface minerals.

    PubMed

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Thiemann, Wolfram H P; Barbier, Bernard; Brack, André; Alcaraz, Christian; Nahon, Laurent; Wolstencroft, Ray

    2002-04-01

    Different mechanisms for the generation of circular polarization by the surface of planets and satellites are described. The observed values for Venus, the Moon, Mars, and Jupiter obtained by photo-polarimetric measurements with Earth based telescopes, showed accordance with theory. However, for planet Mercury asymmetric parameters in the circular polarization were measured that do not fit with calculations. For BepiColombo, the ESA cornerstone mission 5 to Mercury, we propose to investigate this phenomenon using a concept which includes two instruments. The first instrument is a high-resolution optical polarimeter, capable to determine and map the circular polarization by remote scanning of Mercury's surface from the Mercury Planetary Orbiter MPO. The second instrument is an in situ sensor for the detection of the enantiomorphism of surface crystals and minerals, proposed to be included in the Mercury Lander MSE. PMID:12185675

  1. Kilometer-Scale Topographic Roughness of Mercury: Correlation with Geologic Features and Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.

    2014-01-01

    We present maps of the topographic roughness of the northern circumpolar area of Mercury at kilometer scales. The maps are derived from range profiles obtained by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) instrument onboard the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. As measures of roughness, we used the interquartile range of profile curvature at three baselines: 0.7 kilometers, 2.8 kilometers, and 11 kilometers. The maps provide a synoptic overview of variations of typical topographic textures. They show a dichotomy between the smooth northern plains and rougher, more heavily cratered terrains. Analysis of the scale dependence of roughness indicates that the regolith on Mercury is thicker than on the Moon by approximately a factor of three. Roughness contrasts within northern volcanic plains of Mercury indicate a younger unit inside Goethe basin and inside another unnamed stealth basin. These new data permit interplanetary comparisons of topographic roughness.

  2. Non-Solar Photovoltaics for Small Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Clark, Eric B.; Myers, Matthew G.; Piszazor, Michael F.; Murbach, Marcus S.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has missions planned to targets in the solar system ranging from the permanently shadowed craters of Mercury to the icy reaches of the Kuiper belt and beyond. In 2011, the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) requested the NASA Ames and Glenn Research Centers to assess the potential of small power supplies based on direct conversion of energy from radioisotope sources for future NASA missions; and in particular to assess whether alphavoltaic and betavoltaic power sources could be of potential benefit in small missions, as well as examining the use of miniaturized thermophotovoltaic power supplies. This paper summarizes the results of that assessment.

  3. Motion Perception During Variable-Radius Swing Motion in Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Rader, A. A.; Oman, C. M.; Merfeld, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    Using a variable-radius roll swing motion paradigm, we examined the influence of interaural (y-axis) and dorsoventral (z-axis) force modulation on perceived tilt and translation by measuring perception of horizontal translation, roll tilt, and distance from center of rotation (radius) at 0.45 and 0.8 Hz using standard magnitude estimation techniques (primarily verbal reports) in darkness. Results show that motion perception was significantly influenced by both y- and z-axis forces. During constant radius trials, subjects' perceptions of tilt and translation were generally almost veridical. By selectively pairing radius (1.22 and 0.38 m) and frequency (0.45 and 0.8 Hz, respectively), the y-axis acceleration could be tailored in opposition to gravity so that the combined y-axis gravitoinertial force (GIF) variation at the subject's ears was reduced to ∼0.035 m/s2 – in effect, the y-axis GIF was “nulled” below putative perceptual threshold levels. With y-axis force nulling, subjects overestimated their tilt angle and underestimated their horizontal translation and radius. For some y-axis nulling trials, a radial linear acceleration at twice the tilt frequency (0.25 m/s2 at 0.9 Hz, 0.13 m/s2 at 1.6 Hz) was simultaneously applied to reduce the z-axis force variations caused by centripetal acceleration and by changes in the z-axis component of gravity during tilt. For other trials, the phase of this radial linear acceleration was altered to double the magnitude of the z-axis force variations. z-axis force nulling further increased the perceived tilt angle and further decreased perceived horizontal translation and radius relative to the y-axis nulling trials, while z-axis force doubling had the opposite effect. Subject reports were remarkably geometrically consistent; an observer model-based analysis suggests that perception was influenced by knowledge of swing geometry. PMID:19625542

  4. Motion perception during variable-radius swing motion in darkness.

    PubMed

    Rader, A A; Oman, C M; Merfeld, D M

    2009-10-01

    Using a variable-radius roll swing motion paradigm, we examined the influence of interaural (y-axis) and dorsoventral (z-axis) force modulation on perceived tilt and translation by measuring perception of horizontal translation, roll tilt, and distance from center of rotation (radius) at 0.45 and 0.8 Hz using standard magnitude estimation techniques (primarily verbal reports) in darkness. Results show that motion perception was significantly influenced by both y- and z-axis forces. During constant radius trials, subjects' perceptions of tilt and translation were generally almost veridical. By selectively pairing radius (1.22 and 0.38 m) and frequency (0.45 and 0.8 Hz, respectively), the y-axis acceleration could be tailored in opposition to gravity so that the combined y-axis gravitoinertial force (GIF) variation at the subject's ears was reduced to approximately 0.035 m/s(2) - in effect, the y-axis GIF was "nulled" below putative perceptual threshold levels. With y-axis force nulling, subjects overestimated their tilt angle and underestimated their horizontal translation and radius. For some y-axis nulling trials, a radial linear acceleration at twice the tilt frequency (0.25 m/s(2) at 0.9 Hz, 0.13 m/s(2) at 1.6 Hz) was simultaneously applied to reduce the z-axis force variations caused by centripetal acceleration and by changes in the z-axis component of gravity during tilt. For other trials, the phase of this radial linear acceleration was altered to double the magnitude of the z-axis force variations. z-axis force nulling further increased the perceived tilt angle and further decreased perceived horizontal translation and radius relative to the y-axis nulling trials, while z-axis force doubling had the opposite effect. Subject reports were remarkably geometrically consistent; an observer model-based analysis suggests that perception was influenced by knowledge of swing geometry. PMID:19625542

  5. Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the technical feasibility and cost of upgrading low-BTU methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys modular microchannel process technology. The objective of Phase II is to demonstrate the process at the bench-scale. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. The project is on schedule and on budget. Task 4, a bench-scale demonstration of the ultra-fast TSA system is complete. Rapid thermal swing of an adsorbent bed using microchannels has been successfully demonstrated and the separation of a 70% methane and 30% nitrogen was purified to 92% methane. The bench-scale demonstration unit was small relative to the system dead volume for the initial phase of experiments and a purge step was added to sweep the dead volume prior to desorbing the bed and measuring purity. A technical and economic feasibility assessment was completed in Task 3. The proposed Velocys technology appears feasible for the methane upgrading market. Evaluated categories include adsorbent selection, rapid-cycle valve selection, microchannel manufacturability assessment, and system

  6. Simulation and Optimization of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity levels in a spacesuit is critical to ensuring both the safety and comfort of an astronaut during extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Traditionally, this has been accomplished utilizing either non-regenerative lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or regenerative but heavy metal oxide (MetOx) canisters which pose a significant weight burden. Although such technology enables air revitalization, the volume requirements to store the waste canisters as well as the mass to transport multiple units become prohibitive as mission durations increase. Consequently, motivation exists toward developing a fully regenerative technology for spacesuit environmental control. The application of solid amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to control CO2 while concomitantly managing humidity levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating constraints imposed with the traditional technologies. Prototype air revitalization units employing this technology have been fabricated in both a rectangular and cylindrical geometry. Experimental results for these test articles have been collected and are described herein. In order to accelerate the developmental efforts, an axially-dispersed plug flow model with an accompanying energy balance has been established and correlated with the experimental data. The experimental and simulation results display good agreement for a variety of flow rates (110-170 ALM), replicated metabolic challenges (100-590 Watts), and atmosphere pressures under consideration for the spacesuit (248 and 760 mm Hg). The testing and model results lend insight into the operational capabilities of these devices as well as the influence the geometry of the device has on performance. In addition, variable metabolic profiles were imposed on the test articles in order to assess the ability of the technology to transition to new metabolic conditions. The advent of the model provides the capacity to apply

  7. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.; Howard, D.

    2007-01-01

    In NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (Bush, 2004), (Griffin, 2007), humans will once again travel beyond the confines of earth's gravity, this time to remain there for extended periods. These forays will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also liftoff the supplies needed to sustain a larger crew over much longer periods. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. For short-term phases of manned space exploration, such as transit from the earth to the moon, venting of metabolic carbon dioxide and water to space is more efficient than the inclusion of large recycling systems on the spacecraft. The baseline system for the Orion spacecraft is an amine-based vacuum swing system (Smith, Perry et aI., 2006). As part of the development of an alternative approach, a sorbent-based CO2 and H2O removal system (Knox, Adams et aI., 2006), subscale testing was conducted to evaluate potential performance improvements obtainable by recuperating the heat of adsorption to aid in vacuum desorption. This bed design is shown in Figure 1, is depicted here with a lattice structure instead of reticulated foam for heat transfer. The slot widths are approximately 1.2 mm wide and 8.5 mm long. Bed depth is approximately 4.7 mm. Headers (not shown) were produced by the stereo lithography apparatus at MSFC.

  8. Discovery of sodium in the atmosphere of mercury.

    PubMed

    Potter, A; Morgan, T

    1985-08-16

    The spectrum of Mercury at the Fraunhofer sodium D lines shows strong emission features that are attributed to resonant scattering of sunlight from sodium vapor in the atmosphere of the planet. The total column abundance of sodium was estimated to be 8.1 x 10(11) atoms per square centimeter, which corresponds to a surface density at the subsolar point of about 1.5 x 10(5) atoms per cubic centimeter. The most abundant atmospheric species found by the Mariner 10 mission to Mercury was helium, with a surface density of 4.5 x 10(3) atoms per cubic centimeter. It now appears that sodium vapor is a major constituent of Mercury's atmosphere. PMID:17739377

  9. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  10. ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current state of our scientific understanding the mercury cycle tells us that most of the mercury getting into fish comes from atmospheric deposition, but methylation of that mercury in aquatic systems is required for the concentrations in fish to reach harmful levels. We st...

  11. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  12. Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Selid, Paul D.; Xu, Hanying; Collins, E. Michael; Face-Collins, Marla Striped; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wide array of sensors for monitoring mercury is described, including biosensors and chemical sensors, while piezoelectric and microcantilever sensors are also described. Additionally, newly developed nanomaterials offer great potential for fabricating novel mercury sensors. Some of the functional fluorescent nanosensors for the determination of mercury are covered. Afterwards, the in vivo determination of mercury and the characterization of different forms of mercury are discussed. Finally, the future direction for mercury detection is outlined, suggesting that nanomaterials may provide revolutionary tools in biomedical and environmental monitoring of mercury. PMID:22346707

  13. Methods of and system for swing damping movement of suspended objects

    DOEpatents

    Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.; Strip, D.R.

    1991-03-05

    A payload suspended from a gantry is swing damped in accordance with a control algorithm based on the periodic motion of the suspended mass or by servoing on the forces induced by the suspended mass. 13 figures.

