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Sample records for mesencephalic dopamine-rich cultures

  1. Toxicity of redox cycling pesticides in primary mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Bonneh-Barkay, Dafna; Langston, William J; Di Monte, Donato A

    2005-01-01

    A loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons is the primary neurodegenerative feature of Parkinson's disease. Paraquat, a known redox cycling herbicide, has recently been shown to kill selectively nigrostriatal dopaminergic cells in the mouse model. The purpose of this study was to test the ability of paraquat and other redox cycling pesticides to damage dopaminergic neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. Addition of paraquat, diquat, or benzyl viologen to mesencephalic cultures induced morphological changes (e.g., dystrophic neuronal processes) consistent with dopaminergic cell injury. The three pesticides also caused cell death as assessed by a reduction of the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons and a dose-dependent decrease in [(3)H]dopamine uptake. Quite interestingly, diquat and benzyl viologen were significantly more toxic than paraquat, probably reflecting their more pronounced ability to trigger redox cycling reactions. The data support a role of redox cycling as a mechanism of dopaminergic cell degeneration and suggest that the property of redox cycling should be taken into consideration when evaluating putative environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease.

  2. Cabergoline protects dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced cell death in primary mesencephalic cell culture.

    PubMed

    Meinel, J; Radad, K; Rausch, W-D; Reichmann, H; Gille, G

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, primary mesencephalic cell cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were used to investigate the neuroprotective effect of cabergoline, an ergoline D2 receptor agonist, against the pesticide and neurotoxin rotenone relevant to Parkinson disease (PD). Treatment of cultures with cabergoline alone significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons and reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the culture medium compared to untreated controls. Against rotenone toxicity, cabergoline significantly rescued degenerating THir neurons, reduced the release of LDH into the culture medium and improved the morphology of surviving THir neurons. The neuroprotective effects afforded by cabergoline were independent of dopaminergic stimulation as blocking of dopamine receptors by the dopamine receptor antagonist sulpiride did not prevent them. Furthermore, rotenone-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly reduced by cabergoline. Although cabergoline increased the glutathione (GSH) content in the culture, the protective effect for dopaminergic neurons seemed not to be predominantly mediated by increasing GSH, as depletion of GSH by L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a GSH biosynthesis inhibitor, did not prevent cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection of THir neurons in rotenone-treated cultures. Moreover, cabergoline significantly increased the ATP/protein ratio in primary mesencephalic cell cultures when added alone or prior to rotenone treatment. These results indicate a neuroprotective effect of cabergoline for dopaminergic neurons against rotenone toxicity. This effect was independent of dopamine receptor stimulation and was at least partially mediated by reducing ROS production and increasing the ATP/protein ratio.

  3. Isolation, culture and long-term maintenance of primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons from embryonic rodent brains.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Maria; Selvakumar, Tharakeswari; Tierney, Travis S; Alavian, Kambiz N

    2015-02-19

    Degeneration of mesencephalic dopaminergic (mesDA) neurons is the pathological hallmark of Parkinson's diseae. Study of the biological processes involved in physiological functions and vulnerability and death of these neurons is imparative to understanding the underlying causes and unraveling the cure for this common neurodegenerative disorder. Primary cultures of mesDA neurons provide a tool for investigation of the molecular, biochemical and electrophysiological properties, in order to understand the development, long-term survival and degeneration of these neurons during the course of disease. Here we present a detailed method for the isolation, culturing and maintenance of midbrain dopaminergic neurons from E12.5 mouse (or E14.5 rat) embryos. Optimized cell culture conditions in this protocol result in presence of axonal and dendritic projections, synaptic connections and other neuronal morphological properties, which make the cultures suitable for study of the physiological, cell biological and molecular characteristics of this neuronal population.

  4. Attenuation of malonate toxicity in primary mesencephalic cultures using the GABA transport blocker, NO-711.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A H; Bernard, L P; Nicklas, W J; Zeevalk, G D

    2001-04-01

    Cultured rat mesencephalic neurons were used to assess the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport blockers on toxicity caused by malonate, a reversible, competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase. Previous studies utilizing an ex vivo chick retinal preparation have shown that GABA release and cell swelling are early consequences of acute energy impairment and that GABA transport blockers attenuate this toxicity. The present results demonstrate that the nonsubstrate GABA transport blocker, NO-711 (1 nM-1 microM), dose-dependently protected cultured mesencephalic dopamine (DA) and GABA neurons from malonate-induced toxicity. Similar protection was demonstrated with nipecotic acid (1 mM) and SKF89976A (100 nM), substrate and nonsubstrate GABA transport blockers, respectively. These compounds by themselves produced no signs of toxicity, although nipecotic acid caused a long-term decrease in GABA uptake not associated with toxicity. Compounds which decrease intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are protective in this model, but NO-711 did not prevent the rise in intracellular ROS induced by malonate, indicating its protective effects were downstream of ROS production. Supplementation of malonate treated cultures with the GABA(A) agonist, muscimol (10 microM), increased the toxicity toward the DA and GABA neuron populations. Antagonists at the GABA(A) and glycine receptors provided partial protection to both the GABA and DA neurons. These findings suggest that the GABA transporter, GABA(A), and/or glycine channels contribute to cell damage associated with energy impairment in this model. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Cooperative interaction between ascorbate and glutathione during mitochondrial impairment in mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Julie; Zeevalk, Gail D

    2003-09-01

    A decrease in total glutathione, and aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Our previous work exemplified the importance of glutathione (GSH) in the protection of mesencephalic neurons exposed to malonate, a reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase/complex II. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was an early, contributing event in malonate toxicity. Protection by ascorbate was found to correlate with a stimulated increase in protein-glutathione mixed disulfide (Pr-SSG) levels. The present study further examined ascorbate-glutathione interactions during mitochondrial impairment. Depletion of GSH in mesencephalic cells with buthionine sulfoximine potentiated both the malonate-induced toxicity and generation of ROS as monitored by dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF) fluorescence. Ascorbate completely ameliorated the increase in DCF fluorescence and toxicity in normal and GSH-depleted cultures, suggesting that protection by ascorbate was due in part to upstream removal of free radicals. Ascorbate stimulated Pr-SSG formation during mitochondrial impairment in normal and GSH-depleted cultures to a similar extent when expressed as a proportion of total GSH incorporated into mixed disulfides. Malonate increased the efflux of GSH and GSSG over time in cultures treated for 4, 6 or 8 h. The addition of ascorbate to malonate-treated cells prevented the efflux of GSH, attenuated the efflux of GSSG and regulated the intracellular GSSG/GSH ratio. Maintenance of GSSG/GSH with ascorbate plus malonate was accompanied by a stimulation of Pr-SSG formation. These findings indicate that ascorbate contributes to the maintenance of GSSG/GSH status during oxidative stress through scavenging of radical species, attenuation of GSH efflux and redistribution of GSSG to the formation of mixed disulfides. It is speculated that these events are linked by glutaredoxin, an enzyme shown to contain

  6. Interleukin-10 Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuro-Inflammation and Neurotoxicity in Ventral Mesencephalic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Zhan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is expressed in the brain and can inhibit microglial activation. Herein, we utilized lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory Parkinson’s disease (PD) cell model to determine whether microglia and astrocytes are necessary targets for IL-10 neuroprotection. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures with different composition of neurons, microglia and astrocytes were prepared. The cells were exposed to IL-10 (15, 50 or 150 ng/mL) 1 h prior to LPS (50 ng/mL) treatment. LPS induced dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neuronal loss in VM cultures, VM neuron-enriched cultures, and neuron-microglia co-cultures, but not in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures. IL-10 reduced LPS-induced neuronal loss particularly in single VM neuron cultures. Pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) were upregulated in both neuron-microglia and neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. In contrast, neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) were downregulated in neuron-microglia co-cultures, but upregulated in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. IL-10 reduced both the increase in production of the pro-inflammatory mediators and the decrease in production of the neurotrophic factors induced by LPS. These results suggest that astrocytes can balance LPS neurotoxicity by releasing more neurotrophic factors and that IL-10 exerts neuroprotective property by an extensive action including direct on neurons and indirect via inhibiting microglial activation. PMID:26729090

  7. Interleukin-10 Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuro-Inflammation and Neurotoxicity in Ventral Mesencephalic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Zhan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-12-28

    Interleukin (IL)-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is expressed in the brain and can inhibit microglial activation. Herein, we utilized lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory Parkinson's disease (PD) cell model to determine whether microglia and astrocytes are necessary targets for IL-10 neuroprotection. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures with different composition of neurons, microglia and astrocytes were prepared. The cells were exposed to IL-10 (15, 50 or 150 ng/mL) 1 h prior to LPS (50 ng/mL) treatment. LPS induced dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neuronal loss in VM cultures, VM neuron-enriched cultures, and neuron-microglia co-cultures, but not in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures. IL-10 reduced LPS-induced neuronal loss particularly in single VM neuron cultures. Pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) were upregulated in both neuron-microglia and neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. In contrast, neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) were downregulated in neuron-microglia co-cultures, but upregulated in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. IL-10 reduced both the increase in production of the pro-inflammatory mediators and the decrease in production of the neurotrophic factors induced by LPS. These results suggest that astrocytes can balance LPS neurotoxicity by releasing more neurotrophic factors and that IL-10 exerts neuroprotective property by an extensive action including direct on neurons and indirect via inhibiting microglial activation.

  8. Effects of Forskolin on Trefoil factor 1 expression in cultured ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Ducray, A D; Widmer, H R; Meyer, M

    2015-12-03

    Trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) belongs to a family of secreted peptides that are mainly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Notably, TFF1 has been suggested to operate as a neuropeptide, however, its specific cellular expression, regulation and function remain largely unknown. We have previously shown that TFF1 is expressed in developing and adult rat ventral mesencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons. Here, we investigated the expression of TFF1 in rat ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons (embryonic day 14) grown in culture for 5, 7 or 10 days in the absence (controls) or presence of either glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Forskolin or the combination. No TFF1-ir cells were identified at day 5 and only a few at day 7, whereas TH was markedly expressed at both time points. At day 10, several TFF1-ir cells were detected, and their numbers were significantly increased after the addition of GDNF (2.2-fold) or Forskolin (4.1-fold) compared to controls. Furthermore, the combination of GDNF and Forskolin had an additive effect and increased the number of TFF1-ir cells by 5.6-fold compared to controls. TFF1 expression was restricted to neuronal cells, and the percentage of TH/TFF1 co-expressing cells was increased to the same extent in GDNF and Forskolin-treated cultures (4-fold) as compared to controls. Interestingly, the combination of GDNF and Forskolin resulted in a significantly increased co-expression (8-fold) of TH/TFF1, which could indicate that GDNF and Forskolin targeted different subpopulations of TH/TFF1 neurons. Short-term treatment with Forskolin resulted in an increased number of TFF1-ir cells, and this effect was significantly reduced by the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 or the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89, suggesting that Forskolin induced TFF1 expression through diverse signaling pathways. In conclusion, distinct populations of cultured dopaminergic neurons express TFF1, and their numbers can be

  9. Hydrogen peroxide removal and glutathione mixed disulfide formation during metabolic inhibition in mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, J; Zeevalk, G D

    2001-06-01

    Compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism and oxidative stress have been associated with the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. Our previous experiments exemplified the importance of GSH in the protection of neurons exposed to malonate, a reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase/complex II. This study further defines the role of oxidative stress during energy inhibition and begins to unravel the mechanisms by which GSH and other antioxidants may contribute to cell survival. Treatment of mesencephalic cultures with 10 microM buthionine sulfoximine for 24 h depleted total GSH by 60%, whereas 3 h exposure to 5 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole irreversibly inactivated catalase activity by 90%. Treatment of GSH-depleted cells with malonate (40 mM) for 6, 12 or 24 h both potentiated and accelerated the time course of malonate toxicity, however, inhibition of catalase had no effect. In contrast, concomitant treatment with buthionine sulfoximine plus 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole in the presence of malonate significantly potentiated toxicity over that observed with malonate plus either inhibitor alone. Consistent with these findings, GSH depletion enhanced malonate-induced reactive oxygen species generation prior to the onset of toxicity. These findings demonstrate that early generation of reactive oxygen species during mitochondrial inhibition contributes to cell damage and that GSH serves as a first line of defense in its removal. Pre-treatment of cultures with 400 microM ascorbate protected completely against malonate toxicity (50 mM, 12 h), whereas treatment with 1 mM Trolox provided partial protection. Protein-GSH mixed disulfide formation during oxidative stress has been suggested to either protect vulnerable protein thiols or conversely to contribute to toxicity. Malonate exposure (50 mM) for 12 h resulted in a modest increase in mixed disulfide formation. However, exposure to the protective combination of ascorbate plus malonate increased membrane

  10. Pedicularioside A from Buddleia lindleyana inhibits cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ions (MPP+) in primary cultures of rat mesencephalic neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Yun; Lu, Jiang-Hai; Li, Quan; Zhao, Yu-Ying; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2008-01-28

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the progressive degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Buddleia lindleyana is a traditional Chinese herb, commonly called Zui Yu Cao. The purification and identification of pedicularioside A and other phenylethanoid glycosides from this plant have been reported. However, their neuroprotective effects on the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-induced death of rat mesencephalic neuron primary cultures and the precise mechanism of this protection remains unclear. We used the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for cellular growth to examine the effects of five phenylethanoid glycosides isolated from B. lindleyana, including pedicularioside A, leucosceptoside A, isoacteoside, acteoside, and arenariside, on the viability of mesencephalic neurons treated with MPP(+). Of the compounds tested, pedicularioside A exhibited the greatest degree of protection from MPP(+)-induced cell death. We also observed a marked increase in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons. Pedicularioside A inhibited expression of the caspase-3 gene and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in cultures exposed to MPP(+). Our results suggest that pedicularioside A has a neuroprotective effect to improve the survival of mesencephalic neurons (dopaminergic neurons and non-dopaminergic neurons). The mode of action appears to be the inhibition of caspase-3 gene expression, thereby protecting mesencephalic neurons from MPP(+)-induced cell death.

  11. Acute neurotoxic effects of mancozeb and maneb in mesencephalic neuronal cultures are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Domico, Lisa M; Zeevalk, Gail D; Bernard, Laura P; Cooper, Keith R

    2006-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to agrochemicals may contribute to the development of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Maneb (MB), a widely used Mn-containing ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate (EBDC) fungicide, has been implicated in selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity. In this study, we examine the potential neurotoxicity of mancozeb (MZ), a widely used EBDC fungicide that is structurally similar to MB, but contains both Zn and Mn. Primary mesencephalic cells isolated from Sprague-Dawley embryonic day 15 rat embryos were exposed in vitro to either MZ or MB to compare their cytotoxic potential. Exposure to 10-120 microM MZ or MB for 24h resulted in a dose-dependent toxicity in both the dopamine (DA) and GABA mesencephalic populations as assessed by a functional assay for high affinity transporter activity. Consistent with this, cell viability as well as tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons decreased with increasing doses of MZ or MB. Toxic potencies for MZ and MB were similar and no difference in sensitivity between the DA and GABA populations was observed with the fungicides. Exposure to ethylene thiourea, the major metabolite of either MZ or MB, was not toxic, implicating the parent compound in toxicity. Both the organic and Mn metal components of the fungicides were found to contribute to toxicity. Non-toxic exposures to the fungicides decreased ATP levels in a dose-dependent manner suggesting impairment of energy metabolism. In whole mitochondrial preparations isolated from adult rat brains, MZ and MB inhibited NADH-linked state 3 respiration. Mild to moderate mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed in response to the fungicides. In conclusion, our findings indicate that acute exposure to high doses of MZ and MB produce equipotent toxic effects in both DA and GABA neurons that may be associated with perturbations in mitochondrial respiration.

  12. BDNF mediates the neuroprotective effects of positive AMPA receptor modulators against MPP+-induced toxicity in cultured hippocampal and mesencephalic slices.

    PubMed

    Jourdi, H; Hamo, L; Oka, T; Seegan, A; Baudry, M

    2009-04-01

    Neurotoxicity is involved in various neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), which affects mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN). Positive alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor modulators (PARMs, a.k.a. Ampakines, such as CX614) increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in vivo and in cultured hippocampal slices. BDNF is a survival factor for various neuronal cell types including mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Using cultured mesencephalic and hippocampal slices, we investigated whether preincubation with CX614 could provide neuroprotection against MPP(+) toxicity and whether such neuroprotection was mediated by BDNF. Various treatment protocols were tested to demonstrate CX614-induced neuroprotection against MPP(+). Pretreatment with CX614 significantly reduced MPP(+)-induced toxicity and increased BDNF levels in both hippocampal and mesencephalic cultured slices; CX614 pretreatment for 6 h in hippocampal slices and 24 h in mesencephalic slices was sufficient to produce significant neuroprotection as assessed with lactate dehydrogenase release in slice medium and propidium iodide uptake in slices. Both a BDNF scavenger and an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, abrogated CX614-mediated reduction of MPP(+)-induced toxicity. Inhibition of Ca(2+)-activated proteases, calpains, was also protective against MPP(+)-induced toxicity. However, co-application of calpain inhibitor with CX614 abolished CX614-mediated protection, suggesting a dual action of calpains in this model. We conclude that CX614 is neuroprotective against MPP(+)-induced toxicity, an effect mediated by increased BDNF expression and activation of BDNF-dependent signaling pathways. Our results provide support for using PARMs as a new therapy for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD.

  13. Role for dopamine in malonate-induced damage in vivo in striatum and in vitro in mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Moy, L Y; Zeevalk, G D; Sonsalla, P K

    2000-04-01

    Defects in mitochondrial energy metabolism have been implicated in the pathology of several neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the reactive metabolites generated from the metabolism and oxidation of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) are thought to contribute to the damage to neurons of the basal ganglia. We have previously demonstrated that infusions of the metabolic inhibitor malonate into the striata of mice or rats produce degeneration of DA nerve terminals. In the present studies, we demonstrate that an intrastriatal infusion of malonate induces a substantial increase in DA efflux in awake, behaving mice as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Furthermore, pretreatment of mice with tetrabenazine (TBZ) or the TBZ analogue Ro 4-1284 (Ro-4), compounds that reversibly inhibit the vesicular storage of DA, attenuates the malonate-induced DA efflux as well as the damage to DA nerve terminals. Consistent with these findings, the damage to both DA and GABA neurons in mesencephalic cultures by malonate exposure was attenuated by pretreatment with TBZ or Ro-4. Treatment with these compounds did not affect the formation of free radicals or the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation resulting from malonate exposure alone. Our data suggest that DA plays an important role in the neurotoxicity produced by malonate. These findings provide direct evidence that inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase causes an increase in extracellular DA levels and indicate that bioenergetic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative diseases through a mechanism involving DA.

  14. Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition protects against 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) toxicity in primary mesencephalic cultures: new insights into levodopa toxicity.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Heike; Bareiss, Markus; Zettlmeisl, Heinz; Schwarz, Johannes; Storch, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) has protective effects on levodopa (L-DOPA), but not D-DOPA toxicity towards dopamine (DA) neurons in rat primary mesencephalic cultures [Mol. Pharmacol. 57 (2000) 589]. Here, we extend our recent studies to elucidate the mechanisms of these protective effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of all main L-DOPA/DA metabolites on survival of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons in primary rat mesencephalic cultures. 3-O-Methyldopa, homovanillic acid, dihydroxyphenyl acetate and 3-methoxytyramine had no effects at concentrations up to 300 micro M after 24h, whereas DA was more toxic than L-DOPA with toxicity at concentrations of >or=1 micro M. The coenzyme of COMT, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), and its demethylated product S-adenosylhomocystein caused no relevant alteration of THir neuron survival or L-DOPA toxicity. In contrast, inhibition of SAM synthesis by selenomethionine showed time- and dose-dependent increase of THir neuron survival, but did not affect L-DOPA toxicity. L-DOPA-induced lipid peroxidation in mesencephalic cultures was not modified by the COMT inhibitor Ro 41-0960 (1 micro M). Increased contamination of the cultures with glial cells attenuated L- and D-DOPA toxicity, but caused significant enhancement of protection by COMT inhibitors against L-DOPA toxicity only. Investigations of L-DOPA uptake in rat striatal cultures using HPLC revealed a significant reduction of extracellular L-DOPA concentrations by Ro 41-0960. Our data confirm that L-DOPA toxicity towards DA neurons is mediated by an autooxidative process, which is attenuated by glial cells. In addition, we demonstrate a second mechanism of L-DOPA toxicity in vitro mediated by a COMT- and glia-dependent pathway, which is blocked by COMT inhibitors, most likely due to enhanced glial uptake of L-DOPA.

  15. Signaling Mechanisms in the Nitric Oxide Donor- and Amphetamine-Induced Dopamine Release in Mesencephalic Primary Cultured Neurons.

    PubMed

    Salum, Cristiane; Schmidt, Fanny; Michel, Patrick P; Del-Bel, Elaine; Raisman-Vozari, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitors prevent rodents' sensorimotor gating impairments induced by dopamine releasing drugs, such as amphetamine (Amph) and methylphenidate. The mechanisms of this effect have not been entirely understood. In the present work, we investigated some possible mechanisms by which the NO donor, NOC-12 (3-ethyl-3-(ethylaminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene), influence spontaneous and Amph-induced dopamine release, using rat mesencephalic primary cultured neurons preparations. Our results showed that NOC-12 increased dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner and potentiated the Amph-induced one. Dopamine release induced by NOC-12 was disrupted by N-acetyl-L-cystein (NAC-a free radical scavenger) and MK-801, a NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) non-competitive antagonist, and was concentration dependently affected by oxadiazolo[4,3]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). In contrast, dopamine released by Amph was facilitated by NAC and by MK-801 and not affected by nifedipine (a L-type-Ca(+2) channel blocker), which enhanced NOC-12-induced dopamine release. The present work demonstrates that DA release induced by NOC-12 is partially dependent on sGC and on NMDA activation, and is modulated by L-type Ca(+2) channel and the antioxidant NAC. This mechanism differs from the Amph-induced one, which appears not to depend on L-type Ca(+2) channel and seems to be facilitated by NMDA channel blocking and by NAC. These results suggest that Amph and NOC-12 induce dopamine release through complementary pathways, which may explain the potentiation of Amph-induced dopamine release by NOC-12. These findings contribute to understand the involvement of NO in dopamine-related neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Effects of cannabinoids Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid and cannabidiol in MPP+ affected murine mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Moldzio, Rudolf; Pacher, Thomas; Krewenka, Christopher; Kranner, Barbara; Novak, Johannes; Duvigneau, Johanna Catharina; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2012-06-15

    Cannabinoids derived from Cannabis sativa demonstrate neuroprotective properties in various cellular and animal models. Mitochondrial impairment and consecutive oxidative stress appear to be major molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Therefore we studied some major cannabinoids, i.e. delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in mice mesencephalic cultures for their protective capacities against 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity. MPP(+) is an established model compound in the research of parkinsonism that acts as a complex I inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, resulting in excessive radical formation and cell degeneration. MPP(+) (10 μM) was administered for 48 h at the 9th DIV with or without concomitant cannabinoid treatment at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 10 μM. All cannabinoids exhibited in vitro antioxidative action ranging from 669 ± 11.1 (THC), 16 ± 3.2 (THCA) to 356 ± 29.5 (CBD) μg Trolox (a vitamin E derivative)/mg substance in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay. Cannabinoids were without effect on the morphology of dopaminergic cells stained by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreaction. THC caused a dose-dependent increase of cell count up to 17.3% at 10 μM, whereas CBD only had an effect at highest concentrations (decrease of cell count by 10.1-20% at concentrations of 0.01-10 μM). It influenced the viability of the TH immunoreactive neurons significantly, whereas THCA exerts no influence on dopaminergic cell count. Exposure of cultures to 10 μM of MPP(+) for 48 h significantly decreased the number of TH immunoreactive neurons by 44.7%, and shrunken cell bodies and reduced neurite lengths could be observed. Concomitant treatment of cultures with cannabinoids rescued dopaminergic cells. Compared to MPP(+) treated cultures, THC counteracted toxic effects in a dose-dependent manner. THCA and CBD treatment at a concentration of 10

  17. Cryopreservation, Culture, and Transplantation of Human Fetal Mesencephalic Tissue into Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, D. E.; Naftolin, F.; Collier, T. J.; Leranth, C.; Robbins, R. J.; Sladek, C. D.; Roth, R. H.; Sladek, J. R.

    1988-11-01

    Studies in animals suggest that fetal neural grafts might restore lost neurological function in Parkinson's disease. In monkeys, such grafts survive for many months and reverse signs of parkinsonism, without attendant graft rejection. The successful and reliable application of a similar transplantation procedure to human patients, however, will require neural tissue obtained from human fetal cadavers, with demonstrated cellular identity, viability, and biological safety. In this report, human fetal neural tissue was successfully grafted into the brains of monkeys. Neural tissue was collected from human fetal cadavers after 9 to 12 weeks of gestation and cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen. Viability after up to 2 months of storage was demonstrated by cell culture and by transplantation into monkeys. Cryopreservation and storage of human fetal neural tissue would allow formation of a tissue bank. The stored cells could then be specifically tested to assure their cellular identity, viability, and bacteriological and virological safety before clinical use. The capacity to collect and maintain viable human fetal neural tissue would also facilitate research efforts to understand the development and function of the human brain and provide opportunities to study neurological diseases.

  18. SKF-96365 attenuates toxin-induced neuronal injury through opposite regulatory effects on Homer1a and Homer1b/c in cultured rat mesencephalic cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xuan; Pan, Zhi-Guo; Shao, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Na; Liu, Shen-Xi; Li, Nan-Lin; Wang, Wei-Min

    2013-05-24

    Disturbances in Ca(2+) homeostasis have been implicated in a variety of neuro-pathological conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, we investigated the potential protective effect of SKF-96365, an originally identified blocker of receptor-mediated calcium entry, on MPP(+) induced neuronal injury in cultured rat mesencephalic cells. We found that pretreatment with SKF-96365 30 min before injury significantly reduced nuclear damage, decreased LDH release and inhibited apoptotic neuronal death. The results of calcium image also showed that SKF-96365 inhibited the increase of intracellular calcium induced by MPP(+), which was not dependent on the expression and function of TRPC1. In addition, SKF-96365 increased the expression of Homer1a, but decreased the expression of Homer1b/c in the presence or absence of MPP(+). Furthermore, overexpression of Homer1a by using recombinant lentivirus and knockdown of Homer1b/c by short interfering RNA (siRNA) further enhanced protective effects of SKF-96365 against MPP(+) injury. Taken together, these data suggest that SKF-96365 protects cultured rat mesencephalic cells against MPP(+) induced cytotoxicity, and this protection may be at least in part dependent on attenuating intracellular calcium overload, opposite regulatory effects on Homer1a and Homer1b/c expressions.

  19. Neurotoxicity of cerebro-spinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease on mesencephalic primary cultures as an in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Zhang, Ben-Shu; Lei, Ping; Kong, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Shuang; Li, Dai; Zhang, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. In spite of extensive research, neither the cause nor the mechanisms have been firmly established thus far. One assumption is that certain toxic substances may exist in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) of Parkinson's disease patients. To confirm the neurotoxicity of CSF and study the potential correlation between neurotoxicity and the severity of Parkinson's disease, CSF was added to cultured cells. By observation of cell morphology, changes in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, the ratio of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells, and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein, the differences between the two groups were shown. The created in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons using primary culture of mouse embryonic mesencephalic tissue is suitable for the study of neurotoxicity. The observations of the present study indicated that CSF from Parkinson's disease patients contains factors that can cause specific injury to cultured dopaminergic neurons. However, no obvious correlation was found between the neurotoxicity of CSF and the severity of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Relative vulnerability of dopamine and GABA neurons in mesencephalic culture to inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase by malonate and 3-nitropropionic acid and protection by NMDA receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Zeevalk, G D; Derr-Yellin, E; Nicklas, W J

    1995-12-01

    The effects of different severities of metabolic stress on dopamine (DA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cell loss were examined in rat mesencephalic culture. Partial metabolic inhibition was induced in 12-day-old cultures by a 24-hr treatment with various concentrations of 3-nitropropionic acid(3-NPA, 0.1-0.5 mM) or malonate (10-50 mM), irreversible and reversible inhibitors of the Krebs cycle enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase. Cell damage to the DA and GABA populations was assessed after a 48-hr recovery period by simultaneous measurement of high affinity uptake for 3H-DA and 14C-GABA. 3-NPA or malonate caused a dose-dependent loss of DA uptake (EC50 0.21 or 42 mM, respectively). 3-NPA treatment was equally detrimental to the GABA population, whereas malonate exposure did not cause any significant loss of GABA uptake. The presence of the NMDA antagonist, MK-801 (1 microM), during 24 hr of 3-NPA or malonate treatment fully protected against DA and GABA loss with 50 mM malonate or 0.25 mM 3-NPA and partially protected versus 0.5 mM 3-NPA. To determine the degree of metabolic stress imposed by 3-NPA and malonate, 12-day-old cultures were treated with 0.5 mM 3-NPA or 50 mM malonate for 3 hr and the rate of lactate formation was measured. lactate was increased nearly 2-fold at 3 hr of treatment with 3-NPA, but was not significantly elevated above basal with malonate treatment. SDH activity was decreased by 48 or 58% after 3 hr of treatment with 0.25 and 0.5 mM 3-NPA, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. THC (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol) Exerts Neuroprotective Effect in Glutamate-affected Murine Primary Mesencephalic Cultures Through Restoring Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Anti-apoptosis Involving CB1 Receptor-dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chi Huu; Krewenka, Christopher; Radad, Khaled; Kranner, Barbara; Huber, Alexandra; Duvigneau, Johanna Catharina; Miller, Ingrid; Moldzio, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD) or related disorders, are an increasing societal and economic burden worldwide. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is discussed as a neuroprotective agent in several in vitro and in vivo models of brain injury. However, the mechanisms by which THC exhibits neuroprotective properties are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated neuroprotective mechanisms of THC in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary murine mesencephalic cultures, as a culture model for PD. Glutamate was administered for 48 h with or without concomitant THC treatment. Immunocytochemistry staining and resazurin assay were used to evaluate cell viability. Furthermore, superoxide levels, caspase-3 activity, and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined to explore the mode of action of this compound. THC protected dopaminergic neurons and other cell types of primary dissociated cultures from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, THC significantly counteracted the glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and apoptosis. SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, concentration-dependently blocked the protective effect of THC in primary mesencephalic cultures. In conclusion, THC exerts anti-apoptotic and restores mitochondrial membrane potential via a mechanism dependent on CB1 receptor. It strengthens the fact that THC has a benefit on degenerative cellular processes occurring, among others, in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases by slowing down the progression of neuronal cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Methamphetamine induces autophagy and apoptosis in a mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal culture model: role of cathepsin-D in methamphetamine-induced apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, V; Ali, Syed F; Kanthasamy, A G

    2006-08-01

    Autophagy is a phylogenetically conserved process that plays a critical role in the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins and organelle turnover. The role of oxidative stress and apoptosis in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity is well known; however, the potential contribution of autophagy to METH-induced oxidative damage in dopaminergic neuronal systems remains unclear. The goals of the present article were twofold: (a) to develop an in vitro dopaminergic cell culture model to study cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis, and (b) to determine whether lysosomal protease cathepsin-D activation, resulting from the loss of lysosomal membrane integrity, contributes to METH-induced apoptosis. To accomplish these goals, we characterized morphological and biochemical changes in an immortalized mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal cell line (N27 cells) following treatment with METH. Exposure of METH (2 mM) to N27 cells resulted in the appearance of cytoplasmic vacuolar structures reminiscent of autophagic vacuoles within 3 h. In order to ascertain the identity of the vacuolar structures that are formed following METH exposure, immunohistochemical staining for markers of autophagy were performed. LAMP 2, a classical marker of autophagolysosomes, revealed an extensive punctuate pattern of distribution on the vacuolar membrane surface, with exclusive localization in the cytoplasm. Additionally, using DNA fragmentation analysis we showed a dose-dependent increase in fragmented DNA in METH treated N27 cells. Since METH-induced autophagy preceded DNA fragmentation, we tested whether dysfunction of the autophagolysosomal system contributes to nuclear damage. Immunofluorescence studies with cathepsin-d demonstrated a granular pattern of staining in untreated cells, whereas an increased cathepsin- D immunoreactivity with a globular pattern of staining was observed in METH-treated cells. Nevertheless, blockade of cathepsin

  3. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid collaborates with the isthmic organizer to regulate mesencephalic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Martín, Cristina; Alonso, María I; Moro, José A; Bueno, David; Gato, Angel

    2005-11-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors acting in a developmentally regulated manner. Recently it has been shown that diffusible factors contained within embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) promote neuroepithelial cell survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants lacking any known organizing center. In this paper, we show that mesencephalic and mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured only with basal medium do not express the typically expressed mesencephalic or isthmic organizer genes analyzed (otx2 and fgf8, respectively) and that mesencephalic explants cultured with embryonic CSF-supplemented medium do effect such expression, although they exhibit an altered pattern of gene expression, including ectopic shh expression domains. Other trophic sources that are able to maintain normal neuroepithelial cell behavior, i.e., fibroblast growth factor-2, fail to activate this ectopic shh expression. Conversely, the expression pattern of the analyzed genes in mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid-supplemented medium mimics the pattern for control embryos developed in ovo. We demonstrate that embryonic CSF collaborates with the isthmic organizer in regulation of the expression pattern of some characteristic neuroectodermal genes during early stages of central nervous system (CNS) development, and we suggest that this collaboration is not restricted to the maintenance of neuroepithelial cell survival. Data reported in this paper corroborate the hypothesis that factors contained within embryonic CSF contribute to the patterning of the CNS during early embryonic development.

  4. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  5. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  6. Mesencephalic clefts with associated eye movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Lagreze, W D; Warner, J E; Zamani, A A; Gouras, G K; Koralnik, I J; Bienfang, D C

    1996-04-01

    To describe two patients with mesencephalic midline clefts and associated eye movement disorders. Case reports. The first patient developed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia with exotropia, reduced convergence, right ptosis, right fourth-nerve palsy, and right elevator palsy several years after meningitis with hydrocephalus. The second patient had bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia with exotropia, reduced convergence, bilateral ptosis, limited upward gaze, and right hypertropia since childhood. In both patients, magnetic resonance imaging showed a midline cleft extending from the cerebral aqueduct into the midbrain. It is likely that the clefts affected the oculomotor nuclei and medial longitudinal fasciculi, accounting for the eye movement disorders.

  7. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  8. Functional determination of the differentiation potential of ventral mesencephalic neural precursor cells during dopaminergic neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Bastidas-Ponce, Aimée; Collazo-Navarrete, Omar; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Covarrubias, Luis

    2017-09-01

    The ventral mesencephalic neural precursor cells (vmNPCs) that give rise to dopaminergic (DA) neurons have been identified by the expression of distinct genes (e.g., Lmx1a, Foxa2, Msx1/2). However, the commitment of these NPCs to the mesencephalic DA neuronal fate has not been functionally determined. Evaluation of the plasticity of vmNPCs suggests that their commitment occurs after E10.5. Here we show that E9.5 vmNPCs implanted in an ectopic area of E10.5 mesencephalic explants, retained their specification marker Lmx1a and efficiently differentiated into neurons but did not express the gene encoding tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), the limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis. A proportion of E10.5-E11.5 implanted vmNPCs behaved as committed, deriving into Th(+) neurons in ectopic sites. Interestingly, implanted cells from E12.5 embryos were unable to give rise to a significant number of Th(+) neurons. Concomitantly, differentiation assays in culture and in mesencephalic explants treated with Fgf2+LIF detected vmNPCs with astrogenic potential since E11.5. Despite this, a full suspension of E12.5 vmNPCs give rise to DA neurons in a similar proportion as those of E10.5 when they were transplanted into adult brain, but astrocytes were only detected with the former population. These data suggest that the subventricular postmitotic progenitors present in E12.5 ventral mesencephalon are unable to implant in embryonic explants and are the source of DA neurons in the transplanted adult brain. Based on our findings we propose that during DA differentiation committed vmNPCs emerge at E10.5 and they exhaust their neurogenic capacity with the rise of NPCs with astrogenic potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterisation of cell damage and death in embryonic mesencephalic tissue: a study on ultrastructure, vital stains and protease activity.

    PubMed

    Emgård, M; Blomgren, K; Brundin, P

    2002-01-01

    Dissociated embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue is a source of dopaminergic neurones in both cell culture and neural transplantation studies. Around 90% of grafted dopaminergic neurones die within 1 week after transplantation. Little is known about when the cell death is triggered and what forms of cell death predominate. Using electron microscopy, we characterised ultrastructural changes in dissected embryonic day 14 rat mesencephalic tissue before and after tissue dissociation. In addition, cell viability was evaluated using Trypan Blue and Hoechst/Ethidium Homodimer. Several cells exhibited leaky outer membranes (permitting entry of vital stains) and ultrastructural degeneration already immediately after the mesencephalon was dissected, and before it was mechanically disrupted. After 2 h at room temperature, 90% of the remaining cells had intact outer membranes. However, when estimating cells lost acutely in the tissue dissociation, in addition to cells exhibiting condensed chromatin and organellar changes, we suggest that only around 14% of the cells initially dissected in the mesencephalic tissue pieces remained healthy after 2 h. There was a peak in calpain activity (specific cleavage of fodrin) immediately following tissue dissociation, and it subsided during the next few hours. Caspase-3 activity was initially low, but increased almost 20-fold 4 h after tissue disruption. Interestingly, extensive degradation of caspase-3 occurred already directly after dissection and was at least partly calpain-dependent. Our data suggest that, in addition to cells undergoing primary necrosis, some cells undergo apoptotic or related changes soon after tissue harvesting, and eventually undergo a secondary necrosis. In summary, embryonic mesencephalic cells exhibit multiple degenerative changes very early on in the neural transplant/tissue culture preparation protocol.

  10. Glial commitment of mesencephalic neural precursor cells expanded as neurospheres precludes their engagement in niche-dependent dopaminergic neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baizabal, José-Manuel; Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Valencia, Concepción; Santa-Olalla, Jesús; Young, Kaylene M; Rietze, Rodney L; Bartlett, Perry F; Covarrubias, Luis

    2012-05-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) with high proliferative potential are commonly expanded in vitro as neurospheres. As a population, neurosphere cells show long-term self-renewal capacity and multipotentiality in vitro. These features have led to the assumption that neurosphere cells represent an expansion of the endogenous NPCs residing within the embryonic and adult brain. If this is the case, in principle, bona-fide expansion of endogenous NPCs should not significantly affect their capacity to respond to their original niche of differentiation. To address this issue, we generated primary neurospheres from the dopaminergic niche of the ventral mesencephalon and then transplanted these cells to their original niche within mesencephalic explant cultures. Primary neurosphere cells showed poor capacity to generate dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalic niche of dopaminergic neurogenesis. Instead, most primary neurosphere cells showed glial commitment as they differentiated into astrocytes in an exclusively neurogenic niche. Subculture of primary cells demonstrated that the neurosphere assay does not amplify niche-responsive dopaminergic progenitors. Further, neurospheres cells were largely unable to acquire the endogenous positional identity within the Nkx6.1(+), Nkx2.2(+), and Pax7(+) domains of mesencephalic explants. Finally, we demonstrate that our observations are not specific for embryonic mesencephalic cells, as NPCs in the adult subventricular zone also showed an intrinsic fate switch from neuronal to glial potential upon neurosphere amplification. Our data suggest that neurosphere formation does not expand the endogenous neurogenic NPCs but rather promotes amplification of gliogenic precursors that do not respond to niche-derived signals of cellular specification and differentiation.

