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Sample records for mesh hernia repair

  1. Mesh materials and hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Elango, Santhini; Perumalsamy, Sakthivel; Ramachandran, Krishnakumar; Vadodaria, Ketankumar

    2017-01-01

    Hernia incidence has been observed since ancient time. Advancement in the medical textile industry came up with the variety of mesh materials to repair hernia, but none of them are without complications including recurrence of hernia. Therefore individuals once developed with the hernia could not lead a healthy and comfortable life. This drawn attention of surgeons, patients, researchers and industry to know the exact mechanism behind its development, complications and recurrence. Recent investigations highlighted the role of genetic factors and connective tissue disorders being the reason for the development of hernia apart from the abnormal pressure that is known to develop during other disease conditions. This review discusses different mesh materials, their advantages and disadvantages and their biological response after its implantation. PMID:28840830

  2. Which mesh for hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, CN; Finch, JG

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The concept of using a mesh to repair hernias was introduced over 50 years ago. Mesh repair is now standard in most countries and widely accepted as superior to primary suture repair. As a result, there has been a rapid growth in the variety of meshes available and choosing the appropriate one can be difficult. This article outlines the general properties of meshes and factors to be considered when selecting one. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a search of the medical literature from 1950 to 1 May 2009, as indexed by Medline, using the PubMed search engine (). To capture all potentially relevant articles with the highest degree of sensitivity, the search terms were intentionally broad. We used the following terms: ‘mesh, pore size, strength, recurrence, complications, lightweight, properties’. We also hand-searched the bibliographies of relevant articles and product literature to identify additional pertinent reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS The most important properties of meshes were found to be the type of filament, tensile strength and porosity. These determine the weight of the mesh and its biocompatibility. The tensile strength required is much less than originally presumed and light-weight meshes are thought to be superior due to their increased flexibility and reduction in discomfort. Large pores are also associated with a reduced risk of infection and shrinkage. For meshes placed in the peritoneal cavity, consideration should also be given to the risk of adhesion formation. A variety of composite meshes have been promoted to address this, but none appears superior to the others. Finally, biomaterials such as acellular dermis have a place for use in infected fields but have yet to prove their worth in routine hernia repair. PMID:20501011

  3. Surgical mesh for ventral incisional hernia repairs: Understanding mesh design

    PubMed Central

    Rastegarpour, Ali; Cheung, Michael; Vardhan, Madhurima; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Butler, Charles E; Levinson, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mesh has become an indispensable tool in hernia repair to improve outcomes and reduce costs; however, efforts are constantly being undertaken in mesh development to overcome postoperative complications. Common complications include infection, pain, adhesions, mesh extrusion and hernia recurrence. Reducing the complications of mesh implantation is of utmost importance given that hernias occur in hundreds of thousands of patients per year in the United States. In the present review, the authors present the different types of hernia meshes, discuss the key properties of mesh design, and demonstrate how each design element affects performance and complications. The present article will provide a basis for surgeons to understand which mesh to choose for patient care and why, and will explain the important technological aspects that will continue to evolve over the ensuing years. PMID:27054138

  4. Prosthetic Mesh Repair for Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, Cihad; Tüzün, İshak Sefa; Karşıdağ, Tamer; Kızılkaya, Mehmet Celal; Yılmaz, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incarcerated inguinal hernia is a commonly encountered urgent surgical condition, and tension-free repair is a well-established method for the treatment of non-complicated cases. However, due to the risk of prosthetic material-related infections, the use of mesh in the repair of strangulated or incarcerated hernia has often been subject to debate. Recent studies have demonstrated that biomaterials represent suitable materials for performing urgent hernia repair. Certain studies recommend mesh repair only for cases where no bowel resection is required; other studies, however, recommend mesh repair for patients requiring bowel resection as well. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of different surgical techniques performed for strangulated hernia, and to evaluate the effect of mesh use on postoperative complications. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 151 patients who had been admitted to our hospital’s emergency department to undergo surgery for a diagnosis of incarcerated inguinal hernia. The patients were divided into two groups based on the applied surgical technique. Group 1 consisted of 112 patients treated with mesh-based repair techniques, while Group 2 consisted of 39 patients treated with tissue repair techniques. Patients in Group 1 were further divided into two sub-groups: one consisting of patients undergoing bowel resection (Group 3), and the other consisting of patients not undergoing bowel resection (Group 4). Results: In Group 1, it was observed that eight (7.14%) of the patients had wound infections, while two (1.78%) had hematomas, four (3.57%) had seromas, and one (0.89%) had relapse. In Group 2, one (2.56%) of the patients had a wound infection, while three (7.69%) had hematomas, one (2.56%) had seroma, and none had relapses. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to wound infection, seroma

  5. Resorbable biosynthetic mesh for crural reinforcement during hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Alicuben, Evan T; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    The use of mesh to reinforce crural closure during hiatal hernia repair is controversial. Although some studies suggest that using synthetic mesh can reduce recurrence, synthetic mesh can erode into the esophagus and in our opinion should be avoided. Studies with absorbable or biologic mesh have not proven to be of benefit for recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of hiatal hernia repair with modern resorbable biosynthetic mesh in combination with adjunct tension reduction techniques. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had crural reinforcement during repair of a sliding or paraesophageal hiatal hernia with Gore BioA resorbable mesh. Objective follow-up was by videoesophagram and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. There were 114 patients. The majority of operations (72%) were laparoscopic primary repairs with all patients receiving a fundoplication. The crura were closed primarily in all patients and reinforced with a BioA mesh patch. Excessive tension prompted a crural relaxing incision in four per cent and a Collis gastroplasty in 39 per cent of patients. Perioperative morbidity was minor and unrelated to the mesh. Median objective follow-up was one year, but 18 patients have objective follow-up at two or more years. A recurrent hernia was found in one patient (0.9%) three years after repair. The use of crural relaxing incisions and Collis gastroplasty in combination with crural reinforcement with resorbable biosynthetic mesh is associated with a low early hernia recurrence rate and no mesh-related complications. Long-term follow-up will define the role of these techniques for hiatal hernia repair.

  6. Suture versus preperitoneal polypropylene mesh for elective umbilical hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Berger, Rachel L; Li, Linda T; Hicks, Stephanie C; Liang, Mike K

    2014-12-01

    Repair of primary ventral hernias (PVH) such as umbilical hernias is a common surgical procedure. There is a paucity of risk-adjusted data comparing suture versus mesh repair of these hernias. We compared preperitoneal polypropylene (PP) repair versus suture repair for elective umbilical hernia repair. A retrospective review of all elective open PVH repairs at a single institution from 2000-2010 was performed. Only patients with suture or PP repair of umbilical hernias were included. Univariate analysis was conducted and propensity for treatment-adjusted multivariate logistic regression. There were 442 elective open PVH repairs performed; 392 met our inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 126 (32.1%) had a PP repair and 266 (67.9%) underwent suture repair. Median (range) follow-up was 60 mo (1-143). Patients who underwent PP repair had more surgical site infections (SSIs; 19.8% versus 7.9%, P < 0.01) and seromas (14.3% versus 4.1%, P < 0.01). There was no difference in recurrence (5.6% versus 7.5%, P = 0.53). On propensity score-adjusted multivariate analysis, we found that body mass index (odds ratio [OR], 1.10) and smoking status (OR, 2.3) were associated with recurrence. Mesh (OR, 2.34) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (OR, 1.95) were associated with SSI. Only mesh (OR, 3.41) was associated with seroma formation. Although there was a trend toward more recurrence with suture repair in our study, this was not statistically significant. Mesh repair was associated with more SSI and seromas. Further prospective randomized controlled trial is needed to clarify the role of suture and mesh repair in PVH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hiatal hernia repair with biologic mesh reinforcement reduces recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E; Shaligram, A; Reynoso, J F; Kothari, V; Oleynikov, D

    2014-01-01

    The utility of mesh reinforcement for small hiatal hernia found especially during antireflux surgery is unknown. Initial reports for the use of biological mesh for crural reinforcement during repair for defects greater than 5 cm have been shown to decrease recurrence rates. This study compares patients with small hiatal hernias who underwent onlay biologic mesh buttress repair versus those with suture cruroplasty alone. This is a single-institution retrospective review of all patients undergoing repair of hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm between 2002 and 2009. The patients were evaluated based on surgical repair: one group undergoing crural reinforcement with onlay biologic mesh and other group with suture cruroplasty only. Seventy patients with hiatal hernia measuring 1-5 cm were identified. Thirty-eight patients had hernia repair with biologic mesh, and 32 patients had repair with suture cruroplasty only. Recurrence rate at 1 year was 16% (5/32) in patients who had suture cruroplasty only and 0% (0/38) in the group with crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh (statistically significant, P = 0.017). Suture cruroplasty alone appears to be inadequate for hiatal hernias measuring 1-5 cm with significant recurrence rate and failure of antireflux surgery. Crural reinforcement with absorbable mesh may reduce hiatal hernia recurrence rate in small hiatal hernias.

  8. Lightweight polypropylene mesh fixation in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Rizzello, Mario; Greco, Francesco; Iorio, Olga; Iossa, Angelo; Silecchia, Gianfranco

    2013-09-01

    The choice of the mesh and fixation methods in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair is a crucial issue in preventing complications and recurrence. The authors report a series of 40 consecutive laparoscopic incisional hernia repairs, focusing on the use of lightweight polypropylene mesh and on the way of mesh fixation. Forty laparoscopic incisional hernia repairs performed consecutively in 38 patients (16 males, 22 females) were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups depending on tacks used: Titanium tacks vs absorbable tacks. All patients received totally laparoscopic incisional hernia repair by the use of lightweight polypropylene mesh. No major post-operative complications were reported. Post-operative pain (evaluated by VNS) was higher in Group A (titanium tacks, p < 0.05). No differences in follow-up as well as in recurrence incidence (one case in both groups, <6 months time interval) were reported. Securestrap™ absorbable tacks are safe and effective and easy to use and did not increase the risk of mesh dislocation compared with non-absorbable tacks. The specific design well fits the lightweight polypropylene mesh Physiomesh™. Further evaluations in larger randomized studies are needed to confirm these preliminary data.

  9. The lightweight and large porous mesh concept for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Junge, Karsten; Klinge, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    In modern hernia surgery, there are two competing mesh concepts which often lead to controversial discussions, on the one hand the heavyweight small porous model and on the other, the lightweight large porous hypothesis. The present review illustrates the rationale of both mesh concepts and compares experimental data with the first clinical data available. In summary, the lightweight large porous mesh philosophy takes into consideration all of the recent data regarding physiology and mechanics of the abdominal wall and inguinal region. Furthermore, the new mesh concept reveals an optimized foreign body reaction based on reduced amounts of mesh material and, in particular, a significantly decreased surface area in contact with the recipient host tissues by the large porous model. Finally, recent data demonstrate that alterations in the extracellular matrix of hernia patients play a crucial role in the development of hernia recurrence. In particular, long-term recurrences months or years after surgery and implantation of mesh can be explained by the extracellular matrix hypothesis. However, if the altered extracellular matrix proves to be the weak area, the decisive question is whether the amount of material as well as mechanical and tensile strength of the surgical mesh are really of significant importance for the development of recurrent hernia. All experimental evidence and first clinical data indicate the superiority of the lightweight large porous mesh concept with regard to a reduced number of long-term complications and particularly, increased comfort and quality of life after hernia repair.

  10. Initial outcomes of laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair with mesh.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Steven; Armstrong, Chris; Smith, Brian R; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2013-10-01

    The use of mesh in laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair (LHR) may reduce the risk of late hernia recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate initial outcomes and recurrence rate of 92 patients who underwent LHR reinforced with a synthetic bioabsorbable mesh. Surgical approaches included LHR and Nissen fundoplication (n = 64), LHR without fundoplication (n = 10), reoperative LHR (n = 9), LHR with a bariatric operation (n = 6), and emergent LHR (n = 3). The mean length of hospital stay was 2 ± 3 days (range, 1 to 30 days). There were no conversions to open laparotomy and no intraoperative complications. One of 92 patients (1.1%) required intensive care unit stay. The 90-day mortality was zero. Minor complications occurred in 3.3 per cent, major complications in 2.2 per cent, and late complications in 5.5 per cent of patients. There were no perforations or early hernia recurrence. The 30-day reoperation rate was 1.1 per cent. For patients with available 1-year follow-up, the overall recurrence rate was 18.5 per cent with a mean follow-up of 30 months (range, 12 to 51 months). LHR repair with mesh is associated with low perioperative morbidity and no mortality. The use of bioabsorbable mesh appears to be safe with no early hiatal hernia recurrence or late mesh erosion. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the long-term rate of hernia recurrence associated with LHR with mesh.

  11. Intra Peritoneal Polypropylene Mesh and Newer Meshes in Ventral Hernia Repair: What EBM Says?

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, H K; Lakshman, K

    2013-10-01

    Incisional hernias and other ventral hernias are common surgical problems. It is estimated that incisional hernia complicates about 2 % to 10 % of laparotomies. Ventral and incisional hernia repairs are among the common surgeries done by a general surgeon. It is proven beyond any doubt that suture repair of these hernias should not be done as recurrence rates are unacceptably high, some series reporting as high as 54 % on long-term follow-up. A prosthetic mesh should always be used in ventral hernia repair (VHR). Now, the polypropylene mesh (PPM) has become the prosthetic mesh of choice in the repair of hernias, including inguinal hernia. However, with the advent of laparoscopic repair where the mesh is placed intraperitoneally, concerns regarding safety of PPM are raised. Newer meshes are introduced, claiming lesser complication rate. Many types of newer meshes are available now. Newer meshes are invariably costlier than PPM by 15-20 times. Is this extra cost worth? We looked in to available literature for an answer.

  12. The argument for lightweight polypropylene mesh in hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Cobb, William S; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2005-03-01

    The development of polypropylene prosthetics revolutionized surgery for the repair of abdominal wall hernias. A tension-free mesh technique has drastically reduced recurrence rates for all hernias compared to tissue repairs and has made it possible to reconstruct large ventral defects that were previously irreparable. The repair of abdominal wall defects is one of the most commonly performed general surgical procedures, with over 1 million polypropylene implants inserted each year. Surprisingly, little research has been performed to investigate the interaction of abdominal wall forces on a ventral hernia repair or the required amount or strength of the foreign-body material necessary for an adequate hernia repair. The long-term consequences of implantable polypropylene prosthetics are not without concern. The body generates an intense inflammatory response to the prosthetic that results in scar plate formation, increased stiffness of the abdominal wall, and shrinkage of the biomaterial. Reducing the density of polypropylene and creating a ''light weight'' mesh theoretically induces less foreign-body response, results in improved abdominal wall compliance, causes less contraction or shrinkage of the mesh, and allows for better tissue incorporation. A review of the laboratory data and short-term clinical follow-up is reviewed to provide a strong basis or argument for the use of ''light weight'' prosthetics in hernia surgery.

  13. Open Retromuscular Repair of Parastomal Hernias with Synthetic Mesh.

    PubMed

    Beffa, Lucas R; Warren, Jeremy A; Cobb, William S; Knoedler, Bryan; Ewing, Joseph A; Carbonell, Alfredo M

    2017-08-01

    Parastomal hernias (PHs) cause significant morbidity in patients with permanent ostomies, and several laparoscopic and open repair techniques have been described. We report our experience with open retromuscular repair of PHs using permanent synthetic mesh. A prospectively maintained database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients undergoing PH repair. Primary outcomes are surgical site occurrence, surgical site infection (SSI), and hernia recurrence. Variables were analyzed using Pearson's χ2 test or Fisher's exact test. Values of P < 0.05 were considered significant. Forty-six patients underwent retromuscular PH repair with permanent synthetic mesh. There were 26 patients with colostomies and 20 with ileostomies. All the patients were repaired using a keyhole retromuscular technique and direct passage of stoma through mesh. Transversus abdominis release was performed in 65.2 per cent of cases. Permanent synthetic polypropylene mesh was used in all cases. Surgical site occurrence occurred in 47.8 per cent of patients, SSI in 17.4 per cent, and hernia recurrence in 21.7 per cent. Resiting the stoma yielded the highest rate of SSI (40%) compared with leaving the stoma in situ (11.8%) or rematuring the stoma (0%; P = 0.011). Open keyhole retromuscular PH repair of PH with permanent synthetic mesh is safe, effective, and durable.

  14. Laparoscopic-assisted Ventral Hernia Repair: Primary Fascial Repair with Polyester Mesh versus Polyester Mesh Alone.

    PubMed

    Karipineni, Farah; Joshi, Priya; Parsikia, Afshin; Dhir, Teena; Joshi, Amit R T

    2016-03-01

    Laparoscopic-assisted ventral hernia repair (LAVHR) with mesh is well established as the preferred technique for hernia repair. We sought to determine whether primary fascial closure and/or overlap of the mesh reduced recurrence and/or complications. We conducted a retrospective review on 57 LAVHR patients using polyester composite mesh between August 2010 and July 2013. They were divided into mesh-only (nonclosure) and primary fascial closure with mesh (closure) groups. Patient demographics, prior surgical history, mesh overlap, complications, and recurrence rates were compared. Thirty-nine (68%) of 57 patients were in the closure group and 18 (32%) in the nonclosure group. Mean defect sizes were 15.5 and 22.5 cm(2), respectively. Participants were followed for a mean of 1.3 years [standard deviation (SD) = 0.7]. Recurrence rates were 2/39 (5.1%) in the closure group and 1/18 (5.6%) in the nonclosure group (P = 0.947). There were no major postoperative complications in the nonclosure group. The closure group experienced four (10.3%) complications. This was not a statistically significant difference (P = 0.159). The median mesh-to-hernia ratio for all repairs was 15.2 (surface area) and 3.9 (diameter). Median length of stay was 14.5 hours (1.7-99.3) for patients with nonclosure and 11.9 hours (6.9-90.3 hours) for patients with closure (P = 0.625). In conclusion, this is one of the largest series of LAVHR exclusively using polyester dual-sided mesh. Our recurrence rate was about 5 per cent. Significant mesh overlap is needed to achieve such low recurrence rates. Primary closure of hernias seems less important than adequate mesh overlap in preventing recurrence after LAVHR.

  15. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal (TEP) Inguinal Hernia Repair Using 3-dimensional Mesh Without Mesh Fixation.

    PubMed

    Aliyazicioglu, Tolga; Yalti, Tunc; Kabaoglu, Burcak

    2017-08-01

    Approximately one fifth of patients suffer from inguinal pain after laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair. There is existing literature suggesting that the staples used to fix the mesh can cause postoperative inguinal pain. In this study, we describe our experience with laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia surgery using 3-dimensional mesh without mesh fixation, in our institution. A total of 300 patients who had undergone laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair with 3-dimensional mesh in VKV American Hospital, Istanbul from November 2006 to November 2015 were studied retrospectively. Using the hospital's electronic archive, we studied patients' selected parameters, which are demographic features (age, sex), body mass index, hernia locations and types, duration of operations, preoperative and postoperative complications, duration of hospital stays, cost of surgery, need for analgesics, time elapsed until returning to daily activities and work. A total of 300 patients underwent laparoscopic TEP hernia repair of 437 inguinal hernias from November 2006 to November 2015. Of the 185 patients, 140 were symptomatic. Mean duration of follow-up was 48 months (range, 6 to 104 mo). The mean duration of surgery was 55 minutes for bilateral hernia repair, and 38 minutes for unilateral hernia repair. The mean duration of hospital stay was 0.9 day. There was no conversion to open surgery. In none of the cases the mesh was fixated with either staples or fibrin glue. Six patients (2%) developed seroma that were treated conservatively. One patient had inguinal hernia recurrence. One patient had preperitoneal hematoma. One patient operated due to indirect right-sided hernia developed right-sided hydrocele. One patient had wound dehiscence at the umbilical port entry site. Chronic pain developed postoperatively in 1 patient. Ileus developed in 1 patient. Laparoscopic TEP inguinal repair with 3-dimensional mesh without mesh fixation can be performed as safe as

  16. Evaluation of Composite Mesh for Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Jim F.; Agee, Neal; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Heath, Jessica J.; Lau, Kwan N.; McKillop, Iain H.; Sindram, David; Martinie, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Composite mesh prostheses incorporate the properties of multiple materials for ventral hernia repair. This study evaluated a polypropylene/ePTFE composite mesh with a novel internal polydioxanone (PDO) absorbable ring. Methods: Composite mesh was placed intraperitoneally in 16 pigs through an open laparotomy and explanted at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Intraabdominal adhesions were measured laparoscopically. Host tissue in-growth was assessed histologically and tensiometrically. Degradation of the internal PDO ring component was also measured tensiometrically. Appropriate statistical tests were used, and P≤.05 indicated significance. Results: No adhesions were formed in 50% of the grafts explanted at 8 weeks and 25% of grafts explanted at 12 weeks. There were significantly more vascular structures at 8 weeks, 73.5±28, compared with 2 weeks, 6.75±2 (P≤.01). The T-peel force at the mesh-host tissue interface was not significantly different among time points. The absorbable PDO ring underwent complete degradation by 12 weeks. Conclusions: This composite mesh was associated with minimal intraabdominal adhesions, progressive in-growth of host tissues, and complete degradation of a novel internal PDO ring that aided mesh positioning. This composite hernia mesh showed a favorable performance in a porcine model of open ventral hernia repair. PMID:21985713

  17. Mesh erosion into urinary bladder following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Arjun Singh; Kumar, Ameet; Kumar, Bharath N.

    2017-01-01

    Along with advantages, evolving surgical techniques bring unique complications. A young male developed urinary symptoms a few months after undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. On evaluation, mesh erosion into the urinary bladder was found. Removal of mesh with repair of bladder was done. A vesico-cutaneous fistula resulted which was managed with repeat surgery. We review all such cases reported in literature; discuss the etiopathogenesis, presentation, management and possible preventive measures. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the 12th case being reported. PMID:28281479

  18. Choice of mesh for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, J R; Gögenur, I; Rosenberg, J

    2007-12-01

    Surgical treatment of ventral hernias has changed dramatically over the past decades by the introduction of laparoscopy and prosthetic biomaterials for reinforcement of the abdominal wall. There are many meshes available on the market for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR), and new meshes are introduced regularly. Experimental and clinical documentation for safety and efficacy are, however, often not available for the clinician. The choice of mesh may therefore be difficult in clinical practice. We present a review of the current literature regarding safety measures such as adhesions, fistulas, and infections as well as the available data on pain, recurrence, mesh shrinkage, and seroma formation after LVHR. The literature was searched systematically using PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE for controlled studies, prospective descriptive series and retrospective case series. The literature clearly points in the direction of very few mesh-related complications after LVHR. Experimental studies and theoretical considerations may argue for using a covered mesh, i.e., a composite mesh, or ePTFE for LVHR in humans, although it is important to stress that there are no human data at the moment to support this. Concerns about using pure polypropylene mesh in the intraperitoneal position may be re-evaluated with the experience of lightweight macropore meshes from open surgery in mind. There is a tendency towards greater shrinkage in ePTFE-based meshes but no differences seems to exist between different mesh materials in other relevant outcome parameters from clinical series. The literature cannot give general recommendations for choice of mesh based on randomized controlled trials. The final choice of mesh for LVHR will therefore typically be based on surgeons' preference and cost while we await further data from randomized controlled clinical trials.

  19. Cost of ventral hernia repair using biologic or synthetic mesh.

    PubMed

    Totten, Crystal F; Davenport, Daniel L; Ward, Nicholas D; Roth, J Scott

    2016-06-15

    Patients undergoing ventral hernia repair (VHR) with biologic mesh (BioM) have higher hospital costs compared with synthetic mesh (SynM). This study compares 90-d pre- and post-VHR hospital costs (180-d) among BioM and SynM based on infection risk. This retrospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program study matched patient perioperative risk with resource utilization cost for a consecutive series of VHR repairs. Patient infection risks, clinical and financial outcomes were compared in unmatched SynM (n = 303) and BioM (n = 72) groups. Propensity scores were used to match 35 SynM and BioM pairs of cases with similar infection risk for outcomes analysis. BioM patients in the unmatched group were older with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and wound classification, and they more frequently underwent open repairs for recurrent hernias. Wound surgical site infections were more frequent in unmatched BioM patients (P = 0.001) as were 180-d costs ($43.8k versus $14.0k, P < 0.001). Propensity matching resulted in 31 clean cases. In these low-risk patients, wound occurrences and readmissions were identical, but 180-d costs remained higher ($31.8k versus $15.5k, P < 0.001). There were no differences in hospital 180-d diagnostic, emergency room, intensive care unit, floor, pharmacy, or therapeutic costs. However, 180-d operating room services and supply costs were higher in the BioM group ($21.1k versus $7.1k, P < 0.001). BioM is used more commonly in hernia repairs involving higher wound class and ASA scores and recurrent hernias. Clinical outcomes after low-risk VHRs are similar; SynM utilization in low-risk hernia repairs was more cost-effective. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Central mesh recurrence after incisional hernia repair with Marlex--are the meshes strong enough?

    PubMed

    Langer, C; Neufang, T; Kley, C; Liersch, T; Becker, H

    2001-09-01

    The use of biomaterial meshes in the repair of incisional abdominal wall hernias is now widely accepted internationally. The introduction of synthetic meshes to achieve tension-free repair has led to a satisfactory reduction in the recurrence rate to less than 10%. However, the use of such biomaterials can result in the occurrence of undesirable complications such as increased risk of infection, seromas, restriction of the abdominal wall and failure caused by mesh shrinkage. Additionally, at the time of writing there is much discussion concerning the potential risk of a persistent foreign body reaction directly associated with the meshes with regard to possible malignant transformation. As such, the trend seems to be toward the use of lighter meshes utilizing less non-absorbable material. One particular novel mesh theoretically capable of guaranteeing the necessary mechanical stability uses 70% less biomaterial. Against this background, we report a central mesh recurrence through the mesh following incisional hernia repair with a Marlex mesh. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a central mesh recurrence, and we discuss a possible mechanism with particular emphasis on the required abdominal wall forces both physiologically and after incisional hernia repair.

  1. Magnetic Resonance–Visible Meshes for Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pallwein-Prettner, Leo; Koch, Oliver Owen; Luketina, Ruzica Rosalia; Lechner, Michael; Emmanuel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the first human use of magnetic resonance–visible implants for intraperitoneal onlay repair of incisional hernias regarding magnetic resonance presentability. Methods: Ten patients were surgically treated with intraperitoneally positioned superparamagnetic flat meshes. A magnetic resonance investigation with a qualified protocol was performed on postoperative day 1 and at 3 months postoperatively to assess mesh appearance and demarcation. The total magnetic resonance–visible mesh surface area of each implant was calculated and compared with the original physical mesh size to evaluate potential reduction of the functional mesh surfaces. Results: We were able to show a precise mesh demarcation, as well as accurate assessment of the surrounding tissue, in all 10 cases. We documented a significant decrease in the magnetic resonance–visualized total mesh surface area after release of the pneumoperitoneum compared with the original mesh size (mean, 190 cm2 vs 225 cm2; mean reduction of mesh area, 35 cm2; P < .001). At 3 months postoperatively, a further reduction of the surface area due to significant mesh shrinkage could be observed (mean, 182 cm2 vs 190 cm2; mean reduction of mesh area, 8 cm2; P < .001). Conclusion: The new method of combining magnetic resonance imaging and meshes that provide enhanced signal capacity through direct integration of iron particles into the polyvinylidene fluoride base material allows for detailed mesh depiction and quantification of structural changes. In addition to a significant early postoperative decrease in effective mesh surface area, a further considerable reduction in size occurred within 3 months after implantation. PMID:25848195

  2. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40–132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain. PMID:27635414

  3. Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair Using Memory-Ring Mesh: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Takeshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takao, Yoshimune; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) inguinal hernia repair using a memory-ring patch (Polysoft™ mesh). Patients and Methods. Between April 2010 and March 2013, a total of 76 inguinal hernias underwent TAPP repair using Polysoft mesh in 67 adults under general anesthesia. Three different senior resident surgeons performed TAPP repair under the instruction of a specialist surgeon. Nine patients had bilateral hernias. The 76 hernias included 37 indirect inguinal hernias, 29 direct hernias, 1 femoral hernia, 1 pantaloon hernia (combined direct/indirect inguinal hernia), and 8 recurrent hernias after open anterior hernia repair. The immediate postoperative outcomes as well as the short-term outcomes (mainly recurrence and incidence of chronic pain) were studied. Results. There was no conversion from TAPP repair to anterior open repair. The mean operation time was 109 minutes (range, 40-132) for unilateral hernia repair. Scrotal seroma was diagnosed at the operation site in 5 patients. No patient had operation-related orchitis, testicle edema, trocar site infection, or chronic pain during follow-up. Conclusions. The use of Polysoft mesh for TAPP inguinal hernia repair does not seem to adversely affect the quality of repair. The use of this mesh is therefore feasible and safe and may reduce postoperative pain.

  4. Simplified technique of mesh fixation during laparoscopic repair of abdominal ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Piskun, G; Shaftan, G; Fogler, R

    1999-04-01

    The current techniques for intraperitoneal mesh fixation are complex and time-consuming. We present here a simple technique for the fixation of the mesh during laparoscopic intraperitoneal ventral hernia repair.

  5. COPAIBA OIL INFLUENCES VENTRAL HERNIA REPAIR WITH VICRYL® MESH?

    PubMed Central

    YASOJIMA, Edson Yuzur; TEIXEIRA, Renan Kleber Costa; HOUAT, Abdallah de Paula; COSTA, Felipe Lobato da Silva; YAMAKI, Vitor Nagai; FEITOSA-JUNIOR, Denilson José Silva; SILVA, Carlos Augusto Moreira; BRITO, Marcus Vinicius Henriques

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of meshes in hernia surgical repair promoted revolution in the surgical area; however, some difficulties had come, such as a large area of fibrosis, greater postoperative pain and risk of infection. The search for new substances that minimize these effects should be encouraged. Medicinal plants stand out due possible active ingredients that can act on these problems. Aim: To check the copaiba oil influence in the repair of abdominal defects in rats corrected with Vicryl(c) mesh. Method: Twenty-four Wistar rats were submitted to an abdominal defect and corrected with Vicryl(c) mesh. They were distributed into two groups: control and copaíba via gavage, administered for seven days after surgery. The analysis of the animals took place on 8, 15 and 22 postoperative days. It analyzed the amount of adhesions and microscopic analysis of the mesh. Results: There was no statistical difference regarding the amount of adhesions. All animals had signs of acute inflammation. In the control group, there were fewer macrophages in animals of the 8th compared to other days and greater amount of necrosis on day 8 than on day 22. In the copaiba group, the number of gigantocytes increased compared to the days analyzed. Conclusion: Copaiba oil showed an improvement in the inflammatory response accelerating its beginning; however, did not affect the amount of abdominal adhesions or collagen fibers. PMID:26537143

  6. Mesh Inguinal Hernia Repair and Appendectomy in the Treatment of Amyand's Hernia with Non-Inflamed Appendices

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Emin; Sisik, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Amyand's hernia is defined as protrusion of the vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac. It is a rare entity with variable clinical presentation from normal vermiform appendix to abscess formation due to perforation of acute appendicitis. Although surgical treatment includes appendectomy and hernia repair, appendectomy in the absence of an inflamed appendix and use of a mesh in cases of appendectomy remain to be controversial. The aim of this study was to review the experience of mesh inguinal hernia repair plus appendectomy performed for Amyand's hernia with noninflamed appendices. There were five male patients with a mean age of 42.4 ± 16.1 years in this retrospective study in which Amyand's hernia was treated with mesh inguinal hernia repair plus appendectomy for noninflamed appendices. Patients with acute appendicitis and perforated vermiform appendix were excluded. There were four right sided and one bilateral inguinal hernia. Postoperative courses were uneventful. During the follow-up period (14.0 ± 7.7 months), there was no inguinal hernia recurrence. Mesh inguinal hernia repair with appendectomy can be performed for Amyand's hernia in the absence of acute appendicitis. However, presence of fibrous connections between the vermiform appendix and the surrounding hernia sac may be regarded as a parameter to perform appendectomy. PMID:28194430

  7. A meta-analysis comparing lightweight meshes with heavyweight meshes in Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunlin; Wu, Bo; Yang, Zhili; Deng, Xianzhao; Kang, Jie; Guo, Bomin; Fan, Youben

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of lightweight and heavyweight mesh on postoperative recovery in Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library were used to search for published clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which compared lightweight meshes with heavyweight meshes in Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair. Two independent reviewers assessed the trials for eligibility and quality, and all the related data matching our standards were abstracted for meta-analysis by RevMan 5.0 software. The evaluation criteria included recurrence, pain, seroma, hematoma, the sensation of a foreign body, wound infection, urine retention, and testicular atrophy. A total of 2231 hernias from 11 RCTs were included. Compared with a heavyweight polypropylene mesh, the lightweight mesh led to less postoperative chronic pain (odds ratio [OR] = 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.51-0.82; P < .05) and less sensation of a foreign body (OR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.40-0.78; P < .05), regardless of whether the mesh was made of partially absorbable or nonabsorbable material. There was no significant difference in postoperative recurrence, seroma, hematoma, wound infection, urine retention, and testicular atrophy. Current evidence suggests that the use of a lightweight mesh is associated with less postoperative pain and less sensation of a foreign body, without increasing the incidence of recurrence. Further high-quality, long-term follow-up RCTs are needed to provide more reliable evidence.

  8. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... The surgeon makes several small incisions in the abdomen that allow surgical tools into the openings to repair the hernia. Laparoscopic surgery can be performed with or without surgical mesh. Open Repair - The surgeon makes an incision near the ...

  9. Enterocutaneous fistula due to mesh fixation in the repair of lateral incisional hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Reddy, Rajesh; Dharanipragada, Kadambari; Jagdish, Sadasivan

    2008-12-02

    Enterocutaneous fistula following mesh repair of incisional hernia is usually due to mesh erosion of the underlying viscus and presents late. We describe an early enterocutaneous fistula due to an unusual but a potential mode of bowel injury during mesh fixation. This case is reported to emphasize the need for greater attention to the technique of mesh fixation. We suggest laparoscopic guidance to prevent this serious complication in lateral Incisional hernias with ill defined edges of the defect.

  10. Enterocutaneous fistula due to mesh fixation in the repair of lateral incisional hernia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Reddy, Rajesh; Dharanipragada, Kadambari; Jagdish, Sadasivan

    2008-01-01

    Enterocutaneous fistula following mesh repair of incisional hernia is usually due to mesh erosion of the underlying viscus and presents late. We describe an early enterocutaneous fistula due to an unusual but a potential mode of bowel injury during mesh fixation. This case is reported to emphasize the need for greater attention to the technique of mesh fixation. We suggest laparoscopic guidance to prevent this serious complication in lateral Incisional hernias with ill defined edges of the defect. PMID:19055713

  11. Single-Port Onlay Mesh Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernias after Failed Anterior and Laparoscopic Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Despite the exponential increase in the use of laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, a growing number of patients are presenting with recurrent hernias after conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs have failed. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of these hernias. Methods: Patients referred with two or more recurrences of inguinal hernia underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1, 2009, to June 24, 2014. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made, and an SIL port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques were used: chopstick and inline dissection, 5.5-mm/52-cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments. The peritoneum was incised above the pubic symphysis, and dissection was continued laterally and proximally, raising the inferior flap below the previous extraperitoneal mesh while reducing any direct, indirect, femoral, or cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh, which was fixed to the pubic ramus, as well as superiorly, with nonabsorbable tacks before the inferior border was fixed with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: Nine male patients underwent SIL-IPOM. Their mean age was 53 years and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes, with a hospital stay of 1 day. The umbilical scar length was 23 mm at the 6-week follow-up. There were no intra-/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence of the hernia during a mean follow-up of 24 months. Conclusion: Inguinal hernias recurring after two or more failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be safely and efficiently treated with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25848186

  12. Polypropylene mesh repair of a unilateral, congenital hernia in the inguinal region in a Thoroughbred filly

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Valerie J.; Jann, Henry W.

    2009-01-01

    A 2-day-old Thoroughbred intact female was presented for a large subcutaneous swelling in the right inguinal region. Surgical repair was performed using a double layer polypropylene mesh. To the authors’ knowledge, there have been no previous reports of surgical repair of congenital body wall hernias with polypropylene mesh in foals. PMID:19721780

  13. Functional impairment and complaints following incisional hernia repair with different polypropylene meshes.

    PubMed

    Welty, G; Klinge, U; Klosterhalfen, B; Kasperk, R; Schumpelick, V

    2001-09-01

    The influence of mesh material on the clinical outcome of hernia repair has often been neglected, although recent studies have clearly demonstrated the importance of mesh properties for integration in the abdominal wall. Of particular significance are the amount of mesh material and the pore size. In the following study, patients received different mesh types with distinct amounts of polypropylene and of various pore sizes for incisional hernia repair. We investigated whether the type of material influenced the clinical and functional outcomes. Between 1991 and 1999, 235 patients received polypropylene meshes in a sublay position for incisional hernia repair: 115 patients were implanted with a Marlex heavy-weight mesh (Mhw mesh), 37 patients with an Atrium heavy-weight mesh (Ahw mesh) and 83 with a Vypro low-weight mesh (Vlw mesh). The study protocol included ultrasound examination and 3D-stereography in all patients, with a total follow-up of 24 +/- 13 months (Mhw-mesh), 11 +/- 8 months (Ahw-mesh) and 8 +/- 7 months (Vlw-mesh). Our findings demonstrate that the side effects of mesh implantation, comprising paraesthesia and restriction of abdominal wall mobility, were significantly affected by the type of material implanted. Three-dimensional stereographic examinations were well in accordance with our clinical findings. Our data support the hypothesis that the use of low-weight large-pore meshes is advantageous for abdominal wall function.

  14. Laparoscopic Mesh Versus Open Preperitoneal Mesh Versus Conventional Technique for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Bo; Hallerbäck, Bengt; Glise, Hans; Anesten, Bengt; Smedberg, Sam; Román, Jonas

    1999-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of the laparoscopic technique in hernia repair regarding time to full recovery and return to work, complications, recurrence rate, and economic aspects. Summary Background Data Several studies have shown advantages in terms of less pain and faster recovery after laparoscopic hernia repair, whereas others have not, and the cost-effectiveness has been questioned. The laparoscopic technique must be thoroughly compared with the open procedures before its true place in hernia surgery can be defined. Methods Six hundred thirteen male patients aged 40 to 75 years were randomized to the conventional procedure, preperitoneal mesh placed by the open technique, or laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh (TAPP). Follow-up was after 7 days, 8 weeks, and 1 year. Results Of 613 patients undergoing surgery, 604 (98.5%) were followed for 1 year. Patients who underwent TAPP gained full recovery after 18.4 days, compared with 24.2 days for open mesh (p < 0.001) and 26.4 days for the conventional procedure (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent TAPP returned to work after 14.7 days, compared with 17.7 days for open mesh (p = 0.05) and 17.9 days for the conventional procedure (p = 0.04). They also had significantly less restriction in physical activities after 7 days. The TAPP procedure was more expensive, mainly as a result of longer surgical time and equipment costs, even after compensation for earlier return to work. Complications were more common in the TAPP group, with a varying pattern between the groups. Four recurrences in the conventional, 11 in the open mesh, and 4 in the TAPP group were recorded after 1 year (p = n.s.). Conclusion The laparoscopic technique results in both shorter time to full recovery and shorter time to return to work, at the price of substantially increased costs. PMID:10450737

  15. Proposed technique for inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh: avoiding fixation to undesired structures.

    PubMed

    Porrero, J L; Cano-Valderrama, O; Castillo, M J; Alonso, M T

    2015-10-01

    Self-gripping meshes have been developed to avoid fixing sutures during inguinal hernia repair. Operative time is shorter when using a self-gripping mesh than with conventional Lichtenstein repair. However, these meshes can be difficult to handle because they fix to undesired structures. The aim of this report is to describe a new technique to avoid this problem. Inguinal hernia dissection is made as usual. Once dissection is finished, a Parietex ProGrip(®) (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland) flat sheet mesh is cut depending on the size needed. A small split is made between the lower and medium third of the mesh to mark where the split for the spermatic cord will be. Using this mark, the upper third of the mesh is folded over the medium third, hiding the microgrips that make this a self-gripping mesh. In this way, only the lower third of the mesh has the microgrips exposed and the mesh can be fixed to the pubic bone and inguinal ligament without fixation to undesired structures. Once the lower third of the mesh is fixed, the split for the spermatic cord is completed and the upper part of the mesh is passed below the spermatic cord. Then, the mesh is unfolded to expose the microgrips again and the medium and upper third of the mesh are descended to its final position. This proposed technique for inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh makes the surgery easier, avoiding mesh fixation to undesired structures.

  16. A Cost-Utility Assessment of Mesh Selection in Clean-Contaminated Ventral Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Fischer, John P; Basta, Marten N; Krishnan, Naveen M; Wink, Jason D; Kovach, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Mesh reinforcement can reduce hernia recurrence, but mesh selection is poorly understood, particularly in contaminated defects. Acellular dermal matrix has enabled single-stage ventral hernia repair in clean-contaminated wounds but can be associated with higher complications and cost compared with synthetic mesh. This study evaluated the cost-utility of synthetic mesh and acellular dermal matrix for clean-contaminated ventral hernia repairs. A systematic review of articles comparing outcomes for synthetic and acellular dermal matrix repairs identified 14 ventral hernia repair-specific health states. Quality-adjusted life years were determined through Web-based visual analog scale survey of 300 nationally representative individuals. Overall expected cost and quality-adjusted life-years for ventral hernia repair were assessed using a Monte Carlo simulation with sensitivity analyses. Synthetic mesh reinforcement had an expected cost of $15,776 and quality-adjusted life-year value gained of 21.03. Biological mesh had an expected cost of $23,844 and quality-adjusted life-year value gained of 20.94. When referencing a common baseline (do nothing), acellular dermal matrix (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, 3378 ($/quality-adjusted life years)) and synthetic mesh (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, 2208 ($/quality-adjusted life years)) were judged cost-effective, although synthetic mesh was more strongly favored. Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis demonstrated that synthetic mesh was the preferred and most cost-effective strategy in 94 percent of simulations, supporting its overall greater cost-utility. Despite varying the willingness-to-pay threshold from $0 to $100,000 per quality-adjusted life-year, synthetic mesh remained the optimal strategy across all thresholds in sensitivity analysis. This cost-utility analysis suggests that synthetic mesh repair of clean-contaminated hernia defects is more cost-effective than acellular dermal matrix.

  17. A comparison of outcomes and cost in VHWG grade II hernias between Rives-Stoppa synthetic mesh hernia repair versus underlay biologic mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J P; Basta, M N; Mirzabeigi, M N; Kovach, S J

    2014-01-01

    The current literature is void of evidence-based guidelines regarding optimal choice of mesh. We aim to perform a comparative outcome analysis of synthetic mesh and acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in Ventral Hernia Working Grade (VHWG) grade II hernias with primary fascial closure. A retrospective review of patients undergoing ventral hernia repair (VHR) by the senior author (S.J.K.) from 2007 to 2012 was performed. Patients undergoing VHR with primary fascial closure were risk stratified using the VHWG defined grading system. Seventy-two patients met the abovementioned inclusion criteria with 45 receiving synthetic mesh and 27 receiving ADM. The mean length of follow-up was 12.1 ± 9.1 months. Patients were, on average, 53.2 ± 11.6 years of age with a BMI of 33.9 ± 10.6 kg/m(2). The overall incidence of surgical site occurrence (SSO) in the cohort was 41.7 % and the incidence of hernia recurrence was 5.6 %. 30-day mortality was 1.2 %. Bivariate analysis demonstrated that obesity (P = 0.038) and number of comorbidities (P = 0.043) were associated with SSO. Bivariate analysis demonstrated that prior failed hernia, use of ADM, and operative time were associated with higher rates of hernia recurrence; however, adjusted multivariate regression found only prior failed hernia (OR = 4.1, P = 0.03) and biologic mesh (OR = 3.4, P = 0.046) to be independently associated with recurrent hernia. Comparison of mesh types revealed few differences in preoperative or operative characteristics between synthetic mesh and acellular dermal matrices (ADM). The rate of hernia recurrence was significantly higher with ADM (14.8 % vs. 0.0 %, P = 0.017). Patients receiving ADM repairs incurred significantly greater cost ($56,142.1 ± 54,775.5 vs. $30,599.8 ± 39,000.8, P < 0.001). These data suggest synthetic mesh is indicated in higher risk VHWG grade II repairs. In comparison to ADM, synthetic mesh was associated with significantly fewer hernia recurrences

  18. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia Using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Mesh.

    PubMed

    Godazandeh, Gholamali; Mortazian, Meysam

    2012-10-01

    We report the cases of two patients diagnosed with Morgagni hernia who presented with nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Both underwent laparoscopic surgery that used a dual-sided mesh, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF; Dynamesh IPOM®). The procedures were successful and both patients were discharged with no complications. There was no recurrence in 18 months of follow up.Herein is the report of these cases and a literature review.

  19. Laparoscopic Repair of Morgagni Hernia Using Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Godazandeh, Gholamali; Mortazian, Meysam

    2012-01-01

    We report the cases of two patients diagnosed with Morgagni hernia who presented with nonspecific abdominal symptoms. Both underwent laparoscopic surgery that used a dual-sided mesh, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF; Dynamesh IPOM®). The procedures were successful and both patients were discharged with no complications. There was no recurrence in 18 months of follow up.Herein is the report of these cases and a literature review. PMID:24829663

  20. Single-Institution Financial Analysis of Biologic Versus Synthetic Mesh Hernia Repair: A Retrospective Analysis of Patients Readmitted for Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Otake, Leo R; Satterwhite, Thomas; Echo, Anthony; Chiou, Grace; Lee, Gordon K

    2013-07-11

    The advent and proliferation of commercially available biologic mesh material has expanded the repertoire of hernia repair materials available to the surgeon. Given the higher initial cost of these mesh materials relative to synthetic materials such as polypropylene, there has been debate regarding the purported benefit of the use of biologic mesh. This study is a single-institution review of complex hernia repairs using both biologic and synthetic mesh materials. The patients included in the analyses were admitted to the institution at least twice for management of hernia; this permitted specific evaluation of a given diagnosis, hernia, in the same patient, but at different points in time. In a subset of patients, hernia repair was performed upon the second admission with conversion from biologic or synthetic mesh, which had been placed at the initial repair. The objective of this study was to evaluate the financial implications of mesh choice. Specific parameters reviewed included type of mesh used, total costs of hospitalization, direct cost associated with the hernia repair, total collections, and percentage of collections relative to total charges. Through such analysis, our aim was to determine whether there were any variances in revenue and costs associated with the application of either mesh material or the associated clinical scenarios.

  1. Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia Using Surgisis Mesh and Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant is an effective long-term treatment for repair of inguinal hernia. This case series involved 38 adult patients with 51 inguinal hernias treated in a primary care center. Methods: Between December 2002 and May 2005, 38 patients with 45 primary and 6 recurrent inguinal hernias were treated with laparoscopic repair by the total extra-peritoneal mesh placement (TEP) technique using Surgisis mesh secured into place with fibrin sealant. Postoperative complications, incidence of pain, and recurrence were recorded, as evaluated at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 1 year, and with a follow-up questionnaire and telephone interview conducted in May and June 2005. Results: The operations were successfully performed on all patients with no complications or revisions to an open procedure. Average follow-up was 13 months (range, 1 to 30). One hernia recurred (second recurrence of unilateral direct hernia), indicating a 2% recurrence rate. Conclusions: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia using Surgisis mesh secured with fibrin sealant can be effectively used to treat primary, recurrent, direct, indirect, and bilateral inguinal hernias in adults without complications and minimal recurrence within 1-year of follow-up. PMID:17575758

  2. Evaluation of tension-free mesh inguinal hernia repair in Nigeria: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Arowolo, O A; Agbakwuru, E A; Adisa, A O; Lawal, O O; Ibrahim, M H; Afolabi, A I

    2011-01-01

    Tension-free mesh inguinal hernia repair is becoming increasingly popular worldwide. However, reports are sparse in Nigeria. To evaluate the impact, outcome and cost implication of tension free inguinal hernia repair in a Nigerian setting. A prospective study of all consecutive adults patients with uncomplicated inguinal hernia who had mesh repair over a period of 12 months was undertaken. A large sheet of 900cm2 polyproylene mesh material was used for all the patients in the study. All wounds were opened on the third postoperative day while sutures were removed on the eight day. Patients were followed up for one year. A total number of 30 patients had tension-free mesh ingunal hernia repair. Their ages ranged from 21 to 78 years (mean 47.2±15.5) years with a female to male ratio of 1:15. Complete inguinoscrotal hernia was the commonest type of groin hernia accounting for 40% of the cases. The repair of posterior wall which entailed placement of mesh was completed at a median time of 15 minutes. While two (6.7%) and one (3.3%) had wound oedema and groin pain respectively at one month, none of the patients had these complications or recurrence at a median of five months follow-up period. Tension-free mesh inguinal hernia repair was well tolerated and affordable to our patients. Pain and infections, reported to be the common complications of this procedure were infrequent in this study. A larger study is recommended to help confirm these findings.

  3. Laparoscopic repair of voluminous symptomatic hiatal hernia using absorbable synthetic mesh.

    PubMed

    Berselli, Mattia; Livraghi, Lorenzo; Latham, Lorenzo; Farassino, Luca; Rota Bacchetta, Gian Luca; Pasqua, Noemi; Ceriani, Ileana; Segato, Sergio; Cocozza, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Hiatal hernia is a common disorder and a controversial topic. In symptomatic voluminous hernias laparoscopic surgery and use of mesh can be considered. An initial experience in voluminous hiatal hernia laparoscopic repair using absorbable glycolic acid/trimethylene carbonate synthetic mesh is reported. Retrospective study from an institutional database was performed to analyze laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using absorbable synthetic mesh from January 2010 to December 2013. All preoperative symptoms and exams were collected and a standardized procedure was performed. Clinical and radiological follow-up was performed. Eight patients underwent laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia performed by two highly skilled laparoscopic surgeons. One Toupet and seven Nissen fundoplications were tailored. No conversions into laparotomy, neither intraoperative complications nor mortality occurred. After a median follow-up of 23.5 months (range 14 - 44) no mesh complications occurred and all patients are asymptomatic. Two radiological recurrences (25%) were detected. Voluminous symptomatic hiatal hernias can be successfully treated in a high-volume and long-term experienced laparoscopic surgical center by the use of an absorbable synthetic mesh. Further studies and a longer-term follow-up are necessary to confirm this preliminary report.