  14. Identification of standing MHD modes in MHD simulations of planetary magnetospheres. Application to Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griton, Léa; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's magnetosphere using the magnetohydrodynamic code AMRVAC. A procedure for the identification of standing MHD modes has been applied to these simulations showing that large scale standing slow mode structures may exist in Mercury's magnetosheath. The identification is mostly based on relatively simple approximate analytical solutions to the old problem of determining the family of all standing linear plane MHD waves in a flowing plasma. The question of the identification of standing slow mode structures using in situ measurements such as the future BepiColombo MMO mission to Mercury will be discussed as well.

  15. 45Degree view of one (1) arm of the swing span ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45-Degree view of one (1) arm of the swing span bridge in the open position. The view shows the continuous bottom chord of the truss. The vertical post and diagonal web members that frame into this bottom chord are connected with single steel pins at each panel point (or joint). The timber track ties, supporting the track, span from truss to truss bottom chords (16' -0') and are supported thereby. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  16. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  17. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  18. Hybrid markerless tracking of complex articulated motion in golf swings.

    PubMed

    Fung, Sim Kwoh; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Kiang, Lam Chee; Nadarajah, Sivadev; Sahayadhas, Arun; Ali, Md Asraf; Islam, Md Anamul; Palaniappan, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Sports video tracking is a research topic that has attained increasing attention due to its high commercial potential. A number of sports, including tennis, soccer, gymnastics, running, golf, badminton and cricket have been utilised to display the novel ideas in sports motion tracking. The main challenge associated with this research concerns the extraction of a highly complex articulated motion from a video scene. Our research focuses on the development of a markerless human motion tracking system that tracks the major body parts of an athlete straight from a sports broadcast video. We proposed a hybrid tracking method, which consists of a combination of three algorithms (pyramidal Lucas-Kanade optical flow (LK), normalised correlation-based template matching and background subtraction), to track the golfer's head, body, hands, shoulders, knees and feet during a full swing. We then match, track and map the results onto a 2D articulated human stick model to represent the pose of the golfer over time. Our work was tested using two video broadcasts of a golfer, and we obtained satisfactory results. The current outcomes of this research can play an important role in enhancing the performance of a golfer, provide vital information to sports medicine practitioners by providing technically sound guidance on movements and should assist to diminish the risk of golfing injuries.

  19. Challenges of electric swing adsorption for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Grande, Carlos A; Ribeiro, Rui P P L; Rodrigues, Alírio E

    2010-08-23

    This work focuses on the application of electric swing adsorption (ESA) as a selective postcombustion technique to capture and concentrate CO(2) from flue gases of power plants. The initial application should be the capture of CO(2) from flue gases of combined cycle natural gas (NGCC) power plants: the CO(2) content ranges from 3-5 %, with up to 12 % of oxygen. Several challenges to deploy this process for a large-scale application are pointed out. Materials such as amine-modified resins or zeolites should be good candidates for this process (indirect ESA) because they exhibit good loadings at low partial pressures of CO(2). The process design should take into account the temperature increase due to adiabatic operation, pushing the effective loadings to values around 20 % of maximum loading. Several process operations are suggested in order to improve the CO(2) purity and recovery and also to integrate the ESA process with other sources of heat, which may have an important impact in energy consumption. PMID:20623725

  20. Hybrid markerless tracking of complex articulated motion in golf swings.

    PubMed

    Fung, Sim Kwoh; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Kiang, Lam Chee; Nadarajah, Sivadev; Sahayadhas, Arun; Ali, Md Asraf; Islam, Md Anamul; Palaniappan, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Sports video tracking is a research topic that has attained increasing attention due to its high commercial potential. A number of sports, including tennis, soccer, gymnastics, running, golf, badminton and cricket have been utilised to display the novel ideas in sports motion tracking. The main challenge associated with this research concerns the extraction of a highly complex articulated motion from a video scene. Our research focuses on the development of a markerless human motion tracking system that tracks the major body parts of an athlete straight from a sports broadcast video. We proposed a hybrid tracking method, which consists of a combination of three algorithms (pyramidal Lucas-Kanade optical flow (LK), normalised correlation-based template matching and background subtraction), to track the golfer's head, body, hands, shoulders, knees and feet during a full swing. We then match, track and map the results onto a 2D articulated human stick model to represent the pose of the golfer over time. Our work was tested using two video broadcasts of a golfer, and we obtained satisfactory results. The current outcomes of this research can play an important role in enhancing the performance of a golfer, provide vital information to sports medicine practitioners by providing technically sound guidance on movements and should assist to diminish the risk of golfing injuries. PMID:24725790

  1. Follow that mercury!

    SciTech Connect

    Linero, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

  2. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  3. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  4. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Marshall G.

    1985-01-01

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  5. Swing-leg retraction: a simple control model for stable running.

    PubMed

    Seyfarth, André; Geyer, Hartmut; Herr, Hugh

    2003-08-01

    In running, the spring-like axial behavior of stance limbs is a well-known and remarkably general feature. Here we consider how the rotational behavior of limbs affects running stability. It is commonly observed that running animals retract their limbs just prior to ground contact, moving each foot rearward towards the ground. In this study, we employ a conservative spring-mass model to test the effects of swing-leg retraction on running stability. A feed-forward control scheme is applied where the swing-leg is retracted at constant angular velocity throughout the second half of the swing phase. The control scheme allows the spring-mass system to automatically adapt the angle of attack in response to disturbances in forward speed and stance-limb stiffness. Using a return map to investigate system stability, we propose an optimal swing-leg retraction model for the stabilization of flight phase apex height. The results of this study indicate that swing-leg retraction significantly improves the stability of spring-mass running, suggesting that swing-phase limb dynamics may play an important role in the stabilization of running animals. PMID:12819262

  6. Spine biomechanics associated with the shortened, modern one-plane golf swing.

    PubMed

    Dale, R Barry; Brumitt, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic, kinematic, and performance variables associated with full and shortened modern backswings in a skilled group of modern swing (one-plane) golfers. Shortening the modern golf backswing is proposed to reduce vertebral spine stress, but supporting evidence is lacking and performance implications are unknown. Thirteen male golfers performed ten swings of each swing type using their own 7-iron club. Biomechanical-dependent variables included the X-Factor kinematic data and spine kinetics. Performance-related dependent variables included club head velocity (CHV), shot distance, and accuracy (distance from the target line). Data were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA with an a priori alpha of 0.05 (SPSS 22.0, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA). We found significant reductions for the X-Factor (p < 0.05) between the full and shortened swings. The shortened swing condition ameliorated vertebral compression force from 7.6 ± 1.4 to 7.0 ± 1.7 N (normalised to body weight, p = 0.01) and significantly reduced CHV (p < 0.05) by ~2 m/s with concomitant shot distance diminution by ~10 m (p < 0.05). Further research is necessary to examine the applicability of a shortened swing for golfers with low back pain. PMID:27064175

  7. Distance Relaying with Power Swing Detection based on Voltage and Reactive Power Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ujjaval J.; Chothani, Nilesh G.; Bhatt, Praghnesh J.

    2016-02-01

    Sudden changes in loading or configuration of an electrical network causes power swing which may result in an unwanted tripping of the distance relay. Hence, it becomes utmost necessary to rapidly and reliably discriminate between actual fault and power swing conditions in order to prevent instability in power network due to mal operation of distance relay. This paper proposes a novel method for the discrimination between fault and power swing based on rate of change of voltage and reactive power measured at relay location. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by simulating series of power swing conditions in PSCAD/EMTDC® software for different disturbances such as change in mechanical power input to synchronous generator, tripping of parallel line due to fault and sudden application of heavy load. It is revealed that the distance relay gives successful tripping in case of different fault conditions and remains inoperative for power swing with the implementation of the proposed algorithm. Moreover, the proposed scheme has ability to distinguish the symmetrical and asymmetrical fault occurrence during power swing condition.

  8. Segmental and kinetic contributions in vertical jumps performed with and without an arm swing.

    PubMed

    Feltner, Michael E; Bishop, Elijah J; Perez, Cassandra M

    2004-09-01

    To determine the contributions of the motions of the body segments to the vertical ground reaction force (Fz), the joint torques produced by the leg muscles, and the time course of vertical velocity generation during a vertical jump, 15 men were videotaped performing countermovement vertical jumps from a force plate with and without an arm swing. Linear kinematic, Fz, and joint torque data were computed and compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Maximum jump height was significantly larger in the arm swing jumps compared to the no arm swing jumps and was due to both a higher height of the center of mass (CM) at takeoff (54%) and a larger vertical velocity of the CM at takeoff (46%). The net vertical impulse created during the propulsive phase of the arm swing jumps was greater due to a trend of an increased duration (0.021 s) of the propulsive phase and not to larger average values of Fz. In the arm swing jumps, the arm motion resulted in the arms making a larger maximal contribution to Fz during the middle of the propulsive phase and decreased the negative contribution of the trunk-head and thigh to Fz late in the propulsive phase. Last, the arm swing decreased the extensor torques at the hip (13%), knee (10%), and ankle (10%) early in the propulsive phase but augmented these same extensor torques later in the propulsive phase.

  9. A role for hip position in initiating the swing-to-stance transition in walking cats.

    PubMed

    McVea, D A; Donelan, J M; Tachibana, A; Pearson, K G

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we obtained data that support the hypothesis that afferent signals associated with hip flexion play a role in initiating the swing-to-stance transition of the hind legs in walking cats. Direct evidence came from observations in walking decerebrate cats. Assisting the flexion of the hip joint during swing advanced the onset of activity in ankle extensor muscles, and this advance was strongly correlated with a reduction in the duration of hip flexor muscle activity. The hip angle at the time of onset of the flexion to extension transition was similar during assisted and unassisted steps. Additional evidence for the hypothesis that sensory signals related to hip flexion are important in regulating the swing-to-stance transition came from four normal animals trained to walk in a variety of situations designed to alter the coordination of movements at the hip, knee, and ankle joints during the swing phase. Although there were exceptions in some tasks and preparations, the angle of the hip joint at the time of onset of extensor activity was generally less variable than that of the knee and ankle joints. We also found no clear relationships between the angle of the limb and body axes, or the length of the limb axis, and the time of onset of extensor activity. Finally, there were no indications that the stretching of ankle extensor muscles during swing was a factor in regulating the transition from swing-to-stance.