  11. Efficient production of mesencephalic dopamine neurons by Lmx1a expression in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Friling, Stina; Andersson, Elisabet; Thompson, Lachlan H.; Jönsson, Marie E.; Hebsgaard, Josephine B.; Nanou, Evanthia; Alekseenko, Zhanna; Marklund, Ulrika; Kjellander, Susanna; Volakakis, Nikolaos; Hovatta, Outi; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Björklund, Anders; Perlmann, Thomas; Ericson, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Signaling factors involved in CNS development have been used to control the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into mesencephalic dopamine (mesDA) neurons, but tend to generate a limited yield of desired cell type. Here we show that forced expression of Lmx1a, a transcription factor functioning as a determinant of mesDA neurons during embryogenesis, effectively can promote the generation of mesDA neurons from mouse and human ESCs. Under permissive culture conditions, 75%–95% of mouse ESC-derived neurons express molecular and physiological properties characteristic of bona fide mesDA neurons. Similar to primary mesDA neurons, these cells integrate and innervate the striatum of 6-hydroxy dopamine lesioned neonatal rats. Thus, the enriched generation of functional mesDA neurons by forced expression of Lmx1a may be of future importance in cell replacement therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:19383789

  12. Computational heterogeneity in the human mesencephalic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    D'Ardenne, Kimberlee; Lohrenz, Terry; Bartley, Krystle A; Montague, P Read

    2013-12-01

    Recent evidence in animals has indicated that the mesencephalic dopamine system is heterogeneous anatomically, molecularly, and functionally, and it has been suggested that the dopamine system comprises distinct functional systems. Identifying and characterizing these systems in humans will have widespread ramifications for understanding drug addiction and mental health disorders. Model-based studies in humans have suggested an analogous computational heterogeneity, in which dopaminergic targets in striatum encode both experience-based learning signals and counterfactual learning signals that are based on hypothetical information. We used brainstem-tailored fMRI to identify mesencephalic sources of experiential and counterfactual learning signals. Participants completed a decision-making task based on investing in markets. This sequential investment task generated experience-based learning signals, in the form of temporal difference (TD) reward prediction errors, and counterfactual learning signals, in the form of "fictive errors." Fictive errors are reinforcement learning signals based on hypothetical information about "what could have been." An additional learning signal was constructed to be relatable to a motivational salience signal. Blood oxygenation level dependent responses in regions of substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), where dopamine neurons are located, coded for TD and fictive errors, and additionally were related to the motivational salience signal. These results are highly consistent with animal electrophysiology and provide direct evidence that human SN and VTA heterogeneously handle important reward-harvesting computations.

  13. Cryopreservation of porcine fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue for intrastriatal transplantation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, J; HogenEsch, I; Copray, S; Middel, B; van Dijk, H; Go, K G; Staal, M

    2001-01-01

    In this study we examined the efficacy of cryopreserving porcine fetal mesencephalic tissue. After microscopical dissection of the ventral mesencephalon (VM) from E28 pig fetuses, the collection of explants was randomly divided into two equal parts. One part was directly prepared as cell suspension. The other part was stored in hibernation medium for less than 2 days and then cryopreserved as tissue fragments and stored in liquid nitrogen. After 2 weeks up to 1 year, these tissue fragments were thawed and processed as cell suspensions. After cell counting and assessment of viability, these cell suspensions were used to examine survival, morphology, and neurite formation of the dopaminergic neurons in cell culture as well as after intrastriatal implantation in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Comparison of cryopreserved with fresh VM cell suspensions showed no significant difference with respect to cell viability and the average number of living cells per VM explant. The morphology of cultured dopaminergic neurons after cryopreservation was identical to that of fresh cells. After intrastriatal implantation, survival and outgrowth of cryopreserved dopaminergic neurons as well as functional effects did not differ from those of fresh cells. In conclusion, the cryopreservation technique we used proves to be a reliably effective method for storing porcine fetal VM tissue.

  14. Differential sensitivity of immature and mature ventral mesencephalic neurons to rotenone induced neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Satish Bollimpelli, V; Kondapi, Anand K

    2015-12-25

    Rotenone induced neuronal toxicity in ventral mesencephalic (VM) dopaminergic (DA) neurons in culture is widely accepted as an important model for the investigation of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about developmental stage dependent toxic effects of rotenone on VM neurons in vitro. The objective of present study is to investigate the effect of rotenone on developing VM neurons at immature versus mature stages. Primary VM neurons were cultured in the absence of glial cells. Exposure of VM neurons to rotenone for 2 days induced cell death in both immature and mature neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, but to a greater extent in mature neurons. While rotenone-treated mature VM neurons showed α-synuclein aggregation and sensitivity to DA neurons, immature VM neurons exhibited only DA neuronal sensitivity but not α-synuclein aggregation. In addition, on rotenone treatment, enhancement of caspase-3 activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were higher in mature VM neurons than in immature neurons. These results suggest that even though both mature and immature VM neurons are sensitive to rotenone, their manifestations differ from each other, with only mature VM neurons exhibiting Parkinsonian conditions.

  15. Neuroprotection of resveratrol against neurotoxicity induced by methamphetamine in mouse mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; Yue, Qingwei; Guo, Weihua; Li, Tao; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guibao; Liu, Zengxun; Sun, Jinhao

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is originally extracted from huzhang, a Chinese herbal medicine. Recently, resveratrol has attracted a great of attention due to its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. Although the neuroprotection of resveratrol on neural damages in various models has been well characterized, little is known about the role of resveratrol in methamphetamine (MA) induced neurotoxicity in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Dopaminergic neurons were isolated from midbrain of mouse embryos at embryonic day 15 and cultured in the presence of MA and resveratrol. Cell viability was examined by MTT assay and the apoptosis was assessed using Hoechst33342/PI double staining. To evaluate the Oxidative damage, ROS assay was performed. Moreover, the changes of time course of intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+) ]i) were analyzed with Fluo-3/AM tracing. The data showed that MA induced the neurotoxicity of cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. Resveratrol significantly increased cellular viability and retarded cell apoptosis. Furthermore, resveratrol also attenuated MA induced ROS production and intracellular free calcium overload. Our results suggest that resveratrol protects dopaminergic neurons from MA-induced neuronal cytotoxicity, which, at least partly, is mediated by inhibition of [Ca(2+) ]i and oxidative stress. © 2015 BioFactors 41(4):252-260, 2015.

  16. The pesticide rotenone induces caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Ferogh A; Linseman, Daniel A; Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Jones, Susan M; Bouchard, Ron J; Freed, Curt R; Heidenreich, Kim A; Zawada, W Michael

    2003-11-01

    In vivo, the pesticide rotenone induces degeneration of dopamine neurons and parkinsonian-like pathology in adult rats. In the current study, we utilized primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures from E15 rats as an in vitro model to examine the mechanism underlying rotenone-induced death of dopamine neurons. After 11 h of exposure to 30 nm rotenone, the number of dopamine neurons identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining declined rapidly with only 23% of the neurons surviving. By contrast, 73% of total cells survived rotenone treatment, indicating that TH+ neurons are more sensitive to rotenone. Examination of the role of apoptosis in TH+ neuron death, revealed that 10 and 30 nm rotenone significantly increased the number of apoptotic TH+ neurons from 7% under control conditions to 38 and 55%, respectively. The increase in apoptotic TH+ neurons correlated with an increase in immunoreactivity for active caspase-3 in TH+ neurons. The caspase-3 inhibitor, DEVD, rescued a significant number of TH+ neurons from rotenone-induced death. Furthermore, this protective effect lasted for at least 32 h post-rotenone and DEVD exposure, indicating lasting neuroprotection achieved with an intervention prior to the death commitment point. Our results show for the first time in primary dopamine neurons that, at low nanomolar concentrations, rotenone induces caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Understanding the mechanism of rotenone-induced apoptosis in dopamine neurons may contribute to the development of new neuroprotective strategies against Parkinson's disease.

  17. Mesencephalic basolateral domain specification is dependent on Sonic Hedgehog

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A.; Madrigal, M. Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In the study of central nervous system morphogenesis, the identification of new molecular markers allows us to identify domains along the antero-posterior and dorso-ventral (DV) axes. In the past years, the alar and basal plates of the midbrain have been divided into different domains. The precise location of the alar-basal boundary is still under discussion. We have identified Barhl1, Nhlh1 and Six3 as appropriate molecular markers to the adjacent domains of this transition. The description of their expression patterns and the contribution to the different mesencephalic populations corroborated their role in the specification of these domains. We studied the influence of Sonic Hedgehog on these markers and therefore on the specification of these territories. The lack of this morphogen produced severe alterations in the expression pattern of Barhl1 and Nhlh1 with consequent misspecification of the basolateral (BL) domain. Six3 expression was apparently unaffected, however its distribution changed leading to altered basal domains. In this study we confirmed the localization of the alar-basal boundary dorsal to the BL domain and demonstrated that the development of the BL domain highly depends on Shh. PMID:25741244

  18. Mesencephalic representations of recent experience influence decision making

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John A; Costabile, Jamie D; Felsen, Gidon

    2016-01-01

    Decisions are influenced by recent experience, but the neural basis for this phenomenon is not well understood. Here, we address this question in the context of action selection. We focused on activity in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg), a mesencephalic region that provides input to several nuclei in the action selection network, in well-trained mice selecting actions based on sensory cues and recent trial history. We found that, at the time of action selection, the activity of many PPTg neurons reflected the action on the previous trial and its outcome, and the strength of this activity predicted the upcoming choice. Further, inactivating the PPTg predictably decreased the influence of recent experience on action selection. These findings suggest that PPTg input to downstream motor regions, where it can be integrated with other relevant information, provides a simple mechanism for incorporating recent experience into the computations underlying action selection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16572.001 PMID:27454033

  19. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-10

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist.

  20. Electrophysiological Effects of Trace Amines on Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ledonne, Ada; Berretta, Nicola; Davoli, Alessandro; Rizzo, Giada Ricciardo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio

    2011-01-01

    Trace amines (TAs) are a class of endogenous compounds strictly related to classic monoamine neurotransmitters with regard to their structure, metabolism, and tissue distribution. Although the presence of TAs in mammalian brain has been recognized for decades, until recently they were considered to be by-products of amino acid metabolism or as “false” neurotransmitters. The discovery in 2001 of a new family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), namely trace amines receptors, has re-ignited interest in TAs. In particular, two members of the family, trace amine receptor 1 (TA1) and trace amine receptor 2 (TA2), were shown to be highly sensitive to these endogenous compounds. Experimental evidence suggests that TAs modulate the activity of catecholaminergic neurons and that TA dysregulation may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease, all of which are characterized by altered monoaminergic networks. Here we review recent data concerning the electrophysiological effects of TAs on the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. In the context of recent data obtained with TA1 receptor knockout mice, we also discuss the mechanisms by which the activation of these receptors modulates the activity of these neurons. Three important new aspects of TAs action have recently emerged: (a) inhibition of firing due to increased release of dopamine; (b) reduction of D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory responses (excitatory effects due to disinhibition); and (c) a direct TA1 receptor-mediated activation of GIRK channels which produce cell membrane hyperpolarization. While the first two effects have been well documented in our laboratory, the direct activation of GIRK channels by TA1 receptors has been reported by others, but has not been seen in our laboratory (Geracitano et al., 2004). Further research is needed to address this point, and to further characterize

  1. Enhanced proliferation and dopaminergic differentiation of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells by synergistic effect of FGF2 and reduced oxygen tension

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Pia; Gramsbergen, Jan-Bert; Zimmer, Jens; Widmer, Hans R.; Meyer, Morten

    2011-07-15

    Effective numerical expansion of dopaminergic precursors might overcome the limited availability of transplantable cells in replacement strategies for Parkinson's disease. Here we investigated the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and FGF8 on expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic neuroblasts cultured at high (20%) and low (3%) oxygen tension. More cells incorporated bromodeoxyuridine in cultures expanded at low as compared to high oxygen tension, and after 6 days of differentiation there were significantly more neuronal cells in low than in high oxygen cultures. Low oxygen during FGF2-mediated expansion resulted also in a significant increase in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons as compared to high oxygen tension, but no corresponding effect was observed for dopamine release into the culture medium. However, switching FGF2-expanded cultures from low to high oxygen tension during the last two days of differentiation significantly enhanced dopamine release and intracellular dopamine levels as compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the short-term exposure to high oxygen enhanced in situ assessed TH enzyme activity, which may explain the elevated dopamine levels. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of oxygen tension is a recognizable factor for in vitro expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic midbrain precursor cells.

  2. Cleft lip and palate due to deficiency of mesencephalic neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    van Limborgh, J; Lieuw Kie Song, S H; Been, W

    1983-07-01

    The mesencephalic crest was partially eliminated in chick embryos by means of tangential microlaser. The heads of the surviving embryos were serially sectioned and microscopically studied. A deficiency of mesenshyme in the anlage of the maxillary process was observed in 4 of the 42 embryos sacrificed after 24 hours, on the side of irradiation. Among the 99 surviving embryos sacrificed at the ages of 7 or 12 days, 26 showed a unilateral cleft lip, a wide palatal cleft or a combination of these anomalies. It is concluded that cleft lip and palate can result from insufficient growth of the mesenchyme in the maxillary process caused by partial deficiency of mesencephalic neural crest cells.

  3. Nurr1 regulates Top IIβ and functions in axon genesis of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background NURR1 (also named as NR4A2) is a member of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor family, which can bind to DNA and modulate expression of target genes. Previous studies have shown that NURR1 is essential for the nigral dopaminergic neuron phenotype and function maintenance, and the defects of the gene are possibly associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Results In this study, we used new born Nurr1 knock-out mice combined with Affymetrix genechip technology and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify Nurr1 regulated genes, which led to the discovery of several transcripts differentially expressed in the nigro-striatal pathway of Nurr1 knock-out mice. We found that an axon genesis gene called Topoisomerase IIβ (Top IIβ) was down-regulated in Nurr1 knock-out mice and we identified two functional NURR1 binding sites in the proximal Top IIβ promoter. While in Top IIβ null mice, we saw a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantial nigra and lack of neurites along the nigro-striatal pathway. Using specific TOP II antagonist ICRF-193 or Top IIβ siRNA in the primary cultures of ventral mesencephalic (VM) neurons, we documented that suppression of TOP IIβ expression resulted in VM neurites shortening and growth cones collapsing. Furthermore, microinjection of ICRF-193 into the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB) led to the loss of nigro-striatal projection. Conclusion Taken together, our findings suggest that Top IIβ might be a down-stream target of Nurr1, which might influence the processes of axon genesis in dopaminergic neurons via the regulation of TOP IIβ expression. The Nurr1-Top IIβ interaction may shed light on the pathologic role of Nurr1 defect in the nigro-striatal pathway deficiency associated with PD. PMID:22296971

  4. Akinetic mutism and mixed transcortical aphasia following left thalamo-mesencephalic infarction.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, N; McNeil, C; Gilhotra, J S

    1999-02-01

    A 54-year-old man developed somnolent akinetic mutism and acute mixed transcortical aphasia following a left thalamo-mesencephalic infarction. He also exhibited behavioural changes, namely apathy, slowness, lack of spontaneity, disinhibition, perseveration, gait apraxia and incontinence consistent with frontal lobe dysfunction. Presumably the akinetic mutism and language dysfunction were due to the thalamic stroke. All the manifestations could be related to interruption of the frontal-subcortical circuitry.

  5. Reactive oxygen species generation by the ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate (EBDC) fungicide mancozeb and its contribution to neuronal toxicity in mesencephalic cells.

    PubMed

    Domico, Lisa M; Cooper, Keith R; Bernard, Laura P; Zeevalk, Gail D

    2007-11-01

    Previous in vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that mancozeb (MZ) and maneb (MB), both widely used EBDC fungicides, are equipotent neurotoxicants that produce cell loss in mesencephalic dopaminergic and GABAergic cells after an acute 24h exposure. Mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition were associated with fungicide exposure. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is known to increase free radical production. Here the mechanism(s) of neuronal damage associated with MZ exposure was further explored by determining the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) played in toxicity. Damage to mesencephalic dopamine and GABA cell populations were significantly attenuated when carried out in the presence of ascorbate or SOD, indicative of a free radical-mediated contribution to toxicity. ROS generation monitored by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production using Amplex Red increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to MZ. Inhibition of intracellular catalase with aminotriazole had little effect on H(2)O(2) generation, whereas exogenously added catalase significantly reduced H(2)O(2) production, demonstrating a large extracellular contribution to ROS generation. Conversely, cells preloaded with the ROS indicator dye DCF showed significant MZ-induced ROS production, demonstrating an increase in intracellular ROS. Both the organic backbone of MZ as well as its associated Mn ion, but not Zn ion, were responsible and required for H(2)O(2) generation. The functionally diverse NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenylene iodonium chloride, apocynin, and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzene-sulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride significantly attenuated H(2)O(2) production by MZ. In growth medium lacking cells, MZ produced little H(2)O(2), but enhanced H(2)O(2) generation when added with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase whereas, in cultured cells, allopurinol partially attenuated H(2)O(2) production by MZ. Minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation, modestly reduced H(2)O(2) formation in

  6. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES GENERATION BY THE ETHYLENE-BIS-DITHIOCARBAMATE (EBDC) FUNGICIDE MANCOZEB AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO NEURONAL TOXICITY IN MESENCEPHALIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Domico, Lisa M.; Cooper, Keith R.; Bernard, Laura P.; Zeevalk, Gail D.

    2007-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that mancozeb (MZ) and maneb (MB), both widely used EBDC fungicides, are equipotent neurotoxicants that produce cell loss in mesencephalic dopaminergic and GABAergic cells after an acute 24 h exposure. Mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition were associated with fungicide exposure. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is known to increase free radical production. Here the mechanism(s) of neuronal damage associated with MZ exposure was further explored by determining the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) played in toxicity. Damage to mesencephalic dopamine and GABA cell populations were significantly attenuated when carried out in the presence of ascorbate or SOD indicative of a free radical mediated contribution to toxicity. ROS generation monitored by H2O2 production using Amplex Red increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to MZ. Inhibition of intracellular catalase with aminotriazole had little effect on H2O2 generation, whereas exogenously added catalase significantly reduced H2O2 production demonstrating a large extracellular contribution to ROS generation. Conversely, cells preloaded with the ROS indicator dye DCF showed significant MZ-induced ROS production, demonstrating an increase in intracellular ROS. Both the organic backbone of MZ as well as its associated Mn ion, but not Zn ion were responsible and required for H2O2 generation. The functionally diverse NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenylene iodonium chloride, apocynin, and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzene- sulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride significantly attenuated H2O2 production by MZ. In growth medium lacking cells, MZ produced little H2O2, but enhanced H2O2 generation when added with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase whereas, in cultured cells, allopurinol partially attenuated H2O2 production by MZ. Minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation, modestly reduced H2O2 formation in mesencephalic cells. In contrast, neuronal enriched

  7. Stimulation of the mesencephalic ventral tegmental area blunts the sensitivity of cardiac baroreflex in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Ishida, Tomoko; Nagai, Atsushi; Liang, Nan

    2015-05-01

    We have examined for the first time whether electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic ventral tegmental area (VTA) or the substantia nigra (SN) was capable of suppressing cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in decerebrate cats. After decerebration was performed by electrocoagulation at the precollicular-premammillary level and inhalation anesthesia was stopped, the animals were able to show spontaneous motor activity intermittently. Electrical stimulations of the mesencephalic areas (the VTA and SN) for 30s were conducted with a monopolar tungsten microelectrode (current intensity of pulse trains, 50-100 μA; frequency, 40-50 Hz; pulse duration, 0.5-1.0 ms), without producing tibial motor discharge. Stimulation of the VTA evoked the significant increases in heart rate (HR, 12 ± 2 beats/min) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, 12 ± 3 mm Hg). When the baroreflex bradycardia and the slope of the cardiac baroreflex curve were examined using a pressor response with brief occlusion of the abdominal aorta, the VTA stimulation blunted both the baroreflex bradycardia and the maximal slope of the baroreflex MAP-HR curve by 63-74% in the same manner as spontaneously-evoked motor activity. In contrast, stimulation of the SN elicited no modulation of cardiac baroreflex. It is likely that stimulation of the mesencephalic VTA suppresses cardiac baroreflex sensitivity and has the similar features of the effects on the cardiac baroreflex function as those during spontaneously-evoked motor activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Distribution of mesencephalic nucleus and trigeminal ganglion mechanoreceptors in the periodontal ligament of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Linden, R W; Scott, B J

    1989-01-01

    1. In anaesthetized cats recordings have been made in the mesencephalic nucleus of the fifth cranial nerve and the trigeminal ganglion from neurones that respond when forces are applied to the mandibular canine tooth. The site of the mechanoreceptors in the periodontal ligament and their distribution around the tooth root have been determined. 2. Receptors with their cell bodies in the mesencephalic nucleus were found to be situated in the periodontal ligament in a discrete area intermediate between the fulcrum and apex of the tooth, while those in the trigeminal ganglion were situated in the whole area of the periodontal ligament between the fulcrum and apex of the tooth. 3. All of the located mechanoreceptors responded maximally when that part of the ligament in which they lay was put under tension. 4. The directional sensitivities of the mechanoreceptors suggested that there was an uneven distribution around the tooth root of receptors with cell bodies in the mesencephalic nucleus. In contrast mechanoreceptors with cell bodies in the trigeminal ganglion were distributed more equally around the tooth root. The rationale for the differences requires further investigation. PMID:2795482

  9. Role of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus in rat whisker pad proprioception

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Trigeminal proprioception related to rodent macrovibrissae movements is believed to involve skin receptors on the whisker pad because pad muscles operate without muscle spindles. This study was aimed to investigate in rats whether the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (TMnu), which provides proprioceptive feedback for chewing muscles, may be also involved in whisker pad proprioception. Methods Two retrograde tracers, Dil and True Blue Chloride, were injected into the mystacial pad and the masseter muscle on the same side of deeply anesthetized rats to label the respective projecting sensory neurons. This double-labeling technique was used to assess the co-innervation of both structures by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (TMnu). In a separate group of anesthetized animals, the spontaneous electrical activities of TMnu neurons were analyzed by extracellular recordings during spontaneous movements of the macrovibrissae. Mesencephalic neurons (TMne) were previously identified by their responses to masseter muscle stretching. Changes in TMne spontaneous electrical activities, analyzed under baseline conditions and during whisking movements, were statistically evaluated using Student's t-test for paired observations. Results Neuroanatomical experiments revealed different subpopulations of trigeminal mesencephalic neurons: i) those innervating the neuromuscular spindles of the masseter muscle, ii) those innervating the mystacial pad, and iii) those innervating both structures. Extracellular recordings made during spontaneous movements of the macrovibrisae showed that whisking neurons similar to those observed in the trigeminal ganglion were located in the TMnu. These neurons had different patterns of activation, which were dependent on the type of spontaneous macrovibrissae movement. In particular, their spiking activity tonically increased during fan-like movements of the vibrissae and showed phasic bursting during rhythmic whisking. Furthermore, the same

  10. Resonance characteristic and its ionic basis of rat mesencephalic trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Hu, Sanjue; Li, Fujun; Xing, Junling

    2015-01-30

    Intrinsic resonant frequency properties of neurons in the brain provide a basis for different behavioral states and determine the responding modality (i.e. excitability) of different neurons. Previously, three types of excitability behaviors in rat Mesencephalic V neurons were found. To investigate the different resonant frequency and ionic current mechanisms underlying different resonances among three types of excitability, we performed whole-cell patch recordings and applied ZAP current on Mesencephalic V cells (N=70) in rat slices. The results show that: Class 2 neurons (30/30) have two resonances with U-shaped voltage dependence. One is a high frequency resonance (75.4 ± 2.11 Hz) significant at depolarized potentials (about -50 mV) and the other is a low frequency resonance (5.46 ± 0.31 Hz) significant at hyperpolarized potentials (about -70 mV). Voltage clamp experiments reveal two non-inactivating currents operating in the subthreshold voltage range: (1) 4-aminopyridine sensitive K(+) current, which activates at membrane potentials positive than -60 mV and was blocked by 4-AP (50 µM), was underlying the high frequency resonance of Class 2 neuron; (2) h-current, which activates negative than -60mV and was blocked by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker ZD7288 (10 µM), was underlying the low frequency resonance. Class 1 neurons do not show voltage-dependence resonant behaviors (10/10). Class 3 neurons (23/30) have two resonances, which are similar with Class 2 in both resonant frequency and currents. Our results provide clear evidence for the existence of multiple kinds of frequency resonances and how the relationship between the resonant frequency and the ionic current is based in Mesencephalic V neurons.

  11. [In vitro viability and glutathione levels in mesencephalic neurons after seven days hibernation].

    PubMed

    De La Cuétara-Bernal, K; Castillo-Díaz, L; Cruz-Aguado, R; González-Mena, Y; García-Varona, A Y

    In embryonic mesencephalic transplant in patients with Parkinson s disease dopaminergic survival is low (5 10%), and for this reason the use of multiple donors has been considered. The difficulty of obtaining more tissue determines the need for a procedure that enables human nigral tissue to be stored for a time without affecting its physiological state in any significant way. This study was designed to determine whether hibernation of tissue fragments has any influence on viability, how the viability of the mesencephalic cells behaves after 7 days hibernation and the glutathione levels in the hibernated tissue (HT). The viability of the HT in pieces (82.37 2.12) was found to be higher than the value for the whole mesencephalon (70.29 3.43). Viability of the HT, seven days at 4 C, at different post dissociation times, did not differ significantly. Despite the significant differences found between hibernated and fresh tissue at t= 0, this procedure does not seem to affect the mesencephalic tissue in any significant way, as it conserved a 94% viability after hibernation. No evidence was found of increased glutathione content as an antioxidizing response to the damage that might be caused by hibernation. These results suggest that since hibernation does not have any significant effect on the state of the cells it could be considered a useful procedure for conserving tissue to be used in clinical transplants. Moreover, further research is needed on survival and functionality of hibernated cells after being transplanted into animal models in order to evaluate their potential for use in cell therapy.

  12. The effect of different durations of morphine exposure on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in morphine dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weibo; Ma, Chunling; Qi, Qian; Liu, Lizhe; Bi, Haitao; Cong, Bin; Li, Yingmin

    2015-12-01

    Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons are heavily involved in the development of drug dependence. Thyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, plays an important role in the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, this study investigated TH changes in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN), as well as the morphine effects on dopaminergic neurons induced by different durations of morphine dependence. Models of morphine dependence were established in rats, and paraffin-embedded sections, immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to observe the changes in the expression of TH protein. Fluoro-Jade B staining was used to detect degeneration and necrosis, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) detected the apoptosis of mesencephalic dopaminergic nerve cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that the number of TH positive cells and the protein levels in the VTA and SN were significantly decreased in the rats with a long period of morphine dependency. With prolonged morphine exposure, the dopaminergic nerve cells in the VTA and SN showed degeneration and necrosis, while apoptotic cells were not observed. The number of VTA and SN dopaminergic nerve cells decreased with increasing periods of morphine dependence, which was most likely attributable to the degeneration and necrosis of nerve cells induced by morphine toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Alumina cream-induced focal motor seizures in cats: bilateral lesions of the mesencephalic reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Velasco, M; Velasco, F; Cepeda, C; Márquez, I; Estrada-Villanueva, F

    1986-06-01

    The effect of bilateral lesions of the mesencephalic reticular formation on the EEG-EMG patterns of types B and C alumina cream-induced focal motor seizures was studied in cats with chronically implanted electrode and cannula lesion systems. EEG patterns included number, amplitude, and contralateral propagation of type B spikes and occurrence and duration of type C tonic-clonic discharges. EMG patterns included changes in muscular multiple-unit activity time locked to the onset of type B spikes and to the onset and end of type C tonic-clonic EEG paroxysmal discharges. The lesions persistently blocked the orienting response to visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli to both sides in all cats and produced other neurologic symptoms partially or totally recovered in some cats. The lesions significantly increased the number, amplitude, and contralateral propagation of type B EEG spikes and the occurrence, but not the duration, of type C EEG tonic-clonic discharges. Ipsi- and contralateral adversion of the tonic phase were completely blocked and the muscular contractions of the clonic phase were reduced and delayed. These facts suggest that in intact epileptic cats, the mesencephalic reticular formation has an ascending suppressive influence on the mechanism related to EEG spike generation and precipitation of seizures but also a descending facilitatory control on the corticospinal epileptic impulses mediated through pyramidal and extrapyramidal pathways.

  14. Posterior fossa syndrome with a large inflammatory ponto-mesencephalic lesion.

    PubMed

    Breit, S; Keserü, B; Nyffeler, T; Sturzenegger, M; Krestel, H

    2017-02-01

    Demonstration of a posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) in a 32-year-old male patient with clinically isolated syndrome which subsequently developed into relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis. The patient suffered from double vision, coordination problems including unsteady gait and atactic dysarthria, concentration difficulties, as well as adynamia and impaired decision making. The patient clinically presented a cerebellar and dysexecutive syndrome. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a contrast enhancing ponto-mesencephalic lesion with a volume of 4.8cm(3). Neuropsychological tests showed pronounced executive dysfunctions, reduced visuoconstructive skills, attentional deficits, echolalia, and non-fluent speech production. After cortisone and plasmapheresis, the cerebellar syndrome improved but manual fine motor skills and executive dysfunctions persisted. After three months, symptoms remitted except for a slight gait imbalance. After six months, neuropsychological tests were normal except for a moderate attention deficit. MRI revealed a clear regression of the ponto-mesencephalic lesion to a volume of 2.4cm(3) without contrast enhancement. This case report intends to provide an overview of the symptomatology and etiology of PFS and offers new insights into its pathomechanism demonstrating a pontine disconnection syndrome caused by a large demyelinating plaque.

  15. Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to pattern the midbrain-hindbrain and diencephalic-mesencephalic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Timothy; Scholpp, Steffen; Brand, Michael; Moens, Cecilia B; Waskiewicz, Andrew Jan

    2007-01-15

    Pbx proteins are a family of TALE-class transcription factors that are well characterized as Hox co-factors acting to impart segmental identity to the hindbrain rhombomeres. However, no role for Pbx in establishing more anterior neural compartments has been demonstrated. Studies done in Drosophila show that Engrailed requires Exd (Pbx orthologue) for its biological activity. Here, we present evidence that zebrafish Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to compartmentalize the midbrain by regulating the maintenance of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) and the diencephalic-mesencephalic boundary (DMB). Embryos lacking Pbx function correctly initiate midbrain patterning, but fail to maintain eng2a, pax2a, fgf8, gbx2, and wnt1 expression at the MHB. Formation of the DMB is also defective as shown by a caudal expansion of diencephalic epha4a and pax6a expression into midbrain territory. These phenotypes are similar to the phenotype of an Engrailed loss-of-function embryo, supporting the hypothesis that Pbx and Engrailed act together on a common genetic pathway. Consistent with this model, we demonstrate that zebrafish Engrailed and Pbx interact in vitro and that this interaction is required for both the eng2a overexpression phenotype and Engrailed's role in patterning the MHB. Our data support a novel model of midbrain development in which Pbx and Engrailed proteins cooperatively pattern the mesencephalic region of the neural tube.

  16. Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to pattern the midbrain-hindbrain and diencephalic-mesencephalic boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Timothy; Scholpp, Steffen; Brand, Michael; Moens, Cecilia B.; Waskiewicz, Andrew Jan

    2007-01-01

    Pbx proteins are a family of TALE-class transcription factors that are well characterized as Hox co-factors acting to impart segmental identity to the hindbrain rhombomeres. However, no role for Pbx in establishing more anterior neural compartments has been demonstrated. Studies done in Drosophila show that Engrailed requires Exd (Pbx orthologue) for its biological activity. Here, we present evidence that zebrafish Pbx proteins cooperate with Engrailed to compartmentalize the midbrain by regulating the maintenance of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) and the diencephalic-mesencephalic boundary (DMB). Embryos lacking Pbx function correctly initiate midbrain patterning, but fail to maintain eng2a, pax2a, fgf8, gbx2, and wnt1 expression at the MHB. Formation of the DMB is also defective as shown by a caudal expansion of diencephalic epha4a and pax6a expression into midbrain territory. These phenotypes are similar to the phenotype of an Engrailed loss-of-function embryo, supporting the hypothesis that Pbx and Engrailed act together on a common genetic pathway. Consistent with this model, we demonstrate that zebrafish Engrailed and Pbx interact in vitro, and that this interaction is required for both the eng2a overexpression phenotype and Engrailed’s role in patterning the MHB. Our data support a novel model of midbrain development in which Pbx and Engrailed proteins cooperatively pattern the mesencephalic region of the neural tube. PMID:16959235

  17. [Therapeutic effect of GDNF gene-modified mesencephalic neural stem cell transplantation in a rat model of Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Duan, Kuijia; Wang, Xiangpeng; Yang, Zhiyong; Wang, Bo; Wang, Mingguo; Zhang, Hailong; Deng, Xingli

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect of transplantation of mesencephalic neural stem cells (mNSCs) genetically modified by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene in a rat model of Parkinson disease. mNSCs isolated from the lateral component of the midbrain of fetal rats at gestational age of 14 or 15 days were cultured for 5 days before genetic modification with GFP or GDNF gene. Rat models of Parkinson disease established by stereotactic injection of 6-hydroxy dopamine in the ventral area of the midbrain and the medial forebrain bundle were randomized into 3 groups to receive PBS injection, GFP gene-modified mNSCs transplantation, or GDNF gene-modified mNSCs transplantation into the right stratum. The behavioral changes of the rats were evaluated by observing rotations induced by intraperitoneal injection of apomorphine after the transplantation, and the survival, migration and differentiation of the transplanted cells were identified by immunohistochemistry. Transplantation with GDNF gene-modified mNSCs significantly improved the behavioral abnormalities of the rat models as compared with PBS injection and GFP gene-modified mNSCs transplantation. At 56 days after the transplantation, a greater number of the transplanted cells survived in the rat brain and more differentiated dopaminergic neurons were detected in GDNF gene-modified mNSCs transplantation group than in GFP gene-modified mNSCs transplantation group. GDNF gene-modified mNSCs transplantation can significantly improve dyskinesia in rat models of Parkinson disease, but the molecular mechanism needs further clarification.

  18. Ectopic serotonin accumulation and efflux in rat mesencephalic slices after prior tissue 'radiolabelling'.

    PubMed

    Blatchford, Karen L; McLaughlin, Daniel P; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2003-06-30

    Radiolabelling of brain tissue has long been used to facilitate detection of transmitter efflux, on the assumption that egress of tritiated monoamines reflects that of the endogenous transmitter. The present study tested the hypothesis that the application of exogenous serotonin (5-HT) to mesencephalic slices, in the manner used during a typical radiolabelling protocol, leads to efflux of 5-HT from physiologically inappropriate loci such as other non-serotonergic neurones. We used fast cyclic voltammetry (FCV) to determine the effect of tissue pre-incubation with 5-HT on electrically-stimulated 5-HT efflux and reuptake in rat mesencephalic slices. Seven subregions were studied, including the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), dorsomedial periaqueductal grey (PAGdm) and the oral part of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO). In control slices (pre-incubated without 5-HT), stimulated 5-HT efflux was only detectable in DRN, PAGdm and occasionally in PnO. In slices incubated in 5-HT (100nM) for 30min, stimulated 5-HT efflux was detected in all seven subregions studied. In such slices, citalopram (75nM) increased efflux and reuptake t(1/2) in DRN to 201+/-21 and 487+/-117% of pre-drug values (P<0.05) but had no significant effect on either measure in PnO. The 5-HT1 autoreceptor agonist, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 100nM) decreased efflux in DRN by 54+/-6% (P<0.05), but was without effect (10+/-14%) in PnO. The present results show that pre-incubation in 5-HT allows stimulated 5-HT efflux from regions of the mesencephalon other than DRN and PAGdm. This stimulated 5-HT efflux is apparently not influenced by 5-HT transporters or 5-HT1 autoreceptors, suggesting that efflux is ectopic, an artefact of the pre-incubation process. In summary, incubation of rat mesencephalic tissue in 5-HT, in the manner of a typical radiolabelling protocol, results in stimulated 5-HT efflux from non-physiological sites. The results of such transmitter efflux studies should thus be interpreted with

  19. The lifelong maintenance of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by Nurr1 and engrailed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Specific vulnerability and degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the midbrain is the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. A number of transcription factors regulate the birth and development of this set of neurons and some remain constitutively expressed throughout life. These maintenance transcription factors are closely associated with essential neurophysiological functions and are required ultimately for the long-term survival of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The current review describes the role of two such factors, Nurr1 and engrailed, in differentiation, maturation, and in normal physiological functions including acquisition of neurotransmitter identity. The review will also elucidate the relationship of these factors with life, vulnerability, degeneration and death of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in the context of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24685177

  20. Transient total mesencephalic locked-in syndrome after bilateral ptosis due to basilar artery thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yasunori; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Wakayama, Akatsuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2012-11-01

    Locked-in syndrome (LIS) usually occurs as a result of pontine lesions and has been classified into various categories on the basis of neurologic conditions, of which transient total mesencephalic LIS is extremely rare. A 53-year-old man presented with bilateral ptosis followed by a total locked-in state. In the clinical course, the patient successfully recovered with only left slight hemiparesis and skew deviation remaining. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple ischemic lesions caused by thrombosis at the top of basilar artery, including the bilateral cerebral peduncles, tegmentum of the midbrain, and the right cerebellar hemisphere. Antecedent bilateral ptosis before the locked-in state may be related to ischemia in the central caudal nucleus of the oculomotor nuclei. We should pay attention to this easily missed condition during the treatment of ischemic stroke involving the basilar artery.

  1. [Thalamo-mesencephalic aspergillus abscess in a heart transplant subject: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Mazzaferri, Fulvia; Adami, Irene; Tocco, Pierluigi; Cazzadori, Angelo; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Storato, Silvia; Ferrari, Sergio; Concia, Ercole

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare and highly fatal infection that mainly affects immunocompromised patients. We report on a case of a heart transplanted Caucasian man, who arrived at our hospital because of the onset of diplopy. We performed a broad diagnostic work-up: the brain MRI showed a single ring-enhancing thalamo-mesencephalic area suggestive of abscess lesion; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis disclosed galactomannan and beta-D-glucan antigens. Thus the antifungal therapy was immediately started. We decided to discontinue the therapy 16 months later because of severe hepatic toxicity, given that the patient was persistently asymptomatic, brain imaging showed a progressive resolution of the abscess area and CSF antigen analysis was persistently negative. The follow-up at three months was unchanged.

  2. Mesencephalic complex I deficiency does not correlate with parkinsonism in mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders.