  4. Laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernias with the new type of meshes: randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Grubnik, Aleksandra V.; Vorotyntseva, Kseniya O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) was first reported by Le Blanc and Booth in 1993. Many studies are available in the literature that have shown that laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernia is preferred over open repair because of lower recurrence rates (less than 10%), less wound morbidity, less pain, and early return to work. Aim To identify the long-term outcomes between the different types of meshes and two techniques of mesh fixation, i.e., tacks (method Double crown) and transfascial polypropylene sutures. Material and methods A total of 92 patients underwent LIVHR at our department between January 2009 and August 2012. The hernias were umbilical in 26 patients, paraumbilical in 15 patients and incisional in 51 patients. All patients admitted for LIVHR were randomized to either group I (tacker fixation of ePTFE meshes) or group II (suture fixation of meshes with nitinol frame) using computer-generated random numbers with block randomization and sealed envelopes for concealed allocation. Results The mean mesh fixation time was significantly higher in the tacker fixation group (117 ±15 min vs. 72 ±6 min, p < 0.01). There were no conversions in either group. The median postoperative hospital stay was 3.5 ±1.5 days. All patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, 12 and every 6 months thereafter postoperatively. There were 5 recurrences in the study population. In group I there were 4 patients with recurrence, and only 1 patient in the group with meshes with a nitinol frame. Conclusions Meshes of the new generation with a nitinol framework can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. The fixation of these meshes is very simple using 3–4 transfascial sutures. The absence of shrinkage of these meshes makes the probability of recurrence minimal. Absence of tackers allows postoperative pain to be minimized. We consider that these new meshes can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair

  5. Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oguntodu, Olakunle F.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J.; Dzandu, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. Methods: This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m2. Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. Conclusion: The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction. PMID:25587212

  6. Transvaginal Repair of a Large Chronic Porcine Ventral Hernia with Synthetic Mesh Using NOTES

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ben; Whang, Susan H.; Bachman, Sharon L.; Andres Astudillo, J.; Sporn, Emanuel; Miedema, Brent W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ventral incisional hernias still remain a common surgical problem. We tested the feasibility of transvaginal placement of a large synthetic mesh to repair a porcine hernia. Methods: Seven pigs were used in this survival model. Each animal had creation of a 5-cm hernia defect and underwent a transvaginal repair of the defect with synthetic mesh. A single colpotomy was made using a 12-cm trocar for an overtube. The mesh was cut to size and placed through the trocar. A single-channel gastroscope with an endoscopic atraumatic grasper was used for grasping sutures. Further fascial sutures were placed every 5cm. Results: Mesh repair was feasible in all 7 animals. Mean operative time was 133 minutes. Technical difficulties were encountered. No gross contamination was seen at the time of necropsy. However, 5 animals had positive mesh cultures; 7 had positive cultures in the rectouterine space in enrichment broth or on direct culture. Conclusion: Transvaginal placement of synthetic mesh to repair a large porcine hernia using NOTES is challenging but feasible. Future studies need to be conducted to develop better techniques and determine the significance of mesh contamination. PMID:20932375

  7. Composite mesh and gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap for perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Hübner, Gunnar; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Perineal hernia is an uncommon complication following abdominoperineal rectum resection. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for perineal hernia repair, including perineal, laparoscopic and abdominal approaches. Repair techniques can be classified into primary suture techniques, mesh placements and repairs with autogenous tissue. We report a 68-year-old man with a perineal hernia, who underwent a pelvic floor reconstruction with a transperineal composite mesh and a gluteal fasciocutaneous rotation flap. We conclude that a combined approach with transperineal mesh reconstruction and gluteal fasciocutaneous flap could be an alternative choice in perineal hernia repair after abdominoperineal resection.

  8. A prospective randomised trial comparing mesh types and fixation in totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Cristaudo, Adam; Nayak, Arun; Martin, Sarah; Adib, Reza; Martin, Ian

    2015-05-01

    The totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach for surgical repair of inguinal hernias has emerged as a popular technique. We conducted a prospective randomised trial to compare patient comfort scores using different mesh types and fixation using this technique. Over a 14 month period, 146 patients underwent 232 TEP inguinal hernia repairs. We compared the comfort scores of patients who underwent these procedures using different types of mesh and fixation. A non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with absorbable tacks (Control group) was compared with either a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm folding slit mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 2), a partially-absorbable 15 × 10 cm mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) or a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with 2 ml fibrin sealant (Group 4). Outcomes were compared at 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks using the Carolina Comfort Scale (CCS) scores. At 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks, the median global CCS scores were low for all treatment groups. Statistically significant differences were seen only for median CCS scores and subscores with the use of partially-absorbable mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) at weeks 2 and 4. However, these were no longer significant at week 12. In this study, the TEP inguinal hernia repair with minimal fixation results in low CCS scores. There were no statistical differences in CCS scores when comparing types of mesh, configuration of the mesh or fixation methods.

  9. Biomechanical analyses of prosthetic mesh repair in a hiatal hernia model.

    PubMed

    Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Schmid, Sofie; Otto, Jens; Klink, Christian Daniel; Roeth, Anjali; Nolting, Jochen; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Klinge, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Recurrence rate of hiatal hernia can be reduced with prosthetic mesh repair; however, type and shape of the mesh are still a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of four conventional meshes: pure polypropylene mesh (PP-P), polypropylene/poliglecaprone mesh (PP-U), polyvinylidenefluoride/polypropylene mesh (PVDF-I), and pure polyvinylidenefluoride mesh (PVDF-S). Meshes were tested either in warp direction (parallel to production direction) or perpendicular to the warp direction. A Zwick testing machine was used to measure elasticity and effective porosity of the textile probes. Stretching of the meshes in warp direction required forces that were up to 85-fold higher than the same elongation in perpendicular direction. Stretch stress led to loss of effective porosity in most meshes, except for PVDF-S. Biomechanical impact of the mesh was additionally evaluated in a hiatal hernia model. The different meshes were used either as rectangular patches or as circular meshes. Circular meshes led to a significant reinforcement of the hiatus, largely unaffected by the orientation of the warp fibers. In contrast, rectangular meshes provided a significant reinforcement only when warp fibers ran perpendicular to the crura. Anisotropic elasticity of prosthetic meshes should therefore be considered in hiatal closure with rectangular patches.

  10. Telerobotic Laparoscopic Repair of Incisional Ventral Hernias Using Intraperitoneal Prosthetic Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Hourmont, Katherine; Wasielewski, Annette

    2003-01-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair shortens the length of hospital stay and achieves low rates of hernia recurrence. The inherent difficulties of performing advanced laparoscopy operations, however, have limited the adoption of this technique by many surgeons. We hypothesized that the virtual operative field and hand-like instruments of a telerobotic surgical system could overcome these limitations. We present herein the first 2 reported cases of telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with mesh. The operations were accomplished with the da Vinci telerobotic surgical system. The hernia defects were repaired with dual-sided, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. The mesh was secured in place with 8 sutures that were passed through the abdominal wall, and 5-mm surgical tacks were placed around the circumference of the mesh. The 2 operations were accomplished with total operative times of 120 and 135 minutes and total operating room times of 166 and 180 minutes, respectively. The patients were discharged home on postoperative days 1 and 4. The surgeon sat in an ergonomically comfortable position at a computer console that was remote from the patient. Immersion of the surgeon within the 3-dimensional virtual operative field expedited each stage of these procedures. The articulation of the wristed telerobotic instruments greatly facilitated reaching the anterior abdominal cavity near the abdominal wall. This report indicates that telerobotic laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is feasible and suggests that telepresence technology facilitates this procedure. PMID:12722992

  11. Cyanoacrylate surgical glue for mesh fixation in laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallejo, Luis; Couto-Gonzalez, Ivan; Concheiro-Coello, Pablo; Brea-Garcia, Beatriz; Taboada-Suarez, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an attempt to find the ideal surgical technique for mesh fixation during laparoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair, we evaluate the use of a synthetic surgical glue (N-butyl-cyanoacrylate-Glubran 2) in an effort to reduce postoperative pain and the complications associated with the use of staples. We have prospectively evaluated 61 consecutive patients (73 hernias) with a minimum follow-up period of 18 months and an average of 29.7 months, without any significant complications present. The majority (59%) only required low dosages of painkillers during the first 24 hours after surgery and have not experienced any cases of chronic pain or recurring hernias in the time period described. On the basis of this initial experience, the use of the surgical glue used to repair inguinal hernias with the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal technique has been proved to be a simple and effective surgical method for mesh fixation.

  12. Hydrogel coated mesh decreases tissue reaction resulting from polypropylene mesh implant: implication in hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Poppas, D P; Sung, J J; Magro, C M; Chen, J; Toyohara, J P; Ramshaw, B J; Felsen, D

    2016-08-01

    Use of polypropylene mesh (PPM) in hernia repair is associated with tissue reactivity. We examined, in a rat model, a novel non-biodegradable hydrogel coated PPM which may allow for decreased inflammation and a decreased foreign body reaction. Through a dorsal midline incision, a 2 cm × 2 cm section of PPM (either coated or uncoated) was placed on the fascial surface 1.5 cm from the incision on the dorsal wall of Sprague-Dawley rats. At 2 and 12 weeks after placement, the PPM and surrounding tissue were harvested. A board-certified dermatopathologist examined H&E stained slides for fibrosis and foreign body reaction. In addition, tissues were stained for apoptotic cells, oxidative damage, macrophages, fibroblasts, neovascularization and metalloproteases. At 2 and 12 weeks, there was a greater than 95 % decrease in foreign body giant cells in coated PPM samples compared to uncoated; fibrosis was decreased by 50 %. At 2 and 12 weeks, oxidative damage, fibroblast accumulation, apoptosis and macrophages were significantly decreased in coated PPM samples compared to uncoated PPM. These results demonstrate that a non-biodegradable hydrogel coating of PPM led to significant reduction in foreign body reaction, oxidative stress and apoptosis compared to uncoated PPM in vivo, and suggest that this coating could be clinically useful in hernia repair.

  13. Management of Infected Mesh After Abdominal Hernia Repair: Systematic Review and Single-Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Shubinets, Valeriy; Carney, Martin J; Colen, David L; Mirzabeigi, Michael N; Weissler, Jason M; Lanni, Michael A; Braslow, Benjamin M; Fischer, John P; Kovach, Stephen J

    2017-06-01

    Mesh infection after abdominal hernia repair is a devastating complication that affects general and plastic surgeons alike. The purpose of this study was 3-fold: (1) to determine current evidence for treatment of infected abdominal wall mesh via systematic review of literature, (2) to analyze our single-institution experience with treatment of infected mesh patients, and (3) to establish a framework for how to approach this complex clinical problem. Literature search was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis guidelines, followed by single-institution retrospective analysis of infected mesh patients. A total of 3565 abstracts and 92 full-text articles were reviewed. For qualitative and quantitative assessment, articles were subdivided on the basis of treatment approach: "conservative management," "excision of mesh with primary closure," "single-stage reconstruction," "immediate staged repair," and "repair in contaminated field." Evidence for each treatment approach is presented. At our institution, most patients (40/43) were treated by excision of infected mesh and single-stage reconstruction with biologic mesh. When the mesh was placed in a retrorectus or underlay fashion, 21.4% rate of hernia recurrence was achieved. Bridged repairs were highly prone to recurrence (88.9%; P = 0.001), but the bridging biologic mesh seemed to maintain domain and potentially contribute to a more effective repair in the future. Of the patients who underwent additional ("secondary") repairs after recurrence, 75% were eventually able to achieve "hernia-free" state. This study reviews the literature and our single-institution experience regarding treatment of infected abdominal wall mesh. Framework is developed for how to approach this complex clinical problem.

  14. Meta-analysis of self-gripping mesh (Progrip) versus sutured mesh in open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Mittapalli, Devender; Rao, Ahsan; Prasad, Raj; Ahmad, Niaz

    2014-04-01

    This metaanalysis was designed to systematically analyse all published randomized controlled trials comparing self-gripping mesh (ProGrip) and sutured mesh to analyse early and long term outcomes for open inguinal hernia repair. A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Colorectal Cancer Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index Expanded. Randomized trials comparing self-gripping mesh with sutured mesh were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager Version 5.2 software. The primary outcome measures were hernia recurrence and chronic pain after operation. Secondary outcome measures included surgical time, wound complications and perioperative complications. Five randomized trials were identified as suitable, including 1170 patients. There was no significant difference between the two types of mesh repairs in perioperative complications, wound haematoma, chronic groin pain and hernia recurrence. Wound infection was lower in self gripping mesh group compared to sutured mesh but this was not statistically significant (risk ratio (RR) 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.30-1.06, P = 0.08). The duration of operation was significantly shorter with self-gripping mesh compared to sutured mesh with a mean difference of -5.48 min [-9.31, -1.64] Z = 2.80 (P = 0.005). Self-gripping mesh was associated with shorter operative time compared to sutured mesh. Both types of mesh repairs have comparable perioperative and long term outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Open retromuscular mesh repair versus onlay technique of incisional hernia: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Demetrashvili, Zaza; Pipia, Irakli; Loladze, David; Metreveli, Tamar; Ekaladze, Eka; Kenchadze, George; Khutsishvili, Kakhi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized clinical study was to compare and analyze the results of two methods of treatment of incisional hernia: open retromuscular mesh repair and onlay technique. 180 patients who underwent open elective surgery for middle primary incisional hernia were randomized into two groups. The retomuscular mesh repair was used in the first group and the onlay technique - in the second group. Several preoperative and intraoperative factors, also wound complications (wound infection, hematoma, seroma) and hernia recurrence rate were determined and compared between the groups. The operative time was significantly longer in the retromuscular group compared with the onlay group (P < 0.001). In the retromuscular group 17 (22.1%) wound complications were observed, in the onlay group-39 (50.0%) wound complications. The difference was statistically significance (P < 0.001). Seroma was the most frequent postoperative wound complication, ranging from 16.9% to 41.0% among the groups, respectively (P = 0.0013). No significantly difference has been found between groups by wound infection and hematoma. 2 (2.6%) case of hernia recurrence was marked in retromuscular group and 4 (5.1%) case of hernia recurrence - in onlay group. But there was no statistically significantly difference between the two groups. Our research shows no significant difference in frequency of hernia recurrence between retromuscular mesh repair and onlay technique for treatment of incisional hernia. The usage of the retromuscular mesh repair is associated with significantly less wound complications than onlay technique. That can be considered as an advantage of retromuscular method, which makes it more preferential than onlay method. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair With a Novel Hernia Mesh Incorporating a Nitinol Alloy Frame Compared With a Standard Lightweight Polypropylene Mesh.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Hazey, Jeffrey W; Jones, Edward L; Perry, Kyle A; Davenport, Daniel L; Roth, J Scott

    2015-10-01

    Numerous mesh materials are available for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. The role of fixation of mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair remains controversial. Mesh materials have been engineered to anatomically conform to the pelvis to potentially reduce or eliminate the need for fixation. This study evaluates the outcomes of laparoscopic inguinal hernia utilizing a device consisting of a lightweight polypropylene mesh with a nitinol frame (Rebound HRD) compared with repair with lightweight polypropylene mesh with permanent tack fixation. A prospective randomized trial evaluating the outcomes of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with a lightweight polypropylene mesh with a nitinol frame (N-LWM) compared with standard lightweight polypropylene mesh (LWM) was conducted. Randomization was performed at an N-LWM to LWM ratio of 2:1. Repairs were standardized to a laparoscopic extraperitoneal approach without fixation for N-LWM and titanium tack fixation for LWM repairs. Follow-up assessments were performed at 7 days, 6 months, and 1 year. Outcome measures include visual analog pain scale (VAS), Short Form 36 (SF-36), Carolinas Comfort Scale (CCS), operative details, complications, and recurrences. There were 47 patients that underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair and adhered to study protocol (31 N-LWM, 16 LWM). The groups did not differ significantly in age, body mass index, ethnicity, or employment. The N-LWM group had bilateral mesh placed in 51.6% and LWM 43.8% (P = .76). Operative duration was similar, 59.6 ± 23.1 minutes for LWM and 62.4 ± 26.7 minutes for N-LWM (P = .705) as was mesh handling time was 5.4 ± 3.1 minutes LWM versus 7.3 ± 3.9 minutes N-LWM (P = .053). VAS, CCS, and SF-36 survey results were similar between groups. There was one recurrence (0.03%) in the N-LWM group. Nitinol-framed lightweight polypropylene mesh may be safely used during laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with outcomes comparable to LWM at 1 year. N-LWM does

  17. Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) v/s Modified Bassini’s Repair (MBR) + Lichtenstein Mesh Repair of Direct Inguinal Hernias in Rural Population – A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh M; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Kuthadi Sravan; Mithun, Gorre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lichtenstein’s tension free mesh hernioplasty is the commonly done open technique for inguinal hernias. As our hospital is in rural area, majority of patients are labourers, open hernias are commonly done. The present study was done by comparing Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) v/s Modified Bassini’s repair (MBR) + Lichtenstein mesh repair (LMR) of direct Inguinal Hernias to compare the technique of both surgeries and its outcome like postoperative complications and recurrence rate. Materials and Methods A comparative randomized study was conducted on patients reporting to MNR hospital, sangareddy with direct inguinal hernias. A total of fifty consecutive patients were included in this study of which, 25 patients were operated by LMR and 25 patients were operated by MBR+LMR and followed up for a period of two years. The outcomes of the both techniques were compared. Results Study involved 25 each of Lichtenstein’s mesh repair (LMR) and modified bassini’s repair (MBR) + LMR, over a period of 2 years. The duration of surgery for lichtenstein mesh repair is around 34.56 min compared to LMR+MBR, which is 47.56 min which was statistically significant (p-value is <0.0001). In this study the most common complication for both the groups was seroma. The pain was relatively higher in LMR+MBR group in POD 1, but not statistically significant (p-value is 0.0949) and from POD 7 the pain was almost similar in both groups. The recurrence rate is 2% for LMR and 0% for MBR+LMR. Conclusion LMR+MBR was comparatively better than only LMR in all direct inguinal hernias because of low recurrence rate (0%) and low postoperative complications, which showed in our present study. PMID:27042517

  18. Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) v/s Modified Bassini's Repair (MBR) + Lichtenstein Mesh Repair of Direct Inguinal Hernias in Rural Population - A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Santosh M; Gurujala, Avinash; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Kuthadi Sravan; Mithun, Gorre

    2016-02-01

    Lichtenstein's tension free mesh hernioplasty is the commonly done open technique for inguinal hernias. As our hospital is in rural area, majority of patients are labourers, open hernias are commonly done. The present study was done by comparing Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) v/s Modified Bassini's repair (MBR) + Lichtenstein mesh repair (LMR) of direct Inguinal Hernias to compare the technique of both surgeries and its outcome like postoperative complications and recurrence rate. A comparative randomized study was conducted on patients reporting to MNR hospital, sangareddy with direct inguinal hernias. A total of fifty consecutive patients were included in this study of which, 25 patients were operated by LMR and 25 patients were operated by MBR+LMR and followed up for a period of two years. The outcomes of the both techniques were compared. Study involved 25 each of Lichtenstein's mesh repair (LMR) and modified bassini's repair (MBR) + LMR, over a period of 2 years. The duration of surgery for lichtenstein mesh repair is around 34.56 min compared to LMR+MBR, which is 47.56 min which was statistically significant (p-value is <0.0001). In this study the most common complication for both the groups was seroma. The pain was relatively higher in LMR+MBR group in POD 1, but not statistically significant (p-value is 0.0949) and from POD 7 the pain was almost similar in both groups. The recurrence rate is 2% for LMR and 0% for MBR+LMR. LMR+MBR was comparatively better than only LMR in all direct inguinal hernias because of low recurrence rate (0%) and low postoperative complications, which showed in our present study.

  19. Mesh Location in Open Ventral Hernia Repair: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Holihan, Julie L; Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Mo, Jiandi; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the ideal location for mesh placement in open ventral hernia repair (OVHR). We aim to identify the mesh location associated with the lowest rate of recurrence following OVHR using a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search was performed for studies comparing at least two of four locations for mesh placement during OVHR (onlay, inlay, sublay, and underlay). Outcomes assessed were hernia recurrence and surgical site infection (SSI). Pairwise meta-analysis was performed to compare all direct treatment of mesh locations. A multiple treatment meta-analysis was performed to compare all mesh locations in the Bayesian framework. Sensitivity analyses were planned for the following: studies with a low risk of bias, incisional hernias, by hernia size, and by mesh type (synthetic or biologic). Twenty-one studies were identified (n = 5,891). Sublay placement of mesh was associated with the lowest risk for recurrence [OR 0.218 (95% CI 0.06-0.47)] and was the best of the four treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 94.2%]. Sublay was also associated with the lowest risk for SSI [OR 0.449 (95% CI 0.12-1.16)] and was the best of the 4 treatment modalities assessed [Prob (best) = 77.3%]. When only assessing studies at low risk of bias, of incisional hernias, and using synthetic mesh, the probability that sublay had the lowest rate of recurrence and SSI was high. Sublay mesh location has lower complication rates than other mesh locations. While additional randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these findings, this network meta-analysis suggests the probability of sublay being the best location for mesh placement is high.

  20. Randomized Prospective Study of Totally Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair: Fixation Versus No Fixation of Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cody A.; Greenlee, Susan M.; Larson, Dirk R.; Harrington, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Fixation of the mesh during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair is thought to be necessary to prevent recurrence. However, mesh fixation may increase postoperative pain and lead to an increased risk of complications. We questioned whether elimination of fixation of the mesh during TEP inguinal hernia repair leads to decreased postoperative pain or complications, or both, without an increased rate of recurrence. Methods: A randomized prospective single-blinded study was carried out in 40 patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair with (Group A=20) or without (Group B=20) fixation of the mesh. Results: Patients in whom the mesh was not fixed had shorter hospital length of stay (8.3 vs 16.0 hours, P=0.01), were less likely to be admitted to the hospital (P=0.001), used less postoperative narcotic analgesia in the PACU (P=0.01), and were less likely to develop urinary retention (P=0.04). No significant differences occurred in the level of pain, time to return to normal activity, or the difficulty of the operation between the 2 groups. No hernia recurrences were observed in either group (follow-up range, 6 to 30 months, median=19). Conclusions: Elimination of tack fixation of mesh during laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair significantly reduces the use of postoperative narcotic analgesia, hospital length of stay, and the development of postoperative urinary retention but does not lead to a significant reduction in postoperative pain. Eliminating tacks does not lead to an increased rate of recurrence. PMID:17575757

  1. Ventral hernia repair after bowel surgery: does gastrointestinal contamination matter in the era of biologic mesh?

    PubMed

    Pinell-White, Ximena A; Gruszynski, Mark; Losken, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ventral hernias are often repaired after planned or unplanned bowel procedures. Biologic materials are thought to better tolerate gastrointestinal contamination than synthetic alternatives. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the impact of intestinal contamination on ventral hernia repair with biologic material. This is a retrospective review of all patients who underwent ventral hernia repair with biologic material between 2003 and 2012. Groups were defined based on performance of concomitant bowel surgery. Data were collected on patient demographics, risk factors, concomitant procedures, mesh type, and outcomes. Of 82 patients included in this series, 32 (39%) had concomitant bowel surgery. Ventral hernia repair was performed predominantly with Alloderm and Strattice. There was no difference in hernia recurrence (contaminated group-28% vs. non-contaminated group-34%, P = 0.58), surgical site infections (contaminated-28% vs. non-contaminated-20%, P = 0.40), or other complications when patients with and without concomitant bowel surgery were compared. Biologic materials have made it such that ventral hernias can be safely repaired after bowel surgery without increased risk of complications.

  2. Use of resterilized polypropylene mesh in inguinal hernia repair: a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Cingi, Asim; Manukyan, Manuk N; Güllüoğlu, Bahadir M; Barlas, Afşar; Yeğen, Cumhur; Yalin, Rifat; Yilmaz, Nuray; Aktan, A Ozdemir

    2005-12-01

    Inguinal hernia repair consumes considerable health-care resources worldwide. Open mesh repairs are commonly used and the feasibility of using a resterilized mesh, which is a general practice in certain countries, has not been evaluated. In this randomized prospective study, original and resterilized meshes were used in two groups of patients with unilateral inguinal hernia. Microbiologic changes, textile mechanical properties, overall complication rates, and cost-effectiveness of resterilized mesh were investigated. A time period of 3 years was determined for patient enrollment to this pilot feasibility study, with the goal of 100 patients in each group. Ninety-one patients were enrolled in the original group and 93 in the resterilized mesh group. Median followup was 735 and 739 days and calculated interquartile ranges were 454 and 513 days, respectively. Average tensile strength of the original polypropylene mesh changed slightly with resterilization, as maximum load decreased from a mean of 66.6 to 58.2 N/cm. Overall complication rates were similar in the two groups. The 6.6% infection rate in the original mesh group was not statistically different from the 7.5% rate in the resterilized group (p = 0.80, relative risk = 0.88, 95% confidence interval, 0.31-2.51). There was only one recurrence in the original mesh group in the 21st month. Use of a resterilized mesh decreased the overall cost of operation by decreasing the cost of mesh from 15.9% to 8.3% of the total amount. Use of a resterilized mesh for inguinal hernia repair is feasible without considerable changes in infection and recurrence rates.

  3. Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some hernia repairs are performed using a small telescope known as a laparoscope. If your surgeon has ... in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). Laparoscopic repair offers a ...

  4. Previous appendicitis may affect peritoneal overlap of the mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Di Martino, M; Lipari, G; Sambataro, L

    2002-02-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is now increasingly performed in bilateral and recurrent groin hernias. The avoidance of direct exposure of the commonly used meshes to the abdominal viscera is considered essential to reduce the risk of bowel adhesions. We report a case of bilateral inguinal hernia repair in a patients who had had an appendectomy performed 8 years earlier for a perforated appendicitis. Probably as a result of previous inflammation, any attempt to dissect the preperitoneal layer in the right side resulted in peritoneal lacerations. Since the peritoneum could not be used to cover the mesh, we decided to position an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh to avoid postoperative adhesions. The mesh was fixed with tacks to the symphysis pubis, Cooper's ligament, the ilio-pubic tract, and the transversalis fascia 2 cm above the hernia defect. This case suggests that in patient with previous appendicitis, a difficult preperitoneal dissection can be expected. In such cases, especially in young patients for whom future surgical operations cannot be excluded, any attempt to reduce adhesions is justified. At the present time, the use of e-PTFE meshes, which induce no tissue reaction, is a good option in this situation.

  5. The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in mesh repair of primary inguinal hernias using prolene hernia system: a randomized prospective double-blind control trial.

    PubMed

    Jain, S K; Jayant, M; Norbu, C

    2008-04-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is being commonly used in mesh repair of inguinal hernia but its role has been questioned in a recent Cochrane analysis performed in 2003. Routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis in mesh repair of inguinal hernia can lead to bacterial resistance and increase in cost. In a present double-blind placebo controlled trial involving 120 patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair using prolene hernia system, we did not find any benefit of the routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis in terms of wound infection rate.

  6. Parietex™ Composite mesh versus DynaMesh(®)-IPOM for laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tandon, A; Shahzad, K; Pathak, S; Oommen, C M; Nunes, Q M; Smart, N

    2016-11-01

    INTRODUCTION Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) is widely accepted and safe but the type of mesh used is still debated. We retrospectively compared postoperative outcomes with two different meshes commonly used in LIVHR. METHODS This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent incisional hernia repair between January 2008 and December 2010. Two meshes were used: Parietex™ Composite (Covidien, New Haven, CT, USA) and the DynaMesh(®)-IPOM (FEG Textiltechnik mbH, Aachen, Germany). The two groups were compared with respect to recurrence rates, incidence of seroma and intestinal obstruction. RESULTS Among the 88 patients who underwent LIVHR, 75 patients (85.2%) presented with primary incisional hernia, 10 (11.4%) presented with a first recurrence and 3 (3.4%) presented with a second recurrence. Median follow-up was 53.6 months (range 40-61 months). 12.9% of patients had recurrence in the Parietex™ Composite mesh group (n=62) in comparison to 3.8% in the DynaMesh(®)-IPOM mesh group (n=26; P=0.20). DynaMesh(®)-IPOM was associated with a significantly higher incidence of intestinal obstruction secondary to adhesions (11.5% vs. 0%, P=0.006) and lower incidence of seroma and haematoma formation compared to Parietex™ composite mesh group (0% vs. 6.4% of patients; P=0.185). CONCLUSIONS LIVHR is a safe and feasible technique. Dynamesh(®)-IPOM is associated with a significantly higher incidence of adhesion related bowel obstruction, albeit with a lower incidence of recurrence, seroma and haematoma formation compared with Parietex™ Composite mesh. However, there is a need for further well-designed, multicentre randomised controlled studies to investigate the use of these meshes.

  7. First human use of hybrid synthetic/biologic mesh in ventral hernia repair: a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Bittner, James G; El-Hayek, Kevin; Strong, Andrew T; LaPinska, Melissa Phillips; Yoo, Jin S; Pauli, Eric M; Kroh, Matthew

    2017-07-19

    Mesh options for reinforcement of ventral/incisional hernia (VIH) repair include synthetic or biologic materials. While each material has known advantages and disadvantages, little is understood about outcomes when these materials are used in combination. This multicenter study reports on the first human use of a novel synthetic/biologic hybrid mesh (Zenapro(®) Hybrid Hernia Repair Device) for VIH repair. This prospective, multicenter post-market clinical trial enrolled consecutive adults who underwent elective VIH repair with hybrid mesh placed in the intraperitoneal or retromuscular/preperitoneal position. Patients were classified as Ventral Hernia Working Group (VHWG) grades 1-3 and had clean or clean-contaminated wounds. Outcomes of ventral and incisional hernia were compared using appropriate parametric tests. In all, 63 patients underwent VIH repair with hybrid mesh. Most were females (54.0%), had a mean age of 54.8 ± 10.9 years and mean body mass index of 34.5 ± 7.8 kg/m(2), and classified as VHWG grade 2 (87.3%). Most defects were midline (92.1%) with a mean area of 106 ± 155 cm(2). Cases were commonly classified as clean (92.1%) and were performed laparoscopically (60.3%). Primary fascial closure was achieved in 82.5% with 28.2% requiring component separation. Mesh location was frequently intraperitoneal (69.8%). Overall, 39% of patients available for follow-up at 12 months suffered surgical site events, which were generally more frequent after incisional hernia repair. Of these, seroma (23.7%) was most common, but few (8.5%) required procedural intervention. Other surgical site events that required procedural intervention included hematoma (1.7%), wound dehiscence (1.7%), and surgical site infection (3.4%). Recurrence rate was 6.8% (95% CI 2.2-16.6%) at 12-months postoperatively. Zenapro(®) Hybrid Hernia Repair Device is safe and effective in VHWG grade 1-2 patients with clean wounds out to 12 months. Short-term outcomes and recurrence

  8. Onlay parastomal hernia repair with cross-linked porcine dermal collagen biologic mesh: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Warwick, A M; Velineni, R; Smart, N J; Daniels, I R

    2016-04-01

    The optimal technique and mesh type for parastomal hernia repair have yet to be ascertained. Biologic meshes have been advocated in parastomal hernia repair due to purported resistance to infection in contaminated fields. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of additionally cross-linked acellular porcine dermal collagen mesh (Permacol) for onlay parastomal hernia repair. A retrospective review of case notes, and abdominal CT scans when available, was performed for consecutive patients who had a parastomal hernia repaired between January 2007 and May 2010. All hernias were repaired with onlay placement of the biologic mesh. Hernias were classified according to the Moreno-Matias classification where CT scans were available. Over a 34-month period, 30 consecutive patients, median age 74 years, 17 female, underwent parastomal hernia repair using onlay biologic mesh. There were 23 paracolostomy and seven paraileostomy hernias. The hernia was primary in 26 patients. Pre-operative CT scans were available in 18 patients (Moreno-Matias Type 1 = 1, Type 2 = 4, Type 3 = 13). There was one perioperative death, and 29 patients were available for follow-up, and median duration of follow-up (either CT or clinical) was 36 months (range 3-79). Twenty-six patients developed recurrence of the parastomal hernia (89.6%), and median time to recurrence was 10 months (range 3-72),with Moreno-Matias Type 1 = 0, Type 2 = 4, Type 3 = 14, unknown = 8. Fifteen out of 26 patients have had repairs of the recurrence using a variety of techniques. Of these, 10 patients have had further recurrence. Onlay repair of parastomal hernia with cross-linked porcine dermal collagen biologic mesh reinforcement has poor long-term outcomes with unacceptably high recurrence rates and should not be performed.

  9. Laparoscopic intraperitoneal polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prosthetic patch repair of ventral hernia. Prospective comparison to open prefascial polypropylene mesh repair.

    PubMed

    DeMaria, E J; Moss, J M; Sugerman, H J

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic intraperitoneal polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) prosthetic patch (LIPP) repair of a ventral hernia is superior to open prefascial polypropylene mesh (OPPM) repair in a tertiary care university hospital in an urban environment. Data on 39 consecutive patients undergoing either LIPP repair (n = 21) or OPPM repair (n = 18) were compared. Findings showed that LIPP repair is characterized by less painful recovery and shorter hospital stay, with 90% of patients treated successfully as outpatients as compared with 7% in the OPPM group. The total facility costs for the LIPP repair ($8,273+/-$2,950) was significantly lower than for the OPPM repair ($12,461+/-$5,987) (p<0.05). Two serious delayed complications in the LIPP group were treated by reoperation (colocutaneous fistula, mesh infection), but the higher readmission costs in this group did not negate the overall cost advantage for LIPP repair. In the follow-up evaluation, 1 hernia recurrence was found in the LIPP repair group, and none in the OPPM group. Initial experience suggests that LIPP repair has advantages over OPPM repair in terms of decreased hospitalization, postoperative pain, and disability. Refinements in the technique to reduce complications may make LIPP repair the procedure of choice for repair of ventral hernias.

  10. Hiatal hernia repair with the use of biologic meshes: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank A

    2011-02-01

    During the past few years, biologic meshes, primarily evolved for routine and complex cases of abdominal wall reconstruction, have been evaluated in clinical cases and experimental models. Although there is published experience on the use of small intestine submucosa and human cadaveric dermis in hiatal hernia repair with encouraging results, porcine dermal collagen (PDC) matrix has not been subject of study to date in this patient population. A systematic review of the literature was conducted, aiming at evaluating the biomechanical characteristics of cross-linked PDC in comparison to synthetic and biologic meshes. Evidence shows that cross-linked PDC is superior to synthetic meshes in terms of incorporation, adhesion formation, and mesh fibrosis; their biodynamic and biotechnical characteristics do not seem to be superior to other bioprosthetic materials according to current data. The clinical and experimental results of cross-linked PDC implants justify their pilot clinical evaluation in hiatal hernia patients.

  11. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh Repair for the Treatment of Multiple Recurrent Inguinal Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an exponential rise in laparoscopic surgery for inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, an increasing number of patients present with recurrent hernias after having failed anterior and laparoscopic repairs. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair for these hernias. Materials and methods: All patients referred with multiply recurrent inguinal hernias underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1 2009 to October 30 2013. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made and a SIL surgical port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques, namely, “chopsticks” and “inline” dissection, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used. The peritoneum was incised above the symphysis pubis and dissection continued laterally and proximally raising an inferior flap, below a previous extraperitoneal mesh, while reducing any direct/indirect/femoral/cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh that was fixed into the pubic ramus as well as superiorly with nonabsorbable tacks before fixing its inferior border with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: There were 9 male patients who underwent SIL-IPOM. Mean age was 55 years old and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes with hospital stay of 1 day and umbilical scar length of 21 mm at 4 weeks' follow-up. There were no intraoperative/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence with mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: Multiply recurrent inguinal hernias after failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be treated safely and efficiently with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25392643

  12. Shrinkage evaluation of heavyweight and lightweight polypropylene meshes in inguinal hernia repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, A C; de Mathia, G B; Fagundes, D J; Medeiros, L R; Rosa, M I

    2011-12-01

    One of the current complications in inguinal repair is shrinkage following the use of mesh. The selected mesh material, heavyweight (HWM) mesh or lightweight (LWM) mesh, is associated with the frequency of shrinkage. The aim of this study was to investigate shrinkage of these two types of mesh in a controlled trial of male inguinal hernia repair. Thirty-two healthy men with primary unilateral inguinal hernias (Nyhus classification), who presented at São José Hospital of Criciúma, Brazil, underwent the Lichtenstein procedure. In total, 16 polypropylene HWM (105 g/m(2)) and 16 partially absorbable LWM (28 g/m(2)) were implanted into randomly selected patients. On post-operative days 1, 30, 60 and 90, the area of the mesh was evaluated by digital radiography. The study randomized 32 patients and analyzed 30 patients--15 for each type of mesh. At baseline, there were no differences between groups. There were significant differences between the two meshes when comparing the total area initially and on postoperative day 90 (P = 0.001). The HWM had significantly less area initial area, as compared with 90 days postoperatively (P = 0.04). Shrinkage was significantly higher for HWM, although the difference was not large.

  13. A Critical Review of Biologic Mesh Use in Ventral Hernia Repairs under Contaminated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Primus, Frank E.; Harris, Hobart W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We used an evidence-based approach to determine if the promotions and claims of superiority of biologic mesh over synthetic mesh use in ventral hernia repairs (VHRs) under contaminated conditions were sound and valid. Methods We searched the Medline database to specifically identify review articles relating to biologic mesh and VHR and critically reviewed these studies using an evidence-based approach. Results For the past forty-five years, four clinical reviews and one systematic review have included biologic meshes as part of a larger discussion on available prosthetics for VHR. All reviews supported biologic mesh use, especially in the setting of contaminated fields. Yet the primary literature included in these reviews and served as the basis for these conclusions consisted entirely of case series and case reports, which have the lowest level of evidence in determining scientific validity. Furthermore the FDA has neither cleared nor approved this particular use. Conclusions The cumulative data regarding biologic mesh use in VHRs under contaminated conditions does not support the claim that it is better than synthetic mesh used under the same conditions. The highly promoted and at least moderately utilized practice of placing biologic mesh in contamination is being done outside of the original intended use, and a re-evaluation of or possible moratorium on biologic mesh use in hernia surgery is seriously warranted. Alternatively, an industry-sponsored national registry of patients in whom ventral hernia repairs involved biologic mesh would substantively add to our understanding regarding how these intriguing biomaterials are being used and their overall clinical efficacy. PMID:23296600

  14. [Our experiences with the use of 3-dimensional meshes to prevent and to repair parastomal hernias].

    PubMed

    Jánó, Zoltán; Mohos, Elemér; Réti, György; Kovács, Tamás; Mohay, József; Berki, Csaba; Horváth, Sándor; Bene, Krisztina; Horzov, Myroslav; Bognár, Gábor; Sándor, Gábor; Szenkovits, Péter; Mohos, Petra; Tornai, Gábor; Nagy, Attila

    2016-12-01

    Albeit there is decreasing tendency nowadays for stoma construction, if it still happens, parastomal herniation might occur in up to 50% of cases afterwards. One third of the cases requires surgical correction, not rarely as an emergency. The different methods of repair can be quite demanding and the complication rates are high. From 2003 we have started to use specially designed 3-dimensional meshes for the prevention and repair of parastomal hernias. From 1st of January 2012 to 1st of June 2016 we have used these devices within the framework of a prospective, controlled, randomized study enrolling the patients in preventive and repair arms. Until now mesh was implanted for prevention at the time of the index operation in 38 cases, (control group: 46 cases), and for repair in 14 cases (control group: 18 cases). Recruitment of the patients will end in 2017. The operations were performed by laparoscopic approach in 22 cases and by open approach in 62 cases in the preventive arm, and 6/26 cases in the repair arm respectively. Mean follow up period is 19.2 months in the mesh group and 22.6 months in the non mesh group in the preventive arm, and 25.9/20.4 months in the repair arm respectively. No statistical analysis was used to interpret these interim results in this paper, we intend to analyze our results at the end of the study. At this stage apparently there is no difference between the group of patients in terms of complications in both arms. Parastomal herniation was found in 18 cases (39.1%) in the non mesh group and in 3 cases (7.8%) in the mesh group in the preventive arm. Recurrency was noted in 8 cases (44%) in the non mesh group, and in 1 case (7.1%) in the mesh group in the repair arm. Our results correlate with other studies where mesh insertion was used to prevent and/or repair parastomal hernias. We attribute these results mainly to the special, 3-dimensional design of the meshes used by us. This construction was developed based on understanding the

  15. Experimental results of mesh fixation by a manual manipulator in a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair model.

    PubMed

    Inaki, N; Waseda, M; Schurr, M O; Braun, M; Buess, G F

    2007-02-01

    Laparoscopic mesh fixation using a stapler can lead to complications such as nerve injury and bowel injury. However, mesh fixation by suturing with conventional laparoscopic instruments (CLI) is difficult because of limited degrees of freedom. A manual manipulator--Radius Surgical System (Radius)--whose tip can deflect and rotate, gives the surgeon two additional degrees of freedom. The aim of this study is to evaluate the introduction of Radius to mesh fixation in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A model for inguinal hernia repair was prepared using animal organs in a trainer. Mesh fixation was performed using Radius, stapler, and CLI. Tensile strength during extraction of mesh toward the vertical direction, and execution time, were measured. The mean number of fixation points of Radius, stapler, and CLI was 9.3 +/- 1.5, 8.5 +/- 1.4, and 9.0 +/- 1.0, respectively. The mean tensile strength of fixation of mesh of Radius, stapler, and CLI was 140.7 +/- 48.9, 73.1 +/- 23.4, and 53.6 +/- 31.5 (N), respectively. The mean tensile strength per one fixation point by Radius, stapler, and CLI was 16.5 +/- 5.3, 8.7 +/- 2.8, and 6.3 +/- 3.6 (N), respectively. The mean execution time of Radius, stapler, and CLI was 479 +/- 108, 54 +/- 31, and 431 +/- 77 (sec), respectively. The mesh fixation by Radius was stronger than that by staples and CLI. Two additional degrees of freedom were useful in difficult angles. The introduction of Radius is feasible and facilitates the fixation of mesh with sutures in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

  16. Early Wound Morbidity after Open Ventral Hernia Repair with Biosynthetic or Polypropylene Mesh.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sambit; Haskins, Ivy N; Huang, Li-Ching; Krpata, David M; Derwin, Kathleen A; Poulose, Benjamin K; Rosen, Michael J

    2017-10-01

    Recently introduced slow-resorbing biosynthetic and non-resorbing macroporous polypropylene meshes are being used in hernias with clean-contaminated and contaminated wounds. However, information about the use of biosynthetic meshes and their outcomes compared with polypropylene meshes in clean-contaminated and contaminated cases is lacking. Here we evaluate the use of biosynthetic mesh and polypropylene mesh in elective open ventral hernia repair (OVHR) and investigate differences in early wound morbidity after OVHR within clean-contaminated and contaminated cases. All elective, OVHR with biosynthetic mesh or uncoated polypropylene mesh from January 2013 through October 2016 were identified within the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative. Association of mesh type with 30-day wound events in clean-contaminated or contaminated wounds was investigated using a 1:3 propensity-matched analysis. Biosynthetic meshes were used in 8.5% (175 of 2,051) of elective OVHR, with the majority (57.1%) used in low-risk or comorbid clean cases. Propensity-matched analysis in clean-contaminated and contaminated cases showed no significant difference between biosynthetic mesh and polypropylene mesh groups for 30-day surgical site occurrences (20.7% vs 16.7%; p = 0.49) or unplanned readmission (13.8% vs 9.8%; p = 0.4). However, surgical site infections (22.4% vs 10.9%; p = 0.03), surgical site occurrences requiring procedural intervention (24.1% vs 13.2%; p = 0.049), and reoperation rates (13.8% vs 4.0%; p = 0.009) were significantly higher in the biosynthetic group. Biosynthetic mesh appears to have higher rates of 30-day wound morbidity compared with polypropylene mesh in elective OVHR with clean-contaminated or contaminated wounds. Additional post-market analysis is needed to provide evidence defining best mesh choices, location, and surgical technique for repairing contaminated ventral hernias. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  17. Long-term Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Suture Versus Mesh Repair of Incisional Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Jacobus W.A.; Luijendijk, Roland W.; Hop, Wim C.J.; Halm, Jens A.; Verdaasdonk, Emiel G.G.; Jeekel, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the best treatment of incisional hernia, taking into account recurrence, complications, discomfort, cosmetic result, and patient satisfaction. Background: Long-term results of incisional hernia repair are lacking. Retrospective studies and the midterm results of this study indicate that mesh repair is superior to suture repair. However, many surgeons are still performing suture repair. Methods: Between 1992 and 1998, a multicenter trial was performed, in which 181 eligible patients with a primary or first-time recurrent midline incisional hernia were randomly assigned to suture or mesh repair. In 2003, follow-up was updated. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months for suture repair and 81 months for mesh repair patients. The 10-year cumulative rate of recurrence was 63% for suture repair and 32% for mesh repair (P < 0.001). Abdominal aneurysm (P = 0.01) and wound infection (P = 0.02) were identified as independent risk factors for recurrence. In patients with small incisional hernias, the recurrence rates were 67% after suture repair and 17% after mesh repair (P = 0.003). One hundred twenty-six patients completed long-term follow-up (median follow-up 98 months). In the mesh repair group, 17% suffered a complication, compared with 8% in the suture repair group (P = 0.17). Abdominal pain was more frequent in suture repair patients (P = 0.01), but there was no difference in scar pain, cosmetic result, and patient satisfaction. Conclusions: Mesh repair results in a lower recurrence rate and less abdominal pain and does not result in more complications than suture repair. Suture repair of incisional hernia should be abandoned. PMID:15383785

  18. Infection of laparoscopically inserted inguinal hernia repair mesh following subsequent emergency open surgery: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulou, IG; Richardson, C; Gurunathan-Mani, S; Lagattolla, NRF

    2012-01-01

    We present two cases of laparoscopically inserted mesh for inguinal hernia repair that became infected following emergency open bowel surgery. We believe that there is an increased risk of infection due to the larger size of mesh used in the laparoscopic repair but also due to the patient not volunteering the information because of the minimally invasive nature of the procedure. PMID:22524902

  19. Long term recurrence, pain and patient satisfaction after ventral hernia mesh repair

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Bukholm, Ida; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Røkke, Ola

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare long term outcomes of laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair with respect to recurrence, pain and satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre follow-up study of 194 consecutive patients after laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair between March 2000 and June 2010. Of these, 27 patients (13.9%) died and 12 (6.2%) failed to attend their follow-up appointment. One hundred and fifty-three (78.9%) patients attended for follow-up and two patients (1.0%) were interviewed by telephone. Of those who attended the follow-up appointment, 82 (52.9%) patients had received laparoscopic ventral hernia mesh repair (LVHR) while 73 (47.1%) patients had undergone open ventral hernia mesh repair (OVHR), including 11 conversions. The follow-up study included analyses of medical records, clinical interviews, examination of hernia recurrence and assessment of pain using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) ruler anchored by word descriptors. Overall patient satisfaction was also determined. Patients with signs of recurrence were examined by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. RESULTS: Median time from hernia mesh repair to follow-up was 48 and 52 mo after LVHR and OVHR respectively. Overall recurrence rates were 17.1% after LVHR and 23.3% after OVHR. Recurrence after LVHR was associated with higher body mass index. Smoking was associated with recurrence after OVHR. Chronic pain (VAS > 30 mm) was reported by 23.5% in the laparoscopic cohort and by 27.8% in the open surgery cohort. Recurrence and late complications were predictors of chronic pain after LVHR. Smoking was associated with chronic pain after OVHR. Sixty point five percent were satisfied with the outcome after LVHR and 49.3% after OVHR. Predictors for satisfaction were absence of chronic pain and recurrence. Old age and short time to follow-up also predicted satisfaction after LVHR. CONCLUSION: LVHR and OVHR give similar long term results for recurrence, pain and

  20. The Comparison of Lichtenstein Procedure with and without Mesh-Fixation for Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Ersoz, Feyzullah; Culcu, Serdar; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Bektas, Hasan; Sari, Serkan; Arikan, Soykan; Deniz, Mehmet Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Although inguinal hernia repair is the most frequently performed surgical procedure in the world, the best repair method has not gained acceptance yet. The ideal repair must be safe, simple, and easy to perform and require minimal dissection which provides enough exploration, maintain patient's comfort in the early stage, and also be cost-effective, reducing operation costs, labor loss, hospital stay, and recurrence. Materials and Methods. There were eighty-five patients between the ages of 18 and 75, diagnosed with inguinal hernia in our clinic. Lichtenstein procedure for hernia repair was performed under spinal anesthesia in all patients. Forty-two patients had the standard procedure and, in 43 patients, the polypropylene mesh was used without fixation. All patients were examined and questioned on the 7th day of the operation in terms of pain, scrotal edema, and the presence of seroma and later on in the 6th postoperative month in terms of paresthesia, neuropraxia, and recurrence by a single physician. Results. Operative time and pain scores in the nonfixation group were significantly lower, without any increase in rates of recurrence. Conclusion. Based on these findings, in Lichtenstein hernia repair method, nonfixation technique can be used safely with better results.