  10. Mercury's sodium exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2003-08-01

    Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere is simulated using a comprehensive 3D Monte Carlo model following sodium atoms ejected from Mercury's surface by thermal desorption, photon stimulated desorption, micro-meteoroid vaporization and solar wind sputtering. The evolution of the sodium surface density with respect to Mercury's rotation and its motion around the Sun is taken into account by considering enrichment processes due to surface trapping of neutrals and ions and depletion of the sodium available for ejection from the surfaces of grains. The change in the sodium exosphere is calculated during one Mercury year taking into account the variations in the solar radiation pressure, the photo-ionization frequency, the solar wind density, the photon and meteoroid flux intensities, and the surface temperature. Line-of-sight column densities at different phase angles, the supply rate of new sodium, average neutral and ion losses over a Mercury year, surface density distribution and the importance of the different processes of ejection are discussed in this paper. The sodium surface density distribution is found to become significantly nonuniform from day to night sides, from low to high latitudes and from morning to afternoon because of rapid depletion of sodium atoms in the surfaces of grains mainly driven by thermal depletion. The shape of the exosphere, as it would be seen from the Earth, changes drastically with respect to Mercury's heliocentric position. High latitude column density maxima are related to maxima in the sodium surface concentration at high latitudes in Mercury's surface and are not necessarily due to solar wind sputtering. The ratio between the sodium column density on the morning side of Mercury's exosphere and the sodium column density on the afternoon side is consistent with the conclusions of Sprague et al. (1997, Icarus 129, 506-527). The model, which has no fitting parameters, shows surprisingly good agreement with recent observations of Potter et

  11. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  12. Spectrophotometric properties of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, D.; Vilas, F.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Warell, J.; Izenberg, N. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Blewett, D. T.; McClintock, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    The MEcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft obtained photometric observations of Mercury during three flybys (14 January 2008, 6 October 2008, 29 September 2009) using both the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) and the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS). The MDIS measurements include disk-integrated phase-curve observations taken in 11 narrow-band filters ranging from 430 to 1010 nm. The MDIS measurements also include disk-resolved photometric observations taken during the first flyby of a 200-km by 400-km region (centered on 1.7°S, 123.5°E, and spanning 5.5° of latitude and 10° of longitude) over a phase-angle range between 51° and 120°. The MASCS measurements include disk-integrated phase-curve observations taken from 300 to 1450 nm at a spectral resolution of 2.5 nm. During the third flyby, targeted type regions were observed at multiple viewing geometries, providing disk-resolved photometric measurements at high spectral resolution. Comparisons with ground-based observations show that the phase behavior determined by analysis of the MDIS and MASCS observations is consistent with previous studies. Reflectance measurements from the first two flybys show no definitive absorption features and a distinctive steep, or “red,” slope with increasing wavelength common to space-weathered rocky surfaces. The MDIS spectra show evidence of phase reddening (increased spectral slope with increasing phase angle), similar to that observed on the Moon. The derived photometric properties indicate a more compact, less porous regolith that is smoother on meter scales than regolith on the Moon or S-type asteroids. Although Mercury is darker than the average lunar nearside, the calculated geometric albedo (reflectance at zero phase) is higher for Mercury than the Moon, implying a greater opposition-surge magnitude. The geometric albedo, coupled with the lower reflectance of immature (younger) units on

  13. Joint moment contributions to swing knee extension acceleration during gait in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Evan J; Requejo, Philip S; Fowler, Eileen G

    2010-03-22

    Inadequate peak knee extension during the swing phase of gait is a major deficit in individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). The biomechanical mechanisms responsible for knee extension have not been thoroughly examined in CP. The purpose of this study was to assess the contributions of joint moments and gravity to knee extension acceleration during swing in children with spastic hemiplegic CP. Six children with spastic hemiplegic CP were recruited (age=13.4+/-4.8 years). Gait data were collected using an eight-camera system. Induced acceleration analysis was performed for each limb during swing. Average joint moment and gravity contributions to swing knee extension acceleration were calculated. Total swing and stance joint moment contributions were compared between the hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic limbs using paired t-tests (p<0.05). Swing limb joint moment contributions from the hemiplegic limb decelerated swing knee extension significantly more than those of the non-hemiplegic limb and resulted in significantly reduced knee extension acceleration. Total stance limb joint moment contributions were not statistically different. Swing limb joint moment contributions that decelerated knee extension appeared to be the primary cause of inadequate knee extension acceleration during swing. Stance limb muscle strength did not appear to be the limiting factor in achieving adequate knee extension in children with CP. Recent research has shown that the ability to extend the knee during swing is dependent on the selective voluntary motor control of the limb. Data from individual participants support this concept.

  14. Mercury's Sodium Exosphere: Observations during the MESSENGER Orbital Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; McClintock, William E.; Benna, Mehdi; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered into orbit about Mercury on March 18,2011. We now have approximately five Mercury years of data from orbit. Prior to the MESSENGER mission, Mercury's surface-bounded exosphere was known to contain H, He, Na. K, and Ca. The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) began routine orbital observations of both the dayside and nightside exosphere on March 29. 2011, measuring altitude profiles for all previously detected neutral species except for He and K. We focus here on what we have learned about the sodium exosphere: its spatial, seasonal, and sporadic variation. Observations to date permit delineation of the relative roles of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and impact vaporization (IV) from seasonal and spatial effects, as well as of the roles of ions both as sputtering agents and in their possible role to enhance the efficiency of PSD. Correlations of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere with measurements from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) provide insight into the roles of ions and electrons. Models incorporating MAG observations provide a basis for identifying the location and area of the surface exposed to solar wind plasma, and EPPS observations reveal episodic populations of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere and the presence of planetary He(+), 0(+), and Na(+),

  15. Surviving the Sun's Wrath at Mercury: The MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, Barry E.

    2008-03-01

    In spite of the best efforts by satellite engineers to construct electronic components capable of surviving the harsh radiation environment of space, satellites continue to fall victim every year to high-energy particles from galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particle events, and trapped particles in the Earth's magnetic field. According to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), $500 million in commercial satellite insurance claims were filed between 1994 and 1999 as a direct result of space weather impinging on satellite electronics systems [NOAA, 2006]. NOAA also reported that adverse space weather causes damage to U.S. Department of Defense satellites, amounting to $100 million every year.

  16. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  17. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  18. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    DOEpatents

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  19. Effects of Aging on Arm Swing during Gait: The Role of Gait Speed and Dual Tasking

    PubMed Central

    Mirelman, Anat; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Nobel, Tomer; Thaler, Avner; Peruzzi, Agnese; Plotnik, Meir; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy walking is characterized by pronounced arm swing and axial rotation. Aging effects on gait speed, stride length and stride time variability have been previously reported, however, less is known about aging effects on arm swing and axial rotation and their relationship to age-associated gait changes during usual walking and during more challenging conditions like dual tasking. Sixty healthy adults between the ages of 30–77 were included in this study designed to address this gap. Lightweight body fixed sensors were placed on each wrist and lower back. Participants walked under 3 walking conditions each of 1 minute: 1) comfortable speed, 2) walking while serially subtracting 3’s (Dual Task), 3) walking at fast speed. Aging effects on arm swing amplitude, range, symmetry, jerk and axial rotation amplitude and jerk were compared between decades of age (30–40; 41–50; 51–60; 61–77 years). As expected, older adults walked slower (p = 0.03) and with increased stride variability (p = 0.02). Arm swing amplitude decreased with age under all conditions (p = 0.04). In the oldest group, arm swing decreased during dual task and increased during the fast walking condition (p<0.0001). Similarly, arm swing asymmetry increased during the dual task in the older groups (p<0.004), but not in the younger groups (p = 0.67). Significant differences between groups and within conditions were observed in arm swing jerk (p<0.02), axial rotation amplitude (p<0.02) and axial jerk (p<0.001). Gait speed, arm swing amplitude of the dominant arm, arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation jerk were all independent predictors of age in a multivariate model. These findings suggest that the effects of gait speed and dual tasking on arm swing and axial rotation during walking are altered among healthy older adults. Follow-up work is needed to examine if these effects contribute to reduced stability in aging. PMID:26305896

  20. Current Status of MPPE (Mercury Plasma Particle Experiment) on BepiColombo/MMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Hirahara, Masafumi; Barabash, Stas; Delcourt, Dominique; André, Nicolas; Takashima, Takeshi; Asamura, Kazushi

    2015-04-01

    Mercury's plasma/particle environment has gradually become clear thanks to the new observations made by MESSENGER spacecraft orbiting around Mercury. However, it is also true that many questions will be left unsolved. In order to elucidate the detailed plasma structure and dynamics around Mercury, an orbiter BepiColombo MMO (Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter) is going to be launched in 2016 as a joint mission between ESA and ISAS/JAXA. Mercury Plasma/Particle Experiment (MPPE) is a comprehensive instrument package for plasma, high-energy particle and energetic neutral atom measurements. It consists of 7 sensors: two Mercury Electron Analyzers (MEA1 and MEA2), Mercury Ion Analyzer (MIA), Mass Spectrum Analyzer (MSA), High Energy Particle instrument for electron (HEP-ele), High Energy Particle instrument for ion (HEP-ion), and Energetic Neutrals Analyzer (ENA). Currently, the MPPE sensors are on the MMO spacecraft under system integration test at ISAS/JAXA (Institute of Space and Astronautical Science / Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Evaluation of the sensor calibration data and the final check of the onboard processing software are being made in order to realize the flawless future plasma/particle observations around Mercury.

  1. Solar Power for Near Sun, High-Temperature Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Existing solar cells lose performance at the high temperatures encountered in Mercury orbit and inward toward the sun. For future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun, it is desirable to develop array technologies for high temperature and high light intensity. Approaches to solar array design for near-sun missions include modifying the terms governing temperature of the cell and the efficiency at elevated temperature, or use of techniques to reduce the incident solar energy to limit operating temperature. An additional problem is found in missions that involve a range of intensities, such as the Solar Probe + mission, which ranges from a starting distance of 1 AU from the sun to a minimum distance of 9.5 solar radii, or 0.044 AU. During the mission, the solar intensity ranges from one to about 500 times AM0. This requires a power system to operate over nearly three orders of magnitude of incident intensity.

  2. Predicting mercury in mallard ducklings from mercury in chorioallantoic membranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Methylmercury has been suspected as a cause of impaired reproduction in wild birds, but the confounding effects of other environmental stressors has made it difficult to determine how much mercury in the eggs of these wild species is harmful. Even when a sample egg can be collected from the nest of a wild bird and the mercury concentration in that egg compared to the laboratory-derived thresholds for reproductive impairment, additional information on the mercury levels in other eggs from that nest would be helpful in determining whether harmful levels of mercury were present in the clutch. The measurement of mercury levels in chorioallantoic membranes offers a possible way to estimate how much mercury was in a chick that hatched from an egg, and also in the whole fresh egg itself. While an embryo is developing, wastes are collected in a sac called the chorioallantoic membranes, which often remain inside the eggshell and can be collected for contaminant analysis. We fed methylmercury to captive mallards to generate a broad range of mercury levels in eggs, allowed the eggs to hatch normally, and then compared mercury concentrations in the hatchling versus the chorioallantoic membranes left behind in the eggshell. When the data from eggs laid by mercury- treated females were expressed as common logarithms, a linear equation was created by which the concentration of mercury in a duckling could be predicted from the concentration of mercury in the chorioallantoic membranes from the same egg. Therefore, if it were not possible to collect a sample egg from a clutch of wild bird eggs, the collection of the chorioallantoic membranes could be substituted, and the mercury predicted to be in the chick or whole egg could be compared to the thresholds of mercury that have been shown to cause harm in controlled feeding studies with pheasants, chickens, and mallards.