    PubMed

    Palin, Eino J H; Paetau, Anders; Suomalainen, Anu

    2013-08-01

    Genetic evidence from recessively inherited Parkinson's disease has indicated a clear causative role for mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. This role has long been discussed based on findings that toxic inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I caused parkinsonism and that tissues of patients with Parkinson's disease show complex I deficiency. Disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance are a common cause of inherited neurodegenerative disorders, and lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions or depletion and respiratory chain defect, including complex I deficiency. However, parkinsonism associates typically with defects of catalytic domain of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Surprisingly, however, not all mutations affecting DNA polymerase gamma manifest as parkinsonism, but, for example, spacer region mutations lead to spinocerebellar ataxia and/or severe epilepsy. Furthermore, defective Twinkle helicase, a close functional companion of DNA polymerase gamma in mitochondrial DNA replication, results in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, epilepsy or adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy, but not typically parkinsonism. Here we sought for clues for this specificity in the neurological manifestations of mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders by studying mesencephalic neuropathology of patients with DNA polymerase gamma or Twinkle defects, with or without parkinsonism. We show here that all patients with mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders had neuronopathy in substantia nigra, most severe in DNA polymerase gamma-associated parkinsonism. The oculomotor nucleus was also affected, but less severely. In substantia nigra, all patients had a considerable decrease of respiratory chain complex I, but other respiratory chain enzymes were not affected. Complex I deficiency did not correlate with parkinsonism, age, affected gene or inheritance. We conclude that the cell number in substantia nigra correlated well with parkinsonism in DNA polymerase gamma

  3. Nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase signaling mediates depolarization-induced protection of rat mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons from MPP⁺ cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kurauchi, Y; Hisatsune, A; Isohama, Y; Sawa, T; Akaike, T; Katsuki, H

    2013-02-12

    Neuronal electrical activity has been known to affect the viability of neurons in the central nervous system. Here we show that long-lasting membrane depolarization induced by elevated extracellular K(+) recruits nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylyl cyclase/protein kinase G signaling pathway, induces 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP)-mediated protein S-guanylation, and confers dopaminergic neuroprotection. Treatment of primary mesencephalic cell cultures with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) for 72 h decreased the number of dopaminergic neurons, whereas the cell loss was markedly inhibited by elevated extracellular concentration of K(+) (+40 mM). The neuroprotective effect of elevated extracellular K(+) was significantly attenuated by tetrodotoxin (a Na(+) channel blocker), amlodipine (a voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel blocker), N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor), and KT5823 or Rp-8-bromo-β-phenyl-1,N(2)-ethenoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS) (protein kinase G inhibitors). Elevated extracellular K(+) increased 8-nitro-cGMP production resulting in the induction of protein S-guanylation in cells in mesencephalic cultures including dopaminergic neurons. In addition, exogenous application of 8-nitro-cGMP protected dopaminergic neurons from MPP(+) cytotoxicity, which was prevented by zinc protoporphyrin IX, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Zinc protoporphyrin IX also inhibited the neuroprotective effect of elevated extracellular K(+). On the other hand, KT5823 or Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS did not inhibit the induction of HO-1 protein expression by 8-nitro-cGMP, although these protein kinase G inhibitors abrogated the neuroprotective effect of 8-nitro-cGMP. These results suggest that protein S-guanylation (leading to HO-1 induction) as well as canonical protein kinase G

  4. On the absence of a rubrothalamic projection in the monkey with observations on some ascending mesencephalic projections.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, D A; Lawrence, D G

    1975-05-15

    In order to determine whether there is a rubrothalamic projection in the rhesus monkey, the ascending degeneration resulting from electrolytic lesions made in the red nucleus and adjacent mesencephalon in animals surviving at least one year after bilateral interruption of the superior cerebellar peduncles (PCS) was studied by means of the Fink-Heimer technique. In a necessary preliminary step it was shown that virtually all of the degeneration disappeared from the thalamus within twelve months after PCS interruption so that degeneration resulting from the subsequent electrolytic mesencephalic lesions could be attributed to interruption of non-cerebellar ascending fibres. The results show that degeneration was present in the thalamus following the electrolyte mesencephalic-diencephalic lesions but it could be accounted for on the basis of damage either to residual PCS fibres, to somatosensory pathways, to intrathalamic connections or to cell groups or projection fibres of the reticular formation, substantia nigra or globus pallidus. It is concluded that there is no direct rubrothalamic projection in the monkey and, in particular, no evidence of a projection from the red nucleus to the ventral lateral or ventral anterior thalamic nuclei. The results also indicate that the mesencephalic reticular formation is the main source of ascending afferents to the nucelus reticularis thalami. Some observations were made concerning nigrostriatal and nigrothalamic projections. Retrograde cell changes resulting from unilateral lesions made caudal to the red nucleus were studied in three animals. The observed cell changes are interpreted as being consistent with the conclusion that there is no rubrothalamic projection.

  5. Gender-specific role of mitochondria in the vulnerability of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated mesencephalic neurons.

    PubMed

    Misiak, Magdalena; Beyer, Cordian; Arnold, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Morbus Parkinson, exhibit a gender-dependency showing a higher incidence in men than women. Most of the neurodegenerative disorders involve either causally or consequently a dysfunction of mitochondria. Therefore, neuronal mitochondria may demonstrate a gender-specificity with respect to structural and functional characteristics of these organelles during toxic and degenerative processes. The application of 6-OHDA (6-hydroxydopamine) in vitro and in vivo represents a well-accepted experimental model of Parkinson's disease causing Parkinsonian symptoms. Besides the known effects of 6-OHDA on mitochondria and neuronal survivability, we aimed to demonstrate that the mitochondrial neurotoxin affects the morphology and survival of primary dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalon in a gender-specific manner by influencing the transcription of mitochondrial genes, ATP and reactive oxygen species production. Our data suggest that cell death in response to 6-OHDA is primarily caused due to increased oxidative stress which is more pronounced in male than in female mesencephalic neurons.

  6. Projection and synaptic connectivity of trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus neurons controlling jaw reflexes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Atsushi; Moritani, Masayuki; Nagase, Yoshitaka; Bae, Yong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Neurons in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) receive deep sensation (proprioception) from jaw-closing muscle spindles and periodontal ligaments and project primarily to the jaw-closing motoneuron pool (jaw-closing nucleus) of the trigeminal motor nucleus and to the supratrigeminal nucleus. Numerous articles have described the morphology and physiology of the central projections of Vmes afferents originating from the muscle spindles and periodontal ligaments. However, no report has provided a detailed description of projection and synaptic connectivity, especially of single afferents, and their functional implications. In this review, we reanalyze data obtained by single intra-axonal recording and labeling of functionally identified Vmes muscle spindle afferents and periodontal ligament afferents and by electron microscopic observation of their projection features and synaptic organization of boutons, to compare the data for the jaw-closing nucleus and supratrigeminal nucleus. Our analysis shows that each Vmes afferent type has characteristic projection pattern and synaptic feature that may be important in jaw-reflex control.

  7. Enhancement of excitatory postsynaptic potentials by preceding application of acetylcholine in mesencephalic dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Isa, Tadashi

    2004-05-01

    Previously, we reported that Ca(2+) influx through nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) activates a fulfenamic acid (FFA)-sensitive inward current, presumably a Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation current (I(CAN)), in mesencephalic dopamine (DA) neurons. This current exhibited a negative slope conductance in the voltage range between -80 and -40mV and its activation led to a dramatic change in the responses to a transient application of glutamate, from single spikes to burst discharges. In this study, to examine the effect of activation of the FFA-sensitive current on EPSPs, we applied ACh (1mM) by transient air pressure shortly before electrical stimulation to evoke EPSPs in DA neurons. Application of ACh enhanced the amplitude of EPSPs when it preceded the electrical stimulation by less than 2 s, but not when the interval was longer than 3 s. In addition, this enhancement was critically dependent on intracellular Ca(2+) and the membrane potentials of the postsynaptic cell. Furthermore, the enhancing effect of ACh on EPSPs was sensitive to FFA and phenytoin. These results suggest that Ca(2+) influx caused by cholinergic inputs enhances EPSPs via activation of the FFA- and phenytoin-sensitive current.

  8. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T.; Seiz, Emma G.; Ramos, Milagros; Meyer, Morten; Juliusson, Bengt; Kusk, Philip

    2009-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro. Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal of growth factors, proliferation and expression of v-myc were dramatically reduced and the cells differentiated into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. hVM1 cells yield a large number of dopaminergic neurons (about 12% of total cells are TH{sup +}) after differentiation, which also produce dopamine. In addition to proneural genes (NGN2, MASH1), differentiated cells show expression of several genuine mesencephalic dopaminergic markers such as: LMX1A, LMX1B, GIRK2, ADH2, NURR1, PITX3, VMAT2 and DAT, indicating that they retain their regional identity. Our data indicate that this cell line and its clonal derivatives may constitute good candidates for the study of development and physiology of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro, and to develop tools for Parkinson's disease cell replacement preclinical research and drug testing.

  9. Involvement of trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus in kinetic encoding of whisker movements.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Ombretta; Stanzani, Stefania; Russo, Antonella; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Manca, Paolo; De Riu, Pier Luigi; Caria, Marcello Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    In previous experiments performed on anaesthetised rats, we demonstrated that whisking neurons responsive to spontaneous movement of the macrovibrissae are located within the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Me5) and that retrograde tracers injected into the mystacial pad of the rat muzzle extensively labelled a number of Me5 neurons. In order to evaluate the electrophysiological characteristics of the Me5-whisker pad neural connection, the present study analysed the Me5 neurons responses to artificial whisking induced by electrical stimulation of the peripheral stump of the facial nerve. Furthermore, an anterograde tracer was injected into the Me5 to identify and localise the peripheral terminals of these neurons in the mystacial structures. The electrophysiological data demonstrated that artificial whisking induced Me5 evoked potentials as well as single and multiunit Me5 neurons responses consistent with a direct connection. Furthermore, the neuroanatomical findings showed that the peripheral terminals of the Me5 stained neurons established direct connections with the upper part of the macrovibrissae, at the conical body level, with fibres spiralling around the circumference of the vibrissae shaft. As for the functional role of this sensory innervation, we speculated that the Me5 neurons are possibly involved in encoding and relaying proprioceptive information related to vibrissae movements to other CNS structures.

  10. Classification of phthalates based on an in vitro neurosphere assay using rat mesencephalic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ishido, Masami; Suzuki, Junko

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to environmental neurotoxic chemicals both in utero and during the early postnatal period can cause neurodevelopmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neurodevelopmental programming, we previously established an in vitro neurosphere assay system using rat mesencephalic neural stem cells that can be used to evaluate. Here, we extended the assay system to examine the neurodevelopmental toxicity of the endocrine disruptors butyl benzyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, dicyclohexyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, di(2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate, di-n-pentyl phthalate, and dihexyl phthalate at a range of concentrations (0-100 μM). All phthalates tested inhibited cell migration with a linear or non-linear range of concentrations when comparing migration distance to the logarithm of the phthalate concentrations. On the other hand, some, but not all, phthalates decreased the number of proliferating cells. Apoptotic cells were not observed upon phthalate exposure under any of the conditions tested, whereas the dopaminergic toxin rotenone induced significant apoptosis. Thus, we were able to classify phthalate toxicity based on cell migration and cell proliferation using the in vitro neurosphere assay.

  11. Excitatory GABAergic synaptic potentials in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus of adult rat in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Y; Murai, Y; Tanaka, E; Inokuchi, H; Kusukawa, J; Higashi, H

    2005-04-01

    The mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (MesV) contains the somata of primary afferent neurons innervating masticatory muscle spindles and the periodontal membrane. MesV afferent somata are unique in receiving synaptic inputs. Intracellular recordings in coronal pontine slices from adult rats were made from MesV neurons identified by having Cs-sensitive inward rectification and pseudounipolar morphology. Stimuli near the MesV evoked either a cluster of action potentials superimposed on a postsynaptic potential (PSP) or an antidromic spike at resting membrane potential (RMP). Membrane hyperpolarization revealed that each cluster of action potentials consisted of an antidromic spike and a subsequent PSP. Evoked PSPs in slices and miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) recorded using whole-cell patch in dissociated MesV neurons were resistant to glutamate antagonists and strychnine but were reversibly abolished by 40 microM bicuculline. Superfusion of 1-10 mM GABA decreased input resistance and depolarized the membrane. Reversal potentials for evoked PSPs and GABA-induced depolarizations were similar and close to that for mPSCs which matched the Cl- equilibrium potential. Thus activation of synapses on MesV somata evokes GABAergic PSPs that generate action potentials at RMP in the adult. These data also indicate that primary afferent MesV neurons can act as interneurons in the central control of mastication.

  12. Central projections of the mesencephalic nucleus of the fifth nerve: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Luschei, E S

    1987-09-01

    Projections of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of the fifth nerve (Mes V) to brainstem structures in the cat were studied by labelling Mes V cells with tritiated leucine. Before the leucine injections were made, however, large kainic acid lesions were produced in the vicinity of Mes V cells because these neurons are resistant to being killed or injured by this neurotoxin. Thus Mes V cells were selectively labelled by the leucine even though they are scattered among many other neurons. Leucine injections near Mes V cells located in the mesencephalon, which are primarily the somata of jaw muscle spindle afferent fibers, produced essentially the same pattern of terminal labelling as injections near a caudally located group of Mes V cells that includes the somata of many tooth mechanoreceptive afferents. Labelling was dense above the trigeminal motor nucleus in the nucleus supratrigeminalis and in the most medial portion of the principal trigeminal sensory nucleus. A scattering of labelled axons and diffuse label was seen along the length of the tract of Probst, which follows the medial border of the descending trigeminal sensory nucleus as far caudally as the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Labelling within most of the trigeminal motor nucleus, which is known to receive direct synaptic input from Mes V cells, was very light. The only reasonably dense region of label was confined to a small dorsolateral portion of the motor nucleus. Although Mes V has generally been supposed to be involved with jaw control in a direct, reflexive manner, the extensive projections to nucleus supratrigeminalis and parts of the trigeminal sensory system draw attention to the potential proprioceptive sensory contribution of Mes V.

  13. Neurones associated with saccade metrics in the monkey central mesencephalic reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Cromer, Jason A; Waitzman, David M

    2006-02-01

    Neurones in the central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF) begin to discharge prior to saccades. These long lead burst neurones interact with major oculomotor centres including the superior colliculus (SC) and the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF). Three different functions have been proposed for neurones in the cMRF: (1) to carry eye velocity signals that provide efference copy information to the SC (feedback), (2) to provide duration signals from the omnipause neurones to the SC (feedback), or (3) to participate in the transformation from the spatial encoding of a target selection signal in the SC into the temporal pattern of discharge used to drive the excitatory burst neurones in the pons (feed-forward). According to each respective proposal, specific predictions about cMRF neuronal discharge have been formulated. Individual neurones should: (1) encode instantaneous eye velocity, (2) burst specifically in relation to saccade duration but not to other saccade metrics, or (3) have a spectrum of weak to strong correlations to saccade dynamics. To determine if cMRF neurones could subserve these multiple oculomotor roles, we examined neuronal activity in relation to a variety of saccade metrics including amplitude, velocity and duration. We found separate groups of cMRF neurones that have the characteristics predicted by each of the proposed models. We also identified a number of subgroups for which no specific model prediction had previously been established. We found that we could accurately predict the neuronal firing pattern during one type of saccade behaviour (visually guided) using the activity during an alternative behaviour with different saccade metrics (memory guided saccades). We suggest that this evidence of a close relationship of cMRF neuronal discharge to individual saccade metrics supports the hypothesis that the cMRF participates in multiple saccade control pathways carrying saccade amplitude, velocity and duration information

  14. Exaggerated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nan; Mitchell, Jere H; Smith, Scott A; Mizuno, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic and pressor responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms causing this abnormality remain to be fully elucidated. Central command, a neural drive originating in higher brain centers, is known to activate cardiovascular and locomotor control circuits concomitantly. As such, it is a viable candidate for the generation of the augmented vascular response to exercise in this disease. We hypothesized that augmentations in central command function contribute to the heightened cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension. To test this hypothesis, changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to electrical stimulation of mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR; 20-50 μA in 10-μA steps evoking fictive locomotion), a putative component of the central command pathway, were examined in decerebrate, paralyzed normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Tibial nerve discharge during MLR stimulation significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner in both WKY and SHR but was not different between groups. Stimulation of the MLR evoked significantly larger increases in RSNA and MAP with increasing stimulation intensity in both groups. Importantly, the increases in sympathetic and pressor responses to this fictive locomotion were significantly greater in SHR compared with WKY across all stimulation intensities (e.g., at 50 μA, ΔRSNA: WKY 153 ± 31%, SHR 287 ± 42%; ΔMAP: WKY 87 ± 9 mmHg, SHR 139 ± 7 mmHg). These findings provide the first evidence that central command may be a critical contributor to the exaggerated rise in sympathetic activity and blood pressure during exercise in hypertension. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Expression and Distribution of Mesencephalic Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Retina and Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Sheng-Hai; Li, Ting-Ting; Wu, Ji-Hong; Wu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), otherwise named Arginine-Rich, Mutated in Early-stage Tumors (ARMET), is a secretory endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) protein that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. To date, little is known about the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and optic nerve (ON). Therefore, we studied the expression and distribution of MANF in the ON and retina by real-time PCR, immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. Results from rat and mouse were highly consistent in the retina. MANF was detected in both tissues in rat, wherein it was principally localized to the ganglion cell layer (GCL), followed by the inner nuclear layer (INL). The MANF protein levels in the rat retina were 3.33-fold higher than in the rat ON. Additionally, MANF was robustly expressed by retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the human retina. In human ON, MANF was partially co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting that it was not restricted to astrocytes. In vitro studies confirmed that MANF could be robustly expressed in RGCs and was found principally within the cytoplasm. Hypoxia can stimulate up-regulation by of MANF expression over time, suggesting that MANF may play a vital role in the functional regulation of RGCs both in health and disease. We believe that the present study improves our understanding of the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and ON and could help in further analysis of its interact and correlate with the relevant ophthalmic diseases. PMID:28154531

  16. Hyperexcitability of Mesencephalic Trigeminal Neurons and Reorganization of Ion Channel Expression in a Rett Syndrome Model.

    PubMed

    Oginsky, Max F; Cui, Ningren; Zhong, Weiwei; Johnson, Christopher M; Jiang, Chun

    2017-05-01

    People with Rett syndrome (RTT) have defects in motor function also seen in Mecp2-null mice. Motor function depends on not only central motor commands but also sensory feedback that is vulnerable to changes in excitability of propriosensory neurons. Here we report evidence for hyperexcitability of mesencephalic trigeminal (Me5) neurons in Mecp2-null mice and a novel cellular mechanism for lowering its impact. In in vitro brain slices, the Me5 neurons in both Mecp2(-/Y) male and symptomatic Mecp2(+/-) female mice were overly excitable showing increased firing activity in comparison to their wild-type (WT) male and asymptomatic counterparts. In Mecp2(-/Y) males, Me5 neurons showed a reduced firing threshold. Consistently, the steady-state activation of voltage-gated Na(+) currents (INa ) displayed a hyperpolarizing shift in the Mecp2-null neurons with no change in the INa density. This seems to be due to NaV1.1, SCN1B and SCN4B overexpression and NaV1.2 and SCN3B under-expression. In contrast to the hyperexcitability, the sag potential and postinhibitory rebound (PIR) were reduced in Mecp2-null mice. In voltage-clamp, the IH density was deficient by ∼33%, and the steady-state half-activation had a depolarizing shift of ∼10 mV in the Mecp2-null mice. Quantitative PCR analysis indicated that HCN2 was decreased, HCN1 was upregulated with no change in HCN4 in Mecp2(-/Y) mice compared to WT. Lastly, blocking IH reduced the firing rate much more in WT than in Mecp2-null neurons. These data suggest that the Mecp2 defect causes an increase in Me5 neuronal excitability likely attributable to alterations in INa , meanwhile IH is reduced likely altering neuronal excitability as well. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1151-1164, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparative anatomy of the ventromedial mesencephalic tegmentum in the rat, cat, monkey and human.

    PubMed

    Halliday, G M; Törk, I

    1986-10-22

    The five component nuclei of the ventromedial mesencephalic tegmentum (VMT) were studied on Nissl stained serial sections of the brain stem of rat, cat, monkey (Macaca nemestrina) and human. Models of the VMT nuclei were constructed to compare their size, shape and disposition across species. For each nucleus in each species the following were calculated: the volume, the number of neurons, the size distribution of neurons, the mean soma size and the packing density of neurons. The morphology of the cells in the different nuclei is also described. The parabrachial pigmented nucleus (PBP) forms, on average, 51% of the VMT volume and cell number. The paranigral nucleus (PN) and the central linear nucleus (LC) formed 19% and 14% of the VMT volume and cell number respectively. The relatively small, but compact interfascicular nucleus (IF) was on average 9% of the VMT volume and cell number and the rostral linear nucleus (LR) formed its remaining 7%. However, in different species the relative prominence varies between species. Thus PBP is the largest of the VMT nuclei in the monkey, PN is particularly well developed in the human, IF contains a particularly large number of cells in the rat, and LR and LC are strongly developed in the cat. This study presents a cytoarchitectonic description of the five nuclei in each species. The distinctive cytoarchitectonic appearance of each nucleus suggests that their functions may differ. This possibility, which is strengthened by evidence that the projections of the VMT nuclei are differential, may need to be considered in the interpretation of the results of experimental investigations using stimulation and/or lesion experiments in the VMT region and in the interpretation of pathological findings in the human brain.

  18. Peripheral Muscle Targets and Central Projections of the Mesencephalic Trigeminal Nucleus in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niping; May, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (MesV) contains the somata of primary afferent neurons that innervate muscle spindles in masticatory muscles and mechanoreceptors in the periodontal ligaments. There are conflicting reports about additional peripheral targets of MesV, such as the extraocular muscles, as well as about its central targets. In addition, only limited primate data are available. Consequently, we examined MesV projections in macaque monkeys. The retrograde tracer wheat germ agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was injected into masticatory or extraocular muscles to define the peripheral targets of the primate MesV. Numerous labeled neurons were found in ipsilateral MesV following masticatory muscle injections. The scattered distribution of labeled cells, and their presence amongst clusters of unlabeled cells, suggests the muscle representations overlap. Just a few MesV neurons were labeled after extraocular muscle injections. This correlates with the small number of muscle spindles present in macaque extraocular muscles, suggesting MesV cells supplying extraocular muscle spindles may contribute a minor component to oculomotor proprioception. To examine the central connections of MesV, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vs). The presence of retrogradely labeled MesV cells indicated a projection to Vs from MesV. These injections also anterogradely labeled terminals that lay in close association with MesV cells, suggesting an ascending projection from Vs to MesV. Finally, a small number of MesV neurons were labeled following WGA-HRP injections into the upper cervical spinal cord. This pattern of central connections indicates MesV and Vs information is combined to guide mastication. PMID:18461596

  19. Vestibular responses in the macaque pedunculopontine nucleus and central mesencephalic reticular formation

    PubMed Central

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2012-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF) both send projections and receive input from areas with known vestibular responses. Noting their connections with the basal ganglia, the locomotor disturbances that occur following lesions of the PPN or cMRF, and the encouraging results of PPN deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease patients, both the PPN and cMRF have been linked to motor control. In order to determine the existence of and characterize vestibular responses in the PPN and cMRF, we recorded single neurons from both structures during vertical and horizontal rotation, translation, and visual pursuit stimuli. The majority of PPN cells (72.5%) were vestibular-only cells that responded exclusively to rotation and translation stimuli but not visual pursuit. Visual pursuit responses were much more prevalent in the cMRF (57.1%) though close to half of cMRF cells were vestibular-only cells (41.1%). Directional preferences also differed between the PPN, which was preferentially modulated during nose-down pitch, and cMRF, which was preferentially modulated during ipsilateral yaw rotation. Finally, amplitude responses were similar between the PPN and cMRF during rotation and pursuit stimuli, but PPN responses to translation were of higher amplitude than cMRF responses. Taken together with their connections to the vestibular circuit, these results implicate the PPN and cMRF in the processing of vestibular stimuli and suggest important roles for both in responding to motion perturbations like falls and turns. PMID:22864184

  20. The mesencephalic locomotor region sends a bilateral glutamatergic drive to hindbrain reticulospinal neurons in a tetrapod

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Auclair, Francois; Cabelguen, Jean‐Marie

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) on one side evokes symmetrical locomotor movements on both sides. How this occurs was previously examined in detail in a swimmer using body undulations (lamprey), but in tetrapods the downstream projections from the MLR to brainstem neurons are not fully understood. Here we examined the brainstem circuits from the MLR to identified reticulospinal neurons in the salamander Notophthalmus viridescens. Using neural tracing, we show that the MLR sends bilateral projections to the middle reticular nucleus (mRN, rostral hindbrain) and the inferior reticular nucleus (iRN, caudal hindbrain). Ca2+ imaging coupled to electrophysiology in in vitro isolated brains revealed very similar responses in reticulospinal neurons on both sides to a unilateral MLR stimulation. As the strength of MLR stimulation was increased, the responses increased in size in reticulospinal neurons of the mRN and iRN, but the responses in the iRN were smaller. Bath‐application or local microinjections of glutamatergic antagonists markedly reduced reticulospinal neuron responses, indicating that the MLR sends glutamatergic inputs to reticulospinal neurons. In addition, reticulospinal cells responded to glutamate microinjections and the size of the responses paralleled the amount of glutamate microinjected. Immunofluorescence coupled with anatomical tracing confirmed the presence of glutamatergic projections from the MLR to reticulospinal neurons. Overall, we show that the brainstem circuits activated by the MLR in the salamander are organized similarly to those previously described in lampreys, indicating that the anatomo‐physiological features of the locomotor drive are well conserved in vertebrates. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1361–1383, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26470600

  1. Effects of acidic pH on voltage-gated ion channels in rat trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Eon; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Choi, In-Sun; Kim, Do-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    The effects of acidic pH on several voltage-dependent ion channels, such as voltage-dependent K+ and Ca2+ channels, and hyperpolarization-gated and cyclic nucleotide-activated cation (HCN) channels, were examined using a whole-cell patch clamp technique on mechanically isolated rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons. The application of a pH 6.5 solution had no effect on the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. A pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of voltage-dependent K+ currents. The pH 6.0 also shifted both the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The application of a pH 6.5 solution scarcely affected the peak amplitude of membrane currents mediated by HCN channels, which were profoundly inhibited by the general HCN channel blocker Cs+ (1 mM). However, the pH 6.0 solution slightly, but significantly inhibited the peak amplitude of HCN-mediated currents. Although the pH 6.0 solution showed complex modulation of the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships, the midpoint voltages for the activation of HCN channels were not changed by acidic pH. On the other hand, voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels were significantly inhibited by an acidic pH. The application of an acidic pH solution significantly shifted the current-voltage and conductance-voltage relationships to the depolarization range. The modulation of several voltage-dependent ion channels by an acidic pH might affect the excitability of mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neurons, and thus physiological functions mediated by the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus could be affected in acidic pH conditions. PMID:28280415

  2. Developmental deficiencies of the upper facial skeleton due to partial elimination of mesencephalic neural crest cells in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Song, L K; Been, W; Van Limborgh, J

    1983-12-01

    With the aim to test the hypothesis that cells derived from the mesencephalic portion of the neural crest, are involved in the process of differentiation of various upper facial bones, in 41 chick embryos of the 6-somite stage (approx. 26 hours of incubation) the anterior and middle thirds of this part of the neural crest were partially eliminated by micro-laser irradiation, either unilaterally or bilaterally. Of the 14 embryos sacrificed at the age of 12 days, a number of 6 proved to have developed harelip and/or cleft palate conditions. In these embryos, in addition a reduction or absence of the maxillary, palatal, jugale and quadrato-jugale was observed. On the contrary, other facial bones as well as the first and second branchial arch cartilages proved to have developed normally. From these results the conclusion may be drawn that (a sufficient number of) cells from the anterior and middle thirds of the mesencephalic neural crest are indispensable for a normal differentiation of the maxillary, palatal, jugale and quadrato-jugale.

  3. [Nuclear oculomotor nerve syndrome due to mesencephalic infarction or hemorrhage. Five cases and a review of literature].

    PubMed

    Roig, C; Gironell, A; Martí-Vilalta, J L; Grau, J M; Barraquer, L

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear oculomotor nerve syndrome is rarely caused by mesencephalic lesions. We describe 5 patients, 4 with unilateral syndrome (3 due to ischemia and 1 to mesencephalic hemorrhage) and 1 with bilateral nuclear ischemia of the third cranial nerve. These patients represent 0.2% of those admitted with cerebral vascular pathology over the last 12 years. Symptoms are consistent with descriptions of the anatomic organization of this nucleus, with peripheral paralysis of the contralateral superior rectus and possible bilateral involvement of the eyelid elevator and the pupillary constrictor muscles. A noteworthy symptom seen in these cases is supranuclear paralysis of the upward gaze on the side of the lesion, with ocular elevation achieved in response to oculocephalic stimuli in 2 cases and with Bell's synkinesis in 4. We analyze the nature of 22 published cases of unilateral nuclear damage and of 14 published cases of bilateral nuclear damage. Unilateral damage may or may not lead to ipsilateral pupillary involvement, uni- or bilateral eyelid ptosis, contralateral ocular hypotropia, and possible horizontal paresis of the contralateral gaze. Associated deficits are hemiparesis or crossed hemiataxia. Unresponsive pupils and bilateral ptosis associated with tetraparesis, bilateral ataxia and altered states of consciousness were seen with bilateral nuclear lesions. Infarction is the main cause (in 32 out of 41) and recovery of full ocular movement is uncommon.

  4. [Isolated lesion of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus in topographical relation with a post-traumatic mesencephalic hematoma].

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A L; Onzáin, J I; Martín, J A; Blanco, A; Moreta, J A

    1996-08-01

    From the relevant literature, it would seem that the commonest single cause of lesion of the third cranial nerves is indirect, accompanying intracranial traumas. From multiple clinical observations however, it seems that many of these cases may be due to lesions of the mesencephalum which nevertheless have rarely been identified by current imaging techniques. Clinical case. We describe the clinical observation of isolated pupil involvement, attributed to a lesion of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus as a consequence of a mesencephalic haematoma in the context of closed craneo-encephalic trauma. In our review of the literature, we have not found any other such case. We briefly review the most frequently involved mechanisms implicated in the genesis of lesions of the third cranial nerves at different sites and the different changes seen in the pupil in each case, together with the characteristics and pathogenesis of the lesions produced in the mesencephalum as a consequence of intracranial trauma. We emphasize the importance of our case as being the first time an isolated lesion of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus has been described in topographic relation to a mesencephalic haematoma.

  5. Transplantation site influences the phenotypic differentiation of dopamine neurons in ventral mesencephalic grafts in Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Fjodorova, Marija; Torres, Eduardo M; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2017-05-01

    Foetal midbrain progenitors have been shown to survive, give rise to different classes of dopamine neurons and integrate into the host brain alleviating Parkinsonian symptoms following transplantation in patients and animal models of the disease. Dopamine neuron subpopulations in the midbrain, namely A9 and A10, can be identified anatomically based on cell morphology and ascending axonal projections. G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel Girk2 and the calcium binding protein Calbindin are the two best available histochemical markers currently used to label (with some overlap) A9- and A10-like dopamine neuron subtypes, respectively, in tyrosine hydroxylase expressing neurons both in the midbrain and grafts. Both classes of dopamine neurons survive in grafts in the striatum and extend axonal projections to their normal dorsal and ventral striatal targets depending on phenotype. Nevertheless, grafts transplanted into the dorsal striatum, which is an A9 input nucleus, are enriched for dopamine neurons that express Girk2. It remains to be elucidated whether different transplantation sites favour the differential survival and/or development of concordant dopamine neuron subtypes within the grafts. Here we used rat foetal midbrain progenitors at two developmental stages corresponding to a peak in either A9 or A10 neurogenesis and examined their commitment to respective dopaminergic phenotypes by grafting cells into different forebrain regions that contain targets of either nigral A9 dopamine innervation (dorsal striatum), ventral tegmental area A10 dopamine innervation (nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex), or only sparse dopamine but rich noradrenaline innervation (hippocampus). We demonstrate that young (embryonic day, E12), but not older (E14), mesencephalic tissue and the transplant environment influence survival and functional integration of specific subtypes of dopamine neurons into the host brain. We also show that irrespective of donor age A9

  6. Electrophysiological identification of mesencephalic ventromedial tegmental (VMT) neurons projecting to the frontal cortex, septum and nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Deniau, J M; Thierry, A M; Feger, J

    1980-05-12

    The electrophysiological properties of neurons located in the mesencephalic ventromedial tegmentum (VMT) and the organization of the efferents of these neurons to the frontal cortex, the septum, the nucleus accumbens and the head of the striatum were studied in ketamine-anesthetized rats. The projections of the VMT cells were determined through use of the antidromic activation method. Our results show that VMT projections to different target areas originate mainly from different VMT neurons. However, in some cases single VMT neurons were found to send axon collaterals to two different areas. Three branching patterns were observed: septum-cortex, septum--nucleus accumbens and septum--striatum. The occasional observation of temporally distinct antodromic responses from a single area was considered to result from activation of different branches of the arborizing axon. The distribution of antidromic response latencies for VMT projections to each structure is discussed in relation to the question of dopaminergic versus non-dopaminergic mesolimbic and mesocortical systems.

  7. Effects of the intra-arterial injection of bradykinin into the limbs, upon the activity of mesencephalic reticular units.

    PubMed

    Lombard, M C; Guilbaud, G; Besson, J M

    1975-02-01

    The changes in firing rate of mesencephalic reticular units after intra-arterial injection into the limbs of a potent nociceptive agent, bradykinin, were studied in cats (unanesthetized, immobilized with flaxedil and hyperventilated). 30 per cent of the d35 studied cells were affected, 56 per cent were excited, 23 per cent inhibited and 5 per cent had mixed effects. Among the 75 excited cells, the activation of 16 of them seemed to related to the arousa- processes (group A); for 56 cells the increase seemed dire-tly dependent on the nociceptive stimulation itself (group B). The changes of firing rate were repruducible; their latencies and durations were of the same order as the latencies and duration of the nociceptive reactions and painful sensation s, which have been obtained in animals and men after bradykinin injections. The modifications induced by bradykinin administration were suppressed by Ketamin and Thiopental.

  8. The mesencephalic GCt-ICo complex and tonic immobility in pigeons (Columba livia): a c-Fos study.

    PubMed

    Melleu, Fernando Falkenburger; Lino-de-Oliveira, C; Marino-Neto, J

    2017-04-01

    Tonic immobility (TI) is a response to a predator attack, or other inescapable danger, characterized by immobility, analgesia and unresponsiveness to external stimuli. In mammals, the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and deep tectal regions control the expression of TI as well as other defensive behaviors. In birds, little is known about the mesencephalic circuitry involved in the control of TI. Here, adult pigeons (both sex, n = 4/group), randomly assigned to non-handled, handled or TI groups, were killed 90 min after manipulations and the brains processed for detection of c-Fos immunoreactive cells (c-Fos-ir, marker for neural activity) in the mesencephalic central gray (GCt) and the adjacent nucleus intercollicularis (ICo). The NADPH-diaphorase staining delineated the boundaries of the sub nuclei in the ICo-GCt complex. Compared to non-handled, TI (but not handling) induced c-Fos-ir in NADPH-diaphorase-rich and -poor regions. After TI, the number of c-Fos-ir increased in the caudal and intermediate areas of the ICo (but not in the GCt), throughout the rostrocaudal axis of the dorsal stratum griseum periventriculare (SGPd) of the optic tectum and in the n. mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd), which is part of the ascending auditory pathway. These data suggest that inescapable threatening stimuli such as TI may recruit neurons in discrete areas of ICo-GCt complex, deep tectal layer and in ascending auditory circuits that may control the expression of defensive behaviors in pigeons. Additionally, data indicate that the contiguous deep tectal SCPd (but not GCt) in birds may be functionally comparable to the mammalian dorsal PAG.

  9. Culture.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lepsch, Lucilia B.; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Scavone, Critoforo

    2015-01-01

    To study cocaine's toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN) staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mechanism, confirmed by TUNEL assay. Therefore, the present paper shows that cocaine causes apoptotic cell death and inhibition of the neurite prolongation in striatal and mesencephalic cell culture. These data suggest that if similar neuronal damage could be produced in the developing human brain, it could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following prenatal exposure to cocaine. PMID:26295051

  11. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures.

    PubMed

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Critoforo

    2015-01-01

    To study cocaine's toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN) staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mechanism, confirmed by TUNEL assay. Therefore, the present paper shows that cocaine causes apoptotic cell death and inhibition of the neurite prolongation in striatal and mesencephalic cell culture. These data suggest that if similar neuronal damage could be produced in the developing human brain, it could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

  12. Role of the cyclooxygenase 2-thromboxane pathway in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced decrease in mesencephalic vein blood flow in the zebrafish embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Teraoka, Hiroki Kubota, Akira; Dong, Wu; Kawai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Koji; Mori, Chisato; Harada, Yoshiteru; Peterson, Richard E.; Hiraga, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we reported that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) evoked developmental toxicity required activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor type 2 (AHR2), using zebrafish embryos. However, the downstream molecular targets of AHR2 activation are largely unknown and are the focus of the present investigation. TCDD induces cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a rate-limiting enzyme for prostaglandin synthesis in certain cells. In the present study, we investigated the role of the COX2-thromboxane pathway in causing a specific endpoint of TCDD developmental toxicity in the zebrafish embryo, namely, a decrease in regional blood flow in the dorsal midbrain. It was found that the TCDD-induced reduction in mesencephalic vein blood flow was markedly inhibited by selective COX2 inhibitors, NS-398 and SC-236, and by a general COX inhibitor, indomethacin, but not by a selective COX1 inhibitor, SC-560. Gene knock-down of COX2 by two different types of morpholino antisense oligonucleotides, but not by their negative homologs, also protected the zebrafish embryos from mesencephalic vein circulation failure caused by TCDD. This inhibitory effect of TCDD on regional blood flow in the dorsal midbrain was also blocked by selective antagonists of the thromboxane receptor (TP). Treatment of control zebrafish embryos with a TP agonist also caused a reduction in mesencephalic vein blood flow and it too was blocked by a TP antagonist, without any effect on trunk circulation. Finally, gene knock-down of thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXS) with morpholinos but not by the morpholinos' negative homologs provided significant protection against TCDD-induced mesencephalic circulation failure. Taken together, these results point to a role of the prostanoid synthesis pathway via COX2-TBXS-TP in the local circulation failure induced by TCDD in the dorsal midbrain of the zebrafish embryo.

  13. Neuronal development in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus of the duck under normal and hypothyroid states: I. A light microscopic morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Y; Narayanan, C H

    1987-01-01

    Light microscopic morphometric procedures were used in order to examine the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) on the development of the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve in the duck. A single vascular injection of a 0.2% solution of PTU was administered at a dosage of 2 microliter/gm embryo weight on embryonic day nine (E9). Control embryos received a similar dose of Ringer's solution. The following parameters of cytodifferentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V were studied: somal area profiles, nuclear area, and nuclear cytoplasmic ratios. In addition, the frequency of beak clapping was recorded from E16. Significant differences were observed in somal area profiles in the experimental group at E16 and E18 and in nuclear area profiles from E16 through hatching. Beak activity in the experimental embryos was drastically reduced. It is concluded that PTU induces a retardation in the differentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V which may lead to behavior deficits as evidenced by reduction of beak activity. These observations provide a basis for the study of interactions between thyroid hormone and specific neuronal systems in the emergence of an adaptive function.