  1. The Comparison of Lichtenstein Procedure with and without Mesh-Fixation for Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ersoz, Feyzullah; Culcu, Serdar; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Bektas, Hasan; Sari, Serkan; Arikan, Soykan; Deniz, Mehmet Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Although inguinal hernia repair is the most frequently performed surgical procedure in the world, the best repair method has not gained acceptance yet. The ideal repair must be safe, simple, and easy to perform and require minimal dissection which provides enough exploration, maintain patient's comfort in the early stage, and also be cost-effective, reducing operation costs, labor loss, hospital stay, and recurrence. Materials and Methods. There were eighty-five patients between the ages of 18 and 75, diagnosed with inguinal hernia in our clinic. Lichtenstein procedure for hernia repair was performed under spinal anesthesia in all patients. Forty-two patients had the standard procedure and, in 43 patients, the polypropylene mesh was used without fixation. All patients were examined and questioned on the 7th day of the operation in terms of pain, scrotal edema, and the presence of seroma and later on in the 6th postoperative month in terms of paresthesia, neuropraxia, and recurrence by a single physician. Results. Operative time and pain scores in the nonfixation group were significantly lower, without any increase in rates of recurrence. Conclusion. Based on these findings, in Lichtenstein hernia repair method, nonfixation technique can be used safely with better results. PMID:27200411

  2. Strategies to Minimize Adhesions to Intraperitoneally Placed Mesh in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Lucia; Chandratnam, Edward; Turingan, Isidro; Hawthorne, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions to mesh/tacks in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair are often cited as reasons not to adopt its evidence-based superiority over conventional open methods. This pilot study assessed the occurrence of adhesions to full-sized Polypropylene and Gore-tex DualMesh Plus meshes and the possibility for adhesion prevention using fibrin sealant. Methods: Two 10-cm to 15-cm pieces of mesh were placed and fixed laparoscopically in pigs (25kg to 55kg). Group I: 2 animals with Polypropylene mesh on one side and DualMesh on other side. Group II: 2 animals with DualMesh on each side with fibrin sealant applied to the periphery of mesh and staples to one side. Group III: 1 animal with 2 pieces of Polypropylene mesh with fibrin sealant applied to the entire mesh. All animals underwent laparoscopy 3 months later to assess the extent of adhesions, and full-thickness specimens were removed for histological evaluation. Results: More Polypropylene mesh was involved in adhesions than DualMesh. However, with the DualMesh involved in adhesions, more of the surface area was involved in forming adhesions than with Polypropylene mesh. None of the implanted DualMesh had visceral adhesions, while 2 out of 3 Polypropylene meshes had adhesions to both the liver and spleen but none to the bowel. Implanted Polypropylene mesh with fibrin sealant had no adhesions. DualMesh had shrunk more significantly than Polypropylene mesh. Histological evaluation showed absence of acute inflammatory response, significantly more chronic inflammatory response to DualMesh compared to Polypropylene and complete mesothelialization with both meshes. There was extensive collagen deposition between Polypropylene mesh fibers, while fibrosis occurred on both sides of DualMesh with synovial metaplasia over its peritoneal surface akin to encapsulation. Conclusions: DualMesh caused fewer omental and visceral adhesions than Polypropylene mesh did. Fibrin sealant eliminated adhesions to DualMesh and

  3. Long-term quality of life and functionality after ventral hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Langbach, Odd; Bukholm, Ida; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Røkke, Ola

    2016-11-01

    The absence of recurrence and pain are important for good quality of life (QoL) after ventral hernia mesh repair. We wanted to study long-term outcome after laparoscopic (LVHR) and open ventral hernia mesh repair (OVHR) using validated scales to measure QoL and functional outcome. We conducted a single-center follow-up study of 194 consecutive patients after LVHR and OVHR between March 2000 and June 2010. Of these, 27 patients (13.9 %) died and 14 (7.2 %) failed to attend their follow-up appointment. Of 153 (78.9 %) patients who attended, 81 (52.9 %) patients had LVHR and 72 (47.1 %) patients had OVHR, including 11 conversions (surgery group). One hundred and twelve patients with non-recurrent ventral hernia were also enrolled consecutively as controls (non-surgery group). Quality of life was measured by the SF-36 short form questionnaire and functional outcome by the Activities Assessment Scale (AAS) with the revised Life Orientation Test to measure the influence of dispositional optimism on pain and functionality. Assessment of pain was done using a 100-mm visual analogue scale ruler anchored by word descriptors. Median time from hernia mesh repair to follow-up was 48 and 52 months after LVHR and OVHR, respectively. There were no long-term differences between LVHR and OVHR measured by SF-36 and AAS. Physical dimensions in SF-36: physical function, restrictions in physical function and bodily pain, were significantly better in the surgery group compared to the non-surgery group, but only for incisional hernia. Recurrence was associated with a significant reduction in QoL in all dimensions of SF-36 in both hernia repair cohorts. Chronic pain and impairment were closely related. Optimistic patients had less impairment than pessimistic patients. LVHR and OVHR reduce chronic pain and physical impairment and improve long-term QoL. Hernia recurrence and persistent pain reduce the beneficial effect of hernia surgery. Dispositional optimism can modulate Qo

  4. Mechanical Properties of Mesh Materials Used for Hernia Repair and Soft Tissue Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Peter P.; Schwarz, Markus L. R.; Gundling, Ralf; Nowak, Kai; Hohenberger, Peter; Roessner, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure in the world. Augmentation with synthetic meshes has gained importance in recent decades. Most of the published work about hernia meshes focuses on the surgical technique, outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity and the recurrence rate. Appropriate biomechanical and engineering terminology is frequently absent. Meshes are under continuous development but there is little knowledge in the public domain about their mechanical properties. In the presented experimental study we investigated the mechanical properties of several widely available meshes according to German Industrial Standards (DIN ISO). Methodology/Principal Findings Six different meshes were assessed considering longitudinal and transverse direction in a uni-axial tensile test. Based on the force/displacement curve, the maximum force, breaking strain, and stiffness were computed. According to the maximum force the values were assigned to the groups weak and strong to determine a base for comparison. We discovered differences in the maximum force (11.1±6.4 to 100.9±9.4 N/cm), stiffness (0.3±0.1 to 4.6±0.5 N/mm), and breaking strain (150±6% to 340±20%) considering the direction of tension. Conclusions/Significance The measured stiffness and breaking strength vary widely among available mesh materials for hernia repair, and most of the materials show significant anisotropy in their mechanical behavior. Considering the forces present in the abdominal wall, our results suggest that some meshes should be implanted in an appropriate orientation, and that information regarding the directionality of their mechanical properties should be provided by the manufacturers. PMID:23071685

  5. Randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open mesh repair for inguinal hernia: outcome and cost

    PubMed Central

    Wellwood, James; Sculpher, Mark J; Stoker, David; Nicholls, Graham J; Geddes, Cathy; Whitehead, Anne; Singh, Rameet; Spiegelhalter, David

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To compare tension-free open mesh hernioplasty under local anaesthetic with transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair under general anaesthetic. Design: A randomised controlled trial of 403 patients with inguinal hernias. Setting: Two acute general hospitals in London between May 1995 and December 1996. Subjects: 400 patients with a diagnosis of groin hernia, 200 in each group. Main outcome measures: Time until discharge, postoperative pain, and complications; patients’ perceived health (SF-36), duration of convalescence, and patients’ satisfaction with surgery; and health service costs. Results: More patients in the open group (96%) than in the laparoscopic group (89%) were discharged on the same day as the operation (χ2=6.7; 1 df; P=0.01). Although pain scores were lower in the open group while the effect of the local anaesthetic persisted (proportional odds ratio at 2 hours 3.5 (2.3 to 5.1)), scores after open repair were significantly higher for each day of the first week (0.5 (0.3 to 0.7) on day 7) and during the second week (0.7 (0.5 to 0.9)). At 1 month there was a greater improvement (or less deterioration) in mean SF-36 scores over baseline in the laparoscopic group compared with the open group on seven of eight dimensions, reaching significance on five. For every activity considered the median time until return to normal was significantly shorter for the laparoscopic group. Patients randomised to laparoscopic repair were more satisfied with surgery at 1 month and 3 months after surgery. The mean cost per patient of laparoscopic repair was £335 (95% confidence interval £228 to £441) more than the cost of open repair. Conclusion: This study confirms that laparoscopic hernia repair has considerable short term clinical advantages after discharge compared with open mesh hernioplasty, although it was more expensive. Key messages In the 4 hours after surgery laparoscopic hernia repair with general anaesthesia causes more pain

  6. Biomimetic collagen/elastin meshes for ventral hernia repair in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Wang, Xin; Cabrera, Fernando J; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Robbins, Andrew B; Sandri, Monica; Moreno, Michael R; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    Ventral hernia repair remains a major clinical need. Herein, we formulated a type I collagen/elastin crosslinked blend (CollE) for the fabrication of biomimetic meshes for ventral hernia repair. To evaluate the effect of architecture on the performance of the implants, CollE was formulated both as flat sheets (CollE Sheets) and porous scaffolds (CollE Scaffolds). The morphology, hydrophylicity and in vitro degradation were assessed by SEM, water contact angle and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The stiffness of the meshes was determined using a constant stretch rate uniaxial tensile test, and compared to that of native tissue. CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were tested in vitro with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (h-BM-MSC), and finally implanted in a rat ventral hernia model. Neovascularization and tissue regeneration within the implants was evaluated at 6weeks, by histology, immunofluorescence, and q-PCR. It was found that CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were not only biomechanically sturdy enough to provide immediate repair of the hernia defect, but also promoted tissue restoration in only 6weeks. In fact, the presence of elastin enhanced the neovascularization in both sheets and scaffolds. Overall, CollE Scaffolds displayed mechanical properties more closely resembling those of native tissue, and induced higher gene expression of the entire marker genes tested, associated with de novo matrix deposition, angiogenesis, adipogenesis and skeletal muscles, compared to CollE Sheets. Altogether, this data suggests that the improved mechanical properties and bioactivity of CollE Sheets and Scaffolds make them valuable candidates for applications of ventral hernia repair.

  7. Incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Keith W

    2003-10-01

    Incisional ventral hernias are a common problem encountered by surgeons, with over 100,000 repairs being performed annually in the United States. Although many predisposing factors for incisional ventral hernia are patient-related, some factors such as type of primary closure and materials used may reduce the overall incidence of incisional ventral hernia. With the advent of prosthetic meshes being used for incisional ventral hernia repair, the recurrence rate has dropped to approximately 10%. More recently, with the development of prosthetic mesh that is now safe to place intraperitoneally, the recurrence rate has dropped to under 5%. The current controversies that exist for incisional ventral hernia repair are which approach to use (open versus laparoscopic) and what type of fixation (partial- versus full-thickness abdominal muscular/fascial wall) is necessary to stabilize the position of the mesh while tissue ingrowth occurs. During the next decade the answers to these controversies should be available in the surgical literature.

  8. First Case Report of Acute Renal Failure After Mesh-Plug Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Ardita, Vincenzo; Zerbo, Domenico; Caglià, Pietro; Palmucci, Stefano; Sinagra, Nunziata; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute renal failure due to ureter compression after a mesh-plug inguinal repair in a kidney transplant recipient has not been previously reported to our knowledge. A 62-year-old man, who successfully underwent kidney transplantation from a deceased donor 6 years earlier, was admitted for elective repair of a direct inguinal hernia. The patient underwent an open mesh-plug repair of the inguinal hernia with placement of a plug in the preperitoneal space. We did not observe the transplanted ureter and bladder during dissection of the inguinal canal. Immediately after surgery, the patient became anuric, and a graft sonography demonstrated massive hydronephrosis. The serum creatinine level increased rapidly, and the patient underwent an emergency reoperation 8 hours later. During surgery, we did not identify the ureter but, immediately after plug removal, urine output increased progressively. We completed the hernia repair using the standard technique, without plug interposition, and the postoperative course was uneventful with complete resolution of graft dysfunction 3 days later. Furthermore, we reviewed the clinical features of complications related to inguinal hernia surgery. An increased risk of urological complications was reported recently in patients with a previous prosthetic hernia repair undergoing kidney transplantation, mainly due to the mesh adhesion to surrounding structures, making the extraperitoneal dissection during the transplant surgery very challenging. Moreover, older male kidney transplant recipients undergoing an inguinal hernia repair may be at higher risk of graft dysfunction due to inguinal herniation of a transplanted ureter. Mesh-plug inguinal hernia repair is a safe surgical technique, but this unique case suggests that kidney transplant recipients with inguinal hernia may be at higher risk of serious urological complications. Surgeons must be aware of the graft and ureter position before proceeding with hernia repair. A prompt

  9. Histopathological Comparison of Mosquito Net with Polypropylene Mesh for Hernia Repair: An Experimental Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh; Sharma, Deepti Bala; Chandrakar, Shiv Kumar; Sharma, Dhananjaya

    2015-12-01

    Use of mosquito net, in place of polypropylene mesh, had been reported for tension-free hernia repair, as a better cost-effective option. This experimental histopathological study was performed in rats to find out the tissue response and the foreign body reaction and its comparison between commercial polypropylene mesh and the sterilized mosquito net. This experimental study was conducted in the Department of Surgery, Government NSCB, Medical College, Jabalpur (Madhya Pradesh), India. It was carried out in 40 albino rats. A 1.5 × 0.5-cm hernial defect was created by excising full-thickness abdominal wall muscle. All rats underwent on-lay mesh repair of hernial defect (polypropylene mesh, n = 20; mosquito net, n = 20). Half of rats in each group were sacrificed on day 14, and the other half, on day 90. Sections of containing mesh were examined histopathologically for inflammatory infiltrate, giant cells, and collagen deposition. Mosquito net group showed significantly greater number of giant cells and inflammatory cells at 14 and 90 days (p < 0.0001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively), as compared to polypropylene group. Grades of collagen fiber deposition were almost equal in both groups, both at 14 and 90 days (p > 0.05 and p > 0.05, respectively). Results of mosquito net are comparable to conventional polypropylene mesh. In a setup, where cost-effectiveness is of primary importance, use of mosquito net for tension-free hernia repair can be an acceptable alternative as proven histologically, to commercially available polypropylene mesh.

  10. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Praneeth, Kokkula; Rathore, Yashwant; Waran, Vignesh; Singh, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair. PMID:26917927

  11. Deep SSI after mesh-mediated groin hernia repair: management and outcome in an Emergency Surgery Department.

    PubMed

    Salamone, G; Licari, L; Augello, G; Campanella, S; Falco, N; Tutino, R; Cocorullo, G; Gullo, R; Raspanti, C; De Marco, P; Porrello, C; Profita, G; Gulotta, G

    2017-01-01

    Mesh-mediated groin hernia repair is considered the goldstandard procedure. It has low recurrence rate. Rarely a deep Surgical Site Infection (SSI) is seen when a synthetic prosthesis is used. We describe a rare case of bilateral deep SSI after mesh-mediated groin hernia repair. Diagnosis was performed through the physical examination and radiological exams. Microbiological samples identified a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus responsible of the infection. Target therapy was performed and re-operation performed in order to remove the infected prosthesis and to apply a biological one to create the fibrous scaffold. During follow-up time, right side recurrence was observed. Tru-cut biopsy of fascia was obtained in order to identify the responsible of the recurrence. Combination of antibiotic therapy and surgical reoperation seems to be the correct way to approach the deep SSI after mesh-mediated groin hernia repair. The use of biological mesh after synthetic removal seems to improve the final outcome.

  12. Testicular ischemia following mesh hernia repair and acute prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pietro, Pepe; Francesco, Aragona

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of a man admitted to our Hospital for right acute scrotum that six months before had undergone a right hernioplasty with mesh implantation. Clinical history and testicular color Doppler sonography (CDS) patterns suggested an orchiepididymitis following acute prostatitis. After 48h the clinical picture worsened and testicular CDS showed a decreased telediastolic velocity that suggested testicular ischemia. The patient underwent surgical exploration: spermatic cord appeared stretched by an inflammatory tissue in absence of torsion and releasing of spermatic cord was performed. In patients with genitourinary infection who previously underwent inguinal mesh implantation, testicular CDS follow-up is mandatory. PMID:19718342

  13. Adhesion prevention in ventral hernia repair: an experimental study comparing three lightweight porous meshes recommended for intraperitoneal use.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, L; Ceci, F; Mattia, S; Fabbi, M; Negro, P; Gossetti, F

    2017-02-01

    In ventral hernia repair, when prosthetic material is placed intraperitoneally, it may lead to an inflammatory reaction resulting in adhesions between the mesh and abdominal viscera. Several meshes have been developed to minimize this process. In this experimental study, the ability of different combined meshes to attenuate the adhesion formation was examined. Three commercially available lightweight porous combined meshes were placed intraperitoneally to repair an abdominal wall defect in rats: DynaMesh-IPOM (PVDF + PP), TiMesh (titanium-coated filament PP) and C-QUR/FX (omega-3 fatty acid-coated filament PP). The DynaMesh-CICAT (PVDF) was implanted in the control group. Adhesion formation was macroscopically evaluated and scored after 7 and 21 days. All animals except two presented intra-abdominal adhesions. None of the meshes examined in the study demonstrated to prevent adhesions. C-QUR/FX reduced adhesion formation at 7 days' follow-up compared with all other meshes but by 21 days this effect was diminished. Between 7 and 21 days adhesion extension significantly decreased for TiMesh. TAS did not show significant modifications between 7 and 21 days' follow-up for each mesh. The combined porous meshes tested in the present study demonstrated to reduce but not to prevent the adhesion formation, even if with some differences. Combined porous meshes could be chosen instead of simple meshes for retro-rectus preperitoneal prosthetic ventral hernia repair.

  14. Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal Groin Hernia Repair Using a Self-Gripping Mesh: Clinical Results of 235 Primary and Recurrent Groin Hernias.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, John; Choi, Vincent; Hepburn, Kirsten; Hawkins, Will; Loi, Ken

    2015-11-01

    Compared with open surgery, laparoscopic groin hernia repair has been shown to significantly reduce postoperative pain. However, chronic pain remains a problem with the laparoscopic approach, affecting approximately 10% of patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes following the use of Parietex ProGrip™ (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland) self-gripping mesh during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal groin hernia repair. Data were collected prospectively from 145 male and 15 female patients with 235 inguinal hernias. All patients underwent repair by the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal approach using Parietex ProGrip mesh. During follow-up ranging from 5 to 24 months, complications, pain score, patient satisfaction, and recurrence were analyzed. All patients were discharged on the day of surgery or the next morning. There were no immediate complications or returns to the operating room. Delayed postoperative complications included minor bruising to the genital region (3 cases), hematoma/seroma (1 case), and wound infection (1 case). The mean follow-up was 15 months, at which time there were no reports of hernia recurrence and 99% of patients were satisfied with their hernia repair. One patient (0.63%) reported severe pain (numeric rating scale score of >7), and 4 patients (2.5%) reported intermittent mild pain on exertion. The results of this study suggest that the use of a self-gripping mesh during the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal approach is a promising and effective technique for repairing both primary and recurrent inguinal hernias.

  15. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  16. Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia Mesh Repair: Effect on Testicular Blood Flow and Sperm Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Krnić, Dragan; Družijanić, Nikica; Štula, Ivana; Čapkun, Vesna; Krnić, Duška

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to determine an influence of incarcerated inguinal hernia mesh repair on testicular circulation and to investigate consequent sperm autoimmunity as a possible reason for infertility. Material/Methods This prospective study was performed over a 3-year period, and 50 male patients were included; 25 of these patients underwent elective open mesh hernia repair (Group I). Group II consisted of 25 patients who had surgery for incarcerated inguinal hernia. Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the testicular blood flow and blood samplings for antisperm antibodies (ASA) was performed in all patients before the surgery, on the second day, and 5 months after. Main outcome ultrasound measures were resistive index (RI) and pulsative index (PI), as their values are inversely proportional to testicular blood flow. Results In Group I, RI, and PI temporarily increased after surgery and then returned to basal values in the late postoperative period. Friedman analysis showed a significant difference in RI and PI for all measurements in Group II (p<0.05), with a significant decrease between the preoperative, early, and late postoperative periods. All final values were within reference range, including ASA, despite significant increase of ASA in the late postoperative period. Conclusions Although statistically significant differences in values of testicular flow parameters and immunologic sensitization in observed time, final values remained within the reference ranges in all patients. Our results suggest that the polypropylene mesh probably does not cause any clinically significant effect on testicular flow and immunologic response in both groups of patients. PMID:27149257

  17. A case of a colocutaneous fistula: A rare complication of mesh migration into the sigmoid colon after open tension-free hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Al-Subaie, Saud; Al-Haddad, Mohanned; Al-Yaqout, Wadha; Al-Hajeri, Mufarrej; Claus, Christiano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Lichtenstein technique is commonly used in inguinal hernia repair and a polypropylene mesh is the most frequently used mesh. Mesh migration into the colon has been rarely reported in the literature. Here we report a case of a colocutaneous fistula that developed following delayed mesh migration into the sigmoid colon. Presentation of case A 52-year-old man undergone Lichtenstein repair for left direct inguinal herniain 2008. Three years later, he presented complaining of rectal bleeding and concurrent bloody discharge from the hernia repair scar. Colonoscopy identified an internal fistulous orifice with intraluminal extrusion of the polypropylene mesh. Furthermore, abdominal ultrasound revealed a fistulous tract extending from the sigmoid colon to the anterior abdominal wall, and a fistulogram confirmed the findings. Open sigmoidectomy and resection of the abdominal wall with the fistula tract was performed, and BIO-A® tissue reinforcement meshwas placed. His postoperative course was unremarkable and was discharged on postoperative day 3. Discussion Mesh migration after mesh inguinal hernia repair is unpredictable. A previous report has presented complications related to prosthetics in hernia repair, such as infection, contraction, rejection, and, rarely, mesh migration.Mesh migration may occur as an early or late complication after hernioplasty. Conclusion During hernia repair, the surgeon should carefully check for a sliding hernia, which may contain the sigmoid colon within the sac, because failure to identify this hernia may lead to direct contact between the mesh and the colon, which may cause pressure necrosis and fistula formation followed by mesh migration. PMID:26209758

  18. Polylactide-caprolactone composite mesh used for ventral hernia repair: a prospective, randomized, single-blind controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying-Mo; Li, Qi; Chen, Jie; Sun, Li; Chen, Fu-Qiang

    2017-02-23

    Although composite surgical meshes are widely used in laparoscopic repair of ventral hernia, the risk of postoperative complications associated with these type of mesh is relatively high. In this report, we demonstrated the safety as well as the effectiveness of a new composite polypropylene mesh coated with poly Llactidecocaprolactone ε (EasyProsthesTM) for the repair of ventral hernia. This study was a randomized, controlled trial designed to compare EasyProsthes composite mesh (EPM) with ParietexTM Composite (PCO) in patients undergoing laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. Hernia recurrence, chronic pain, seroma formation, intestinal fistula or obstruction, wound or abdominal infection, and viscera adhesion were evaluated. 80 patients who needed repair surgery for primary or secondary ventral hernias were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: the EPM group (n=40) and the PCO group (n=40). Patients completed 12 months of followup. Our results revealed that one patient in the EPM group (2.5%) and two patients in the PCO group (5%) developed mesh viscera adhesions after surgery (p=1.000). We had no case of intestinal fistulas or obstruction. Seventeen patients in EPM group (42.5%) and 21 in PCO group (52.2%) developed post surgical seromas in the surgery area (p=0.370). One patient from each group developed postoperative wound infection. There was no case of abdominal infection, chronic pain or hernia recurrence. The incidence of postoperative complications in the EPM group was similar to that observed in the PCO group. We concluded that EPM is a safe and effective method to be used in ventral hernia repair surgeries.

  19. Tension-free mesh hernia repair: review of 1098 cases using local anaesthesia in a day unit.

    PubMed Central

    Kark, A. E.; Kurzer, M.; Waters, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    The technical problems, early complications and short-term results of a tension-free method of 1098 inguinal hernia repairs in 1017 patients have been assessed. The operation was conducted under local anaesthesia, and the inguinal canal floor was reinforced by a polypropylene mesh. Patients were discharged home the same day. There was no mortality, no urinary complications and one case of venous thrombosis. There was one recurrence after a primary hernia repair and two patients have developed recurrences after repair of a recurrent hernia. The overall sepsis rate was 0.9% and 1% of patients had persistent neuralgia. No prosthesis required removal. In all, 49.6% of office workers returned to work in 1 week or less and 61% of manual workers in 2 weeks or less. The major advantages of the tension-free mesh repair under local anaesthesia are simplicity, substantial cost savings and very low rates of complications. PMID:7574324

  20. Cost and clinical outcomes of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair using intraperitoneal nonheavyweight polypropylene mesh.

    PubMed

    Alkhoury, Fuad; Helton, Scott; Ippolito, Raymond J

    2011-04-01

    There are a variety of different products available for laparoscopic ventral hernia repairs (LVHR), which vary widely in their costs. There are few clinical studies commenting on cost efficacy of LVHR. The objective of this study is to investigate the cost, safety, and efficacy of using intraperitoneal nonheavyweight polypropylene (PP) mesh in LVHR. Between the years 2002 and 2006, LVHR was performed in 141 consecutive patients (84 male, 57 female) using intraperitoneal PP. Using a 3-trocar technique, PP mesh was underlayed by 3 to 5 cm beyond the edges of the hernia defect and fixed to the abdominal wall with 2 rows of titanium staples. Data concerning the demographics of patients, mesh cost, operative time, length of hospital stay, and complications were collected. One hundred thirty-four patients (95%) were discharged on the day of surgery. Mean age was 58.7 years (range, 29 to 91 y). Mean operative time was 63 minutes (range, 34 to 124 min). Follow-up was achieved in 123 patients (87%) with a mean of 40 months (range, 12 to 68 mo). The average mesh size was 256.9 cm (range, 116 to 903 cm). The cost of the PP mesh was US$0.14 per cm. The average mesh cost per patient was $35.90. When compared with other meshes commonly used for LVHR, PP mesh was substantially cheaper with a cost saving of $436 per patient with proceed, $770 per patient with composix, and $931 per patient with polytetrafluoroethylene. The postoperative complications included: Wound infection n=4 (3.2%), transient partial small bowel obstruction which resolved in all cases without operative management n=3 (2.4%), port site hernia n=2 (1.6%), and seroma n=1 (0.7%). Overall recurrence rate was n=6 (4.8%). There were no conversions to an open procedure. LVHR with intraperitoneal PP results in outcomes comparable with earlier publications on LVHR but at reduced costs. These data suggest that the use of intraperitoneal PP in LVHR is safe and cost effective.

  1. Prosthetic mesh materials used in hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Sanders, David L; Kingsnorth, Andrew N

    2012-03-01

    It is estimated that 20 million prosthetic meshes are implanted each year worldwide. It is clear that the evolution of meshes is not yet complete and the ideal mesh is yet to be found. There is a vast array of prosthetics available for hernia repair. This review outlines the properties of available meshes and the evidence to be considered when choosing a prosthetic for hernia repair.

  2. Ventral incisional hernia (VIH) repair after liver transplantation (OLT) with a biological mesh: experience in 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Schaffellner, S; Sereinigg, M; Wagner, D; Jakoby, E; Kniepeiss, D; Stiegler, P; Haybäck, J; Müller, H

    2016-05-01

    Hernias after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) occur in about 30 % of cases. Predisposing factors in liver cirrhotic patients of cases are ascites, low abdominal muscle mass and cachexia before and immunosuppression after OLT. Standard operative transplant-technique even in small hernias is to implant a mesh. For patients after liver transplantation a porcine non-cross linked biological patch being less immunogenic than synthetic and cross-linked meshes is chosen for ventral incisional hernia repair. 3 patients (1 female, 2 male), OLT indications Hepatitis C, exogenous- toxic cirrhosis, median-age 53 (51 - 56) and median time to hernia occurrence after OLT were 10 month (6 - 18 m) are documented. 2 patients suffered from diabetes, 2 from chronic-obstructive lung disease. Maintenance immunosuppressions were Everolimus in 1 patient, Everolimus + MMF in the second and Everolimus +Tacrolimus in the third patient. The biological was chosen for hernia repair due to the preexisting risk- factors. Meshes, 10 × 16 cm were placed, in IPOM (Intra-Peritonel-Onlay-Mesh) -position by relaparatomy. Insolvable, monofile, interrupted sutures were used. All patients recovered primarily, and were dismissed within 10 d post OP. No wound healing disorders or signs of postoperative infections occurred. All are free of hernia recurrence in a mean observation time of 22 month (10 - 36). The usage of porcine non-cross-linked biological patches seems feasible for incisional hernia repair after OLT. Wound infections in these patients have been observed with other meshes. Further investigation is needed to prove potential superiority of this biological to the other meshes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  4. Comparison of three different mesh materials in tension-free inguinal hernia repair: prolene versus Vypro versus surgisis.

    PubMed

    Puccio, F; Solazzo, M; Marciano, P

    2005-01-01

    Using mesh or a synthetic prosthesis during tension-free inguinal hernia repair has been shown to be safe and effective. We compared the final outcome in treating inguinal hernia in 45 patients using three different prosthetic materials: 15 patients underwent tension-free inguinal hernia repair using Prolene (polypropylene) mesh, 15 using Vypro (polyglactin and polypropylene) mesh, and 15 with Surgisis-a new bioactive material derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of tension-free inguinal repair using Surgisis, comparing it with conventional prosthetic materials. From January 2003 to December 2003, 45 male patients underwent Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair. Median follow-up was 12 months, with a range of 1-16 months. Each patient underwent ultrasound evaluation of the inguinal region 1 month after surgery. All the procedures were completed under local anesthesia. There were no intraoperative complications, and all patients were discharged home the same day of surgery. No recurrent hernias and wound infections were observed in our post-operative follow-up period. Postoperative pain (visual analog score) and discomfort were lower in patients with Surgisis mesh. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of overall early and late complications; however, there was a tendency toward a higher incidence of pain and discomfort in Vypro and Prolene group. The median time to full recovery was significantly shorter in the Surgisis group. Surgisis mesh seems to be a promising new prosthetic material for hernia repair. Long-term follow-up is necessary to confirm these preliminary results.

  5. A laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique for the repair of an indirect inguinal hernia.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgibbons, R J; Salerno, G M; Filipi, C J; Hunter, W J; Watson, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was done (1) to determine whether congenital indirect inguinal hernias in male pigs could be repaired by placing a polypropylene mesh prosthesis over the defect intra-abdominally, (2) to measure the incidence of adhesions between intra-abdominal viscera and the prosthesis with and without the adhesion barrier oxidized regenerated cellulose, (3) to determine the incidence of other complications, and (4) to assess the effect on fertility. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Several techniques for laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy are currently being evaluated to determine whether there are advantages over conventional inguinal herniorrhaphy. Perhaps the most controversial is the intraperitoneal onlay mesh procedure (IPOM). Its advantage is its simplicity (in that the repair is accomplished by placing a prosthesis over the hernia defect intra-abdominally, avoiding a groin dissection). Its disadvantage is the potential for complications because the prosthesis is in contact with the intra-abdominal viscera. METHODS: In male pigs, polypropylene mesh alone or polypropylene mesh plus the adhesion barrier oxidized regenerated cellulose (composite prosthesis) was fixed to the peritoneum surrounding the hernia defect. In phase 1 (6-week follow-up), two groups of 13 pigs each underwent herniorrhaphy at laparotomy or laparoscopy. In phase 2 (7.1-month follow-up), 21 pigs underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy. RESULTS: All IPOM herniorrhaphies were successful. The prostheses adhered most frequently to the bladder, followed by small bowel, peritoneum, and cord structures. Prosthetic erosion into these organs was not observed. Laparoscopically placed prostheses in phases 1 and 2 had significantly less surface covered by adhesions (13% +/- 13% and 19% +/- 27%, respectively) and a lower adhesion tenacity grade (1.5 +/- 0.9 and 1.3 +/- 1.1, respectively) than those placed at laparotomy (44% +/- 27% and 2.5 +/- 0.7, respectively; p < 0.01). In phase 1, a histologic

  6. Short-term results for laparoscopic repair of large paraesophageal hiatal hernias with Gore Bio A® mesh.

    PubMed

    Priego Jiménez, Pablo; Salvador Sanchís, José Luis; Angel, Vicente; Escrig-Sos, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The application of mesh-reinforced hiatal closure has resulted in a significant reduction in recurrence rates in comparison with primary suture repair. One of the most debated issues is the risk of complications related to the use of the prosthesis, such as esophageal erosion and postoperative dysphagia. The aim of this study is to present our short-terms results in the treatment of laparoscopic paraesophageal hiatal hernia (LPHH) with a synthetic polyglycolic acid:trimethylene carbonate mesh (Gore Bio A(®)). From January 2011 to December 2012, 10 patients with large paraesophageal hiatal hernias and hiatal defect over 5 cm were included. Primary simple suture of the crura and additional reinforcement with a Gore Bio A(®) mesh was performed. Hiatal hernia or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms recurrence, dysphagia and mesh-related complications were investigated. Of the 10 patients undergoing mesh repair, there were 7 women and 3 men with a mean age of 65.5 years. All operations were completed laparoscopically. Median postoperative stay was 3 days. After a median follow-up of 20.3 months, one patient developed a recurrent hiatal hernia (10%). There were no mesh-related complications. The use of Gore Bio A(®) mesh for the laparoscopic repair of large paraesophageal hiatal hernias is safe and with a reasonably low recurrence rate in this short-term study. Additional long-term studies with ample numbers carried out for years will be necessary to see if this synthetic mesh is not only safe but also successful in the prevention of recurrences. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Polypropylene and polypropylene/polyglecaprone (Ultrapro®) meshes in the repair of incisional hernia in rats.

    PubMed

    Utiyama, Edivaldo Massazo; Rosa, Maria Beatriz Sartor de Faria; Andres, Marina de Paula; Miranda, Jocielle Santos de; Damous, Sérgio Henrique Bastos; Birolini, Cláudio Augusto Vianna; Damous, Luciana Lamarão; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza

    2015-06-01

    To compare the inflammatory response of three different meshes on abdominal hernia repair in an experimental model of incisional hernia. Median fascial incision and skin synthesis was performed on 30 Wistar rats. After 21 days, abdominal hernia developed was corrected as follows: 1) No mesh; 2) Polypropylene mesh; and, 3) Ultrapro(r) mesh. After 21 days, the mesh and surrounding tissue were submitted to macroscopic (presence of adhesions, mesh retraction), microscopic analysis to identify and quantify the inflammatory and fibrotic response using a score based on a predefined scale of 0-3 degrees, evaluating infiltration of macrophages, giant cells, neutrophils and lymphocytes. No significant difference was seen among groups in adherences, fibrosis, giant cells, macrophages, neutrophils or lymphocytes (p>0.05). Mesh shrinkage was observed in all groups, but also no difference was observed between polypropylene and Ultrapro mesh (7.0±9.9 vs. 7.4±10.1, respectively, p=0.967). Post-operatory complications included fistula, abscess, dehiscence, serohematic collection and reherniation, but with no difference among groups (p=0.363). There is no difference between polypropylene (high-density) and Ultrapro(r) (low-density) meshes at 21 days after surgery in extraperitoneal use in rats, comparing inflammatory response, mesh shortening, adhesions or complications.

  8. Flank Hernia Repair with Suture Anchor Mesh Fixation to the Iliac Crest.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Miller, Richard S

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic or postsurgical flank hernias are complex and prone to recurrence, particularly at the border of the iliac crest. We reviewed our experience using suture anchors drilled into the iliac crest to fixate the mesh to bone. Our study of 10 repairs in eight patients was Institutional Review Board exempt. We obtained demographics, body mass index, diabetes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) history, smoking status, steroid use, number of prior repairs, defect size, mesh size, number of anchors, and recurrence and infection at follow-up. We performed Kaplan-Meier analysis using a composite of recurrence or infection. Three of eight (interquartile range, 37.5%) patients were male. Median age and body mass index were 47.5 years (31.0, 54.7) and 32.2 (29.0, 36.0), respectively. Three patients had prior repairs, one each with two, three, and five prior attempts at fixation. One of eight patients (12.5%) had a history of MRSA infection. One of eight patients (12.5%) had a history of intermittent steroid use for sarcoidosis. Defect size was 90 cm2 (62.2, 165) and mesh size was 155 cm2 (150, 232) with four anchors (4, 5.5). Procedural complications included 2/10 (20%) with recurrence and 1/10 (10%) with postoperative MRSA infection. Follow-up was 12 months (3.0, 25.0). Mean freedom from recurrence and mesh infection (Kaplan-Meier) was 43.5 months (95%confidence interval = 24.2, 62.8). In conclusion, our series is one of the largest in the literature involving the suture anchor technique. Despite a high-risk patient population due to trauma, obesity, and prior smoking and MRSA history, we achieved an acceptable recurrence rate. Further study may benefit from a randomized trial design.

  9. The use of nontreated mosquito-net mesh cloth for a tension free inguinal hernia repair: our experience.

    PubMed

    Oribabor, Felix O; Amao, Oluwasegun A; Akanni, Saheed O; Fatidinu, Samuel O

    2015-01-01

    The prohibitive costs and scarcity of the imported prosthetic mesh for hernioplasty, has prevented its widespread use in most developing countries. We then set out to ascertain the outcome, complications (undue pain, wound infection, recurrence, and mesh extrusion) and cost implications in the use of a nontreated mosquito-net for inguinal hernioplasty. A prospective study of all consecutive adult patients with uncomplicated inguinal hernia who were admitted for open herniorrhaphy between January 2012 and December, 2013 at the Federal Medical Centre, Ido - Ekiti, South West, Nigeria. A sheet of the nontreated mosquito-net mesh 10 cm Χ 8 cm, autoclaved, a day prior to surgery was used for each patient's hernia repair. The operation sites were exposed and examined 3(rd) and 6(th) postoperative days. Findings were documented for analysis. A total of 130 adult patients were recruited for this study of which 115 of the patients were males and 15 were females. Forty-four (41.53%) had inguinal hernia and 76 (58.46%) of them had inguinoscrotal hernia. They all had successful repair and were followed-up for complications for a period of 6 weeks to 6 months at the surgical out-patient department. Locally-sourced and autoclaved mosquito-net mesh is an effective alternative for hernioplasty especially in situations where commercial mesh is not readily available or affordable.

  10. Prospective repair of Ventral Hernia Working Group type 3 and 4 abdominal wall defects with condensed polytetrafluoroethylene (MotifMESH) mesh.

    PubMed

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E; Liu, Jing; Hsu, Derek; Dumanian, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of clean-contaminated and contaminated ventral hernia defects remains controversial. Newer prosthetic materials may play an important role in these patients. Ten patients with Ventral Hernia Working Group types 3 and 4 were prospectively enrolled and subsequently treated with direct supported repairs with condensed fenestrated polytetrafluoroethylene mesh. The primary outcome was hernia occurrence at 1 year after surgery. Secondary outcomes included surgical site infection, surgical site occurrence, medical complications, pain, and other patient-reported outcomes. There were no immediate postoperative infections and one minor postoperative hematoma treated in the office. One patient required delayed mesh removal 9 months after placement. Importantly, the mesh removal procedure was straightforward because of the material properties of the mesh. Of the 9 patients still with mesh, there were no hernia recurrences at the repair site with one full year of follow-up. Contaminated and clean-contaminated abdominal wall defects can be effectively and durably treated with condensed polytetrafluoroethylene mesh. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative efficacy of Prolene and Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh for experimental ventral hernia repair in dogs.

    PubMed

    Anjum, H; Bokhari, S G; Khan, M A; Awais, M; Mughal, Z U; Shahzad, H K; Ijaz, F; Siddiqui, M I; Khan, I U; Chaudhry, A S; Akhtar, R; Aslam, S; Akbar, H; Asif, M; Maan, M K; Khan, M A; Noor, A; Khan, W A; Ullah, A; Hayat, M A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, efficacy of two hernia mesh implants viz. conventional Prolene and a novel Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh was assessed for experimental ventral hernia repair in dogs. Twelve healthy mongrel dogs were selected and randomly divided into three groups, A, Band C (n=4). In all groups, an experimental laparotomy was performed; thereafter, the posterior rectus sheath and peritoneum were sutured together, while, a 5 × 5 cm defect was created in the rectus muscle belly and anterior rectus sheath. For sublay hernioplasty, the hernia mesh (Prolene: group A; Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh: group B), was implanted over the posterior rectus sheath. In group C (control), mesh was not implanted; instead the laparotomy incision was closed after a herniorrhaphy. Post-operative pain, mesh shrinkage and adhesion formation were assessed as short term complications. Post-operatively, pain at surgical site was significantly less (P<0.001) in group B (composite mesh); mesh shrinkage was also significantly less in group B (21.42%, P<0.05) than in group A (Prolene mesh shrinkage: 58.18%). Group B (composite mesh) also depicted less than 25% adhesions (Mean ± SE: 0.75 ± 0.50 scores, P≤0.013) when assessed on the basis of a Quantitative Modified Diamond scale; a Qualitative Adhesion Tenacity scale also depicted either no adhesions (n=2), or, only flimsy adhesions (n=2) in group B (composite mesh), in contrast to group A (Prolene), which manifested greater adhesion formation and presence of dense adhesions requiring blunt dissection. Conclusively, the Prolene-Vicryl composite mesh proved superior to the Prolene mesh regarding lesser mesh contraction, fewer adhesions and no short-term follow-up complications.

  12. Interposition of the omentum and/or the peritoneum in the emergency repair of large ventral hernias with polypropylene mesh.

    PubMed

    Sorour, Magdy A

    2014-01-01

    Ventral and incisional hernias are common surgical problems and their repairs are among the common surgeries done by a general surgeon. Repair of a large ventral hernia is still associated with high postoperative morbidity and recurrence rates. No single approach to ventral hernia repair will be the best choice for all patients. Large ventral hernias are often better approached with open surgery but may still be problematic when the defect is too wide for primary fascial closure to be achieved, as this leaves mesh exposed, bridging the gap. Techniques for incisional hernia repair have evolved over many years, and the use of mesh has reduced recurrence rates dramatically. The use of polypropylene mesh is reported to be associated with long-term complications such as severe adhesions and enterocutaneous fistula, which occur more commonly if the mesh is applied intraperitoneally with direct contact of the serosal surface of the intestine. Composite meshes containing expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) have been used recently; their major drawbacks lie in their high cost, inferior handling characteristics, and poor incorporation into the tissues. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the safety and efficacy of prosthetic mesh repair in the emergency management of the incarcerated and/or strangulated inguinal and ventral hernias, however, surgeons remained reluctant to use prosthetics in such settings. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of placing the omentum and/or the peritoneum of the hernia sac as a protective layer over the viscera in the emergency repair of large ventral hernias using on-lay polypropylene mesh whenever complete tension-free closure of the abdominal wall was impossible. This study was carried out on all patients with large ventral hernia presented to the Gastrointestinal Surgery Unit, Main Alexandria University Hospital in an emergency situation during the period from October 2005 till October 2012

  13. Onlay with Adhesive Use Compared with Sublay Mesh Placement in Ventral Hernia Repair: Was Chevrel Right? An Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Ivy N; Voeller, Guy R; Stoikes, Nathaniel F; Webb, David L; Chandler, Robert G; Phillips, Sharon; Poulose, Benjamin K; Rosen, Michael J

    2017-05-01

    The use of mesh during ventral hernia repair (VHR) is a well-accepted concept. However, the ideal location of mesh placement remains strongly debated. Although VHR with onlay mesh placement has historically been associated with a high rate of wound events, this surgical approach is technically less challenging than VHR with sublay mesh placement. The purpose of this study was to compare 30-day wound events after onlay mesh placement with adhesive fixation vs those after sublay mesh placement using the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative database. All patients undergoing elective, open VHR with synthetic mesh placement from January 2013 through January 2016 were identified within the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative. Only patients with clean wounds were included. Patients were divided into 2 groups: onlay mesh placement with the use of adhesive and sublay mesh placement. The association of mesh location with 30-day wound events was investigated using a matched analysis. A total of 1,854 patients met inclusion criteria; 1,761 (95.0%) underwent sublay mesh placement and 93 (5.0%) underwent onlay mesh placement with the use of adhesive. A 2:1 sublay to onlay matched analysis was performed based on factors previously shown to influence wound events after VHR. After matching, both groups had a lower mean Ventral Hernia Working Group grade and fewer associated comorbidities. There was no statistically significant difference between the sublay and onlay groups with respect to 30-day surgical site infections (2.9% vs 5.5%; p = 0.30), surgical site occurrences (15.2% vs 7.7%; p = 0.08), or surgical site occurrences requiring procedural intervention (8.2% vs 5.5%; p = 0.42). Ventral hernia repair with onlay mesh placement is a safe alternative to VHR with sublay mesh placement in low-risk patients. Additional studies are needed to determine the long-term mesh outcomes and recurrence rates in both of these groups. Copyright © 2017 American College of

  14. Lightweight Titanium-coated Mesh Versus Standard-Weight Polypropylene Mesh in Totally Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair (TEP): A Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prassas, Dimitrios; Rolfs, Thomas-Marten; Sirothia, Nishank; Schumacher, Franz-Josef

    2016-12-01

    The study objective is to compare the outcomes of laparoscopic to tally extraperitoneal repair using the standard-weight polypropylene mesh or a lightweight titanium-coated mesh. A retrospective review was conducted on 138 adult patients with unilateral inguinal hernias, who underwent totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair between 2010 and 2013 using either a standard-weight polypropylene mesh (Prolene mesh, 80 g/m) or a lightweight titanium-coated mesh (Ti Mesh light, 35 g/m). There was no difference in reported pain at 24 hours postoperatively. The difference in reported pain at follow-up (mean: 21 mo) was insignificant [PP vs. Ti: 7.8% (n=5) vs. 8.3% (n=3), P=0.92], the differences regarding chronic inguinal pain was also insignificant [PP vs. Ti: 14% (n=9) vs. 5.5% (n=2), P=0.191], and there was no difference in the development of hernia recurrence [PP vs. Ti: 1.5% (n=1) vs. 0, P=0.42]. No statistically significant differences of the overall postoperative outcome were observed between the 2 mesh types.

  15. Self-gripping mesh versus fibrin glue fixation in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a randomized prospective clinical trial in young and elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindi, Marco; Rivelli, Matteo; Solej, Mario; Enrico, Stefano; Martino, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair is a safe and effective technique. In this study we tested the hypothesis that self-gripping mesh used with the laparoscopic approach is comparable to polypropylene mesh in terms of perioperative complications, against a lower overall cost of the procedure. We carried out a prospective randomized trial comparing a group of 30 patients who underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh versus a group of 30 patients who received polypropylene mesh with fibrin glue fixation. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with regard to intraoperative variables, early or late intraoperative complications, chronic pain or recurrence. Self-gripping mesh in transabdominal hernia repair was found to be a valid alternative to polypropylene mesh in terms of complications, recurrence and postoperative pain. The cost analysis and comparability of outcomes support the preferential use of self-gripping mesh. PMID:28352842

  16. [Prospective randomized trial of long-term results of inguinal hernia repair using autoadhesive mesh compared to classic Lichtenstein technique with sutures and polypropylene mesh].

    PubMed

    Bruna Esteban, Marcos; Cantos Pallarés, Miriam; Artigues Sánchez de Rojas, Enrique; Vila, María José

    2014-03-01

    The use of autoadhesive meshes with hooks that allow fixation without sutures is a therapeutic alternative to decrease recurrence and chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate if this kind of mesh has any advantage in long term results in comparison with the classic Lichtenstein technique with sutures and polypropylene mesh. We report a prospective and randomized study of patients who have been operated on for inguinal hernia between march of 2009 to march 2010, divided into 2 groups of 45 patients. In AutoAdhesive (AA) group, we included patients operated on with an autoadhesive mesh and in Classic Lichtenstein (CL) group we included cases with an inguinal hernioplasty with sutured polypropylene mesh. We evaluated time of inactivity, complications, recurrences and grade of pain after one year. The mean age was 60 years in AA group and 49 in LC group. There were more men than women and there were no differences in co-morbilities between groups. The mean size of hernia orifice was 3cm in both groups and 60% of the hernias were indirect. After one year, 77 patients were evaluated; 39 in LC group and 38 in AA group. 86,8% and 87,2% of them were asymptomatic. The mean time of recovery of daily activities was 15 days in both groups. There were neither recurrences nor severe chronic pain in the AA group. The mean of grade of pain was 0 (range:0-4) in AA group and 0 (range: 0-5) in LC group. In this group, there was one recurrence and one patient was taking analgesics for intense pain. No mortality nor other long term complications were found. The use of autoadhesive and parcial reabsorbible meshes in inguinal hernia repair has no effect on recovery of daily activities, postoperative pain and long term complications compared with hernioplasty with polypropylene mesh fixed with monofilament suture. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Early results of a randomised trial comparing Prolene and VyproII-mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair (TEP) of recurrent unilateral hernias.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, T; Wollert, S; Osterberg, J; Smedberg, S; Bringman, S

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a lightweight mesh to a standard polypropylene hernia mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal hernioplasty in recurrent hernias. A total of 140 men with recurrent unilateral inguinal hernias were randomised to a totally extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) with Prolene or VyproII in a single-blinded multi-center trial. The randomisation and all data handling were performed through the Internet. 137 patients were operated as allocated. Follow-up was completed in 88% of the patients. The median operation times were 55 (24-125) min and 53.5 (21-123) min for the Prolene and VyproII groups, respectively. The meshes had comparable results in the surgeon's assessment of the handling of the mesh, return to work, return to daily activities, complications, postoperative pain and quality of life during the first 8 weeks of rehabilitation, except in General Health (GH) SF-36, where the VyproII-group had a significantly better score (P=0.045). The use of Prolene and VyproII-meshes in endoscopic repair of recurrent inguinal hernia seems to result in similar short-term outcomes and quality of life.

  18. Structural Analysis and Application of n-Alkyl Cyanoacrylate Surgical Adhesives to the Fixation of Meshes for Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Rodriguez-Mancheño, Marta; Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel; Román, Julio San

    2016-12-01

    The article deals with a comparative analysis of the parameters of the polymerization in physiological conditions of three commercially available alkyl cyanoacrylates, n-butyl cyanoacrylate (GLUBRAN 2), n-hexyl cyanoacrylate (IFABOND), and n-octyl cyanoacrylate (EVOBOND), the cell behavior of the corresponding polymers and the application of these adhesives in the fixation of surgical polypropylene meshes for hernia repair in an animal model of rabbits. The results obtained demonstrate that the curing process depends on the nature of the alkyl residue of the ester group of cyanoacrylate molecules, being the heat of polymerization lower for the octyl derivative in comparison with the hexyl and butyl, and reaching a maximum temperature of 35 °C after a time of mixing with physiological fluids of 60-70 s. The cell behavior demonstrates that the three systems do not present toxicity for fibroblasts and low adhesion of cells, which is a positive result for application as tissue adhesives, especially for the fixation of abdominal polypropylene meshes for hernia repair. The animal experimentation indicates the excellent tolerance of the meshes fixed with the cyanoacrylic adhesives, during at least a period of 90 d, and guarantees a good adhesion for the application of hernia repair meshes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The role of prophylactic cefazolin in the prevention of infection after various types of abdominal wall hernia repair with mesh.

    PubMed

    Mehrabi Bahar, Mostafa; Jabbari Nooghabi, Azadeh; Jabbari Nooghabi, Mehdi; Jangjoo, Ali

    2015-07-01

    There are controversies about the benefits of prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) in mesh herniorrhaphy for a long time. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and efficacy of systemic prophylactic cefazolin in prevention of wound infection in various types of hernia repair with mesh materials. This is a prospective randomized control study. We evaluated wound infection rates in 395 patients with various kinds of hernia who underwent elective mesh repair using polypropylene mesh from 2007 to 2011. A total of 237 (60.0%) patients received prophylactic cefazolin (study group) and the remaining 158 (40.0%) patients did not receive any prophylactic antibiotics (control group). Patients were followed for infection at the following periods after the operation by an independent surgeon: 10 days, 30 days, 12 months, and then annually for at least 2 years. Eight (2.03%) patients had infection in the site of surgery [2 (1.27%) in the control group and 6 (2.53%) in the study group]. The distribution of infection was not significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.364). The superficial infections were managed by drainage and irrigation. One patient from the study group developed deep SSI and was readmitted and subsequently received antibiotic therapy, drainage, and debridement. Preoperative administration of single-dose cefazolin for prosthetic hernia repairs did not markedly decrease the risk of wound infection. Our results do not support the use of cefazolin as a prophylactic antibiotic for various kinds of abdominal wall hernia repair with mesh. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Tensile strength testing for resorbable mesh fixation systems in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Reynvoet, Emmelie; Berrevoet, Frederik; De Somer, Filip; Vercauteren, Griet; Vanoverbeke, Ingrid; Chiers, Koen; Troisi, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    In an attempt to improve patient outcome and quality of life after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, resorbable fixation devices have been developed to allow adequate mesh fixation while minimizing accompanying side-effects as tack erosion and adhesion formation. In experimental set-up, 24 pigs were treated by laparoscopic mesh placement. Two different meshes (PP/ORC and PP/ePTFE) and four fixation devices were evaluated: a 6.4 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide pushpin (tack I), a 6.8 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide with blunt tip (tack II), a 4.1 mm poly(glycolide-co-L-lactide) (tack III) and one titanium tack (control tack). A first group of animals (n = 12) was euthanized after 2 weeks survival and a second group (n = 12) after 6 months. At euthanasia, a relaparoscopy was performed to assess adhesion formation followed by laparotomy with excision of the entire abdominal wall. Tensile strength of the individual fixation systems was tested with the use of a tensiometer by measuring the force to pull the tack out of the mesh. Additionally, the foreign body reaction to the fixation systems was evaluated histologically as was their potential degradation. At 2 weeks the tensile strength was significantly higher for the control tack (31.98 N/cm²) compared to the resorbable devices. Except for tack II, the tensile strength was higher when the devices were fixed in a PP/ePTFE mesh compared to the PP/ORC mesh. After 6 months only tack III was completely resorbed, while tack I (9.292 N/cm²) had the lowest tensile strength. At this time-point similar tensile strength was observed for both tack II (29.56 N/cm²) and the control tack (27.77 N/cm²). Adhesions seem to be more depending on the type of mesh, in favor of PP/ePTFE. At long term, the 4.1 mm poly(glycolide-co-L-lactide) tack was the only tack completely resorbed while the 6.8 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide tack with blunt tip reached equal strengths to the permanent tack.