  3. G measurements with time-of-swing method at HUST

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Hui-Hui; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Liu, Qi; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun; Milyukov, Vadim; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We review the G measurements with time-of-swing method at HUST. Two independent experiments have been completed and an improved experiment is in progress. The first G value was determined as 6.6699(7)×10−11 m3 kg−1 s−2 with a relative standard uncertainty (ur) of 105 ppm by using a long period torsion pendulum and two cylindrical source masses. Later, this result was corrected to be 6.6723(9)×10−11 m3 kg−1 s−2 with ur=130 ppm after considering the density distribution of the cylinders and the air buoyancy, which was 360 ppm larger than the previous value. In 2009, a new experiment by using a simple block pendulum and spherical source masses with more homogeneous density was carried out. A series of improvements were performed, and the G value was determined to be 6.67349(18)×10−11 m3 kg−1 s−2 with ur=26 ppm. To reduce the anelasticity of the torsion fibre, fused silica fibres with Q's of approximately 5×104 are used to measure G in the ongoing experiment. These fibres are coated with thin layers of germanium and bismuth in turn to reduce the electrostatic effect. Some other improvements include the gravity compensation, reduction of the coating layer effect, etc. The prospective uncertainty of the next G value is 20 ppm or lower. PMID:25202004

  4. Demonstration of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Iacomini, Christine; Powers, Aaron; Dunham, Jonah; Straub-Lopez, Katie; Anerson, Grant; MacCallum, Taber

    2007-01-01

    Patent-pending Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is currently being investigated for removal and rejection of CO2 and heat from a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) to a Martian environment. The metabolically-produced CO2 present in the vent loop gas is collected using a CO2 selective adsorbent that has been cooled via a heat exchanger to near CO2 sublimation temperatures (approx.195K) with liquid CO2 obtained from Martian resources. Once the adsorbent is fully loaded, fresh warm, moist vent loop (approx.300K) is used to heat the adsorbent via another heat exchanger. The adsorbent will then reject the collected CO2 to the Martian ambient. Two beds are used to achieve continuous CO2 removal by cycling between the cold and warm conditions for adsorbent loading and regeneration, respectively. Small experiments have already been completed to show that an adsorbent can be cycled between these PLSS operating conditions to provide adequate conditions for CO2 removal from a simulated vent loop. One of the remaining technical challenges is extracting enough heat from the vent loop to warm the adsorbent in an appreciable time frame to meet the required adsorb/desorb cycle. The other key technical aspect of the technology is employing liquid CO2 to achieve the appropriate cooling. A technology demonstrator has been designed, built and tested to investigate the feasibility of 1) warming the adsorbent using the moist vent loop, 2) cooling the adsorbent using liquid CO2, and 3) using these two methods in conjunction to successfully remove CO2 from a vent loop and reject it to Mars ambient. Both analytical and numerical methods were used to perform design calculations and trades. The demonstrator was built and tested. The design analysis and testing results are presented along with recommendations for future development required to increase the maturity of the technology.

  5. G measurements with time-of-swing method at HUST.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Hui-Hui; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Liu, Qi; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun; Milyukov, Vadim; Luo, Jun

    2014-10-13

    We review the G measurements with time-of-swing method at HUST. Two independent experiments have been completed and an improved experiment is in progress. The first G value was determined as 6.6699(7)×10(-11) m(3) kg(-1) s(-2) with a relative standard uncertainty (ur) of 105 ppm by using a long period torsion pendulum and two cylindrical source masses. Later, this result was corrected to be 6.6723(9)×10(-11) m(3) kg(-1) s(-2) with ur=130 ppm after considering the density distribution of the cylinders and the air buoyancy, which was 360 ppm larger than the previous value. In 2009, a new experiment by using a simple block pendulum and spherical source masses with more homogeneous density was carried out. A series of improvements were performed, and the G value was determined to be 6.67349(18)×10(-11) m(3) kg(-1) s(-2) with ur=26 ppm. To reduce the anelasticity of the torsion fibre, fused silica fibres with Q's of approximately 5×10(4) are used to measure G in the ongoing experiment. These fibres are coated with thin layers of germanium and bismuth in turn to reduce the electrostatic effect. Some other improvements include the gravity compensation, reduction of the coating layer effect, etc. The prospective uncertainty of the next G value is 20 ppm or lower.

  6. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  7. MERCURY SPECIATION AND CAPTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In December 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) announced its intent to regulate mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utility steam generating plants. Maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements are to be proposed by December 2003 and finali...

  8. Magnetosphere of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    A model magnetosphere of Mercury using Mariner 10 data is presented. Diagrams of the bow shock wave and magnetopause are shown. The analysis of Mariner 10 data indicates that the magnetic field of the planet is intrinsic. The magnetic tail and secondary magnetic fields, and the influence of the solar wind are also discussed.

  9. Mercury Shopping Cart Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

  10. Hazards of Mercury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Research, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Common concern for the protection and improvement of the environment and the enhancement of human health and welfare underscore the purpose of this special report on the hazards of mercury directed to the Secretary's Pesticide Advisory Committee, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The report summarizes the findings of a ten-member study…

  11. Mercury Information Clearinghouse

    SciTech Connect

    Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

    2006-03-31

    The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through

  12. Arm Swing as a Potential New Prodromal Marker of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirelman, Anat; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Thaler, Avner; Giladi-Yacobi, Eytan; Gurevich, Tanya; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Raymond, Deborah; Doan, Nancy; Bressman, Susan B.; Marder, Karen S.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Rao, Ashwini K.; Berg, Daniela; Brockmann, Kathrin; Aasly, Jan; Waro, Bjørg Johanne; Tolosa, Eduardo; Vilas, Dolores; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Giladi, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reduced arm swing is a well-known clinical feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD), often observed early in the course of the disease. We hypothesized that subtle changes in arm swing and axial rotation may also be detectable in the prodromal phase. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the LRRK2-G2019S mutation, arm swing, and axial rotation in healthy nonmanifesting carriers and noncarriers of the G2019S mutation and in patients with PD. Methods A total of 380 participants (186 healthy nonmanifesting controls and 194 PD patients) from 6 clinical sites underwent gait analysis while wearing synchronized 3-axis body-fixed sensors on the lower back and bilateral wrists. Participants walked for 1 minute under the following 2 conditions: (1) usual walking and (2) dual-task walking. Arm swing amplitudes, asymmetry, variability, and smoothness were calculated for both arms along with measures of axial rotation. Results A total of 122 nonmanifesting participants and 67 PD patients were carriers of the G2019S mutation. Nonmanifesting mutation carriers walked with greater arm swing asymmetry and variability and lower axial rotation smoothness under the dual task condition when compared with noncarriers (P < .04). In the nonmanifesting mutation carriers, arm swing asymmetry was associated with gait variability under dual task (P = .003). PD carriers showed greater asymmetry and variability of movement than PD noncarriers, even after controlling for disease severity (P < .009). Conclusions The G2019S mutation is associated with increased asymmetry and variability among nonmanifesting participants and patients with PD. Prospective studies should determine if arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation smoothness may be used as motor markers of prodromal PD. PMID:27430880

  13. Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Peter L.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of solar system tests of gravitational theory could be very much improved by range and Doppler measurements to a Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter. A nearly circular orbit at roughly 2400 km altitude is assumed in order to minimize problems with orbit determination and thermal radiation from the surface. The spacecraft is spin-stabilized and has a 30 cm diameter de-spun antenna. With K-band and X-band ranging systems using a 50 MHz offset sidetone at K-band, a range accuracy of 3 cm appears to be realistically achievable. The estimated spacecraft mass is 50 kg. A consider-covariance analysis was performed to determine how well the Earth-Mercury distance as a function of time could be determined with such a Relativity Orbiter. The minimum data set is assumed to be 40 independent 8-hour arcs of tracking data at selected times during a two year period. The gravity field of Mercury up through degree and order 10 is solved for, along with the initial conditions for each arc and the Earth-Mercury distance at the center of each arc. The considered parameters include the gravity field parameters of degree 11 and 12 plus the tracking station coordinates, the tropospheric delay, and two parameters in a crude radiation pressure model. The conclusion is that the Earth-Mercury distance can be determined to 6 cm accuracy or better. From a modified worst-case analysis, this would lead to roughly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the precession of perihelion, the relativistic time delay, and the possible change in the gravitational constant with time.

  14. Mercury control in 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, S.; Durham, M.; Bustard, J.; Martin, C.

    2009-07-15

    Although activated carbon injection (ACI) has been proven to be effective for many configurations and is a preferred option at many plants sufficient quantities of powdered activated coking (PAC) must be available to meet future needs. The authors estimate that upcoming federal and state regulations will result in tripling the annual US demand for activated carbon to nearly 1.5 billion lb from approximately 450 million lb. Rapid expansion of US production capacity is required. Many PAC manufacturers are discussing expansion of their existing production capabilities. One company, ADA Carbon Solutions, is in the process of constructing the largest activated carbon facility in North America to meet the future demand for PAC as a sorbent for mercury control. Emission control technology development and commercialization is driven by regulation and legislation. Although ACI will not achieve > 90% mercury control at every plant, the expected required MACT legislation level, it offers promise as a low-cost primary mercury control technology option for many configurations and an important trim technology for others. ACI has emerged as the clear mercury-specific control option of choice, representing over 98% of the commercial mercury control system orders to date. As state regulations are implemented and the potential for a federal rule becomes more imminent, suppliers are continuing to develop technologies to improve the cost effectiveness and limit the balance of plant impacts associated with ACI and are developing additional PAC production capabilities to ensure that the industry's needs are met. The commercialisation of ACI is a clear example of industry, through the dedication of many individuals and companies with support from the DOE and EPRI, meeting the challenge of developing cost-effectively reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  15. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  16. Space physics missions handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Robert A. (Compiler); Burks, David H. (Compiler); Hayne, Julie A. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide background data on current, approved, and planned missions, including a summary of the recommended candidate future missions. Topics include the space physics mission plan, operational spacecraft, and details of such approved missions as the Tethered Satellite System, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science.

  17. Mir Mission Chronicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Sue

    1998-01-01

    Dockings, module additions, configuration changes, crew changes, and major mission events are tracked for Mir missions 17 through 21 (November 1994 through August 1996). The international aspects of these missions are presented, comprising joint missions with ESA and NASA, including three U.S. Space Shuttle dockings. New Mir modules described are Spektr, the Docking Module, and Priroda.

  18. Missions and Moral Judgement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushnell, Amy Turner

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the history of Spanish-American missions, discussing the view of missions in church history, their role in the Spanish conquest, and the role and ideas of Herbert E. Bolton. Focuses on differences among Spanish borderlands missions, paying particular attention to the Florida missions. (CMK)

  19. MERCURY USAGE AND ALTERNATIVES IN THE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many industries have already found alternatives for mercury or have greatly decreased mercury use. However, the unique electromechanical and photoelectric properties of mercury and mercury compounds have made replacement of mercury difficult in some applications. This study was i...

  20. A MODELLING FRAMEWORK FOR MERCURY CYCLING IN LAKE MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time dependent mercury model was developed to describe mercury cycling in Lake Michigan. The model addresses dynamic relationships between net mercury loadings and the resulting concentrations of mercury species in the water and sediment. The transformations among three mercury...

  1. Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Patanjali

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with five different oxidation catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 mug

  2. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    PubMed

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-01

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby. PMID:18599778

  3. MERCURY DEPOSITION AND LAKE QUALITY TRENDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed factors influence the differing trends in mercury residue levels. Fish mercury concentrations show positive correlations with water color, methylmercury concentrations, and plankton mercury, and negative correlations with pH and alkalinity.