  14. Caffeine and CSC, adenosine A2A antagonists, offer neuroprotection against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in rat mesencephalic cells.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Hélio Vitoriano; Cunha, Geanne Matos de Andrade; de Vasconcelos, Lissiana Magna; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Oliveira Neto, Raimundo Nogueira; Maia, Flávio Damasceno; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Leal, L Kalyne A Moreira; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the cytoprotective effects of caffeine (CAF) and 8-(3-chlorostyryl)-caffeine (CSC), A(2A) receptor antagonists, were tested against 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity, in rat mesencephalic cells. Both drugs significantly increased the number of viable cells, after their exposure to 6-OHDA, as measured by the MTT assay. While nitrite levels in the cells were drastically increased by 6-OHDA, their concentrations were brought toward normality after CAF or CSC, indicating that both drugs block 6-OHDA-induced oxidative stress which leads to free radicals generation. A complete blockade of 6-OHDA-induced lipid peroxidation, considered as a major source of DNA damage, was observed after cells treatment with CAF or CSC. 6-OHDA decreased the number of normal cells while increasing the number of apoptotic cells. In the CAF plus 6-OHDA group, a significant recover in the number of viable cells and a decrease in the number of apoptotic cells were seen, as compared to the group treated with 6-OHDA alone. A similar effect was observed after cells exposure to CSC in the presence of 6-OHDA. Unexpectedly, while a significant lower number of activated microglia was observed after cells exposure to CAF plus 6-OHDA, this was not the case after cells exposure to CSC under the same conditions. While CAF lowered the percentage of reactive astrocytes increased by 6-OHDA, CSC presented no effect. The effects of these drugs were also examined on the releases of myeloperoxidase (MPO), an inflammatory marker, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a marker for cytotoxicity, in human neutrophils, in vitro. CSC and CAF (0.1, 1 and 10 microg/ml) produced inhibitions of the MPO release from PMA-stimulated cells, ranging from 45 to 83%. In addition, CSC and CAF (5, 50 and 100 microg/ml) did not show any cytotoxicity in the range of concentrations used, as determined by the LDH assay. All together, our results showed a strong neuroptrotection afforded by caffeine or CSC, on rat mesencephalic

  15. Calcium regulation in mouse mesencephalic neurons-Differential roles of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Chun; Kao, Lung-Sen

    2016-06-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons are the key to finely tune the voluntary movement, habit and motivation. The progressive and selective degeneration of these neurons is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The susceptibility of DA neurons in the SNpc may result from differences in how Ca(2+) is handled. However, very little information is available about the mechanisms involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in DA neurons. In this study, the relative contributions of various Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers and their interplay with internal Ca(2+) stores, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the mitochondria, in the regulation of the [Ca(2+)]i of mouse mesencephalic neurons were characterized. Both the K(+)-dependent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCKX) and the K(+)-independent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) can be detected and are functional in DA and non-DA neurons. NCX accounts for the larger component of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange activity. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis showed each individual neuron expressed a distinct set of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers. Furthermore, the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers play prominent roles in removing [Ca(2+)]i induced by glutamate but not [Ca(2+)]i induced by depolarization. The mitochondria serve as a major Ca(2+) sink and are functionally located close to NCX. In contrast, the ER is functionally located close to NCKX and acts primarily as a Ca(2+) source with marginal effects. This study reveals that the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers, the ER and the mitochondria, which cooperate interactively, act similarly when regulating [Ca(2+)]i in mesencephalic DA and non-DA neurons. The heterogeneous expression of multiple types of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers and the quantitative differences found in [Ca(2+)]i regulation, together with other risk factors specific to DA neurons such as dopamine oxidation resulting in oxidative stress, may drive these cells to undergo selective degeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  16. Curcumin enhances paraquat-induced apoptosis of N27 mesencephalic cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Ortiz, Miguel A; Morán, José M; Bravosanpedro, Jose M; González-Polo, Rosa A; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Soler, Germán; Fuentes, José M

    2009-11-01

    Curcumin, the active compound of the rhizome of Curcuma longa has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. This agent has been shown to regulate numerous transcription factors, cytokines, protein kinases, adhesion molecules, redox status and enzymes that have been linked to inflammation. While curcumin has been identified as an activator of apoptosis in several cell lines, the mechanism by which it initiates apoptosis, however, remains poorly understood. We considered curcumin from the point of view of its ability to protect against oxidative stress, the latter being one factor strongly implicated in the development of Parkinson's disease. Although the etiology of Parkinson's disease remains unknown, epidemiological studies have linked exposure to pesticides such paraquat to an increased risk of developing the condition. Analysis of the neurotoxic properties of these pesticide compounds has been focused on their ability to induce oxidative stress in neural cells. Given curcumin's capacity to protect against oxidative stress, it has been considered as a potential therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease that involve an oxidative stress component. In the present report we describe the effect of curcumin in paraquat-mediated apoptosis of N27 mesencepahlic cells. We show that subtoxic concentrations of curcumin sensitize N27 mesencephalic cells to paraquat-mediated apoptosis.

  17. Fine structure and synaptic organization of the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus of the cat: a quantitative electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, N

    1996-01-01

    The ultrastructure and synaptic organization of the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (MTN) were studied in adult cats by transmission electron microscopy and more precisely quantified with an automated image analysis system. Two subpopulations of MTN neurons were identified within the nucleus: large spherical or ovoid (pseudo)unipolar cells amounted to about 60% of the total population that resemble typical primary sensory neurons and small multipolar neurons (estimated 40%), some of which are possibly interneurons. By electron microscopy, most neurons in the MTN proved to have a rich cytoplasm in the perikaryon with abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, a large number of free ribosomes and polysomes, also well-developed Golgi complex, and numerous mitochondria and neurofilaments indicating a high rate of protein synthesis and axonal transport in these cells. Three types of synaptic contacts were observed in the MTN: axodendritic, axosomatic and axospinic of both symmetric and asymmetric morphology. Most of them (almost 90%) were axodendritic and axodendritic spine. Approximately 70% of axon terminals contained small round vesicles (S-type boutons) whereas the other 30% belonged to the P-type boutons filled with a pleomorphic vesicle population. Axosomatic synapses were comparatively rare accounting for 10% of the total. About two-third of them were of S-type and almost 25% of the remaining third were F-type in which flat synaptic vesicles could be seen, and less than 10% were P- and G-types with granular vesicles.

  18. Identification of Mesencephalic Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophic Factor as a Novel Neuroprotective Factor for Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng-Juan; Wu, Ji-Hong; Li, Ting-Ting; Du, Shan-Shan; Wu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), a newly discovered secreted neurotrophic factor, has been proven to not only protect dopaminergic neurons and other cell types but also regulate neuroinflammation and the immune response to promote tissue repair and regeneration. However, to date, there is no information regarding the relationship between MANF and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the eye. In the current study, we first determined the expression of MANF in the retina and vitreous. Then, we examined the effect of MANF on RGCs using both in vivo and in vitro models and simultaneously explored the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms of MANF. Finally, we measured the concentrations of MANF in the vitreous of patients with different retinopathies. We demonstrated that MANF was highly expressed in RGCs and that exogenous MANF could protect RGCs from hypoxia-induced cell injury and apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo by preventing endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, MANF can be detected in the vitreous humor, and the concentration changed under pathological conditions. Our results provide important evidence that MANF may be a potential therapeutic protein for a range of retinal pathologies in either the preclinical stage or after diagnosis to promote the survival of RGCs. Vitreous MANF may be a promising protein biomarker for the indirect assessment of retinal disorders, which could provide indirect evidence of retinal pathology. PMID:28367115

  19. Anatomical Location of the Mesencephalic Locomotor Region and Its Possible Role in Locomotion, Posture, Cataplexy, and Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, David; Fuller, Patrick M.; Marcus, Jacob; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Ping; Chamberlin, Nancy L.; Saper, Clifford B.; Lu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mesencephalic (or midbrain) locomotor region (MLR) was first described in 1966 by Shik and colleagues, who demonstrated that electrical stimulation of this region induced locomotion in decerebrate (intercollicular transection) cats. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons and midbrain extrapyramidal area (MEA) have been suggested to form the neuroanatomical basis for the MLR, but direct evidence for the role of these structures in locomotor behavior has been lacking. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the MLR is composed of non-cholinergic spinally projecting cells in the lateral pontine tegmentum. Our results showed that putative MLR neurons medial to the PPT and MEA in rats were non-cholinergic, glutamatergic, and express the orexin (hypocretin) type 2 receptors. Fos mapping correlated with motor behaviors revealed that the dorsal and ventral MLR are activated, respectively, in association with locomotion and an erect posture. Consistent with these findings, chemical stimulation of the dorsal MLR produced locomotion, whereas stimulation of the ventral MLR caused standing. Lesions of the MLR (dorsal and ventral regions together) resulted in cataplexy and episodic immobility of gait. Finally, trans-neuronal tracing with pseudorabies virus demonstrated disynaptic input to the MLR from the substantia nigra via the MEA. These findings offer a new perspective on the neuroanatomic basis of the MLR, and suggest that MLR dysfunction may contribute to the postural and gait abnormalities in Parkinsonism. PMID:26157418

  20. Projections of the optic tectum and the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve in the tegu lizard (Tupinambis nigropunctatus).

    PubMed

    Ebbesson, S O

    1981-01-01

    Fibers undergoing Wallerian degeneration following tectal lesions were demonstrated with the Nauta and Fink-Heimer methods and traced to their termination. Four of the five distinct fiber paths originating in the optic tectum appear related to vision, while one is related to the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminus. The latter component of the tectal efferents distributes fibers to 1) the main sensory nucleus of the trigeminus, 2) the motor nucleus of the trigeminus, 3) the nucleus of tractus solitarius, and 4) the intermediate gray of the cervical spinal cord. The principal ascending bundle projects to the nucleus rotundus, three components of the ventral geniculate nucleus and the nucleus ventromedialis anterior ipsilaterally, before it crosses in the supraoptic commissure and terminates in the contralateral nucleus rotundus, ventral geniculate nucleus and a hitherto unnamed region dorsal to the nucleus of the posterior accessory optic tract. Fibers leaving the tectum dorso-medially terminate in the posterodorsal nucleus ipsilaterally and the stratum griseum periventriculare of the contralateral tectum. The descending fiber paths terminate in medial reticular cell groups and the rostral spinal cord contralaterally and in the torus and the lateral reticular regions ipsilaterally. The ipsilateral fascicle also issues fibers to the magnocellular nucleus isthmi.

  1. Morphometric analysis of subcortical structures in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: in vivo evidence of neostriatal and mesencephalic atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Looi, Jeffrey Chee Leong; Macfarlane, Matthew D.; Walterfang, Mark; Styner, Martin; Velakoulis, Dennis; Lätt, Jimmy; van Westen, Danielle; Nilsson, Christer

    2011-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by gait and postural disturbance, gaze palsy, apathy, decreased verbal fluency and dysexecutive symptoms, with some of these clinical features potentially having origins in degeneration of frontostriatal circuits and the mesencephalon. This hypothesis was investigated by manual segmentation of the caudate and putamen on MRI scans, using previously published protocols, in 15 subjects with PSP and 15 healthy age-matched controls. Midbrain atrophy was assessed by measurement of mid-sagittal area of the midbrain and pons. Shape analysis of the caudate and putamen was performed using spherical harmonics (SPHARM-PDM, University of North Carolina). The sagittal pons area/midbrain area ratio (P/M ratio) was significantly higher in the PSP group, consistent with previous findings. Significantly smaller striatal volumes were found in the PSP group – putamina were 10% smaller and caudate volumes were 17% smaller than in controls after controlling for age and intracranial volume. Shape analysis revealed significant shape deflation in PSP in the striatum, compared to controls; with regionally significant change relevant to frontostriatal and corticostriatal circuits in the caudate. Thus, in a clinically diagnosed and biomarker-confirmed cohort with early PSP, we demonstrate that neostriatal volume and shape are significantly reduced in vivo. The findings suggest a neostriatal and mesencephalic structural basis for the clinical features of PSP leading to frontostriatal and mesocortical-striatal circuit disruption. PMID:21899988

  2. Structural plasticity in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons produced by drugs of abuse: critical role of BDNF and dopamine.

    PubMed

    Collo, Ginetta; Cavalleri, Laura; Spano, PierFranco

    2014-01-01

    Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons were suggested to be a critical physiopathology substrate for addiction disorders. Among neuroadaptive processes to addictive drugs, structural plasticity has attracted attention. While structural plasticity occurs at both pre- and post-synaptic levels in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, the present review focuses only on dopaminergic neurons. Exposures to addictive drugs determine two opposite structural responses, hypothrophic plasticity produced by opioids and cannabinoids (in particular during the early withdrawal phase) and hypertrophic plasticity, mostly driven by psychostimulants and nicotine. In vitro and in vivo studies identified BDNF and extracellular dopamine as two critical factors in determining structural plasticity, the two molecules sharing similar intracellular pathways involved in cell soma and dendrite growth, the MEK-ERK1/2 and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR, via preferential activation of TrkB and dopamine D3 receptors, respectively. At present information regarding specific structural changes associated to the various stages of the addiction cycle is incomplete. Encouraging neuroimaging data in humans indirectly support the preclinical evidence of hypotrophic and hypertrophic effects, suggesting a possible differential engagement of dopamine neurons in parallel and partially converging circuits controlling motivation, stress, and emotions.

  3. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the…

  4. Ventromedial mesencephalic tegmental (VMT) projections to ten functionally different cortical areas in the cat: topography and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Scheibner, T; Törk, I

    1987-05-08

    The cortical projections of the ventromedial mesencephalic tegmentum (VMT) were studied in the cat by the retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated HRP (WGA-HRP). The following cortical regions were injected: prefrontal, cingulate, motor, somatic sensory, auditory, primary visual, secondary visual, parasplenial, insular, and entorhinal. Labelled cells in the five component nuclei of the VMT (rostral linear, parabrachial pigmented, central linear, interfascicular, and paranigral nuclei) were counted and the numbers correlated with the total cell populations of the nuclei. In all experiments large numbers of cells were labelled in the VMT, particularly in the rostral linear and parabrachial pigmented nuclei. Following entorhinal cortical injections, significant labelling occurred in the interfascicular and central linear nucleus, although some cells of these nuclei were labelled in every experiment. The cells of the paranigral nucleus remained unlabelled in all experiments. Several hundred VMT cells were labelled in most experiments, over 1000 in the case of the parasplenial and over 2000 in the case of prefrontal injections. The most strongly labelled nucleus was the rostral linear, in which up to 36% of the total cell population could be labelled in a single experiment. These results indicate that the VMT of the cat is a major source of brainstem projections to the cerebral cortex and that all cortical areas are reached by this system. Although the projections to the prefrontal and limbic cortical areas are particularly prominent, there appears to be a consistent and significant projection to all areas. Further, the projection of the VMT to the cortex is topographically organized, indicating that the functional roles of the component nuclei of the VMT may be substantially different.

  5. The mesencephalic trigeminal sensory nucleus is involved in the control of feeding and exploratory behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Toshiaki; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Itou, Takuya; Kitamura, Nobuo; Nishimura, Masakazu

    2005-06-28

    The mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5), which receives input from oral proprioceptors and projects to higher brain regions, is involved in mastication-induced modulation of satiation. To investigate how the Me5 is involved in the control of feeding and exploratory behavior, we examined the effect of bilateral electrolytic lesions of the Me5 on feeding and exploratory behavior in mice. Mouse feeding and exploratory behaviors were analyzed using a food-search-compulsion-apparatus (FSCA), which was designed to distinguish between the two behaviors under standard living conditions. To assess anxiety in mice in an unfamiliar environment, exploratory activity was analyzed in an automated hole-board apparatus. Mice with bilateral Me5 lesions had unique feeding and exploratory behavior profiles in the FSCA compared with sham-operated mice. Me5-lesioned mice spent more time in the food chamber during each trial in the FSCA, but the number of entries into the food chamber was decreased by 40% compared to sham-operated mice. Moreover, Me5 lesions markedly inhibited exploratory behavior, manifested as low-frequency exploration. In spite of the low-frequency exploration in the FSCA, Me5 lesions had no effect on various exploratory activities analyzed in the hole-board apparatus, i.e., total locomotor activity, frequency and duration of rearing and head-dipping, and latency to the first head-dipping. These results suggest that the Me5 is involved in the control of feeding and exploratory behavior through its ascending neuronal pathways in mice without modulating the emotional state.

  6. Preclinical Analysis of Fetal Human Mesencephalic Neural Progenitor Cell Lines: Characterization and Safety In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jisook; Schwarz, Sigrid C; Lee, Hyun-Seob; Kang, Jun Mo; Lee, Young-Eun; Kim, Bona; Sung, Mi-Young; Höglinger, Günter; Wegner, Florian; Kim, Jin Su; Chung, Hyung-Min; Chang, Sung Woon; Cha, Kwang Yul; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Schwarz, Johannes

    2016-09-02

    : We have developed a good manufacturing practice for long-term cultivation of fetal human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells. The generation of human dopaminergic neurons may serve as a tool of either restorative cell therapies or cellular models, particularly as a reference for phenotyping region-specific human neural stem cell lines such as human embryonic stem cells and human inducible pluripotent stem cells. We cultivated 3 different midbrain neural progenitor lines at 10, 12, and 14 weeks of gestation for more than a year and characterized them in great detail, as well as in comparison with Lund mesencephalic cells. The whole cultivation process of tissue preparation, cultivation, and cryopreservation was developed using strict serum-free conditions and standardized operating protocols under clean-room conditions. Long-term-cultivated midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells retained stemness, midbrain fate specificity, and floorplate markers. The potential to differentiate into authentic A9-specific dopaminergic neurons was markedly elevated after prolonged expansion, resulting in large quantities of functional dopaminergic neurons without genetic modification. In restorative cell therapeutic approaches, midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells reversed impaired motor function in rodents, survived well, and did not exhibit tumor formation in immunodeficient nude mice in the short or long term (8 and 30 weeks, respectively). We conclude that midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells are a promising source for human dopaminergic neurons and suitable for long-term expansion under good manufacturing practice, thus opening the avenue for restorative clinical applications or robust cellular models such as high-content or high-throughput screening.

  7. Participation of Kv1 Channels in Control of Membrane Excitability and Burst Generation in Mesencephalic V Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chie-Fang; Kaur, Gurvinder; Vong, Angela; Bawa, Harpreet; Chandler, Scott H.

    2009-01-01

    The function and biophysical properties of low threshold Kv1 current in control of membrane resonance, subthreshold oscillations, and bursting in mesencephalic V neurons (Mes V) were examined in rat brain stem slices (P8–P12) using whole cell current and voltage patch-clamp methods. α-dendrotoxin application, a toxin with high specificity for Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.6 channels, showed the presence of a low-threshold K+ current that activated rapidly around −50 mV and was relatively noninactivating over a 1-s period and had a V1/2max of −36.2 mV. Other toxins, specific for individual channels containing either Kv 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 α-subunits, were applied individually, or in combination, and showed that Kv1 channels are heteromeric, composed of combinations of subunits. In current-clamp mode, toxin application transformed the high-frequency resonant properties of the membrane into a low-pass filter and concomitantly reduced the frequency of the subthreshold membrane oscillations. During this period, rhythmical bursting was transformed into low-frequency tonic discharge. Interestingly, in a subset of neurons that did not show bursting, low doses of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX) sufficient to block 50% of the low threshold Kv1 channels induced bursting and increased the resonant peak impedance and subthreshold oscillations, which was replicated with computer simulation. This suggests that a critical balance between inward and outward currents is necessary for bursting. This was replicated with computer simulation. Single cell RT-PCR and immunohistochemical methods confirmed the presence of Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.6 α-subunits in Mes V neurons. These data indicate that low threshold Kv1 channels are responsible for membrane resonance, contribute to subthreshold oscillations, and are critical for burst generation. PMID:19144742

  8. Preclinical Analysis of Fetal Human Mesencephalic Neural Progenitor Cell Lines: Characterization and Safety In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jisook; Schwarz, Sigrid C; Lee, Hyun-Seob; Kang, Jun Mo; Lee, Young-Eun; Kim, Bona; Sung, Mi-Young; Höglinger, Günter; Wegner, Florian; Kim, Jin Su; Chung, Hyung-Min; Chang, Sung Woon; Cha, Kwang Yul; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Schwarz, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a good manufacturing practice for long-term cultivation of fetal human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells. The generation of human dopaminergic neurons may serve as a tool of either restorative cell therapies or cellular models, particularly as a reference for phenotyping region-specific human neural stem cell lines such as human embryonic stem cells and human inducible pluripotent stem cells. We cultivated 3 different midbrain neural progenitor lines at 10, 12, and 14 weeks of gestation for more than a year and characterized them in great detail, as well as in comparison with Lund mesencephalic cells. The whole cultivation process of tissue preparation, cultivation, and cryopreservation was developed using strict serum-free conditions and standardized operating protocols under clean-room conditions. Long-term-cultivated midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells retained stemness, midbrain fate specificity, and floorplate markers. The potential to differentiate into authentic A9-specific dopaminergic neurons was markedly elevated after prolonged expansion, resulting in large quantities of functional dopaminergic neurons without genetic modification. In restorative cell therapeutic approaches, midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells reversed impaired motor function in rodents, survived well, and did not exhibit tumor formation in immunodeficient nude mice in the short or long term (8 and 30 weeks, respectively). We conclude that midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells are a promising source for human dopaminergic neurons and suitable for long-term expansion under good manufacturing practice, thus opening the avenue for restorative clinical applications or robust cellular models such as high-content or high-throughput screening. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:576-588.

  9. Long-term protective effects of AAV9-mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fei; Yang, Chun; Chen, Sha-Sha; Wang, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Wei; Hao, Qiang; Lu, Tao; Hoffer, Barry; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming; Xu, Qun-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Intrastriatal injection of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) protein has been shown to provide neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) - lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease. Here, we used an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vector to deliver the human MANF (hMANF) gene into the rat striatum 10days after a 6-OHDA lesion to examine long-term effects of hMANF on nigral dopaminergic neurons and mechanisms underlying MANF neuroprotection. Intrastriatal injection of AAV9-hMANF vectors led to a robust and widespread expression of the hMANF gene in the injected striatum up to 24weeks. Increased levels of hMANF protein were also detected in the ipsilateral substantia nigra. The hMANF gene transfer promoted the survival of nigral dopaminergic neurons, regeneration of striatal dopaminergic fibers and an upregulation of striatal dopamine levels, resulting in a long-term improvement of rotational behavior up to 16weeks after viral injections. By using SH-SY5Y cells, we found that intra- and extracellular application of MANF protected cells against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity via inhibiting the endoplasmic reticulum stress and activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results suggest that AAV9-mediated hMANF gene delivery into the striatum exerts long-term neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in parkinsonian rats, and provide insights into mechanisms responsible for MANF neuroprotection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A central mesencephalic reticular formation projection to medial rectus motoneurons supplying singly and multiply innervated extraocular muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Martin O; Warren, Susan; May, Paul J

    2017-06-01

    We recently demonstrated a bilateral projection to the supraoculomotor area from the central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF), a region implicated in horizontal gaze changes. C-group motoneurons, which supply multiply innervated fibers in the medial rectus muscle, are located within the primate supraoculomotor area, but their inputs and function are poorly understood. Here, we tested whether C-group motoneurons in Macaca fascicularis monkeys receive a direct cMRF input by injecting this portion of the reticular formation with anterograde tracers in combination with injection of retrograde tracer into the medial rectus muscle. The results indicate that the cMRF provides a dense, bilateral projection to the region of the medial rectus C-group motoneurons. Numerous close associations between labeled terminals and each multiply innervated fiber motoneuron were present. Within the oculomotor nucleus, a much sparser ipsilateral projection onto some of the A- and B- group medial rectus motoneurons that supply singly innervated fibers was observed. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated a direct synaptic linkage between anterogradely labeled reticular terminals and retrogradely labeled medial rectus motoneurons in all three groups. These findings reinforce the notion that the cMRF is a critical hub for oculomotility by proving that it contains premotor neurons supplying horizontal extraocular muscle motoneurons. The differences between the cMRF input patterns for C-group versus A- and B-group motoneurons suggest the C-group motoneurons serve a different oculomotor role than the others. The similar patterns of cMRF input to C-group motoneurons and preganglionic Edinger-Westphal motoneurons suggest that medial rectus C-group motoneurons may play a role in accommodation-related vergence. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Monoamine Release in the Cat Lumbar Spinal Cord during Fictive Locomotion Evoked by the Mesencephalic Locomotor Region.

    PubMed

    Noga, Brian R; Turkson, Riza P; Xie, Songtao; Taberner, Annette; Pinzon, Alberto; Hentall, Ian D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord neurons active during locomotion are innervated by descending axons that release the monoamines serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) and these neurons express monoaminergic receptor subtypes implicated in the control of locomotion. The timing, level and spinal locations of release of these two substances during centrally-generated locomotor activity should therefore be critical to this control. These variables were measured in real time by fast-cyclic voltammetry in the decerebrate cat's lumbar spinal cord during fictive locomotion, which was evoked by electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) and registered as integrated activity in bilateral peripheral nerves to hindlimb muscles. Monoamine release was observed in dorsal horn (DH), intermediate zone/ventral horn (IZ/VH) and adjacent white matter (WM) during evoked locomotion. Extracellular peak levels (all sites) increased above baseline by 138 ± 232.5 nM and 35.6 ± 94.4 nM (mean ± SD) for NE and 5-HT, respectively. For both substances, release usually began prior to the onset of locomotion typically earliest in the IZ/VH and peaks were positively correlated with net activity in peripheral nerves. Monoamine levels gradually returned to baseline levels or below at the end of stimulation in most trials. Monoamine oxidase and uptake inhibitors increased the release magnitude, time-to-peak (TTP) and decline-to-baseline. These results demonstrate that spinal monoamine release is modulated on a timescale of seconds, in tandem with centrally-generated locomotion and indicate that MLR-evoked locomotor activity involves concurrent activation of descending monoaminergic and reticulospinal pathways. These gradual changes in space and time of monoamine concentrations high enough to strongly activate various receptors subtypes on locomotor activated neurons further suggest that during MLR-evoked locomotion, monoamine action is, in part, mediated by extrasynaptic neurotransmission in

  12. Anatomical evidence that the superior colliculus controls saccades through central mesencephalic reticular formation gating of omnipause neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Niping; Perkins, Eddie; Zhou, Lan; Warren, Susan; May, Paul J

    2013-10-09

    Omnipause neurons (OPNs) within the nucleus raphe interpositus (RIP) help gate the transition between fixation and saccadic eye movements by monosynaptically suppressing activity in premotor burst neurons during fixation, and releasing them during saccades. Premotor neuron activity is initiated by excitatory input from the superior colliculus (SC), but how the tectum's saccade-related activity turns off OPNs is not known. Since the central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF) is a major SC target, we explored whether this nucleus has the appropriate connections to support tectal gating of OPN activity. In dual-tracer experiments undertaken in macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), cMRF neurons labeled retrogradely from injections into RIP had numerous anterogradely labeled terminals closely associated with them following SC injections. This suggested the presence of an SC-cMRF-RIP pathway. Furthermore, anterograde tracers injected into the cMRF of other macaques labeled axonal terminals in RIP, confirming this cMRF projection. To determine whether the cMRF projections gate OPN activity, postembedding electron microscopic immunochemistry was performed on anterogradely labeled cMRF terminals with antibody to GABA or glycine. Of the terminals analyzed, 51.4% were GABA positive, 35.5% were GABA negative, and most contacted glycinergic cells. In summary, a trans-cMRF pathway connecting the SC to the RIP is present. This pathway contains inhibitory elements that could help gate omnipause activity and allow other tectal drives to induce the bursts of firing in premotor neurons that are necessary for saccades. The non-GABAergic cMRF terminals may derive from fixation units in the cMRF.

  13. Extended Anatomical Grading in Diffuse Axonal Injury Using MRI: Hemorrhagic Lesions in the Substantia Nigra and Mesencephalic Tegmentum Indicate Poor Long-Term Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Marklund, Niklas; Lannsjö, Marianne; Howells, Tim; Raininko, Raili; Wikström, Johan; Enblad, Per

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years). PMID:27356857

  14. Cultural

    Treesearch

    Wilbur F. LaPage

    1971-01-01

    A critical look at outdoor recreation research and some underlying premises. The author focuses on the concept of culture as communication and how it influences our perception of problems and our search for solutions. Both outdoor recreation and science are viewed as subcultures that have their own bodies of mythology, making recreation problems more difficult to...

  15. Role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 CYP1C genes in the reduced mesencephalic vein blood flow caused by activation of AHR2

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Stegeman, John J.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Harano, Ryo; Peterson, Richard E.; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki

    2011-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes various signs of toxicity in early life stages of vertebrates through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We previously reported a sensitive and useful endpoint of TCDD developmental toxicity in zebrafish, namely a decrease in blood flow in the dorsal midbrain, but downstream genes involved in the effect are not known. The present study addressed the role of zebrafish cytochrome P450 1C (CYP1C) genes in association with a decrease in mesencephalic vein (MsV) blood flow. The CYP1C subfamily was recently discovered in fish and includes the paralogues CYP1C1 and CYP1C2, both of which are induced via AHR2 in zebrafish embryos. We used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO or morpholino) to block initiation of translation of the target genes. TCDD-induced mRNA expression of CYP1Cs and a decrease in MsV blood flow were both blocked by gene knockdown of AHR2. Gene knockdown of CYP1C1 by two different morpholinos and CYP1C2 by two different morpholinos, but not by their 5 nucleotide-mismatch controls, was effective in blocking reduced MsV blood flow caused by TCDD. The same CYP1C-MOs prevented reduction of blood flow in the MsV caused by {beta}-naphthoflavone (BNF), representing another class of AHR agonists. Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA expression of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 was induced by TCDD most strongly in branchiogenic primordia and pectoral fin buds. In situ hybridization using head transverse sections showed that TCDD increased the expression of both CYP1Cs in endothelial cells of blood vessels, including the MsV. These results indicate a potential role of CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in the local circulation failure induced by AHR2 activation in the dorsal midbrain of the zebrafish embryo. - Research Highlights: > We examine the roles of zebrafish CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 in TCDD developmental toxicity. > TCDD induces mRNA expression of both CYP1Cs in the mesencephalic vein. > Knockdown of each

  16. Developmental anomalies of the lower face and the hyoid cartilage due to partial elimination of the posterior mesencephalic and anterior rhombencephalic neural crest in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Been, W; Lieuw Kie Song, S H; van Limborgh, J

    1984-12-01

    In an effort to verify the supposition that a normal development of the lower face and the hyoid apparatus is dependent on the availability of a sufficient number of cells derived from the posterior mesencephalic and anterior rhombencephalic parts of the neural crest, in a total of 52 six-somite stage chick embryos (about 26 hours of incubation) these parts of the neural crest were partially eliminated by tangential micro-laser irradiation. Among the 17 irradiated embryos sacrificed after 24 hours, several ones showed an underdevelopment of the mesenchyme in the ventral part of the first branchial arch; in 2 of these cases, additionally the second branchial arch was underdeveloped. At the age of 7-8 days, 4 out of 15 surviving embryos showed an underdevelopment of the lower beak and a reduction in size of Meckel's cartilage; in 3 of these cases, in addition, a median cleft in the lower beak and/or reduction or absence of the hyoid cartilage were observed. From these observations the conclusion is drawn that for a normal development and growth of the mandibular part of the face and the hyoid cartilage sufficient numbers of posterior mesencephalic and anterior rhombencephalic neural crest cells are indispensable, indeed.

  17. [Case of unilateral thalamo-mesencephalic infarction with enlargement to bilateral vertical gaze palsy due to vertical one-and-a-half syndrome].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Odaka, Masaaki; Tatsumoto, Muneto; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Hirata, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    An 88-year-old female with atrial fibrillation and hypertension, was admitted to our hospital with sudden onset diplopia and somnolence. She had right hemiparesis with bilateral positive Babinski's sign. Additionally, there was bilateral blepharoptosis with right esotropia. With regard to extraocular movement, the patient demonstrated conjugate upgaze palsy and left monocular down gaze palsy (vertical one-and-a-half syndrome: VOHS). Horizontal gaze in the left eye was completely impaired and there was limited abduction of the right eye. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed left thalamo-mesencephalic infarction. On day 4, the vertical eye movement developed into conjugate upgaze and down- gaze palsies. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated high signal lesion extending into the dorsal portion of the midbrain. It was suggested that the pathway to contralateral downgaze neurons could have been damaged due to the unilateral (left) dosal midbrain lesion before its decussation with the unilateral interstitial nucleus of Cajal, the oculomotor nucleus and the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. This case is considered to be important because there has been no previous report of bilateral vertical gaze palsy due to VOHS in the same patient. Since there are various patterns of ocular movement disorder in the thalamo-mesencephalic portion, careful observations are required to localize the lesions.

  18. Comparison between Brain Computed Tomography Scan and Transcranial Sonography to Evaluate Third Ventricle Width, Peri-Mesencephalic Cistern, and Sylvian Fissure in Traumatic Brain-Injured Patients.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Raphael A G; de Oliveira Lima, Marcelo; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; de Sá Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo; Teixeira, Manuel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCS) may help guide multimodal monitoring in the neurocritical setting. It may provide indirect information about intracranial hypertension, such as midline shift, third ventricle width, and peri-mesencephalic cistern obliteration. We aim to assess the agreement between brain computed tomography scan (CT scan) and TCCS in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. In this retrospective cross-sectional observational study, TCCS was performed within 6 h before a brain CT scan. Only the first CT and TCCS after ICU admission were included. The agreement between the CT scan and TCCS was assessed by Bland-Altman plots and evaluating the intraclass correlation coefficient. Overall, 15 consecutive patients were included (80% male, 42 ± 23 years of age, Glasgow Coma Score 5 [4,6]). The mean difference between the brain CT scan and TCCS in measuring the midline shift was 0.30 ± 2.1 mm (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.93; p < 0.01). An excellent correlation was also observed between the methods in assessing the third ventricle width (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.88; p < 0.01). Bland-Altman plots did not show any systematic bias in either agreement analysis. TCCS showed good accuracy in predicting non-compressed peri-mesencephalic cisterns (AUC: 0.83, 95% CI 0.46-1.0) and the presence of the Sylvian fissure (AUC: 0.91, 95% CI 0.73-1.0) on CT scan. TCCS is a promising tool and may be an alternative to CT scans for evaluating TBI patients.

  19. A Wnt1 regulated Frizzled-1/β-Catenin signaling pathway as a candidate regulatory circuit controlling mesencephalic dopaminergic neuron-astrocyte crosstalk: Therapeutical relevance for neuron survival and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dopamine-synthesizing (dopaminergic, DA) neurons in the ventral midbrain (VM) constitute a pivotal neuronal population controlling motor behaviors, cognitive and affective brain functions, which generation critically relies on the activation of Wingless-type MMTV integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin pathway in their progenitors. In Parkinson's disease, DA cell bodies within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) progressively degenerate, with causes and mechanisms poorly understood. Emerging evidence suggests that Wnt signaling via Frizzled (Fzd) receptors may play a role in different degenerative states, but little is known about Wnt signaling in the adult midbrain. Using in vitro and in vivo model systems of DA degeneration, along with functional studies in both intact and SN lesioned mice, we herein highlight an intrinsic Wnt1/Fzd-1/β-catenin tone critically contributing to the survival and protection of adult midbrain DA neurons. Results In vitro experiments identifie Fzd-1 receptor expression at a mRNA and protein levels in dopamine transporter (DAT) expressing neurons, and demonstrate the ability of exogenous Wnt1 to exert robust neuroprotective effects against Caspase-3 activation, the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) neurons and [3H] dopamine uptake induced by different DA-specific insults, including serum and growth factor deprivation, 6-hydroxydopamine and MPTP/MPP+. Co-culture of DA neurons with midbrain astrocytes phenocopies Wnt1 neuroprotective effects, whereas RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Wnt1 in midbrain astrocytes markedly reduces astrocyte-induced TH+ neuroprotection. Likewise, silencing β-catenin mRNA or knocking down Fzd-1 receptor expression in mesencephalic neurons counteract astrocyte-induced TH+ neuroprotection. In vivo experiments document Fzd-1 co-localization with TH+ neurons within the intact SNpc and blockade of Fzd/β-catenin signaling by unilateral infusion of a Fzd/β-catenin antagonist within the SN

  20. Distribution of calcium-binding proteins in the pigeon visual thalamic centers and related pretectal and mesencephalic nuclei. Phylogenetic and functional determinants.

    PubMed

    Belekhova, Margarita G; Chudinova, Tatiana V; Rio, Jean-Paul; Tostivint, Hérve; Vesselkin, Nikolai P; Kenigfest, Natalia B

    2016-01-15

    Multichannel processing of environmental information constitutes a fundamental basis of functioning of sensory systems in the vertebrate brain. Two distinct parallel visual systems - the tectofugal and thalamofugal exist in all amniotes. The vertebrate central nervous system contains high concentrations of intracellular calcium-binding proteins (CaBPrs) and each of them has a restricted expression pattern in different brain regions and specific neuronal subpopulations. This study aimed at describing the patterns of distribution of parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB) in the visual thalamic and mesencephalic centers of the pigeon (Columba livia). We used a combination of immunohistochemistry and double labeling immunofluorescent technique. Structures studied included the thalamic relay centers involved in the tectofugal (nucleus rotundus, Rot) and thalamofugal (nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars dorsalis, GLd) visual pathways as well as pretectal, mesencephalic, isthmic and thalamic structures inducing the driver and/or modulatory action to the visual processing. We showed that neither of these proteins was unique to the Rot or GLd. The Rot contained i) numerous PV-immunoreactive (ir) neurons and a dense neuropil, and ii) a few CB-ir neurons mostly located in the anterior dorsal part and associated with a light neuropil. These latter neurons partially overlapped with the former and some of them colocalized both proteins. The distinct subnuclei of the GLd were also characterized by different patterns of distribution of CaBPrs. Some (nucleus dorsolateralis anterior, pars magnocellularis, DLAmc; pars lateralis, DLL; pars rostrolateralis, DLAlr; nucleus lateralis anterior thalami, LA) contained both CB- and PV-ir neurons in different proportions with a predominance of the former in the DLAmc and DLL. The nucleus lateralis dorsalis of nuclei optici principalis thalami only contained PV-ir neurons and a neuropil similar to the interstitial pretectal/thalamic nuclei of the

  1. Temporal-spatial changes in Sonic Hedgehog expression and signaling reveal different potentials of ventral mesencephalic progenitors to populate distinct ventral midbrain nuclei

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ventral midbrain contains a diverse array of neurons, including dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) and neurons of the red nucleus (RN). Dopaminergic and RN neurons have been shown to arise from ventral mesencephalic precursors that express Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). However, Shh expression, which is initially confined to the mesencephalic ventral midline, expands laterally and is then downregulated in the ventral midline. In contrast, expression of the Hedgehog target gene Gli1 initiates in the ventral midline prior to Shh expression, but after the onset of Shh expression it is expressed in precursors lateral to Shh-positive cells. Given these dynamic gene expression patterns, Shh and Gli1 expression could delineate different progenitor populations at distinct embryonic time points. Results We employed genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to investigate whether precursors that express Shh (Shh-GIFM) or transduce Shh signaling (Gli1-GIFM) at different time points give rise to different ventral midbrain cell types. We find that precursors restricted to the ventral midline are labeled at embryonic day (E)7.5 with Gli1-GIFM, and with Shh-GIFM at E8.5. These precursors give rise to all subtypes of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and the anterior RN. A broader domain of progenitors that includes the ventral midline is marked with Gli1-GIFM at E8.5 and with Shh-GIFM at E9.5; these fate-mapped cells also contribute to all midbrain dopaminergic subtypes and to the entire RN. In contrast, a lateral progenitor domain that is labeled with Gli1-GIFM at E9.5 and with Shh-GIFM at E11.5 has a markedly reduced potential to give rise to the RN and to SN dopaminergic neurons, and preferentially gives rise to the ventral-medial VTA. In addition, cells derived from Shh- and Gli1-expressing progenitors located outside of the ventral midline give rise to astrocytes. Conclusions We define a ventral midbrain precursor map based on

  2. Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-stimulated mesencephalic astrocytes by interference with TLR4 and downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Song; Wang, Xu; He, Xingliang; Wang, Yue; Gao, Sujie; Ren, Lu; Shi, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Neuroinflammation is closely associated with the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidence indicates that astrocytes also play pro-inflammatory roles in the central nervous system (CNS) by activation with toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Therefore, targeting anti-inflammation may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for PD. Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound isolated from Curcuma longa root, has been commonly used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the details of how curcumin exerts neuroprotection remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the protective effect of curcumin on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-(MPP(+)-) stimulated primary astrocytes. Our results showed that MPP(+) stimulation resulted in significant production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL-6), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in primary mesencephalic astrocytes. Curcumin pretreatment decreased the levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines while increased IL-10 expression in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. In addition, curcumin increased the levels of antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and reduced ROS production. Our results further showed that curcumin decreased the levels of TLR4 and its downstream effectors including NF-κB, IRF3, MyD88, and TIRF that are induced by MPP(+) as well as inhibited the immunoreactivity of TLR4 and morphological activation in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. Together, data suggest that curcumin might exert a beneficial effect on neuroinflammation in the pathophysiology of PD.