  1. Chronic Pain after Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Hernia Repair: A Randomized Comparison of Light and Extralight Titanized Polypropylene Mesh

    PubMed Central

    von Ahnen, Thomas; von Ahnen, Martin; Schardey, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-blinded clinical trial was to compare the incidence of chronic pain after laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair (TAPP) using a 35-g/m2 titanized polypropylene mesh and a 16-g/m2 titanized polypropylene mesh. The reported incidence of chronic pain in patients who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair is a serious problem. The techniques of dissection, mesh fixation, and the mesh material used have all been identified as being part of the problem. Excellent biocompatibility through a unique combination of a lightweight open porous polypropylene mesh covered with a covalent-bonded titanium layer has been claimed. The aim of this study was to find out whether the titanium surface alone or the difference in material load between the two available meshes influences clinical outcomes. Methods Three hundred eighty patients with 466 inguinal hernias were operated on between 2002 and 2006 with the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) technique. Mesh fixation with staples was carried out routinely. After the dissection was completed just prior to the implantation of the mesh, patients were randomized into two groups. In Group A, 250 (53.6%) inguinal hernias were repaired with a 35-g/m2 titanized polypropylene mesh, and in Group B, 216 (46.4%) inguinal hernias were repaired with a 16-g/m2 titanized polypropylene mesh. The primary outcome was chronic pain 3 years after surgery. The degree of pain was determined using a visual analog scale (VAS) with a range from 0 to 10. The secondary outcome was the rate of recurrence. Results The postoperative period of observation was at least 3 years for every patient. In both groups, 90% of the patients could be questioned and examined clinically: in Group A (Light), 5.3% of the patients and in Group B (Extralight), 1.5% of the patients suffered from chronic pain. Chronic pain was significantly more common in Group A than in Group B (p = 0

  2. Serial tightening of Prolene mesh in the repair of a large ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anurag

    2006-04-01

    A 9-month-old female baby was brought to our hospital with a large ventral hernia which had developed after conservative treatment of an exomphalos. A hitherto undescribed technique involving serial tightening of a Prolene mesh was utilised to close the ventral hernia. We were able to achieve a good result within a short period of 2 weeks, without resorting to ventilation. We propose this procedure as an alternative to other existing techniques in similar situations.

  3. Use of a new type of PTFE mesh in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair: the continuing evolution of technique and surgical expertise.

    PubMed

    Verbo, Alessandro; Petito, Luigi; Pedretti, Giorgio; Lurati, Massimo; D'Alba, Pierfrancesco; Coco, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of our first 44 laparoscopic incisional hernia repairs. This study examines the effectiveness of this technique in patients presenting with a first-time or recurrent incisional hernia. From October 2001 to November 2002, a total of 45 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic incisional hernia repair with a new form of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh. Patient data, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative records, were recorded and analyzed. Mean defect size was 84 cm2, mean mesh size was 311 cm2, mean surgical time was 65 minutes, and mean hospital stay was 2.25 days. Postoperative complications occurred in four patients (9.1%). The laparoscopic approach is a safe, effective, and relatively complication-free option in the management of first-time and recurrent incisional hernias. The use of modified ePTFE mesh with a dual surface in incisional hernia repair enables early tissue attachment, reduces adhesions, and could reduce the incidence of recurrences.

  4. Lower recurrence rates after mesh-reinforced versus simple hiatal hernia repair: a meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Stavros A; Antoniou, George A; Koch, Oliver O; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank A

    2012-12-01

    Mesh hiatoplasty has been postulated to reduce recurrence rates, it is however prone to esophageal stricture, and early-term and mid-term dysphagia. The present meta-analysis was designed to compare the outcome between mesh-reinforced and primary hiatal hernia repair. The databases of Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched; only randomized controlled trials entered the meta-analytical model. Anatomic recurrence documented by barium oesophagography was defined as the primary outcome endpoint. Three randomized controlled trials reporting the outcomes of 267 patients were identified. The follow-up period ranged between 6 and 12 months. The weighted mean recurrence rates after primary and mesh-reinforced hiatoplasty were 24.3% and 5.8%, respectively. Pooled analysis demonstrated increased risk of recurrence in primary hiatal closure (odds ratio, 4.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-9.5; P=0.001). Mesh-reinforced hiatal hernia repair is associated with an approximately 4-fold decreased risk of recurrence in comparison with simple repair. The long-term results of mesh-augmented hiatal closure remain to be investigated.

  5. No enterocutaneous fistula development in a cohort of 695 patients after incisional hernia repair using intraperitoneal uncoated polyproylene mesh.

    PubMed

    Brandi, C D; Roche, S; Bertone, S; Fratantoni, M E

    2017-02-01

    To determine the incidence of enterocutaneous fistulas (ECFs) developed after elective incisional hernia (IH) repair using intraperitoneal uncoated polypropylene (PPE) mesh. This is a retrospective descriptive study of a prospective cohort of patients undergoing elective IH repair using intraperitoneal uncoated PPE mesh at the Department of General Surgery of a high complexity University Hospital. Between January 1992 and December 2013, 695 IH repairs were performed using intraperitoneal uncoated PPE mesh. The omentum was placed between the mesh and bowel in 507 patients (73 %). In 188 patients (27 %) it was not possible to place the omentum between the mesh and bowel; therefore, in 69 patients (9.92 %) the PPE mesh was placed over the bowel, whereas in 119 patients (17.12 %) a Vicryl® mesh was placed between the bowel and PPE mesh. Six hundred and seventy-eight (97.5 %) IH repairs were open whereas 17 (2.5 %) were laparoscopic. Postoperative complications consisted of seroma (5.9 %), hematoma (4.3 %), wound infection (4.8 %), and mesh infection (4.0 %). Recurrence of IH occurred in 52 patients (7.4 %) after a mean follow-up of 59 months. Four (0.5 %) patients required additional surgery due to intestinal occlusion. Neither acute nor chronic ECFs were encountered during follow-up in 695 patients. Based on these results, the placement of intraperitoneal uncoated PPE mesh for elective IH repair might be a safe procedure that is not associated with ECF formation.

  6. Usage of a self-adhesive mesh in TAPP hernia repair: A prospective study based on Herniamed Register

    PubMed Central

    Klobusicky, Pavol; Feyerherd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide in general surgery. The transabdominal laparoscopic (TAPP) approach in the therapy of inguinal hernia seems to be a suitable alternative to classical open inguinal hernia repair mainly in the hands of an experienced surgeon. TAPP repair offers the possibility of gentle dissection with implantation of the mesh and the possibility of non-invasive fixation of the implanted mesh. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data analysis encompassed all patients who underwent inguinal hernia surgery at our Surgical Department within the period from July 1, 2012 to September 30, 2014 and who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The standard surgical technique was used. Data were entered and subsequently analysed on the Herniamed platform. Herniamed is an Internet-based register in German and English, and includes all data of outpatient and hospitalised patients who underwent surgery for some type of hernia. All relevant patient data are collected via Internet. RESULTS: There were 241 patients enrolled in the group and there were 396 inguinal hernias repaired in total. Standard long-term follow-up after 12 months was evaluated in 205 patients (85.06%), and in the rest of the patients during the closing of the study, but at least 6 months after operation. The mean follow-up was at 19.69 months. At the 1-year assessment, mild discomfort was reported in the groin in 10 patients (4.88%) [1-3 on the visual analogue scale (VAS)]. Post-operative pain lasting over 12 months in the groin of moderate degree (4-6 VAS) was reported in two cases (0.97%). There was no recurrence and no chronic post-operative pain of severe degree reported. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using the TAPP technique with the implantation of a self-fixation mesh is fast, effective, reliable and economically advantageous method in experienced hands and, according to our results

  7. Comparison of the Clinical Outcome and Complications in Laparoscopic Hernia Repair of Inguinal Hernia With Mesh Fixation Using Fibrin Glue vs Tacker.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Prasant; Phalgune, Deepak; Shah, Shashank

    2016-12-01

    Although laparoscopic repair offers a quick and less morbid way of treating hernias, complications like hematoma, seroma, neuralgia, recurrence, mesh infection, hydrocele, etc. are known. The present study was undertaken to compare various clinical outcomes between mesh fixation using fibrin glue and mesh fixation with tacker in a 3-months follow-up. One hundred patients aged 18 to 60 years having inguinal hernia admitted in Poona Hospital and Research Centre, Pune, between October 2012 and November 2014 for laparoscopic hernia surgery and ready to participate in this study were included. All of them underwent laparoscopic repair of hernia by total extra peritoneal (TEP) method following sample surgical protocol in all of them except for method of mesh fixation. Mean time calculated from insertion of the first trocar to beginning of skin suturing was 54.9 min in tacker group and 50.3 min in fibrin glue group with no statistically significant difference between the two. The incidence of urinary retention was significantly higher in tacker (34 %) as compared to fibrin glue (12 %) group. Incidence of hematoma was significantly higher in tacker group in 15-day follow-up, but there was no significant difference in hematoma formation at hernial sites in both groups after 15 days of follow-up. The incidence of neuralgia was significantly higher in the tacker group (24 %) compared with the fibrin glue group (2 %). Significantly, more number of people in the fibrin glue group 68 and 90 %, respectively, returned to work during 15 and 30 days follow-up as compared to the tacker group 46 and 64 %. Fibrin glue can be considered as an alternative to tacker for mesh fixation.

  8. Wrapping the visceral sac into a bilateral mesh prosthesis in groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Stoppa, René E

    2003-03-01

    Almost 40 years of lucky existence is enough time for questioning and/or updating the Stoppa method for hernia repair. In this paper, the author reports the circumstances of the birth of this method more than 30 years ago, recalls its innovative principles, describes its technical aspects, and exposes its good results. Not simply approving old concepts, the author concludes with critical remarks with regard to a so-called political correctness of today's groin hernia repair, which gives great importance to reducing patient trauma arising from surgery. For belief without doubt can be wrong belief!

  9. Computed tomography evidence of fluid in the hernia sac predicts surgical site infection following mesh repair of acutely incarcerated ventral and groin hernias.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Tyler J; Go, Kristina L; Jordan, Janeen R; Croft, Chasen A; Smith, R Stephen; Moore, Frederick A; Efron, Philip A; Mohr, Alicia M; Brakenridge, Scott C

    2017-07-01

    Mesh placement during repair of acutely incarcerated ventral and groin hernias is associated with high rates of surgical site infection (SSI). The utility of preoperative computed tomography (CT) in this setting is unclear. We hypothesized that CT evidence of bowel wall compromise would predict SSI while accounting for physiologic parameters. We performed a 4-year retrospective cohort analysis of 50 consecutive patients who underwent mesh repair of acutely incarcerated ventral or groin hernias. We analyzed chronic disease burden, acute illness severity, CT findings, operative management, and herniorrhaphy-specific outcomes within 180 days. The primary outcome was SSI by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of SSI. Eighty-four percent of all patients were American Society of Anesthesiologists class III or IV, 28% were active smokers, and mean body mass index (BMI) was 35 kg/m. Fifty-four percent had ventral hernias, 40% had inguinal hernias, and 6% had femoral or combined inguinal/ femoral hernias. Seventy percent of preoperative CT scans had features suggesting bowel compromise, abdominal free fluid, or fluid in the hernia sac. Surgical site infection occurred in 32% of all patients (8% superficial, 24% deep or organ/space). The strongest predictors of SSI were CT evidence of fluid in the hernia sac (odds ratio [OR], 8.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-41), initial heart rate 90 beats/min or greater (OR, 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-34), and BMI 35 kg/m or greater (OR, 5.8; 95% CI, 1.2-28). Surgical site infection rates were significantly higher among patients who had CT evidence of fluid in the hernia sac (56% vs. 19%, p = 0.012). More than half of all patients with CT scan evidence of fluid in the hernia sac developed an SSI. Computed tomography evidence of fluid in the hernia sac was the strongest predictor of SSI, followed by heart rate and BMI. Together, these parameters

  10. Assessing complications and cost-utilization in ventral hernia repair utilizing biologic mesh in a bridged underlay technique.

    PubMed

    Basta, Marten N; Fischer, John P; Kovach, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    The inability to reapproximate fascia in complex ventral hernia (CVH) repair remains challenging. Single-stage bridging reconstructions have been reported, however, with high rates of recurrence and wound complications. We describe a single-surgeon experience with bridging biologic CVH repair. We reviewed 37 patients undergoing CVH repair with bridging biologic mesh by the senior author from January 1, 2007 to January 1, 2013. Surgical history and operative characteristics were analyzed for predictors of hernia recurrence and wound complications. Average age was 53 ± 15 years, body mass index was 31.1 ± 8.1 kg/m(2), and history of prior repair in 18 patients. Common indications were trauma, intra-abdominal infection, and prior intra-abdominal surgery. Incidence of wound complications was 51.4%, most commonly wound breakdown and infection. With average follow-up of 13 months, recurrence rate was 18.9% at an average of 8.2 months postoperatively. Analysis demonstrated postoperative wound infection as the only predictor of recurrence (odds ratio = 22.1, P = .017). Hernia recurrence rate was 18.9% with bridged biologic CVH repairs, strongly associated with postoperative wound infection. This suggests that patients with postoperative infections may benefit from closer surveillance and more aggressive wound management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiac complications after laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair. Is it related with staple fixation of the mesh? -Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria del Carmen; Diaz, María; López, Fernando; Martí-Obiol, Roberto; Ortega, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic Nissen operation with mesh reinforcement remains being the most popular operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Complications related to mesh placement have been widely described. Cardiac complications are rare, but have a fatal outcome if they are misdiagnosed. Presentation of cases We sought to outline our institutional experience of three patients who developed cardiac complications following a laparoscopic Nissen operation for large hiatal hernia repair. Discussion Laparoscopic hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication are safe and effective procedures for the hiatal hernia repair, but they are not exempt from complications. Fixation technique and material used must be taken into account. We have conducted a review of the literature on complications related to these procedures. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of hemodynamic instability after laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair, cardiac tamponade and other cardiac complications should be considered. PMID:26635954

  12. Gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to late-onset enteric fistula after polyester mesh repair of an incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Moussi, A; Daldoul, S; Bourguiba, B; Othmani, D; Zaouche, A

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of enteric fistulae after wall repair using a prosthetic mesh is a serious but, fortunately, rare complication. We report the case of a 66-year-old diabetic man who presented with gas gangrene of the abdominal wall due to an intra-abdominal abscess caused by intestinal erosion six years after an incisional hernia repair using a polyester mesh. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the seriousness of enteric fistula after parietal repair using a synthetic material.

  13. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the post-operative adverse effects associated with mosquito net mesh in comparison to commercial hernia mesh for inguinal hernia repair in low income countries.

    PubMed

    Patterson, T; Currie, P; Patterson, S; Patterson, P; Meek, C; McMaster, R

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal wall hernia is a common surgical condition, with more than 20 million estimated to be repaired each year. Mesh repair is the standard for most repairs; however, the mesh material itself may be a barrier to care, the cost prohibitively high for some populations and healthcare systems. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to produce a pooled comparison between the adverse event rate associated with mosquito net mesh and commercial hernia mesh. A systematic review was carried out in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Ovid Embase/Medline, SCOPUS, Web of Science and the Cochrane library were searched. In addition, the ISRCTN register, ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTR Platform and EU Clinical Trials Register were searched. Five randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. The RCTs were deemed to have similar sample populations after inspection of their sample parameters. Therefore, the adverse effects were compared individually (reoccurrence, haematoma, seroma, infection, and serous discharge) and pooled. A total of 313 mosquito net meshes were included in the study, there was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups for pooled adverse effects or individually. There is not a significant difference between the commercial mesh group and the mosquito net mesh group for pooled [odds ratio 0.93 (0.63, 1.35)] and individual adverse event rates. However, the 95% confidence intervals of these results are still wide. To reduce this uncertainty sample sizes must increase in future studies.

  14. Significant improvement of biocompatibility of polypropylene mesh for incisional hernia repair by using poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers functionalized with thrombocyte-rich solution

    PubMed Central

    Plencner, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; East, Barbora; Buzgo, Matej; Vysloužilová, Lucie; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is the most common postoperative complication, affecting up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Insertion of a synthetic surgical mesh has become the standard of care in ventral hernia repair. However, the implementation of a mesh does not reduce the risk of recurrence and the onset of hernia recurrence is only delayed by 2–3 years. Nowadays, more than 100 surgical meshes are available on the market, with polypropylene the most widely used for ventral hernia repair. Nonetheless, the ideal mesh does not exist yet; it still needs to be developed. Polycaprolactone nanofibers appear to be a suitable material for different kinds of cells, including fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells. The aim of the study reported here was to develop a functionalized scaffold for ventral hernia regeneration. We prepared a novel composite scaffold based on a polypropylene surgical mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers and adhered thrombocytes as a natural source of growth factors. In extensive in vitro tests, we proved the biocompatibility of PCL nanofibers with adhered thrombocytes deposited on a polypropylene mesh. Compared with polypropylene mesh alone, this composite scaffold provided better adhesion, growth, metabolic activity, proliferation, and viability of mouse fibroblasts in all tests and was even better than a polypropylene mesh functionalized with PCL nanofibers. The gradual release of growth factors from biocompatible nanofiber-modified scaffolds seems to be a promising approach in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25878497

  15. Significant improvement of biocompatibility of polypropylene mesh for incisional hernia repair by using poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers functionalized with thrombocyte-rich solution.

    PubMed

    Plencner, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; East, Barbora; Buzgo, Matej; Vysloužilová, Lucie; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is the most common postoperative complication, affecting up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Insertion of a synthetic surgical mesh has become the standard of care in ventral hernia repair. However, the implementation of a mesh does not reduce the risk of recurrence and the onset of hernia recurrence is only delayed by 2-3 years. Nowadays, more than 100 surgical meshes are available on the market, with polypropylene the most widely used for ventral hernia repair. Nonetheless, the ideal mesh does not exist yet; it still needs to be developed. Polycaprolactone nanofibers appear to be a suitable material for different kinds of cells, including fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells. The aim of the study reported here was to develop a functionalized scaffold for ventral hernia regeneration. We prepared a novel composite scaffold based on a polypropylene surgical mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers and adhered thrombocytes as a natural source of growth factors. In extensive in vitro tests, we proved the biocompatibility of PCL nanofibers with adhered thrombocytes deposited on a polypropylene mesh. Compared with polypropylene mesh alone, this composite scaffold provided better adhesion, growth, metabolic activity, proliferation, and viability of mouse fibroblasts in all tests and was even better than a polypropylene mesh functionalized with PCL nanofibers. The gradual release of growth factors from biocompatible nanofiber-modified scaffolds seems to be a promising approach in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  16. Preclinical Bioassay of a Polypropylene Mesh for Hernia Repair Pretreated with Antibacterial Solutions of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Brune, Thierry; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic mesh infection constitutes one of the major complications following hernia repair. Antimicrobial, non-antibiotic biomaterials have the potential to reduce bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface and adjacent tissues while avoiding the development of novel antibiotic resistance. This study assesses the efficacy of presoaking reticular polypropylene meshes in chlorhexidine or a chlorhexidine and allicin combination (a natural antibacterial agent) for preventing bacterial infection in a short-time hernia-repair rabbit model. Partial hernia defects (5 x 2 cm) were created on the lateral right side of the abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits (n = 21). The defects were inoculated with 0.5 mL of a 106 CFU/mL Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 strain and repaired with a DualMesh Plus antimicrobial mesh or a Surgipro mesh presoaked in either chlorhexidine (0.05%) or allicin-chlorhexidine (900 μg/mL-0.05%). Fourteen days post-implant, mesh contraction was measured and tissue specimens were harvested to evaluate bacterial adhesion to the implant surface (via sonication, S. aureus immunolabeling), host-tissue incorporation (via staining, scanning electron microscopy) and macrophage response (via RAM-11 immunolabeling). The polypropylene mesh showed improved tissue integration relative to the DualMesh Plus. Both the DualMesh Plus and the chlorhexidine-soaked polypropylene meshes exhibited high bacterial clearance, with the latter material showing lower bacterial yields. The implants from the allicin-chlorhexidine group displayed a neoformed tissue containing differently sized abscesses and living bacteria, as well as a diminished macrophage response. The allicin-chlorhexidine coated implants exhibited the highest contraction. The presoaking of reticular polypropylene materials with a low concentration of chlorhexidine provides the mesh with antibacterial activity without disrupting tissue integration. Due to the similarities found with the antimicrobial DualMesh

  17. Parastomal hernia repair. An update.

    PubMed

    Wara, P

    2011-04-01

    Repair of parastomal hernia remains controversial. Open suture repair of the fascial defect or stoma resiting are both associated with high morbidity and unacceptably high recurrence rates and are no longer recommended for routine use. Mesh repair appears to provide the best results. Following the first anectodal reports there are accumulating evidence that laparoscopic mesh repair is feasible and has a promising potential in the management of parastomal hernia. Two laparoscopic techniques have emerged, the use of a mesh with a slit and a central keyhole and a mesh without a slit, the latter often termed as a modified Sugarbaker. Published series, however, are observational and often with a short length of follow-up. Most series suffer from small sample size and controlled trials are lacking. The limited data, therefore, make it difficult to draw conclusions. At present none of the methods of open or laparoscopic mesh repair has proved superior. In spite of this laparoscopic repair has gained increasing acceptance. A polypropylene based mesh with an anti-adhesive layer covering the visceral side seems to be applicable using the keyhole technique with a slit as well as the modified Sugarbaker technique. A PTFE mesh should preferably be used with the modified Sugarbaker technique. If a PTFE mesh is used with the keyhole technique parastomal hernia is likely to recur.

  18. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C A; McKnight, R L

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a laparoscopic approach to recurrent inguinal hernia repair which dissected the entire inguinal floor and repaired all potential areas of recurrence without producing tension. Both a transabdominal preperitoneal and a totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach were utilized. Ninety recurrent hernias were repaired in 81 patients. The patients had 26 indirect, 36 direct, and 26 pantaloon recurrent hernias of which eight had a femoral component. In all but one patient the primary operations were open anterior repairs. The median follow-up was 14 months, ranging from 1 to 28 months. Patients returned to normal activities in an average of 1 week. The only recurrence observed was in the one patient whose primary repair was laparoscopic. When the entire inguinal floor of the recurrent hernia was redissected and buttressed with mesh, early recurrence was eliminated and recovery was shortened.

  19. Interparietal hernias after open retromuscular hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, A M

    2008-12-01

    The retromuscular or sublay repair of ventral hernias, popularized by Rives and Stoppa, requires that a layer of tissue be reapproximated dorsal to the mesh to separate the bowel from the prosthetic. This is the first report of two patients who developed bowel obstruction resulting from interparietal incarceration between the posterior rectus sheath and the prosthetic graft through a defect in this dorsal layer. Both patients underwent open retromuscular hernia repair, one with lightweight polypropylene mesh, the other with human acellular dermal matrix. Postoperatively (day 3 and day 42, respectively), the patients developed signs of bowel obstruction. Computed tomography demonstrated the herniation of the small bowel into the potential space between the prosthesis and the posterior rectus sheath. The first patient underwent successful laparoscopic repair, while the second patient had an open operation to reduce the incarcerated bowel and repair the defect. In the patient convalescing from an uneventful retromuscular hernia repair who develops signs and symptoms of a bowel obstruction, there should be a high index of suspicion that an interparietal hernia may have formed, with the small bowel herniated into the surgically created space between the prosthetic and the posterior rectus sheath.

  20. A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing Fibrin Glue Versus Prolene Suture for Mesh Fixation in Lichtenstein Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Karigoudar, Ashirwad; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Mukharjee, Sourabh; Gupta, Nikhil; Durga, C K

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the advantages of fibrin glue over Prolene suture in fixation of the mesh in open inguinal hernia repair. Sixty-four cases of inguinal hernia underwent hernia repair by the Lichtenstein method in the department of surgery in PGIMER & Dr. RML Hospital, New Delhi. The patients were randomized prospectively into group A (fibrin glue group) and group B (Prolene suture group). In group A, fibrin glue was used for mesh fixation, and in group B, Prolene suture was used for mesh fixation. The mean age of patients in group A was 44.5 years and that of group B patients was 44.2 years. There was a significant difference in the duration of surgery, with the mean duration in fibrin glue group being 30.6 min and that of the suture group was 43.3 min. The mean visual analogue pain score of postoperative pain at 1, 6, 12, and 24 h was significantly higher in the suture group than in the fibrin glue group (p < 0.001). The mean total dose of analgesia in ampoules of tramadol was significantly less in the fibrin glue group (1.56 ampoules) than that in the suture group (4.125 ampoules) with p = 0.000. At the end of the first month, 25 % of subjects in the suture group presented with mild groin pain (p value = 0.0048). At the end of the second and third month, 22 % (p 68 value = 0.0048) and 12.5 % (p value = 0.1132) of subjects respectively presented with mild groin pain in the suture group. The present study demonstrates that the use of fibrin glue in place of Prolene suture for mesh fixation in open inguinal hernia repair can help decreasing the time required for surgery, reduce the intensity of postoperative pain, shorten the duration of hospital stay, and prevent the incidence of chronic groin pain.

  1. Large abdominal incisional hernias: repair by fascial approximation reinforced with a stainless steel mesh.

    PubMed

    Validire, J; Imbaud, P; Dutet, D; Duron, J J

    1986-01-01

    One hundred and fifty large abdominal incisional hernias were treated following a standardized operating technique using metallic mesh (Toilinox) and approximation of the anterior sheath of the rectus abdominis. The average follow-up was four years. Good clinical results without pain were found in more than 95 per cent of the patients. Recurrence occurred in 9.5 per cent of the patients. The complications, wound infection or parietal necrosis, never necessitated removal of the prosthesis. These results justify the use of this technique even when intra-abdominal septic procedure is associated.

  2. Histologic and biomechanical evaluation of a novel macroporous polytetrafluoroethylene knit mesh compared to lightweight and heavyweight polypropylene mesh in a porcine model of ventral incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Melman, L.; Jenkins, E. D.; Hamilton, N. A.; Bender, L. C.; Brodt, M. D.; Deeken, C. R.; Greco, S. C.; Frisella, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the biocompatibility of heavyweight polypropylene (HWPP), lightweight polypropylene (LWPP), and monofilament knit polytetrafluoroethylene (mkPTFE) mesh by comparing biomechanics and histologic response at 1, 3, and 5 months in a porcine model of incisional hernia repair. Methods Bilateral full-thickness abdominal wall defects measuring 4 cm in length were created in 27 Yucatan minipigs. Twenty-one days after hernia creation, animals underwent bilateral preperitoneal ventral hernia repair with 8 × 10 cm pieces of mesh. Repairs were randomized to Bard®Mesh (HWPP, Bard/Davol, http://www.davol.com), ULTRAPRO® (LWPP, Ethicon, http://www.ethicon.com), and GORE®INFINIT Mesh (mkPTFE, Gore & Associates, http://www.gore.com). Nine animals were sacrificed at each timepoint (1, 3, and 5 months). At harvest, a 3 × 4 cm sample of mesh and incorporated tissue was taken from the center of the implant site and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing at a rate of 0.42 mm/s. The maximum force (N) and tensile strength (N/cm) were measured with a tensiometer, and stiffness (N/mm) was calculated from the slope of the force-versus-displacement curve. Adjacent sections of tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and analyzed for inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue ingrowth. Data are reported as mean ± SEM. Statistical significance (P < 0.05) was determined using a two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post-test. Results No significant difference in maximum force was detected between meshes at any of the time points (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). However, for each mesh type, the maximum strength at 5 months was significantly lower than that at 1 month (P < 0.05). No significant difference in stiffness was detected between the mesh types or between timepoints (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). No significant differences with regard to inflammation, fibrosis, or tissue ingrowth were detected between mesh types at any time point (P > 0.09 for all comparisons). However

  3. Use of Mesh in Laparoscopic Paraesophageal Hernia Repair: A Meta-Analysis and Risk-Benefit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gondan, Matthias; Stock, Christian; Linke, Georg R.; Fritz, Franziska; Nickel, Felix; Diener, Markus K.; Gutt, Carsten N.; Wente, Moritz; Büchler, Markus W.; Fischer, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mesh augmentation seems to reduce recurrences following laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair (LPHR). However, there is an uncertain risk of mesh-associated complications. Risk-benefit analysis might solve the dilemma. Materials and Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational clinical studies (OCSs) comparing laparoscopic mesh-augmented hiatoplasty (LMAH) with laparoscopic mesh-free hiatoplasty (LH) with regard to recurrences and complications. Random effects meta-analyses were performed to determine potential benefits of LMAH. All data regarding LMAH were used to estimate risk of mesh-associated complications. Risk-benefit analysis was performed using a Markov Monte Carlo decision-analytic model. Results Meta-analysis of 3 RCTs and 9 OCSs including 915 patients revealed a significantly lower recurrence rate for LMAH compared to LH (pooled proportions, 12.1% vs. 20.5%; odds ratio (OR), 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.89; p = 0.04). Complication rates were comparable in both groups (pooled proportions, 15.3% vs. 14.2%; OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.65; p = 0.94). The systematic review of LMAH data yielded a mesh-associated complication rate of 1.9% (41/2121; 95% CI, 1.3% to 2.5%) for those series reporting at least one mesh-associated complication. The Markov Monte Carlo decision-analytic model revealed a procedure-related mortality rate of 1.6% for LMAH and 1.8% for LH. Conclusions Mesh application should be considered for LPHR because it reduces recurrences at least in the mid-term. Overall procedure-related complications and mortality seem to not be increased despite of potential mesh-associated complications. PMID:26469286

  4. Reconstruction of an infected recurrent ventral hernia after a mesh repair using a pedicled tensor fascia lata flap: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hayami, Shinya; Hotta, Tsukasa; Takifuji, Katsunari; Iwahashi, Makoto; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the use of prosthetic mesh has revolutionized the repair of ventral hernias. However, the occurrence of infection related with the use of this prosthesis remains an important complication, which may result in occurrence of fistula formation of the skin or intestine, sepsis, or reoccurrence of ventral hernia. This report presents two cases where a pedicled musculocutaneous flap using the tensor fascia lata (pedicled TFL flap) was effective as a treatment for an infectious large abdominal hernia, and reviews the previous literature. Two Japanese men aged 61 and 78 years old underwent a ventral hernia repair using Composix Kugel mesh. They both developed a wound infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conservative therapy was not successful and the defect in the abdominal wall of two patients measured 12 x 21 cm and 7 x 10 cm in length, respectively. Reoperations were performed by removing the infectious mesh and then reconstructing the abdominal wall with the bilateral and left-side pedicled TFL flaps, respectively. No recurrence of the ventral hernia has been recognized for 50 months and 7 months after reoperation, respectively. A review of previous studies showed that no patients treated with a pedicled TFL flap experienced a recurrent hernia. Therefore, the pedicled TFL flap was considered to be effective for infectious large abdominal recurrent hernia.

  5. Laparoscopic repair of adult Bochdalek's hernia

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Musharraf; Hajini, Firdoos Farooq; Ganguly, Pavitra; Bukhari, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Bochdalek's hernia is a type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia occurring in approximately 1 in 2200–12 500 live births. It is considered to be extremely rare in adults and poses a diagnostic challenge. We present a case of a young man who was diagnosed as a case of congenital Bochdalek's hernia and underwent laparoscopic mesh repair. PMID:23761496

  6. Reliable complex abdominal wall hernia repairs with a narrow, well-fixed retrorectus polypropylene mesh: A review of over 100 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Steven T; Fligor, Jennifer E; Miller, Kyle R; Dumanian, Gregory A

    2016-12-01

    Our objective was to determine outcomes for complex ventral hernia repairs in a large cohort of patients utilizing an operative construct employing retrorectus placement of a narrow, macroporous polypropylene mesh with up to 45 suture fixation points for force distribution. No consensus exists on the optimal technique for repair of complex ventral hernias. Current trends emphasize large meshes with wide overlaps and minimal suture fixation, though reported complications and recurrence remain problematic. A retrospective review was performed for all patients undergoing ventral hernia repair with retrorectus placement of midweight, uncoated, soft polypropylene mesh by a single surgeon (GAD) between the years of 2010 and 2015. Patient characteristics, operative history, operative data, and postoperative course were reviewed. A total of 101 patients with a mean age of 56 years and a mean body mass index of 29 m/kg(2) (range 18-51 m/kg(2)) underwent hernia repair. Patients had a median of 3 prior abdominal operations (range 0-9), with 44 patients presenting with recurrent hernias. A total of 42 patients were Ventral Hernia Working Group grade 1, 40 grade 2, 17 grade 3, and 2 grade 4. There were no recurrences at a mean follow-up of almost 400 days for the 93 patients with long-term follow-up. The surgical site occurrence rate was 7.9% (3 surgical site infections, 2 seromas, 2 hematomas, and 4 instances of delayed wound healing in 8 patients). One patient required reoperation for hematoma drainage; 5 patients required readmission within 30 days. An operative construct employing a retrorectus placement of a narrow, macroporous polypropylene mesh with up to 45 suture fixation points for force distribution can achieve significantly better outcomes across a spectrum of Ventral Hernia Working Group grade, risk-stratified patients compared to rates reported in the literature for current strategies that employ wide meshes with minimal fixation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  7. Results of prosthetic mesh repair in the emergency management of the acutely incarcerated and/or strangulated groin hernias: a 10-year study.

    PubMed

    Bessa, S S; Abdel-fattah, M R; Al-Sayes, I A; Korayem, I T

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to present a 10-year experience with the use of prosthetic mesh repair in the management of the acutely incarcerated and/or strangulated groin hernias. Patients with acutely incarcerated and/or strangulated groin hernias were treated by emergency repair of the hernia using a Prolene mesh. The presence of non-viable intestine necessitating resection-anastomosis of the bowel was not considered a contraindication to the use of mesh. The present study included 234 patients. Their age ranged from 16 to 85 years with a mean of 55.9 ± 17.7 years. The hernia was indirect inguinal in 201 patients (85.9%), direct inguinal in 5 patients 5 (2.1%), hernia of canal of nuck in 13 patients (5.6%) and femoral in 15 patients (6.4%). Thirty patients (12.8%) had recurrent hernias. Resection-anastomosis of non-viable small intestine was performed in 32 patients (13.7%). There were 5 perioperative mortalities (2.1%). Complications were encountered in 41 patients (17.5%) and included wound infection in 14 patients (6%), scrotal hematoma in 9 patients (3.8%), chest infection in 8 patients (3.4%), deep vein thrombosis in 2 patients (0.9%), transient deterioration of liver function in 11 patients (4.7%) and mesh infection in 1 patient (0.5%). Follow-up duration ranged from 6 to 120 months with a mean of 62.5 ± 35.3 months. Two recurrences (0.9%) were encountered throughout the study period. The use of prosthetic mesh repair in the emergency management of the acutely incarcerated and/or strangulated groin hernias is safe. The presence of non-viable intestine cannot be regarded as a contraindication for prosthetic repair.

  8. Multicenter, Prospective, Longitudinal Study of the Recurrence, Surgical Site Infection, and Quality of Life After Contaminated Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biosynthetic Absorbable Mesh: The COBRA Study.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Michael J; Bauer, Joel J; Harmaty, Marco; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Cobb, William S; Matthews, Brent; Goldblatt, Matthew I; Selzer, Don J; Poulose, Benjamin K; Hansson, Bibi M E; Rosman, Camiel; Chao, James J; Jacobsen, Garth R

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate biosynthetic absorbable mesh in single-staged contaminated (Centers for Disease Control class II and III) ventral hernia (CVH) repair over 24 months. CVH has an increased risk of postoperative infection. CVH repair with synthetic or biologic meshes has reported chronic biomaterial infections and high hernia recurrence rates. Patients with a contaminated or clean-contaminated operative field and a hernia defect at least 9 cm had a biosynthetic mesh (open, sublay, retrorectus, or intraperitoneal) repair with fascial closure (n = 104). Endpoints included overall Kaplan-Meier estimates for hernia recurrence and postoperative wound infection rates at 24 months, and the EQ-5D and Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12). Analyses were conducted on the intent-to-treat population, and health outcome measures evaluated using paired t tests. Patients had a mean age of 58 years, body mass index of 28 kg/m, 77% had contaminated wounds, and 84% completed 24-months follow-up. Concomitant procedures included fistula takedown (n = 24) or removal of infected previously placed mesh (n = 29). Hernia recurrence rate was 17% (n = 16). At the time of CVH repair, intraperitoneal placement of the biosynthetic mesh significantly increased the risk of recurrences (P ≤ 0.04). Surgical site infections (19/104) led to higher risk of recurrence (P < 0.01). Mean 24-month EQ-5D (index and visual analogue) and SF-12 physical component and mental scores improved from baseline (P < 0.05). In this prospective longitudinal study, biosynthetic absorbable mesh showed efficacy in terms of long-term recurrence and quality of life for CVH repair patients and offers an alternative to biologic and permanent synthetic meshes in these complex situations.

  9. Multicenter, Prospective, Longitudinal Study of the Recurrence, Surgical Site Infection, and Quality of Life After Contaminated Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biosynthetic Absorbable Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Bauer, Joel J.; Harmaty, Marco; Carbonell, Alfredo M.; Cobb, William S.; Matthews, Brent; Goldblatt, Matthew I.; Selzer, Don J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Hansson, Bibi M. E.; Rosman, Camiel; Chao, James J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate biosynthetic absorbable mesh in single-staged contaminated (Centers for Disease Control class II and III) ventral hernia (CVH) repair over 24 months. Background: CVH has an increased risk of postoperative infection. CVH repair with synthetic or biologic meshes has reported chronic biomaterial infections and high hernia recurrence rates. Methods: Patients with a contaminated or clean-contaminated operative field and a hernia defect at least 9 cm2 had a biosynthetic mesh (open, sublay, retrorectus, or intraperitoneal) repair with fascial closure (n = 104). Endpoints included overall Kaplan-Meier estimates for hernia recurrence and postoperative wound infection rates at 24 months, and the EQ-5D and Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12). Analyses were conducted on the intent-to-treat population, and health outcome measures evaluated using paired t tests. Results: Patients had a mean age of 58 years, body mass index of 28 kg/m2, 77% had contaminated wounds, and 84% completed 24-months follow-up. Concomitant procedures included fistula takedown (n = 24) or removal of infected previously placed mesh (n = 29). Hernia recurrence rate was 17% (n = 16). At the time of CVH repair, intraperitoneal placement of the biosynthetic mesh significantly increased the risk of recurrences (P ≤ 0.04). Surgical site infections (19/104) led to higher risk of recurrence (P < 0.01). Mean 24-month EQ-5D (index and visual analogue) and SF-12 physical component and mental scores improved from baseline (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In this prospective longitudinal study, biosynthetic absorbable mesh showed efficacy in terms of long-term recurrence and quality of life for CVH repair patients and offers an alternative to biologic and permanent synthetic meshes in these complex situations. PMID:28009747

  10. Biaxial Mechanical Evaluation of Absorbable and Nonabsorbable Synthetic Surgical Meshes Used for Hernia Repair: Physiological Loads Modify Anisotropy Response.

    PubMed

    Cordero, A; Hernández-Gascón, B; Pascual, G; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B; Peña, E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information about the mechanical properties of six meshes commonly used for hernia repair (Surgipro(®), Optilene(®), Infinit(®), DynaMesh(®), Ultrapro™ and TIGR(®)) by planar biaxial tests. Stress-stretch behavior and equibiaxial stiffness were evaluated, and the anisotropy was determined by testing. In particular, equibiaxial test (equal simultaneous loading in both directions) and biaxial test (half of the load in one direction following the Laplace law) were selected as a representation of physiologically relevant loads. The majority of the meshes displayed values in the range of 8 and 18 (N/mm) in each direction for equibiaxial stiffness (tangent modulus under equibiaxial load state in both directions), while a few achieved 28 and 50 (N/mm) (Infinit (®) and TIGR (®)). Only the Surgipro (®) mesh exhibited planar isotropy, with similar mechanical properties regardless of the direction of loading, and an anisotropy ratio of 1.18. Optilene (®), DynaMesh (®), Ultrapro (®) and TIGR (®) exhibited moderate anisotropy with ratios of 1.82, 1.84, 2.17 and 1.47, respectively. The Infinit (®) scaffold exhibited very high anisotropy with a ratio of 3.37. These trends in material anisotropic response changed during the physiological state in the human abdominal wall, i.e. T:0.5T test, which the meshes were loaded in one direction with half the load used in the other direction. The Surgipro (®) mesh increased its anisotropic response (Anis[Formula: see text] = 0.478) and the materials that demonstrated moderate and high anisotropic responses during multiaxial testing presented a quasi-isotropic response, especially the Infinit(®) mesh that decreased its anisotropic response from 3.369 to 1.292.

  11. Umbilical hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100105.htm Umbilical hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hernia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  12. Prolene hernia system compared with mesh plug technique: a prospective study of short- to mid-term outcomes in primary groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Huang, C S; Huang, C C; Lien, H H

    2005-05-01

    Two types of anterior tension-free hernioplasty, prolene hernia system (PHS) repair and mesh plug technique (MPT), were introduced to Taiwan in 2001. This study compared the short- to mid-term outcomes following primary groin hernia repair with PHS and MPT. From January 2001 to December 2003, 393 patients with 426 primary groin hernias were operated on by a single surgeon using MPT (n=192) and PHS (n=234). Baseline perioperative details and follow-up information were compared. Demographic characteristics of both groups were similar. The laterality, types of anesthesia, postoperative stay, postoperative wound pain scores, wound complications and days to return to activities of daily life were equally distributed between the two groups. However, the distribution of Gilbert types in the PHS group was shifted a little to the right compared with that of the MPT group. PHS repair had longer operative time (34+/-17 vs 25+/-9 minutes, p<0.01). No recurrence was noted in both groups during the follow-up from 5 to 41 months. Chronic non-disabling groin pains were noted in 2.8% (6/218) of patients in the PHS group and 8.9% (14/175) in the MPT group (p=0.01). Our results show that both PHS and MPT repairs can be performed with short operation time, minor wound pain and quick return to activities of daily life without short- to mid-term recurrences, but postoperatively the MPT group had higher incidence of chronic non-disabling groin pain. Although the MPT is less invasive, the additional protective patch in the preperitoneal space of the PHS may provide a further safeguard against recurrences, especially for those patients with attenuated inguinal floor. Long-term follow-up is needed.

  13. Long-term results and complications related to Crurasoft(®) mesh repair for paraesophageal hiatal hernias.

    PubMed

    Priego, P; Perez de Oteyza, J; Galindo, J; Carda, P; García-Moreno, F; Rodríguez Velasco, G; Lobo, E

    2017-04-01

    The application of mesh-reinforced hiatal closure has resulted in a significant reduction in recurrence rates in comparison with primary suture repair. However, the use of meshes has not completely extended in all the cases of large paraesophageal hiatal hernias (LPHH) due to the complications related to them. The aim of this study is to present our long-term results and complications related to Crurasoft(®) mesh (Bard) for the treatment of LPHH. From January 2004 to December 2014, 536 consecutive patients underwent open or laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease or LPHH at Ramón y Cajal University Hospital. Primary simple suture of the crura and additional reinforcement with a Crurasoft(®) mesh (Bard) was performed in 93 patients (17.35 %). Radiologic hiatal hernia recurrence and mesh-related complications were investigated. Of the 93 patients undergoing mesh repair, there were 28 male and 65 female with a mean age of 67.27 years (range 22-87 years). Laparoscopic surgery was attended in 88.2 % of the cases, and open surgery in the rest 11.8 %. Mean operative time was 167.05 min (range 90-370 min). Median postoperative stay was 4.79 days (range 1-41 days). Conversion rate was 8.53 % (7 patients). Intraoperative complications were described in 10.75 % (10 patients), but all of them, except in one case, could be managed laparoscopically. Overall postoperative complications rate was 28 %. Early postoperative complications occurred in 11 patients (12 %), respectively, for grades 2 (6 cases), 3b (1 case) and 5 (4 cases) according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Late postoperative complications occurred in 15 patients (16 %), respectively, for grades 1 (7 cases), 2 (2 cases), 3b (5 cases) and 5 (1 case) according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Thirty day-mortality rate was 4.3 %. Mortality rate specific associated with the mesh was 1 %. Reoperation rate was 5.4 %. After a median follow-up of 76.33 months (range 3

  14. Low recurrence rate and low chronic pain associated with inguinal hernia repair by laparoscopic placement of Parietex ProGrip™ mesh: clinical outcomes of 220 hernias with mean follow-up at 23 months.

    PubMed

    Birk, D; Hess, S; Garcia-Pardo, C

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the safety and the efficacy of the self-gripping Parietex ProGrip™ mesh (Sofradim Production, Trévoux, France) used with the laparoscopic approach for inguinal hernia repair. The incidence of chronic pain, post-operative complications, patient satisfaction and hernia recurrence at follow-up after 12 months was evaluated. Data were collected retrospectively from patient files and were analyzed for 169 male and female patients with 220 primary inguinal hernias. All patients included had undergone surgical repair for inguinal hernia by the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal approach using Parietex ProGrip™ meshes performed in the same clinical center in Germany. Pre-, per- and post-operative data were collected, and a follow-up after 12 months was performed prospectively. Complications, pain scored on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS), patient satisfaction and hernia recurrence were assessed. The only complications were minor and were post-operative: hematoma/seroma (3 cases), secondary hemorrhage through the trocar's site (2 cases), hematuria, emphysema in the inguinal regions (both sides) and swelling above the genital organs (1 case for each). At mean follow-up at 22.8 months, there were only 3 reports of hernia recurrence: 1.4 % of the hernias. Most patients (95.9 %) were satisfied or very satisfied with their hernia repair with only 1.2 % reporting severe pain (NRS score 7-10) and 3.6 % reported mild pain. This study demonstrates that in experienced hands, inguinal hernia repair surgery performed by laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernioplasty using Parietex ProGrip™ self-gripping meshes is rapid, efficient and safe with low pain and low hernia recurrence rate.

  15. Multilayer myofascial-mesh repair for giant midline incisional hernias: a novel advantageous combination of old and new techniques.

    PubMed

    Picazo-Yeste, Joaquín; Morandeira-Rivas, Antonio; Moreno-Sanz, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The components separation technique has been proposed as the best solution when facing large abdominal wall defects. In counterpart, this sometimes comes at the price of high rates of wound complications and recurrence. Moreover, the components separation method alone seems insufficient for huge defects, in which it is impossible to reapproximate the rectus muscles without tension. For these cases, we illustrate a novel operation using a modified components separation technique. Twenty-eight patients with giant midline incisional hernias were treated with a combination of the components separation (bilateral sliding rectus abdominis advancement flaps), an autologous multilayer repair, and a retromuscular mesh reinforcement. Twenty-four (85%) patients have been analyzed. Transverse defect size ranged from 15 to 25 cm (average, 18.8 cm). Wound complications occurred in nine (37%) cases; three of them required drainage of a subcutaneous abscess. After a mean follow-up of 22 (range, 12-48) months, one (4%) recurrence was identified. Multilayer myofascial-mesh repair was associated with a low recurrence rate, and wound complications were managed without issues. This approach is a reliable technique for most surgeons and may constitute a new part of the armamentarium for the repair of challenging defects.