  4. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-12-05

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  5. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1987-02-27

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

  6. Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues

    DOEpatents

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1989-01-01

    Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

  7. Shared mission operations concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradlin, Gary L.; Rudd, Richard P.; Linick, Susan H.

    1994-01-01

    Historically, new JPL flight projects have developed a Mission Operations System (MOS) as unique as their spacecraft, and have utilized a mission-dedicated staff to monitor and control the spacecraft through the MOS. NASA budgetary pressures to reduce mission operations costs have led to the development and reliance on multimission ground system capabilities. The use of these multimission capabilities has not eliminated an ongoing requirement for a nucleus of personnel familiar with a given spacecraft and its mission to perform mission-dedicated operations. The high cost of skilled personnel required to support projects with diverse mission objectives has the potential for significant reduction through shared mission operations among mission-compatible projects. Shared mission operations are feasible if: (1) the missions do not conflict with one another in terms of peak activity periods, (2) a unique MOS is not required, and (3) there is sufficient similarity in the mission profiles so that greatly different skills would not be required to support each mission. This paper will further develop this shared mission operations concept. We will illustrate how a Discovery-class mission would enter a 'partner' relationship with the Voyager Project, and can minimize MOS development and operations costs by early and careful consideration of mission operations requirements.

  8. Predicting Mission Success in Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Mark; Richie, Wayne; Rogers, John; Moore, Arlene

    1992-01-01

    In our global society with its increasing international competition and tighter financial resources, governments, commercial entities and other organizations are becoming critically aware of the need to ensure that space missions can be achieved on time and within budget. This has become particularly true for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Office of Space Science (OSS) which has developed their Discovery and Explorer programs to meet this need. As technologies advance, space missions are becoming smaller and more capable than their predecessors. The ability to predict the mission success of these small satellite missions is critical to the continued achievement of NASA science mission objectives. The NASA Office of Space Science, in cooperation with the NASA Langley Research Center, has implemented a process to predict the likely success of missions proposed to its Discovery and Explorer Programs. This process is becoming the basis for predicting mission success in many other NASA programs as well. This paper describes the process, methodology, tools and synthesis techniques used to predict mission success for this class of mission.

  9. Feeding the Astronauts During Long Duration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the issues surrounding feeding astronauts during long duration missions. There is a brief history from the food and food packaging available during Project Mercury through the current food requirements. It shows the packaging and the requirements that have been used. The current food system includes thermostabilized and irradiated foods to reduce the potential of harmful microorganisms. There is an explanation of drinks available, rehydratable foods, and natural forms of food, (i.e., commercially available foods that are packaged in individual serving sizes). There is also discussion of the requirements for future missions, and the research gap for requirements for food that will last 5 years, with packaging and nutrients intact.

  10. Kinetic and Kinematic Differences in a Golf Swing in One and Both Lower Limb Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Petr; Maszczyk, Adam; Tománková, Kristina; Kubový, Petr; Richtrová, Michaela; Otáhal, Jakub; Čichoň, Rostislav; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Żmijewski, Piotr; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Amputee golfers need to cope with the absence of sole proprioception, a decreased range of swing motion and other factors which should be recognized for training purposes. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetic and kinematic differences in the golf swing in one leg and two legs amputees. The participants consisted of two males and one female at a professional or amateur level with a different degree of disability. Each participant was taped by 3D markers and performed five golf swings with the iron 6. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) did not vary between individuals in kinematics, however, it was low in kinetic variables of two leg amputees. The Kendal rank correlation showed a significant relationship between the level of amputation and a large number of kinetic and kinematic variables such as X factor, O factor, S factor and individual body angles. The fluency and similarity of the golf swing did not depend on the level of amputation. One lower limb amputation did not seem to increase movement variability contrary to two lower limb amputation. The most variable parameter was a weight-shift in all golfers. The takeaway and horizontal force angle depended on the level of amputation rather than individual technique, thus, their modification by training may be difficult. Estimation of golf swing „mistakes” in amputees in respect to the leading arm in an early follow or late follow position appeared to be useless. PMID:26834871

  11. Kinetic and Kinematic Differences in a Golf Swing in One and Both Lower Limb Amputees.

    PubMed

    Stastny, Petr; Maszczyk, Adam; Tománková, Kristina; Kubový, Petr; Richtrová, Michaela; Otáhal, Jakub; Čichoň, Rostislav; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Żmijewski, Piotr; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-11-22

    Amputee golfers need to cope with the absence of sole proprioception, a decreased range of swing motion and other factors which should be recognized for training purposes. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetic and kinematic differences in the golf swing in one leg and two legs amputees. The participants consisted of two males and one female at a professional or amateur level with a different degree of disability. Each participant was taped by 3D markers and performed five golf swings with the iron 6. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) did not vary between individuals in kinematics, however, it was low in kinetic variables of two leg amputees. The Kendal rank correlation showed a significant relationship between the level of amputation and a large number of kinetic and kinematic variables such as X factor, O factor, S factor and individual body angles. The fluency and similarity of the golf swing did not depend on the level of amputation. One lower limb amputation did not seem to increase movement variability contrary to two lower limb amputation. The most variable parameter was a weight-shift in all golfers. The takeaway and horizontal force angle depended on the level of amputation rather than individual technique, thus, their modification by training may be difficult. Estimation of golf swing "mistakes" in amputees in respect to the leading arm in an early follow or late follow position appeared to be useless. PMID:26834871

  12. Synchronized metronome training induces changes in the kinematic properties of the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marius; Häger, Charlotte; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on movement dynamics during golf-swing performance, as captured by kinematic analysis. A one-group, between-test design was applied on 13 male golfers (27.5 +/- 4.6 years old, 12.7 +/- 4.9 handicap) who completed 12 sessions of SMT over a four-week period. Pre- and post-assessments of golf swings with three different clubs (4-iron, 7-iron, and pitching wedge) were performed using a three-dimensional motion capture system. Club velocity at three different swing phases (backswing, downswing, and follow-through) was measured and cross-correlation analysis of time-series signals were made on joint couplings (wrist-elbow-shoulder) of both arms, and between joints and the club, during the full golf swing. There were significantly higher cross-correlations between joint-couplings and concomitant changes of the associated phase-shift differences, as well as reduced phase-shift variability at post-test. No significant effect of SMT was found for the club velocities. We suggest that domain-general influences of SMT on the underlying brain-based motor control strategies lead to a more coordinated movement pattern of the golf-swing performance, which may explain previous observations of significantly improved golf-shot accuracy and decreased variability after SMT.

  13. Kinetic and Kinematic Differences in a Golf Swing in One and Both Lower Limb Amputees.

    PubMed

    Stastny, Petr; Maszczyk, Adam; Tománková, Kristina; Kubový, Petr; Richtrová, Michaela; Otáhal, Jakub; Čichoň, Rostislav; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Żmijewski, Piotr; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-11-22

    Amputee golfers need to cope with the absence of sole proprioception, a decreased range of swing motion and other factors which should be recognized for training purposes. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetic and kinematic differences in the golf swing in one leg and two legs amputees. The participants consisted of two males and one female at a professional or amateur level with a different degree of disability. Each participant was taped by 3D markers and performed five golf swings with the iron 6. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) did not vary between individuals in kinematics, however, it was low in kinetic variables of two leg amputees. The Kendal rank correlation showed a significant relationship between the level of amputation and a large number of kinetic and kinematic variables such as X factor, O factor, S factor and individual body angles. The fluency and similarity of the golf swing did not depend on the level of amputation. One lower limb amputation did not seem to increase movement variability contrary to two lower limb amputation. The most variable parameter was a weight-shift in all golfers. The takeaway and horizontal force angle depended on the level of amputation rather than individual technique, thus, their modification by training may be difficult. Estimation of golf swing "mistakes" in amputees in respect to the leading arm in an early follow or late follow position appeared to be useless.

  14. Synchronized metronome training induces changes in the kinematic properties of the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marius; Häger, Charlotte; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on movement dynamics during golf-swing performance, as captured by kinematic analysis. A one-group, between-test design was applied on 13 male golfers (27.5 +/- 4.6 years old, 12.7 +/- 4.9 handicap) who completed 12 sessions of SMT over a four-week period. Pre- and post-assessments of golf swings with three different clubs (4-iron, 7-iron, and pitching wedge) were performed using a three-dimensional motion capture system. Club velocity at three different swing phases (backswing, downswing, and follow-through) was measured and cross-correlation analysis of time-series signals were made on joint couplings (wrist-elbow-shoulder) of both arms, and between joints and the club, during the full golf swing. There were significantly higher cross-correlations between joint-couplings and concomitant changes of the associated phase-shift differences, as well as reduced phase-shift variability at post-test. No significant effect of SMT was found for the club velocities. We suggest that domain-general influences of SMT on the underlying brain-based motor control strategies lead to a more coordinated movement pattern of the golf-swing performance, which may explain previous observations of significantly improved golf-shot accuracy and decreased variability after SMT. PMID:24968507

  15. Crater chains on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V.; Skobeleva, T.

    After discovery of disruption comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into fragment train before it's collision with Jupiter there was proposed that linear crater chains on the large satellites of Jupiter and on the Moon are impact scars of past tidally disrupted comets.It's known that radar images have revealed the possible presence of water ice deposits in polar regions of Mercury. Impacts by a few large comets seem to provide the best explanation for both the amount and cleanliness of the ice deposits on Mercury because they have a larger volatile content that others external sources, for example, asteroid. A number of crater chains on the surface of Mercury are most likely the impact tracks of "fragment trains" of comets tidally disrupted by Sun or by Mercury and are not secondary craters. Mariner 10 image set (the three Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975) was used to recognize the crater chains these did not associate with secondary crater ejecta from observed impact structures. As example, it can be shown such crater chain located near crater Imhotep and crater Ibsen (The Kuiper Quadrangle of Mercury). Resolution of the Mariner 10 image is about 0.54 km/pixel. The crater chain is about 50 km long. It was found a similar crater chain inside large crater Sophocles (The Tolstoj Quadrangle of Mercury). The image resolution is about 1.46 km/pixel. The chain about 50 km long is located in northen part of the crater. Image resolution limits possibility to examine the form of craters strongly. It seems the craters in chains have roughly flat floor and smooth form. Most chain craters are approximately circular. It was examined many images from the Mariner 10 set and there were identified a total 15 crater chains and were unable to link any of these directly to any specific large crater associated with ejecta deposits. Chain craters are remarkably aligned. All distinguished crater chains are superposed on preexisting formations. A total of 127 craters were identified in the 15 recognized

  16. Kettlebell swing training improves maximal and explosive strength.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Lauder, Mike A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect that kettlebell swing (KB) training had on measures of maximum (half squat-HS-1 repetition maximum [1RM]) and explosive (vertical jump height-VJH) strength. To put these effects into context, they were compared with the effects of jump squat power training (JS-known to improve 1RM and VJH). Twenty-one healthy men (age = 18-27 years, body mass = 72.58 ± 12.87 kg) who could perform a proficient HS were tested for their HS 1RM and VJH pre- and post-training. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a KB or JS training group after HS 1RM testing and trained twice a week. The KB group performed 12-minute bouts of KB exercise (12 rounds of 30-second exercise, 30-second rest with 12 kg if <70 kg or 16 kg if >70 kg). The JS group performed at least 4 sets of 3 JS with the load that maximized peak power-Training volume was altered to accommodate different training loads and ranged from 4 sets of 3 with the heaviest load (60% 1RM) to 8 sets of 6 with the lightest load (0% 1RM). Maximum strength improved by 9.8% (HS 1RM: 165-181% body mass, p < 0.001) after the training intervention, and post hoc analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between the effect of KB and JS training (p = 0.56). Explosive strength improved by 19.8% (VJH: 20.6-24.3 cm) after the training intervention, and post hoc analysis revealed that the type of training did not significantly affect this either (p = 0.38). The results of this study clearly demonstrate that 6 weeks of biweekly KB training provides a stimulus that is sufficient to increase both maximum and explosive strength offering a useful alternative to strength and conditioning professionals seeking variety for their athletes.