  3. The mesencephalic trigeminal sensory nucleus is involved in acquisition of active exploratory behavior induced by changing from a diet of exclusively milk formula to food pellets in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Toshiaki; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kitamura, Nobuo; Muroi, Yoshikage; Nishimura, Masakazu

    2006-09-21

    Post-weaning mice fed exclusively milk display low-frequency exploratory behavior [Ishii, T., Itou, T., and Nishimura, M. (2005) Life Sci. 78, 174-179] compared to mice fed a food pellet diet. This low-frequency exploratory behavior switched to high-frequency exploration after a switch from exclusively milk formula to a food pellet diet. Acquisition of the high-frequency exploratory behavior was irreversible. Recently, we demonstrated that the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) is involved in the control of feeding and exploratory behavior in mice without modulating the emotional state [Ishii, T., Furuoka, H., Itou, T., Kitamura, N., and Nishimura, M. (2005) Brain Res. 1048, 80-86]. We therefore investigated whether the Me5 is involved in acquisition of high-frequency exploratory behavior induced by the switch in diet from an exclusively milk formula to food pellets. Mouse feeding and exploratory behaviors were analyzed using a food search compulsion apparatus, which was designed to distinguish between the two behaviors under standard living conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis of immediate early genes indicated that the Me5, which receives signals from oral proprioceptors, is transiently activated after the diet change. The change from low-frequency to high-frequency exploratory behavior was prevented in milk-fed mice by bilateral lesion of the Me5. These results suggest that the Me5 is activated by signals associated with mastication-induced proprioception and contributes to the acquisition of active exploratory behavior.

  4. A comparison of the postnatal development of muscle-spindle and periodontal-ligament neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Tetsuhiro; Yasuda, Kouichi; Ishihama, Kohji; Yamada, Hidefumi; Okayama, Masaki; Hasumi-Nakayama, Yoko; Furusawa, Kiyofumi

    2010-04-05

    The trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) is known to include primary afferent neurons of jaw muscle spindles (MS neurons) and periodontal ligament receptors (PL neurons). The aim of this study was to clarify the postnatal development of Vmes neurons by comparing MS neurons with PL neurons using horseradish peroxidase labeling. We measured somal diameter and somal shape of MS and PL neurons in rats from postnatal day (P)7 to P70. No significant changes were seen between postnatal day P7 and P70 in somal diameter or somal shape of MS neurons. Conversely, PL neurons showed a larger somal diameter at P7 than at P14, and in terms of somal profile, multipolar neurons comprised 0% at P7, but 4.8% at P14 and 16.9% at P70. These findings suggest that PL neurons develop with the eruption of teeth, taking into account the fact that tooth eruption occurs from around P14 in rats. Conversely, the lack of postnatal changes in MS neurons is due to the fact that these neurons have been active since the embryonic period, as swallowing starts in utero.

  5. ApoER2 and VLDLr Are Required for Mediating Reelin Signalling Pathway for Normal Migration and Positioning of Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf, Ahmed; Bock, Hans H.; Spittau, Björn; Bouché, Elisabeth; Krieglstein, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from the subventricular zone to their final positions in the substantia nigra compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA), and retrorubral field (RRF) is controlled by signalling from neurotrophic factors, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and extracellular matrix molecules (ECM). Reelin and the cytoplasmic adaptor protein Disabled-1 (Dab1) have been shown to play important roles in the migration and positioning of mDA neurons. Mice lacking Reelin and Dab1 both display phenotypes characterised by the failure of nigral mDA neurons to migrate properly. ApoER2 and VLDLr are receptors for Reelin signalling and are therefore part of the same signal transduction pathway as Dab1. Here we describe the roles of ApoER2 and VLDLr in the proper migration and positioning of mDA neurons in mice. Our results demonstrate that VLDLr- and ApoER2-mutant mice have both a reduction in and abnormal positioning of mDA neurons. This phenotype was more pronounced in VLDLr-mutant mice. Moreover, we provide evidence that ApoER2/VLDLr double-knockout mice show a phenotype comparable with the phenotypes observed for Reelin- and Dab1- mutant mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Reelin receptors ApoER2 and VLDLr play essential roles in Reelin-mediated migration and positioning of mDA neurons. PMID:23976984

  6. Inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters are utilized by the projection from the dorsal deep mesencephalic nucleus to the sublaterodorsal nucleus REM sleep induction zone

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chang-Lin; Nguyen, Tin Quang; Marks, Gerald A.

    2014-01-01

    The sublaterodorsal nucleus (SLD) in the pons of the rat is a locus supporting short-latency induction of a REM sleep-like state following local application of a GABAA receptor antagonist or kainate, glutamate receptor agonist. One putatively relevant source of these neurotransmitters is from the region of the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DpMe) just ventrolateral to the periaquiductal gray, termed the dorsal DpMe (dDpMe). Here, the amino acid neurotransmitter innervation of SLD from dDpMe was studied utilizing anterograde tract-tracing with biotinylated dextranamine (BDA) and fluorescence immunohistochemistry visualized with laser scanning confocal microscopy. Both markers for inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters were found in varicose axon fibers in SLD originating from dDpMe. Vesicular glutamate transporter2 (VGLUT2) represented the largest number of anterogradely labeled varicosities followed by vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT). Numerous VGAT and VGLUT2 labeled varicosities were observed apposed to dDpMe-labeled axon fibers indicating both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic, local modulation within the SLD. Some double-labeled BDA/VGAT varicosities were seen apposed to small somata labeled for glutamate consistent with being presynaptic to the phenotype of REM sleep-active SLD neurons. Results found support the current theoretical framework of the interaction of dDpMe and SLD in control of REM sleep, while also indicating operation of mechanisms with a greater level of complexity. PMID:24751569

  7. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus.

  8. γ-Aminobutyric acid-, glycine-, and glutamate-immunopositive boutons on mesencephalic trigeminal neurons that innervate jaw-closing muscle spindles in the rat: ultrastructure and development.

    PubMed

    Paik, Sang Kyoo; Kwak, Myung Kyw; Bae, Jin Young; Yi, Hyun Won; Yoshida, Atsushi; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Bae, Yong Chul

    2012-10-15

    Unlike other primary sensory neurons, the neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Vmes) receive most of their synaptic input onto their somata. Detailed description of the synaptic boutons onto Vmes neurons is crucial for understanding the synaptic input onto these neurons and their role in the motor control of masticatory muscles. For this, we investigated the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-, glycine-, and glutamate-immunopositive (+) boutons on Vmes neurons and their ultrastructural parameters that relate to transmitter release: Vmes neurons that innervate masseteric muscle spindles were identified by labeling with horseradish peroxidase injected into the muscle, and immunogold staining and quantitative ultrastructural analysis of synapses onto these neurons were performed in adult rats and during postnatal development. The bouton volume, mitochondrial volume, and active zone area of the boutons contacting labeled somata (axosomatic synapses) were similar to those of boutons forming axoaxonic synapses with Vmes neurons but smaller than those of boutons forming axodendritic or axosomatic synapses with most other neurons. GABA+ , glycine+ , and glutamate+ boutons constituted a large majority (83%) of all boutons on labeled somata. A considerable fraction of boutons (28%) was glycine(+) , and all glycine+ boutons were also GABA+ . Bouton size remained unchanged during postnatal development. These findings suggest that the excitability of Vmes neurons is determined to a great extent by GABA, glycine, and glutamate and that the relatively lower synaptic strength of axosomatic synapses may reflect the role of the Vmes neurons in modulating orofacial motor function.

  9. Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell damage and inflammation by suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Liu, Yi; Cheng, Lei; Liu, Ben; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-11-01

    Astrocyte inflammation plays important roles both in physiological and pathological processes in the central nervous system (CNS). Ischemic injury in the CNS causes damage to astrocytes and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6. This current study investigates whether mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) inhibits oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced cell damage and inflammatory cytokine secretion by suppressing endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat primary astrocytes. We found that MANF alleviated OGD-induced astrocyte damage and rescued the cell viability, and the upregulation of GRP78 (endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker) and NF-κB p65 (one of the central mediators of proinflammatory pathways) induced by OGD were significantly reduced by preincubation of MANF. In addition, the increases of secretion and mRNA expression levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in astrocytes induced by OGD were significantly suppressed by MANF. These findings demonstrate that MANF shows the potential to alleviate cell damage and inflammation in rat primary astrocytes by suppressing ER stress, indicating that MANF plays an important role in astrocyte inflammation and functioning and may suggest a promising strategy for neuroprotection in the CNS.

  10. Pancreatic β-cell protection from inflammatory stress by the endoplasmic reticulum proteins thrombospondin 1 and mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neutrotrophic factor (MANF).

    PubMed

    Cunha, Daniel A; Cito, Monia; Grieco, Fabio Arturo; Cosentino, Cristina; Danilova, Tatiana; Ladrière, Laurence; Lindahl, Maria; Domanskyi, Andrii; Bugliani, Marco; Marchetti, Piero; Eizirik, Décio L; Cnop, Miriam

    2017-09-08

    Cytokine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is one of the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic β-cell demise in type 1 diabetes. Thrombospondin 1 (THBS1) was recently shown to promote β-cell survival during lipotoxic stress. Here we show that ER-localized THBS1 is cytoprotective to rat, mouse, and human β-cells exposed to cytokines or thapsigargin-induced ER stress. THBS1 confers cytoprotection by maintaining expression of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neutrotrophic factor (MANF) in β-cells and thereby prevents the BH3-only protein BIM (BCL2-interacting mediator of cell death)-dependent triggering of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to cytokines or thapsigargin leads to THBS1 and MANF degradation and loss of this prosurvival mechanism. Approaches that sustain intracellular THBS1 and MANF expression in β-cells should be explored as a cytoprotective strategy in type 1 diabetes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Morphogenesis of the medaka cerebellum, with special reference to the mesencephalic sheet, a structure homologous to the rostrolateral part of mammalian anterior medullary velum.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yasuda, Takako; Yoshimoto, Masami; Ito, Hironobu

    2010-01-01

    We have examined cerebellar morphogenesis after neural tube stage in medaka (Oryzias latipes), a ray-finned fish, by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry using anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and anti-acetylated tubulin antibodies. Our results indicate that the medaka cerebellum is formed in 4 successive stages: (1) formation and enlargement of the cerebellar primordia; (2) rostral midline fusion of the left/right halves of the cerebellar primordia; (3) formation of the cerebellar matrix zones in the midline and caudalmost regions of the primitive cerebellum, and (4) growth and differentiation of the cerebellum. Our results also show that cerebellar morphogenesis is different from that in mammals in 3 important points: the developmental origins of the primordia, directions along which cerebellar fusion proceeds, and number, locations and duration of the cerebellar matrix zones. During the course of this study, an alar-derived membranous structure between the cerebellum and the midbrain in the adult medaka brain was identified as the structure homologous to the rostrolateral part of the mammalian anterior medullary velum. We have named this structure in the adult teleostean brains as the 'mesencephalic sheet'. The present study indicates that there exists both conserved and divergent patterns in cerebellar morphogenesis in vertebrates.

  12. Harsh Corporal Punishment Is Associated With Increased T2 Relaxation Time in Dopamine-Rich Regions

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Shin; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    Harsh corporal punishment (HCP) was defined as frequent parental administration of corporal punishment (CP) for discipline, with occasional use of objects such as straps, or paddles. CP is linked to increased risk for depression and substance abuse. We examine whether long-term exposure to HCP acts as sub-traumatic stressor that contributes to brain alterations, particularly in dopaminergic pathways, which may mediate their increased vulnerability to drug and alcohol abuse. Nineteen young adults who experienced early HCP but no other forms of maltreatment and twenty-three comparable controls were studied. T2 relaxation time (T2-RT) measurements were performed with an echo planar imaging TE stepping technique and T2 maps were calculated and analyzed voxel-by-voxel to locate regional T2-RT differences between groups. Previous studies indicated that T2-RT provides an indirect index of resting cerebral blood volume. Region of interest (ROI) analyses were also conducted in caudate, putamen, nucleus accumbens, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus, globus pallidus and cerebellar hemispheres. Voxel-based relaxometry showed that HCP was associated with increased T2-RT in right caudate and putamen. ROI analyses also revealed increased T2-RT in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, substantia nigra, thalamus and accumbens but not globus pallidus or cerebellum. There were significant associations between T2-RT measures in dopamine target regions and use of drugs and alcohol, and memory performance. Alteration in the paramagnetic or hemodynamic properties of dopaminergic cell body and projection regions were observed in subjects with HCP, and these findings may relate to their increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse. PMID:20600981

  13. Harsh corporal punishment is associated with increased T2 relaxation time in dopamine-rich regions.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Yi-Shin; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2010-11-01

    Harsh corporal punishment (HCP) was defined as frequent parental administration of corporal punishment (CP) for discipline, with occasional use of objects such as straps, or paddles. CP is linked to increased risk for depression and substance abuse. We examine whether long-term exposure to HCP acts as sub-traumatic stressor that contributes to brain alterations, particularly in dopaminergic pathways, which may mediate their increased vulnerability to drug and alcohol abuse. Nineteen young adults who experienced early HCP but no other forms of maltreatment and twenty-three comparable controls were studied. T2 relaxation time (T2-RT) measurements were performed with an echo planar imaging TE stepping technique and T2 maps were calculated and analyzed voxel-by-voxel to locate regional T2-RT differences between groups. Previous studies indicated that T2-RT provides an indirect index of resting cerebral blood volume. Region of interest (ROI) analyses were also conducted in caudate, putamen, nucleus accumbens, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus, globus pallidus and cerebellar hemispheres. Voxel-based relaxometry showed that HCP was associated with increased T2-RT in right caudate and putamen. ROI analyses also revealed increased T2-RT in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, substantia nigra, thalamus and accumbens but not globus pallidus or cerebellum. There were significant associations between T2-RT measures in dopamine target regions and use of drugs and alcohol, and memory performance. Alteration in the paramagnetic or hemodynamic properties of dopaminergic cell body and projection regions were observed in subjects with HCP, and these findings may relate to their increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse.

  14. Comparable Neuroprotective Effects of Pergolide and Pramipexole on Ferrous Sulfate-Induced Dopaminergic Cell Death in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Doreen; Radad, Khaled; Moldzio, Rudolf; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Reichmann, Heinz; Gille, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine agonists are utilized clinically as an initial treatment in younger Parkinson's disease patients to delay the side effects associated with commencement of levodopa medication. These agonists also serveas adjunctive therapeutics with levodopa to lower the incidence of adverse motor symptoms in advanced stages of the disease. To compare the neuroprotective effects of the dopamine agonists pergolide and pramipexole on ferrous sulfate-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons from primary mesencephalic cell culture. Pergolide (0.001-1 μM) and pramipexole (0.01-200 μM) were administered to 8 day primary murine mesencephalic cultures for 24 h. in the presence or absence of desferal, sulpiride or cycloheximide. Ferrous sulfate (450 μM) was then added for 24 hrs. Lactate dehydrogenase was assayed in the supernatant, glutathione concentrations measured in cell lysates and fixed cells were stained for tyrosine hydroxylase. Ferrous sulphate induced neurotoxity in cultures (p<0.0001) was abolished in the presence of the iron chelator desferal (p<0.008). Both pergolide (p<0.0001) and pramipexole (p<0.0001) significantly protected dopaminergic neurons against ferrous sulfate induced neurotoxicity and pramipexole helped preserve neurite morphology. Pramipexole treatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release (p<0.0001) as a measure of cellular injury. The dopamine receptor antagonist sulpiride (p<0.0001) and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (p<0.0001) reduced the neuroprotective effects of pergolide indicating the involvement receptor stimulation and de novo protein synthesis in pergolide-mediated neuroprotection. Pramipexole also significantly reversed the decrease in cellular glutathione concentrations induced by ferrous sulfate (p<0.001). Both pergolide and pramipexole protect dopaminergic neurons against the neurotoxicity of ferrous sulfate. Pergolide specifically protects dopaminergic neurons through activation of dopamine receptors

  15. Ganoderma Lucidum polysaccharides protect against MPP+ and rotenone-induced apoptosis in primary dopaminergic cell cultures through inhibiting oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Cui, Xiao-Lan; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the progressive neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD) which is responsible for disabling motor abnormalities in more than 6.5 million people worldwide. Polysaccharides are the main active constituents from Ganoderma lucidum which is characterized with anti-oxidant, antitumor and immunostimulant properties. In the present study, primary dopaminergic cell cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were used to investigate the neuroprotective effects and the potential mechanisms of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons induced by the neurotoxins methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+) and rotenone. Results revealed that GLP can protect dopamine neurons against MPP+ and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in primary mesencephalic cultures in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, either with or without neurotoxin treatment, GLP treatment elevated the survival of THir neurons, and increased the length of neurites of dopaminergic neurons. The Trolox equivalent anti-oxidant capacity (TEAC) of GLP was determined to be 199.53 μmol Trolox/g extract, and the decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity induced by MPP+ and rotenone was elevated by GLP treatment (100, 50, 25 and 12.5 μg/ml) in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, GLP dramatically decreased the relative number of apoptotic cells and increased the declining mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by MPP+ and rotenone in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GLP treatment reduced the ROS formation induced by MPP+ and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Our study indicates that GLP possesses neuroprotective properties against MPP+ and rotenone neurotoxicity through suppressing oxidative stress in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic cell culture owning to its antioxidant activities. PMID:27335703

  16. A targeted secretome profiling by multiplexed immunoassay revealed that secreted chemokine ligand 2 (MCP-1/CCL2) affects neural differentiation in mesencephalic neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Cicatiello, Anna Emilia; Reccia, Mafalda Giovanna; Volpicelli, Floriana; Severino, Valeria; Russo, Rosita; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Doti, Nunzianna; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Formisano, Pietro; Chambery, Angela

    2015-02-01

    Chemokines and cytokines, primarily known for their roles in the immune and inflammatory response, have also been identified as key components of the neurogenic niche where they are involved in the modulation of neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, a complete understanding of the functional role played in neural differentiation and a comprehensive profiling of these secreted molecules are lacking. By exploiting the multiplexing capability of magnetic bead-based immunoassays, we have investigated the changes of the expression levels of a set of chemokines and cytokines released from the pluripotent neural cell line mes-c-myc A1 following its differentiation from a proliferating phenotype (A1P) toward a neural (A1D) phenotype. We found a subset of molecules exclusively released from A1P, whereas others were differentially detected in A1P and A1D conditioned media. Among them, we identified monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/chemokine ligand 2 (MCP-1/CCL2) as a proneurogenic factor able to affect neuronal differentiation of A1 cells as well as of neuroblasts from primary cultures and to induce the elongation and/or formation of neuritic processes. Altogether, data are suggestive of a main role played by the CCL2/CCR2 signaling pathway and in general of the network of secreted cytokines/chemokines in the differentiation of neural progenitor cells toward a neural fate.

  17. Angiotensin II protects cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Ahmadi, Ferogh; Jones, Susan M; Fariss, Marc W; Weyhenmeyer, James A; Zawada, W Michael

    2005-05-31

    In this study, we demonstrate that angiotensin II (Ang II) protects dopamine (DA) neurons from rotenone toxicity in vitro. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures from E15 rats were grown for 5 days and then cultured in the presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Acute exposure (20 h) to 20 nM rotenone reduced the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) neurons by 50 +/- 6% when compared to untreated cultures. Pre-treatment of VM cultures with 100 nM Ang II decreased TH+ neuronal loss to 25 +/- 10% at the 20-nM rotenone concentration. Ang II in the presence of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist, losartan, was even more effective in protecting DA neurons showing a loss of only 13 +/- 4% at 20 nM rotenone. Conversely, the AT2R antagonist, PD123319, abolished the protective effects of Ang II. Furthermore, both the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801, and the antioxidant, alpha-tocopheryl succinate (vitamin E analogue), prevented rotenone-induced toxicity. Here, we show that acute exposure of VM cultures to the pesticide rotenone leads to dopaminergic neuronal cell death and that angiotensin acting through the AT2 receptor protects dopamine neurons from rotenone toxicity.

  18. Urine Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Urinalysis ; Blood Culture ; Susceptibility Testing ; Bacterial Wound Culture ; Gram Stain ; Urine Protein All content on Lab Tests ... growing at high colony counts is considered a positive urine culture. For clean catch samples that have ...

  19. Urine culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  20. Safeguards Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  1. Functional and ultrastructural neuroanatomy of interactive intratectal/tectonigral mesencephalic opioid inhibitory links and nigrotectal GABAergic pathways: involvement of GABAA and mu1-opioid receptors in the modulation of panic-like reactions elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal midbrain.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, S J; Ciscato, J G; de Oliveira, R; de Oliveira, R C; D'Angelo-Dias, R; Carvalho, A D; Felippotti, T T; Rebouças, E C C; Castellan-Baldan, L; Hoffmann, A; Corrêa, S A L; Moreira, J E; Coimbra, N C

    2005-12-01

    In the present study, the functional neuroanatomy of nigrotectal-tectonigral pathways as well as the effects of central administration of opioid antagonists on aversive stimuli-induced responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the midbrain tectum were determined. Central microinjections of naloxonazine, a selective mu(1)-opiod receptor antagonist, in the mesencephalic tectum (MT) caused a significant increase in the escape thresholds elicited by local electrical stimulation. Furthermore, either naltrexone or naloxonazine microinjected in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata (SNpr), caused a significant increase in the defensive thresholds elicited by electrical stimulation of the continuum comprised by dorsolateral aspects of the periaqueductal gray matter (dlPAG) and deep layers of the superior colliculus (dlSC), as compared with controls. These findings suggest an opioid modulation of GABAergic inhibitory inputs controlling the defensive behavior elicited by MT stimulation, in cranial aspects. In fact, iontophoretic microinjections of the neurotracer biodextran into the SNpr, a mesencephalic structure rich in GABA-containing neurons, show outputs to neural substrate of the dlSC/dlPAG involved with the generation and organization of fear- and panic-like reactions. Neurochemical lesion of the nigrotectal pathways increased the sensitivity of the MT to electrical (at alertness, freezing and escape thresholds) and chemical (blockade of GABA(A) receptors) stimulation, suggesting a tonic modulatory effect of the nigrotectal GABAergic outputs on the neural networks of the MT involved with the organization of the defensive behavior and panic-like reactions. Labeled neurons of the midbrain tectum send inputs with varicosities to ipsi and contralateral dlSC/dlPAG and ipsilateral substantia nigra, pars reticulata and compacta, in which the anterograde and retrograde tracing from a single injection indicates that the substantia nigra has reciprocal connections with

  2. Cultural psychology.

    PubMed

    Heine, Steven J; Ruby, Matthew B

    2010-03-01

    Humans are a cultural species, constantly navigating a complex web of culturally bound practices, norms, and worldviews. This article provides a brief overview of the relatively young field of cultural psychology, which investigates the many ways psychology and culture interweave with one another. Highlighting the cultural nature of the human species, it draws upon research on cultural evolution, enculturation, and developmental processes. This review further summarizes a number of cultural differences in how people perceive the self, and the behavioral consequences that follow from these differences, in the domains of internal and external attribution styles, motivations for self-enhancement, approach/avoidance, primary and secondary control, as well as motivations for distinctiveness and conformity. Additionally, the review discusses research on the intersection of culture and emotion, as well as cultural differences in cognition, perception, and reasoning. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Cultural Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience issues from the apparently incompatible combination of neuroscience and cultural psychology. A brief literature sampling suggests, instead, several preliminary topics that demonstrate proof of possibilities: cultural differences in both lower-level processes (e.g. perception, number representation) and higher-order processes (e.g. inferring others’ emotions, contemplating the self) are beginning to shed new light on both culture and cognition. Candidates for future cultural neuroscience research include cultural variations in the default (resting) network, which may be social; regulation and inhibition of feelings, thoughts, and actions; prejudice and dehumanization; and neural signatures of fundamental warmth and competence judgments. PMID:23874143

  4. Bile culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... these risks. Alternative Names Culture - bile Images Bile culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - esophageal ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, fungi, ... and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  6. Bronchoscopic culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003748.htm Bronchoscopic culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bronchoscopic culture is a laboratory exam to check a piece ...

  7. Throat Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Throat Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Collecting | ... treatment | Getting results | see BLOOD SAMPLE Collecting A culture is a test that is often used to ...

  8. Endocervical culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003754.htm Endocervical culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endocervical culture is a laboratory test that helps identify infection ...

  9. Culturing Protozoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  10. Culturing Protozoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  11. Beyond Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the lack of literature relating to cultural differences and school library media programs and reviews the book "Beyond Culture" by Edward T. Hall. Highlights include the population/environment crisis, cultural literacy, the use of technology, and Marshall McLuhan's idea of the global village. (LRW)

  12. Culture evolves

    PubMed Central

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A.; Laland, Kevin N.; Stringer, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to facilitate cross-disciplinary fertilization. Each approach emphasizes important linkages between culture and evolutionary biology rather than quarantining one from the other. Recent studies reveal that processes important in cultural transmission are more widespread and significant across the animal kingdom than earlier recognized, with important implications for evolutionary theory. Recent archaeological discoveries have pushed back the origins of human culture to much more ancient times than traditionally thought. These developments suggest previously unidentified continuities between animal and human culture. A third new array of discoveries concerns the later diversification of human cultures, where the operations of Darwinian-like processes are identified, in part, through scientific methods borrowed from biology. Finally, surprising discoveries have been made about the imprint of cultural evolution in the predispositions of human minds for cultural transmission. PMID:21357216

  13. Culture evolves.

    PubMed

    Whiten, Andrew; Hinde, Robert A; Laland, Kevin N; Stringer, Christopher B

    2011-04-12

    Culture pervades human lives and has allowed our species to create niches all around the world and its oceans, in ways quite unlike any other primate. Indeed, our cultural nature appears so distinctive that it is often thought to separate humanity from the rest of nature and the Darwinian forces that shape it. A contrary view arises through the recent discoveries of a diverse range of disciplines, here brought together to illustrate the scope of a burgeoning field of cultural evolution and to facilitate cross-disciplinary fertilization. Each approach emphasizes important linkages between culture and evolutionary biology rather than quarantining one from the other. Recent studies reveal that processes important in cultural transmission are more widespread and significant across the animal kingdom than earlier recognized, with important implications for evolutionary theory. Recent archaeological discoveries have pushed back the origins of human culture to much more ancient times than traditionally thought. These developments suggest previously unidentified continuities between animal and human culture. A third new array of discoveries concerns the later diversification of human cultures, where the operations of Darwinian-like processes are identified, in part, through scientific methods borrowed from biology. Finally, surprising discoveries have been made about the imprint of cultural evolution in the predispositions of human minds for cultural transmission.

  14. Nasopharyngeal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - nasopharyngeal; Swab for respiratory viruses; Swab for staph carriage ... The test identifies viruses and bacteria that cause upper respiratory ... Staphylococcus aureus Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

  15. Skin or nail culture

    MedlinePlus

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  16. Cultures Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his belief that, in the interactions between teachers and learners, it is not just culture that matters, but the encounter of the cultures that shape who they are, what they believe, and how they practice those beliefs in their relationships with each other and the world around them. When teachers teach they…

  17. Cultural Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  18. Ryukyuan Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafton, Terry

    The Ryukyu Islands of Japan, of which Okinawa is the best known, possess a lengthy history and a sophisticated cultural background, an exploration of which helps to shed light on this area and on mainland Japan. This document is an exposition of Ryukuan culture. Divided into eight sections, the areas covered include: (1) Historical perspective;…

  19. Ryukyuan Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafton, Terry

    The Ryukyu Islands of Japan, of which Okinawa is the best known, possess a lengthy history and a sophisticated cultural background, an exploration of which helps to shed light on this area and on mainland Japan. This document is an exposition of Ryukuan culture. Divided into eight sections, the areas covered include: (1) Historical perspective;…

  20. Cultural issues.

    PubMed

    Crowe, C C

    1995-08-01

    Central Australian Aborigines have a wide variety of medical illnesses which differ in incidence and severity from elsewhere in Australia. Coinciding with this are a range of cultural considerations that directly affect the management of these conditions. This article is an attempt to relate some of these cultural considerations to explain the outcome of these illnesses in the Aboriginal population.

  1. Cultural History and Cultural Materialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ronald

    1990-01-01

    Historicism critiques cultural history and cultural materialism as a methodology for literary analysis. Questions the finality of interpretation, how original values change, and whether dramatic history implies actual history. Using Shakespearean plays, analyzes the power and politics of a play in relation to its audience; posits that cultural…

  2. Fecal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fecal culture is a lab test to find organisms in the stool (feces) that can cause gastrointestinal ... Results There are no abnormal bacteria or other organisms in the sample. Talk to your provider about ...

  3. Blood culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  4. Paramilitary Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, James William

    1989-01-01

    Identifies the movie, "Rambo," and "Soldier of Fortune" magazine as artifacts of "paramilitary culture." Contends that they are a social phenomenon which helps legitimate the United States government's rapid escalation of military forces. (MS)

  5. Culture perspectives.

    PubMed

    Locsin, Rozzano C

    2002-10-01

    All cultures have had means and techniques that express their immediate aims. The thing that interests me is that today, painters do not have to go to a subject matter outside of themselves. They work from a different source. They work from within. It seems to me that the modern artist cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old form of the Renaissance or of any of the old cultures.

  6. Differences in receptor binding affinity of several phytocannabinoids do not explain their effects on neural cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rosenthaler, Sarah; Pöhn, Birgit; Kolmanz, Caroline; Huu, Chi Nguyen; Krewenka, Christopher; Huber, Alexandra; Kranner, Barbara; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Moldzio, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids are potential candidates for neurodegenerative disease treatment. Nonetheless, the exact mode of action of major phytocannabinoids has to be elucidated, but both, receptor and non-receptor mediated effects are discussed. Focusing on the often presumed structure-affinity-relationship, Ki values of phytocannabinoids cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarin (CBDV), cannabichromene (CBC), cannabigerol (CBG), cannabinol (CBN), THC acid (THCA) and THC to human CB1 and CB2 receptors were detected by using competitive inhibition between radioligand [(3)H]CP-55,940 and the phytocannabinoids. The resulting Ki values to CB1 range from 23.5 nM (THCA) to 14711 nM (CBDV), whereas Ki values to CB2 range from 8.5 nM (THC) to 574.2 nM (CBDV). To study the relationship between binding affinity and effects on neurons, we investigated possible CB1 related cytotoxic properties in murine mesencephalic primary cell cultures and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cell line. Most of the phytocannabinoids did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in primary cultures, whereas propidium iodide and resazurin formation assays revealed cytotoxic properties of CBN, CBDV and CBG. However, THC showed positive effects on N18TG2 cell viability at a concentration of 10 μM, whereas CBC and THCA also displayed slightly positive activities. These findings are not linked to the receptor binding affinity therewith pointing to another mechanism than a receptor mediated one. [Corrected] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Understanding Disability Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2013-01-01

    To be culturally responsive teachers, we must first have an understanding of other cultures and how students from these cultures differ from one another. As we consider the many cultures represented in our classrooms, we might also consider students with disabilities as a cultural group. Within any main culture are subgroups differentiated by…

  8. Hydroponic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steucek, G. L.; Yurkiewicz, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a hydroponic culture technique suitable for student exercises in biology. This technique of growing plants in nutrient solutions enhances plant growth, and is an excellent way to obtain intact plants with root systems free of soil or other particulate matter. (JR)

  9. Culture Shock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  10. Black Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  11. Cultural Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on cultural concerns in human resource development (HRD). "Race, Gender, and Mentoring Patterns" (Linda M. Hite) examines mentoring patterns and opportunities among black female professionals and reports results reinforcing the need for increased availability of same-sex, same-race mentors in…

  12. Hydroponic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steucek, G. L.; Yurkiewicz, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a hydroponic culture technique suitable for student exercises in biology. This technique of growing plants in nutrient solutions enhances plant growth, and is an excellent way to obtain intact plants with root systems free of soil or other particulate matter. (JR)

  13. Cultural Themes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 10 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American cultural themes. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Texas at…

  14. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related tests: Gram Stain , Susceptibility Testing , Blood Culture , Urine Culture , AFB Testing , ... wound culture is primarily used, along with a Gram stain and other tests, to help determine whether a ...

  15. Culture Theory and American Cultural Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, John J.

    This paper addresses three questions related to cultural geography--(1) do cultural geographers have a serious interest in culture theory? (2) is there some indication in the ways in which cultural geographers have traditionally approached their subject which has given rise to an apparent lack of concern with the implications of culture theory?…

  16. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  17. Opening the Culture Door.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Barbara; Rasminsky, Judy Sklar

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that child care providers must collaborate with children's families in order to better understand their culture and their child, and to successfully deal with challenging behavior issues. Addresses: (1) culture definition; (2) culture and identity; (3) cultural differences; (4) seeing culture; (5) child care and school culture; (6) moving…

  18. Deaf Culture Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests how insights from Paul Bohannon's book, "How Culture Works" (1995), could be used to address such questions as, "How do deaf people learn their culture?" and "How do deaf children learn (what) culture?" Bohannon's idea of cultural dynamics is applied to deaf culture to trace how that culture evolved, how it…

  19. Deaf Culture Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests how insights from Paul Bohannon's book, "How Culture Works" (1995), could be used to address such questions as, "How do deaf people learn their culture?" and "How do deaf children learn (what) culture?" Bohannon's idea of cultural dynamics is applied to deaf culture to trace how that culture evolved, how it…

  20. Marketing across Cultures: Tools for Cultural Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    The concept of cultural universals, the basic needs shared by people around the world, is a critical concept in assessing the impact of culture on decisions about the international marketing of goods and services. In most cases, international marketers have little need to understand all the ways in which their culture differs from the culture of…

  1. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  2. Widespread Increases in Malondialdehyde Immunoreactivity in Dopamine-Rich and Dopamine-Poor Regions of Rat Brain Following Multiple, High Doses of Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Kristen A.; Gilbert, Yamiece E.; Cline, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment with multiple high doses of methamphetamine (METH) can induce oxidative damage, including dopamine (DA)-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which may contribute to the neurotoxic damage of monoamine neurons and long-term depletion of DA in the caudate putamen (CPu) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Malondialdehyde (MDA), a product of lipid peroxidation by ROS, is commonly used as a marker of oxidative damage and treatment with multiple high doses of METH increases MDA reactivity in the CPu of humans and experimental animals. Recent data indicate that MDA itself may contribute to the destruction of DA neurons, as MDA causes the accumulation of toxic intermediates of DA metabolism via its chemical modification of the enzymes necessary for the breakdown of DA. However, it has been shown that in human METH abusers there is also increased MDA reactivity in the frontal cortex, which receives relatively fewer DA afferents than the CPu. These data suggest that METH may induce neuronal damage regardless of the regional density of DA or origin of DA input. The goal of the current study was to examine the modification of proteins by MDA in the DA-rich nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbal systems, as well as the less DA-dense cortex and hippocampus following a neurotoxic regimen of METH treatment. Animals were treated with METH (10 mg/kg) every 2 h for 6 h, sacrificed 1 week later, and examined using immunocytochemistry for changes in MDA-adducted proteins. Multiple, high doses of METH significantly increased MDA immunoreactivity (MDA-ir) in the CPu, SNpc, cortex, and hippocampus. Multiple METH administration also increased MDA-ir in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens. Our data indicate that multiple METH treatment can induce persistent and widespread neuronal damage that may not necessarily be limited to the nigrostriatal DA system. PMID:21602916

  3. Cultural Humility and Hospital Safety Culture.

    PubMed

    Hook, Joshua N; Boan, David; Davis, Don E; Aten, Jamie D; Ruiz, John M; Maryon, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Hospital safety culture is an integral part of providing high quality care for patients, as well as promoting a safe and healthy environment for healthcare workers. In this article, we explore the extent to which cultural humility, which involves openness to cultural diverse individuals and groups, is related to hospital safety culture. A sample of 2011 hospital employees from four hospitals completed measures of organizational cultural humility and hospital safety culture. Higher perceptions of organizational cultural humility were associated with higher levels of general perceptions of hospital safety, as well as more positive ratings on non-punitive response to error (i.e., mistakes of staff are not held against them), handoffs and transitions, and organizational learning. The cultural humility of one's organization may be an important factor to help improve hospital safety culture. We conclude by discussing potential directions for future research.

  4. Culture Theory in Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, John J.

    The current debates about cultural geography fall into three categories: (1) arguments for the convergence of cultural and spatial geography; (2) arguments against current reports of the disappearance of culture as a result of increased cultural divergence; and (3) attempts at the reconstruction of culture theory to conform with generally valid…

  5. Culture ou Intercultures (Culture or Intercultural).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Ross

    1996-01-01

    While planet Earth endeavors to transmit information instantaneously, cultural misunderstanding interferes with communication more than any language barrier. The article urges teachers of French to be cognizant of their role as cultural mediators. (Author/CK)

  6. Culture contre Universite (Culture against University).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fumaroli, Marc

    1992-01-01

    France's cultural policy since the 1950s is criticized as having more of a leisure and recreational focus than being truly encouraging of French culture and intellect. Politics and economics are seen as inappropriate policy motivators. (MSE)

  7. Culture, Cultural Conflicts, and Work Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Gus; Garcia, Jesus

    1987-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with integrating culturally different workers into an existing work force and suggests possible management solutions. Case studies and a table comparing different cultural values among Mexican Americans, Blacks, Orientals, and American Indians are included. (LRW)

  8. Revisiting cultural awareness and cultural relevancy.

    PubMed

    Abi-Hashem, Naji

    2015-10-01

    Comments on the original article by Christopher et al. (see record 2014-20055-001) regarding critical cultural awareness. The more insights and exploration of the meaning and influence of culture we receive, the better. There is no single treatment of any personal or collective culture(s) that can be inherently complete or totally exhaustive. New hermeneutics and skills are always needed, appreciated, and refreshing.

  9. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  10. Dehistoricized Cultural Identity and Cultural Othering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiguo, Qu

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that each culture has its own distinctive identity has been generally accepted in the discussion of cultural identities. Quite often identity formation is not perceived as a dynamic and interactive ongoing process that engages other cultures and involves change in its responses to different challenges at different times. I will…

  11. Dehistoricized Cultural Identity and Cultural Othering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiguo, Qu

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that each culture has its own distinctive identity has been generally accepted in the discussion of cultural identities. Quite often identity formation is not perceived as a dynamic and interactive ongoing process that engages other cultures and involves change in its responses to different challenges at different times. I will…

  12. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Blood Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Culture Print A A ... adjust the treatment choice. Why Do a Blood Culture? During some illnesses, certain infection-causing bacteria and ...

  13. Routine sputum culture

    MedlinePlus

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  14. Lymph node culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - lymph node ... or viruses grow. This process is called a culture. Sometimes, special stains are also used to identify specific cells or microorganisms before culture results are available. If needle aspiration does not ...

  15. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity.

  16. Mesencephalic neuronal populations: new insights on the ventral differentiation programs.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Bravo, J A; Martinez-Lopez, J E; Puelles, E

    2012-12-01

    The midbrain is a complex structure where different functions are located. This formation is mainly involved in the visual and auditory information process (tectum) and visual movements and motor coordination (tegmentum). Here we display a complete description of midbrain anatomy based on the prosomeric model and of the developmental events that take place to generate this structure. We also summarize the new data about the differentiation and specification of the basal populations of the midbrain. The neural tube suffers the influence of several secondary organizers. These signaling centers confer exact positional information to the neuroblasts. In the midbrain these centers are the Isthmic organizer for the antero-posterior axis and the floor and roof plates for the dorso-ventral axis. This segment of the brain contains, in the dorsal part, structures such as the collicula (superior and inferior), tectal grey and the preisthmic segment, and in the basal plate, neuronal populations such as the oculomotor complex, the dopaminergic substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area, the reticular formation and the periacueductal grey. Knowledge of the genetic cascades involved in the differentiation programs of the diverse populations will be extremely important to understand not only how the midbrain develops, but how degenerative pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease, occurs. These cascades are triggered by signaling molecules such as Shh, Fgf8 or Wnt1 and are integrated by receptor complexes and transcription factors. These are directly responsible for the induction or repression of the differentiation programs that will produce a specific neuronal phenotype.