  16. Medium-term durability of giant hiatus hernia repair without mesh

    PubMed Central

    Vivian, SJ; van der Wall, H; Falk, GL

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This is the second report on objective review of 100 patients who underwent composite fundoplication-cardiopexy for repair of giant hiatus hernia (GHH) at a median of 24 months following surgery. Outcomes were objective follow-up by endoscopy and quality of life (QoL) by Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI), modified Visick scores and dysphagia scores. The initial report for this cohort suggested a low objective recurrence rate (9%) and substantial improvements in QoL indices. Methods The rate of hernia recurrence was assessed with Kaplan–Meier analysis and covariates were analysed with the Cox proportional hazards model. Paired t-tests and related samples Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare QoL scores. Unpaired data were compared with the independent samples t-test and Mann–Whitney U test. Results Objective review was obtained in 97% of the patients. There were five recurrences of hernias that had a vertical height of >2cm from the diaphragmatic hiatus, with three patients requiring reoperation for severe dysphagia. Small recurrences (<2cm) occurred in 20 patients. The median time to recurrence was 40 months (95% confidence interval: 34–46 months). At two years, recurrence of any size had occurred in 24% of cases. At follow-up review (median: 27 months), the mean GIQLI score was 109 (p=0.279), the median modified Visick score was 2 (p=0.954) and the median dysphagia score was 41 (p=0.623). There was no evidence that the GIQLI score (p=0.089), the modified Visick score (p=0.339) or the dysphagia score (p=0.445) changed significantly after recurrence. Conclusions There was a sustained improvement in overall QoL and reflux scores after GHH repair. QoL scores showed persistent improvement in reflux and overall health, even in the subgroup with recurrence. The majority (80%) of recurrences were small and recurrent herniation did not appear to significantly change QoL. The rates of recurrence and QoL are comparable with those for

  17. A prospective randomised controlled trial comparing chronic groin pain and quality of life in lightweight versus heavyweight polypropylene mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradeep; Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Babu, Divya; Sagar, Rajesh; Krishna, Asuri; Kumar, Subodh; Rewari, Vimi; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to compare chronic groin pain and quality of life (QOL) after laparoscopic lightweight (LW) and heavyweight (HW) mesh repair for groin hernia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and forty adult patients with uncomplicated inguinal hernia were randomised into HW mesh group or LW mesh group. Return to activity, chronic groin pain and recurrence rates were assessed. Short form-36 v2 health survey was used for QOL analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-one completed follow-up of 3 months, 66 in HW mesh group and 65 in LW mesh group. Early post-operative convalescence was better in LW mesh group in terms of early return to walking (P = 0.01) and driving (P = 0.05). The incidence of early post-operative pain, chronic groin pain and QOL and recurrences were comparable. CONCLUSION: Outcomes following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using HW and LW mesh are comparable in the short-term as well as long-term. PMID:27073309

  18. Current Trends in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Patapis, Paul; Zavras, Nick; Tzanetis, Panagiotis; Machairas, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the surgical technique, postoperative complications, and possible recurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) in comparison with open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Database: A Medline search of the current English literature was performed using the terms laparoscopic ventral hernia repair and incisional hernia repair. Conclusions: LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method, with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, shorter recovery, and decreased wound and mesh infections. Incidental enterotomy can be avoided by using a meticulous technique and sharp dissection to avoid thermal injury. PMID:26273186

  19. Vacuum suction fixation versus staple fixation in TAPP laparoscopic hernia repair: introduction of a new technique for mesh fixation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangyong; Zhang, Xiang; Zhan, Hanxiang; Hu, Sanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Proper mesh fixation is critical for successful TAPP laparoscopic hernia repair. Conventional mesh fixation may cause chronic neuralgia, groin paresthesia or other complications. This study aimed at introducing a new vacuum suction technique for mesh fixation and evaluating its efficacy and safety compared with traditional staple fixation way. Clinical data of 242 patients undergoing TAPP from July 2011 to March 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into vacuum suction fixation group and staple fixation group. The operation time, hospital stay, complications, recurrence, visual analogue scale pain score and cost were evaluated. All surgeries were successful. The operation time of staple group was (42.34 ± 10.15) min for unilateral hernia and (64.08 ± 16.01) min for bilateral hernias. The postoperative hospital stay was (2.76 ± 0.84) days. One recurrence was observed (0.90%). For vacuum group, the operation time was (42.66 ± 7.76) min and (63.92 ± 10.49) min, and hospital stay was (2.60 ± 0.74) days. No recurrence was observed. There was no significant difference in recurrence, operation time, postoperative pain and hospital stay between two groups (P > 0.05). Average cost were (11,714 ± 726) RMB for vacuum group which was lower than staple group (14,837 ± 1568) RMB (P < 0.05). The top three complications of staple group were scrotal emphysema (10.81%), scrotal seroma (6.31%) and temporary nerve paresthesia (4.50%) while for vacuum group, they were scrotal seroma (3.82%), temporary nerve paresthesia (3.05%), scrotal emphysema (1.53%) and uroschesis (1.53%). The incidence of scrotal emphysema was lower in vacuum group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in other complications (P > 0.05). Both techniques for mesh fixation are safe and effective. There is no significant difference in recurrence, operation time, postoperative pain or hospital stay. The vacuum suction fixation technique is more economical with lower incidence of

  20. Preclinical Bioassay of a Polypropylene Mesh for Hernia Repair Pretreated with Antibacterial Solutions of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Brune, Thierry; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic mesh infection constitutes one of the major complications following hernia repair. Antimicrobial, non-antibiotic biomaterials have the potential to reduce bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface and adjacent tissues while avoiding the development of novel antibiotic resistance. This study assesses the efficacy of presoaking reticular polypropylene meshes in chlorhexidine or a chlorhexidine and allicin combination (a natural antibacterial agent) for preventing bacterial infection in a short-time hernia-repair rabbit model. Methods Partial hernia defects (5 x 2 cm) were created on the lateral right side of the abdominal wall of New Zealand White rabbits (n = 21). The defects were inoculated with 0.5 mL of a 106 CFU/mL Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 strain and repaired with a DualMesh Plus antimicrobial mesh or a Surgipro mesh presoaked in either chlorhexidine (0.05%) or allicin-chlorhexidine (900 μg/mL-0.05%). Fourteen days post-implant, mesh contraction was measured and tissue specimens were harvested to evaluate bacterial adhesion to the implant surface (via sonication, S. aureus immunolabeling), host-tissue incorporation (via staining, scanning electron microscopy) and macrophage response (via RAM-11 immunolabeling). Results The polypropylene mesh showed improved tissue integration relative to the DualMesh Plus. Both the DualMesh Plus and the chlorhexidine-soaked polypropylene meshes exhibited high bacterial clearance, with the latter material showing lower bacterial yields. The implants from the allicin-chlorhexidine group displayed a neoformed tissue containing differently sized abscesses and living bacteria, as well as a diminished macrophage response. The allicin-chlorhexidine coated implants exhibited the highest contraction. Conclusions The presoaking of reticular polypropylene materials with a low concentration of chlorhexidine provides the mesh with antibacterial activity without disrupting tissue integration. Due to the

  1. Increased use of surgical energy promotes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in rabbits following open ventral hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Peress, Lilia; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J; Jenkins, Leslie; Cabrera, Fernando J; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Dunkin, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    Surgical energy has been widely implemented because of ease of use, effective hemostasis, and surgical dissection. Studies demonstrate its use to be an independent risk factor for postoperative wound infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most common bacteria found in postoperative mesh infection. No reports are available on the sequelae of surgical energy use for open ventral hernia repair (oVHR) with mesh. We hypothesized that increasing amounts of surgical energy will result in higher infectious burden after oVHR with composite multifilament polyester mesh (Parietex™ PCO). New Zealand rabbits underwent bridging oVHR with Parietex™ PCO and were divided into three surgical treatment groups: (1) scalpel alone, (2) 120 J of energy, and (3) 600 J of energy. The bioprosthesis was then inoculated with 10(5) colony-forming units of MRSA. Rabbits were survived for 7 days with daily physical examination. Complete blood count, basci metabolic panel, and blood cultures were performed on postoperative days one, four, and seven. Surviving rabbits were killed, and meshes explanted for MRSA colony counts. Rabbits receiving the most surgical energy developed signs and symptoms of severe sepsis and wound necrosis within 24 h. In comparison, rabbits receiving no surgical energy had significantly less MRSA recovered from explanted mesh, significantly less bacteremia, and fewer adhesions. Increased use of surgical energy promoted greater colonization, exaggerated septic response to bacterial contamination, and more severe adhesions. In the absence of devitalized tissue, rabbits can effectively limit bacterial contamination. These findings support the surgical principles of proper tissue handling and highlight the detrimental effects of indiscriminant surgical energy usage, thus emphasizing the importance of programs such as Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy.

  2. Laparoscopic Repair of Incidentally Found Spigelian Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Nickloes, Todd; Mancini, Greg; Solla, Julio A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A Spigelian hernia is a rare type of hernia that occurs through a defect in the anterior abdominal wall adjacent to the linea semilunaris. Estimation of its incidence has been reported as 0.12% of all abdominal wall hernias. Traditionally, the method of repair has been an open approach. Herein, we discuss a series of laparoscopic repairs. Methods: Case series and review of the literature. Cases: Three patients are presented. All were evaluated and taken to surgery initially for a different disease process, and all were incidentally found to have a spigelian hernia. These patients underwent laparoscopic repair of their hernias; 2 were repaired intraperitoneally and one was repaired totally extraperitoneally. Two patients initially underwent a mesh repair, while the third had an attempted primary repair. Conclusions: There is evidence that supports the use of laparoscopy for both diagnosis and repair of spigelian hernias. There are also reports of successful repairs both primarily and with mesh. In our experience with the preceding 3 patients, we found that laparoscopic repair of incidentally discovered spigelian hernias is a viable option, and we also found that implantation of mesh, when possible, resulted in satisfactory results and no recurrence. PMID:21902949

  3. [Treatment of large postoperative hernias using intraperitoneal meshes].

    PubMed

    Trojanowski, Piotr; Witczak, Witold; Najdecki, Marek; Stanowski, Edward

    2007-05-01

    Most common hernias among men and women are inguinal hernias (75-80%) and postoperative (incisional) hernias (8-10%). Management of large incisional hernias (hernia gate bigger than 10 cm) both primary and recurrent could be an encounter for a surgeon. In surgical repair of large hernia use of synthetic materials (mesh) is being prefered. Using mesh can significantly decrease recurrence rate (<10%), compare to operations without synthetic grafts where risk of recurrence can reach 50%. One of the methods of surgical treatment of large abdominal hernias is intraperitoneal placing of implants. For such purpose complex meshes (multi-layered) should be used to prevent adhesion of the mesh to the intestines and avoid dangerous complications such as migration of the mesh through the tissues, perforation of the urine bladder, small and large intestine, forming fistulas and blocking intestines. Presentation of own experience in dealing with patients with large postoperative abdominal hernias using composite meshes: Bard--Composix Mesh, Parietex--Composite Sofradim and Proceed Ethicon. Since 2003 to 2006 were performed 7 surgical repairs of large abdominal hernia via an open aproach. 3 male, 4 female, average age 47 years old. Every hernia gate was wider than 15 cm. Bard mesh was used three times, Sofradim and Ethicon two times. Mesh was implanted without tension with single sutures and overlap of more than 5 cm from the edge of the hernia gate. Mesh was separated from intestines with greater momentum if it was possible. Anticoagulant and antibiotic preventive therapies were applied as a rule. Average time of operation was 140 minutes; average time of postoperative hospitalization was 8 days. Only one case was complicated with seroma which was treated with transcutaneous punctures with good result. (1) Surgical treatment of large abdominal hernia using composite mesh (intraperitoneal). in selected cases has good results. (2) The limiting factor of using presented method is

  4. Adhesions after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A comparison of extra versus intra peritoneal placement of a polypropylene mesh in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Attwood, S E; Caldwell, M T; Marks, P; McDermott, M; Stephens, R B

    1994-07-01

    Prosthetic mesh for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become popular but the method of its placement is controversial. Mesh placed within the peritoneum may cause adhesion formation and further complications. The aim of this study was to examine the laparoscopic placement of a mesh, comparing intraperitoneal vs extraperitoneal insertion. In a porcine model (n = 15) a polypropylene mesh was placed laparoscopically over the anterior abdominal wall. On the left side the mesh was stapled on the parietal peritoneum. On the right side the peritoneum was incised, an extraperitoneal space was dissected, the mesh was inserted, and the peritoneum was closed over it. The animals were maintained for 2 weeks. At postmortem there were adhesions in two of those placed extraperitoneally and five of those placed intraperitoneally (P = 0.19, Fisher's exact test). The adhesions comprised fibrous peritoneal bands to loops of small intestine. Both methods of laparoscopic mesh placement were associated with a small but significant incidence of adhesion formation.

  5. National results after ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Helgstrand, Frederik

    2016-07-01

    Ventral hernia repairs are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures. The variations of repair techniques are multiple and outcome has been unacceptable. Despite the high volume, it has been difficult to obtain sufficient data to provide evidence for best practice. In order to monitor national surgical quality and provide the warranted high volume data, the first national ventral hernia register (The Danish Ventral Hernia Database) was established in 2007 in Denmark. The present study series show that data from a well-established database supported by clinical examinations, patient files, questionnaires, and administrative data makes it possible to obtain nationwide high volume data and to achieve evidence for better outcome in a complex surgical condition as ventral hernia. Due to the high volume and included variables on surgical technique, it is now possible to make analyses adjusting for a variety of surgical techniques and different hernia specifications. We documented high 30-day complications and recurrence rates for both primary and secondary ventral hernias in a nationwide cohort. Furthermore, recurrence found by clinical examination was shown to exceed the number of patients undergoing reoperation for recurrence by a factor 4-5. The nationwide adjusted analyses proved that open mesh and laparoscopic repair for umbilical and epigastric hernias does not differ in 30-day outcome or in risk of recurrence. There is a minor risk reduction in early complications after open sutured repairs. However, the risk for a later recurrence repair is significantly higher after sutured repairs compared with mesh repairs. The study series showed that large hernia defects and open re-pairs were independent predictors for 30-day complications after an incisional hernia repair. Open procedures and large hernia defects were independent risk factors for a later recurrence re-pair. However, patients with large defects (> 15 cm) seemed to benefit from an open mesh

  6. Antibiotic Coating of Hernia Meshes: The Next Step Toward Preventing Mesh Infection.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Arnab; Neupane, Ruel; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2015-11-01

    Mesh bacterial colonization/infection remains a critical issue in complex ventral hernia repair. Despite the recent emergence of biologic meshes, current strategies to prevent and treat mesh infection are largely ineffective, often leading to device failure and subsequent explantation along with the associated costs and effect on patient welfare. Unacceptably high rates of morbidity and hernia recurrence following mesh infection highlight the need for innovation in the area of hernia repair for the complex patient. One recent strategy to address such shortcomings is local antibiosis in the form of polymer coatings applied to the mesh itself. Current literature regarding the use of antibiotic-coated hernia mesh is limited but does illustrate the ability of these devices to inhibit bacterial growth and prevent mesh infection in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Although there is a paucity of literature regarding long-term clinical efficacy, this provides opportunity for further inquiry into a promising new development to combat mesh infective complications.

  7. Health Technology Assessment of laparoscopic compared to conventional surgery with and without mesh for incisional hernia repair regarding safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Meik; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Roll, Stephanie; Kulp, Werner; Vauth, Christoph; Greiner, Wolfgang; Willich, Stefan; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Incisional hernias are a common complication following abdominal surgery and they represent about 80% of all ventral hernia. In uncomplicated postoperative follow-up they can develop in about eleven percent of cases and up to 23% of cases with wound infections or other forms of wound complications. Localisation and size of the incisional hernia can vary according to the causal abdominal scar. Conservative treatment (e. g. weight reduction) is only available to relieve symptoms while operative treatments are the only therapeutic treatment option for incisional hernia. Traditionally, open suture repair was used for incisional hernia repair but was associated with recurrence rates as high as 46%. To strengthen the abdominal wall and prevent the development of recurrences the additional implantation of an alloplastic mesh is nowadays commonly used. Conventional hernia surgery as well as minimally invasive surgery, introduced in the early 90s, make use of this mesh-technique and thereby showed marked reductions in recurrence rates. However, there are possible side effects associated with mesh-implantation. Therefore recommendations remain uncertain on which technique to apply for incisional hernia repair and which technique might, under specific circumstances, be associated with advantages over others. Objectives The goal of this HTA-Report is to compare laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) and conventional incisional hernia repair with and without mesh-implantation in terms of their medical efficacy and safety, their cost-effectiveness as well as their ethical, social und legal implications. In addition, this report aims to compare different techniques of mesh-implantation and mesh-fixation as well as to identify factors, in which certain techniques might be associated with advantages over others. Methods Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation

  8. Health Technology Assessment of laparoscopic compared to conventional surgery with and without mesh for incisional hernia repair regarding safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Meik; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Roll, Stephanie; Kulp, Werner; Vauth, Christoph; Greiner, Wolfgang; Willich, Stefan; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2008-03-07

    Incisional hernias are a common complication following abdominal surgery and they represent about 80% of all ventral hernia. In uncomplicated postoperative follow-up they can develop in about eleven percent of cases and up to 23% of cases with wound infections or other forms of wound complications. Localisation and size of the incisional hernia can vary according to the causal abdominal scar. Conservative treatment (e. g. weight reduction) is only available to relieve symptoms while operative treatments are the only therapeutic treatment option for incisional hernia. Traditionally, open suture repair was used for incisional hernia repair but was associated with recurrence rates as high as 46%. To strengthen the abdominal wall and prevent the development of recurrences the additional implantation of an alloplastic mesh is nowadays commonly used. Conventional hernia surgery as well as minimally invasive surgery, introduced in the early 90s, make use of this mesh-technique and thereby showed marked reductions in recurrence rates. However, there are possible side effects associated with mesh-implantation. Therefore recommendations remain uncertain on which technique to apply for incisional hernia repair and which technique might, under specific circumstances, be associated with advantages over others. The goal of this HTA-Report is to compare laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) and conventional incisional hernia repair with and without mesh-implantation in terms of their medical efficacy and safety, their cost-effectiveness as well as their ethical, social und legal implications. In addition, this report aims to compare different techniques of mesh-implantation and mesh-fixation as well as to identify factors, in which certain techniques might be associated with advantages over others. Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) as well

  9. A lightweight polypropylene mesh (TiMesh) for laparoscopic intraperitoneal repair of abdominal wall hernias: comparison of biocompatibility with the DualMesh in an experimental study using the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Schug-Pass, C; Tamme, C; Tannapfel, A; Köckerling, F

    2006-03-01

    showed significantly higher values for ePTFE than for TiMesh (p = 0.011). The apoptosis index was significantly higher for the ePTFE membranes (p = 0.002). Titanium-coated polypropylene mesh (TiMesh) is clearly superior to the DualMesh in terms of biocompatibility, and is thus suitable for the laparoscopic intraperitoneal repair of abdominal wall and incisional hernias.

  10. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal incisional hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal incisional hernia is a common complication after open abdominal operations. Laparoscopic procedures have obvious mini-invasive advantages for surgical treatment of abdominal incisional hernia, especially to cases with big hernia defect. Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia has routine mode but the actual operations will be various according to the condition of every hernia. Key points of these operations include design of the position of trocars, closure of defects and fixation of meshes. The details of these issues and experiences of perioperative evaluation and treatment will be talked about in this article. PMID:27761446

  11. The effect of fabric structure on the mechanical properties of warp knitted surgical mesh for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Mirjavan, Mohammad; Asayesh, Azita; Asgharian Jeddi, Ali Asghar

    2017-02-01

    Surgical mesh is being used for healing hernia, pelvic organ prolapse, skull injuries and urinary incontinence. In this research the effect of fabric structure on the mechanical properties of warp knitted surgical meshes in comparison to abdominal fascia has been investigated. For this purpose, warp knitted surgical mesh with five different structures (Tricot, Pin-hole-net, quasi-Sandfly, Sandfly and quasi-Marquissite) were produced using polypropylene monofilament. Thereafter, their mechanical properties such as uniaxial tensile behavior in various directions (wale-wise (90°), course-wise (0°) and diagonal (45°)), bending resistance and crease recovery were analyzed. The meshes demonstrated different elastic modulus in various directions, which can be attributed to the pore shape (pore angle) and underlap angle in the structure of mesh. Except Pin-hole-net mesh, other produced meshes exhibited better level of orthotropy in comparison to abdominal fascia. The most flexible mesh in both wale-wise and course-wise directions was quasi-Sandfly and thereafter quasi-Marquissite. Tricot and Pin-hole-net manifested the highest crease recovery in wale-wise and coursewise directions respectively. The most desirable mesh in terms of porosity was quasi-Marquissite mesh. Overall, the quasi-Marquissite mesh was selected as the most suitable surgical mesh considering all advantages and disadvantages of each produced mesh in this study.

  12. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  13. Hiatal hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100028.htm Hiatal hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on ... Overview The esophagus runs through the diaphragm to the stomach. It functions to carry food from the mouth ...

  14. Ventral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia. PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:539-545. Nagle AP, Soper NJ. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. In: Khatri ... Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players ...

  15. Diaphragmatic hernia repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100014.htm Diaphragmatic hernia repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview The chest cavity includes the heart and lungs. The abdominal cavity includes the liver, the stomach, ...

  16. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine to relax you . Your surgeon makes a cut (incision) in your groin area. The hernia is ... wall. At the end of the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparascopic surgery: The surgeon ...

  17. Early postoperative and one year results of a randomized controlled trial comparing the impact of extralight titanized polypropylene mesh and traditional heavyweight polypropylene mesh on pain and seroma production in laparoscopic hernia repair (TAPP).

    PubMed

    Bittner, R; Schmedt, C-G; Leibl, B J; Schwarz, J

    2011-08-01

    Today the main goals of inguinal hernia repair are maximum postoperative comfort and a minimal rate of chronic pain. This randomized trial compares these parameters after laparoscopic hernia repair (TAPP) using an extralight titanized polypropylene mesh (ELW group) TiMesh(®) 16 g/m(2) without any fixation with those using a standard heavyweight mesh (HW) Prolene 90 g/m(2) fixed in a standardized way with two absorbable sutures. Three hundred patients with an inguinal hernia and a defect diameter ≤3 cm were included in the trial. Patients were assessed for pain, foreign body sensation, and physical activities preoperatively, early postoperatively, at 4 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year by questionnaire and were examined clinically. Postoperatively, seroma formation was measured by ultrasound. One year after TAPP, the frequency of chronic pain was not greater than 3%, with no difference between the two mesh groups; in no patient was intensity of pain higher than VAS 40. In the early postoperative period, 40% of the patients in the titanized ELW group needed pain medication compared with 52.7% in the HW group (P = 0.0378). Foreign body sensation was not different between the groups but there was significantly less impairment of physical activities (P = 0.0425) and seroma production (P = 0.0415) in the titanized ELW group compared to the HW group in the early postoperative period. Use of titanized ELW mesh for laparoscopic hernia repair did not affect the rate of chronic pain but it seems to improve early postoperative convalescence. Its use without any fixation can be recommended in TAPP for inguinal hernia patients with a defect size ≤3 cm.

  18. Minilaparoscopy For Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Malcher, Flavio; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti; Araujo, Guilherme D. E.; Silva, José Antônio Da Cunha E.; Rao, Prashanth; Iglesias, Antonio Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Inguinal hernia repair is among the most common procedures performed worldwide and the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach is a recognized and effective surgical technique. Although technically advantageous because of the option of no mesh fixation and no need for creation of a peritoneal flap resulting, in less postoperative pain and faster recovery, TEP has not achieved the popularity it deserves, mainly because of its complexity and steep learning curve. Minilaparoscopy was first described in the 1990s and has recently gained significantly from better instrumentation that may increase TEP's effectiveness and acceptance. We performed a prospective study, to analyze the outcomes of minilaparoscopy in pain and operative time when compared to the conventional laparoscopic technique in hernia repair. Methods: Fifty-eight laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs were performed: 36 by traditional laparoscopic technique and 22 by minilaparoscopic instruments (mini). A study protocol was applied prospectively for data collection. Variables analyzed were early postoperative pain (at hour 6 after procedure), pain at discharge, use of on-demand analgesics, and operative time. Results: The mini group presented reduced early postoperative pain and operative time. The present study also suggests less postoperative pain at discharge with mini procedures, although this difference was not statistically significant. No difference between the groups regarding on-demand use of analgesics was found. Conclusions: This study corroborates findings in previously published papers that have shown the feasibility of minilaparoscopy in laparoscopic TEP hernia repair and its benefits regarding postoperative pain, operative time, and aesthetic outcomes. PMID:27777499

  19. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged.

  20. Erosion of small intestine with necrotising fasciitis of over lying abdominal wall after expanded poly-tetrafluoroethylene mesh implantation: A rare complication after laparoscopic incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Akshara; Gupta, Achal; Shrivastava, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Complications such as bowel erosions, enterocutaneous fistulae are rare with the use of expandedpoly-tetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) mesh in laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR). This unusual case patient presented to us with necrotising fasciitis of overlying anterior abdominal wall with peritonitis withsepticaemia and underwent aLIHR6 weeks before, which has not been reported till yet. We report a case of LIHR, presented to us with necrotising fasciitis of overlying anterior abdominal wall, peritonitis and septicaemia which was managed by small bowel segmental resection and exteriorisation of the ends, debridement of overlying anterior abdominal wall and maximum resection of implanted mesh. This case is unusual secondary to long experience with ePTFE mesh and the lack of published cases similar to this one. A brief review of relevant literature has been included in the article. We recommend pre-peritoneal placement of dual mesh fixed preferably by trans-abdominal polypropylene suture in LIHR. PMID:24019695

  1. Definitive Surgical Treatment of Infected or Exposed Ventral Hernia Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Szczerba, Steven R.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To discuss the difficulties in dealing with infected or exposed ventral hernia mesh, and to illustrate one solution using an autogenous abdominal wall reconstruction technique. Summary Background Data The definitive treatment for any infected prosthetic material in the body is removal and substitution. When ventral hernia mesh becomes exposed or infected, its removal requires a solution to prevent a subsequent hernia or evisceration. Methods Eleven patients with ventral hernia mesh that was exposed, nonincorporated, with chronic drainage, or associated with a spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula were referred by their initial surgeons after failed local wound care for definitive management. The patients were treated with radical en bloc excision of mesh and scarred fascia followed by immediate abdominal wall reconstruction using bilateral sliding rectus abdominis myofascial advancement flaps. Results Four of the 11 patients treated for infected mesh additionally required a bowel resection. Transverse defect size ranged from 8 to 18 cm (average 13 cm). Average procedure duration was 3 hours without bowel repair and 5 hours with bowel repair. Postoperative length of stay was 5 to 7 days without bowel repair and 7 to 9 days with bowel repair. Complications included hernia recurrence in one case and stitch abscesses in two cases. Follow-up ranges from 6 to 54 months (average 24 months). Conclusions Removal of infected mesh and autogenous flap reconstruction is a safe, reliable, and one-step surgical solution to the problem of infected abdominal wall mesh. PMID:12616130

  2. A prospective, multicenter, observational study on quality of life after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with ProGrip laparoscopic, self-fixating mesh according to the European Registry for Abdominal Wall Hernias Quality of Life Instrument.

    PubMed

    Muysoms, Filip E; Vanlander, Aude; Ceulemans, Robrecht; Kyle-Leinhase, Iris; Michiels, Maarten; Jacobs, Ivo; Pletinckx, Pieter; Berrevoet, Frederik

    2016-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in patient-reported outcome measurement to evaluate hernia operations. Several hernia-specific quality of life (QoL) scales have been proposed, but none are constructed for preoperative assessment. The European Registry for Abdominal Wall Hernias (EuraHS) proposed the short, 9-question EuraHS-QoL instrument for assessment pre- and postoperatively. The EuraHS-QoL was evaluated in a prospective, multicenter validation study alongside the Visual Analogue Scale, Verbal Rating Scale, and Carolina Comfort Scale (https://clinicaltrials.gov; NCT01936584). We included 101 patients undergoing unilateral laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with ProGrip laparoscopic, self-fixating mesh. Clinical follow-up at 12 months was 87% complete. The EuraHS-QoL score shows good internal consistency (Cronbach's α ≥ .90), good test-retest reliability (Spearman correlation coefficient r ≥ 0.72), and high correlation for pain with the Visual Analogue Scale, the Verbal Rating Scale, the Carolina Comfort Scale pain scale (r between 0.64 and 0.86), and for restriction of activity with the Carolina Comfort Scale movement scale (r between 0.65 and 0.79). Our results show significant improvement in quality of life at 3 weeks compared with preoperative and further significant improvement at 12 months (P < .05). No late complications or recurrences were recorded. An operation was performed in day surgery (>75%) or with a <24-hour admission (>95%) in the majority of the patients. The EuraHS-QoL instrument is a short and valid patient-reported outcome measurement following groin hernia repair. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with ProGrip laparoscopic, self-fixating mesh results in a favorable outcome and significant improvement of quality of life compared with the preoperative assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lightweight partially absorbable monofilament mesh (polypropylene/poliglecaprone 25) for TAPP inguinal hernia repair: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Agresta, Ferdinando; Baldazzi, Gian Andrea; Ciardo, Luigi Francesco; Trentin, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Sansonetti; Ferrante, Furio; Bedin, Natalino

    2007-04-01

    An ideal mesh should produce slight foreign-body reactions and be compatible with the human organisms. Studies focusing on these aspects indicate that the use of mesh with less nonabsorbable material may reduce postoperative complications, insofar the web structure and its rigidity play an important role in compatibility. We evaluated retrospectively the patients of the past 1 year, who underwent laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernioplasty (without the use any trocar and/or instrument of 10 mm in diameter) focusing attention on the feasibility of the technique and on the incidence of complications, especially those possibly related to the new type of mesh implanted. Between June 2004 and September 2005, 76 patients have been operated on by using TAPP hernioplasty (bilateral or unilateral) without any 10 mm instrument/optic/trocar, and by applying a lightweight composite mesh fixed by "glues" (fibrin sealant and N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate). The mean overall operative time was 55.57 (+/-15.2) minutes. All the procedures have been performed on a day surgery basis. We have registered any kind of major or minor morbidity (early or late), relapse, prosthesis rejection, and/or infection. We have registered no severe pain at 10 days; whereas a mild pain is still reported in 10.5% of our cases at a 3-month follow-up. The mean follow-up is 12.4 (+/-5.1; range 4 to 19) months. On the basis of this our initial experience, TAPP hernioplasty with a lightweight composite mesh is feasible, effective, and easy to perform by experienced hands, with good results. The well-known characteristics of a mini-invasive and gentle approach, together with the type of mesh implanted and its fixation of related glues, might explain the encouraging results of our experience.

  4. Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. The procedures include intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair, transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) repair and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair. These procedures have totally different anatomic point of view, process and technical key points from open operations. The technical details of these operations are discussed in this article, also the strategies of treatment for some special conditions. PMID:27867954

  5. Laparoscopic repair of recurrent groin hernias.

    PubMed

    Felix, E L; Michas, C; McKnight, R L

    1994-06-01

    Between November 1991 and May 1993, 54 recurrent groin hernias were laparoscopically repaired in 50 patients. Forty-eight were men and two were women. Forty-six recurrent hernias were unilateral and four bilateral. Twenty-five were direct, 19 indirect, 10 pantaloon, and two had a femoral component. In only 10 patients was the contralateral side normal. In 27 patients, the other side had been previously repaired, and in 13 they had a new contralateral hernia. A transabdominal preperitoneal technique was used to dissect and repair the entire floor in all patients. A single sheet of polypropylene mesh was used in the repair of the women patients, and a double-buttress technique with the first sheet slitted for the cord was used for the men. Patients were examined every 3 months for the first year and at 6-month intervals thereafter. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 18 months with a mean of 8 months. No patient was lost to follow-up, and no recurrence was observed. Patients returned to normal activity in an average of 1 week. Seroma, which resolved spontaneously, was the most common complication. The overall short-term results suggested that a laparoscopic mesh buttressed repair of recurrent groin hernias is technically feasible and can eliminate early rerecurrence of the hernia so commonly seen after repair of recurrent hernias.

  6. Dynamic intermittent strain can rapidly impair ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Kallinowski, Friedrich; Baumann, Elena; Harder, Felix; Siassi, Michael; Mahn, Axel; Vollmer, Matthias; Morlock, Michael M

    2015-11-26

    Ventral hernia repair fails frequently despite advanced mesh inserting surgery. A model for dynamic intermittent straining (DIS) of ventral hernia repairs was developed. The influence of phospholipids, position, overlap, fixation and tissue quality of various meshes on the durability of hernia repair was studied. DIS comprises the repetition of submaximal impacts delivered via a hydraulically driven plastic containment. Pig tissues simulate a ventral hernia with a standardized 5cm defect. Commercially available meshes strengthened with tacks, glue and sutures were used to bridge this defect in an underlay (IPOM) or sublay (retromuscular) position starting with a 5cm overlap in all directions. We tested 35 different ways of ventral hernia repair with up to 425 submaximal intermittent dynamic impacts until mesh dislocation occurred 10 times or a maximum of 4000 impacts each were withstood. The likelihood of a failing repair was related to the mesh, the lubricants, the position, the overlap, the fixation and the tissue quality. Most meshes dislocated easily and required fixation. One of the meshes tested was stable without fixation with a 5cm overlap and failed after reducing the overlap. Phospholipids exerted a strong influence on the biomaterial tested. The sublay position was about 10% more durable in comparison to the IPOM position. DIS revealed distinct degrees of stability with primarily stable, intermediate and primarily unstable repairs. Based on the DIS results available, the currently used ventral hernia repair options can be classified. In the future, DIS investigations can improve the durability of hernia repair.

  7. Surgical Resection and Scarification for Chronic Seroma Post-Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakis, Vasileios; Cook, Kristin; Wilson, Dorian

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 52 Final Diagnosis: Seroma Symptoms: Abdominal discomfort • abdominal mass Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Excision and evacuation of the complex seroma Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: The aim of this report is to present a new surgical approach in the definitive management of challenging cases of abdominal wall seroma following herniorrhaphy with mesh. Case Report: We describe the case of a 56-year-old male with a 4-year history of a complex abdominal wall seroma. He had undergone fluid aspiration twice without success. On physical examination, the mass was supraumbilical and measured 15×10 cm. Computer tomography (CT) scan revealed a complex encapsulated formation overall measuring 10.1×17.3×17.3 cm in AP, transverse, and craniocaudal dimensions, respectively. In this case complete resection was not safe due to the anatomic relationship of the posterior aspect of the pseudocapsule and the mesh. Intraoperatively, the anterior and lateral aspects of the pseudocapsule were resected and an argon beam was used to scarify the residual posterior pseudocapsule and prevent recurrence. This technique was successful in preventing reaccumulation of the seroma. Conclusions: Capsulectomy and scarification of the remnant pseudocapsule is an acceptable and safe surgical option for complex chronic abdominal wall seromas. PMID:25430512

  8. Surgical resection and scarification for chronic seroma post-ventral hernia mesh repair.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Vasileios; Cook, Kristin; Wilson, Dorian

    2014-11-28

    The aim of this report is to present a new surgical approach in the definitive management of challenging cases of abdominal wall seroma following herniorrhaphy with mesh. We describe the case of a 56-year-old male with a 4-year history of a complex abdominal wall seroma. He had undergone fluid aspiration twice without success. On physical examination, the mass was supraumbilical and measured 15×10 cm. Computer tomography (CT) scan revealed a complex encapsulated formation overall measuring 10.1×17.3×17.3 cm in AP, transverse, and craniocaudal dimensions, respectively. In this case complete resection was not safe due to the anatomic relationship of the posterior aspect of the pseudocapsule and the mesh. Intraoperatively, the anterior and lateral aspects of the pseudocapsule were resected and an argon beam was used to scarify the residual posterior pseudocapsule and prevent recurrence. This technique was successful in preventing reaccumulation of the seroma. Capsulectomy and scarification of the remnant pseudocapsule is an acceptable and safe surgical option for complex chronic abdominal wall seromas.

  9. Evaluation of a fully absorbable poly-4-hydroxybutyrate/absorbable barrier composite mesh in a porcine model of ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeffrey R; Deeken, Corey R; Martindale, Robert G; Rosen, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical and histological properties of a fully absorbable poly-4-hydroxybutyrate/absorbable barrier composite mesh (Phasix™ ST) compared to partially absorbable (Ventralight™ ST), fully absorbable (Phasix™), and biologically derived (Strattice™) meshes in a porcine model of ventral hernia repair. Bilateral abdominal surgical defects were created in twenty-four Yucatan pigs, repaired with intraperitoneal (Phasix™ ST, Ventralight™ ST) or retromuscular (Phasix™, Strattice™) mesh, and evaluated at 12 and 24 weeks (n = 6 mesh/group/time point). Prior to implantation, Strattice™ demonstrated significantly higher (p < 0.001) strength (636.6 ± 192.1 N) compared to Ventralight™ ST (324.3 ± 37.1 N), Phasix™ ST (206.9 ± 11.3 N), and Phasix™ (200.6 ± 25.2 N). At 12 and 24 weeks, mesh/repair strength was significantly greater than NAW (p < 0.01 in all cases), and no significant changes in strength were observed for any meshes between 12 and 24 weeks (p > 0.05). Phasix™ mesh/repair strength was significantly greater than Strattice™ (p < 0.001) at 12 and 24 weeks, and Ventralight™ ST mesh/repair strength was significantly greater than Phasix™ ST mesh (p < 0.05) at 24 weeks. At 12 and 24 weeks, Phasix™ ST and Ventralight™ ST were associated with mild inflammation and minimal-mild fibrosis/neovascularization, with no significant differences between groups. At both time points, Phasix™ was associated with minimal-mild inflammation/fibrosis and mild neovascularization. Strattice™ was associated with minimal inflammation/fibrosis, with minimal neovascularization at 12 weeks, which increased to mild by 24 weeks. Strattice™ exhibited significantly less neovascularization than Phasix™ at 12 weeks and significantly greater inflammation at 24 weeks due to remodeling. Phasix™ ST demonstrated mechanical and histological properties comparable to partially

  10. Umbilical Hernia Repair: Analysis After 934 Procedures.

    PubMed

    Porrero, José L; Cano-Valderrama, Oscar; Marcos, Alberto; Bonachia, Oscar; Ramos, Beatriz; Alcaide, Benito; Villar, Sol; Sánchez-Cabezudo, Carlos; Quirós, Esther; Alonso, María T; Castillo, María J

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of consensus about the surgical management of umbilical hernias. The aim of this study is to analyze the medium-term results of 934 umbilical hernia repairs. In this study, 934 patients with an umbilical hernia underwent surgery between 2004 and 2010, 599 (64.1%) of which were evaluated at least one year after the surgery. Complications, recurrence, and the reoperation rate were analyzed. Complications were observed in 5.7 per cent of the patients. With a mean follow-up time of 35.5 months, recurrence and reoperation rates were 3.8 per cent and 4.7 per cent, respectively. A higher percentage of female patients (60.9 % vs 29 %, P = 0.001) and a longer follow-up time (47.4 vs 35 months, P = 0.037) were observed in patients who developed a recurrence. No significant differences were observed between complications and the reoperation rate in patients who underwent Ventralex(®) preperitoneal mesh reinforcement and suture repair; however, a trend toward a higher recurrence rate was observed in patients with suture repair (6.5 % vs 3.2 %, P = 0.082). Suture repair had lower recurrence and reoperation rates in patients with umbilical hernias less than 1 cm. Suture repair is an appropriate procedure for small umbilical hernias; however, for larger umbilical hernias, mesh reinforcement should be considered.

  11. Oral, intestinal, and skin bacteria in ventral hernia mesh implants

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Abesha-Belay, Emnet; Enersen, Morten; Røkke, Ola; Olsen, Ingar

    2016-01-01

    Background In ventral hernia surgery, mesh implants are used to reduce recurrence. Infection after mesh implantation can be a problem and rates around 6–10% have been reported. Bacterial colonization of mesh implants in patients without clinical signs of infection has not been thoroughly investigated. Molecular techniques have proven effective in demonstrating bacterial diversity in various environments and are able to identify bacteria on a gene-specific level. Objective The purpose of this study was to detect bacterial biofilm in mesh implants, analyze its bacterial diversity, and look for possible resemblance with bacterial biofilm from the periodontal pocket. Methods Thirty patients referred to our hospital for recurrence after former ventral hernia mesh repair, were examined for periodontitis in advance of new surgical hernia repair. Oral examination included periapical radiographs, periodontal probing, and subgingival plaque collection. A piece of mesh (1×1 cm) from the abdominal wall was harvested during the new surgical hernia repair and analyzed for bacteria by PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From patients with positive PCR mesh samples, subgingival plaque samples were analyzed with the same techniques. Results A great variety of taxa were detected in 20 (66.7%) mesh samples, including typical oral commensals and periodontopathogens, enterics, and skin bacteria. Mesh and periodontal bacteria were further analyzed for similarity in 16S rRNA gene sequences. In 17 sequences, the level of resemblance between mesh and subgingival bacterial colonization was 98–100% suggesting, but not proving, a transfer of oral bacteria to the mesh. Conclusion The results show great bacterial diversity on mesh implants from the anterior abdominal wall including oral commensals and periodontopathogens. Mesh can be reached by bacteria in several ways including hematogenous spread from an oral site. However, other sites such as gut and skin may also serve as sources for the

  12. Current options in inguinal hernia repair in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Kulacoglu, H

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a very common problem. Surgical repair is the current approach, whereas asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hernias may be good candidate for watchful waiting. Prophylactic antibiotics can be used in centers with high rate of wound infection. Local anesthesia is a suitable and economic option for open repairs, and should be popularized in day-case setting. Numerous repair methods have been described to date. Mesh repairs are superior to "nonmesh" tissue-suture repairs. Lichtenstein repair and endoscopic/laparoscopic techniques have similar efficacy. Standard polypropylene mesh is still the choice, whereas use of partially absorbable lightweight meshes seems to have some advantages. PMID:22435019

  13. Comparing the behavior of different polypropylene meshes (heavy and lightweight) in an experimental model of ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Bellón, J M; Rodríguez, M; García-Honduvilla, N; Gómez-Gil, V; Pascual, G; Buján, J

    2009-05-01

    New generation prosthetic biomaterials for abdominal wall repair have been designed to be less dense, by having larger pores than that of the standard polypropylene meshes, to improve abdominal wall compliance. The aim of the present study was to analyze the functional and morphologic properties of these new meshes. For this purpose, 7 x 5 cm(2) defects were created in the anterior abdominal wall of 36 male New Zealand White rabbits and repaired using different polypropylene meshes: a heavyweight mesh (HW), Surgipro, and two lightweight meshes (LW), Parietene and Optilene. Six animals each implanted with biomaterial were sacrificed on postoperative days 14 and 90. Histological and morphometric analysis, adhesion assessment, and biomechanical resistance tests were performed. Similar behavior was shown by the LW and HW meshes in terms of the adhesions and macrophage response induced. After 14 days, the tensile strength of Optilene was greater than the strengths recorded for the other two biomaterials, probably because of its high elasticity. By 90 days, however, the tensile strengths of the three biomaterials were comparable. In conclusion, despite an initial tensile strength advantage shown by the mesh with larger pores, at 90 days postimplant, tensile strengths were similar. Compared with HW, LW prostheses have the benefit that less foreign material was implanted, preserving the elasticity of the recipient host tissue. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cost-utility analysis of the use of prophylactic mesh augmentation compared with primary fascial suture repair in patients at high risk for incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Fischer, John P; Basta, Marten N; Wink, Jason D; Krishnan, Naveen M; Kovach, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Although hernia repair with mesh can be successful, prophylactic mesh augmentation (PMA) represents a potentially useful preventative technique to mitigate incisional hernia risk in select high-risk patients. The efficacy, cost-benefit, and societal value of such an intervention are not known. The aim of this study was to determine the cost-utility of using prophylactic mesh to augment fascial incisions. A decision tree model was employed to evaluate the cost-utility of using PMA relative to primary suture closure (PSC) after elective laparotomy. The authors adopted the societal perspective for cost and utility estimates. A systematic review of the literature on PMA was performed. The costs in this study included direct hospital costs and indirect costs to society, and utilities were obtained through a survey of 300 English-speaking members of the general public evaluating 14 health state scenarios relating to ventral hernia. PSC without mesh demonstrated an expected average cost of $17,182 (average quality-adjusted life-year [QALY] of 21.17) compared with $15,450 (expected QALY was 21.21) for PMA. PSC was associated with an incremental cost-efficacy ratio (ICER) of -$42,444/QALY compared with PMA such that PMA was more effective and less costly. Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was performed demonstrating more simulations resulting in ICERs for PSC above the willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000/QALY, supporting the finding that PMA is superior. Cost-utility analysis of PSC compared to PMA for abdominal laparotomy closure demonstrates PMA to be more effective, less costly, and overall more cost-effective than PSC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prosthetic mesh contamination during NOTES(®) transgastric hernia repair: a randomized controlled trial with swine explants.

    PubMed

    Earle, D B; Romanelli, J R; McLawhorn, T; Omotosho, P; Wu, P; Rossini, C; Swayze, H; Desilets, D J

    2012-12-01

    Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES(®)) is a developing field in minimally invasive surgery that has been applied across a wide range of procedures; however, infectious concerns remain. Most of the applications have been for extraction, rather than reconstructive procedures. Prosthetic hernia repair, is a constructive procedure, has the unique challenge of avoiding contamination and infection of a permanent implant. Utilizing a novel device, we hypothesize that we can significantly reduce or eliminate prosthetic contamination during a transgastric approach for delivery of a clinically relevant, permanent, synthetic prosthetic. 20 swine explants of stomach with attached esophagus were prepared by placing an ultraviolet (UV) light sensitive gel within the lumen of the stomach. Each stomach then underwent endoscopic gastrotomy utilizing a needle, wire guide, and 18-mm balloon dilator. A 10 × 15 cm polypropylene prosthetic was rolled and tied with a 2-0 silk suture, and delivered with one of two methods. Group A (control) utilized a snare to grasp the prosthetic adjacent to the endoscope, which was used to drag it through the gastrotomy. Group B (device) utilized a modified esophageal stent delivery system to deliver the prosthetic through the gastrotomy. Each prosthetic was then digitally photographed with UV illumination, with the contaminated areas illuminating brightly. Software analysis was performed on the photographs to quantify areas of contamination for each group. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-tailed t test with unequal variance. Group A demonstrated a mean of 57 % of the surface area of the prosthetic contaminated with UV light sensitive gel. Group B (experimental group) showed a mean of 0.01 % of the surface area contaminated (p < 0.0001). 95 % confidence intervals indicated that the unprotected delivery technique exposes approximately 6,000 times more of the surface area to contamination than the delivery

  16. [Treatment of paracolostomic hernias using polypropylene mesh].

    PubMed

    Grigoriuk, A A; Ishchenko, V N; Matveev, A V; Kovalev, V A; Krasnobaev, A E; Stuzhin, S A

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 23 patients with large paracolostomic hernias. Twenty patients underwent colostomy suturing and hernial ring Onlay-plasty with polypropylene mesh without tension. Onlay-plasty of hernial ring with own tissues and polypropylene mesh and colostomy reconstruction outside of implant were performed in 3 patients. Onlay-alloplasty with polypropylene mesh "PROLENE" is effective method of treatment of postoperative paracolostomic ventral hernias with colostomy closing as well as with its reconstruction outside of implant.

  17. Operation hernia: humanitarian hernia repairs in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Sanders, D L; Kingsnorth, A N

    2007-10-01

    Ghana has a high incidence of inguinal hernias and the healthcare system is unable to deliver an adequate repair rate. This results in morbidity and mortality and has a knock-on effect on the local economy. A project has been set up to try and reduce the burden of these hernias by establishing Africa's first Hernia Centre. This is supported by structured visits by European surgeons to the centre. In October 2006, a team of four surgeons, two specialist registrars, one hernia nurse specialist, and three nurses was assembled in order to open the Hernia Centre, which will provide a base for the delivery of hernia services in the West of Ghana. A 2-year teaching programme has been formulated, tailored to the needs of local surgeons and nurses, with the aim of developing an integrated team that will initially deliver up to 50 hernia repairs each month. It is planned that the centre will be supported by structured periodic visits from surgeons and nurses based in Plymouth, the European Hernia Society, and any other volunteers wishing to support the link.

  18. Single-incision laparoscopic repair of Spigelian hernia.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hanh; Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J

    2015-01-01

    Spigelian hernias represent only 1% to 2% of all abdominal wall hernias. The treatment, however, remains controversial but depends on institutional expertise. This case series reports the first experience with single-incision laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (SILTEP) repair of Spigelian hernias with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection in combination with inguinal hernia repair. From February 2013 to April 2014, all patients referred with inguinal or Spigelian hernias, without histories of extraperitoneal intervention, underwent SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. A single-port device, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used for all cases. Extraperitoneal dissection was performed under direct vision with preservation of preperitoneal fascia overlying retroperitoneal nerves. Inguinal herniorrhaphy was performed with lightweight mesh that covered low-lying Spigelian defects. High-lying Spigelian defects were repaired with additional mesh. There were 131 patients with 186 (92 direct) inguinal hernias and 7 patients with 8 Spigelian hernias (6 incidental, including 1 bilateral and 2 preoperatively diagnosed), with a mean age of 51.3 years and a mean body mass index of 25.1 kg/m(2). An additional piece of mesh was used for 3 hernias. All Spigelian hernias were associated with direct inguinal hernias, and 8 combined inguinal and Spigelian hernias were successfully repaired with SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection as day cases. There were no clinical recurrences during a mean follow-up period of 6 months (range, 1-15 months). Combined Spigelian and inguinal hernias can be successfully treated with SILTEP herniorrhaphy with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. The high incidence of Spigelian hernias associated with direct inguinal hernias suggests a high index of suspicion for Spigelian hernias during laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy.

  19. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Repair of Spigelian Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernias represent only 1% to 2% of all abdominal wall hernias. The treatment, however, remains controversial but depends on institutional expertise. This case series reports the first experience with single-incision laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (SILTEP) repair of Spigelian hernias with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection in combination with inguinal hernia repair. Methods: From February 2013 to April 2014, all patients referred with inguinal or Spigelian hernias, without histories of extraperitoneal intervention, underwent SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. A single-port device, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope, and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used for all cases. Extraperitoneal dissection was performed under direct vision with preservation of preperitoneal fascia overlying retroperitoneal nerves. Inguinal herniorrhaphy was performed with lightweight mesh that covered low-lying Spigelian defects. High-lying Spigelian defects were repaired with additional mesh. Results: There were 131 patients with 186 (92 direct) inguinal hernias and 7 patients with 8 Spigelian hernias (6 incidental, including 1 bilateral and 2 preoperatively diagnosed), with a mean age of 51.3 years and a mean body mass index of 25.1 kg/m2. An additional piece of mesh was used for 3 hernias. All Spigelian hernias were associated with direct inguinal hernias, and 8 combined inguinal and Spigelian hernias were successfully repaired with SILTEP repair with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection as day cases. There were no clinical recurrences during a mean follow-up period of 6 months (range, 1–15 months). Conclusions: Combined Spigelian and inguinal hernias can be successfully treated with SILTEP herniorrhaphy with telescopic extraperitoneal dissection. The high incidence of Spigelian hernias associated with direct inguinal hernias suggests a high index of suspicion for Spigelian hernias during laparoscopic inguinal

  20. The use of composite meshes in laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernias: are there differences in biocompatibily?: experimental results obtained in a laparoscopic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Schug-Pass, Christine; Sommerer, Florian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Lippert, Hans; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernias has become increasingly established in routine clinical practice thanks to the myriad advantages it confers. Apart from the risk of intestinal damage following adhesiolysis, to date no information is available on the best way of preventing the formation of new adhesions in the vicinity of the implanted meshes. Numerous experimental investigations, mainly conducted on an open small-animal model, have demonstrated the advantages of coating meshes, inter alia with absorbable materials, compared with uncoated polypropylene meshes. In our established laparoscopic porcine model we set about investigating three of these meshes, which are already available on the market. In total, 18 domestic pigs underwent laparoscopic surgery and three different composite meshes were tested in each case on six animals (Dynamesh IPOM, Proceed, Parietene Composite). At 4 months, postmortem diagnostic laparoscopy was carried out, followed by full-wall excision of the specimens. Planimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the size of the entire surface area and the extent of adhesions. Histological investigations were performed on five sections for each specimen. These focused on the partial volumes of inflammatory cells, the proliferation marker Ki67, apoptotic index, inflammatory cell marker CD68 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) as a marker of the extracellular matrix. A similar value of 14% was obtained for shrinkage of Dynamesh IPOM and Parietene Composite, while Proceed showed a 25% reduction in its surface area. Markedly lower values of 12.8% were obtained for Parietene Composite in respect of adhesions to the greater omentum, compared with 31.7% for Proceed and 33.2% for Dynamesh IPOM (p = 0.01). Overall, Parietene Composite performed best in the histological and immunhistochemistry tests. On the whole, all composite meshes showed evidence of good biocompatibility. However, none of the coatings was

  1. A review of available prosthetics for ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Vidya; Weber, Daniel J; Reed, R Lawrence; Luchette, Fred A

    2011-01-01

    To review mesh products currently available for ventral hernia repair and to evaluate their efficacy in complex repair, including contaminated and reoperative fields. Although commonly referenced, the concept of the ideal prosthetic has never been fully realized. With the development of newer prosthetics and approaches to the ventral hernia repair, many surgeons do not fully understand the properties of the available prosthetics or the circumstances that warrant the use of a specific mesh. A systematic review of published literature from 1951 to June of 2009 was conducted to identify articles relating to ventral hernia repairs and the use of prosthetics in herniorrhaphy. Important differences exist between the synthetics, composites, and biologic prosthetics used for ventral hernia repair in terms of mechanics, cost, and the ideal situation in which each should be used. The use of synthetic mesh remains an appropriate solution for most ventral hernia repairs. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair has created a niche for both expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and composite mesh, as they are suited to intraperitoneal placement. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that the newer biologic prosthetics are reasonable options for hernia repair in contaminated fields and for large abdominal wall defects; however, more studies need to be done before advocating the use of these biologics in other settings.

  2. [Inguinal hernia repair by the tension free technique of Lichtenstein].