  17. Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the technical feasibility and cost of upgrading low-BTU methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys modular microchannel process technology. The objective of Phase II is to demonstrate the process at the bench scale. The project is on schedule and on budget. A technical and economic feasibility assessment was completed in Task 3. The proposed Velocys technology appears feasible for the methane upgrading market. Evaluated categories include adsorbent selection, rapid-cycle valve selection, microchannel manufacturability assessment, and system design and cost. The selected adsorbent, granular microporous carbon from either Barnaby-Sutcliffe or Calgon, experimentally demonstrated sufficient methane capacity under differential temperature at 100 pounds per square inch gauge. Several valve options were identified, including candidates that can operate millions of cycles between refurbishment. The microchannel adsorber and desorber designs were made using internal Velocys manufacturability standards, and the associated costs are acceptable as included with the complete nitrogen rejection unit (NRU) cost projection. A system design and cost estimate was completed for the NRU section of the methane upgrading system. As integrated into the complete system, the cost is in line with the market requirement. The system has six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration will be initiated in the next fiscal year. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary

  18. Impact of lunar and planetary missions on the space station: Preliminary STS logistics report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Space station requirements for lunar and planetary missions are discussed. Specific reference is made to projected Ceres and Kopff missions; Titan probes; Saturn and Mercury orbiters; and a Mars sample return mission. Such requirements as base design; station function; program definition; mission scenarios; uncertainties impact; launch manifest and mission schedule; and shuttle loads are considered. It is concluded that: (1) the impact of the planetary missions on the space station is not large when compared to the lunar base; (2) a quarantine module may be desirable for sample returns; (3) the Ceres and Kopff missions require the ability to stack and checkout two-stage OTVs; and (4) two to seven manweeks of on-orbit work are required of the station crew to launch a mission and, with the exception of the quarantine module, dedicated crew will not be required.

  19. Mercury contamination of aquatic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabbenhoft, David P.; Rickert, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Mercury has been well known as an environmental pollutant for several decades. As early as the 1950's it was established that emissions of mercury to the environment could have serious effects on human health. These early studies demonstrated that fish and other wildlife from various ecosystems commonly attain mercury levels of toxicological concern when directly affected by mercury-containing emissions from human-related activities. Human health concerns arise when fish and wildlife from these ecosystems are consumed by humans. During the past decade, a new trend has emerged with regard to mercury pollution. Investigations initiated in the late 1980's in the northern-tier states of the U.S., Canada, and Nordic countries found that fish, mainly from nutrient-poor lakes and often in very remote areas, commonly have high levels of mercury. More recent fish sampling surveys in other regions of the U.S. have shown widespread mercury contamination in streams, wet-lands, reservoirs, and lakes. To date, 33 states have issued fish consumption advisories because of mercury contamination. These continental to global scale occurrences of mercury contamination cannot be linked to individual emissions of mercury, but instead are due to widespread air pollution. When scientists measure mercury levels in air and surface water, however, the observed levels are extraordinarily low. In fact, scientists have to take extreme precautions to avoid direct contact with water samples or sample containers, to avert sample contamination (Fig 3). Herein lies an apparent discrepancy: Why do fish from some remote areas have elevated mercury concentrations, when contamination levels in the environment are so low?

  20. [Mercury (and...) through the centuries].

    PubMed

    Kłys, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Mercury has a long history, fascinating in its many aspects. Through the centuries--from ancient times to the present day--the metal in its various forms, also known under the name "quicksilver", accompanied the man and was used for diversified purposes. Today, mercury is employed in manufacturing thermometers, barometers, vacuum pumps and explosives. It is also used in silver and gold mining processes. Mercury compounds play a significant role in dentistry, pharmaceutical industry and crop protection. The contemporary use of mercury markedly decreases, but historically speaking, the archives abound in materials that document facts and events occurring over generations and the immense intellectual effort aiming at discovering the true properties and mechanisms of mercury activity. Mercury toxicity, manifested in destruction of biological membranes and binding of the element with proteins, what disturbs biochemical processes occurring in the body, was discovered only after many centuries of the metal exerting its effect on the lives of individuals and communities. For centuries, mercury was present in the work of alchemists, who searched for the universal essence or quintessence and the so-called philosopher's stone. In the early modern era, between the 16th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to manufacture mirrors. Mercury compounds were employed as a medication against syphilis, which plagued mankind for more than four hundred years--from the Middle Ages till mid 20th century, when the discovery of penicillin became the turning point. This extremely toxic therapy resulted in much suffering, individual tragedies, chronic poisonings leading to fatalities and dramatic sudden deaths. In the last fifty years, there even occurred attempts of mentally imbalanced individuals at injecting themselves with metallic mercury, also as a performance-enhancing drug. Instances of mass mercury poisoning occurred many times in the past in consequence of eating food products

  1. [Mercury (and...) through the centuries].

    PubMed

    Kłys, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Mercury has a long history, fascinating in its many aspects. Through the centuries--from ancient times to the present day--the metal in its various forms, also known under the name "quicksilver", accompanied the man and was used for diversified purposes. Today, mercury is employed in manufacturing thermometers, barometers, vacuum pumps and explosives. It is also used in silver and gold mining processes. Mercury compounds play a significant role in dentistry, pharmaceutical industry and crop protection. The contemporary use of mercury markedly decreases, but historically speaking, the archives abound in materials that document facts and events occurring over generations and the immense intellectual effort aiming at discovering the true properties and mechanisms of mercury activity. Mercury toxicity, manifested in destruction of biological membranes and binding of the element with proteins, what disturbs biochemical processes occurring in the body, was discovered only after many centuries of the metal exerting its effect on the lives of individuals and communities. For centuries, mercury was present in the work of alchemists, who searched for the universal essence or quintessence and the so-called philosopher's stone. In the early modern era, between the 16th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to manufacture mirrors. Mercury compounds were employed as a medication against syphilis, which plagued mankind for more than four hundred years--from the Middle Ages till mid 20th century, when the discovery of penicillin became the turning point. This extremely toxic therapy resulted in much suffering, individual tragedies, chronic poisonings leading to fatalities and dramatic sudden deaths. In the last fifty years, there even occurred attempts of mentally imbalanced individuals at injecting themselves with metallic mercury, also as a performance-enhancing drug. Instances of mass mercury poisoning occurred many times in the past in consequence of eating food products

  2. Mercury's gravity field and ephemeris after 3 years of MESSENGER orbital observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-05-01

    18 March 2014 will be the third anniversary of MESSENGER's insertion into orbit about Mercury. The initial orbit was highly eccentric and nearly polar, with a 12-h period and a periapsis at 200 km altitude and ~60°N latitude. The third-body perturbation of the Sun combined with the high eccentricity of the orbit led to a substantial evolution of the periapsis, which drifted slowly northward and reached an altitude of 500 km several times before orbit-corrections maneuvers returned the periapsis altitude to ~200 km. In March 2012, the mission orbital phase was extended for a second year, and the spacecraft transitioned to an 8-h orbit period one month later. A second extended mission started in March 2013, will last for another two years, and will eventually allow observations at very low altitudes (<100 km), starting in September 2014. One of the main mission goals is the determination of the interior structure of Mercury, enabled by a suite of instruments that includes the radio system and a laser altimeter. The X-band tracking system and NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) were used to determine the gravity field of Mercury. The effective spatial resolution of the gravity field is strongly dependent on latitude, however, because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit and its high apoapsis over the southern hemisphere (~15,000 km in the first year, ~10,000 km subsequently). The gravity field of the southern hemisphere remains largely unconstrained at short wavelengths, although the global long-wavelength field has been determined robustly. Furthermore, MESSENGER radio tracking data represent an excellent opportunity to improve Mercury's ephemeris. The current knowledge of the orbit of Mercury around the Sun has been mainly defined by direct ranging. Range measurements from the three Mercury flybys and orbital phase of MESSENGER provide a strong data set to measure the motion of Mercury's center of mass. The 1-m range accuracy potentially allows the recovery of the

  3. Potential Mission Scenarios Post Asteroid Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro, Jr.; McDonald, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    A deep-space mission has been proposed to identify and redirect an asteroid to a distant retrograde orbit around the moon, and explore it by sending a crew using the Space Launch System and the Orion spacecraft. The Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), which represents the third segment of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), could be performed on EM-3 or EM-4 depending on asteroid return date. Recent NASA studies have raised questions on how we could progress from current Human Space Flight (HSF) efforts to longer term human exploration of Mars. This paper will describe the benefits of execution of the ARM as the initial stepping stone towards Mars exploration, and how the capabilities required to send humans to Mars could be built upon those developed for the asteroid mission. A series of potential interim missions aimed at developing such capabilities will be described, and the feasibility of such mission manifest will be discussed. Options for the asteroid crewed mission will also be addressed, including crew size and mission duration.

  4. Mission design options for human Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, Paul D.; Braun, Robert D.; Ahn, Jaemyung; Putnam, Zachary R.

    Trajectory options for conjunction-class human Mars missions are examined, including crewed Earth-Mars trajectories with the option for abort to Earth, with the intent of serving as a resource for mission designers. An analysis of the impact of Earth and Mars entry velocities on aeroassist systems is included, and constraints are suggested for interplanetary trajectories based upon aeroassist system capabilities.

  5. Detecting potassium on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R. M.; Potter, A. E.; Morgan, T. H.

    1991-01-01

    A critical comment on the work of A.L. Sprague et al. (1990) is presented. It is argued that, in attributing an enhanced emission in the potassium D lines on Oct. 14, 1987 in the equatorial region of Mercury to a diffusion source centered on Caloris Basin, Sprague et al. misinterpreted the data. Sprague et al. present a reply, taking issue with the commenters.

  6. The planet Mercury (1971)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The physical properties of the planet Mercury, its surface, and atmosphere are presented for space vehicle design criteria. The mass, dimensions, mean density, and orbital and rotational motions are described. The gravity field, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and charged particles in the planet's orbit are discussed. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, and composition data are given along with the surface composition, soil mechanical properties, and topography, and the surface electromagnetic and temperature properties.