  17. Migration, cultural bereavement and cultural identity

    PubMed Central

    BHUGRA, DINESH; BECKER, MATTHEW A

    2005-01-01

    Migration has contributed to the richness in diversity of cultures, ethnicities and races in developed countries. Individuals who migrate experience multiple stresses that can impact their mental well being, including the loss of cultural norms, religious customs, and social support systems, adjustment to a new culture and changes in identity and concept of self. Indeed, the rates of mental illness are increased in some migrant groups. Mental health practitioners need to be attuned to the unique stresses and cultural aspects that affect immigrants and refugees in order to best address the needs of this increasing and vulnerable population. This paper will review the concepts of migration, cultural bereavement and cultural identity, and explore the interrelationship between these three aspects of the migrant's experience and cultural congruity. The complex interplay of the migration process, cultural bereavement, cultural identity, and cultural congruity, along with biological, psychological and social factors, is hypothesized as playing a major role in the increased rates of mental illness in affected migrant groups. PMID:16633496

  18. Many Forms of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  19. Understanding Organizational Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for workplace education providers, defines organizational culture, reviews selected techniques for reading a company's culture, and presents examples of ways in which organizations' culture can affect workplace education programs. An organization's culture is determined by: recognizing the company's philosophy…

  20. Popular Culture and Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Ray B., Ed.; Ambrosetti, Ronald J., Ed.

    The seven essays in this publication, including four read at the fall 1969 American Studies Association meeting, attempt to present both the nature of popular culture study and a guide for teachers of popular culture courses. Papers are (1) "Popular Culture: Notes toward a Definition" by Ray B. Browne; (2) "Can Popular Culture Save American…

  1. Deaf Culture and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padden, Carol; Ramsey, Claire

    1993-01-01

    Issues in deaf culture and literacy are addressed, including literacy versus reading and writing, the nature of deaf culture, the relationship between culture (particularly deaf culture) and literacy, the relationship between literacy and face-to-face communication, and application of theory to practice. (DB)

  2. Deaf Culture and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padden, Carol; Ramsey, Claire

    1993-01-01

    Issues in deaf culture and literacy are addressed, including literacy versus reading and writing, the nature of deaf culture, the relationship between culture (particularly deaf culture) and literacy, the relationship between literacy and face-to-face communication, and application of theory to practice. (DB)

  3. Teaching Language, Learning Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swiderski, Richard M.

    A discussion of language focuses on the relationship between language learning and culture learning. The first four chapters look at the cultural context of language learning, particularly in the language classroom. The second part examines culture learning through language teaching. The first chapter discusses lexical culture, or the vocabulary…

  4. Aging in culture.

    PubMed

    Fung, Helene H

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the empirical studies that test socioemotional aging across cultures. The review focuses on comparisons between Western (mostly North Americans and Germans) and Eastern cultures (mostly Chinese) in areas including age-related personality, social relationships, and cognition. Based on the review, I argue that aging is a meaning-making process. Individuals from each cultural context internalize cultural values with age. These internalized cultural values become goals that guide adult development. When individuals from different cultures each pursue their own goals with age, cultural differences in socioemotional aging occur.

  5. Cultural Approaches to Parenting

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article first introduces some main ideas behind culture and parenting and next addresses philosophical rationales and methodological considerations central to cultural approaches to parenting, including a brief account of a cross-cultural study of parenting. It then focuses on universals, specifics, and distinctions between form (behavior) and function (meaning) in parenting as embedded in culture. The article concludes by pointing to social policy implications as well as future directions prompted by a cultural approach to parenting. PMID:22962544

  6. Cultural Molding: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module introduces the student to cultural molding, the idea that most human behavior can be traced to enculturation and exposure rather than to a socio-biological explanation of human behavior. Following a brief description of socialization,…

  7. Invited Comments: National Culture and Teaching Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Levitt, Kathryn M.

    1987-01-01

    Comments on the cross-cultural research reported in the two preceding articles on comparisons of a German and American school and Dutch and Israeli teachers. Supports cross-national comparisons of school culture as an enlightening element of school reform. (LHW)

  8. Cultural Activation of Consumers.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Carole E; Reid-Rose, Lenora; Joseph, Adriana M; Hernandez, Jennifer C; Haugland, Gary

    2016-02-01

    This column discusses "cultural activation," defined as a consumer's recognition of the importance of providing cultural information to providers about cultural affiliations, challenges, views about, and attitudes toward behavioral health and general medical health care, as well as the consumer's confidence in his or her ability to provide this information. An aid to activation, "Cultural Activation Prompts," and a scale that measures a consumer's level of activation, the Cultural Activation Measurement Scale, are described. Suggestions are made about ways to introduce cultural activation as a component of usual care.

  9. Neuroprotective effect of the natural iron chelator, phytic acid in a cell culture model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Reddy, Manju B

    2008-03-12

    Disrupted iron metabolism and excess iron accumulation has been reported in the brains of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Because excessive iron can induce oxidative stress subsequently causing degradation of nigral dopaminergic neurons in PD, we determined the protective effect of a naturally occurring iron chelator, phytic acid (IP6), on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced cell death in immortalized rat mesencephalic/dopaminergic cells. Cell death was induced with MPP(+) in normal and iron-excess conditions and cytotoxicity was measured by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay) and trypan blue staining. Apoptotic cell death was also measured with caspase-3 activity, DNA fragmentation, and Hoechst nuclear staining. Compared to MPP(+) treatment, IP6 (30 micromol/L) increased cell viability by 19% (P<0.05) and decreased cell death by 22% (P<0.05). A threefold increase in caspase-3 activity (P<0.001) and a twofold increase in DNA fragmentation (P<0.05) with MPP(+) treatment was decreased by 55% (P<0.01) and 52% (P<0.05), respectively with IP6. Cell survival was increased by 18% (P<0.05) and 42% (P<0.001) with 30 and 100 micromol/L of IP6, respectively in iron-excess conditions. A 40% and 52% (P<0.001) protection was observed in caspase-3 activity with 30 and 100 micromol/L IP6, respectively in iron-excess condition. Similarly, a 45% reduction (P<0.001) in DNA fragmentation was found with 100 micromol/L IP6. In addition, Hoechst nuclear staining results confirmed the protective effect of IP6 against apoptosis. Similar protection was also observed with the differentiated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate a significant neuroprotective effect of phytate in a cell culture model of PD.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Culture - CSF; Spinal fluid culture; CSF ... In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23d ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  11. Blood Culture Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complete Blood Count , Urine Culture , Bacterial Wound Culture , Gram Stain , CSF Analysis , Fungal Tests , Susceptibility Testing At a ... Other related tests that may be performed include: Gram stain —a relatively quick test used to detect and ...

  12. Cross-Cultural Nongeneralizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1985-01-01

    This synthesis of the previous articles concludes that cultural considerations are important for effective evaluation practice. Culturally sensitive and situationally responsive evaluation practices can contribute to international understanding. (BS)

  13. Culture and social class.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-08-08

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003752.htm Urine culture - catheterized specimen To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Catheterized specimen urine culture is a laboratory test that looks for germs ...

  15. Pericardial fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003720.htm Pericardial fluid culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pericardial fluid culture is a test performed on a sample of ...

  16. Culture in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  17. Culture in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  18. Cultural Communication and Transmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschumi, R.

    1973-01-01

    Part of a larger work, of which the French version, Theorie de la Culture'' (Theory of Culture), is to be published first; shorter version read at the International Federation for Modern Languages and Literatures Congress, Cambridge, England, 1972. (RS)

  19. Urethral discharge culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003750.htm Urethral discharge culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urethral discharge culture is a laboratory test done on men and ...

  20. Culture and Achievement Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.

    1974-01-01

    A framework is suggested for the cross-cultural study of motivation that stresses the importance of contextual conditions in eliciting achievement motivation and emphasizes cultural relativity in the definition of the concept. (EH)

  1. Bile culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract. A specimen of bile is placed in culture media and observed for growth of microorganisms. If there ... no infection. If there is growth in the culture media, the growth is then isolated and identified to ...

  2. Armenian Cultural Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to this sphere, particularly international organizations were established, conferences are held and journals are published. Armenia is also rich in cultural astronomy. The present paper focuses on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation.

  3. Cultural changes in aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobl, Bill

    1991-01-01

    Cultural changes; people and jobs; examples of cultural changes required; advanced launch system (ALS) philosophy; ALS operability capabilities; and ALS operability in design are outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs.

  4. Culture-negative endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the lining of one or more heart valves, but no endocarditis-causing germs can be found ... the heart, where they can settle on damaged heart valves. Alternative Names Endocarditis (culture-negative) Images Culture-negative ...

  5. Developing Soldier Cultural Competency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-03

    heavily on small patrols establishing personal relationships with the local populace -- understanding the culture is a key to success. The commander...the world, a Soldier’s cultural misstep can quickly turn a local , simple cultural misunderstanding into a situation with strategic implications -- “the...means for developing a Soldier’s cultural awareness is decentralized to local commanders. When assigned to a command overseas, Soldiers typically

  6. Culture & Cognition Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    the teams. Key: Bulgaria (b), The Netherlands (d), Norway-senior age (n), Norway-junior age (j), Sweden ( s ), & the United States (u), Mixed culture (m...what degree are not well understood. Considerable distance on many cultural dimensions can exist between strong friends and allies. Also, some of the... cultural dimensions . Team cultural diversity was indexed using the population standard deviation of the four team-members’s scores on a particular

  7. Asthma, culture, and cultural analysis: continuing challenges.

    PubMed

    Fortun, Mike; Fortun, Kim; Costelloe-Kuehn, Brandon; Saheb, Tahereh; Price, Daniel; Kenner, Alison; Crowder, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that asthma is more complicated than already recognized, requiring a multilateral approach of study in order to better understand its many facets. Apart from being a health problem, asthma is seen as a knowledge problem, and as we argue here, a cultural problem. Employing cultural analysis we outline ways to challenge conventional ideas and practices about asthma by considering how culture shapes asthma experience, diagnosis, management, research, and politics. Finally, we discuss the value of viewing asthma through multiple lenses, and how such "explanatory pluralism" advances transdisciplinary approaches to asthma.

  8. Culture Differences and English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Language is a part of culture, and plays a very important role in the development of the culture. Some sociologists consider it as the keystone of culture. They believe, without language, culture would not be available. At the same time, language is influenced and shaped by culture, it reflects culture. Therefore, culture plays a very important…

  9. Cultur(ally) Jammed: Culture Jams as a Form of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ulyssa

    2012-01-01

    Does the person become the name or does the name become the person? This question was asked by a participant of my culture jam entitled, "What's my name?" In this culture jam, I asked people to discern the name of a person based solely on their appearance and a list of possible names below their picture. This article aims to show how culture jams…

  10. The University Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  11. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  12. Problems Confronting Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efland, Arthur D.

    2005-01-01

    A new movement has appeared recommending, in part, that the field of art education should lessen its traditional ties to drawing, painting, and the study of masterpieces to become the study of visual culture. Visual cultural study refers to an all-encompassing category of cultural practice that includes the fine arts but also deals with the study…

  13. A Cultural Classroom Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Native American and other cultural stories provide students with a broader perspective on the world. In addition, cultural stories connect science content and knowledge about the world to cultural interpretations and people's life ways. By implementing the ideas suggested in this article, you can select books that both enrich your science library…

  14. OVERCOMING CULTURAL BARRIERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARRUTIA, RICHARD

    THE RELATIONSHIP OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT TO CULTURAL BARRIERS AND THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES IS DISCUSSED IN THIS ARTICLE. VARIOUS VIEWS OF THE MEANING OF CULTURE ARE MENTIONED IN ORDER TO SINGLE OUT ANTHROPOLOGICAL CULTURE AS A MAIN FOCAL POINT. INTERCULTURAL DIFFERENCES ARE SPELLED OUT WITH EXAMPLES OF LINGUISTIC BARRIERS, AND…

  15. Cultural Exploration through Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schall, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the United States means that all students must understand multiple cultural perspectives and identities. Educators need to facilitate learning engagements that highlight the complexities of culture and cultural identity, going beyond surface characteristics such as foods, holidays, and clothing that are often the focus in…

  16. Europeana: Think Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kail, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Europeana: Think Culture (http://www.europeana.eu) is a wonderful cultural repository. It includes more than 15 million items (images, text, audio, and video) from 1,500 European institutions. Europeana provides access to an abundance of cultural and heritage information and knowledge. Because Europeana has partnered with and brought together so…

  17. The Two Cultures Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultberg, John

    1997-01-01

    Addresses the work of British writer, C. P. Snow, and examines the differences in scientific and literary cultures. Discusses post-World War II professionalization of science and the rebellious literary culture; the scientific revolution; the lack of communication between the two cultures; the generalization of science through sociology; the need…

  18. Cultural Concepts of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Different cultures have different conceptions of what it means to be gifted. But in identifying children as gifted, we often use only our own conception, ignoring the cultural context in which the children grew up. Such identification is inadequate and fails to do justice to the richness of the world's cultures. It also misses children who are…

  19. Teaching Culture through Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Janet C.

    Some of the literature on the role of teaching culture in second language instruction is reviewed, with some emphasis on the work of Ortunio and the Kluckholn model of French culture. One instructor's use of French print and television advertising to teach French culture is described. Values such as intellectuality, traditionalism, and patriotism…

  20. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... The peritoneal fluid culture may be negative, even if you have ... diagnosis of peritonitis is based on other factors, in addition ...

  1. Cultural Exploration through Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schall, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the United States means that all students must understand multiple cultural perspectives and identities. Educators need to facilitate learning engagements that highlight the complexities of culture and cultural identity, going beyond surface characteristics such as foods, holidays, and clothing that are often the focus in…

  2. Problems Confronting Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efland, Arthur D.

    2005-01-01

    A new movement has appeared recommending, in part, that the field of art education should lessen its traditional ties to drawing, painting, and the study of masterpieces to become the study of visual culture. Visual cultural study refers to an all-encompassing category of cultural practice that includes the fine arts but also deals with the study…

  3. Why Teach Visual Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passmore, Kaye

    2007-01-01

    Visual culture is a hot topic in art education right now as some teachers are dedicated to teaching it and others are adamant that it has no place in a traditional art class. Visual culture, the author asserts, can include just about anything that is visually represented. Although people often think of visual culture as contemporary visuals such…

  4. Deaf Culture. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siple, Linda; Greer, Leslie; Holcomb, Barbra Ray

    2004-01-01

    It often comes as a surprise to people that many deaf people refer to themselves as being members of Deaf culture. The American Deaf culture is a unique linguistic minority that uses American Sign Language (ASL) as its primary mode of communication. This tipsheet provides a description of Deaf culture and suggestions for effective communication.

  5. Bridges: Literature across Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Gilbert H., Comp.; Williams, John A., Comp.

    This anthology of literature from the many American cultures as well as cultures around the world is intended for use in today's college composition and introductory literature courses. Offering a blend of classic favorites and selections from other cultures, the anthology contains some 300 stories, poems, and plays from the six habitable…

  6. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2010-06-01

    Today, safeguards culture can be a useful tool for measuring nonproliferation postures, but so far its impact on the international safeguards regime has been underappreciated. There is no agreed upon definition for safeguards culture nor agreement on how it should be measured. This paper argues that safeguards culture as an indicator of a country’s nonproliferation posture can be a useful tool.

  7. How Culture Misdirects Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Murray L.

    In the ongoing debate over whether or what sort of multiculturalism should be provided by schools, the origin, evolution, and rhetorical function of the basic term "culture" have been unwisely neglected. The 19th century notion of "culture" implied a process of growth and development, of culturing an organism, or of the human organism becoming…

  8. Cultural Arts Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistone, Kathleen A.

    The handbook presents activities to aid elementary school classroom teachers as they develop and implement cultural arts lessons. A cultural arts program is interpreted as a way to help students develop perceptual awareness, build a basic vocabulary in some art cultural form, evaluate their own works of art, appreciate creative expressions, and…

  9. Europeana: Think Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kail, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Europeana: Think Culture (http://www.europeana.eu) is a wonderful cultural repository. It includes more than 15 million items (images, text, audio, and video) from 1,500 European institutions. Europeana provides access to an abundance of cultural and heritage information and knowledge. Because Europeana has partnered with and brought together so…

  10. Resolving conflicting safety cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Slider, J.E. ); Patterson, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Several nuclear power plant sites have been wounded in the crossfire between two distinct corporate cultures. The traditional utility culture lies on one side and that of the nuclear navy on the other. The two corporate cultures lead to different perceptions of [open quotes]safety culture.[close quotes] This clash of safety cultures obscures a very important point about nuclear plant operations: Safety depends on organizational learning. Organizational learning provides the foundation for a perception of safety culture that transcends the conflict between utility and nuclear navy cultures. Corporate culture may be defined as the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs shared by employees of a given company. Safety culture is the part of corporate culture concerning shared attitudes and beliefs affecting individual or public safety. If the safety culture promotes behaviors that lead to greater safety, employees will tend to [open quotes]do the right thing[close quotes] even when circumstances and formal guidance alone do not ensure that actions will be correct. Safety culture has become particularly important to nuclear plant owners and regulators as they have sought to establish and maintain a high level of safety in today's plants.

  11. Principals as Cultural Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Karen Seashore; Wahlstrom, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Principals have a strong role to play in forming school cultures that encourage change. Changing a school's culture requires shared or distributed leadership and instructional leadership. A multiyear study found that three elements are necessary for a school culture that stimulates teachers to improve their instruction: 1) Teachers and…

  12. Resource Guide: Cultural Resilience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Joyce A.; Peacock, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Offers resources for the study of cultural resilience. This term, used in American Indian culture theory, suggests that traditional culture can help to overcome oppression, abuse, poverty, and other social ills. Offers annotated reference to 19 books, articles, Internet sites, and other publications. (NB)

  13. Cultur(ally) Jammed: Culture Jams as a Form of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ulyssa

    2012-01-01

    Does the person become the name or does the name become the person? This question was asked by a participant of my culture jam entitled, "What's my name?" In this culture jam, I asked people to discern the name of a person based solely on their appearance and a list of possible names below their picture. This article aims to show how culture jams…

  14. Teaching Language, Teaching Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony J., Ed.; Crozet, Chantal, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Essays and research reports on the relationship between teaching second languages and teaching culture include: "Teaching Culture as an Integrated Part of Language Teaching: An Introduction" (Chantal Crozet, Anthony J. Liddicoat); "Primary Socialization and Cultural Factors in Second Language Learning: Wending Our Way through Semi-Charted…

  15. What Kind of Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Samson B.

    The question of what should be taught as the cultural component of language instruction is discussed, with special reference to German. A present-directed humanism is urged, with emphasis on the relevance and immediacy of cultural materials. Mistaken and irrelevant directions in the teaching of German culture are discussed in some detail; similar…

  16. Deaf Culture. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siple, Linda; Greer, Leslie; Holcomb, Barbra Ray

    2004-01-01

    It often comes as a surprise to people that many deaf people refer to themselves as being members of Deaf culture. The American Deaf culture is a unique linguistic minority that uses American Sign Language (ASL) as its primary mode of communication. This tipsheet provides a description of Deaf culture and suggestions for effective communication.

  17. Why Teach Visual Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passmore, Kaye

    2007-01-01

    Visual culture is a hot topic in art education right now as some teachers are dedicated to teaching it and others are adamant that it has no place in a traditional art class. Visual culture, the author asserts, can include just about anything that is visually represented. Although people often think of visual culture as contemporary visuals such…

  18. Cultural Arts Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistone, Kathleen A.

    The handbook presents activities to aid elementary school classroom teachers as they develop and implement cultural arts lessons. A cultural arts program is interpreted as a way to help students develop perceptual awareness, build a basic vocabulary in some art cultural form, evaluate their own works of art, appreciate creative expressions, and…

  19. Cultural Knowledge in Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olk, Harald

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study exploring the influence of cultural knowledge on the translation performance of German students of English. Found that the students often lacked sufficient knowledge about British culture to deal with widely-used cultural concepts. Findings suggest that factual reference sources have an important role to play in translation…

  20. The University Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  1. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A; Ehlers, Anke; Foa, Edna B; Hasan, Aram; Mwiti, Gladys; Kristensen, Christian H; Neuner, Frank; Oe, Misari; Yule, William

    2016-01-01

    Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-)stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. In summary, culture-sensitive psychotraumatology means assuming an

  2. Culture shock and travelers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  3. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    PubMed

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  4. Indian culture and psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shiv; Jain, Nikhil

    2010-01-01

    ‘Culture’ is an abstraction, reflecting the total way of life of a society. Culture uniquely influences mental health of people living in a given society. Similarity in thinking and understanding of mental health across the ancient cultures has been observed. Studies which relate to the demographic factors, cultural factors influencing presentation of illness, diagnosis of the illness-culture bound syndromes and influence of the cultural factors and the belief system on psychopathology, stigma and discrimination towards the patient have been reviewed. An attempt has been made to critically look at the research on culture and psychiatry in different areas. There is a need for culturally oriented modules of non-pharmacological management. PMID:21836701

  5. Uyghur food culture.

    PubMed

    Ayoufu, Ayixiamuguli; Yang, Degang; Yimit, Dilshat

    2017-01-01

    Uyghur food culture has a long history. It is rich in resources, with the strong characteristics of being "green" and healthy, and having high nutritional value. We analyze the development and current status of Uyghur food culture, and explore the value of developing this food culture's resources. Traditional Uyghur food culture formed with influences from many ethnic groups, and has evolved into an intangible element of cultural heritage. It has several components with different healthy and therapeutic functions and is widely utilized in local communities. Overall, Uyghur food is rich in nutrients and beneficial for health. We propose strategies to address issues associated with Uyghur food culture and cultural resources, and specific measures for the development of these resources.

  6. Cultural effects on mindreading.

    PubMed

    Perez-Zapata, Daniel; Slaughter, Virginia; Henry, Julie D

    2016-01-01

    People from other cultural backgrounds sometimes seem inscrutable. We identified a potential cause of this phenomenon in two experiments demonstrating that adults' mental state inferences are influenced by the cultural identity of the target. We adapted White, Hill, Happé, and Frith's (2009) Strange Stories to create matched intra-cultural and cross-cultural mindreading and control conditions. Experiment 1 showed that Australian participants were faster to respond and received higher scores in the intra-cultural mindreading condition relative to the cross-cultural mindreading condition, but performance in the control conditions was equivalent. Experiment 2 replicated this pattern in independent samples of Australian and Chilean participants. These findings have important implications for cross-cultural communication and understanding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2009-05-27

    Abstract: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper builds on that theoretical discussion to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Paper: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop on “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges,” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper, coauthored by Karyn R. Durbin and Andrew Van Duzer, described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper updates that theoretical discussion, and seeks to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Implicit in this discussion is an understanding that improving a culture is not an end in itself, but is one method of improving the underlying discipline, that is safety, security, or safeguards. Culture can be defined as a way of life, or general customs and beliefs of a particular group of people at a particular time. There are internationally accepted definitions of safety culture and nuclear security culture. As yet, there is no official agreed upon definition of safeguards culture. At the end of the paper I will propose my definition. At the Santa Fe Workshop the summary by the Co-Chairs of Working Group 1, “The Further Evolution of Safeguards,” noted: “It is clear that ‘safeguards culture

  8. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  9. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  10. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A.; Ehlers, Anke; Foa, Edna B.; Hasan, Aram; Mwiti, Gladys; Kristensen, Christian H.; Neuner, Frank; Oe, Misari; Yule, William

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-)stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions In summary, culture

  11. Astronomy in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2010-07-01

    Which is more appropriate? “Astronomy in culture,” or “Astronomy and culture,” or “Culture without astronomy?” These are only few variants, each with its own sense. I guess the last question is the most pertinent. Does culture really exist without astronomy? The existence and evolution of the human civilization answer NO! But what “culture” means? When we are thinking of a culture (the Hellenistic one, for instance), we mean a set of customs, artistic, religious, intellectual manifestations that differentiate one group or society from another. On the other hand, we often use the notion of culture in a different sense: shared beliefs, ways of regarding and doing, which orient more or less consciously the behavior of an individual or a group. An example would be the laic culture. Moreover, the set of knowledge acquired in one or several domains also constitutes a culture, for instance the scientific culture of an individual or a group. Finally, the set of cultures is nothing else but the civilization. Now, if we come back in time into the history of civilization, we find a permanent component, which was never missing and often played a decisive part in its evolution: the Astronomy.

  12. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2015-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, a number of components related to psychiatric diagnosis have come under criticism for their inaccuracies and inadequacies. Neurobiologists and anthropologists have particularly criticized the rigidity of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis –composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress—as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. PMID:23816860

  13. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  14. Culture in Foreign Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramsch, Claire

    2013-01-01

    In foreign language education, the teaching of culture remains a hotly debated issue. What is culture? What is its relation to language? Which and whose culture should be taught? What role should the learners' culture play in the acquisition of knowledge of the target culture? How can we avoid essentializing cultures and teaching stereotypes? And…

  15. Ethics, evolution and culture.

    PubMed

    Mesoudi, Alex; Danielson, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Recent work in the fields of evolutionary ethics and moral psychology appears to be converging on a single empirically- and evolutionary-based science of morality or ethics. To date, however, these fields have failed to provide an adequate conceptualisation of how culture affects the content and distribution of moral norms. This is particularly important for a large class of moral norms relating to rapidly changing technological or social environments, such as norms regarding the acceptability of genetically modified organisms. Here we suggest that a science of morality/ethics can benefit from adopting a cultural evolution or gene-culture coevolution approach, which treats culture as a second, separate evolutionary system that acts in parallel to biological/genetic evolution. This cultural evolution approach brings with it a set of established theoretical concepts (e.g. different cultural transmission mechanisms) and empirical methods (e.g. evolutionary game theory) that can significantly improve our understanding of human morality.

  16. Nature/culture/seawater.

    PubMed

    Helmreich, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place in anthropological categories of "nature" and "culture." Seawater as nature appears as potentiality of form and uncontainable flux; it moves faster than culture - with culture frequently figured through land-based metaphors - even as culture seeks to channel water's (nature's) flow. Seawater as culture manifests as a medium of pleasure, sustenance, travel, disaster. I argue that, although seawater's qualities in early anthropology were portrayed impressionistically, today technical, scientific descriptions of water's form prevail. For example, processes of globalization - which may also be called "oceanization" - are often described as "currents," "flows," and "circulations." Examining sea-set ethnography, maritime anthropologies, and contemporary social theory, I propose that seawater has operated as a “theory machine” for generating insights about human cultural organization. I develop this argument with ethnography from the Sargasso Sea and in the Sea Islands. I conclude with a critique of appeals to water's form in social theory.

  17. Culturally sensitive assessment.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C P; Kumru, A

    1999-04-01

    Issues of cultural interaction and culturally sensitive assessment and treatment of young children have become prominent in recent years for mental health professionals, for reasons having to do with changing demographics, public values, and professional vision. "Culture" refers to the sociocultural adaptation of design for living shared by people as members of a community. Mental health professionals who work with culturally diverse populations need to become culturally self-aware and find abstract and experiential ways to build a useful body of professional knowledge concerning childrearing and discipline practices, health and illness beliefs, communication styles, and expectations about family or professional relations or other group interactions. They also need to learn how to work effectively in intercultural teams, use families as partners and resources, train and work with interpreters, and select and use formal and nonformal assessment procedures in appropriate, culturally sensitive ways.

  18. Culture and math.

    PubMed

    Tcheang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Cultural differences have been shown across a number of different cognitive domains from vision, language, and music. Mathematical cognition is another domain that is an integral part of modern society and because there are a fixed number of ways in which many math operations can be performed, it is also an apposite tool for cultural comparisons. This discussion examines the literature on mathematical processing in accordance with culture, summarizing the brain regions involved across various mathematical tasks. In doing so, we provide a clear picture of the anatomical similarities and differences between cultures when performing different math tasks. This information is useful to explore the possibility of enhancement of mathematical skills, where different strategies may be applicable in accordance with culture. It also contributes to the evolutionary development of different math skills and the growing theory that anatomical and behavioral studies must account for the cultural identity of their sample.

  19. Culture, ethnicity, and paranoia.

    PubMed

    Sen, P; Chowdhury, A N

    2006-06-01

    This paper defines concepts of culture, ethnicity, and paranoia. It then explores the relationship between culture and ethnicity and the development of paranoia both in mental health settings and in the wider world. The importance of cultural awareness training while dealing with an ethnic population in any multicultural setting is emphasized. When exploring paranoia, proper exploration of its genesis is essential to distinguish between pathological and nonpathological paranoia.

  20. Cultural relativity and poverty.

    PubMed

    Martin, M E; Henry, M

    1989-03-01

    The nurse who practices from a perspective of cultural relativity attempts to understand client behaviors within the context of the clients' culture. Viewing customs (behaviors) as a reflection of client beliefs and values can enhance the nurse's effectiveness with clients in poverty. This paper presents a case study in which a culturally relativistic perspective was used to assess and intervene with a family living in poverty.

  1. Darwinism and cultural change.

    PubMed

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2012-08-05

    Evolutionary models of cultural change have acquired an important role in attempts to explain the course of human evolution, especially our specialization in knowledge-gathering and intelligent control of environments. In both biological and cultural change, different patterns of explanation become relevant at different 'grains' of analysis and in contexts associated with different explanatory targets. Existing treatments of the evolutionary approach to culture, both positive and negative, underestimate the importance of these distinctions. Close attention to grain of analysis motivates distinctions between three possible modes of cultural evolution, each associated with different empirical assumptions and explanatory roles.

  2. Cultivating Cultural Appreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esprivalo, Pamela Sue; Forney, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity that addresses cultural differences and diversity through ethnobotany. Offers a multicultural framework designed to develop concepts about plant characteristics and taxonomy. (ASK)

  3. Darwinism and cultural change

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary models of cultural change have acquired an important role in attempts to explain the course of human evolution, especially our specialization in knowledge-gathering and intelligent control of environments. In both biological and cultural change, different patterns of explanation become relevant at different ‘grains’ of analysis and in contexts associated with different explanatory targets. Existing treatments of the evolutionary approach to culture, both positive and negative, underestimate the importance of these distinctions. Close attention to grain of analysis motivates distinctions between three possible modes of cultural evolution, each associated with different empirical assumptions and explanatory roles. PMID:22734059

  4. Cultivating Cultural Appreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esprivalo, Pamela Sue; Forney, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity that addresses cultural differences and diversity through ethnobotany. Offers a multicultural framework designed to develop concepts about plant characteristics and taxonomy. (ASK)

  5. Do invertebrates have culture?

    PubMed

    Danchin, Etienne; Blanchet, Simon; Mery, Frédérick; Wagner, Richard H

    2010-07-01

    A recent paper in Current Biology1 showed for the first time that female invertebrates (Drosophila melanogaster) can perform mate choice copying. Here, we discuss how female mating preferences in this species may be transmitted culturally. If culture occurs in invertebrates, it may be a relatively ancient evolutionary process that may have contributed to the evolution of many different taxa. This would considerably broaden the taxonomic range of cultural processes and suggest the need to include cultural inheritance in all animals into the general theory of evolution.2-4.

  6. Runaway cultural niche construction

    PubMed Central

    Rendell, Luke; Fogarty, Laurel; Laland, Kevin N.

    2011-01-01

    Cultural niche construction is a uniquely potent source of selection on human populations, and a major cause of recent human evolution. Previous theoretical analyses have not, however, explored the local effects of cultural niche construction. Here, we use spatially explicit coevolutionary models to investigate how cultural processes could drive selection on human genes by modifying local resources. We show that cultural learning, expressed in local niche construction, can trigger a process with dynamics that resemble runaway sexual selection. Under a broad range of conditions, cultural niche-constructing practices generate selection for gene-based traits and hitchhike to fixation through the build up of statistical associations between practice and trait. This process can occur even when the cultural practice is costly, or is subject to counteracting transmission biases, or the genetic trait is selected against. Under some conditions a secondary hitchhiking occurs, through which genetic variants that enhance the capability for cultural learning are also favoured by similar dynamics. We suggest that runaway cultural niche construction could have played an important role in human evolution, helping to explain why humans are simultaneously the species with the largest relative brain size, the most potent capacity for niche construction and the greatest reliance on culture. PMID:21320897

  7. Anorexia nervosa and culture.

    PubMed

    Simpson, K J

    2002-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is currently considered a disorder confined to Western culture. Its recent identification in non-Western societies and different subcultures within the Western world has provoked a theory that Western cultural ideals of slimness and beauty have infiltrated these societies. The biomedical definition of anorexia nervosa emphasizes fat-phobia in the presentation of anorexia nervosa. However, evidence exists that suggests anorexia nevosa can exist without the Western fear of fatness and that this culturally biased view of anorexia nervosa may obscure health care professionals' understanding of a patient's own cultural reasons for self-starvation, and even hinder their recovery.

  8. Cultural change that sticks.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, Jon R; Steffen, Ilona; Kronley, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    When a major change initiative runs aground, leaders often blame their company's culture for pushing it off course. They try to forge ahead by overhauling the culture--a tactic that tends to fizzle, fail, or backfire. Most cultures are too well entrenched to be jettisoned. The secret is to stop fighting your culture--and to work with and within it, until it evolves in the right direction. Today's best-performing companies, such as Southwest Airlines, Apple, and the Four Seasons, understand this, say the authors, three consultants from Booz & Company. These organizations follow five principles for making the most of their cultures: 1. Match strategy to culture. Culture trumps strategy every time, no matter how brilliant the plan, so the two need to be in alignment. 2. Focus on a few critical shifts in behavior. Wholesale change is hard; choose your battles wisely. 3. Honor the strengths of the existing culture. Every culture is the product of good intentions and has strengths; put them to use. 4. Integrate formal and informal interventions. Don't just implement new rules and processes; identify "influencers" who can bring other employees along. 5. Measure and monitor cultural evolution. Otherwise you can't identify backsliding or correct course. When the leaders of Aetna applied these rules while implementing a new strategy in the early 2000s, they reinvigorated the company's ailing culture and restored employee pride. That shift was reflected in the business results, as Aetna went from a $300 million loss to a $1.7 billion gain.

  9. Cultural Perspective on African American Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  10. Cultural Legacies: Operationalizing Chicano Cultural Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordaz, Maricela; Anda, Diane de

    1996-01-01

    Survey of 41 Chicanos and 39 whites ages 18-80 found that despite effects of acculturation, Chicanos held educational and developmental values and beliefs consistent with ancient Nahuatl (Aztec) society, an indigenous Mexican culture. Suggests a need to examine social service delivery systems to determine whether assumptions and procedures are…

  11. Cultural Legacies: Operationalizing Chicano Cultural Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordaz, Maricela; Anda, Diane de

    1996-01-01

    Survey of 41 Chicanos and 39 whites ages 18-80 found that despite effects of acculturation, Chicanos held educational and developmental values and beliefs consistent with ancient Nahuatl (Aztec) society, an indigenous Mexican culture. Suggests a need to examine social service delivery systems to determine whether assumptions and procedures are…

  12. Cultural macroevolution matters.

    PubMed

    Gray, Russell D; Watts, Joseph

    2017-07-24

    Evolutionary thinking can be applied to both cultural microevolution and macroevolution. However, much of the current literature focuses on cultural microevolution. In this article, we argue that the growing availability of large cross-cultural datasets facilitates the use of computational methods derived from evolutionary biology to answer broad-scale questions about the major transitions in human social organization. Biological methods can be extended to human cultural evolution. We illustrate this argument with examples drawn from our recent work on the roles of Big Gods and ritual human sacrifice in the evolution of large, stratified societies. These analyses show that, although the presence of Big Gods is correlated with the evolution of political complexity, in Austronesian cultures at least, they do not play a causal role in ratcheting up political complexity. In contrast, ritual human sacrifice does play a causal role in promoting and sustaining the evolution of stratified societies by maintaining and legitimizing the power of elites. We briefly discuss some common objections to the application of phylogenetic modeling to cultural evolution and argue that the use of these methods does not require a commitment to either gene-like cultural inheritance or to the view that cultures are like vertebrate species. We conclude that the careful application of these methods can substantially enhance the prospects of an evolutionary science of human history.

  13. The Popular Culture Explosion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Ray B.; Madden, David

    Popular culture is defined here as anything produced by and/or dissembled by the mass media or mass production or transportation, either directly or indirectly, and that reaches the majority of the people. This sampler from mass magazines, intended for use in the study of popular culture, includes fiction from "Playboy"; articles on cars, Johnny…

  14. Literature and Cultural Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosch, Rafael

    References and scenes from literature that portray objectively the social elements and patterns of a culture are recommended to teach readers about typical situations and modes of behavior. This is a way of introducing the reader not only to common sociocultural patterns, but also to the cultural traits peculiar to situations that are…

  15. Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

  16. Crusade for Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayre, Ruth W.

    1995-01-01

    Reprints an article originally published in 1961. Describes the "culture crusade" at William Penn High School for Girls in midcity Philadelphia, part of Project WINGS, an overall program of educational incentive and motivation. Notes that over a 2-year period, more than 1,000 girls went on at least 1 cultural trip. (RS)

  17. Finnish Science and Culture[.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Numminen, Jaakko; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This issue serves as a package of information for foreigners about Finnish science and culture and about international cooperation in these fields. It contains a speech on security and cooperation in Europe and articles on the university in an international world, the Academy of Finland, information activity in cultural studies, and activities of…

  18. Introduction: transnational lesbian cultures.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Heike; Mahn, Churnjeet

    2014-01-01

    This special issue examines the transnational shape and shaping of lesbian lives and cultures in and across China, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It uses the expression "transnational lesbian cultures" to suggest that despite sometimes radically different sociopolitical and cultural contexts, the lived experiences of same-sex desire and their emotional attachments create particular affinities between women who love women, affinities that reach across the distinct cultural and social contexts that shape them. The articles brought together explore lesbian subcultures, film, graphic novels, music, and online intimacies. They show that as a cultural and political signifier and as an analytical tool, lesbian troubles and complicates contemporary sexual politics, not least by revealing some of the gendered structures that shape debates about sexuality in a range of critical, cultural and political contexts. While the individual pieces cover a wide range of issues and concerns-which are often highly specific to the historical, cultural, and political contexts they discuss-together they tell a story about contemporary transnational lesbian culture: one that is marked by intricate links between norms and their effects and shaped by the efforts to resist denial, discrimination, and sometimes even active persecution.

  19. One School, Many Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    This report grows out of a symposium focusing on Education and Cultural and Linguistic Pluralism (ECALP), a project of enquiry of the international Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI). The report aims to clarify trends in multicultural education, and to examine the effects of cultural and linguistic development on educational…

  20. Culture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Gayle; And Others

    Developed by the Texas Department of Human Resources' Child Development Division, this guide supports and encourages the integration of cultural diversity into children's programs; furnishes basic information related to race, ethnicity, and culture; and briefly considers some issues associated with the concepts. While not dealing in depth with all…

  1. A School Culture Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald; Blackburn, Barbara R.

    2009-01-01

    Educators know that something needs to change; they analyze data, build a plan, and provide professional development, yet little changes. Often that is because they fail to take into account the culture of their schools. Culture reflects the complex set of values, traditions, assumptions, and patterns of behavior that are present in a school.…

  2. Assessing Knowledge of Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Robert

    The procedures used in a study to determine how well a group of American Indian college students understood their traditional and modern cultures and a college Caucasian culture were explained in this paper. The sample consisted of 111 Indian students enrolled in the University of New Mexico. The students were tested in the areas of knowledge of…

  3. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  4. Pop Culture in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, David Manning, Ed.