    PubMed

    Prywiński, S; Zomrowski, L; Kapała, A; Mackiewicz, Z

    1997-01-01

    Failure rate in standard groin hernia repair varies from 3 to 10%. Polypropylene mesh implantation based on Lichtenstein "tension free" method in 1986 year reduced the failure rate to less than 1%. From Feb. '95 to Dec.'96, 115 patients were operated on with 127 groin hernias repair. The average age of patients was 58 years 52 direct hernias, 74 indirect hernias and 1 pantaloon hernia have been diagnosed in examined material, 101 primary repairs and 26 repairs of recurrent hernia have been performed. The operations were performed in subarachnoid anaesthesia--66 patients, in general anaesthesia--11 patients in local anaesthesia--38 patients. After having opened the inguinal canal estimated the type of its wall defect. In case of direct hernia the sac usually was invaginated by absorbing suture. In case of indirect hernia sac was cut and peritoneal cavity left opened. The patch made of polypropylene monofilament mesh (size 6 x 8 cm) was sewn with "tension free" method under spermatic funiculus. As a complication 6 patients had haematomas in operating wounds. Four of the patients had wound infections. One of these patients was operated again and the patch was removed. The patients had no recurrence of hernia during the previous 10.6 months of observation. We haven't confirmed recurrence in examined material, yet it was too short time to estimate the efficiency of repair. The proposed way of groin hernia repair is easy and simple in every-day surgery practice.

  3. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  4. Management of strangulated abdominal wall hernias with mesh; early results

    PubMed Central

    Ozbagriacik, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Acar, Aylin; Kudas, Ilyas; Yucel, Metin; Ozpek, Adnan; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgery for abdominal wall hernias is a common procedure in general surgery practice. The main causes of delay for the operation are comorbid problems and patient unwillingness, which eventually, means that some patients are admitted to emergency clinics with strangulated hernias. In this report, patients who admitted to the emergency department with strangulated adominal wall hernias are presented together with their clinical management. METHODS: Patients who admitted to our clinic between January 2009 and November 2011 and underwent emergency operation were included in the study retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, hernia type, length of hospital stay, surgical treatment and complications were assessed. RESULTS: A total 81 patients (37 female, 44 male) with a mean age of 52.1±17.64 years were included in the study. Inguinal, femoral, umbilical and incisional hernias were detected in 40, 26, 9 and 6 patients respectively. Polypropylene mesh was used in 75 patients for repair. Primary repair without mesh was used in six patients. Small bowel (n=10; 12.34%), omentum (n=19; 23.45%), appendix (n=1; 1.2%) and Meckel’s diverticulum (n=1; 1.2%) were resected. Median length of hospital stay was 2 (1–7) days. Surgical site infection was detected in five (6.2%) patients. No significant difference was detected for length of hospital stay and surgical site infection in patients who had mesh repair (p=0.232 and 0.326 respectively). CONCLUSION: The need for bowel resection is common in strangulated abdominal wall hernias which undergo emergency operation. In the present study, an increase of morbidity was seen in patients who underwent bowel resection. No morbidity was detected related to the usage of prosthetic materials in repair of hernias. Hence, we believe that prosthetic materials can be used safely in emergency cases. PMID:28058336

  5. Materials characterization of explanted polypropylene hernia mesh: Patient factor correlation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; Cozad, Matthew J; Grant, David A; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Grant, Sheila A

    2016-02-01

    This study quantitatively assessed polypropylene (PP) hernia mesh degradation and its correlation with patient factors including body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status with the goal of improving hernia repair outcomes through patient-matched mesh. Thirty PP hernia mesh explants were subjected to a tissue removal process followed by assessment of their in vivo degradation using Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis analyses. Results were then analyzed with respect to patient factors (body mass index, tobacco use, and diabetes status) to determine their influence on in vivo hernia mesh oxidation and degradation. Twenty of the explants show significant surface oxidation. Tobacco use exhibits a positive correlation with modulated differential scanning calorimetry melt temperature and exhibits significantly lower TGA decomposition temperatures than non-/past users. Chemical and thermal characterization of the explanted meshes indicate measurable degradation while in vivo regardless of the patient population; however, tobacco use is correlated with less oxidation and degradation of the polymeric mesh possibly due to a reduced inflammatory response.

  6. Surface functionalisation of polypropylene hernia-repair meshes by RF-activated plasma polymerisation of acrylic acid and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Rosellini, Andrea; Rivolo, Paola; Faga, Maria Giulia; Lamberti, Roberta; Martorana, Selanna; Castellino, Micaela; Virga, Alessandro; Mandracci, Pietro; Malandrino, Mery; Magnacca, Giuliana

    2015-02-01

    Hernia diseases are among the most common and diffuse causes of surgical interventions. Unfortunately, still nowadays there are different phenomena which can cause the hernioplasty failure, for instance post-operative prostheses displacements and proliferation of bacteria in the surgical site. In order to limit these problems, commercial polypropylene (PP) and polypropylene/Teflon (PP/PTFE) bi-material meshes were surface functionalised to confer adhesive properties (and therefore reduce undesired displacements) using polyacrylic acid synthesized by plasma polymerisation (PPAA). A broad physico-chemical and morphological characterisation was carried out and adhesion properties were investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) used in force/distance (F/D) mode. Once biomedical devices surface was functionalised by PPAA coating, metallic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antimicrobial properties were synthesised and loaded onto the polymeric prostheses. The effect of the PPAA, containing carboxylic functionalities, adhesive coating towards AgNPs loading capacity was verified by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary measurement of the Ag loaded amount and release in water were also investigated via inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Promising results were obtained for the functionalised biomaterials, encouraging future in vitro and in vivo tests.

  7. The influence of the number of endoclips and of mesh incorporation on the strength of an experimental hernia patch repair.

    PubMed

    Dion, Y M; Laplante, R; Charara, J; Marois, M

    1994-11-01

    The strength conferred to a mesh by fixing it with laparoscopic staples and the effects of tissue incorporation have never been quantified. Eighteen dogs were divided into three groups sacrificed at 2 days (5 dogs), 2 weeks (6 dogs), and 2 months (7 dogs). One 3.5- by 5-cm piece of abdominal wall was removed from each side through a median laparotomy, leaving the skin intact. A polypropylene mesh (5 by 7 cm) was fixed over one defect with four Endopath EMS staples (Ethicon Endo-surgery) and over the other with 16 EMS staples. At sacrifice, bursting strength (BS) was measured with an Instron tester and specimens were studied histologically. One-way analysis of variance and the Newmann-Keuls multiple-comparison test were used. BS tests showed that for each period studied, the strength of the repair performed with 16 staples was significantly higher than that obtained when four staples were applied. They also showed that tensile strength increased significantly in both groups as time elapsed. Light microscopy supported the conclusion that the initial strength of the repair was related to the number of clips and was significantly increased by cellular infiltration at 2 weeks and significantly more by collagen deposition at 2 months. At 2 months, BS was significantly higher in the 16-staples group, suggesting that initial fixation still plays a significant role.

  8. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: is the enthusiasm justified?

    PubMed

    Cooper, S S; McAlhany, J C

    1997-01-01

    One surgeon repaired 72 inguinal hernias in 61 patients by a transabdominal preperitoneal laparoscopic placement of prosthetic mesh. There were 58 male and 3 female patients; the mean age was 47.9 years. Thirty-six unilateral inguinal hernias (either direct or indirect), 11 bilateral inguinal hernias, 12 recurrent inguinal hernias, and 2 unilateral pantaloon inguinal hernias were repaired. There were no operative mortalities. The mean follow-up was 21 months, with a range of 6 to 42 months. Ten hernia recurrences (13.8%) were documented 3 to 24 months postoperatively (mean, 12 months). There were six direct hernia recurrences, two indirect hernia recurrences, and two recurrences of recurrent hernia repairs. Thirteen patients (21.3%) experienced morbidity: seromas in eight, a hematoma in one, an ileus in one, hematuria in one, and neuropathy in two. In our opinion, the significant morbidity and early recurrence rate of a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair are unacceptable. Enthusiasm for laparoscopic technique to repair inguinal hernias is not justified if similar morbidity and recurrence rates are documented within the surgical community.

  9. Synchronous femoral hernias diagnosed during endoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Putnis, Soni; Wong, April; Berney, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    During totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair of inguinal hernias, it is possible to see the internal opening of the femoral canal. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence of synchronous femoral hernias found in patients undergoing TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. This was a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 362 consecutive patients who underwent 484 TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repairs during a 5-year period, May 2005 to May 2010. During surgery, both inguinal and femoral canal orifices were routinely inspected. The presence of unilateral or bilateral inguinal and femoral hernias was recorded and repaired accordingly. There were a total of 362 patients. More males (343, 95%) underwent a TEP hernia repair than females (19, 5%). There were more cases of unilateral (240/362, 66%) than bilateral (122/362, 34%) inguinal hernias. A total of 18 cases of synchronous femoral hernias were found during operation. There was a higher incidence of femoral hernia in females (7/19, 37%) compared to males (11/343, 3%) (P < 0.001). None of the femoral hernias were clinically detectable preoperatively. Females undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair are more likely to have a synchronous femoral hernia than males. We suggest that all women presenting with an inguinal hernia also have a formal assessment of the femoral canal. TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair is an ideal approach as both inguinal and femoral orifices can be assessed and hernias repaired simultaneously during surgery.

  10. Endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia.

    PubMed

    Postema, R R; Bonjer, H J

    2002-04-01

    There are three types of lumbar hernia: congenital, acquired, and incisional hernias. Acquired hernia can appear in two forms: the inferior (Petit) type and the superior type, first described by Grynfeltt in 1866. We report endoscopic extraperitoneal repair of a Grynfeltt hernia. A 46-year-old woman presented with a painful swelling in the left lumbar region that had caused her increasing discomfort. The diagnosis of Grynfeltt's hernia was made, and she underwent surgery. With the patient in a left-side decubitus position, access to the extraperitoneal space was gained by inserting a 10-mm inflatable balloon trocar just anteriorly to the midaxillary line between the 12th rib and the superior iliac crest through a muscle-splitting incision into the extraperitoneal space. After the balloon trocar had been removed a blunt-tip trocar was inserted. Using two 5-mm trocars, one above and another below the 10-mm port in the midaxillary line, the hernia could be reduced. A polypropylene mesh graft was introduced through the 10-mm trocar and tacked with spiral tackers. The patient could be discharged the next day after requiring only minimal analgesics. At this writing, 2 (1/2) years after the operation, there is no sign of recurrence. This Grynfeltt hernia could safely be treated using the extraperitoneal approach, which obviates opening and closing the peritoneum, thereby reducing operative time and possibly postoperative complications.

  11. The role of TGF-beta1 as a determinant of foreign body reaction to alloplastic materials in rat fibroblast cultures: comparison of different commercially available polypropylene meshes for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Weyhe, Dirk; Hoffmann, Peter; Belyaev, Orlin; Mros, Kirsten; Muller, Christophe; Uhl, Waldemar; Schmitz, Frank

    2007-01-10

    Animal experiments on hernia repair demonstrated better biocompatibility of light-weight polypropylene meshes. However, implanted medical devices trigger a variety of adverse tissue responses, such as inflammation, fibrosis, infection and thrombosis, but the mechanisms involved in such responses remain largely unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) on host tolerance by quantification of foreign body reaction in cultured fibroblasts depending on the amount and composition of implanted material used for hernia repair. An NRK-49F fibroblast culture was incubated in the presence of 4 commercially available meshes approved for hernia repair. A mesh-free cell suspension served as a control group, in which the influence of TGF-beta1 on fibroblasts was evaluated. Levels of TGF-beta1 in the supernatant were dynamically measured in a time interval of 6 to 96 h and cell proliferation rates were assessed colorimetrically using MTT test. A dose-dependent suppression of fibroblasts proliferation by TGF-beta1 was observed. All meshes suppressed the secretion of TGF-beta1 and conversely increased significantly cell proliferation in comparison to the control group (p<0.01) in the first 24 to 48 h of incubation. That effect was more pronounced in meshes partially containing absorbable material when compared to samples of pure polypropylene meshes (p<0.05) and to the control group (p<0.001). Our experiment revealed that early biological reaction of connective tissue cells towards polypropylene meshes and their variants depended much more on the composition and type of the material than on its absolute amount. The assumption that material weight reduction alone might affect the foreign body reaction of mesh implants could not be confirmed by our in vitro study.

  12. Evolution and advances in laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Vorst, Alan L; Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Franz, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Primary ventral hernias and ventral incisional hernias have been a challenge for surgeons throughout the ages. In the current era, incisional hernias have increased in prevalence due to the very high number of laparotomies performed in the 20th century. Even though minimally invasive surgery and hernia repair have evolved rapidly, general surgeons have yet to develop the ideal, standardized method that adequately decreases common postoperative complications, such as wound failure, hernia recurrence and pain. The evolution of laparoscopy and ventral hernia repair will be reviewed, from the rectoscopy of the 4th century to the advent of laparoscopy, from suture repair to the evolution of mesh reinforcement. The nuances of minimally invasive ventral and incisional hernia repair will be summarized, from preoperative considerations to variations in intraoperative practice. New techniques have become increasingly popular, such as primary defect closure, retrorectus mesh placement, and concomitant component separation. The advent of robotics has made some of these repairs more feasible, but only time and well-designed clinical studies will tell if this will be a durable modality for ventral and incisional hernia repair. PMID:26649152

  13. Day-case laparoscopic hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Evans, D S; Ghaneh, P; Khan, I M

    1996-10-01

    Some 114 patients (median age 52 years) underwent laparoscopic hernia repair as a day-case procedure. Twenty-one patients had bilateral and 11 recurrent hernias. Some 113 patients underwent transabdominal preperitoneal mesh repair but one required conversion to open operation. Mean operating time was 24 min for unilateral and 38 min for bilateral repair. In an operating session of 3.5 h, up to five patients (mean 4.4) underwent surgery and as many as seven hernias were repaired. More than 10 per cent of patients were found to have a previously undiagnosed hernia on the opposite side. A total of 111 patients were discharged home on the day of surgery. Major complications included one omental bleed and one small bowel obstruction. Seroma was the commonest minor complication and occurred in 7 per cent of patients. More than 35 per cent of patients needed no postoperative analgesia. To date there has been one recurrence (follow-up range 2-18 months).

  14. A single-surgeon randomized trial comparing sutures, N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate and human fibrin glue for mesh fixation during primary inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Testini, Mario; Lissidini, Germana; Poli, Elisabetta; Gurrado, Angela; Lardo, Domenica; Piccinni, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the efficacy of sutures, human fibrin glue and N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate for mesh fixation in patients undergoing the plug and mesh procedure for groin hernia. Methods A total of 156 patients with 167 inguinal hernias (11 bilateral) underwent a plug and mesh procedure and were randomly assigned to received either sutures (n = 59 hernias), human fibrin glue (n = 52) or N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (n = 56) for mesh fixation. Results The overall morbidity rate was 38.98% in the suture group, 9.62% in the fibrin glue group and 10.71% in the N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate group (suture v. fibrin glue, p < 0.001; suture v. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in morbidity between the fibrin glue and N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate groups. Overall, short-term morbidity was significantly higher in the suture group (27.12%) than in the fibrin glue (9.62%, p = 0.01) or N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (8.93%, p = 0.004) groups, but there was no significant difference between the fibrin glue and N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mean postoperative stay (32.6 h in the suture group v. 30.8 h in the fibrin glue group v. 32.0 h in the N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate group) or mean time to return to work (20.4 d in the suture group v. 20.3 d in the fibrin glue group v. 19.8 d in the N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate group). Overall, long-term morbidity was significantly higher in the suture group (11.86%) than in the fibrin glue (0%, p = 0.001) or N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (1.78%, p = 0.03) groups. There was no recurrence in any of the groups. Two cases (3.39%) of chronic groin pain were reported in patients in the suture group. A sensation of extraneous body was reported in 5 (8.47%) patients who received sutures and in 1 (1.78%) patient in the N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate group; there were no reported cases in the fibrin glue group (suture v. fibrin glue, p = 0.01; suture v. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate

  15. Fibrin Sealant: A Review of the History, Biomechanics, and Current Applications for Prosthetic Fixation in Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jefferson Tyler; Webb, David L; Stoikes, Nathaniel F N; Voeller, Guy R

    2015-11-01

    The role of surgical adhesives in hernia repair has continued to evolve. The purpose of this chapter is to review the role of fibrin sealant and its application in general surgery for mesh fixation, specifically the history, biomechanics, and clinical utilization. The utilization of fibrin sealant for repair of groin hernias, both open and laparoscopic, ventral hernias, and hiatal hernias will be discussed.

  16. Laparoscopic Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair has become increasingly popular as an alternative to open surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the laparoscopic total extraperitoneal procedure with the use of staple fixation and polypropylene mesh. Methods: A retrospective chart review examined outcomes of 1240 laparoscopic hernia operations in 783 patients, focusing on intraoperative and early postoperative complications, pain, and time until return to work and normal physical activities. Results: There were no intraoperative complications in this series; 106 patients experienced early postoperative complications across 8 evaluated categories: urinary retention (4.1%), seroma (3.0%), testicular/hemiscrotal swelling (1.9%), testicular atrophy (0%), hydrocele (0.6%), mesh infection (0.1%), and neurological symptoms (transient, 1.0%; persistent, 0.2%). Patients used an average of 5.6 Percocet pills after the procedure, and mean times until return to work and normal activities, including their routine exercise regimen, were 3.0 and 3.8 days, respectively. Conclusion: Complication rates and convalescence times were considered equivalent or superior to those found in other studies assessing both laparoscopic and open techniques. The usage of multiple Endostaples did not result in increased neurologic complications in the early postoperative period when compared with findings in the literature. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, total extraperitoneal repair is a safe, effective alternative to open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:27493471

  17. Laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; He, Kai; Hua, Rong; Shen, Qiwei

    2017-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common long-term complications after abdominal ostomy. Surgical treatment for parastomal hernia is the only cure but a fairly difficult field because of the problems of infection, effects, complications and recurrence. Laparoscopic repair operations are good choices for Parastomal hernia because of their mini-invasive nature and confirmed effects. There are several major laparoscopic procedures for parastomal hernioplasty. The indications, technical details and complications of them will be introduced and discussed in this article. PMID:28251124

  18. Vesicocutaneous fistula after sliding hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Varun; Kapoor, Rakesh; Sureka, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. The incidence of bladder forming a part of an inguinal hernia, called as “scrotal cystocele,” is 1–4%. The risk of bladder injury is as high as 12% when repairing this type of hernia. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a 65-year-old man who presented with urinary leak through the scrotal wound following right inguinal hernia repair. PMID:26941501

  19. Fibrin sealing versus stapling of hernia meshes in an onlay model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Petter-Puchner, Alexander H; Fortelny, R; Mittermayr, R; Ohlinger, W; Redl, H

    2005-12-01

    Incisional and inguinal hernia repair are among the most common procedures of general surgery. Mesh fixation by means of staples or sutures may lead to severe complications. The use of fibrin sealant (FS) has been suggested as alternative, but data on biocompatibility and adhesive strength of FS in combination with macroporous meshes is limited. Ventral hernia (n = 8 per group) was treated in rats in onlay technique with two types of meshes, fibrin sealed or stapled. TI-Mesh (TMxl) extralight and VYPROII (VPII) were tested 17 days post op. No failure in mechanical tests (tensile and burst strength) occurred in sealed or stapled meshes. Histology revealed equally good tissue integration and neovascularization in all groups. Fibrin sealant yields excellent fixation in experimental hernia repair. This rat model is suitable for testing meshes and fixation techniques.

  20. Combined in vivo and ex vivo analysis of mesh mechanics in a porcine hernia model.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Lindsey G; Lake, Spencer P; McAllister, Jared M; Tan, Wen Hui; Yu, Jennifer; Thompson, Dominic; Brunt, L Michael; Blatnik, Jeffrey A

    2017-07-21

    Hernia meshes exhibit variability in mechanical properties, and their mechanical match to tissue has not been comprehensively studied. We used an innovative imaging model of in vivo strain tracking and ex vivo mechanical analysis to assess effects of mesh properties on repaired abdominal walls in a porcine model. We hypothesized that meshes with dissimilar mechanical properties compared to native tissue would alter abdominal wall mechanics more than better-matched meshes. Seven mini-pigs underwent ventral hernia creation and subsequent open repair with one of two heavyweight polypropylene meshes. Following mesh implantation with attached radio-opaque beads, fluoroscopic images were taken at insufflation pressures from 5 to 30 mmHg on postoperative days 0, 7, and 28. At 28 days, animals were euthanized and ex vivo mechanical testing performed on full-thickness samples across repaired abdominal walls. Testing was conducted on 13 mini-pig controls, and on meshes separately. Stiffness and anisotropy (the ratio of stiffness in the transverse versus craniocaudal directions) were assessed. 3D reconstructions of repaired abdominal walls showed stretch patterns. As pressure increased, both meshes expanded, with no differences between groups. Over time, meshes contracted 17.65% (Mesh A) and 0.12% (Mesh B; p = 0.06). Mesh mechanics showed that Mesh A deviated from anisotropic native tissue more than Mesh B. Compared to native tissue, Mesh A was stiffer both transversely and craniocaudally. Explanted repaired abdominal walls of both treatment groups were stiffer than native tissue. Repaired tissue became less anisotropic over time, as mesh properties prevailed over native abdominal wall properties. This technique assessed 3D stretch at the mesh level in vivo in a porcine model. While the abdominal wall expanded, mesh-ingrown areas contracted, potentially indicating stresses at mesh edges. Ex vivo mechanics demonstrate that repaired tissue adopts mesh properties, suggesting

  1. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: a community hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Saiz, A A; Willis, I H; Paul, D K; Sivina, M

    1996-05-01

    From October 1993 to April 1994, laparoscopic ventral hernia repair was performed on 10 patients, all of whom had a history of failed ventral hernia repair and at least two prior ventral hernia repair procedures. Patients presented with complaints of abdominal discomfort, painful mass at the hernia site, or vague abdominal discomfort. No operative deaths occurred. Two patients had minor complications: a seroma at the repair site, which resolved spontaneously, and a superficial wound infection at a trochar site, which responded to an oral cephalosporin. Six patients were discharged within 24 hours of surgery and one patient was operated on as an outpatient and discharged the same day. Follow-up of all patients ranged from 10 to 17 months. No evidence of hernia recurrence has been noted. Some recurrent ventral hernias are amenable to laparoscopic repair, and this technique may be preferable in some patients, especially those who have had an earlier failed open repair with mesh. We do not advocate use of our technique for the first repair of a ventral hernia. Long-term follow-up is still needed to determine recurrence rates compared with conventional open techniques.

  2. Open tension free repair of inguinal hernias; the Lichtenstein technique

    PubMed Central

    Sakorafas, George H; Halikias, Ioannis; Nissotakis, Christos; Kotsifopoulos, Nikolaos; Stavrou, Alexios; Antonopoulos, Constantinos; Kassaras, George A

    2001-01-01

    Background Recurrences have been a significant problem following hernia repair. Prosthetic materials have been increasingly used in hernia repair to prevent recurrences. Their use has been associated with several advantages, such as less postoperative pain, rapid recovery, low recurrence rates. Methods In this retrospective study, 540 tension-free inguinal hernia repairs were performed between August 1994 and December 1999 in 510 patients, using a polypropylene mesh (Lichtenstein technique). The main outcome measure was early and late morbidity and especially recurrence. Results Inguinal hernia was indirect in 55 % of cases (297 patients), direct in 30 % (162 patients) and of the pantaloon (mixed) type in 15 % (81 patients). Mean patient age was 53.7 years (range, 18 – 85). Follow-up was completed in 407 patients (80 %) by clinical examination or phone call. The median follow-up period was 3.8 years (range, 1 – 6 years). Seroma and hematoma formation requiring drainage was observed in 6 and 2 patients, respectively, while transient testicular swelling occurred in 5 patients. We have not observed acute infection or abscess formation related to the presence of the foreign body (mesh). In two patients, however, a delayed rejection of the mesh occurred 10 months and 4 years following surgery. There was one recurrence of the hernia (in one of these patients with late mesh rejection) (recurrence rate = 0.2 %). Postoperative neuralgia was observed in 5 patients (1 %). Conclusion Lichtenstein tension-free mesh inguinal hernia repair is a simple, safe, comfortable, effective method, with extremely low early and late morbidity and remarkably low recurrence rate and therefore it is our preferred method for hernia repair since 1994. PMID:11696246

  3. Tissucol application in dermolipectomy and incisional hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Fernández Lobato, R; García Septiem, J; Ortega Deballon, P; Martín Lucas, F J; Ruíz de Adana, J C; Limones Esteban, M

    2001-01-01

    Biological adhesives have a lot of applications in surgical procedures. Here we present a prospective study with the aim of analyzing results of the application of Tissucol between the muscle layers and subcutaneous tissue after incisional hernia repair with polypropylene mesh and associated dermolipectomy. We assess clinical and technical parameters, local morbidity, and hospital stay. Fifty-six patients were divided into two groups. Patients with whom we used fibrin glue were older, with more obesity (P < 0.005) with associated diseases, and their incisional hernias were larger and more complicated to repair. Patients in the Tissucol group developed less local morbidity (hematomas or abscesses; P < 0.01), had a shorter mean hospital stay (P < 0.01), and required less wound care. The use of Tissucol improves the results of surgical repair of large abdominal incisional hernias repaired by mesh placement and dermolipectomy, and it decreases global morbidity and hospital stay are reduced.

  4. Female 'groin' hernia: totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair seems the most appropriate treatment modality.

    PubMed

    Schouten, N; Burgmans, J P J; van Dalen, T; Smakman, N; Clevers, G J; Davids, P H P; Verleisdonk, E J M M; Elias, S G; Simmermacher, R K J

    2012-08-01

    About 30% of all female 'groin' hernias are femoral hernias, although often only diagnosed during surgery. A Lichtenstein repair though, as preferred treatment modality according to guidelines, would not diagnose and treat femoral hernias. Totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair, however, offers the advantage of being an appropriate modality for the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of both inguinal and femoral hernias. TEP therefore seems an appealing surgical technique for women with groin hernias. This study included all female patients ≥ 18 years operated for a groin hernia between 2005 and 2009. A total of 183 groin hernias were repaired in 164 women. TEP was performed in 85% of women; the other 24 women underwent an open anterior (mesh) repair. Peroperatively, femoral hernias were observed in 23% of patients with primary hernias and 35% of patients with recurrent hernias. There were 30 cases (18.3%) of an incorrect preoperative diagnosis. Peroperatively, femoral hernias were observed in 17.3% of women who were diagnosed with an inguinal hernia before surgery. In addition, inguinal hernias were found in 24.0% of women who were diagnosed with a femoral hernia preoperatively. After a follow-up of 25 months, moderate to severe (VAS 4-10) postoperative pain was reported by 8 of 125 patients (6.4%) after TEP and 5 of 23 patients (21.7%) after open hernia repair (P = 0.03). Five patients had a recurrent hernia, two following TEP (1.4%) and three following open anterior repair (12.5%, P = 0.02). Two of these three patients presented with a femoral recurrence after a previous repair of an inguinal hernia. Femoral hernias are common in women with groin hernias, but not always detected preoperatively; this argues for the use of a preperitoneal approach. TEP hernia repair combines the advantage of a peroperative diagnosis and subsequent appropriate treatment with the known good clinical outcomes.

  5. Perineal hernia repair in dogs.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J J

    1984-05-01

    Old male Collies, Pekingese , Boxers and Boston Terriers are predisposed to perineal hernia. Recurrence is often related to poor surgical technic in the initial repair. With the anesthetized dog in sternal recumbency and the tail tied forward, a curvilinear skin incision is made over the hernia, from the tail base to the midline, ventral to the anus. The hernial sac is opened and its contents reduced. Five stainless-steel sutures are preplaced in the muscles and ligaments of the perineal diaphragm and tied from top to bottom. In cases of failure of the ventral aspect of the repair, the internal obturator muscle can be elevated from the ischial table and used to cover the ventral aspect of the hernia. Postoperative complications are related to infection, self-trauma and straining.

  6. Endoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair in the management of occult obturator and femoral hernias.

    PubMed

    Rath, Alok; Bhatia, Parveen; Kalhan, Sudhir; John, Suviraj; Khetan, Mukund; Bindal, Vivek; Ali, Asfar; Singh, Rahul

    2014-08-01

    The gold standard technique for the repair of groin hernias has always been a controversial issue. Richard Ger introduced the endoscopic approach for the repair of groin hernias in 1991.The endoscopic technique follows the basic principle of preperitoneal placement of a polypropylene mesh over the myopectineal orifice. During the course of dissection of the preperitoneal space, occult obturator and femoral hernias were discovered. Patients who underwent endoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernias over a period of 2 years were included in this retrospective study. A total of 305 cases of groin hernias were operated in 208 patients over a period of 2 years from January 2010 to January 2012 in a single institution. Eleven synchronous clinically occult obturator hernias were found in 8 patients (3.84%) and 5 synchronous clinically occult femoral hernias were found in 5 patients (2.40%) during repair. Preoperative and perioperative findings were discordant in quite a few cases. Preperitoneal dissection discovered coincidental occult hernias in 6.25% of patients.

  7. Spigelian hernias: repair and outcome for 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Larson, David W; Farley, David R

    2002-10-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare partial abdominal wall defect. The frequent lack of physical findings along with vague associated abdominal complaints makes the diagnosis elusive. A retrospective review of Mayo Clinic patients was performed to find all patients who had undergone surgical repair of a Spigelian hernia from 1976 to 1997. Patients were scrutinized for presentation, work-up, therapy, and outcome. The goal of this study was to obtain long-term outcome. The study was set in a tertiary referral center. There were 76 patients in whom 81 Spigelian hernias were repaired. Symptoms most commonly included an intermittent mass (n = 29), pain (n = 20), pain with a mass (n = 22), and bowel obstruction (n = 5). Five patients were asymptomatic. Preoperative imaging was performed in 21 patients and correctly diagnosed the hernia in 15. Spigelian hernias were repaired by primary suture closure (n = 75), mesh (n = 5), and laparoscopic (n = 1) techniques. Eight patients (10%) required emergent operations. Thirteen hernias (17%) were found to be incarcerated at the time of the operation. Overall mean follow-up for the 76 patients was 8 years, with three hernia recurrences identified. Spigelian hernia is rare and requires a high index of suspicion given the lack of consistent symptoms and signs. An astute physician may couple a proper history and physical examination with preoperative imaging to secure the diagnosis. Mesh and laparoscopic repairs are viable alternatives to the durable results of standard primary closure. Given the high rate of incarceration/strangulation, the diagnosis of Spigelian hernia is an indication for surgical repair.

  8. Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia Repair in 221 Patients: Outcomes and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernia is a common condition often associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair (LHHR) with biologic mesh to reduce and/or alleviate GERD symptoms and associated hiatal hernia recurrence. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive LHHR procedures with biologic mesh performed by a single surgeon from July 2009 to October 2014. The primary efficacy outcome measures were relief from GERD symptoms, as measured according to the GERD–health-related quality-of-life (GERD-HRQL) scale and hiatal hernia recurrence. A secondary outcome measure was overall safety of the procedure. Results: A total of 221 patients underwent LHHR with biologic mesh during the study period, and pre- and postoperative GERD-HRQL studies were available for 172 of them. At baseline (preoperative), the mean GERD-HRQL score for all procedures was 18.5 ± 14.4. At follow-up (mean, 14.5 ± 11.0 months [range, 2.0–56.0]), the score showed a statistically significant decline to a mean of 4.4 ± 7.5 (P < .0001). To date, 8 patients (3.6%, 8/221) have had a documented anatomic hiatal hernia recurrence. However, a secondary hiatal hernia repair reoperation was necessary in only 1 patient. Most complications were minor (dysphagia, nausea and vomiting). However, there was 1 death caused by a hemorrhage that occurred 1 week after surgery. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using biologic mesh, both with and without a simultaneous bariatric or antireflux procedure, is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for management of hiatal hernia, prevention of recurrence, and relief of symptomatic GERD. PMID:26884676

  9. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni’s hernia for a young man

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni’s hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH. PMID:27621903

  10. Inguinal hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... This repair can be done with open or laparoscopic surgery. You and your surgeon can discuss which type ... the repair, the cuts are stitched closed. In laparoscopic surgery: The surgeon makes three to five small cuts ...

  11. Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... SAGES Top 21 MIS Procedures SAGES Pearls SAGES Flexible Endoscopy 101 SAGES Tips & Tricks of the Top ... telescopes inserted into the abdomen) and a patch (screen or mesh) to reinforce the abdominal wall. It ...

  12. Anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias: An alternative technique☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Koning, Giel G.; Vriens, Patrick W.H.E.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Standard open anterior inguinal hernia repair is nowadays performed using a soft mesh to prevent recurrence and to minimalize postoperative chronic pain. To further reduce postoperative chronic pain, the use of a preperitoneal placed mesh has been suggested. In extremely large hernias, the lateral side of the mesh can be insufficient to fully embrace the hernial sac. We describe the use of two preperitoneal placed meshes to repair extremely large hernias. This ‘Butterfly Technique’ has proven to be useful. Hernias were classified according to hernia classification of the European Hernia Society (EHS) during operation. Extremely large indirect hernias were repaired by using two inverted meshes to cover the deep inguinal ring both medial and lateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. VAS pain score was assessed in all patients during follow up. Outcomes of these Butterfly repairs were evaluated. Medical drawings were made to illustrate this technique. A Total of 689 patients underwent anterior hernia repair 2006–2008. PRESENTATION OF CASE Seven male patients (1%) presented with extremely large hernial sacs. All these patients were men. Mean age 69.9 years (range: 63–76), EHS classifications of hernias were all unilateral. Follow up was at least 6 months. Recurrence did not occur after repair. Chronic pain was not reported. Discussion Open preperitoneal hernia repair of extremely large hernias has not been described. The seven patients were trated with this technique uneventfully. No chronic pain occurred. CONCLUSION The Butterfly Technique is an easy and safe alternative in anterior preperitoneal repair of extremely large inguinal hernias. PMID:22288042

  13. Laparoscopic repair of complicated umbilical hernia with Strattice Laparoscopic™ reconstructive tissue matrix.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Complex hernias continue to present a challenge. Surgical techniques for repair are carefully considered to reduce risk for complications. Laparoscopic repairs improve postoperative infection rates, and placement of biologic mesh decreases mesh infection rates. However, laparoscopic repairs using biologic mesh is generally challenging due to difficulty with maneuverability. We present a case of a complex ventral hernia that was laparoscopically repaired using a new FDA cleared laparoscopic biologic graft. The patient had multiple comorbidities, including obesity, hepatitis C, endocarditis secondary to IV drug use, tobacco smoking, bilateral inguinal hernia, and recurrent umbilical hernia. The recurrent hernia was larger, irreducible, and discolored compared to original defect. The patient underwent laparoscopic repair with primary closure and reinforcement with Strattice™ Tissue Matrix Laparoscopic (LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ). At nine months postoperative, the patient had no evidence of recurrence, infection, or chronic pain, demonstrating early success from the surgical management. Presence of multiple comorbidities and incarcerated recurrent hernia increase risk for complications during and/or after hernia repair. Considering these factors, laparoscopic repair with Strattice Laparoscopic and defect closure was a reasonable technique for repair. Laparoscopic suture repair reinforced with biologic dermal tissue matrix was successfully performed during a complex hernia repair. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Laparoscopic totally extra-peritoneal hernia repair for bilateral Spigelian hernias and coincident inguinal hernia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shimpei; Nitori, Nobuhiro; Kato, Ayu; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Kiatagwa, Yuko; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Okabayashi, Koji; Tsuruta, Masashi; Kitajima, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Spigelian hernia (SH) is a rare ventral hernia occurring near the lateral border of the rectus muscle. The treatment remains controversial and depends on institutional expertise. Although laparoscopic surgery is a good adaptation for the repair of ventral hernias, only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) repair for bilateral SHs. A 74-year-old Japanese man presented with asymptomatic bulges in the right lower abdominal quadrant. On physical examination, the bulges were located to the right of the lateral border of the abdominal rectus muscle and the right inguinal region in an upright position. We diagnosed right SH and coincident homonymous ipsilateral inguinal hernia (IH) by abdominal computed tomography and planned a curative operation by laparoscopy. By first laparoscopic exploration, we found an asymptomatic SH to the left of the lateral border of the abdominal rectus muscle and performed TEP repair for all hernias. The second laparoscopic exploration after fixing the mesh in place revealed that the orifice of the right SH was scarred and stiffened by repeated prolapse. We finally eliminated the sac by ligation because of a fear causing of reduction en masse of the SH. The use of laparoscopy simplified the diagnosis and facilitates the subsequent repair of the hernia. TEP approach is the ideal treatment for the simultaneous laparoscopic repair of SH and IH. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair With Fibrin Glue in Select Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Olmi; Luca, Saguatti; Claudio, Pagano; Giuseppe, Vittoria; Enrico, Croce

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective: Laparoscopic treatment of incisional hernias can be performed using different types of fixation devices and prosthesis. We present a case series of 19 patients with incisional hernias with a diameter of <6cm, who underwent laparoscopic repair using Hi-tex dual-side mesh, positioned intraperitoneally, fixed to the abdominal wall by fibrin glue (Tissucol). Methods: Nineteen patients with incisional hernias <6cm in diameter were enrolled in this study and treated laparoscopically with Hi-tex and Tissucol. Surgical complications and patient outcomes were assessed with a clinical follow-up. Results: Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias by using Hi-tex mesh affixed to the parietal wall with fibrin glue was feasible and easy in patients with parietal defects <6cm in diameter. Mean operating time was 30 minutes. Mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. Almost no postoperative pain, major surgical complications, seroma formation, relapses, or prosthesis infection occurred during a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: In select patients, Hi-tex mesh affixed using fibrin glue allows laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias with very good patient outcomes, especially in terms of postoperative pain and seroma formation. PMID:20932376

  16. Doxycycline administration improves fascial interface in hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Tharappel, Job C; Bower, Curtis E; Whittington Harris, Jennifer; Ramineni, Sandeep K; Puleo, David A; Roth, J Scott

    2014-08-01

    Despite improvements in ventral hernia repair techniques, their recurrence rates are unacceptably high. Increased levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and reduced collagen-1 to -3 ratios are implicated in incisional hernia formation. We have recently shown doxycycline treatment for 4 wk after hernia repair reduced MMP levels, significantly increased collagen-1 to -3 ratios, and increased tensile strength of repaired interface fascia. However, this increase was not statistically significant. In this study, we extended treatment duration to determine whether this would impact the tensile strength of the repaired interface fascia. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent incision hernia creation and subsequent repair with polypropylene mesh. The animals received either saline (n = 16) or doxycycline (n = 16) beginning from 1 day before hernia repair until the end of survival time of 6 wk (n = 16) or 12 wk (n = 16). Tissue samples were investigated for MMPs and collagen subtypes using Western blot procedures, and tensiometric analysis was performed. At both 6 and 12 wk after hernia repair, the tensiometric strength of doxycycline-treated mesh to fascia interface (MFI) tissue showed a statistically significant increase when compared with untreated control MFI. In both groups, collagen-1, -2, and -3 ratios were remarkably increased in doxycycline-treated MFI. At 6 wk, the doxycycline-treated MFI group showed a significant decrease in MMP-2, an increase in MMP-3, and no change in MMP-9. At 12 wk, MMP-9 showed a remarkable reduction, whereas MMP-2 and -3 protein levels increased in the doxycycline-treated MFI group. Doxycycline administration results in significantly improved strength of repaired fascial interface tissue along with a remarkable increase in collagen-1, -2, and -3 ratios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lymphoma Diagnosed at Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Veal, David R; Hammill, Chet W

    2010-01-01

    Tumors presenting in the inguinal hernia sac are considered to be extremely rare, with the more common neoplasms metastasizing from the gastrointestinal tract, ovary and prostate. We report the case of Mantle cell lymphoma identified in the inguinal hernia sac following hernia repair. While the hernia sac appeared normal to the surgeon, evaluation by the pathologist showed subtle gross irregularities, with subsequent histologic and immunochemical diagnosis of Mantle cell lymphoma. Twelve previous cases of a lymphoma diagnosed during hernia repair have been described in the English literature. This is the first report of Mantle cell lymphoma found in the hernia sac. This case illustrates the value of routine microscopic evaluation of hernia sacs found from inguinal/femoral herniorrhaphies, as it may be the primary presentation of an asymptomatic metastatic lymphoma. Additionally, it underscores the importance of the surgeon's role in screening hernia sacs if the practice of submitting only macroscopically abnormal specimens for microscopic evaluation is adopted. PMID:20358722

  18. [Azoospermia and a history of inguinal hernia repair in adult].

    PubMed

    Khodari, M; Ouzzane, A; Marcelli, F; Yakoubi, R; Mitchell, V; Zerbib, P; Rigot, J-M

    2015-10-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most performed surgeries in the world. It is recognized that any surgery of the pelvic floor may represent a risk factor of male infertility. Retrospective study of patients with azoospermia and a history of adult inguinal hernia repair surgery and referred to our center between January 1990 and January 2011 for infertility. Among 69 azoospermia patients with history of adult inguinal hernia repair surgery, 60 patients underwent surgical extraction of sperm that was successful in 75% (45/60). Positive extraction rate decreases in the subgroup of patients with risk factors for infertility (61.4%) as well as in the group with bilateral inguinal hernia (67.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in the positive rate of sperm retrieval according to surgical technique or according to the use of polypropylene mesh (P>0.05). The obstruction of the vas deferens due to an inguinal hernia repair was a potential iatrogenic cause of male infertility that was rare and underestimated. The influence of using a polypropylene mesh was not clearly demonstrated. The management of these patients is based on prevention in order to identify patients with risk factors of infertility in order to propose a presurgery cryopreservation of sperm. 5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Staged hernia repair preceded by gastric bypass for the treatment of morbidly obese patients with complex ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, W L; Polhill, J L; Chen, A Y; Kuwada, T S; Gersin, K S; Getz, S B; Kercher, K W; Heniford, B T

    2008-10-01

    Obesity may be the most predominant risk factor for recurrence following ventral hernia repair. This is secondary to significantly increased intra-abdominal pressures, higher rates of wound complications, and the technical difficulties encountered due to obesity. Medically managed weight loss prior to surgery is difficult. One potential strategy is to provide a surgical means to correct patient weight prior to hernia repair. After institutional review board approval, we reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent gastric bypass surgery prior to the definitive repair of a complex ventral hernia at our medical center. Twenty-seven morbidly obese patients with an average of 3.7 (range 1-10) failed ventral hernia repairs underwent gastric bypass prior to definitive ventral hernia repair. Twenty-two of the gastric bypasses were open operations and five were laparoscopic. The patients' average pre-bypass body mass index (BMI) was 51 kg/m2 (range 39-69 kg/m2), which decreased to an average of 33 kg/m2 (range 25-37 kg/m2) at the time of hernia repair at a mean of 1.3 years (range 0.9-3.1 years) after gastric bypass. Seven patients had hernia repair at the same time as their gastric bypass (four sutured, three biologic mesh), all of which recurred. Of the 27 patients, 19 had an open hernia repair and eight had a laparoscopic repair. Panniculectomy was performed concurrently in 15 patients who had an open repair. Prior to formal hernia repair, one patient required an urgent operation to repair a hernia incarceration and a small-bowel obstruction 11 months after gastric bypass. The average hernia and mesh size was 203 cm2 (range 24-1,350 cm2) and 1,040 cm2 (range 400-2,700 cm2), respectively. There have been no recurrences at an average follow-up of 20 months (range 2 months-5 years). Gastric bypass prior to staged ventral hernia repair in morbidly obese patients with complex ventral hernias is a safe and definitive method to effect weight loss and facilitate a

  20. Anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Fei; Liu, Jia-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is performed more and more nowadays. The anatomy of these procedures is totally different from traditional open procedures because they are performed from different direction and in different space. The important anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be discussed in this article.

  1. Anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is performed more and more nowadays. The anatomy of these procedures is totally different from traditional open procedures because they are performed from different direction and in different space. The important anatomy essentials for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair will be discussed in this article. PMID:27826575

  2. Sutureless onlay hernia repair: a review of 97 patients.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Charles P; Stoikes, Nathaniel F; Webb, David L; Voeller, Guy R

    2016-08-01

    Repair of large ventral/incisional (V/I) hernias is a common problem. Outside of recurrence, other factors such as wound complications and mesh infection can create significant morbidity. Chevrel described the premuscular repair and later modified it by using glue over the midline closure. We previously described our onlay technique using fibrin glue alone in a small case series. The aim of this study is to review the largest case series of sutureless onlay V/I hernia repair whereby mesh is fixated with fibrin glue alone for complex ventral hernias, and how the technique has evolved. All patients who underwent onlay V/I hernia repair over a 3-year period were reviewed. Patient demographics, operative details, complications, and follow-up were reviewed. In total, 97 patients were included. 54.6 % were female, with a mean age of 57.3 years. Mean BMI was 32.2. 23(23.7 %) patients had diabetes. 90 (92.8 %) of the operations were for incisional hernias, 3 (3.1 %) primary ventral hernias, 2 (2.1 %) flank hernias, and 2 (2 %) complex abdominal wall reconstruction. 88 (90.7 %) of the cases were performed on an elective basis. 77 (77.3 %) cases were classified as clean, 21 (21.6 %) clean-contaminated, and 1 (1.0 %) contaminated. The mean defect size was 150 cm(2). Mean follow-up was 386 days, and maximum was 3.1 years. There were 21 (21.6 %) seromas, 4 (4.1 %) wound infections, 7 (7.4 %) had skin necrosis, and 9 (9.3 %) required re-operation due to a complication. At 3 years, there have been no recurrences or mesh explants. The sutureless onlay V/I hernia repair with fibrin glue fixation has proven to be durable with a comparable complication profile to other techniques. The most common sequela, seroma, is easily managed in the outpatient setting. This sutureless technique is an effective option for onlay hernia repair that may provide several advantages over traditional suture techniques.

  3. Biologic Prosthesis Reduces Recurrence After Laparoscopic Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Oelschlager, Brant K.; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Hunter, John; Soper, Nathaniel; Brunt, Michael; Sheppard, Brett; Jobe, Blair; Polissar, Nayak; Mitsumori, Lee; Nelson, James; Swanstrom, L

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair (LPEHR) is associated with a high recurrence rate. Repair with synthetic mesh lowers recurrence but can cause dysphagia and visceral erosions. This trial was designed to study the value of a biologic prosthesis, small intestinal submucosa (SIS), in LPEHR. Methods: Patients undergoing LPEHR (n = 108) at 4 institutions were randomized to primary repair −1° (n = 57) or primary repair buttressed with SIS (n = 51) using a standardized technique. The primary outcome measure was evidence of recurrent hernia (≥2 cm) on UGI, read by a study radiologist blinded to the randomization status, 6 months after operation. Results: At 6 months, 99 (93%) patients completed clinical symptomatic follow-up and 95 (90%) patients had an UGI. The groups had similar clinical presentations (symptom profile, quality of life, type and size of hernia, esophageal length, and BMI). Operative times (SIS 202 minutes vs. 1° 183 minutes, P = 0.15) and perioperative complications did not differ. There were no operations for recurrent hernia nor mesh-related complications. At 6 months, 4 patients (9%) developed a recurrent hernia >2 cm in the SIS group and 12 patients (24%) in the 1° group (P = 0.04). Both groups experienced a significant reduction in all measured symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia, chest pain, early satiety, and postprandial pain) and improved QOL (SF-36) after operation. There was no difference between groups in either pre or postoperative symptom severity. Patients with a recurrent hernia had more chest pain (2.7 vs. 1.0, P = 0.03) and early satiety (2.8 vs. 1.3, P = 0.02) and worse physical functioning (63 vs. 72, P = 0.03 per SF-36). Conclusions: Adding a biologic prosthesis during LPEHR reduces the likelihood of recurrence at 6 months, without mesh-related complications or side effects. PMID:16998356

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis in open inguinal hernia repair: a literature review and summary of current knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Makarewicz, Wojciech; Ropel, Jerzy; Bobowicz, Maciej; Kąkol, Michał; Śmietański, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    More than 1 million inguinal hernia repairs are performed in Europe and the US annually. Although antibiotic prophylaxis is not required in clean, elective procedures, the routine use of implants (90% of inguinal hernia repairs are performed with mesh) makes the topic controversial. The European Hernia Society does not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis for elective inguinal hernia repairs. However, the latest randomized controlled trial, published by Mazaki et al., indicates that the use of prophylaxis is effective for the prevention of surgical site infection. Unnecessary prophylaxis contributes to the development of bacterial resistance and significantly increases healthcare costs. This review documents clinical trials on inguinal hernia repairs with mesh and summarizes the current knowledge. It also tries to solve certain problems, namely: what constitutes a real risk factor, late-onset infection, and how the “surgical environment” impacts on the need to use antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:27829934

  5. Decreased hernia recurrence using autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with Strattice™ mesh in a rodent ventral hernia model.

    PubMed

    Van Eps, Jeffrey; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph; Cabrera, Fernando; Wang, Xin; Karim, Azim; Corradetti, Bruna; Chan, Paige; Dunkin, Brian; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley; Ellsworth, Warren

    2016-08-01

    Recurrence after ventral hernia repair (VHR) remains a multifactorial problem still plaguing surgeons today. Some of the many contributing factors include mechanical strain, poor tissue-mesh integration, and degradation of matrices. The high recurrence rate witnessed with the use of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) for definitive hernia repair has reduced their use largely to bridging repair and breast reconstruction. Modalities that improve classic cellular metrics of successful VHR could theoretically result in improved rates of hernia recurrence; autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may represent one such tool, but has been underinvestigated for this purpose. Lewis rats (32) had chronic ventral hernias created surgically and then repaired with Strattice™ mesh alone (control) or mesh + autologous PRP. Samples were harvested at 3 and 6 months postoperatively and compared for gross, histologic, and molecular outcomes of: neovascularization, tissue incorporation, peritoneal adhesions, hernia recurrence, and residual mesh thickness. Compared to control at 3 months postoperatively, PRP-treated rats displayed significantly more neovascularization of implanted mesh and considerable upregulation of both angiogenic genes (vEGF 2.73-fold, vWF 2.21-fold) and myofibroblastic genes (αSMA 9.68-fold, FSP-1 3.61-fold, Col1a1 3.32-fold, Col31a1 3.29-fold). Histologically, they also showed enhanced tissue deposition/ingrowth and diminished chronic immune cell infiltration. Peritoneal adhesions were less severe at both 3 (1.88 vs. 2.94) and 6 months (1.63 vs. 2.75) by Modified Hopkins Adhesion Scoring. PRP-treated rats experienced decreased hernia recurrence at 6 months (0/10 vs. 7/10) and had significantly improved ADM preservation as evidenced by quantification of residual mesh thickness. PRP is an autologous source of pro-regenerative growth factors and chemokines uniquely suited to soft tissue wound healing. When applied to a model of chronic VHR, it incites enhanced

  6. Elective laparoscopic repair after reduction might be useful strategy for incarcerated obturator hernia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kohga, Atsushi; Kawabe, Akihiro; Cao, Yuchen; Yajima, Kiyoshige; Okumura, Takuya; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Isogaki, Jun; Suzuki, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare clinical condition that causes intestinal obstruction. Recent reports have suggested that laparoscopic repair may be useful for incarcerated obturator hernia in select patients. The patient was a 64-year-old female who presented to our emergency department with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed an incarcerated obturator hernia on her right side, without apparent findings of irreversible ischaemic change or perforation. She had a previous history of cardiovascular surgery and was taking an anticoagulant medication. We performed a reduction of the incarcerated intestine. After heparin displacement, laparoscopic repair was electively performed. During laparoscopy, an occult obturator hernia was found on the left side. We repaired the bilateral obturator hernia using a mesh prosthesis. Elective laparoscopic repair after reduction might be a useful procedure for incarcerated obturator hernias in those patients without findings of irreversible ischaemic change or perforation.