  7. Method for mercury refinement

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

  8. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-ger; Liu, Shou-heng; Liu, Zhao-rong; Yan, Naiqiang

    2009-01-20

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  9. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-ger; Liu, Shou-heng; Liu, Zhao-rong; Yan, Naiqiang

    2010-07-13

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  10. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; Speer, Richard; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

  11. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Liu, Shou-Heng; Liu, Zhao-Rong; Yan, Naiqiang

    2011-08-30

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  12. Method for mercury refinement

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-04-09

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  13. Apparatus for mercury refinement

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

    1991-07-16

    The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

  14. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  15. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  16. Optimization of Seesaw Swing Arm Actuator Design for Small Form Factor Optical Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po-Chien Chou,; Yu-Cheng Lin,; Stone Cheng,

    2010-05-01

    Many small form factor (SFF) optical pickup heads based on the swing arm design utilize a piezoelectric material or the slim metal plate to perform the focusing action. The seesaw-type actuator is a new mechanism used in the focusing action for SFF optical data storage devices. The swing arm nutates along a pivot instead of a hinge in the vertical movement. In this paper, an optimized design of a biaxial voice coil motor (VCM), in which the tracking and focusing VCMs are combined in the rear of the swing arm, is proposed. Simulation and experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design methodology by showing that the stress magnitude distribution characteristics, mechanism stiffness, and driving stability of the optimized design are enhanced in comparison with those of the original.

  17. High-speed measurement of nozzle swing angle of rocket engine based on monocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yufu; Yang, Haijuan

    2015-02-01

    A nozzle angle measurement system based on monocular vision is proposed to achieve high-speed and non-contact angle measurement of rocket engine nozzle. The measurement system consists of two illumination sources, a lens, a target board with spots, a high-speed camera, an image acquisition card and a PC. A target board with spots was fixed on the end of rocket engine nozzle. The image of the target board moved along with the rocket engine nozzle swing was captured by a high-speed camera and transferred to the PC by an image acquisition card. Then a data processing algorithm was utilized to acquire the swing angle of the engine nozzle. Experiment shows that the accuracy of swing angle measurement was 0.2° and the measurement frequency was up to 500Hz.

  18. Skill Analysis of the Wrist Release in the Golf Swings Utilizing Shaft Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soichiro; Hoshino, Yohei; Kobayashi, Yukinori

    This study analyzes the skill component of the wrist release in the golf swing by employing a three-dimensional dynamic model considering vibration of the club shaft. It is observed that professional and expert golfers relax their wrists in the swing motion as a "natural" or "late" release. Thus, the relationship between the timing of the wrist release and the shaft vibration is examined in this study. First, it is demonstrated that "natural release" at the zero-crossing point of the bending vibration of the shaft efficiently increases the head speed at impact. In the next step, the "late hitting" condition is imposed upon the model. It is demonstrated that "late hitting" could further improve the efficiency of the swing motion. Finally, the skill component in the wrist release for the long drive is experimentally verified by measuring the movement of the wrist and the dynamic deformation of the shaft during the downswing.

  19. How do batters use visual, auditory, and tactile information about the success of a baseball swing?

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob

    2009-09-01

    Bat/ball contact produces visual (the ball leaving the bat), auditory (the "crack" of the bat), and tactile (bat vibration) feedback about the success of the swing. We used a batting simulation to investigate how college baseball players use visual, tactile, and auditory feedback. In Experiment 1, swing accuracy (i.e., the lateral separation between the point of contact and "sweet spot") was compared for no feedback (N), visual alone, auditory alone, and tactile alone. Swings were more accurate for all single-modality combinations as compared to no feedback, and visual produced the greatest accuracy. In Experiment 2, the congruency between visual, tactile, and auditory was varied so that in some trials, the different modalities indicated that the simulated ball contacted the bat at different points. Results indicated that batters combined information but gave more weight to visual. Batting training manuals, which typically only discuss visual cues, should emphasize the importance of auditory and tactile feedback in baseball batting.

  20. Mercury removal sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  1. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  2. The Determination of Mercury's Rotational state with BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palli, Alessandra; Junior Mariani, Mirco; Silvestri, Davide; Tortora, Paolo; Zannoni, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The BepiColombo mission will start its one year nominal in-orbit operation phase at Mercury in January 2024. More than forty years after Mariner 10 discovered the presence of an intrinsic magnetic field, the study of Mercury's core still remains a fascinating objective and in-orbit investigations are a privileged condition for doing this. Since the strict connection existing between core and rotational state, measurements of Mercury's obliquity and librations at unprecedented accuracies became one the main purposes of MORE (Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment) rotation experiment. The rotation experiment avails of the employment of precise orbit determination data and high resolution images provided by HRIC, part of the SYMBIO-SYS payload. The correlation of surface landmarks extrapolated by two images of the same area taken at different epochs provides their displacement in time and hence constitutes an observable to be fed into an estimation process for deriving Mercury's rotation parameters. An end-to-end simulator has been built up employing the camera images as the primary observables with the final aim of defining their optimal acquisition scheduling. An extensive simulation campaign has been performed leading to the identification of the most favorable observational strategy and location of the landmarks on the surface so as to fulfill accuracies lower than 1 arcsecond for both obliquity and libration estimation. Finally, the full rotation experiment has been implemented in a global multiarc solution where both optical and radiometric simulated observables are processed by the filter in order to evaluate the science capabilities in terms of Mercury Orientation Parameters. The results also account for the effects of the onboard accelerometer (ISA) error model. The talk will focus on the description of the end-to-end simulator, illustrating the results obtained in terms of the optimal selection of the observations. Next, full simulations results, obtained

  3. Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screens and golf swing faults.

    PubMed

    Gulgin, Heather R; Schulte, Brian C; Crawley, Amy A

    2014-02-01

    Although some research in the past has examined how physical limitations in strength or flexibility affect a golfer's performance, the performance outcome most measured was driving distance. Currently, there are no data that have examined the relationship between selected strength and flexibility variables and golf swing faults. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screen variables and 14 common golf swing faults. Thirty-six male and female golfers (mean age, 25.4 ± 9.9 years; height, 175.9 ± 16.2 cm; mass, 76.2 ± 14.6 kg; handicap, 14.2 ± 10.4) participated. Twelve physical tests of strength, flexibility, and balance were assessed using the TPI level 1 golf fitness screening tool. Golfers then hit 4 golf shots (with a 5-iron) while being videoed, and those were then analyzed for 14 different golf swing faults (using V1Pro software). Three significant associations between a physical limitation and a particular golf swing fault were found: toe touch and early hip extension (p = 0.015), bridge on right side with both early hip extension (p = 0.050), and loss of posture (p = 0.028). In addition, an odds ratio showed that when a golfer could not overhead deep squat or single leg balance on left side, they were 2-3 times more likely to exhibit a early hip extension, loss of posture, or slide during the golf swing, as compared with those who could perform a correct overhead deep squat. Based on our findings, it is important for the golf fitness professional to particularly address a golfer's core strength, balance, and hamstring flexibility to help avoid common golf swing faults, which affect a golfer's ball striking ability and ultimately their performance.

  4. Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screens and golf swing faults.

    PubMed

    Gulgin, Heather R; Schulte, Brian C; Crawley, Amy A

    2014-02-01

    Although some research in the past has examined how physical limitations in strength or flexibility affect a golfer's performance, the performance outcome most measured was driving distance. Currently, there are no data that have examined the relationship between selected strength and flexibility variables and golf swing faults. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screen variables and 14 common golf swing faults. Thirty-six male and female golfers (mean age, 25.4 ± 9.9 years; height, 175.9 ± 16.2 cm; mass, 76.2 ± 14.6 kg; handicap, 14.2 ± 10.4) participated. Twelve physical tests of strength, flexibility, and balance were assessed using the TPI level 1 golf fitness screening tool. Golfers then hit 4 golf shots (with a 5-iron) while being videoed, and those were then analyzed for 14 different golf swing faults (using V1Pro software). Three significant associations between a physical limitation and a particular golf swing fault were found: toe touch and early hip extension (p = 0.015), bridge on right side with both early hip extension (p = 0.050), and loss of posture (p = 0.028). In addition, an odds ratio showed that when a golfer could not overhead deep squat or single leg balance on left side, they were 2-3 times more likely to exhibit a early hip extension, loss of posture, or slide during the golf swing, as compared with those who could perform a correct overhead deep squat. Based on our findings, it is important for the golf fitness professional to particularly address a golfer's core strength, balance, and hamstring flexibility to help avoid common golf swing faults, which affect a golfer's ball striking ability and ultimately their performance. PMID:24476744

  5. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  6. Imaging the Sources and Full Extent of the Sodium Tail of the Planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wilson, Jody; Mendillo, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Observations of sodium emission from Mercury can be used to describe the spatial and temporal patterns of sources and sinks in the planet s surface-boundary-exosphere. We report on new data sets that provide the highest spatial resolution of source regions at polar latitudes, as well as the extraordinary length of a tail of escaping Na atoms. The tail s extent of approx.1.5 degrees (nearly 1400 Mercury radii) is driven by radiation pressure effects upon Na atoms sputtered from the surface in the previous approx.5 hours. Wide-angle filtered-imaging instruments are thus capable of studying the time history of sputtering processes of sodium and other species at Mercury from ground-based observatories in concert with upcoming satellite missions to the planet. Plasma tails produced by photo-ionization of Na and other gases in Mercury s neutral tails may be observable by in-situ instruments.

  7. Merging of the USGS Atlas of Mercury 1:5,000,000 Geologic Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigeri, A.; Federico, C.; Pauselli, C.; Coradini, A.

    2008-01-01

    After 30 years, the planet Mercury is going to give us new information. The NASA MESSENGER [1] already made its first successful flyby on December 2007 while the European Space Agency and the Japanese Space Agency ISAS/JAXA are preparing the upcoming mission BepiColombo [2]. In order to contribute to current and future analyses on the geology of Mercury, we have started to work on the production of a single digital geologic map of Mercury derived from the merging process of the geologic maps of the Atlas of Mercury, produced by the United States Geological Survey, based on Mariner 10 data. The aim of this work is to merge the nine maps so that the final product reflects as much as possible the original work. Herein we describe the data we used, the working environment and the steps made for producing the final map.

  8. Status of 30-centimeter-diameter mercury ion thruster isolator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of several 30 cm diameter mercury ion thruster isolator life tests that show that the onset and exponential increase of leakage current problems observed in earlier thruster operations and isolator tests have been solved. A 10,006 hour life test of a main isolator vaporizer operated with no mercury flow at 320 C and 1500 volts was found to have no onset of leakage current during the test. A cathode-isolator vaporizer operated with a mercury discharge at 340 to 360 C and 1200 volts for 18,000 hours, was found to have a small increase of leakage current with time. A 10,000 hour thruster life test exhibited no increase of leakage current during the life test. Isolators have been developed which will satisfy 30 cm mercury ion thruster mission requirements.

  9. Wildfires threaten mercury stocks in northern soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turetsky, M.R.; Harden, J.W.; Friedli, H.R.; Flannigan, M.; Payne, N.; Crock, J.; Radke, L.