    The nature of today's popular culture, its place in American life, and its merit or lack of it are the themes of these essays from "The New York Times Magazine." Introductory essays discuss the use of leisure time, paying the cost of the arts, and whether American society can be considered "cultured." Subsequent essays discuss the nature of radio…

  5. Culture and Disability Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Carroll M.

    1983-01-01

    A substantial amount of literature suggests that illness behavior in the United States is a product of a patient's core culture; equally credible findings do not support this contention. Most students and graduates in the health care professions believe that illness and disability behavior are affected by a patient's culture, but they are hard put to find convincing examples of that relationship. In experience with medical students studying the social and cultural bases of illness behavior, with patients who are disabled and with persons who claim disability in the absence of physical disease or disabling psychopathology, I observed no deviant disability behavior that was typical for the members of any cultural group, and no behavior was displayed by the members of one cultural group that was not seen in members of other cultural groups. No cultural stereotypes were upheld. I did find evidence that disability behavior is influenced by personality factors, social situations and the gains derived from the disability status. Evolving concepts of “entitlement,” which are closely related to socioeconomic status, also have a significant influence. The impact of feedback from others in a person's many social and medical subcultures is a more crucial determinant of illness and disability behavior, except in those for whom illness and disability behavior is determined by the limitations imposed by the disease or by a personality structure resistant to cultural expectations and social feedback. PMID:6666106

  6. Introduction to Cambodian Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chhim, Sun-Him

    This booklet about the cultural background of Cambodia is one of three booklets that serve as a foundation for understanding the cultural diversity and values of Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese students. Cambodia, or Kampuchea, has a population of about 7,000,000 and is located in mainland Southeast Asia. Its history is divided into the…

  7. Complexity in Cultural Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite their diverse national backgrounds, 28 interviewees speak similarly about the complexity of the cultural realities with which they live, and refuse to be pinned down to specific cultural types. While nation is of great importance, unless personally inspiring, it tends to be an external force which is in conflict with a wide variety of…

  8. Mainstreaming Culture in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural…

  9. Bridging the Cultural Divide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magolda, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding culture is a critical part of the work of creating educational environments that meet the needs of diverse students. The three ethnographic works reviewed in this article can, each in its own way, inform the work of crafting an educational practice that is more responsive to students' cultural heritage. (BF)

  10. The Popular Culture Explosion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Ray B.; Madden, David

    Popular culture is defined here as anything produced by and/or dissembled by the mass media or mass production or transportation, either directly or indirectly, and that reaches the majority of the people. This sampler from mass magazines, intended for use in the study of popular culture, includes fiction from "Playboy"; articles on cars, Johnny…

  11. Culture and cognition.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, Neil G; Banissy, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the nature and both environmental and cognitive origins of culturally associated differences in a range of behaviors. This special issue of Cognitive Neuroscience presents six empirical papers investigating diverse categories of potential culturally related effects as well as a review article, all of which provide timely updates of the current state of knowledge in this area.

  12. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  13. Cultural Pluralism on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E.; And Others

    This book is addressed primarily to higher education personnel responsible for campus programming that promotes a culturally plural environment. These chapters are included: (1) "Affirming Affirmative Action" (Harold E. Cheatham); (2) "Identity Development in a Pluralistic Society" (Harold E. Cheatham); (3) "The Minority Cultural Center on a…

  14. Cultural Policies in Kenya.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opondo, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the challenges that arise when government policies are implemented with the goal of promoting culture, tradition, heritage, and identity in society. Focuses specifically on music education. Examines the impact and effects of the post-independence cultural policies in Kenya. Provides recommendations for restructuring present cultural…

  15. Pop Culture in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, David Manning, Ed.

    The nature of today's popular culture, its place in American life, and its merit or lack of it are the themes of these essays from "The New York Times Magazine." Introductory essays discuss the use of leisure time, paying the cost of the arts, and whether American society can be considered "cultured." Subsequent essays discuss the nature of radio…

  16. Teaching Languages, Teaching Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony J., Ed.; Crozet, Chantal, Ed.

    This collection of papers examines what it means to teach culture as an integrated part of language from both the language learner's and the language teacher's perspectives. The 11 papers include the following: "Teaching Cultures as an Integrated Part of Language: Implications for the Aims, Approaches and Pedagogies of Language Teaching"…

  17. Outline of World Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, George Peter

    This outline supplements the topical classification of the "Outline of Cultural Materials" with a new outline organizing and classifying the known cultures of the world. The new system: (1) expedites the beginning of actual processing of information into the Human Relations Area Files, (2) permits excerpting of sources processed that pertain to…

  18. Outline of World Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, George Peter

    This outline supplements the topical classification of the "Outline of Cultural Materials" with a new outline organizing and classifying the known cultures of the world. The new system: (1) expedites the beginning of actual processing of information into the Human Relations Area Files, (2) permits excerpting of sources processed that pertain to…

  19. Introduction to Cambodian Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chhim, Sun-Him

    This booklet about the cultural background of Cambodia is one of three booklets that serve as a foundation for understanding the cultural diversity and values of Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese students. Cambodia, or Kampuchea, has a population of about 7,000,000 and is located in mainland Southeast Asia. Its history is divided into the…

  20. Culturally Centered Psychosocial Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Saez-Santiago, Emily

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few decades, psychologists and other health professionals have called attention to the importance of considering cultural and ethnic-minority aspects in any psychosocial interventions. Although, at present, there are published guidelines on the practice of culturally competent psychology, there is still a lack of practical…

  1. Cultural Awareness for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Judy; And Others

    This book documents a portion of The Learning Tree program, which develops cultural awareness. It provides activities, written from practical experience, that are designed to give children their first contact with the customs of other cultures. These activities are for teachers to share with preschool-, kindergarten-, and primary-school-age…

  2. Introduction to Vietnamese Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Te, Huynh Dinh

    This booklet about the cultural background of Vietnam is one of three booklets that serve as a foundation for understanding the cultural diversity and values of Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese students. Vietnam is located on the eastern coast of the Indochinese peninsula and has a population of 56 million. Its history is divided into the…

  3. Counseling Third Culture Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barringer, Carolyn Fox

    Third Culture Kids (TCKs) represent a group of youth who have lived overseas with their families for business, service, or missionary work. The implications of living in multiple cultures, especially during the developmental and formative years of youth, warrant investigation. This study informs the US counseling community about the…

  4. Adaptation and Cultural Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormrod, Richard K.

    1992-01-01

    Explores the role of adaptation in cultural diffusion. Explains that adaptation theory recognizes the lack of independence between innovations and their environmental settings. Discusses testing and selection, modification, motivation, and cognition. Suggests that adaptation effects are pervasive in cultural diffusion but require a broader, more…

  5. Complexity in Cultural Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite their diverse national backgrounds, 28 interviewees speak similarly about the complexity of the cultural realities with which they live, and refuse to be pinned down to specific cultural types. While nation is of great importance, unless personally inspiring, it tends to be an external force which is in conflict with a wide variety of…

  6. Why Youth Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cintron, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses youth culture and raises concerns about the tricky social terrain modernity offers for youth identity. He discusses familiar "topoi" or thematics that seem to drive most work on youth culture, suggests that justice and fairness are moral imperatives, and that acknowledging the worthiness of difference is one…

  7. Culture and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Gayle; And Others

    Developed by the Texas Department of Human Resources' Child Development Division, this guide supports and encourages the integration of cultural diversity into children's programs; furnishes basic information related to race, ethnicity, and culture; and briefly considers some issues associated with the concepts. While not dealing in depth with all…

  8. Cultural Pluralism on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E.; And Others

    This book is addressed primarily to higher education personnel responsible for campus programming that promotes a culturally plural environment. These chapters are included: (1) "Affirming Affirmative Action" (Harold E. Cheatham); (2) "Identity Development in a Pluralistic Society" (Harold E. Cheatham); (3) "The Minority Cultural Center on a…

  9. The Concept of Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James Q.

    1993-01-01

    Explores the concept of culture as a factor in the well-being of children. Holding students accountable for their behavior, holding schools accountable for activities and achievements of students, and inducing parents to support their children in school require a cultural change in how we look at schooling. (SLD)

  10. Cultural Anthropology and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilleri, Carmel

    After the Second World War, the field of cultural anthropology underwent an explosive development. Sociologists, psychologists, educators, and economists all added to the increasing interest in a discipline which began by assuming that culture is the foundation of social structures and that every institution manifests itself as a system of…

  11. Cultural Diplomacy in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Anthony

    The evolution of European government activities in the sphere of international cultural relations is examined. Section 1 describes the period between World War I and World War II when European governments tried to enhance their prestige and policies by means of cultural propaganda. Section 2 analyzes the period during World War II when the…

  12. Cultural macroevolution matters

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Russell D.

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary thinking can be applied to both cultural microevolution and macroevolution. However, much of the current literature focuses on cultural microevolution. In this article, we argue that the growing availability of large cross-cultural datasets facilitates the use of computational methods derived from evolutionary biology to answer broad-scale questions about the major transitions in human social organization. Biological methods can be extended to human cultural evolution. We illustrate this argument with examples drawn from our recent work on the roles of Big Gods and ritual human sacrifice in the evolution of large, stratified societies. These analyses show that, although the presence of Big Gods is correlated with the evolution of political complexity, in Austronesian cultures at least, they do not play a causal role in ratcheting up political complexity. In contrast, ritual human sacrifice does play a causal role in promoting and sustaining the evolution of stratified societies by maintaining and legitimizing the power of elites. We briefly discuss some common objections to the application of phylogenetic modeling to cultural evolution and argue that the use of these methods does not require a commitment to either gene-like cultural inheritance or to the view that cultures are like vertebrate species. We conclude that the careful application of these methods can substantially enhance the prospects of an evolutionary science of human history. PMID:28739960

  13. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  14. Cultural Policy in Yugoslavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majstorovic, Stevan

    This text, one of a series focusing on various UNESCO Member States, examines how cultural policies are planned and implemented within those nations. The study is limited in scope to institutions and activity directly concerned with the arts. The focus of attention is directed to examination of the principles and methods of cultural policy,…

  15. Grounding Evaluations in Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Maurice; Ryan, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of and the attention given to culture in the evaluation field over the last decade has created a heightened awareness of and need for evaluators to understand the complexity and multidimensionality of evaluations within multicultural, multiracial, and cross-cultural contexts. In this article, the authors discuss how cultural…

  16. Cultural Anthropology and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilleri, Carmel

    After the Second World War, the field of cultural anthropology underwent an explosive development. Sociologists, psychologists, educators, and economists all added to the increasing interest in a discipline which began by assuming that culture is the foundation of social structures and that every institution manifests itself as a system of…

  17. Building Culturally Responsive Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polleck, Jody; Shabdin, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a variety of culturally responsive approaches and activities so as to better know and understand our students' diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. These methods will not only help to make more equitable classrooms where we make meaningful connections with our students--but also yield useful data so as to inform our…

  18. Language and Cultural Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlewood, William T.

    1978-01-01

    Language is inseparable from its cultural context. Considered here are: aspects of culture to be learned (not just odd differences); method; use of suitable, well-balanced materials; aims - informational, communicative (for life situations), and motivational. Motivation is higher in students with favorable attitudes toward the foreign people.…

  19. Throat swab culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... easy to tolerate. In very few people, the sensation of gagging may lead to an urge to vomit or cough. Alternative Names Throat culture and sensitivity; Culture - throat Images Throat anatomy Throat swabs References Nussenbaum B, Bradford CR. Pharyngitis in adults. In: ...

  20. Cultural Competence Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garran, Ann Marie; Werkmeister Rozas, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) adopted 10 discrete standards of culturally competent practice which undergird our commitment to diversity and social justice. The concept of intersectionality is newly emerging in social work, though, causing us to reflect on our current conceptualizations of cultural competence.…

  1. Enhancing students' cultural competence using cross-cultural experiential learning.

    PubMed

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Bertolo, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate community health students' perceptions of their cultural competence. Little is known about students' cultural awareness, knowledge, and skills after their experience working with diverse cultural groups and language barriers. A cross-cultural experiential learning exercise was used as an educational approach. Reflective writing was used to elicit students' attitudes of the other culture and their coping skills. Three themes emerged as cultural awareness and knowledge, observation and learning, and cross-cultural communication. Results underscore the need for student academic preparation using cross-cultural educational approaches to enhance cultural competence.

  2. [Disease, tradition and culture].

    PubMed

    Ritarossi, P

    1989-01-01

    The observation of the present technological society nullifies thesis of the scientific rationalism, that is the equation between magic, popular or primitive culture and underdevelopment. The pathological experience invests every plane of the cultural pattern, so the different levels of technical knowledge, rationality, symbols and magic imagination are mobilized to give a reason to pain; the illness, in addition to representing an indisposition really existing, has a specific cultural meaning too. In fact every culture, following certain parameters, has built ideologic frames; the concept of illness is connected to the classification of the reality. Biology and culture are inseparable. For this, lately, the gnosiological horizons of the science are becoming larger and less dogmatic. The knowledge (in the medicine, too) is a process in fieri, without absolute and final limits.

  3. Culture and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Gächter, Simon; Herrmann, Benedikt; Thöni, Christian

    2010-09-12

    Does the cultural background influence the success with which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate in social dilemma situations? In this paper, we provide an answer by analysing the data of Herrmann et al. (2008a), who studied cooperation and punishment in 16 subject pools from six different world cultures (as classified by Inglehart & Baker (2000)). We use analysis of variance to disentangle the importance of cultural background relative to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences in cooperation. We find that culture has a substantial influence on the extent of cooperation, in addition to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences identified by previous research. The significance of this result is that cultural background has a substantial influence on cooperation in otherwise identical environments. This is particularly true in the presence of punishment opportunities.

  4. Culture and cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Gächter, Simon; Herrmann, Benedikt; Thöni, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Does the cultural background influence the success with which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate in social dilemma situations? In this paper, we provide an answer by analysing the data of Herrmann et al. (2008a), who studied cooperation and punishment in 16 subject pools from six different world cultures (as classified by Inglehart & Baker (2000)). We use analysis of variance to disentangle the importance of cultural background relative to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences in cooperation. We find that culture has a substantial influence on the extent of cooperation, in addition to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences identified by previous research. The significance of this result is that cultural background has a substantial influence on cooperation in otherwise identical environments. This is particularly true in the presence of punishment opportunities. PMID:20679109

  5. Cultural dimensions of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyford, Glen A.

    1990-06-01

    How, what, when and where we learn is frequently discussed, as are content versus process, or right brain versus left brain learning. What is usually missing is the cultural dimension. This is not an easy concept to define, but various aspects can be identified. The World Decade for Cultural Development emphasizes the need for a counterbalance to a quantitative, economic approach. In the last century poets also warned against brutalizing materialism, and Sorokin and others have described culture more recently in terms of cohesive basic values expressed through aesthetics and institutions. Bloom's taxonomy incorporates the category of affective learning, which internalizes values. If cultural learning goes beyond knowledge acquisition, perhaps the surest way of understanding the cultural dimension of learning is to examine the aesthetic experience. This can use myths, metaphors and symbols, and to teach and learn by using these can help to unlock the human potential for vision and creativity.

  6. Using Culture to Teach Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Henry

    Language learning is a form of cultural learning, and cultural learning embraces language learning. The goal of cultural learning is a continuing search for understanding that bridges cultures. Language can be a bridge, a system that constructs reality as it communicates about reality. Education in the U.S. has tended to define culture as American…

  7. Teaching World Cultures through Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauf, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching world cultures in the middle-level geography classroom presents challenges both because of the complexity of culture and because of the characteristics of students of this age. One effective way to teach about a culture is through the use of cultural artifacts. This article discusses how to collect and use cultural artifacts in the…

  8. Teaching World Cultures through Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauf, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching world cultures in the middle-level geography classroom presents challenges both because of the complexity of culture and because of the characteristics of students of this age. One effective way to teach about a culture is through the use of cultural artifacts. This article discusses how to collect and use cultural artifacts in the…

  9. Working with Culturally Diverse Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Elizabeth S.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews demographic and economic trends promoting cultural diversity in postsecondary education. Urges educators to support cultural diversity and respect cultural differences, rather than forcing students to reject their culture of origin and adopt the dominant culture. Discusses instructional implications of ethnic/racial differences,…

  10. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  11. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  12. Culturally-Sensitive Learning Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2010-01-01

    In today's global world, to provide meaningful education, teacher-librarians and their students need to become culturally competent: open to learning about other cultures and sharing one's own culture, able to change personal perspectives, and able to communicate effectively across cultures. Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions provides a…

  13. Cultural Influences on Technical Manuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the cultural elements in developing a technical manual. Shows, through a comparison of two mythical cultures, how the manual will differ when organized for those two cultures. Considers the influences of culture on developing technical documents, specifically manuals. Concludes that the attitudes of a culture are significant factors in…

  14. Blood culture contaminants.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S

    2014-05-01

    Blood cultures are an essential diagnostic tool. However, contamination may impact on patients' care and lead to increased patient stay, additional tests, and inappropriate antibiotic use. The aim of this study was to review the literature for factors that influence the rate of blood culture contamination. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline and CINAHL on blood culture contamination. Hospitals/units should have in place a protocol for staff on how to take blood cultures, incorporating use of an aseptic technique. Studies have shown that several key factors in the process may lower contamination rates such as adherence to a protocol, sampling by peripheral venepuncture route rather than via an intravascular catheter, use of sterile gloves, cleaning tops of blood culture bottles with antiseptics and inoculating blood culture bottles before other blood tubes, samples being taken by a phlebotomy team, monitoring contamination rates, and providing individual feedback and retraining for those with contaminants. Although skin antisepsis is advocated there is still debate on which antiseptic is most effective, as there is no conclusive evidence, only that there is benefit from alcohol-containing preparations. In conclusion, hospitals should aim to minimize their blood culture contamination rates. They should monitor their rate regularly and aim for a rate of ≤3%.

  15. Cultural Evolution and SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Drake Equation for the number of radio communicative technological civilizations in the Galaxy encompasses three components of cosmic evolution: astronomical, biological and cultural. Of these three, cultural evolution totally dominates in terms of the rapidity of its effects. Yet, SETI scientists do not take cultural evolution into account, perhaps for understandable reasons, since cultural evolution is not well-understood even on Earth and is unpredictable in its outcome. But the one certainty for technical civilizations billions, millions, or even thousands of years older than ours is that they will have undergone cultural evolution. Cultural evolution potentially takes place in many directions, but this paper argues that its central driving force is the maintenance, improvement and perpetuation of knowledge and intelligence, and that to the extent intelligence can be improved, it will be improved. Applying this principle to life in the universe, extraterrestrials will have sought the best way to improve their intelligence. One possibility is that they may have long ago advanced beyond flesh-and-blood to artificial intelligence, constituting a postbiological universe. Although this subject has been broached, it has not been given the attention it is due from its foundation in cultural evolution. Nor has the idea of a postbiological universe been carried to its logical conclusion, including a careful analysis of the implications for SETI. SETI scientists, social scientists, and experts in AI should consider the strengths and weaknesses of this new paradigm.

  16. Organizational climate and culture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Benjamin; Ehrhart, Mark G; Macey, William H

    2013-01-01

    Organizational climate and organizational culture theory and research are reviewed. The article is first framed with definitions of the constructs, and preliminary thoughts on their interrelationships are noted. Organizational climate is briefly defined as the meanings people attach to interrelated bundles of experiences they have at work. Organizational culture is briefly defined as the basic assumptions about the world and the values that guide life in organizations. A brief history of climate research is presented, followed by the major accomplishments in research on the topic with regard to levels issues, the foci of climate research, and studies of climate strength. A brief overview of the more recent study of organizational culture is then introduced, followed by samples of important thinking and research on the roles of leadership and national culture in understanding organizational culture and performance and culture as a moderator variable in research in organizational behavior. The final section of the article proposes an integration of climate and culture thinking and research and concludes with practical implications for the management of effective contemporary organizations. Throughout, recommendations are made for additional thinking and research.

  17. a Cultural Market Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HerdaǦDELEN, Amaç; Bingol, Haluk

    Social interactions and personal tastes shape our consumption behavior of cultural products. In this study, we present a computational model of a cultural market and we aim to analyze the behavior of the consumer population as an emergent phenomena. Our results suggest that the final market shares of cultural products dramatically depend on consumer heterogeneity and social interaction pressure. Furthermore, the relation between the resulting market shares and social interaction is robust with respect to a wide range of variation in the parameter values and the type of topology.

  18. Surveillance as cultural practice.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Torin

    2011-01-01

    This special section of The Sociological Quarterly explores research on “surveillance as cultural practice,” which indicates an orientation to surveillance that views it as embedded within, brought about by, and generative of social practices in specific cultural contexts. Such an approach is more likely to include elements of popular culture, media, art, and narrative; it is also more likely to try to comprehend people's engagement with surveillance on their own terms, stressing the production of emic over etic forms of knowledge. This introduction sketches some key developments in this area and discusses their implications for the field of “surveillance studies” as a whole.

  19. HUMAN SARCOMAS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Gaetano; Beth, Elke; Hirshaut, Yashar; Aoki, Tadao; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.; Chopra, Harish C.

    1971-01-01

    In a study of human sarcomas maintained in culture for periods up to two years, the following observations were made. The most prominent cell type in serially cultured osteosarcomas was fibroblastic in appearance. After 16–20 wk in culture some lines spontaneously developed foci of altered cells resembling the foci produced in monolayer cultures by oncogenic viruses. The presence of these foci in the sarcoma cultures was transient, and usually they did not reappear; but in one instance they recurred with a characteristic periodicity of several weeks. From one of the sarcoma lines, in which foci appeared after 5 months in culture, two subcultures were established from stored frozen cells and these both exhibited foci after approximately the same lapse of time. The same phenomenon has been seen with another line, suggesting that the time of appearance of foci is characteristic for particular sarcomas. Foci of similar type could sometimes be induced in monolayer cultures of human fibroblasts by filtered medium from cultured sarcomas; this bore no relation to the presence or absence of foci in the sarcoma cultures at the time the filtrate was prepared. Electron microscopy of the spontaneous and induced foci, and of the sarcoma cultures, revealed no demonstrable virus. 12 out of 15 sarcoma cultures contained an antigen (S) demonstrable by indirect immunofluorescence with human sera. It was not present in any of the original sarcoma specimens, nor in any culture lines other than sarcomas. At least 3–4 wk in culture appear to be required for its demonstration. The antigen was cytoplasmic, occurred in only a small proportion of the cells, and was unpredictably variable in its expression, even in the same culture line. It could be induced in monolayer cultures of human fibroblasts by filtrates of medium from sarcoma cultures. As with the foci, the induction of S antigen in indicator cultures was not dependent upon the expression of antigen in the sarcoma line from which

  20. Popular Culture, Cultural Resistance, and Anticonsumption Activism: An Exploration of Culture Jamming as Critical Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandlin, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter examines popular culture as a site of cultural resistance. Specifically, it explores how "culture jamming," a cultural-resistance activity, can be a form of adult education. It examines adult education and learning as it intersects with both consumerism and popular culture. Focus is placed on a growing social movement of individuals…

  1. Popular Culture, Cultural Resistance, and Anticonsumption Activism: An Exploration of Culture Jamming as Critical Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandlin, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter examines popular culture as a site of cultural resistance. Specifically, it explores how "culture jamming," a cultural-resistance activity, can be a form of adult education. It examines adult education and learning as it intersects with both consumerism and popular culture. Focus is placed on a growing social movement of individuals…

  2. TISSUE CULTURE STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Wayne; Kirk, Paul L.

    1950-01-01

    An improved procedure for measuring the uptake of tracer P32 by tissues in culture is described. It consisted of counting the β-emissions through a specially designed roller tube in which the culture medium could be effectively removed from the system without opening or damaging the cultures. In standard growth-promoting medium, the uptake was shown to be markedly greater than in Tyrode's solution. The uptake curve was found to be essentially parallel with the uptake of P32 in desoxyribo- and ribonucleic acids when standard medium was used, and in desoxyrihonucleic acid when Tyrode's solution was used. This is interpreted to signify that the total uptake of tracer phosphorus approximates the growth in the culture. The value of uptake measurements as a frame of reference for comparison of various types of media and of metabolic studies is indicated. PMID:15406372

  3. Embracing cultural diversity.

    PubMed

    Casady, W M

    2001-01-01

    Healthcare providers from all backgrounds are taught the Western medicine approach with little consideration given to cultural-specific care. Yet, today it is difficult to ignore that approximately 33 percent of Americans originate from ethnically diverse groups. As our population continues to become more diversified, it is imperative that healthcare professionals become more sensitive to cultural differences. Effectively managing cultural diversity in the workplace requires a complex set of skills as well as an understanding of the concept. Communication skills will be challenged in a complex and diverse work environment. Managers must learn to listen. Embracing cultural diversity is a two-step process. The first step begins with personal self-interest and self-examination. The second step in the process is the "awakening." Tomorrow's successful managers will take an active role today in creating an environment that views diversity as an asset to the work force.

  4. Are Canadians Cultural Cuckoos?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickleburgh, Brita

    1977-01-01

    The author believes that teachers have been remiss in transmitting Canadian culture to their students. They have also neglected the development of self-realization and identity in the majority of students. (Author)

  5. Cultural Astronomy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Steven L.

    While Japan is known more for its contributions to modern astronomy than its archaeoastronomical sites, there is still much about the culture's heritage that is of interest in the study of cultural astronomy. This case study provides an overview of historical considerations necessary to understand the place of astronomy in Japanese society as well as methodological considerations that highlight traditional approaches that have at times been a barrier to interdisciplinary research. Some specific areas of study in the cultural astronomy of Japan are discussed including examples of contemporary research based on interdisciplinary approaches. Japan provides a fascinating background for scholars who are willing to go beyond their curiosity for sites of alignment and approach the culture with a desire to place astronomical iconography in social context.

  6. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The test is performed to isolate and identify organisms in the rectum that can cause gastrointestinal symptoms and/or disease.

  7. Ear drainage culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An ear drainage culture is collected by placing a cotton swab gently in the ear canal. The sample is sent to the laboratory for testing to isolate and identify the type of organism causing the ear infection.

  8. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... are very rare. Alternative Names Culture - bone marrow Images Bone marrow aspiration References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Bone marrow aspiration analysis-specimen (biopsy, bone marrow iron stain, iron stain, ...

  9. Museology and Scientific Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunier, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the period of transition and self examination of the museology of science. Defines the main issues and limits of the museum as a means of transmitting a scientific culture and scientific ways. (Author/RT)

  10. Pleural fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pleural fluid ... is used to get a sample of pleural fluid. The sample is sent to a laboratory and ... the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough ...

  11. Hanford cultural resources laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.K.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes activities of the Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) which was established by the Richland Operations Office in 1987 as part of PNL.The HCRL provides support for the management of the archaeological, historical, and traditional cultural resources of the site in a manner consistent with the National Historic Preservation Act, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

  12. Astronomy in Aboriginal culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhathal, Ragbir

    2006-10-01

    In all probability, long before other civilizations had named the celestial objects in the night sky, the indigenous people of Australia had not only given them names but had also built an astronomical knowledge system which they incorporated into their social, cultural and religious life. Their socio-cultural astronomical knowledge system both assists and clashes with Australia's legal system, which is based on English law.

  13. Mainstreaming culture in psychology.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Fanny M

    2012-11-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, the author discusses the inadequacies of sole reliance on either the etic or the emic approach and points out the advantages of a combined emic-etic approach in bridging global and local human experiences in psychological science and practice. With the blurring of the boundaries between North American-European psychologies and psychology in the rest of the world, there is a need to mainstream culture in psychology's epistemological paradigm. Borrowing from the concept of gender mainstreaming that embraces both similarities and differences in promoting equal opportunities, the author discusses the parallel needs of acknowledging universals and specifics when mainstreaming culture in psychology. She calls for building a culturally informed universal knowledge base that should be incorporated in the psychology curriculum and textbooks.

  14. Changing our culture.

    PubMed

    Benzil, Deborah L

    2014-05-01

    Today, a great challenge of our profession is to envision how we will deliver exemplary neurosurgical care in the future. To accomplish this requires anticipating how economic, political, and societal influences will affect our ability to provide the highest quality of patient care in an arena that will look increasingly different from today's world of medicine. Already, our profession is battling a relentless assault as numerous sectors implement change that impacts us and our community every day. Surviving this requires an effective strategy that will involve significant cultural change. To accomplish this, neurosurgery must take an honest look inward and then commit to being the agents of positive cultural change. Such a path will not be easy but should reap important benefits for all of neurosurgery and our patients. Several practical and proven strategies can help us to realize the rewards of changing our culture. Vital to this process is understanding that effecting behavioral change will increase the likelihood of achieving sustainable cultural change. Innovation and diversity are crucial to encourage and reward when trying to effect meaningful cultural change, while appreciating the power of a "Tipping Point" strategy will also reap significant benefits. As a profession, if we adopt these strategies and tactics we can lead our profession to proceed in improvement, and as individuals we can use the spirit that drove us into neurosurgery to become the agents of an enduring and meaningful cultural change that will benefit our patients and us.

  15. PURE CULTURES OF CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis

    1912-01-01

    In experiment I a group of ameboid cells was isolated from a culture of cardiac muscle sixty-three days old, and cultivated in plasma. After several passages, they formed a dense tissue from which ameboid cells radiated. The culture was divided into two parts. The part cultivated in plasma alone kept its morphological characters and continued to produce ameboid cells. The part cultivated upon silk in plasma became modified; the cells lost their ameboid characters, and were transformed into large elongated cells which were united in chains, or interlaced to form a network. In experiment II the round cells taken from a culture of connective tissue seventy-four days old multiplied rapidly. They transformed themselves into elongated cells and produced, after a few passages, a mass of dense connective tissue. From the tissue a large number of elongated cells were constantly growing. In both experiments the tissues originated from the ameboid or round cells extirpated from cultures that were sixty-three and seventy-four days old respectively. These cultures were still growing actively thirty and forty days later; that is, more than one hundred days after the extirpation of the original fragments from the organism. These experiments show that from old cultures it is possible to isolate and propagate cells that belong to a definite type. A tissue, formed by a pure strain of cells, can be obtained in this way, and this new method may be of value in cytological investigations. PMID:19867562

  16. Astronomy and Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.

    2006-08-01

    Astronomy is, by definition, the sum of the material and spiritual values created by mankind and of the institutions necessary to communicate these values. Consequently, astronomy belongs to the culture of each society and its scientific progress does nothing but underline its role in culture. It is interesting that there is even a European society which bears this name "Astronomy for Culture" (SEAC). Its main goal is "the study of calendric and astronomical aspects of culture". Owning ancient evidence of astronomical knowledge, dating from the dawn of the first millennium, Romania is interested in this topic. But Astronomy has a much deeper role in culture and civilization. There are many aspects that deserve to be discussed. Examples? The progress of astronomy in a certain society, in connection with its evolution; the place held by the astronomy in literature and, generally, in art; the role of the SF in the epoch of super-mediatization; astronomy and belief; astronomy and astrology in the modern society, and so forth. These are problems that can be of interest for IAU, but the most important one could be her educational role, in the formation of the culture of the new generation, in the education of the population for the protection of our planet, in the ensuring of a high level of spiritual development of the society in the present epoch.

  17. [Blood culture update].

    PubMed

    Muller-Serieys, C; Bergogne-Bérézin, E

    2002-01-12

    Blood culture is one of the most important bacteriological examinations with important clinical and therapeutic consequences. Blood cultures should be ordered in all patients with signs suggesting septicemia, endocarditis or severe infection (pneumococcal pneumonia, bacterial meningitis with bloodstream dissemination). Blood culture methods have evolved considerably over the last twenty years. After using manual methods for many years, read by non-standardized visual methods, the development of media with defined compositions and supplemented to allow growth of bacteria difficult to culture has been associated with the development of automatic blood culture devices. These devices have undergone rapid improvement. Semi-automatic devices (Bactec NR-660) were rapidly followed by completely automatic techniques, including four devices currently available: since 1989 Bio-Argos (Rio-Rad) and Bact/Alert (Organon-Teknika) and in 1993, Bactec 9240 (Becton-Dickinson) and Vital (BioMérieux). All these devices allow automatic detection of CO2 produced during bacterial growth. Automatic reading systems provide continuous output avoiding the need for invasive methods and thus the risk of contamination in addition to saving time. Potential application to achieve quantitative blood cultures for intensive care units is in the development stage. The reliability of these devices is well recognized and their contribution to severe bacterial infection is undeniable. There are certain limitations however related to material cost and the non-identification of the pathogen involved. Molecular biology techniques open new perspectives in this field. The evolution of techniques, definitions, and pathogenic approach to septicemia must be revisited as new infectious situations have been identified at the same time as new investigation tools resulting from considerable technological progress. New methods of blood culture have largely contributed to this progress.

  18. Exploring Cultural Tensions in Cross-Cultural Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Miu Chung

    2008-01-01

    Discussion of cultural tension in the social work literature is piecemeal. As part of a grounded theory study, this article reports some major findings on cultural tensions experienced by 30 frontline social workers. Cultural tensions caused by cultural similarities and differences among social workers, clients, organizations, and society are…

  19. Culture Circles: A Cultural Self-Awareness Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Gary; Sarason, Yolanda

    1998-01-01

    The Culture Circles exercise involves pairs of students in describing their cultural background, customs, and role models and then describing these things from the point of view of a different cultural background. Debriefing discussions examine what is culture, whether people choose their identity, and the discomfort of difference. (SK)

  20. The Cultural Conundrum: Cultural Literacy in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the potential pitfalls of exposing students from a non-Western culture, such as Thailand, to literature in English with its accompanying baggage of cultural references. Referencing Ed Hirsch, Jr.s, "Cultural Literacy--What Every American Needs to Know," the importance of cultural literacy as opposed to mere lexical literacy is…

  1. From Cultural Awareness to Intercultural Awareness: Culture in ELT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Will

    2012-01-01

    Cultural awareness (CA) has emerged over the last few decades as a significant part of conceptualizing the cultural dimension to language teaching. That is, L2 users need to understand L2 communication as a cultural process and to be aware of their own culturally based communicative behaviour and that of others. However, while CA has provided a…

  2. The Culture Based Model: Constructing a Model of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends reveal that models of culture aid in mapping the design and analysis of information and communication technologies. Therefore, models of culture are powerful tools to guide the building of instructional products and services. This research examines the construction of the culture based model (CBM), a model of culture that evolved…

  3. From Cultural Awareness to Intercultural Awareness: Culture in ELT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Will

    2012-01-01

    Cultural awareness (CA) has emerged over the last few decades as a significant part of conceptualizing the cultural dimension to language teaching. That is, L2 users need to understand L2 communication as a cultural process and to be aware of their own culturally based communicative behaviour and that of others. However, while CA has provided a…

  4. Examining Cultural Intelligence and Cross-Cultural Negotiation Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Kevin S.; Feyerherm, Ann; Gu, Minhua

    2015-01-01

    International negotiation failures are often linked to deficiencies in negotiator cross-cultural capabilities, including limited understanding of the cultures engaged in the transaction, an inability to communicate with persons from different cultural backgrounds, and limited behavioral flexibility to adapt to culturally unfamiliar contexts.…

  5. The effect of cultural interaction on cumulative cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi, Wataru

    2014-07-07

    Cultural transmission and cultural evolution are important for animals, especially for humans. I developed a new analytical model of cultural evolution, in which each newborn learns cultural traits from multiple individuals (exemplars) in parental generation, individually explores around learned cultural traits, judges the utility of known cultural traits, and adopts a mature cultural trait. Cultural evolutionary speed increases when individuals explore a wider range of cultural traits, accurately judge the skill level of cultural traits (strong direct bias), do not strongly conform to the population mean, increase the exploration range according to the variety of socially learned cultural traits (condition dependent exploration), and make smaller errors in social learning. Number of exemplars, population size, similarity of cultural traits between exemplars, and one-to-many transmission have little effect on cultural evolutionary speed. I also investigated how cultural interaction between two populations with different mean skill levels affects their cultural evolution. A population sometimes increases in skill level more if it encounters a less skilled population than if it does not encounter anyone. A less skilled population sometimes exceeds a more skilled population in skill level by cultural interaction between both populations. The appropriateness of this analytical method is confirmed by individual-based simulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Examining Cultural Intelligence and Cross-Cultural Negotiation Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Kevin S.; Feyerherm, Ann; Gu, Minhua

    2015-01-01

    International negotiation failures are often linked to deficiencies in negotiator cross-cultural capabilities, including limited understanding of the cultures engaged in the transaction, an inability to communicate with persons from different cultural backgrounds, and limited behavioral flexibility to adapt to culturally unfamiliar contexts.…

  7. Creating Cultural Consumers: The Dynamics of Cultural Capital Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisida, Brian; Greene, Jay P.; Bowen, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The theories of cultural reproduction and cultural mobility have largely shaped the study of the effects of cultural capital on academic outcomes. Missing in this debate has been a rigorous examination of how children actually acquire cultural capital when it is not provided by their families. Drawing on data from a large-scale experimental study…

  8. Culture Training: Validation Evidence for the Culture Assimilator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Terence R.; And Others

    The culture assimilator, a programed self-instructional approach to culture training, is described and a series of laboratory experiments and field studies validating the culture assimilator are reviewed. These studies show that the culture assimilator is an effective method of decreasing some of the stress experienced when one works with people…

  9. Exploring the 'cultural' in cultural competencies in Pacific mental health.

    PubMed

    Samu, Kathleen Seataoai; Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau

    2009-02-01

    Cultural competency is about the ability of individuals and systems to respond respectfully and effectively to the cultural needs of peoples of all cultures. Its general attributes include knowledge, attitudes, skills and professional judgment. In Pacific mental health, 'the cultural' is generally understood to be ethnic culture. Accordingly, Pacific cultural competencies assume ethnic specific markers. In mental health Pacific cultural competencies has seen a blending of cultural and clinical beliefs and practices. This paper provides an overview of five key theme areas arising from Auckland-based ethnic-specific Pacific workshop data: language, family, tapu relationships, skills and organisation policy. Workshop participants comprised of Pacific mental health providers, Pacific consumers, family members of Pacific consumers and members of the Pacific community members. This paper purports that identifying the perceptions of different Pacific groups on ethnic-specific elements of cultural competencies are necessary to build and strengthen the capacity and capability of mental health services to provide culturally relevant services.

  10. Culture, cultural factors and psychiatric diagnosis: review and projections

    PubMed Central

    ALARCÓN, RENATO D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to provide conceptual justifications for the inclusion of culture and cultural factors in psychiatric diagnosis, and logistic suggestions as to the content and use of this approach. A discussion of the scope and limitations of current diagnostic practice, criticisms from different quarters, and the role and relevance of culture in the diagnostic encounter, precede the examination of advantages and disadvantages of the approach. The cultural content of psychiatric diagnosis should include the main, well-recognized cultural variables, adequate family data, explanatory models, and strengths and weaknesses of every individual patient. The practical aspects include the acceptance of “cultural discordances” as a component of an updated definition of mental disorder, and the use of a refurbished cultural formulation. Clinical “telescoping” strategies to obtain relevant cultural data during the diagnostic interview, and areas of future research (including field trials on the cultural formulation and on “culture bound syndromes”), are outlined. PMID:19812742

  11. Culture, cultural factors and psychiatric diagnosis: review and projections.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Renato D

    2009-10-01

    This paper aims to provide conceptual justifications for the inclusion of culture and cultural factors in psychiatric diagnosis, and logistic suggestions as to the content and use of this approach. A discussion of the scope and limitations of current diagnostic practice, criticisms from different quarters, and the role and relevance of culture in the diagnostic encounter, precede the examination of advantages and disadvantages of the approach. The cultural content of psychiatric diagnosis should include the main, well-recognized cultural variables, adequate family data, explanatory models, and strengths and weaknesses of every individual patient. The practical aspects include the acceptance of "cultural discordances" as a component of an updated definition of mental disorder, and the use of a refurbished cultural formulation. Clinical "telescoping" strategies to obtain relevant cultural data during the diagnostic interview, and areas of future research (including field trials on the cultural formulation and on "culture bound syndromes"), are outlined.