  7. Microlaparoscopic hernia repair in children: initial experiences.

    PubMed

    Turial, Salmai; Saied, Ahmad; Schier, Felix

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the authors' experience with the exclusive use of 2-mm instrument sets and small diameter scopes in 100 children undergoing microlaparoscopic herniorrhaphy. This prospective study was designed as a pilot feasibility study; all data related to patients and procedures were prospectively collected. A pneumoperitoneum was established, and 1.7 to 2 mm 0° or 30° scopes were introduced for visualization. Exclusively 2-mm instruments were used. This study included 100 children (aged 15 days to 11 years, median age 2.3 years) undergoing microlaparoscopic hernia repair. A total of 140 hernias were treated. The average operative time for the microlaparoscopically experienced surgeon was 16 minutes for bilateral inguinal hernia and 12 minutes for unilateral hernias. All procedures were completed microlaparoscopically. Hernia recurrence was observed in 2 patients. Based on the authors' early experience, it is found that microlaparoscopic hernia repair in children seems to be a safe and feasible procedure.

  8. Laparoscopic Repair of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satendra; Afaque, Yusuf; Bhartia, Abhishek Kumar; Bhartia, Vishnu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background, Aims, and Objectives. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia typically presents in childhood but in adults is extremely rare entity. Surgery is indicated for symptomatic and asymptomatic patients who are fit for surgery. It can be done by laparotomy, thoracotomy, thoracoscopy, or laparoscopy. With the advent of minimal access techniques, the open surgical repair for this hernia has decreased and results are comparable with early recovery and less hospital stay. The aim of this study is to establish that laparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study of laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair done during May 2011 to Oct 2014. Total n = 13 (M/F: 11/2) cases of confirmed diaphragmatic hernia on CT scan, 4 cases Bochdalek hernia (BH), 8 cases of left eventration of the diaphragm (ED), and one case of right-sided eventration of the diaphragm (ED) were included in the study. Largest defect found on the left side was 15 × 6 cm and on the right side it was 15 × 8 cm. Stomach, small intestine, transverse colon, and omentum were contents in the hernial sac. The contents were reduced with harmonic scalpel and thin sacs were usually excised. The eventration was plicated and hernial orifices were repaired with interrupted horizontal mattress sutures buttressed by Teflon pieces. A composite mesh was fixed with nonabsorbable tackers. All patients had good postoperative recovery and went home early with normal follow-up and were followed up for 2 years. Conclusion. The laparoscopic repair is a safe and effective modality of surgical treatment for congenital diaphragmatic hernia in experienced hands. PMID:28074156

  9. A new open anterior tension-free onlay patch technique for inguinofemoral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Devesa, Hugo Enrique; Martinez-Dejesús, Fermín; Martínez-Mier, Gustavo; Viñas-Dozal, Julio Cesar

    2005-07-01

    The high rate of misdiagnosed, coincident, or recurrent femoral hernias while or after mesh herniorrhaphy suggests its systematic search. We introduced a new open anterior tension-free mesh herniorrhaphy with a novel design. A description of the operative technique and patients demographics is presented. Two hundred sixty-eight hernias were repaired with this technique in a 5-year period. Two hundred twelve patients had a primary inguinal hernia. An unsuspected femoral hernia was discovered in 39 patients with a preoperatively diagnosed inguinal hernia. Operative time was 45 minutes, most patients were discharged in less than 24 hours, no recurrence has been noted, and minor complications were present. Most patients had minimal pain and returned to their normal activities within 10 days after surgery. This technique has the same advantages of open tension-free repairs, allows identification of femoral hernias, and protects a herniorrhaphy for recurrence.

  10. Laparoscopic Repair Reduces Incidence of Surgical Site Infections for All Ventral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Nestor A.; Nguyen, Mylan T.; Nguyen, Duyen H.; Berger, Rachel L.; Lew, Debbie F.; Suliburk, James T.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Kao, Lillian S.; Liang, Mike K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias remains incompletely defined. We hypothesize that laparoscopy, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases surgical site infection (SSI) for all ventral hernia types. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were reviewed to identify studies evaluating outcomes of laparoscopic versus open repair with mesh of ventral hernias and divided into groups (primary or incisional). Studies with high risk of bias were excluded. Primary outcomes of interest were recurrence and SSI. Fixed effects model was used unless significant heterogeneity, assessed with the Higgins I-square (I2), was encountered. Results There were five and fifteen studies for primary and incisional cohorts. No difference was seen in recurrence between laparoscopic and open repair in the two hernia groups. SSI was more common with open repair in both hernia groups: primary (OR 4.17, 95%CI [2.03–8.55]) and incisional (OR 5.16, 95%CI [2.79–9.57]). Conclusions Laparoscopic repair, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases rates of SSI in all types of ventral hernias with no difference in recurrence. This data suggests that laparoscopic approach may be the treatment of choice for all types of ventral hernias. PMID:25294541

  11. Colocutaneous Fistula after Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kallis, Panayiotis; Koronakis, Nikolaos; Hadjicostas, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    The plug-and-patch technique is frequently used for the open repair of inguinal hernias; however, serious complications may arise on rare occasions. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who presented with a colocutaneous fistula with the sigmoid colon 9 years after the repair of a left sliding inguinal hernia with the plug-and-patch technique. The patient underwent sigmoidectomy and excision of the fistulous track. He was discharged on postoperative day 5 and had an uneventful recovery. Although such complications are reported rarely, the surgeon must be aware of them when deciding upon the method of hernia repair. PMID:27738544

  12. Prophylactic Mesh Application during Colostomy to Prevent Parastomal Hernia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parastomal hernia is a common complication after stoma formation, especially in permanent colostomy. The present meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic mesh application during permanent colostomy for preventing parastomal hernia. Methods. Randomized controlled trials comparing outcomes in patients who underwent colostomy with or without prophylactic mesh application were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and the Cochrane Libraries. Results. This meta-analysis included 8 randomized controlled trials with 522 participants. Our pooled results showed that prophylactic mesh application (mesh group) reduced the incidence of clinically detected parastomal hernia (risk ratio [RR]: 0.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.13–0.38; P < 0.00001), radiologically detected parastomal hernia (RR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.47–0.82; P = 0.0008), and surgical repair for herniation (RR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.14–0.83; P = 0.02) when compared with conventional permanent colostomy formation (control group). The incidence of complications, including wound infection, peristomal infection, mesh infection, stomal necrosis and stenosis, stoma site pain, and fistula, was not higher in the mesh group than in the control group. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that prophylactic mesh application at the time of primary colostomy formation is a promising method for the prevention of parastomal herniation. PMID:27818679

  13. Inguinodynia following Lichtenstein tension-free hernia repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, Abdul; Shanmugam, Venkatesh

    2011-04-14

    Chronic groin pain (Inguinodynia) following inguinal hernia repair is a significant, though under-reported problem. Mild pain lasting for a few days is common following mesh inguinal hernia repair. However, moderate to severe pain persisting more than 3 mo after inguinal herniorrhaphy should be considered as pathological. The major reasons for chronic groin pain have been identified as neuropathic cause due to inguinal nerve(s) damage or non-neuropathic cause due to mesh or other related factors. The symptom complex of chronic groin pain varies from a dull ache to sharp shooting pain along the distribution of inguinal nerves. Thorough history and meticulous clinical examination should be performed to identify the exact cause of chronic groin pain, as there is no single test to confirm the aetiology behind the pain or to point out the exact nerve involved. Various studies have been performed to look at the difference in chronic groin pain rates with the use of mesh vs non-mesh repair, use of heavyweight vs lightweight mesh and mesh fixation with sutures vs. glue. Though there is no convincing evidence favouring one over the other, lightweight meshes are generally preferred because of their lesser foreign body reaction and better tolerance by the patients. Identification of all three nerves has been shown to be an important factor in reducing chronic groin pain, though there are no well conducted randomised studies to recommend the benefits of nerve excision vs preservation. Both non-surgical and surgical options have been tried for chronic groin pain, with their consequent risks of analgesic side-effects, recurrent pain, recurrent hernia and significant sensory loss. By far the best treatment for chronic groin pain is to avoid bestowing this on the patient by careful intra-operative handling of inguinal structures and better patient counselling pre- and post-herniorraphy.

  14. [Laparoscopic incisional hernia repair as first therapeutic choice].

    PubMed

    Verbo, A; Petito, L; Pedretti, G; Manno, A; Rizzo, G; Masi, A; Coco, C

    2005-08-01

    Incisional hernias are one of the most frequent complications of open abdominal surgery. Historically, the best results have been obtained with the open rives-stoppa approach. This is done by fixing a large piece of prosthetic mesh behind the rectus muscle. Laparoscopic approach allows similar mesh placement with minimal dissection and lower recurrence rate compared to the open mesh repair. Between October 2001 to September 2003, 75 consecutive patients were scheduled to undergo laparoscopic incisional hernia repair with ePTFE mesh (Gore-Tex Dualmesh Plus). Postoperative complications were recorded and analysed. Most were obese affected by multiple wall defects Conversion to open surgery was required in 1 case Postoperative complications occurred 13.3%. Recurrence occurred in one only case. The key to the success of this procedure is avoidance of complications. The laparoscopic approach is safe, effective and relatively complication-free option in the management of patients presenting with a first time or recurrent incisional hernia and recommended as the treatment of choice.

  15. Characterization of ventral incisional hernia and repair using shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Anuj; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Shajudeen, Peer Shafeeq; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Cabrera, Fernando J; Weiner, Bradley K; Dunkin, Brian J; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2017-04-01

    To assess the integrity of hernia repair, imaging modalities such as computed tomography or ultrasound (US) are commonly used. Neither modality has currently the capacity to simultaneously image the mesh and quantify a prosthetic and surrounding tissue stiffness. In this pilot study, we hypothesize that US shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to identify a polyester mesh and a biologic graft and to assess their stiffness noninvasively in a rat model of bridging hernia repair. Lewis rats underwent hernia creation and repair with Parietex or Strattice at 30 d. After 3 mo, the animals were euthanized, and the Young's Modulus was measured using SWE. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the hernia pre- and post-repair were performed using in-house image processing algorithms. SWE was capable of accurate and real-time assessment and diagnosis of the hernia defects in vivo. Young's Modulus of Parietex meshes and Strattice grafts as estimated from the shear wave elastograms were found to be statistically different from each other (P < 0.05). Accurate three-dimensional reconstructions of the hernia defects pre- and post-repair were generated. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using US SWE to detect ventral hernias and evaluate mesh repair in vivo. Our results indicate that the presence of a hernia and repair can be reliably visualized by SWE and three dimensionally reconstructed. Thus, this technique may provide both structural and functional information regarding the hernia and the repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Made in Italy for hernia: the Italian history of groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Negro, Paolo; Gossetti, Francesco; Ceci, Francesca; D'Amore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The history of groin hernia surgery is as long as the history of surgery. For many centuries doctors, anatomists and surgeons have been devoted to this pathology, afflicting the mankind throughout its evolution. Since ancient times the Italian contribution has been very important with many representative personalities. Authors, investigators and pioneers are really well represented. Every period (the classic period, the Middle Age, the Renaissance and the post-Renaissance) opened new perspectives for a better understanding. During the 18th century, more information about groin anatomy, mainly due to Antonio Scarpa, prepared the Bassini revolution. Edoardo Bassini developed the first modern anatomically based hernia repair. This procedure spread worldwide becoming the most performed surgical technique. After World War II synthetic meshes were introduced and a new era has begun for hernia repair, once again with the support of Italian surgeons, first of all Ermanno Trabucco. But Italian contribution extends also to educational, with the first national school for abdominal wall surgery starting in Rome, and to Italian participation and support in international scientific societies. Authors hereby wish to resume this long history highlighting the "made in Italy" for groin hernia surgery. Bassini, Groin hernia, History, Prosthetic repair.

  17. Results of AlloDerm use in abdominal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Misra, S; Raj, P K; Tarr, S M; Treat, R C

    2008-06-01

    AlloDerm (decellularized human cadaveric dermis) is increasingly being used for tissue reconstruction and hernia repairs. This article presents the results of AlloDerm use in treating abdominal wall hernias by analyzing all patients who underwent repair with AlloDerm at our institution. A series of 70 consecutive patients starting in October 2003 with abdominal wall hernia repair using AlloDerm was studied. This study began as a retrospective chart review, which included subsequent postoperative follow-up. SPSS version 11.5 was used for statistical analysis, and parametric tests were conducted. Various technical variables (type of AlloDerm placement, mesh-suture technique, suture type) and nontechnical variables (steroids use, obesity, smoking status, diabetes, prior surgeries, number of comorbidities) were evaluated. Of 70 study patients, 31 were men and 39 were women, with a mean age of 58 (range 25-88) years. Fifty-six patients (80%) had no complications, whereas 14 (20%) suffered one or more complications. Of those patients with complications, there was one rejection, two infections, and 14 hernia recurrences. The overall complication rate was 24%. Of patients with hernia recurrences, one had the initial repair with AlloDerm implant of <1.8-mm thickness (thick) and 13 patients had their initial repair with AlloDerm implant of >1.8-mm thickness (ultrathick). The 14 patients with recurrences include three who had a prior AlloDerm repair with ultrathick implant. Two of these three patients reported abdominal wall protrusion, and one had a recurrence between two pieces of AlloDerm used in the initial repair. Of these 14 patients, nine had subsequent repair of their recurrence with synthetic mesh, and four had subsequent repair with AlloDerm with satisfactory outcomes; one patient was yet to have a repair at the time of this paper. Recurrence rates with ultrathick and thick AlloDerm were 23% and 6%, respectively. None of the patients who were on steroid therapy had

  18. Robotic repair of a large abdominal intercostal hernia: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Stephani C; Singh, Tejinder P

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal intercostal hernia is an uncommon phenomenon, reported in few case reports and small case series. If left untreated, it can lead to strangulation and visceral ischemia. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate surgical intervention are thus critical to prevent resulting morbidity. We present a 50-year-old woman with a large abdominal intercostal hernia after an open nephrectomy. She underwent a successful robotic repair of the hernia with mesh placement. Through the presentation, we would like to raise awareness of intercostal hernia as a complication of open nephrectomy and significance of early diagnosis in avoiding potential morbidity. We also performed a review of literature especially focusing on acquired abdominal intercostal hernia secondary to prior surgery. Although intercostal hernias can be difficult to repair secondary to the size and location, adequate visualization and surgical planning are critical to successful repair.

  19. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a prospective evaluation at Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Sood, Shasank; Bhattarai, Bal Krishna; Agrawal, Chandra Shekhar; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inguinal hernias have been treated traditionally with open methods of herniorrhaphy or hernioplasty. But the trends have changed in the last decade with the introduction of minimal access surgery. Methods This study was a prospective descriptive study in patients presenting to Surgery Department of B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal with reducible inguinal hernias from January 2011 to June 2012. All patients >18 years of age presenting with inguinal hernias were given the choice of laparoscopic repair or open repair. Those who opted for laparoscopic repair were included in the study. Results There were 50 patients, age ranged from 18 to 71 years with 34 being median age at presentation. In 41 patients, totally extraperitoneal repair was attempted. Of these, 2 (4%) repairs were converted to transabdominal repair and 2 to open mesh repair (4%). In 9 patients, transabdominal repair was done. The median total hospital stay was 4 days (range 3-32 days), the mean postoperative stay was 3.38±3.14 days (range 2-23 days), average time taken for full ambulation postoperatively was 2.05±1.39 days (range 1-10 days), and median time taken to return for normal activity was 5 days (range 2-50 days). One patient developed recurrence (2%). None of the patients who had laparoscopic repair completed complained of neuralgias in the follow-up. Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias could be contemplated safely both via totally extra peritoneal as well as transperitoneal route even in our setup of a developing country with modifications. PMID:25170385

  20. The Usefulness of International Cooperation in the Repair of Inguinal Hernias in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Gil, José; Rodriguez, J M; Gil, E; Hernández Agúera, Q; González, F M; García, J A; Balsalobre, M D; Tortosa, J A; Hernández Palazón, D; Diallo, A B; Parrilla, P

    2015-11-01

    The burden of disease and mortality associated with inguinal hernia in Africa, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, is very high. The purpose of this study is to show that International Cooperation work in the field of hernia repair is effective; it minimizes the delay in hernia repairs in the targeted population, and can prevent a large number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). As a part of an International Cooperation program, a total of 990 black patients with inguinal hernias were studied, in whom hernioplasty was performed using polypropylene mesh. The type of hernia and surgical technique were studied. Indicators of scientific and technical quality, indicators of efficiency and of effectiveness were analyzed. The results on the usefulness of interventions were calculated as avoided DALYs. Surgery was performed on 926 patients with a total of 1033 hernia repairs. 87.2 % of the repairs were made with mesh. There was no mortality in the series, complications were minor, and 85.7 % of patients remained less than 24 h in the center. There was a 2.8 % of recurrence, with a follow-up 58.7 % of the patients in the first year. 5014 DALYs were avoided, and the average of the avoided DALYs per patient was of 5.41. Hernia repair with mesh in low development countries is a procedure with low morbidity and high effectiveness that can prevent a large number of DALYs.

  1. Parastomal Hernia Repair and Reinforcement: The Role of Biologic and Synthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gillern, Suzanne; Bleier, Joshua I. S.

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a prevalent problem and treatment can pose difficulties due to significant rates of recurrence and morbidities of the repair. The current standard of care is to perform parastomal hernia repair with mesh whenever possible. There exist multiple options for mesh reinforcement (biologic and synthetic) as well as surgical techniques, to include type of repair (keyhole and Sugarbaker) and position of mesh placement (onlay, sublay, or intraperitoneal). The sublay and intraperitoneal positions have been shown to be superior with a lower incidence of recurrence. This procedure may be performed open or laparoscopically, both having similar recurrence and morbidity results. Prophylactic mesh placement at the time of stoma formation has been shown to significantly decrease the rates of parastomal hernia formation. PMID:25435825

  2. New injectable elastomeric biomaterials for hernia repair and their biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Skrobot, J; Zair, L; Ostrowski, M; El Fray, M

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with implantation of polymeric hernia meshes remain a difficult surgical challenge. We report here on our work, developing for the first time, an injectable viscous material that can be converted to a solid and elastic implant in vivo, thus successfully closing herniated tissue. In this study, long-chain fatty acids were used for the preparation of telechelic macromonomers end-capped with methacrylic functionalities to provide UV curable systems possessing high biocompatibility, good mechanical strength and flexibility. Two different systems, comprising urethane and ester bonds, were synthesized from non-toxic raw materials and then subjected to UV curing after injection of viscous material into the cavity at the abdominal wall during hernioplasty in a rabbit hernia model. No additional fixation or sutures were required. The control group of animals was treated with commercially available polypropylene hernia mesh. The observation period lasted for 28 days. We show here that artificially fabricated defect was healed and no reherniation was observed in the case of the fatty acid derived materials. Importantly, the number of inflammatory cells found in the surrounding tissue was comparable to these found around the standard polypropylene mesh. No inflammatory cells were detected in connective tissues and no sign of necrosis has been observed. Collectively, our results demonstrated that new injectable and photocurable systems can be used for minimally invasive surgical protocols in repair of small hernia defects.

  3. Multi-directional mechanical analysis of synthetic scaffolds for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Est, Savannah; Roen, Madeleine; Chi, Tingying; Simien, Adrian; Castile, Ryan M; Thompson, Dominic M; Blatnik, Jeffrey A; Deeken, Corey R; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-02-09

    Hernias remain one of the most common ailments to affect men and women worldwide. Surgical mesh materials were first used to reinforce hernia defects during surgery in the late 1950s (Laker, n.d.). Today, there are well over 50 prosthetic meshes available for hernia repair (Brown and Finch, 2010; Bryan et al., 2014; Hope and El-hayek, 2014). With the multitude of available options, surgeons are faced with the challenging task of optimizing mesh selection for each patient. If the mechanics of the mesh are not compatible with the surrounding tissue, mismatch can occur, which can lead to complications such as mesh failure and/or hernia recurrence. Unfortunately, many aspects of synthetic mesh mechanics remain poorly described. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to provide a more complete mechanical analysis of a variety of commercially available prosthetic meshes for hernia repair, including evaluation of meshes in a variety of orientations. Twenty different meshes were subjected to biaxial tensile tests at both 90° and 45° orientations, and results were analyzed for relative strength, strain behavior, and anisotropy. Peak tension and strain values varied dramatically across all mesh types for all directions, ranging between 4.08 and 25.74N/cm and -5% to 10% strain. Anisotropy ratios for the evaluated meshes ranged from 0.33 to 1.89, demonstrating a wide range in relative direction-dependence of mesh mechanics. While further study of prosthetic meshes and better characterization of properties of the human abdominal wall are needed, results of this study provide valuable data that may aid clinicians in optimizing mesh selection for specific patients and repair conditions.

  4. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with primary fascial closure versus bridged repair: a risk-adjusted comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wennergren, John Emil; Askenasy, Erik P; Greenberg, Jacob A; Holihan, Julie; Keith, Jerrod; Liang, Mike K; Martindale, Robert G; Trott, Skylar; Plymale, Margaret; Roth, John Scott

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopy, specifically the bridged mesh technique, is a popular means used for ventral hernia repair. While laparoscopy has decreased the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI), hernia recurrence rates remain unchanged. Some surgeons advocate laparoscopic primary fascial closure (PFC) with placement of intraperitoneal mesh to decrease recurrence rates. We hypothesize that in patients undergoing laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR), PFC compared to a bridged mesh repair decreases hernia recurrence rates. A multicenter, retrospective database of all ventral hernia repairs performed from 2010-2012 was accessed. Patients who underwent LVHR with mesh were reviewed. Patients who had PFC were compared to bridged repair. Primary outcome was hernia recurrence determined by clinical examination or CT scan. Secondary outcomes included SSI and seroma formation. A total of 1594 patients were identified. Following exclusion, a total of 196 patients were left who underwent LVHR with a mean follow-up period of 17.5 months. Ninety-seven patients underwent PFC, while 99 underwent bridged repairs. Initial comparisons between both groups was negative for any significant statistical difference in terms of recurrence, seroma formation, SSI, deep/organ space SSI, reoperation, and readmission. The same initial findings held true during subgroup analysis. Propensity score analysis was then performed for recurrence, seroma, and SSI controlling for age, gender, immune status, ASA class, BMI, smoking status, and acute repair. No statistically significant differences were identified in either group. Primary fascial closure during laparoscopic hernia repairs did not result in reduced recurrence, seroma, and SSI as compared to bridge repairs in a retrospective, multi-institutional study. However, additional research is needed to further evaluate benefits to the patient in terms of pain, function, cosmesis, and overall satisfaction. Randomized, blinded, control trials should focus on

  5. Changes in the Frequencies of Abdominal Wall Hernias and the Preferences for Their Repair: A Multicenter National Study From Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şeker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Öztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Çakmak, Atıl; Karateke, Faruk; Özdoğan, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorgancı, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Aydın, İbrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, İzzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalaycı, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demirağ, Alp; Kesicioğlu, Tuğrul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündoğdu, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%.1–3 As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world.4 Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic),5,6 the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional),7,8 and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes).9,10 PMID:25216417

  6. Right-sided diaphragmatic rupture after repair of a large Morgagni hernia.

    PubMed

    Schiergens, T S; Koch, J G; Khalil, P N; Graser, A; Zügel, N P; Jauch, K-W; Kleespies, A

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of a combination of primary and secondary diaphragmatic hernia in a 63-year male patient. For progressive dyspnea and palpitations caused by a large and symptomatic Morgagni hernia resulting in a right-sided enterothorax, an open tension-free mesh repair was performed. The postoperative course was complicated by a secondary hepatothorax through a spontaneous rupture of the right diaphragm. Primary mesh repair of the Morgagni hernia, however, proved to be sufficient. This recurrent herniation might be a consequence of (1) preexisting atrophy of the right diaphragm caused by disposition and/or long-term diaphragmatic dysfunction due to the large hernia, combined with (2) further thinning out of the diaphragm by intraoperative hernia sac resection, and (3) postoperative increase of intra-abdominal pressure.

  7. Prevention of Parastomal Hernia Using Pre-peritoneal Mesh - Long Term Outcome of a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, A; Marimuthu, K; Mathew, G

    2015-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a frequent complication after stoma formation. The objective of this prospective study was to find long-term outcome of prophylactic mesh placement in the pre-peritoneal space in order to prevent parastomal hernia. Patients undergoing elective formation of permanent stoma were included in the study. A polypropylene mesh was placed in the pre-peritoneal space without any anchoring stitches and bowel was taken out through a central circular hole made in the mesh. These patients were followed up for 5 years-by clinical examination and CT scan when needed. A total of 42 patients were included in the study. These patients were followed up for a median period of 60 months (range 32-100 months). Twelve patients died before the 5-year follow up due to causes unrelated to stoma. As two patients were unable to be contacted, 28 patients remained in the long-term follow up. Three cases of parastomal hernia were detected after 5 years. None of these patients required repairing of the parastomal hernia. However, a previous study conducted 3 years ago found 4 cases of parastomal hernia that was treated by resiting the stomas. Therefore the total number of parastomal hernia detected in our series is 7 (incidence 25%). Putting a pre-peritoneal polypropylene mesh is an easy, quick and inexpensive method, and easy to learn. The outcome is better than creating stomas without mesh, but further studies are needed to explore potential benefits of different types of mesh and their methods of positioning and anchoring. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  8. Prevention of Parastomal Hernia Using Pre-peritoneal Mesh - Long Term Outcome of a Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, A; Marimuthu, K; Mathew, G

    2015-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a frequent complication after stoma formation. The objective of this prospective study was to find long-term outcome of prophylactic mesh placement in the pre-peritoneal space in order to prevent parastomal hernia. Patients undergoing elective formation of permanent stoma were included in the study. A polypropylene mesh was placed in the pre-peritoneal space without any anchoring stitches and bowel was taken out through a central circular hole made in the mesh. These patients were followed up for 5 years-by clinical examination and CT scan when needed. A total of 42 patients were included in the study. These patients were followed up for a median period of 60 months (range 32-100 months). Twelve patients died before the 5-year follow up due to causes unrelated to stoma. As two patients were unable to be contacted, 28 patients remained in the long-term follow up. Three cases of parastomal hernia were detected after 5 years. None of these patients required repairing of the parastomal hernia. However, a previous study conducted 3 years ago found 4 cases of parastomal hernia that was treated by resiting the stomas. Therefore the total number of parastomal hernia detected in our series is 7 (incidence 25%). Putting a pre-peritoneal polypropylene mesh is an easy, quick and inexpensive method, and easy to learn. The outcome is better than creating stomas without mesh, but further studies are needed to explore potential benefits of different types of mesh and their methods of positioning and anchoring.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of alternative methods of surgical repair of inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Vale, Luke; Grant, Adrian; McCormack, Kirsty; Scott, Neil W

    2004-01-01

    To assess the relative cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic methods of inguinal hernia repair compared with open flat mesh and open non-mesh repair. Data on the effectiveness of these alternatives came from three systematic reviews comparing: (i) laparoscopic methods with open flat mesh or non-mesh methods; (ii) open flat mesh with open non-mesh repair; and (iii) methods that used synthetic mesh to repair the hernia defect with those that did not. Data on costs were obtained from the authors of economic evaluations previously conducted alongside trials included in the reviews. A Markov model was used to model cost-effectiveness for a five-year period after the initial operation. The outcomes of the model were presented using a balance sheet approach and as cost per hernia recurrence avoided and cost per extra day at usual activities. Open flat mesh was the most cost-effective method of preventing recurrences. Laparoscopic repair provided a shorter period of convalescence and less long-term pain compared with open flat mesh but was more costly. The mean incremental cost per additional day back at usual activities compared with open flat mesh was Euro 38 and Euro 80 for totally extraperitoneal and transabdominal preperitoneal repair, respectively. Laparoscopic repair is not cost-effective compared with open flat mesh repair in terms of cost per recurrence avoided. Decisions about the use of laparoscopic repair depend on whether the benefits (reduced pain and earlier return to usual activities) outweigh the extra costs and intraoperative risks. On the evidence presented here, these extra costs are unlikely to be offset by the short-term benefits of laparoscopic repair.

  10. Strangulated Groin Hernia Repair: A New Approach for All

    PubMed Central

    Goud, Vallabhdas Srinivas; Kumar, Dodda Ramesh; Reddy, Bande Karunakar; Boda, Kumara Swamy; Madipeddi, Venkanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The available classical approaches for Groin hernia are multiple. The change of approach with change of incision is needed with these approaches when the bowel is gangrenous. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new approach for all strangulated groin hernias (inguinal, femoral and obturator), in terms of change of approach/complications. Materials and Methods It was conducted in surgical unit-2 of MGM Hospital, Kakatiya Medical College Warangal, Telangana State, India, from Nov 2000 to Oct 2010. Total 52 patients operated with classical approach were compared with 52 patients operated present new approach. All the cases (52+52) were with gangrenous bowel which required resection and end to end anastomosis of bowel. All the cases (52+52) were managed with mesh repair and the results were analysed. Results In classical approach: Three cases required laparotomy (5.7%). Twelve cases required change of approach with change of incision (23%). Eight cases developed wound infection after mesh repair (15%). Four cases required removal of mesh (7.6%). Two Cases developed recurrence (3.8%). In present new approach: No laparotomy (0%), no change of incision (0%), no removal of mesh (0%) and no recurrence(0%). Only 2 cases (3.8%) developed wound infection at lateral part of incision ie. p<0.05. Conclusion This new approach for all - gives a best approach for strangulated groin hernias as it is easy to follow. It obviates the change of incision and need for a laparotomy. It further retains normal anatomy, prevents contamination of the inguinal canal and permits a mesh repair leading to decreasing the chances of recurrence. PMID:27190878

  11. Integrating a novel shape memory polymer into surgical meshes to improve device performance during laparoscopic hernia surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimkowski, Michael M.

    About 600,000 hernia repair surgeries are performed each year. The use of laparoscopic minimally invasive techniques has become increasingly popular in these operations. Use of surgical mesh in hernia repair has shown lower recurrence rates compared to other repair methods. However in many procedures, placement of surgical mesh can be challenging and even complicate the procedure, potentially leading to lengthy operating times. Various techniques have been attempted to improve mesh placement, including use of specialized systems to orient the mesh into a specific shape, with limited success and acceptance. In this work, a programmed novel Shape Memory Polymer (SMP) was integrated into commercially available polyester surgical meshes to add automatic unrolling and tissue conforming functionalities, while preserving the intrinsic structural properties of the original surgical mesh. Tensile testing and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was performed on four different SMP formulas to identify appropriate mechanical properties for surgical mesh integration. In vitro testing involved monitoring the time required for a modified surgical mesh to deploy in a 37°C water bath. An acute porcine model was used to test the in vivo unrolling of SMP integrated surgical meshes. The SMP-integrated surgical meshes produced an automated, temperature activated, controlled deployment of surgical mesh on the order of several seconds, via laparoscopy in the animal model. A 30 day chronic rat model was used to test initial in vivo subcutaneous biocompatibility. To produce large more clinical relevant sizes of mesh, a mold was developed to facilitate manufacturing of SMP-integrated surgical mesh. The mold is capable of manufacturing mesh up to 361 cm2, which is believed to accommodate the majority of clinical cases. Results indicate surgical mesh modified with SMP is capable of laparoscopic deployment in vivo, activated by body temperature, and possesses the necessary strength and

  12. Bilateral inguinal hernias: simultaneous or sequential repair?

    PubMed Central

    Stott, M. A.; Sutton, R.; Royle, G. T.

    1988-01-01

    Two hundred and forty four patients underwent either simultaneous bilateral inguinal hernia repair (n = 122) or unilateral inguinal hernia (n = 122) repair at a general hospital between January 1971 and December 1981. The two groups of patients were matched for age and sex. Both groups had a similar overall incidence of post-operative complications and in both groups the duration of post-operative stay and duration of operating time were similar. Chest infections developed in 12 patients after bilateral repair and in 3 patients after unilateral repair (P less than 0.02). All patients were assessed prospectively from 4 to 15 years after operation, when no significant difference in the number of recurrent hernias was found. Our results suggest that simultaneous bilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy is economical in terms of both operating time and duration of hospital stay, and that this economy is not bought at a cost of increased short term morbidity or long-term recurrence rate. PMID:3200778

  13. Two-stage laparoscopic treatment for strangulated inguinal, femoral and obturator hernias: totally extraperitoneal repair followed by intestinal resection assisted by intraperitoneal laparoscopic exploration.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, A; Takeuchi, Y; Izumi, K; Morimoto, A; Inomata, M; Kitano, S

    2016-06-01

    Total extraperitoneal preperitoneal (TEP) repair is widely used for inguinal, femoral, or obturator hernia treatment. However, mesh repair is not often used for strangulated hernia treatment if intestinal resection is required because of the risk of postoperative mesh infection. Complete mesh repair is required for hernia treatment to prevent postoperative recurrence, particularly in patients with femoral or obturator hernia. We treated four patients with inguinocrural and obturator hernias (a 72-year-old male with a right indirect inguinal hernia; an 83-year-old female with a right obturator hernia; and 86- and 82-year-old females with femoral hernias) via a two-stage laparoscopic surgery. All patients were diagnosed with intestinal obstruction due to strangulated hernia. First, the incarcerated small intestine was released and then laparoscopically resected. Further, 8-24 days after the first surgery, bilateral TEP repairs were performed in all patients; the postoperative course was uneventful in all patients, and they were discharged 5-10 days after TEP repair. At present, no hernia recurrence has been reported in any patient. The two-stage laparoscopic treatment is safe for treatment of strangulated inguinal, femoral, and obturator hernias, and complete mesh repair via the TEP method can be performed in elderly patients to minimize the occurrence of mesh infection.

  14. Laparoscopic repair of strangulated Morgagni hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    A 73 year old man presented with vomiting and pain due to a strangulated Morgagni hernia containing a gastric volvulus. Laparoscopic operation allowed reduction of the contents, excision of necrotic omentum and the sac, with mesh closure of the large defect. A brief review of the condition is presented along with discussion of the technique used. PMID:17935621

  15. Repair of an inguinoscrotal hernia in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    TATULLI, F.; CARAGLIA, A.; DELCURATOLO, A.; CASSANO, S.; CHETTA, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inguinal hernia repairs are routinely performed as outpatient procedures in most patients, whereas a few require admission due to clinical or social peculiarities. Muscular dystrophies are inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness. In case of surgery there is no definite recommendation for either general or regional anesthesia. Case report This contribution regards a 48 y. o. male patient diagnosed with Becker Muscular Dystrophy by muscle biopsy 10 years earlier. He had a left-sided sizable inguinoscrotal hernia with repeat episodes of incarceration. An elective mesh repair with suction drainage was accomplished under selective spinal anesthesia. The post-operative course was uneventful. Discussion A few inguinal hernia repairs require admission due to peculiarities such as extensive scrotal hernias requiring suction drainage. Muscular dystrophies are inherited disorders with no cure and no two dystrophy patients are exactly alike, therefore the health issues will be different for each individual. In case of surgery there is no definite recommendation for either general or regional anesthesia. This contribution regards the successful elective mesh repair with suction drainage of a large left-sided inguino-scrotal hernia in a 48 y. o. male patient affected by Becker muscular dystrophy by selective spinal anesthesia obtained by 10 milligrams of hyperbaric bupivacaine. Conclusion Effective mesh repair with suction drainage of large inguinal hernias under spinal anesthesia can be achieved in patients affected by muscular dystrophy. PMID:28098058

  16. Prospective randomized controlled study using polyethylene mesh for inguinal hernia meshplasty as a safe and cost-effective alternative to polypropylene mesh.

    PubMed

    Gundre, Nitin P; Iyer, Sandhya P; Subramaniyan, Prabhakar

    2012-03-01

    Most patients who come to a general hospital in a developing country are poor. The most important prohibiting factor for use of polypropylene mesh in hernia repair is its exorbitant cost. Hence, research workers have been on the lookout for an equally effective but economically affordable mesh. Worldwide, surgical repair of inguinal hernia is the most common general surgery procedure performed at the present. Lifetime risk of groin hernia is 15% in males and 5% in females. Most of the patients who visit a general hospital are from either lower middle class or poor socioeconomic strata. The most important prohibiting factor for use of polypropylene mesh in hernia repair for the common man is its exorbitant cost. The aim of this study is to document the feasibility, safety and cost-effectiveness of the use of polyethylene mesh. A single blind, prospective, randomized controlled study, comparing 35 patients of two groups was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital over a period of 5 years. The patients in both groups underwent inguinal hernioplasty, and were administered similar antibiotics and analgesics. The postoperative course with regard to pain, seroma formation, infection, hospital stay, recurrence and scar quality was evaluated and compared. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi square test. The properties of both meshes were the same with respect to ease of handling, pain score, seroma formation, infection rate, resumption of daily activities, scar quality and mesh rejection. Recurrence rate was zero for both groups. Polyethylene mesh was 2,808 times cheaper than the commercially available polypropylene mesh. This study proved the safety, simplicity, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of polyethylene mesh for inguinal hernia meshplasty, insuring economical, accessible health care for the financially weak section of the population.

  17. Quality of life following component separation versus standard open ventral hernia repair for large hernias.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Dacey, Kristian T; Lincourt, Amy E; Kercher, Kent W; Heniford, B Todd

    2014-04-01

    Component separation (CS) has become a viable alternative to repair large ventral defects when the fascia cannot be reapproximated. However, the impact of transecting the external oblique to facilitate closure of the abdomen on quality of life (QOL) has yet to be investigated. The study goal was to investigate QOL and outcomes after standard open ventral hernia repair (OVHR) versus CS for large ventral hernias. Prospective data for all CSs were reviewed and compared with matched OVHR controls. All defects were 100 to 1000 cm2 in size and repaired with mesh. Comorbidities, complications, outcomes, and Carolinas Comfort Scale (CCS) scores, were reviewed. Seventy-four CS patients were compared with 154 patients undergoing standard OVHR with similar defect sizes. Age (56.7±13.0 vs. 54.7 ± 12.3 years, P = .26), defect sizes (299 ± 160 vs. 304 ± 210 cm2, P = .87), and BMI (32.7 ± 6.9 vs. 34.2 ± 9.0 kg/m2, P = .26) were similar in both groups, respectively. There were no differences in major postoperative complications (P = .22), mesh infections (P = 1.00), wound infections (P = .07), or hernia recurrence (P = .09), but wound breakdown increased after CS (10% vs. 1%, P < .001) as did seroma interventions (15% vs. 4%, P = .005). Postoperative CCS scores were similar at 1 month (P = .82) and 1 year (P = .14). In the first comparative study of its kind, it is found that patient undergoing CS with mesh reinforcement had equal short- and long-term QOL outcomes compared with similar patients who underwent standard OVHR. Whereas wound breakdown and seroma formation are higher, the overall complication, mesh infection, and recurrence rates are similar.

  18. Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernias: a Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Boushey, Robin P.; Moloo, Husein; Burpee, Stephen; Schlachta, Christopher M.; Poulin, Eric C.; Haggar, Fatima; Trottier, Daniel C.; Mamazza, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Background The surgical approach to paraesophageal hernias (PEH) has changed with the advent of laparoscopic techniques. Variation in both perioperative outcomes and hernia recurrence rates are reported in the literature. We sought to evaluate the short-and intermediate-term outcomes with laparoscopic PEH repair. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients having laparoscopic repair of PEH between June 1998 and September 2002. We included patients with more than 120 days of follow-up. Results A total of 58 patients with a mean age of 60.4 (standard deviation [SD] 15.0) years had a laparoscopic procedure to repair a primary PEH, as well as adequate follow-up, during the study period. The types of PEH included type II (n = 13), III (n = 44) and IV (n = 1). The most common symptoms were epigastric pain (57%), dysphagia (40%), heartburn (31%) and vomiting (28%). Associated procedures included 56 (96%) Nissen fundoplications and 2 (4%) gastropexies. We closed all crural defects either with or without pledgets, and 2 patients required the use of mesh. There was 1 conversion to open surgery owing to intraoperative bleeding secondary to a consumptive coagulopathy; we observed no other major intraoperative emergencies. Minor or major complications occurred in 15 patients (26%). Late postoperative complications included 1 umbilical hernia. The mean length of stay in hospital was 3.8 (SD 2.5) days. After surgery, 19 patients were completely asymptomatic, and the majority of the remaining patients (83%) described marked symptom improvement. Upper gastrointestinal series performed in symptomatic patients in the postoperative setting identified 5 recurrent paraesophageal hernias (8.6%) and 5 small sliding hernias (9%). Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of PEH is associated with improved long-term symptom relief, low morbidity and acceptable recurrence rates when performed in an experienced centre. PMID:18841230

  19. Mechanical properties of mosquito nets in the context of hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Ambroziak, Andrzej; Szepietowska, Katarzyna; Lubowiecka, Izabela

    2016-02-01

    The paper deals with issue of applying mosquito nets as implants in hernia repair, which have already been used in resource-poor developing countries. Uniaxial tensile tests have been conducted on polyester mosquito meshes in two orthogonal directions. Non-linear elastic constitutive laws parameters have been identified to be applied in dense net material models. Mechanical performance of tested mosquito nets has been compared with properties of commercial implants used in treatment of hernia and with properties of human tissue. This study contributes to mechanical knowledge of hernia repair issue by investigation of cheaper alternative to commercial implants.

  20. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: outcomes in primary versus incisional hernias: no effect of defect closure.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, J R; Vaktskjold, A; Trondsen, E; Øyen, O M; Reiertsen, O

    2015-06-01

    Supposing divergent aetiology, we found it interesting to investigate outcomes between primary (PH) versus incisional (IH) hernias. In addition, we wanted to analyse the effect of defect closure and mesh fixation techniques. 37 patients with PH and 70 with IH were enrolled in a prospective cohort-study, treated with laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) and randomised to ± transfascial sutures. In addition, we analysed results from a retrospective study with 36 PH and 51 IH patients. Mean follow-up time was 38 months in the prospective study and 27 months in the retrospective study. 35 % of PH's and 10 % of IH's were recurrences after previous suture repair. No late infections or mesh removals occurred. Recurrence rates in the prospective study were 0 vs. 4.3 % (p = 0.55) and the complication rates were 16 vs. 27 % (p = 0.24) in favour of the PH cohort. The IH group had a mesh protrusion rate of 13 vs. 5 % in the PH group (p = 0.32), and significantly (p < 0.01) larger hernias and adhesion score, longer operating time (100 vs. 79 min) and admission time (2.8 vs. 1.6 days). Closure of the hernia defect did not influence rate of seroma, pain at 2 months, protrusion or recurrence. An overall increased complication rate was seen after defect closure (OR 3.42; CI 1.25-9.33). With PH, in comparison to IH treated with LVHR, no differences were observed regarding recurrence, protrusion or complication rates. Defect closure (raphe), when using absorbable suture, did not benefit long-term outcomes and caused a higher overall complication rate. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00455299).

  1. Bowel complications after prolene hernia system (PHS) repair: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lo, D J; Bilimoria, K Y; Pugh, C M

    2008-08-01

    The advent of mesh devices allowed for tension-free inguinal hernia repairs and a subsequent reduction in the rate of recurrences. In 1993, Rutkow and Robbins introduced the plug-and-patch repair method whereby the hernia defect is filled with a mesh plug. This new procedure led to new technique-specific complications. Here, we report the case of a man who presented with obstructive symptoms and pain at the site of his inguinal hernia repair performed with the Prolene Hernia System((R)) 18 months prior. At laparotomy, he was found to have a small bowel obstruction and perforation due to mesh contact with the small bowel and colon. The literature is reviewed for cases of bowel complications due to mesh plugs. Based on reported complications, three recommendations can be made to avoid or reduce the risk of this complication. First, the pre-peritoneal dissection should be performed carefully with particular attention to identify and repair any tears of the peritoneum. Secondly, the mesh plug should not be placed too deep within the defect. Finally, the plug should be secured to reduce the possibility of mesh migration.

  2. Meshless treatment of open inguinal hernia repair: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Paulo; Franciulli, Ettore Ferrari; Wroclawski, Carolina Kassab; Ilias, Elias Jirjoss; Castro, Osvaldo Antônio Prado; Malheiros, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate two types of meshless open inguinal repair and to evaluate the recurrence rate. Methods: We operated on sequentially 98 men and 15 women with 144 unilateral or bilateral inguinal hernias between December 1988 and April 2007. The surgeries were performed by two experienced surgeons and divided into two groups: Bassini or McVay reconstructive surgery techniques. Bassini type reinforcements were employed for Nyhus II and IIIB with minor destruction of the posterior wall. Patients with Nyhus type IIIA, type IIIB with major destruction of the fascia transversalis, and type IIIC were subjected to the McVay technique. Results: Seventy-five hernias were corrected using the McVay technique. Only two recurrences (2.67%) were observed in this group. For group Bassini, two recurrences for 69 hernias (2.89%) were observed (p=0.658). Mean age for the recurrent group was 56 years. No differences were observed between the ages of males and females (52 years). Conclusions: Non-mesh repair in inguinal hernia can be safely used if performed by experienced surgeons. PMID:23843059

  3. Bilateral Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal Repair Without Mesh Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Brandon; Johna, Samir; Yamanishi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Mesh fixation during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair is thought to be necessary to prevent recurrence. However, mesh fixation may increase postoperative chronic pain. This study aimed to describe the experience of a single surgeon at our institution performing this operation. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of all patients who underwent bilateral laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair without mesh fixation for inguinal hernia from January 2005 to December 2011. Demographic, operative, and postoperative data were obtained for analysis. Results: A total of 343 patients underwent simultaneous bilateral laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair of 686 primary and recurrent inguinal hernias from January 2005 to December 2011. The mean operative time was 33 minutes. One patient was converted to an open approach (0.3%), and 1 patient had intraoperative bladder injury. Postoperative hematoma/seroma occurred in 5 patients (1.5%), wound infection in 1 (0.3%), hematuria in 2 (0.6%), and acute myocardial infarction in 1 (0.3%). Chronic pain developed postoperatively in 9 patients (2.6%); 3 of them underwent re-exploration. All patients were discharged home a few hours after surgery except for 3 patients. Among the 686 hernia repairs, there were a total of 20 recurrences (2.9%) in 18 patients (5.2%). Two patients had bilateral recurrences, whereas 16 had unilateral recurrences. Twelve of the recurrences occurred after 1 year (60%). Fourteen recurrences occurred among direct hernias (70%). Conclusion: Compared with the literature, our patients had fewer intraoperative and postoperative complications, less chronic pain, and no increase in operative time or length of hospital stay but had a slight increase in recurrence rate. PMID:25392633

  4. Laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia with mesenterioaxial volvulus of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Kazuki; Sakurai, Yoichi; Isogaki, Jun; Komori, Yoshiyuki; Uyama, Ichiro

    2011-04-21

    Although mesenterioaxial gastric volvulus is an uncommon entity characterized by rotation at the transverse axis of the stomach, laparoscopic repair procedures have still been controversial. We reported a case of mesenterioaxial intrathoracic gastric volvulus, which was successfully treated with laparoscopic repair of the diaphragmatic hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication. A 70-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital because of sudden onset of upper abdominal pain. An upper gastrointestinal series revealed an incarcerated intrathoracic mesenterioaxial volvulus of the distal portion of the stomach and the duodenum. The complete laparoscopic approach was used to repair the volvulus. The laparoscopic procedures involved the repair of the hiatal hernia using polytetrafluoroethylene mesh and Toupet fundoplication. This case highlights the feasibility and effectiveness of the laparoscopic procedure, and laparoscopic repair of the hiatal defect using a polytetrafluoroethylene mesh associated with Toupet fundoplication may be useful for preventing postoperative recurrence of hiatal hernia, volvulus, and gastroesophageal reflux.

  5. Suction test to demonstrate the peritoneal edge during laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Christopher; Free, Jason; Gananadha, Sivakumar; Hugh, Thomas J; Samra, Jaswinder S

    2013-11-01

    Inadequate peritoneal dissection from retroperitoneal structures may account for a large number of hernia recurrences amongst surgeons and trainees who are new to totally extraperitoneal (TEP) laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. In this paper, we describe a simple dynamic test that allows surgeons to better appreciate the peritoneal edge during the initial dissection phase of TEP inguinal hernia repair, allowing for more adequate dissection of the peritoneum from retroperitoneal structures before placement of mesh. Data from a single surgeon was collected on 113 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney. The data was retrospectively reviewed to determine the number of cases in which the suction test led to further peritoneal dissection prior to mesh placement. After balloon dissection of the pre-peritoneal space and initial dissection of peritoneum and sac from retroperitoneal structures, a laparoscopic suction device is used to aspirate the insufflated gas from the pre-peritoneal space to cause the peritoneum to bulge anteriorly, thus demonstrating the edge of the peritoneal reflection. Further dissection is performed if deemed necessary at this point, and the mesh is placed over the hernia defect. 136 TEP hernia repairs were performed in 113 patients. In 26 (23 %) of patients, the abovementioned technique was of particular value resulting in further dissection of peritoneum prior to mesh placement. There were no complications as a direct result of the test. This dynamic suction test is a risk-free and useful operative tool for surgeons and trainees who are new to TEP inguinal hernia repair, and provides a definitive way of identifying the peritoneal reflection to ensure the peritoneum has been dissected adequately prior to mesh placement.

  6. Ventral Hernia Repair: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Holihan, Julie L; Hannon, Craig; Goodenough, Christopher; Flores-Gonzalez, Juan R; Itani, Kamal M; Olavarria, Oscar; Mo, Jiandi; Ko, Tien C; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    From the patient's perspective, a ventral hernia (VH) can cause pain, adversely affect function, increase size, cosmetically distort the abdomen, and incarcerate/strangulate abdominal contents. The only known "cure" for a VH is surgical repair. The aim of this study was to review systematically the published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the surgical care of VH. A search of the Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed to obtain reports of RCTs on the use of mesh reinforcement in abdominal wall hernia repair. The outcomes assessed were hernia recurrence and surgical site infection (SSI). The overall quality of evidence was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). When feasible, based on assessment of heterogeneity, data were pooled and analyzed in a meta-analysis. Of the 10,349 titles screened, 25 articles (23 studies) met the search criteria. Evidence indicates that mesh reinforcement in clean cases can decrease hernia recurrence (number needed to treat = 7.9) but increase risk of SSI (number needed to harm = 27.8). Placing mesh in the sublay position (as opposed to the onlay or underlay position) may decrease the risk of hernia recurrence and SSI. Mesh reinforcement is recommended for all VH repairs in a clean case (high grade of evidence). Sublay mesh location may result in fewer recurrences and SSIs than onlay or inlay placement, but further study is needed to confirm this hypothesis (moderate grade of evidence).

  7. [Late vaginal mesh exposure after prolapse repair].