    2006-01-01

    With climate change rapidly affecting northern forests and wetlands, mercury reserves once protected in cold, wet soils are being exposed to burning, likely triggering large releases of mercury to the atmosphere. We quantify organic soil mercury stocks and burn areas across western, boreal Canada for use in fire emission models that explore controls of burn area, consumption severity, and fuel loading on atmospheric mercury emissions. Though renowned as hotspots for the accumulation of mercury and its transformation to the toxic methylmercury, boreal wetlands might soon transition to hotspots for atmospheric mercury emissions. Estimates of circumboreal mercury emissions from this study are 15-fold greater than estimates that do not account for mercury stored in peat soils. Ongoing and projected increases in boreal wildfire activity due to climate change will increase atmospheric mercury emissions, contributing to the anthropogenic alteration of the global mercury cycle and exacerbating mercury toxicities for northern food chains. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Mercury's gravity field, orientation, and ephemeris after MESSENGER's Low-Altitude Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-04-01

    In April 2015, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft will complete more than 4 years of operations in orbit around Mercury. In its last year, as part of MESSENGER's Second Extended Mission (XM2) started in March 2013, the spacecraft has been collecting radio tracking data at unprecedented low altitudes in Mercury's northern hemisphere. During the first two years in orbit, the spacecraft periapsis altitude was kept between 200 and 500 km, while its location drifted slowly northward from 60˚N to 84˚N. The orbital period initially was 12 h, but it was decreased to 8 h in April 2012. The remaining fuel onboard the spacecraft enabled two extended missions, the last of which will end with an impact expected on or before 28 April 2015. During the second extended mission, the periapsis altitude has been as low as 15-25 km. NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) tracked the spacecraft during periapsis passages from April to October 2014, when the spacecraft periapsis altitude was between 25 and 100 km. In the last six months of the mission, the closest approaches of MESSENGER were occulted by Mercury and were thus not visible from Earth. However, additional radio tracking data have been collected at altitudes (75-100 km) that are still substantially below the initial periapsis altitude. The new low-altitude radio tracking data have enabled an updated model of the gravity field of Mercury. With these data, the resolution of the field in the northern hemisphere has been improved, revealing features that were previously undetectable and that correlate well with topography. The zonal harmonics are in good agreement with those in previous models of the gravity field. We also focused our study on the determination of other geophysical parameters, such as the orientation of Mercury. The new data were acquired not only at lower altitudes but also at latitudes closer to the equator, so they provide important information on tides, the

  11. Gasdynamic modeling and parametric study of mesoscale internal combustion swing engine/generator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongxian

    The demand of portable power generation systems for both domestic and military applications has driven the advances of mesoscale internal combustion engine systems. This dissertation was devoted to the gasdynamic modeling and parametric study of the mesoscale internal combustion swing engine/generator systems. First, the system-level thermodynamic modeling for the swing engine/generator systems has been developed. The system performance as well as the potentials of both two- and four-stroke swing engine systems has been investigated based on this model. Then through parameterc studies, the parameters that have significant impacts on the system performance have been identified, among which, the burn time and spark advance time are the critical factors related to combustion process. It is found that the shorter burn time leads to higher system efficiency and power output and the optimal spark advance time is about half of the burn time. Secondly, the turbulent combustion modeling based on levelset method (G-equation) has been implemented into the commercial software FLUENT. Thereafter, the turbulent flame propagation in a generic mesoscale combustion chamber and realistic swing engine chambers has been studied. It is found that, in mesoscale combustion engines, the burn time is dominated by the mean turbulent kinetic energy in the chamber. It is also shown that in a generic mesoscale combustion chamber, the burn time depends on the longest distance between the initial ignition kernel to its walls and by changing the ignition and injection locations, the burn time can be reduced by a factor of two. Furthermore, the studies of turbulent flame propagation in real swing engine chambers show that the combustion can be enhanced through in-chamber turbulence augmentation and with higher engine frequency, the burn time is shorter, which indicates that the in-chamber turbulence can be induced by the motion of moving components as well as the intake gas jet flow. The burn time

  12. Myosin VI: an innovative motor that challenged the swinging lever arm hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2010-01-01

    The swinging crossbridge hypothesis states that energy from ATP hydrolysis is transduced to mechanical movement of the myosin head while bound to actin. The light chain-binding region of myosin is thought to act as a lever arm that amplifies movements near the catalytic site. This model has been challenged by findings that myosin VI takes larger steps along actin filaments than early interpretations of its structure seem to allow. We now know that myosin VI does indeed operate by an unusual ~ 180° lever arm swing and achieves its large step size using special structural features in its tail domain. PMID:20094053

  13. Out-of-plane orbital maneuvers using swing-bys with the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, J. B. S.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Formiga, J. K. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper has the goal of showing some cases of plane change maneuvers using a swing-by with the Moon to decrease the magnitude of the impulses used, when compared to a classical Hohmann maneuver. The analytical model is based on the "patched-conics" approach, where a series of "two-body" problems is considered to build the whole maneuver. A study of the effects of the semi-major axes of the transfer orbits were made, to complete some previous studies made in the literature. The results show that, for some final inclinations, the use of the swing-by in the Moon is really advantageous.

  14. Resonant Rotation of Two-layer Moon and Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Y. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    Present significance of the study of rotation of the Moon and Mercury (M&M)considered as a core-mantle system arises from planned missions to these bodies. An investigation of the resonant rotation of Mercury, begun by Colombo G. (1966), will play main part for Messenger and BepiColombo missions to Mercury. New accurate data about the Moon dynamics will be obtained from a series of future missions to the Moon. In this connection the new approach to the study of M&M resonant dynamics are suggested. Within these approaches M&M are considered as a system of two non-spherical interacting bodies: a liquid core and a mantle. The porpoise of study is to construct the analytical theories of resonant rotational motion of two-layer body (M&M). In first we give an explanation and illustration of the main regularities of M&M rotation and formulate generalized Cassini's laws. Main resonant properties of Mercury motion were described first as generalized Cassini's laws (Colombo, 1966). But Colombo and some another's scientists (Peale, 1969; Beletskii, 1972; Ward, 1975, Barkin, 1978) considered Mercury (and the Moon) as rigid non-spherical body sometimes taking into account a tidal deformation. Here we have been formulated these laws and their eneralization for a two-layer model of Mercury and the Moon. The mantle of M&M is considered as non-spherical, rigid (or elastic) layer. Inner shell is a liquid core, which occupies a ellipsoidal cavity of M&M (Poincare model). The Mercury system moves in the gravitational field of the Sun in a traslatory-rotary regime of the resonance 3:2 and the Moon system - in synchronous regime. We take into account gravitational attraction of the Sun (for Mercury) and gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun (for the Moon). For the study of M&M rotation we have been used specially designed canonical equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincare variables (Barkin, Ferrandiz, 2001) and special analytical methods of construction of the conditionally

  15. Mercury's Gravity Field from BepiColombo MORE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marabucci, M.; Genova, A.; Iess, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Mercury Orbiter Radioscience Experiment (MORE) is one of the main instruments on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), designed to provide an accurate estimation of Mercury's gravity field by means of highly stable, multi-frequency radio links in X and Ka band. The state-of-the-art microwave equipment enables simultaneous two-way links in X/X (7.2 GHz uplink/8.4 GHz downlink), X/Ka (7.2/32.5 GHz) and Ka/Ka band (34/32.5 GHz), providing range rate accuracies of 3 micron/s (at 1000 s integration time) at nearly all elongation angles. Range observables accurate to 20 cm (two-way) will be attained using a novel, wideband (24 Mcps) ranging system, based upon a pseudo-noise modulation scheme. The multifrequency link, adopted for the first time by the Cassini mission to Saturn [1,2], allows a nearly complete cancellation of the plasma noise both in Doppler and range measurements and hence an accurate determination of Mercury's gravity field and ephemerides. The orbit determination of spacecraft in deep space is generally carried out by means of batch filters, for recovering the trajectory and the model parameters (i.e. gravity field coefficients). The complexity of Mercury's environment penalizes strongly the accuracy of the orbit determination because of the non-gravitational perturbations, such as the solar radiation pressure. Although the non-gravitational accelerations of the MPO will be measured by a highly sensitive accelerometer (the Italian Spring Accelerometer, ISA), a classical, global batch filter proved to be inadequate for precise orbit propagation due to numerical instabilities. Therefore, a different approach has been devised, where the information accumulated previously is exploited in a batch-sequential filter. This paper reports on a new set of numerical simulations carried out with this strategy. The simulation setup takes into account the latest changes in the spacecraft design, the mission profile and the tracking system. We

  16. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  17. Space missions to comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor); Yeomans, D. K. (Editor); Brandt, J. C. (Editor); Hobbs, R. W. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The broad impact of a cometary mission is assessed with particular emphasis on scientific interest in a fly-by mission to Halley's comet and a rendezvous with Tempel 2. Scientific results, speculations, and future plans are discussed.

  18. Editing the Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sharon; Fogg, Piper

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the decision by Columbia University's new president to reevaluate the mission of its journalism school before naming a new dean, in order to explore how the journalism school fits into the mission of a research university. (EV)

  19. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Stefano; Morgavi, Daniele; Namur, Olivier; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego; Mancinelli, Paolo; Pauselli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    After more than four years of orbiting Mercury, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft came to an end in late April 2015. MESSENGER has provided many new and surprising results. This session will again highlight the latest results on Mercury based on MESSENGER observations or updated modelling. The session will further address instrument calibration and science performance both retrospective on MESSENGER and on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission. Papers covering additional themes related to Mercury are also welcomed. Please be aware that this session will be held as a PICO session. This will allow an intensive exchange of expertise and experience between the individual instruments and mission. NVP melt/magma viscosity: insight on Mercury lava flows S. Rossi1, D. Morgavi1, O. Namur2, D. Perugini1, F.Vetere1, P. Mancinelli1 and C. Pauselli1 1 Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, piazza Università 1, 06123 Perugia, Italy 2 Uni Hannover Institut für Mineralogie, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Callinstraβe 3, 30167 Hannover, Germany In this contribution we report new measurements of viscosity of synthetic komatitic melts, used the behaviour of silicate melts erupted at the surface of Mercury. Composition of Mercurian surface magmas was calculated using the most recent maps produced from MESSENGER XRS data (Weider et al., 2015). We focused on the northern hemisphere (Northern Volcanic Province, NVP, the largest lava flow on Mercury and possibly in the Solar System) for which the spatial resolution of MESSENGER measurements is high and individual maps of Mg/Si, Ca/Si, Al/Si and S/Si were combined. The experimental starting material contains high Na2O content (≈7 wt.%) that strongly influences viscosity. High temperature viscosity measurements were carried out at 1 atm using a concentric cylinder apparatus equipped with an Anton Paar RheolabQC viscometer head at the Department of Physics and Geology (PVRG_lab) at the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy

  20. Mission Operations Directorate - Success Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azbell, James A.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Space Shuttle Program, as well as NASA s other human space flight programs, the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at the Johnson Space Center has become the world leader in human spaceflight operations. From the earliest programs - Mercury, Gemini, Apollo - through Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and our Exploration initiatives, MOD and its predecessors have pioneered ops concepts and emphasized a history of mission leadership which has added value, maximized mission success, and built on continual improvement of the capabilities to become more efficient and effective. MOD s focus on building and contributing value with diverse teams has been key to their successes both with the US space industry and the broader international community. Since their beginning, MOD has consistently demonstrated their ability to evolve and respond to an ever changing environment, effectively prepare for the expected and successfully respond to the unexpected, and develop leaders, expertise, and a culture that has led to mission and Program success.