  12. Quality Culture Survey Report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pritesh; Baker, Denyse; Burdick, Rick; Chen, Cylia; Hill, Jonathon; Holland, Morgan; Sawant, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The Parenteral Drug Association conducted an anonymous global survey of quality culture in the pharmaceutical industry to determine whether there is a relationship between certain quality behaviors and certain quality attributes, and whether these quality attributes could be used as surrogates (or proxy variables) to assess quality culture. Other studies have shown that an unhealthy quality culture is a root cause of many quality or compliance issues seen by sites and organizations. Statistical analysis of survey data suggests that certain attributes are driving good behaviors, and the demographic data suggests that this relationship holds irrespective of the geographic location of the site. Executive survey respondents had a more optimistic view of the current state of quality culture than survey respondents at large, with cross-functional vision showing the biggest gap (P-value = 0.07, F-Test). The top five quality attributes that can serve as surrogates for quality culture were (1) Management communication that quality is everyone's responsibility, (2) Site has formal quality improvement objectives and targets, (3) Clear performance criteria for feedback and coaching, (4) Quality topics included in at least half of all-hands meetings, and (5) Collecting error prevention metrics. These identified mature quality attributes are related to management responsibility, and continual improvement of the pharmaceutical quality system sections of ICH Q10, and therefore may be amenable to be incorporated in audit programs or in regulatory inspections. Additional research and discussion is required to build a coherent approach, which the pharmaceutical industry and regulators can adopt.

  13. [Psychotherapy as cultural discourse].

    PubMed

    Józefik, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    It is impossible to think about psychotherapy without reference to the cultural context. In order to understand the development of this domain it is helpful to apply the concept of cultural discourse. When we think about the over one hundred years' history of psychotherapy it becomes clear that understanding of a person, his/her difficulties, psychopathology, the role of a psychotherapist, psychotherapy and its limitations have been changing. It depended on the acknowledged epistemological horizon. Therefore it is important to observe the process of creating discourses related to psychotherapeutic "reality". These discourses are not simply descriptive but they participate in creation of reality. They are not neutral, on the contrary, their application has broad practical, theoretical, ethical and legal consequences. An attempt to describe the culture, or better cultures, we are immersed in, is an attempt to describe the identity of contemporary psychotherapists. This article, referring to the constructionists' perspective and works of Michael Foucault, presents how cultural changes influence psychotherapists' ways of thinking, their practice and presence in social space.

  14. Culture and Happiness.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dezhu; Ng, Yew-Kwang; Lian, Yujun

    Culture is an important factor affecting happiness. This paper examines the predictive power of cultural factors on the cross-country differences in happiness and explores how different dimensions of cultural indices differ in their effects on happiness. Our empirical results show that the global leadership and organizational behavior effectiveness nine culture indices are all significantly related with happiness. Out of these nine indices, power distance (PDI) and gender egalitarianism (GEI) play the most important and stable role in determining subjective well-being (SWB). We further examine the relative importance of the various variables in contributing to the R-squared of the regression. The results show that PDI is the most important, accounting for 50 % of the contributions to R-squared of all variables, or equalling the combined contributions of income, population density and four other traditional variables. The contribution of GEI is 37.1 %, also well surpassing other variables. Our results remain robust even taking account of the different data for culture and SWB.

  15. How Culture Shock Affects Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barna, LaRay M.

    The paper defines the term "culture shock" and discusses the changes that this state can make in a person's behavior. Culture shock refers to the emotional and physiological reaction of high activation that is brought about by sudden immersion in a new culture. Because one's own culture shields one from the unknown and reduces the need to make…

  16. Cultural Dimensions of Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    advanced language skills, and culture and regional expertise with the goals to promote a rethinking of culture and intercultural competence , and how... Intercultural Competence ” (Center for Languages, Cultures, and Regional Studies, United States Military Academy, West Point, NY), 4. 34Headquarters...motivational components that enable individuals to adapt effectively in intercultural environments.”39 The Cross-cultural Competence model

  17. Learning Cultures in Further Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Phil; Anderson, Graham; Colley, Helen; Davies, Jenny; Diment, Kim; Scaife, Tony; Tedder, Mike; Wahlberg, Madeleine; Wheeler, Eunice

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of learning cultures in English Further Education (FE), as revealed in the Transforming Learning Cultures in FE (TLC) research project. In it, we describe four characteristics of a generic FE learning culture: the significance of learning cultures in every site; the significance of the tutor in influencing site…

  18. How Culture Shock Affects Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barna, LaRay M.

    The paper defines the term "culture shock" and discusses the changes that this state can make in a person's behavior. Culture shock refers to the emotional and physiological reaction of high activation that is brought about by sudden immersion in a new culture. Because one's own culture shields one from the unknown and reduces the need to make…

  19. Communication Media in Ancient Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabusch, David M.

    Interest in early means of communication and in the uses and kinds of media that existed in ancient cultures is starting to grow among communication scholars. Conversation analysis of these cultures is obviously impossible, so that the emphasis must rest with material cultural artifacts. Many ancient cultures used non-verbal codes for dyadic…

  20. Youth, Crime, and Cultural Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Explores the criminalization of young people's alternative cultural spaces as a strategy of social and cultural control, a defense of mainstream cultural space and its boundaries. Contemporary social control, the emerging political economy of urban life, and the evolving connections of youth, crime, and cultural space are considered. (SLD)

  1. Culture from the Bottom Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight; Sohn, Jija

    2013-01-01

    The culture concept has been severely criticized for its top-down nature in TESOL, leading arguably to its falling out of favor in the field. But what of the fact that people do "live culturally" (Ingold, 1994)? This article describes a case study of culture from the bottom up--culture as understood and enacted by its individual users.…

  2. Cultural Bias in Testing ESL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargill-Power, C.

    Although cultural content is unavoidable as a backdrop for good language testing, cultural bias in testing English as a second language presents many dangers. A picture cue calling for a correct grammatical response may evoke an incorrect answer if the pictorial content is culturally coded. The cultural background behind a test must be accurately…

  3. Cultural Perspectives Toward Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Li-Li

    2008-01-01

    Cultural conflicts may be derived from using inappropriate language. Appropriate linguistic-pragmatic competence may also be produced by providing various and multicultural backgrounds. Culture and language are linked together naturally, unconsciously, and closely in daily social lives. Culture affects language and language affects culture through…

  4. Culture from the Bottom Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight; Sohn, Jija

    2013-01-01

    The culture concept has been severely criticized for its top-down nature in TESOL, leading arguably to its falling out of favor in the field. But what of the fact that people do "live culturally" (Ingold, 1994)? This article describes a case study of culture from the bottom up--culture as understood and enacted by its individual users.…

  5. Chicanos and Concepts of Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ortego y Gasca, Felipe

    The Chicano culture has been ill-treated and misunderstood in studies that utilize concepts of culture derived from dominant group values and norms. Historical approaches to the study of cultures like the normative approach, taxonomic concept, componential concept, and existential approach have all had impacts upon concepts of Chicano culture.…

  6. Learning Cultures in Further Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Phil; Anderson, Graham; Colley, Helen; Davies, Jenny; Diment, Kim; Scaife, Tony; Tedder, Mike; Wahlberg, Madeleine; Wheeler, Eunice

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of learning cultures in English Further Education (FE), as revealed in the Transforming Learning Cultures in FE (TLC) research project. In it, we describe four characteristics of a generic FE learning culture: the significance of learning cultures in every site; the significance of the tutor in influencing site…

  7. Regional Expertise and Culture Proficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    frameworks Dimensions of cultural variability (e.g., norms and values, GLOBE dimensions , frameworks describing kinship, politics, and religion) that...of Cultural Variability Can describe and assess how cultures vary according to general dimensions (e.g., individualism- collectivism, power...distance); understands how each dimension can influence a particular culture’s thinking and behavior; applies this knowledge to help understand cultural

  8. Kamikazes and cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Allen-Hermanson, Sean

    2017-02-01

    Is cultural evolution needed to explain altruistic selfsacrifice? Some contend that cultural traits (e.g. beliefs, behaviors, and for some "memes") replicate according to selection processes that have "floated free" from biology. One test case is the example of suicide kamikaze attacks in wartime Japan. Standard biological mechanisms-such as reciprocal altruism and kin selection-might not seem to apply here: The suicide pilots did not act on the expectation that others would reciprocate, and they were supposedly sacrificing themselves for country and emperor, not close relatives. Yet an examination of both the historical record and the demands of evolutionary theory suggest the kamikaze phenomenon does not cry out for explanation in terms of a special non-biological selection process. This weakens the case for cultural evolution, and has interesting implications for our understanding of altruistic self-sacrifice.

  9. Cultural history and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Loewenberg, Peter

    2007-01-01

    There is a congruence of hermeneutic method between cultural history and psychoanalysis which includes a recognition of the subjectivity and self-reflexivity of interpretation and of the centrality of emotions in the structuring of historical motivation and action. Psychoanalysis is a humanistic discipline that offers tentative multi-causal conclusions, combining in its method both self-reflection and empiricism, but basing itself on a unique process of inquiry different from either the natural or the cultural sciences. Distinguished shapers of the historian's craft, including Dilthey, Collingwood, and Bloch, used the self as an instrument of research and insight. Freud was a cultural pessimist, as was Burckhardt whom he admired. Leading contemporary American historians, such as Williamson, foreground self-reflection as an acknowledged tool of historical discovery and cognition. The "Bauhaus," 1919-1939, is presented as a case study of creative group process utilizing Winnicott's concepts of transitional space.

  10. Organizational Culture and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  11. Globalization, culture and psychology.

    PubMed

    Melluish, Steve

    2014-10-01

    This article outlines the cultural and psychological effects of globalization. It looks at the impact of globalization on identity; ideas of privacy and intimacy; the way we understand and perceive psychological distress; and the development of the profession of psychology around the world. The article takes a critical perspective on globalization, seeing it as aligned with the spread of neoliberal capitalism, a tendency towards cultural homogenization, the imposition of dominant 'global north' ideas and the resultant growing inequalities in health and well-being. However, it also argues that the increased interconnectedness created by globalization allows for greater acknowledgement of our common humanity and for collective efforts to be developed to tackle what are increasingly global problems. This requires the development of more nuanced understandings of cultural differences and of indigenous psychologies.

  12. Culture systems: air quality.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Poor laboratory air quality is a known hazard to the culture of human gametes and embryos. Embryologists and chemists have employed analytical methods for identifying and measuring bulk and select air pollutants to assess the risk they pose to the embryo culture system. However, contaminant concentrations that result in gamete or embryotoxicity are poorly defined. Combating the ill effects of poor air quality requires an understanding of how toxicants can infiltrate the laboratory, the incubator, and ultimately the culture media. A further understanding of site-specific air quality can then lead to the consideration of laboratory design and management strategies that can minimize the deleterious effects that air contamination may have on early embryonic development in vitro.

  13. Hydroponics or soilless culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, H. D.

    1963-01-01

    Historically, hydroponics is not a new field; plant physiologists have known and used it for some 100 years. Inevitably, some enthusiasts got carried away.Claims were made of enormous potential yields; skyscraper tops were said to be capable of producing enough food for all of their occupants; and closets, basements, garages, etc. were wishfully converted into fields for hydroponic culture. Numerous publications on the subject appeared during this period. Basic requirements for hydropinc techniques are given along with examples of where soilless culture has been used commercially.

  14. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  15. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  16. Hydroponics or soilless culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, H. D.

    1963-01-01

    Historically, hydroponics is not a new field; plant physiologists have known and used it for some 100 years. Inevitably, some enthusiasts got carried away.Claims were made of enormous potential yields; skyscraper tops were said to be capable of producing enough food for all of their occupants; and closets, basements, garages, etc. were wishfully converted into fields for hydroponic culture. Numerous publications on the subject appeared during this period. Basic requirements for hydropinc techniques are given along with examples of where soilless culture has been used commercially.

  17. Neuronal Cell Cultures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    AD-A123 120 NEURONAL . CELL CULTURES( U) FEDERATION OF AMERICAN / SOCIETIES FOR EXPER IMENTAL B IOLOGY BETHES DA MD R BUNOF ET AL 01 0C 82 AFOSR-- a...REPRT NUM2. GOVT ACCESSION No. 3. RECIIENT’S CATALOG NUmBER 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) 5, TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Neuronal Cell Cultures FNLRPR...10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PRZjECT. TASK~ Federation of American Societies for Experi- AREA & WORK UNIT N.jVBERS mental Biology (FASEB), 9650 Rockville

  18. Culture-bound syndromes.

    PubMed

    Levine, R E; Gaw, A C

    1995-09-01

    Since its inception, scholars have struggled with the concept of CBSs. This struggle is reflected in the continuing use of a term that is confusing and inaccurate. Most authors would agree that the term "culture-bound syndrome" was intended to describe forms of otherwise common mental illness that are rendered unusual because of the pathoplastic influence of culture. It was intended not only to describe specific syndromes, but also meanings of illness and non-Western notions of disease causation. The term has become an anachronism, for the word, "syndrome," implies specific disease entities, not illnesses of attribution of idioms of distress. Furthermore, the word "bound" implies that the entities described are restricted to a single culture. Close examination reveals that many of the so-called "culture-bound" syndromes are found in multiple cultures that have in common only that they are "non-Western." It may be unreasonable to expect one term to describe these different concepts. The most accurate of the designations offered might be "folk diagnostic categories." Perhaps the most difficult question remaining is "How can we understand (and classify) these phenomena in such a way that highlights their uniqueness but does not dismiss them as too rare and exotic to warrant attention?" The first step is to recognize that the CBSs are a heterogeneous group of conditions. We must next acknowledge that the concepts represented may be difficult for the average Western clinician to recognize but, in their respective cultures, are neither rare nor unusual. With 80% of our increasingly shrinking world coming from "non-Western" cultures, a familiarity with non-Western notions of disease causation is particularly important for modern clinicians. Many authors have recommended that those CBSs that are "true" syndromes be classified together with their Western counterparts. In order to do this, the folk labels need to be put aside and the fundamental components of each disorder

  19. Perfusion Based Cell Culture Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskanen, A.; Emnéus, J.; Dufva, M.

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers.

  20. Cross-cultural investigations.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Case, R; Bleiker, C; Henderson, B

    1996-01-01

    In Piaget's system, the development of children's cognitive structures is seen as progressing through a universal sequence from sensorimotor, to concrete, to formal logical thought. The data that have been obtained on his measures are problematic in their support for this view, however, because they indicate that adults in traditional societies often fail his formal tasks. Piaget's (1972) interpretation of such findings was that they indicated a problem with his measures, not his theory - if appropriate measures were available, he believed that formal logical operations would be found in all cultures and social groups. Our own interpretation differs. While we acknowledge that adults in all cultures are capable of thinking in a fashion that is more sophisticated, subtle, and complex than that of young children, we see the highest forms of thought as being dependent on the mastery of systems that are cultural creations and not universal human attainments - and we see Piaget's system of formal operations as being just one example of the sort of system that can be created by a culture and passed on from one generation to the next. In a previous investigation, Fiati (1992) studied children who were growing up in isolated, agricultural villages in the Volta region of West Africa. In these communities, life was still a traditional one, and children's experiences with time, money, and mathematical computation were considerably different from those of children who were attending schools in the nearby towns. Under these conditions, Fiati found that village children's skill in using numbers or in thinking about quantitative variables did not develop to a very high level as compared to that of their peers in the towns or as compared to their own thinking about social issues. In the terms used in the present Monograph, it appeared as though children's central conceptual structures for number - in contrast to their central conceptual structures for narrative - did not advance

  1. Cultural similarity, cultural competence, and nurse workforce diversity.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Sandra L; Brush, Barbara L; Moore, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Proponents of health workforce diversity argue that increasing the number of minority health care providers will enhance cultural similarity between patients and providers as well as the health system's capacity to provide culturally competent care. Measuring cultural similarity has been difficult, however, given that current benchmarks of workforce diversity categorize health workers by major racial/ethnic classifications rather than by cultural measures. This study examined the use of national racial/ethnic categories in both patient and registered nurse (RN) populations and found them to be a poor indicator of cultural similarity. Rather, we found that cultural similarity between RN and patient populations needs to be established at the level of local labor markets and broadened to include other cultural parameters such as country of origin, primary language, and self-identified ancestry. Only then can the relationship between cultural similarity and cultural competence be accurately determined and its outcomes measured.

  2. The ethics of cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Cultural competence curricula have proliferated throughout medical education. Awareness of the moral underpinnings of this movement can clarify the purpose of such curricula for educators and trainees and serve as a way to evaluate the relationship between the ethics of cultural competence and normative Western medical ethics. Though rarely stated explicitly, the essential principles of cultural competence are (1) acknowledgement of the importance of culture in people's lives, (2) respect for cultural differences, and (3) minimization of any negative consequences of cultural differences. Culturally competent clinicians promote these principles by learning about culture, embracing pluralism, and proactive accommodation. Generally, culturally competent care will advance patient autonomy and justice. In this sense, cultural competence and Western medical ethics are mutually supportive movements. However, Western bioethics and the personal ethical commitments of many medical trainees will place limits on the extent to which they will endorse pluralism and accommodation. Specifically, if the values of cultural competence are thought to embrace ethical relativity, inexorable conflicts will be created. The author presents his view of the ethics of cultural competence and places the concepts of cultural competence in the context of Western moral theory. Clarity about the ethics of cultural competence can help educators promote and evaluate trainees' integration of their own moral intuitions, Western medical ethics, and the ethics of cultural competence.

  3. Culture, Personality, Health, and Family Dynamics: Cultural Competence in the Selection of Culturally Sensitive Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len

    2010-01-01

    Cultural sensitivity and cultural competence in the selection of culturally sensitive treatments is a requisite for effective counseling practice in working with diverse clients and their families, particularly when clients present with health issues or medical problems. Described here is a strategy for selecting culturally sensitive treatments…

  4. Culture, Personality, Health, and Family Dynamics: Cultural Competence in the Selection of Culturally Sensitive Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len

    2010-01-01

    Cultural sensitivity and cultural competence in the selection of culturally sensitive treatments is a requisite for effective counseling practice in working with diverse clients and their families, particularly when clients present with health issues or medical problems. Described here is a strategy for selecting culturally sensitive treatments…

  5. Dictionary of Black Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskin, Wade; Runes, Richard N.

    This dictionary is an encyclopedic survey of the cultural background and development of the black American, covering the basic issues, events, contributions and biographies germane to the subject. The author-compiler is Chairman of Classical Languages Department at Southeastern State College, Durant, Oklahoma. Richard Runes is practicing law as a…

  6. Public Knowledge Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.; Besley, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    This article first reviews claims for the knowledge economy in terms of excludability, rivalry, and transparency indicating the way that digital goods behave differently from other commodities. In the second section it discusses the theory of "public knowledge cultures" starting from the primacy of practice based on Marx, Wittgenstein and…

  7. Plant Tissue Culture Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert Alan

    Plant tissue culture has developed into a valid botanical discipline and is considered a key area of biotechnology, but it has not been a key component of the science curriculum because of the expensive and technical nature of research in this area. This manual presents a number of activities that are relatively easy to prepare and perform. The…

  8. Cultural Issues in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on cultural issues in organizations. "Emotion Management and Organizational Functions: A Study of Action in a Not-for-Profit Organization" (Jamie Callahan Fabian) uses Hochschild's emotion systems theory and Parsons' social systems theory to explain why members of an organization managed their…

  9. Respectful Youth Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Children are social beings who rely on interactions with others to survive and thrive. Since the human brain is wired to connect, cultures in schools and youth organizations must be designed so youth can bond to supportive peers and adults. Children learn through observation, modeling, and responding to people in their environments. Bronfenbrenner…

  10. Respectful Youth Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Children are social beings who rely on interactions with others to survive and thrive. Since the human brain is wired to connect, cultures in schools and youth organizations must be designed so youth can bond to supportive peers and adults. Children learn through observation, modeling, and responding to people in their environments. Bronfenbrenner…

  11. Language and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramsch, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the research methods and approaches used in the multidisciplinary field of applied language studies or language education over the last fourty years. Drawing on insights gained in psycho- and sociolinguistics, educational linguistics and linguistic anthropology with regard to language and culture, it is organized around five…

  12. Culture and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji, Ed.; And Others

    Representing a refereed selection of papers from the 1994 JALT Kansai Conference, this collection of 25 papers contains formal presentations, teaching experiences, research projects, and ideas for effective teaching. The papers and their authors are, as follows: (1) "Culturally Influenced Communication Patterns: Overview, Implications and…

  13. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  14. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  15. Linguistics and "Cultural Deprivation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, David E.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion of certain methodological issues in linguistics as they bear on the debate over cultural deprivation. Whether or not the non-standard English (NNE) of a minority group can be considered a distinct language with its own grammar is arbitrary and therefore not a useful question. However, one can compare standard and NNE forms for…

  16. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding ... blood culture is a test that looks for germs such as bacteria or fungi in the blood. A doctor might order this test when a child has symptoms of ...

  17. Educating Tomorrow's Culture Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Stephen Mark

    1979-01-01

    In light of the fact that young Americans spend hundreds of dollars each year on the arts yet have little training in developing critical skills, this writer outlines what must be done in school arts programs to educate culture consumers. (Author/JM)

  18. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  19. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  20. Ontology, Language, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Richard Bruce

    The purpose of this essay is to consider some of the practical implications of Martin Heideger's view that "Language is the house of Being," for the academic study of cultural transformation and intercultural communication. The paper describes the ontological basis of Heidegger's work, and the inquiry into Being, and contains sections on…

  1. It Takes a Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckner, Martha; Mausbach, Ann

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, the graduation rate for the Council Bluffs Community School District was, at 68 percent, the lowest in Iowa. District leaders knew that to improve, they needed to create a cultural change throughout the community. They began by getting community members involved in creating a strategic plan and mission statement that included a guarantee…

  2. Rethinking Culture and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambach, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews three books that provide complementary and thought-provoking insights. The three books under review are: (1) "Reproducing class: education, neoliberalism, and the rise of the new middle class in Istanbul," by Henry J. Rutz and Erol M. Balkan; (2) "Technology, culture, family: influences on home life," by…

  3. Students' Conceptions: Culturing Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiberghien, Andree

    2008-01-01

    This commentary on Roth, Lee, and Hwang's paper aims at analysing their theoretical approach in terms of its object of study, and the aspects that are brought to the fore, like the cultural activity of conversation, and those that are overshadowed, like the role of the material world and its perception on learning. This analysis, developed on the…

  4. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  5. Culture and Imperialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Said, Edward W.

    Growing out of a series of lectures given at universities in the United States, Canada, and England, this book reopens the dialogue between literature and the life of its time. It draws dramatic connections between the imperial endeavor and the culture that both reflected and reinforced it, describing a general pattern of relationships between the…

  6. Creating a Collaborative Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Stacey; Fisher, Alice; Brown, Genevieve; Irby, Beverly; Lunenburg, Fred; Creighton, Ted; Czaja, Marion; Merchant, Jimmy; Christianson, Judy

    More and more research is focusing on the importance of a healthy work environment and its impact on workers' well-being and productivity. A culture of collaboration has been shown to have an important impact on school-reform efforts and is recognized by several authors as an effective platform for progress within an organization. A collaborative…

  7. Curriculum Development: Cultural Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John C.

    1978-01-01

    Language and cultural modules are multimedia in nature and non-sequential. Modules should be used in association with the themes and vocabulary found in the main course textbook. Reference is made to the "A-LM German Language Programs" and modules produced by Ontario German teachers in 1976 in West Germany. (SW)

  8. The Culture of Migrancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilvra, Bridget

    Approximately 360,000 people in Florida are migrant and seasonal farmworkers. Although this group includes a wide array of ethnicities with their own cultural characteristics, the shared experience of migrancy lends some common threads to an otherwise diverse population. This publication explores these commonalities, as they relate to educators'…

  9. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by David C. Bjorkquist on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development conference. "Developing Managers for Overseas Assignments in the Pacific Rim: A Study of International HRD Issues in Singapore" (A. Ahad M. Osman-Gani,…

  10. Visual Culture of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Current discussions regarding the notion of visual culture in art educational practice center the actions of the viewer as participant within the networks of visuality common in many contemporary societies. Surveillance technologies and techniques shift this notion of participation from active to passive, from seeing to being seen. This article…

  11. Requiem for Cultural Internationalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninkovich, Frank

    1986-01-01

    Reviews Mary Brown Bullock's 1980 book,"An American Transplant: The Rockefeller Foundation and Peking Union Medical College." Far more than a narrow, scholarly history, this book is a case study of the far-reaching cultural impact of international educational exchange efforts. (JDH)

  12. The Culturally Responsive Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villegas, Ana Maria; Lucas, Tamara

    2007-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the K-12 student population in the United States has become ethnically and linguistically diverse. Not so with the vast majority of teachers, who are generally white, middle class, and monolingual English speaking. Successfully teaching students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds requires a new way…

  13. Pericardial fluid culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Samples of the fluid are placed in various culture media in the laboratory, and the media is observed for the growth of microorganisms. The test is performed when an infection of the heart is suspected or when a pericardial effusion is present.

  14. Supervision as Cultural Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinders, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a framework for "culturally responsive supervision." An understanding of analogic or iconic metaphors reveals the power of language to shape what are regarded as matters of fact. Kinesics, proxemics, and prosody bring into focus channels of nonverbal communication. The concept of "framing" calls attention to the metamessages of verbal…

  15. Storytelling and German Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Connie S. Eigenmann

    The genre of fairytales, one structured form of storytelling, has been labeled "Marchen." German culture is orally transmitted in this generic form, and can be traced to a collection of 210 fairytales, the Grimm brothers'"Kinder-und Taus-Marchen," first published shortly after 1800. For this study, research questions were posed…

  16. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of three papers presented at a symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) moderated by Connie Fletcher at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Intercultural Adjustment of U.S. Expatriates in the People's Republic of China" (Hallett G. Hullinger, Robert E. Nolan)…

  17. Culture and Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji, Ed.; And Others

    Representing a refereed selection of papers from the 1994 JALT Kansai Conference, this collection of 25 papers contains formal presentations, teaching experiences, research projects, and ideas for effective teaching. The papers and their authors are, as follows: (1) "Culturally Influenced Communication Patterns: Overview, Implications and…

  18. Television in American Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Hermene D.

    What is television doing to our society and our culture? What has it done to education? Television has had a great impact on human behavior but rather than communicating, it dictates a philosophy of life, moral judgments and a lifestyle. Television presents a violent image of society where fantasy and reality are often confused. It is a system…

  19. Dictionary of Black Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskin, Wade; Runes, Richard N.

    This dictionary is an encyclopedic survey of the cultural background and development of the black American, covering the basic issues, events, contributions and biographies germane to the subject. The author-compiler is Chairman of Classical Languages Department at Southeastern State College, Durant, Oklahoma. Richard Runes is practicing law as a…

  20. Counseling and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Juan; And Others

    This booklet, developed for school counselors, explores basic considerations for effective counseling of Lau students, defined as those from distinct language and cultural backgrounds, whose home language is other than English and who are not performing conceptually and linguistically at a level equal to district standards. Following a brief…

  1. Cultural Learning Redux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    2016-01-01

    M. Tomasello, A. Kruger, and H. Ratner (1993) proposed a theory of cultural learning comprising imitative learning, instructed learning, and collaborative learning. Empirical and theoretical advances in the past 20 years suggest modifications to the theory; for example, children do not just imitate but overimitate in order to identify and…

  2. The Cultural Twilight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treuer, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author begins by saying how privileged he feels to be included in the celebration of the American Indian Culture and Research Journal (AICRJ) and to toast forty years of American Indian studies at UCLA. He looks back over the field of Native American literature and criticism, then peeks at the present, and last, makes some…

  3. Rebuilding a safety culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, George A.

    1991-11-01

    The development of a culture of safety and NASA since the Challenger accident is reviewed. The technical elements of the strengthened NASA safety program are described, including problem reporting, risk/assessment/risk management, operational safety, and safety assurance are addressed. Future directions in the development of safety are considered.

  4. Writing 302: Writing Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Farnham, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    WRT 302: Writing Culture is an upper-level elective in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Rhode Island (URI). As part of a group of four 300-level courses, Writing 302 draws many junior and senior majors in Writing and Rhetoric, English, and other majors who are looking to add creativity and experience with design to their…

  5. Persian Language & Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mir-Djalali, Elahe

    Designed to be used as complementary instructional material for American students as well as second-generation Iranians in America, this work presents a collection of material for teaching Persian language and culture. Research and analysis of some relevant linguistic issues, interactive methodology of language teaching and acquisition, and models…

  6. Reflections: Bridging Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Julia

    1992-01-01

    Chronicles the confusion and anguish of being caught between traditional Dominican culture and that of modern U.S. society. Relates the author's experiences at a community college, problems in "fitting in," and issues of identity as an immigrant student. (DMM)

  7. Cultural Learning Redux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    2016-01-01

    M. Tomasello, A. Kruger, and H. Ratner (1993) proposed a theory of cultural learning comprising imitative learning, instructed learning, and collaborative learning. Empirical and theoretical advances in the past 20 years suggest modifications to the theory; for example, children do not just imitate but overimitate in order to identify and…

  8. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  9. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of three papers presented at a symposium on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) moderated by Connie Fletcher at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Intercultural Adjustment of U.S. Expatriates in the People's Republic of China" (Hallett G. Hullinger, Robert E. Nolan)…

  10. TEACHING THE CULTURALLY DIFFERENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCREARY, EUGENE

    TEACHING PRACTICES USED SUCCESSFULLY AT THE SECONDARY LEVEL WITH CULTURALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN ARE PRESENTED. STUDENTS SHOULD BE PROVIDED WITH OPPORTUNITIES THAT ALLOW FOR PARTICIPATION, ACHIEVEMENT, AND SUCCESS. THIS CAN BE DONE BY DIVERSIFYING LEARNING EXPERIENCES SO THAT STUDENTS OF ALL INTERESTS CAN DO THINGS THEY LIKE AND CAN DO WELL, BY…

  11. Cultural Vignette: Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ida; And Others

    Developed as part of a multicultural research project conducted in the San Diego Community College District, this booklet presents the findings of an eight-member research team about various elements of Black American culture and history. The booklet begins with a brief history of Black Americans from the time of the arrival of the first slaves to…

  12. Who Owns Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Thomas G.

    1990-01-01

    Suggests that Margaret Mead's distinctions among three kinds of culture--here referred to as "traditional,""transitional," and "learning"--are useful in understanding the current controversy over how much the Western tradition should be emphasized in the curriculum. (EVL)

  13. Quality, Culture and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strydom, J. F.; Zulu, N.; Murray, L.

    2004-01-01

    Higher education in South Africa has been grappling with the issue of quality assurance since the early 1990s. This paper investigates the relationships or tensions between quality, culture and change as a result of the introduction of quality assurance systems in higher education institutions in South Africa. The imperatives for the introduction…

  14. Understanding Quality Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlers, Ulf Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a holistic understanding of quality in higher education which reveals the current debates about accreditation or quality process standards as insufficient, and to propose an enhanced model for quality culture in educational organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The conceptual framework is…

  15. Bone culture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Nicola C.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments described are aimed at exploring PTH regulation of production of collagenase and protein inhibitors of collagenase (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases, TIMP-1 and -2) by osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells under conditions of weightlessness. The results of this work will contribute to information as to whether a microgravity environment alters the functions and responsiveness of the osteoblast. The objectives of the Bone Culture Research (BCR) experiment are: to observe the effects of microgravity on the morphology, rate of proliferation, and behavior of the osteoblastic cells, UMR 106-01; to determine whether microgravy affects the hormonal sensitivity of osteroblastic cells; and to measure the secretion of collagenase and its inhibitors into the medium under conditions of microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: the osteoblast-like cells, UMR-106-01, will be cultured in four NASDA cell culture chambers; two chambers will be subjected to microgravity on SL-J; two chambers will remain on the ground at KSC as ground controls but subjected to an identical set of culture conditions as on the shuttle; media will be changed four times; twice the cells will receive the hormone parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and media collected; cells will be photographed under conditions of microgravity; and media and photographs will be analyzed upon return to determine whether functions of the cells changed.

  16. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  17. Understanding Quality Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlers, Ulf Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a holistic understanding of quality in higher education which reveals the current debates about accreditation or quality process standards as insufficient, and to propose an enhanced model for quality culture in educational organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The conceptual framework is…

  18. Psychiatry and Chinese Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsung-Yi

    1983-01-01

    When we examine the cultural characteristics that influence mental disorders and related behavior among the Chinese, no major differences are found between Chinese and other groups in the range of disorders or in overall prevalence. Several cultural factors influence the recognition and treatment of mental illness, among which are attitudes toward emotional display, somatic as opposed to psychogenic disorders and features of the traditional medical belief system in Chinese culture. The Chinese have a relatively favorable prognosis of schizophrenia, low rates of depressive illness, a strong tendency towards somatization and the presence of several unique culture-bound syndromes. From studying Chinese in Vancouver, it was found that they have a characteristic way of dealing with mental illness in the family, in that there is first a protracted period of intrafamilial coping with serious psychiatric illness, followed by recourse to friends, elders and neighbors in the community; third, consultation with traditional specialists, religious healers or general physicians; fourth, outpatient or inpatient treatment from specialists, and, finally, a process of rejection and scapegoating of the patient. The efficacy of Western psychiatric treatment of Chinese patients has yet to be objectively assessed. PMID:6364576

  19. Understanding Learning Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Phil; Biesta, Gert; James, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper sets out an explanation about the nature of learning cultures and how they work. In so doing, it directly addresses some key weaknesses in current situated learning theoretical writing, by working to overcome unhelpful dualisms, such as the individual and the social, and structure and agency. It does this through extensive use of some…

  20. Third-Culture Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Useem, Ruth Hill; Downie, Richard D.

    1976-01-01

    Children who live abroad with their parents are exposed to a wide diversity of cultural and educational influences, are internationally oriented, and have high career aspirations; when they return to schools in the United States they are often misunderstood by their peers and not sufficiently challenged academically by their teachers. (JD)

  1. Assessing Culturally Competent Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendias, Elnora P.; Guevara, Edilma B.

    2001-01-01

    Eight criteria for culturally competent scholarship (contextuality, relevance, communication styles, awareness of identity and power differences, disclosure, reciprocation, empowerment, time) were applied to an international education/research nursing program. Appropriate measures for each were developed and ways to improve the program were…

  2. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  3. Cultural Vignette: Vietnamese Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Mary Ellen; And Others

    This booklet, developed as part of a multicultural research project conducted in the San Diego Community College District, presents the findings of a nine-member research team on various aspects of the history and culture of Vietnamese Americans. The areas covered are: (1) the Vietnamese as immigrant, which includes a discussion of the trauma and…

  4. Cross-Cultural Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opalko, Jane

    1991-01-01

    The teaching of physics principles by drawing examples from African students' surroundings in a cross-cultural environment is discussed. The concepts of pressure, center of gravity, and the action of salt on melting are described using examples that Nigerien students would understand. (KR)

  5. Linguistics and "Cultural Deprivation."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, David E.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion of certain methodological issues in linguistics as they bear on the debate over cultural deprivation. Whether or not the non-standard English (NNE) of a minority group can be considered a distinct language with its own grammar is arbitrary and therefore not a useful question. However, one can compare standard and NNE forms for…

  6. California Cultural Crossroads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Patricia M.; Francisco, Grace; Keller, Shelly G.

    2007-01-01

    This document is designed for readers who have an interest in developing cultural community partnerships but who may not have an in-depth understanding of the concept or process. It provides a focus for partnership and joint venture discussions within agencies, community organizations or communities at large. Seven public library community…

  7. The Cultural Twilight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treuer, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author begins by saying how privileged he feels to be included in the celebration of the American Indian Culture and Research Journal (AICRJ) and to toast forty years of American Indian studies at UCLA. He looks back over the field of Native American literature and criticism, then peeks at the present, and last, makes some…

  8. Understanding Learning Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Phil; Biesta, Gert; James, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper sets out an explanation about the nature of learning cultures and how they work. In so doing, it directly addresses some key weaknesses in current situated learning theoretical writing, by working to overcome unhelpful dualisms, such as the individual and the social, and structure and agency. It does this through extensive use of some…

  9. Kaleidoscope of Parenting Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirumurthy, Vidya

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author shares observations of parents and children from over 27 countries who participated in a university preschool program, and also provides examples that illustrate cultural variations in parenting behavior. It is shown that the patterns of parental attitudes and behaviors exhibited in the preschool differed greatly…

  10. Cross-Cultural HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by David C. Bjorkquist on cross-cultural human resource development (HRD) at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development conference. "Developing Managers for Overseas Assignments in the Pacific Rim: A Study of International HRD Issues in Singapore" (A. Ahad M. Osman-Gani,…

  11. Art, Culture, and Ethnicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Bernard, Ed.

    The 20 articles in this volume provide varying perspectives on the concepts of multiculturalism, multiethnicity, and global literacy and how to correct art curricula to include the diversity. The development and application of viable multiethnic curricula is a function of the interrelationship of pedagogy and social-cultural realities. The…

  12. Ontology, Language, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Richard Bruce

    The purpose of this essay is to consider some of the practical implications of Martin Heideger's view that "Language is the house of Being," for the academic study of cultural transformation and intercultural communication. The paper describes the ontological basis of Heidegger's work, and the inquiry into Being, and contains sections on…

  13. It Takes a Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruckner, Martha; Mausbach, Ann

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, the graduation rate for the Council Bluffs Community School District was, at 68 percent, the lowest in Iowa. District leaders knew that to improve, they needed to create a cultural change throughout the community. They began by getting community members involved in creating a strategic plan and mission statement that included a guarantee…

  14. Cultural Issues in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on cultural issues in organizations. "Emotion Management and Organizational Functions: A Study of Action in a Not-for-Profit Organization" (Jamie Callahan Fabian) uses Hochschild's emotion systems theory and Parsons' social systems theory to explain why members of an organization managed their…

  15. Language and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramsch, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the research methods and approaches used in the multidisciplinary field of applied language studies or language education over the last fourty years. Drawing on insights gained in psycho- and sociolinguistics, educational linguistics and linguistic anthropology with regard to language and culture, it is organized around five…

  16. Assessing Culturally Competent Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendias, Elnora P.; Guevara, Edilma B.

    2001-01-01

    Eight criteria for culturally competent scholarship (contextuality, relevance, communication styles, awareness of identity and power differences, disclosure, reciprocation, empowerment, time) were applied to an international education/research nursing program. Appropriate measures for each were developed and ways to improve the program were…

  17. Connecting Community and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corine Meredith; White, Meg

    2014-01-01

    In order to be effective educators in the 21st century, it is essential for teacher candidates to develop a deep understanding of the culture and contextual factors surrounding their students' lives, and the ability to apply this understanding to classroom instruction. This action research study discusses how the implementation of teaching…

  18. Cultural and Linguistic Ambidexterity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuszka, Peter

    2007-01-01

    It might sound like a no-brainer that being bilingual or multilingual helps students planning engineering and just about any other career. But it is certainly true and is becoming more important as the economies of nations become more intertwined. What's more, being able to go beyond mere language ability and understand cultural distinctions are…

  19. Military Culture and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    mines the success of transformation. The period between 1914 and 1945 shows the dynamic nature of military innova - tion and the difficulty military...maximized unity of effort. Leaders can foster a disciplined culture that encourages change and innova - tion by “creating a consistent system with clear

  20. Reading, Writing Cultural Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, E. D., Jr.

    A study of reader response to stylistically poor prose indicated that the negative effects were greater if the topic was familiar to the readers. The readers were not measuring the stylistic quality of the text, but rather, the texts were measuring the cultural information of the readers. It is not possible to separate reading skills from the…