    PubMed

    Chanelles, O; Poncelet, C

    2010-12-01

    Mesh exposure is the major complication of vaginal prolapse repair. Incidence rates are variable according to the series. Mesh exposure usually occurs during the year following the intervention. We report here the first case of a patient with a late exposure of an anterior vaginal mesh 4 years after a surgical cystocele repair. The mesh has been easily removed at the operative theatre by vaginal approach.

  8. Plugoma: CT findings after prosthetic plug inguinal hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Aganovic, Lejla; Ishioka, Kevin M; Hughes Cassidy, Fiona; Chu, Pauline K; Cosman, Bard C

    2010-10-01

    Unrecognized CT findings of a prosthetic plug used in inguinal hernia repair can lead to incorrect diagnosis or unnecessary workup of a patient. The objective of this study is to review the expected CT findings present in patients with a history of plug repair. Retrospective cohort study retrieving clinical and image data from a single-institution database. Patients who underwent prosthetic plug hernia repair during a 5-year period at our institution had their records queried for subsequent abdominal CT scans. These CT scans were reviewed by 2 radiologists for findings referable to the hernia repair. Five-hundred and sixty-four consecutive patients underwent prosthetic plug hernia repair during a 5-year period. Fifty-one patients who had had 55 surgical procedures had subsequent CT scans, none in the early postoperative period. Readers identified 100% of the plugs, 68% of which were described as round or oval in shape. All the plugs were in close proximity to the inferior epigastric artery and were of low density on CT images. Surgical scar was identifiable in 87% of patients. Thirty-two patients (63%) had a second CT scan, demonstrating no change in size and location of the plugoma. A prosthetic mesh plug is easily seen on CT images, typically appearing as a smooth round or oval hypodense mass close to the inferior epigastric artery, deep to a surgical scar, and stable over time. It can usually be distinguished from pathologic findings. It is important that the radiologist be familiar with the patient's surgical history when interpreting these images. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Incidence of pain after inguinal hernia repair in the elderly. A retrospective historical cohort evaluation of 18-years’ experience with a mesh & plug inguinal hernia repair method on about 3000 patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain after prosthetic inguinal hernioplasty is one of the most important current issues in the current literature debate. Mechanisms related to pain development are only partially known. Influence of age as well as other factors is still unclear. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether development of chronic pain after open prosthetic plug and mesh inguinal hernioplasty is influenced by age. Methods Analysis was retrospectively conducted, dividing our cohort of patients (2,902) who had undergone prosthetic open plug&mesh inguinal hernioplasty from Jannuary 1994 to May 2012, following only the age criterion (cut-off 65 yrs.), into two groups (Gr.A<65 yrs, Gr.B>65 yrs.). All patients were routinely submitted to a postoperative questionnaire. Complications such as analgesic assumption were registered in both groups. Pain intensity was classified following the Visual Analogic Scale (VAS). Incidence of chronic pain, discomfort, and numbness, was assessed in both groups. Statistical significance was assessed by X2-test. Results Only 0.2% of patients suffered from a recurrence in our cohort. Postoperative chronic pain was observed in Gr. A in 0.12% of patients vs Gr.B 0.09% (p>0.05). Incidence of other postoperative symptoms such as discomfort or numbness were slightly prevalent on young patients (respectively p = 0.0286 and p = 0.01), while for hyperesthesia and sensation of foreign body no statistically significant difference of incidence between groups was observed. Conclusions Real chronic pain after inguinal hernioplasty is a rare clinical entity. Other causes of chronic pain should be accurately researched and excluded. In young patients psychological factors seem to show a slight influence. There was no influence of age on chronic postoperative pain incidence after inguinal hernioplasty. PMID:24268023

  10. Prospective analysis of ventral hernia repair using the Ventralight™ ST hernia patch.

    PubMed

    Tollens, Tim; Topal, Halit; Ovaere, Sander; Beunis, Anthony; Vermeiren, Koen; Aelvoet, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current prospective study was to show the results of a new type of medium-weight monofilament polypropylene mesh covered with a hydrogel barrier on the visceral side. Between July 2011 and April 2013 prospectively collected data on 30 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal wall hernia repair using a medium-weight mesh covered with carboxymethylcellulose-sodiumhyaluronate coating (Ventralight™ ST mesh, Davol Inc, Subsidary of C. R. Bard, Inc. Warwick, RI) were analyzed. Out of these patients, those who had a follow-up of at least 12 months were selected. Short- and long-term outcomes were described. Meanwhile, registration continues up to completion of a series with 100 included patients. A total of 17 patients were selected (men/women ratio 11/6). Median follow-up was 12 months (range 12-21). Mean hernia diameter was 7 cm x 5 cm (craniocaudal x laterolateral) (range 1.5 x 1.5 to 20 x 15). Mean length of hospital stay was 6.1 days. Postoperative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at last follow-up was significantly lower than the preoperative VAS (P = 0.017) There were no intraoperative complications. Four patients (23%) developed minor complications. Two patients had mild discomfort, another two patients developed a seroma. No recurrences were observed. This intermediate study shows good results using a biofilm coated mesh and confirm the positive results obtained in the Sasse clinical trial.

  11. Totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using a self-expanding nitinol framed hernia repair device: A prospective case series.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Mathieu; Nuytens, Frederiek; Yoshihara, Emi; Adriaens, Els; Vansteenkiste, Franky; Pottel, Hans

    2017-04-01

    The use of a self-expanding nitinol framed prosthesis (ReboundHRD(®)) for totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (TEP-IHR) could solve issues of mesh shrinkage and associated pain. We prospectively evaluated the use of the ReboundHRD(®) mesh for TEP-IHR. All patients who underwent a TEP-IHR using the ReboundHRD(®) Large mesh from April 2014 till May 2015, were included. No mesh fixation was performed. Follow-up assessments were performed at the day of surgery, 1, 2, and 7 days, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Outcome measures include post-operative pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), operative details, complications, and recurrence rate. In total, 69 TEP-IHR procedures were performed in 54 patients (15 bilateral hernias). No perioperative and 5 (9%) postoperative complications occurred, all graded Clavien-Dindo I-II. The median length of stay was 1 day (range 0-3), with 78% of the operations performed in an ambulatory setting. Median VAS score decreased from 3 (range 0-4) on the day of surgery to 1 (range 0-2) on day 7. Patients were completely pain-free at a median time of 5 (range 1-60) days. The majority (80.4%, 37/46) of the active patients went back to work within 2 weeks (maximum 6 weeks). At a median follow-up of 19 months (range 16-26 months), no recurrences occurred. TEP-IHR using a self-expanding nitinol framed hernia repair device is a safe technique in longterm follow-up. The technique is associated with a low incidence of postoperative pain, a short hospital stay and quick return to normal activities. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Does topical rifampicin reduce the risk of surgical field infection in hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Kahramanca, Şahin; Kaya, Oskay; Azılı, Cem; Celep, Bahadır; Gökce, Emre; Küçükpınar, Tevfik

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Inguinal hernia operations are common procedures in general surgery. There have been many approaches in the historical development of hernia repair; tension free repair with mesh being the most commonly used technique today. Although it is a clean wound, antibiotic use is still controversial due to concerns about infection related to synthetic mesh. We aimed to determine the probable role of topical rifampicin in patients with tension-free hernia repair and mesh support. Material and Methods: The charts of patients who underwent tension-free inguinal hernia repair were retrospectively analyzed. Information and operative notes on patients, in whom synthetic materials were used, were identified. The patients were divided into two groups, placebo group (G1) and patients with application of topical rifampicin on the mesh (G2). Infection rates between the groups in the early postoperative period were compared. Results: The mean age of the 278 patients who were included in the study was 49.6±15.39 and the female/male ratio was 10/268. There were recurrent hernias in four patients and superficial wound infections in 22 patients in the early period. One patient had testicle torsion and underwent an orchiectomy. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age and gender. The types of hernia and body mass index were homogenous between the two groups. In the early postoperative period the infection rates were 16/144 (11.1%) and 6/134 (4.48%) in the groups, respectively, with the difference being statistically significant (p=0.041). Conclusion: We suggest that applying rifampicin locally can decrease surgical site infection in hernia operations where meshes are used. PMID:25931846

  13. Local and General Anesthesia in the Laparoscopic Preperitoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ferzli, George

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach (EXTRA) has been shown to be an effective and safe repair for primary (PIH), recurrent (RIH) and bilateral hernia (BIH). There is very little data examining the merits of laparoscopic repair for hernias under local anesthesia. In this paper, we compare EXTRA performed under both general and local anesthesia. Methods: This nonrandomized prospective study was performed selectively on a male population only. Patients with associated pulmonary disease and high risk for general surgery were selected. Patients with recurrence and previous abdominal operations were excluded to decrease confounding variables in the study. A Prolene mesh was used in all patients. Results: Between May 1997 and September 1998, 92 male patients underwent the repair of 107 groin hernias using the EXTRA technique. The procedure was explained to them, and different anesthesia options were given. Fourteen of these repairs were performed under local anesthesia and 93 under general anesthesia. Of the 10 patients who underwent a repair under local anesthesia, there were 8 indirect, 5 direct and 1 pantaloon. The mean age was 53 years. In the group of general anesthesia, the types of hernias repaired were 45 indirect, 30 direct and 11 pantaloon. The mean age was 45 years. The mean follow-up was 15 months. Each patient was sent home the same day. Two peritoneal tears were recorded in the first group. The operative time was longer in the local group (47 ± 11 vs 18 ± 3). None of the patients required conversion to an open technique or change of anesthesia. No recurrences were found in either group. The average time of return to work and regular activity was 3.5 ± 1 and 3 ± 1 days, respectively. Conclusion: There appears to be no significant difference in recurrence and complication rates when the EXTRA is performed under local anesthesia as compared to general. Blunt dissection of the preperitoneal space does not trigger pain and does not require

  14. Patient satisfaction, chronic pain, and quality of life after elective incisional hernia repair: effects of recurrence and repair technique.

    PubMed

    Snyder, C W; Graham, L A; Vick, C C; Gray, S H; Finan, K R; Hawn, M T

    2011-04-01

    To determine the effects of repair technique and hernia recurrence on patient-reported outcomes after incisional hernia repair. This cohort study included patients from sixteen Veteran's Affairs Medical Centers across the United States who underwent elective incisional hernia repair between 1997 and 2002. Technical details and outcomes (repair type and recurrence status) were determined by physician chart review. Patient satisfaction, chronic pain (McGill pain scale and visual analogue scale), and health-related quality of life (Short Form 36) were evaluated with a mailed survey at a median of five years after repair. Multivariable regression modeling was performed to evaluate the effect of repair type and recurrence status on patient-reported outcomes. Of 854 patients alive at the time of survey mailing, 371 responded (43.4%). Patients with active recurrence were more likely to be dissatisfied with their results (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, P < 0.0001), to have chronic sensory hernia site pain (OR 3.2, P = 0.01), to report disturbance from pain (OR 2.1, P = 0.04), and to have significantly worse quality of life on the Physical Function, General Health, and Physical Component Score domains. Repair technique with permanent mesh versus suture had no independent effect on patient satisfaction, chronic pain, or QOL. Recurrence has a substantial negative effect on patient-reported outcomes after incisional hernia repair, whereas the repair technique has no independent effect.

  15. The use of T-bars in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Saiz, A A; Paul, D; Willis, I H; Sivina, M

    1996-04-01

    During the past 2 years 15 laparoscopic ventral hernias have been performed at our Community Hospital. Marlex mesh has been the material used. We have noticed some difficulty with the grasping and initial anchoring of the mesh. Percutaneously placed prolene sutures allow the mesh to be drawn upward with some effort. By using laparoscopic T-bars for the initial anchoring of the mesh to the anterior abdominal wall then stapling, the operative time was greatly reduced. This modification in technique allows for quicker placement of the mesh during the repair.

  16. Incidental Non-Inguinals Hernias in Totally Extra-Peritoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Old, OJ; Kulkarni, SR; Hardy, TJ; Slim, FJ; Emerson, LG; Bulbulia, RA; Whyman, MR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair allows identification and repair of incidental non-inguinal groin hernias. We assessed the prevalence of incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair and identified the risk factors for incidental hernias. Materials and Methods Consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair from May 2005 to November 2012 were the study cohort. Inspection for ipsilateral femoral, obturator and rarer varieties of hernia was undertaken during TEP repair. Patient characteristics and operative findings were recorded on a prospectively collected database. Results A total of 1,532 TEP repairs were undertaken in 1,196 patients. Ninety-three patients were excluded due to incomplete data, leaving 1,103 patients and 1,404 hernias for analyses (1,380 male; 802 unilateral and 301 bilateral repairs; median age, 59 years). Among the 37 incidental hernias identified (2.6% of cases), the most common type of incidental hernia was femoral (n=32, 2.3%) followed by obturator (n=2, 0.1%). Increasing age was associated with an increased risk of incidental hernia, with a significant linear trend (p<0.01). The risk for patients >60 years of age was 4.0% vs 1.4% for those aged <60 years (p<0.01). Incidental hernias were found in 29.2% of females vs 2.2% of males, (p<0.0001). Risk of incidental hernia in those with a recurrent inguinal hernia was 3.0% vs 2.6% for primary repair (p=0.79). Conclusions Incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair were found in 2.6% of cases and, though infrequent, could cause complications if left untreated. The risk of incidental hernia increased with age and was significantly higher in patients aged >60 years and in females. PMID:25723688

  17. Incidental non-inguinals hernias in totally extra-peritoneal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Old, O J; Kulkarni, S R; Hardy, T J; Slim, F J; Emerson, L G; Bulbulia, R A; Whyman, M R; Poskitt, K R

    2015-03-01

    Totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair allows identification and repair of incidental non-inguinal groin hernias. We assessed the prevalence of incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair and identified the risk factors for incidental hernias. Consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair from May 2005 to November 2012 were the study cohort. Inspection for ipsilateral femoral, obturator and rarer varieties of hernia was undertaken during TEP repair. Patient characteristics and operative findings were recorded on a prospectively collected database. A total of 1,532 TEP repairs were undertaken in 1,196 patients. Ninety-three patients were excluded due to incomplete data, leaving 1,103 patients and 1,404 hernias for analyses (1,380 male; 802 unilateral and 301 bilateral repairs; median age, 59 years). Among the 37 incidental hernias identified (2.6% of cases), the most common type of incidental hernia was femoral (n=32, 2.3%) followed by obturator (n=2, 0.1%). Increasing age was associated with an increased risk of incidental hernia, with a significant linear trend (p<0.01). The risk for patients >60 years of age was 4.0% vs 1.4% for those aged <60 years (p<0.01). Incidental hernias were found in 29.2% of females vs 2.2% of males, (p<0.0001). Risk of incidental hernia in those with a recurrent inguinal hernia was 3.0% vs 2.6% for primary repair (p=0.79). Incidental hernias during TEP inguinal hernia repair were found in 2.6% of cases and, though infrequent, could cause complications if left untreated. The risk of incidental hernia increased with age and was significantly higher in patients aged >60 years and in females.

  18. Comparison of institutional costs for laparoscopic preperitoneal inguinal hernia versus open repair and its reimbursement in an ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Volker R; Morrison, John E

    2008-02-01

    To compare institutional costs for open versus laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair and its relationship to reimbursement in an ambulatory surgery center in the United States. Analysis of institutional costs in US$ of 2006 for all nonreusables used in a laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair using a polyester mesh compared with open hernia repair using polypropylene mesh. A comparison of the institution's disposable costs related to reimbursement at an ambulatory surgery center in Southeastern United States was performed to identify the most cost-effective procedure for the outpatient facility. As fixed and indirect costs of the ambulatory surgery center are similar for both procedures, a cost difference can only be found in direct disposable costs with that being US$ 235.57 for the procedure-specific disposables in the laparoscopic hernia repair as compared with US$ 117.15 for the open hernia repair. Cost for identical disposables used in both procedures amounted to US$ 32.57. Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair has a higher cost for procedure related disposables versus the open hernia repair at +US$ 118.42 mainly being due to the more costly polyester mesh. A flat rate reimbursement of US$ 1800 for a laparoscopic procedure compared with only US$ 950 for the open procedure minus all disposable cost results in a higher institutional income of +US&$ 731.58 (US$ 1531.86 vs. US$ 800.28), from which other institutional costs can be paid. Despite marginally higher procedure-related disposable costs for laparoscopic TEP hernia repair, the institutional income is remarkably higher owing to a better reimbursement for this procedure in ambulatory surgery centers. From the institution's point of view, laparoscopic hernia repair is by far the more cost-effective procedure when compared with an open hernia procedure at the present time.

  19. Incisional Hernia in Women: Predisposing Factors and Management Where Mesh is not Readily Available

    PubMed Central

    Agbakwuru, EA; Olabanji, JK; Alatise, OI; Okwerekwu, RO; Esimai, OA

    2009-01-01

    Background / Aim: Incisional hernia is still relatively common in our practice. The aim of the study was to identify risk factors associated with incisional hernia in our region. The setting is the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria during a period when prosthetic mesh was not readily available. Patients and Methods: All the women who presented with incisional hernia between 1996 and 2005 were prospectively studied using a standard form to obtain information on pre-hernia (index) operations and possible predisposing factors. They all had open surgical repair and were followed up for 18–60 months. Results: Forty-four women were treated during study period. The index surgeries leading to the hernias were emergency caesarian section 26/44 (59.1%), emergency exploratory laparotomy 6/44 (13.6%), and elective surgeries 12/44 (27.3%). Major associated risk factors were the use of wrong suture materials for fascia repair, midline incisions, wound sepsis, and overweight. Conclusion: For elective surgeries, reduction of weight should be encouraged when appropriate, and transverse incisions are preferred. Absorbable sutures, especially chromic catgut, should be avoided in fascia closure. Antibiotics should be used for complicated obstetric cases. PMID:21483511

  20. First human magnetic resonance visualisation of prosthetics for laparoscopic large hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Köhler, G; Pallwein-Prettner, L; Lechner, M; Spaun, G O; Koch, O O; Emmanuel, K

    2015-12-01

    Mesh repair of large hiatal hernias has increasingly gained popularity to reduce recurrence rates. Integration of iron particles into the polyvinylidene fluoride mesh-based material allows for magnetic resonance visualisation (MR). In a pilot prospective case series eight patients underwent surgical repair of hiatal hernias repair with pre-shaped meshes, which were fixated with fibrin glue. An MR investigation with a qualified protocol was performed on postoperative day four and 3 months postoperatively to evaluate the correct position of the mesh by assessing mesh appearance and demarcation. The total MR-visible mesh surface area of each implant was calculated and compared with the original physical mesh size to evaluate potential reduction of the functional mesh surfaces. We documented no mesh migrations or dislocations but we found a significant decrease of MR-visualised total mesh surface area after release of the pneumoperitoneum compared to the original mesh size (mean 78.9 vs 84 cm(2); mean reduction of mesh area = 5.1 cm(2), p < 0.001). At 3 months postoperatively, a further reduction of the mesh surface area could be observed (mean 78.5 vs 78.9 cm(2); mean reduction of mesh area = 0.4 cm(2), p < 0.037). Detailed mesh depiction and accurate assessment of the surrounding anatomy could be successfully achieved in all cases. Fibrin glue seems to provide effective mesh fixation. In addition to a significant early postoperative decrease in effective mesh surface area a further reduction in size occurred within 3 months after implantation.

  1. Occult hernias detected by laparoscopic totally extra-peritoneal inguinal hernia repair: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Dulucq, J-L; Wintringer, P; Mahajna, A

    2011-08-01

    One distinct advantage of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is the opportunity for clear visualization of the direct, indirect, femoral, obturator and other groin spaces. The aim of this study was to examine/assess the potential of the laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair method in detecting unexpected additional hernias. Patients who underwent an elective inguinal hernia repair, in the department of abdominal surgery at the institute of laparoscopic surgery (ILS, Bordeaux, France) between September 2003 and July 2005 were enrolled prospectively in the study. The patients' demographic data, operative, postoperative course and outpatient follow-up were studied. A total of 337 laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs were performed in 263 patients. Of these, 189 patients had unilateral hernia (109 right and 80 left) and 74 patients had bilateral hernias. Indirect hernias were the most common, followed by direct and then femoral hernias. There were 218 male patients and 45 female patients with a mean age of 60 ± 15 years. There were 44 unexpected hernias: 6 spegilian hernias, 19 obturator hernias and another 19 femoral hernias. Two patients were converted to transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) due to surgical difficulties. There were no major intraoperative complications in all patients except for three cases of bleeding arising from the inferior epigastric artery. Only one patient had postoperative bleeding and was re-operated on several hours after the hernia repair. No recurrence occurred in the present series. The laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair approach allows viewing of the entire myopectineal orifice, facilitating repair of any unexpected hernias and thereby reducing the chance of recurrence.

  2. Giant Inguinal Herniae Managed by Primary Repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Madhur; Naku, Narang; Hajong, Debobratta; Singh, K Lenish

    2017-01-01

    Giant inguinal hernia are usually found in developing countries due to delay in seeking medical attention. The management of such hernias may sometimes require procedures to increase the intra-peritoneal capacity prior to the repair of the giant hernia. Otherwise patients may develop abdominal compartment syndrome leading to various unwanted complications. Primary repair of giant hernias are possible in some cases without having significant post-operative complications. In this present case series, we have managed a total of four patients of giant inguinal hernia by primary repair without much post-operative complications. PMID:28384934

  3. Outcomes of robot-assisted versus laparoscopic repair of small-sized ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Julia; Huynh, Desmond; Nguyen, Scott; Chin, Edward; Divino, Celia; Zhang, Linda

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the outcomes of the da Vinci robot-assisted laparoscopic hernia repair of small-sized ventral hernias with circumferential suturing of the mesh compared to the traditional laparoscopic repair with trans-fascial suturing. A retrospective review was conducted of all robot-assisted umbilical, epigastric and incisional hernia repairs performed at our institution between 2013 and 2015 compared to laparoscopic umbilical or epigastric hernia repairs. Patient characteristics, operative details and postoperative complications were collected and analyzed using univariate analysis. Three primary minimally invasive fellowship trained surgeons performed all of the procedures included in the analysis. 72 patients were identified during the study period. 39 patients underwent robot- assisted repair (21 umbilical, 14 epigastric, 4 incisional), and 33 patients laparoscopic repair (27 umbilical, 6 epigastric). Seven had recurrent hernias (robot: 4, laparoscopic: 3). There were no significant differences in preoperative characteristics between the two groups. Average operative time was 156 min for robot-assisted repair and 65 min for laparoscopic repair (p < 0.0001). The average defect size was significantly larger for the robot group [3.07 cm (1-9 cm)] than that for the laparoscopic group [2.02 cm (0.5-5 cm)] (p < 0.0001), although there was no significant difference in the average size of mesh used (13 vs. 13 cm). There was no difference in patients requiring postoperative admission or length of stay between the two groups. The mean duration of follow-up was 47 days. There was no difference in complication rate during this time, and no recurrences were reported. There are no significant differences in terms of safety and early efficacy when comparing small-sized ventral hernias repaired using the robot-assisted technique versus the standard laparoscopic repair.

  4. Inguinal hernia repair in overweight and obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Yong; Kim, Jung Chul; Kim, Shin Kon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes after inguinal hernia repair in overweight and obese patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 636 adult patients who underwent mesh plug inguinal hernia repair performed by one surgeon from November 2001 to January 2009.The clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes of the patients were analyzed. According to the body mass index, patients higher than 23 were defined as overweight and obese patient group (O group) and patients between 18.5 and 23 were defined as normal weight patient group (N group). Seventeen underweight patients were excluded in this study. Results Of 619 cases, the number for O group was 344 (55.6%) and for N group was 275 (44.4%). The mean age was significantly higher in N group (62.2 ± 12.6 vs. 64.4 ± 14.8, P = 0.048). Underlying diseases were present in 226 (65.7%) of the O group and 191 (69.5%) of the N group (P = 0.322). Anesthesia method, operative time and postoperative hospital stay had no significant difference between the two groups. Postoperative complications developed in 41 (11.9%) of the O group and in 28 (10.2%) of the N group, respectively, and no major complications developed in either group. Conclusion Adult inguinal hernias developed at a relatively younger age in overweight and obese patients than in normal weight patients. There were no specific differences in other clinical characteristics and outcomes between the two groups. Therefore inguinal hernia repair in overweight and obese patients is a safe procedure as in normal weight patients. PMID:22066122

  5. [Historic analysis of complex incisional hernia: to an understanding of the double prosthetic repair technique].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    2010-11-01

    The treatment of complex incisional hernias is, on occasions, a real social and professional, and still controversial, challenge. A multitude of techniques have been described over the years in an attempt to solve this problem. The social context and technological development of each period are essential to understand the continuous changes in the way of performing these techniques. This article caries out an historical review of the prosthetic treatment of incisional hernias, trying to understand and apply the basic principles of the treatment of all incisional hernias to the repair with a double mesh. Copyright © 2010 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. An innovative repair for a re-recurrence of an incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Merali, N; Verma, A; Davies, T

    2014-11-01

    A patient presented with a recurrent incarcerated inguinoscrotal hernia requiring urgent surgery. The defect was through the gap in the mesh left originally for the cord structures. As a result, a modified funnel repair was performed. An innovative approach was adopted that was best suited to tackling and reducing the risk of recurrence.

  7. Abdominal adhesions in laparoscopic hernia repair. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Eller, R; Twaddell, C; Poulos, E; Jenevein, E; McIntire, D; Russell, S

    1994-03-01

    Laparoscopic herniorrhaphy is becoming an increasingly common procedure. The possible creation of intraperitoneal adhesions during laparoscopic herniorrhaphy has not been examined. For the transperitoneal hernia repair to be an acceptable option, the hypothesis that this approach will incite significant adhesions must be rejected. To test this hypothesis, 21 pigs underwent laparoscopic herniorrhaphy using a standard procedure with the implantation of a polypropylene mesh graft on one side while a sham procedure was performed on the other. These animals were later examined laparoscopically for adhesion formation and the condition of the graft. None of the 21 animals developed adhesions to the trocar sites, 12 animals developed adhesions to the area of the polypropylene mesh, and 3 developed adhesions to the side of the sham procedure. There were no adhesions involving the small intestine. It is therefore concluded that the hypothesis should be rejected and that laparoscopic herniorrhaphy does not incite significant adhesions.

  8. Long-term recurrence and complication rates after incisional hernia repair with the open onlay technique

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia after abdominal surgery is a well-known complication. Controversy still exists with respect to the choice of hernia repair technique. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term recurrence rate as well as surgical complications in a consecutive group of patients undergoing open repair using an onlay mesh technique. Methods Consecutive patients undergoing open incisional hernia repair with onlay-technique between 01/05/1995 and 01/09/2007 at a single institution were included in the study. For follow-up patients were contacted by telephone, and answered a questionnaire containing questions related to the primary operation, the hernia and general risk factors. Patients were examined by a consultant surgeon in the outpatient clinic or in the patient's home if there was suspicion of an incisional hernia recurrence. Results The study included 56 patients with 100% follow-up. The median follow-up was 35 months (range 4–151). Recurrent incisional hernia was found in 8 of 56 patients (15%, 95% CI: 6–24). The overall complication rate was 13% (95% CI, 4–22). All complications were minor and needed no hospital admission. Conclusion This study with a long follow-up showed low recurrence and complication rates in patients undergoing incisional hernia repair with the open onlay technique. PMID:19400934

  9. Occult hernias and bilateral endoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: is there a need for prophylactic repair? : Results of endoscopic extraperitoneal repair over a period of 10 years.

    PubMed

    Saggar, V R; Sarangi, R

    2007-02-01

    An advantage of the endoscopic total extraperitoneal approach over the conventional hernia repair is detection of an unsuspected, asymptomatic hernia on the contralateral side. A high incidence of occult contralateral hernias has been reported in the literature. However, few studies have examined the incidence of development of a hernia on the healthy side evaluated previously during an endoscopic unilateral hernia repair. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of development of a contralateral hernia after a previous bilateral exploration. The need for a prophylactic contralateral repair is also addressed. We retrospectively reviewed the results of 822 endoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs done in 634 patients over a period of 10 years from May 1993 to 2003. Incidence of hernia undetected clinically and during previous contralateral repair was assessed over a follow up period ranging from 10 to 82 months. About 7.97% of bilateral hernias were clinically occult hernias. Only 1.12% of unilateral hernia repairs (who had undergone a contralateral evaluation at surgery) subsequently developed a hernia on the other side. The endoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair is an excellent tool to detect and treat occult contralateral hernias. The incidence of hernia occurring at the contralateral side after a previous bilateral exploration is low, hence a prophylactic repair on the contralateral side is not recommended on a routine basis.

  10. Complications and recurrences associated with laparoscopic repair of groin hernias. A multi-institutional retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Tetik, C; Arregui, M E; Dulucq, J L; Fitzgibbons, R J; Franklin, M E; McKernan, J B; Rosin, R D; Schultz, L S; Toy, F K

    1994-11-01

    Although the laparoscopic technique is a new approach to groin hernia, it is becoming more widely accepted as an alternative to traditional open techniques. This study is a preliminary review of complications and recurrences. A questionnaire specific for complications was sent to each investigator. From 12/89 to 4/93, 1,514 hernias were repaired; 119 (7.8%) were bilateral and 192 (12.7%) recurrent. There were 860 indirect, 560 direct, 43 pantaloon, 37 femoral, and 6 obturator hernias, and 8 were not specified; 553 were repaired using a transabdominal preperitoneal mesh technique (TAPP), 457 with a total extraperitoneal technique (TEP), 320 with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM), 102 by ring closure, and 82 involved plug and patch technique. Eighteen intraoperative and 188 postoperative complications were seen. The total complication rate was 13.6%, of which 1.2% were intraoperative. Of the intraoperative complications, 12 were related to the laparoscopic technique, three were related to the hernia repair, and one was related to anesthesia. The rate of conversion to open was 0.8%. Of the postoperative complications, there were 95 local, 25 neurologic, 23 testicular, 23 urinary, 10 mesh, and 12 miscellaneous. There were 34 recurrences after the 1,514 hernia repairs (2.2%). The follow-up was reported in 825 patients for an average of 13 months. The recurrence rate varied drastically with the technique: A 22% recurrence rate after the plug and patch vs 3%, 2.2%, 0.7%, and 0.4% with the ring closure, IPOM, TAPP, and TEP, respectively. Laparoscopic repair of groin hernia can be safely performed. Complications, mostly minor, diminish with experience. The recurrence rate is less with large mesh which is anchored.

  11. Preoperative abdominal muscle elongation with botulinum toxin A for complex incisional ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Faisal; Jacombs, Anita S W; Roussos, Emmanouel; Read, John W; Dardano, Anthony N; Edye, Michael; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Surgical repair of recurrent abdominal incisional hernia(s) can be challenging due to complex operative conditions, intense post-operative pain, potential respiratory compromise and lateral muscle traction predisposing to early recurrence. We report our preliminary results with botulinum toxin A (BTA) injection causing flaccid paralysis (relaxation) of the lateral abdominal wall muscles prior to surgery. A prospective pilot study measured the effect of preoperative BTA prior to elective repair of recurrent abdominal hernias. Under ultrasound control, 2 weeks prior to surgery, 50 units of BTA was injected into the external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles at three sites on each side of the lateral abdominal wall (total dose 300 units). Pre- and post-BTA abdominal computed tomography measured changes in abdominal wall muscle thickness and length. All hernias were repaired with laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted mesh techniques in a single or two-staged procedure. Eight patients received BTA injections which were tolerated with no complications. Post-BTA preoperative computed tomography showed a significant increase in mean length of lateral abdominal wall from 18.5 cm pre-BTA to 21.3 cm post-BTA (P = 0.017) with a mean unstretched length gain of 2.8 cm per side (range 0.8-6.0 cm). All hernias were surgically reduced with mesh with no early recurrence. Preoperative BTA injection prior to complex abdominal hernia repair is a safe procedure that causes flaccid relaxation, elongation and thinning of the lateral abdominal muscles and decrease in hernia defect. Although further evaluation is required, BTA injections may be a useful adjunct to surgical repair of complex incisional hernias. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Long-term outcomes of sandwich ventral hernia repair paired with hybrid vacuum-assisted closure.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Poruk, Katherine E; Baltodano, Pablo A; Soares, Kevin C; Azoury, Said C; Cooney, Carisa M; Cornell, Peter; Eckhauser, Frederic E

    2016-08-01

    Sandwich ventral hernia repair (SVHR) may reduce ventral hernia recurrence rates, although with an increased risk of surgical site occurrences (SSOs) and surgical site infections (SSIs). Previously, we found that a modified negative pressure wound therapy (hybrid vacuum-assisted closure [HVAC]) system reduced SSOs and SSIs after ventral hernia repair. We aimed to describe our outcomes after SVHR paired with HVAC closure. We conducted a 4-y retrospective review of all complex SVHRs (biologic mesh underlay and synthetic mesh overlay) with HVAC closure performed at our institution by a single surgeon. All patients had fascial defects that could not be reapproximated primarily using anterior component separation. Descriptive statistics were used to report the incidence of postoperative complications and hernia recurrence. A total of 60 patients (59.3 ± 11.4 y, 58.3% male, 75% American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥3) with complex ventral hernias being underwent sandwich repair with HVAC closure. Major postoperative morbidity (Dindo-Clavien class ≥3) occurred in 14 (23.3%) patients, but incidence of SSO (n = 13, 21.7%) and SSI (n = 4, 6.7%) was low compared with historical reports. Median follow-up time for all patients was 12 mo (interquartile range 5.8-26.5 mo). Hernia recurrence occurred in eight patients (13.3%) after a median time of 20.6 months (interquartile range 16.4- 25.4 months). Use of a dual layer sandwich repair for complex abdominal wall reconstruction is associated with low rates of hernia recurrence at 1 year postoperatively. The addition of the HVAC closure system may reduce the risk of SSOs and SSIs previously reported with this technique and deserves consideration in future prospective studies assessing optimization of ventral hernia repair approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined paraesophageal hernia repair and partial longitudinal gastrectomy in obese patients with symptomatic paraesophageal hernias.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John H; Kroh, Matthew; El-Hayek, Kevin; Timratana, Poochong; Chand, Bipan

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia. Studies have demonstrated poor symptom control in obese patients undergoing fundoplication. The ideal operation remains elusive. However, addressing both obesity and the anatomic abnormality should be the goal. This study retrospectively identified 19 obese (body mass index [BMI], >30 kg/m(2)) and morbidly obese (BMI, >40 kg/m(2)) patients who presented between December 2007 and November 2011 for management of large or recurrent paraesophageal hernia. All the patients underwent a combined primary paraesophageal hernia repair and longitudinal gastrectomy. Charts were retrospectively reviewed to collect preoperative, operative, and short-term postoperative results. Quantitative data were analyzed using Student's t test and qualitative data with χ(2) testing. Laparoscopy was successful for all 19 patients. The mean preoperative BMI was 37.8 ± 4.1 kg/m(2), and the mean operative time was 236 ± 80 min. Preoperative endoscopy showed that 5 patients who had undergone prior fundoplication experienced anatomic failures, whereas the remaining 14 patients had type 3 and one type 4 paraesophageal Hernia. Mesh was used to reinforce the hiatus in 15 of the 19 cases. The postoperative complications included pulmonary embolism (n = 1) and pulmonary decompensation (n = 2) due to underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The mean hospital stay was 5.3 ± 3 days. Upper gastrointestinal esophagography was performed for all the patients, with no short-term recurrence of paraesophageal hernia. Weight loss was seen for all the patients during the first month, with a mean BMI drop of 2.7 ± 1 kg/m(2). All the patients experienced near to total resolution of their preoperative symptoms within the first month. Combined laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair and longitudinal gastrectomy offer a safe and feasible approach for the management of large or recurrent paraesophageal

  14. A prospective study of bilateral inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, J. W.; Johnson, C. D.; Jarrett, P. E.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of outcome after inguinal hernia repair in patients undergoing simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias (n = 31), sequential repair of bilateral hernias (n = 5), and unilateral hernia repair (n = 75) is reported. There were no differences in wound complications, post-operative respiratory complications, or other adverse effects in the three groups. Operating time was similar in the unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs (median 55 min), but was longer (100 min) for the combination of two sequential repairs. Hospital stay was shortest for patients undergoing unilateral repair (2 days) but was less with bilateral simultaneous repair (4 days) than after two sequential repairs (total of 6 days). There were 12 (11%) wound complications of which five (5%) were infections. There was no difference in complication rate between unilateral and bilateral hernia repair. Postoperative recovery was assessed prospectively and was recorded at 1 month. There was no difference between unilateral and bilateral simultaneous repairs in the number of days before the patient was able to climb stairs easily, drive a car or return to work. The duration of the requirement for analgesia was similar in each group. We conclude that bilateral simultaneous hernia repair can be carried out with no greater morbidity than a unilateral repair, and the return to normal activity is as rapid. Bilateral hernias should be repaired simultaneously rather than sequentially. PMID:2221764

  15. Repair of a bowel-containing, scrotal hernia with incarceration contributed by femorofemoral bypass graft

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Schouten, Jonathan A.; Itani, Kamal M. F.

    2017-01-01

    The rising use of endovascular techniques utilizing femoral artery access may increase the frequency with which surgeons face the challenge of hernia repair in reoperative groins—which may or may not include a vascular graft. We present a case where a vascular graft contributed to an acute presentation and complicated dissection, and review the literature. A 67-year-old man who had undergone prior endovascular aneurysm repair via open bilateral femoral artery access and concomitant prosthetic femorofemoral bypass, presented with an incarcerated, scrotal inguinal hernia. The graft with its associated fibrosis contributed to the incarceration by compressing the inguinal ring. Repair was undertaken via an open, anterior approach with tension-free, Lichtenstein herniorraphy after releasing graft-associated fibrosis. Repair of groin hernias in this complex setting requires careful surgical planning, preparation for potential vascular reconstruction and meticulous technique to avoid bowel injury in the face of a vascular conduit and mesh. PMID:28069880

  16. Hybrid NOTES transvaginal intraperitoneal onlay mesh in abdominal wall hernias: an alternative to traditional laparoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Descloux, Alexandre; Pohle, Sebastian; Nocito, Antonio; Keerl, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are increasingly treated by laparoscopic placement of an intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM). We present an alternative technique for women: the laparoscopic-assisted transvaginal IPOM. Before surgery, all patients underwent a gynecological examination. The patients agreed to IPOM repair via a transvaginal approach, and written informed consent for surgery was obtained. Pneumoperitoneum was established with a Veress needle at the umbilicus. This access was subsequently dilated to 5 mm (VersaStep), and a 5-mm laparoscope was inserted. Under laparoscopic view, the transvaginal trocars (12-mm VersaStep and 5-mm flexible accesses) were safely inserted after lifting the uterus with a uterus manipulator. After preparation of the falciform ligament, the ligamentum teres and the preperitoneal fat, a lightweight composite mesh was introduced through the transvaginal access and fixed with absorbable tacks using the double-crown technique. From September 2011 to December 2012, we performed six laparoscopic-assisted transvaginal IPOM procedures (one epigastric, three umbilical, two combined epigastric and umbilical hernias; all were primary hernias). In the initial phase, only patients with small or medium primary abdominal wall hernia were selected (max. 3 cm diameter). Median hospital stay was 3 days (range 2-6 days). One minor complication occurred perioperatively (second-degree skin burn to the labia majora). At 1-year follow-up, we identified one recurrence in a high-risk patient with a body mass index higher than 35 kg/m(2). No infection and no mortality were observed. Although no final conclusion can be made regarding the presumed non-inferiority of this technique in terms of recurrence and mesh infection compared with traditional laparoscopic IPOM, laparoscopic-assisted transvaginal IPOM is a feasible alternative to treat abdominal wall hernias.

  17. Direct and recurrent inguinal hernias are associated with ventral hernia repair: a database study.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Nadia A; Sorensen, Lars T; Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-02-01

    A systemically altered connective tissue metabolism has been demonstrated in patients with abdominal wall hernias. The most pronounced connective tissue changes are found in patients with direct or recurrent inguinal hernias as opposed to patients with indirect inguinal hernias. The aim of the present study was to assess whether direct or recurrent inguinal hernias are associated with an elevated rate of ventral hernia surgery. In the nationwide Danish Hernia Database, a cohort of 92,457 patients operated on for inguinal hernias was recorded from January 1998 until June 2010. Eight-hundred forty-three (0.91 %) of these patients underwent a ventral hernia operation between January 2007 and June 2010. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess an association between inguinal and ventral hernia repair. Direct (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.28 [95 % CI, 1.08-1.51]) and recurrent (OR = 1.76, [95 % CI, 1.39-2.23]) inguinal hernias were significantly associated with ventral hernia repair after adjustment for age, gender, and surgical approach (open or laparoscopic). Patients with direct and recurrent inguinal herniation are more prone to ventral hernia repair than patients with indirect inguinal herniation. This is the first study to show that herniogenesis is associated with type of inguinal hernia.

  18. A complication to remember: stitch sinus following laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Rabiu, Abdul-Rasheed; Tan, Lam Chin

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a diagnostic dilemma and what we believe to be a previously unreported case of a stitch sinus caused by the presence of a non-absorbable centring suture used during laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. Successful treatment was achieved through umbilical excision and removal of the offending suture; the patient's recovery thereafter was uneventful. Surgeons should be aware of this complication when consenting patients and should consider the use of absorbable sutures to minimize such risk in similar procedures. In addition, clinicians may add this to their list of differential diagnoses in a patient presenting with pain, discharge or what appears to be a recurrence of their hernia following laparoscopic mesh repair of an umbilical hernia. PMID:27572679

  19. Risk factors for early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Family history, male gender and age are significant risk factors for inguinal hernia disease. Family history provides evidence for a genetic trait and could explain early recurrence after inguinal hernia repair despite technical advance at least in a subgroup of patients. This study evaluates if age and family history can be identified as risk factors for early recurrence after primary hernia repair. Methods We performed an observational cohort study for 75 patients having at least two recurrent hernias. The impact of age, gender and family history on the onset of primary hernias, age at first recurrence and recurrence rates was investigated. Results 44% (33/75) of recurrent hernia patients had a family history and primary as well as recurrent hernias occurred significantly earlier in this group (p = 0.04). The older the patients were at onset the earlier they got a recurrent hernia. Smoking could be identified as on additional risk factor for early onset of hernia disease but not for hernia recurrence. Conclusion Our data reveal an increased incidence of family history for recurrent hernia patients when compared with primary hernia patients. Patients with a family history have their primary hernias as well as their recurrence at younger age then patients without a family history. Though recurrent hernia has to be regarded as a disease caused by multiple factors, a family history may be considered as a criterion to identify the risk for recurrence before the primary operation. PMID:20003183

  20. Primary fascial closure with laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duyen H; Nguyen, Mylan T; Askenasy, Erik P; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) has grown in popularity. Typically, this procedure is performed with a mesh bridge technique that results in high rates of seroma, eventration (bulging), and patient dissatisfaction. In an effort to avoid these complications, there is growing interest in the role of laparoscopic primary fascial closure with intraperitoneal mesh placement. This systematic review evaluated the outcomes of closure of the central defect during LVHR. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane databases, and Embase was conducted using PRISMA guidelines. MINORS was used to assess the methodologic quality. Primary outcome was hernia recurrence. Secondary outcomes were surgical-site infection, seroma formation, bulging, and patient-centered items (satisfaction, chronic pain, functional status). Eleven studies were identified, eight of which were case series (level 4 data). Three comparative studies examined the difference between closure and nonclosure of the fascial defect during laparoscopic ventral incisional hernia repairs (level 3 and 4 data). These studies suggested that primary fascial closure (n = 138) compared to nonclosure (n = 255) resulted in lower recurrence rates (0-5.7 vs. 4.8-16.7 %) and seroma formation rates (5.6-11.4 vs. 4.3-27.8 %). Follow-up periods for both groups were similar (1-108 months). Only one study evaluated patient function and clinical bulging. It showed better outcomes with primary fascial closure. Closure of the central defect during LVHR resulted in less recurrence, bulging, and seroma than nonclosure. Patients with closure were more satisfied with the results and had better functional status. The quality of the data was poor, however. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the role of closure of the central defect during LVHR is warranted.

  1. Treatment of a giant inguinal hernia using transabdominal pre-peritoneal repair

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Masato; Mizutani, Fumitoshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuyoshi; Aoyama, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a male Japanese patient with a giant inguinal hernia that extended to his knees while standing. A transabdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) repair was performed under general anesthesia. Complete reduction of the contents of the hernia was achieved within 2 h 50 min. A blood loss of approximately 700 ml was noted. The patient was discharged from the hospital on post-operative Day 12, with no recurrence of the hernia 6 months post-surgery. Factors contributing to the successful outcomes included preparation of several reduction methods before surgery, use of a large size mesh and implementation of pre-operative measures to prevent abdominal compartment syndrome. Further studies are required to evaluate the feasibility of laparoscopic repair in the management of giant inguinal hernia. PMID:27672103

  2. Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

  3. Peritoneal colon cancer metastasis to bilateral inguinal hernia repair sites: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Michihiro; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Kubota, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Sakakura, Chouhei; Kojima, Osamu; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of peritoneal metastasis from colon cancer being found in the bilateral sites of inguinal hernia repair. The patient was an 85-year-old man who underwent colonoscopy for a positive fecal occult blood test, with a subsequent diagnosis of ascending colon cancer. He had undergone mesh plug repair for bilateral inguinal hernias at another hospital 6 years previously. We performed laparoscopy-assisted right hemi-colectomy and found nodes in the bilateral scars from the inguinal hernioplasty. Biopsy confirmed that both of the nodes were peritoneal metastasis, leading to the assumption that cancer cells disseminated within the abdominal cavity had been implanted at the repair sites, although the mechanism for this was unclear. A relationship between inflammation and peritoneal metastasis has been reported; thus, we speculated that local inflammation resulting from chronic stimulus of mesh plugs and peritoneal trauma caused peritoneal metastasis at the repair sites.

  4. Prevention of parastomal hernia with a preperitoneal polypropelene mesh.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Hernández, Javier; Díaz Milanés, Juan Antonio; Capitán Morales, Luis Cristóbal; Del Río la Fuente, Francisco Javier; Torres Arcos, Cristina; Cañete Gómez, Jesús; Oliva Mompeán, Fernando; Padillo Ruiz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    To show our results with the use of a polypropylene mesh at the stoma site, as prophylaxis of parastomal hernias in patients with rectal cancer when a terminal colostomy is performed. From January 2010 until March 2014, 45 consecutive patients with rectal cancer, underwent surgical treatment with the need of a terminal colostomy. A prophylactic mesh was placed in a sublay position at the stoma site in all cases. We analyze Demographics, technical issues and effectiveness of the procedure, as well as subsequent complications. A prophylactic mesh was placed in 45 patients, 35 male and 10 females, mean age of 66.2 (47-88) and Body Mass Index 29.19 (20.4-40.6). A total of 7 middle rectal carcinoma, 36 low rectal carcinoma, one rectal melanoma and one squamous cell anal carcinoma were electively treated with identical protocol. Abdominoperineal resection was performed in 38 patients, and low anterior resection with terminal colostomy in 7. An open approach was elected in 39 patients and laparoscopy in 6, with 2 conversions to open surgery. Medium follow up was 22 months (2.1-53). Overall, 3 parastomal hernias (6.66%) were found, one of which was a radiological finding with no clinical significance. No complications related to the mesh or the colostomy were found. The use of a prophylactic polypropylene mesh placed in a sublay position at the stoma site is a safe and feasible technique. It lowers the incidence of parastomal hernias with no increased morbidity. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Study of Prolene Hernia System and Lichtenstein Method for Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Badkur, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolene Hernia System (PHS) is a bi-layered polypropylene mesh with a connector that combines the anterior and posterior inguinal hernia repair, but still not very popular in this part of the country. Hence a prospective & randomized comparative study was undertaken to compare PHS with the already popular Lichtenstein Hernia Repair (LHR) and determine the post-operative outcome. Materials and Methods Total 67 inguinal hernia repairs were randomly assigned to either PHS or LHR method, and data was collected regarding various outcome measures like duration of surgery, post-operative pain, requirement of analgesia, return to normal activity, and early and late complications. Results Mean duration of surgery was significantly higher for PHS group than LHR group (65.4 min vs 51.26 min, p-value <0.0001). Significant difference was noted between the PHS and LHR group in terms of moderate to severe post-operative pain (15.15% vs 41.18%,p-value 0.018), time of requirement of analgesia (3.7 vs 4.6 days, p-value 0.024), and time to return to normal activity (2.7 vs 3.4 days, p-value 0.023), all in favour of the former technique. No intra-operative complication was noted in either of the groups. 5 patients had early complications in PHS group and 6 in LHR group, but this was statistically not significant. The average time of follow-up for the study was 7.8 month, ranging from 1 to 18 months. Chronic inguinal pain was noted in 1 and 2 patients respectively in PHS and LHR group, again statistically not significant. No recurrence was noted in both the groups till the time of follow-up. Conclusion PHS is a safe and better alternative to the time honored Lichtenstein hernia repair with the added advantage of strengthening whole of myopectineal orifice, and virtually eliminating any risk of recurrence. PMID:26266158

  6. Laparoscopic Repair of Bochdalek Diaphragmatic Hernia in Adults.

    PubMed

    Machado, Norman Oneil

    2016-02-01

    Bochdalek hernia (BH) is an uncommon form of diaphragmatic hernia. The rarity of this hernia and its nonspecific presentation leads to delay in the diagnosis, with the potential risk of complications. This review summarizes the relevant aspects of its presentation and management, based on the present evidence in the literature. A literature search was performed on PubMed, Google Scholar, and EMBASE for articles in English on BH in adults. All case reports and series from the period after 1955 till January 2015 were included. A total of 180 articles comprising 368 cases were studied. The mean age of these patients was 51 years (range 15-90 years) with a male preponderance of 57% (211/368). Significantly, 6.5% of patients were above 70 years, with 3.5% of these being above 80 years. The majority of the hernias were on the left side (63%), with right-sided hernias and bilateral occurring in 27% and 10%, respectively. Precipitating factors were noted in 24%, with 5.3% of them being pregnant. Congenital anomalies were seen in 11%. The presenting symptoms included abdominal (62%), respiratory (40%), obstructive (vomiting/abdominal distension; 36%), strangulation (26%); 14% of them were asymptomatic (detected incidentally). In the 184 patients who underwent surgical intervention, the surgical approach involved laparotomy in 74 (40.27%), thoracotomy in 50 (27.7%), combined thoracoabdominal approach in 27 (14.6%), laparoscopy in 23 (12.5%), and thoracoscopic repair in 9 (4.89%). An overall recurrence rate of 1.6% was noted. Among these patients who underwent laparoscopic repair, 82% underwent elective procedure; 66% underwent primary repair, with 61% requiring interposition of mesh or reenforcement with or without primary repair. The overall mortality was 2.7%. Therefore, BH should form one of the differential diagnoses in patients who present with simultaneous abdominal and chest symptoms. Minimal access surgery offers a good alternative with short hospital stay and is

  7. Polyglactine/Polypropylene Mesh vs. Propylene Mesh: Is There a Need for Newer Prosthesis in Inguinal Hernia?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadim; Bangash, Adil; Sadiq, Muzaffaruddin; Ul Hadi, Ain; Hamid, Haris

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: To compare outcomes of light and heavy weight mesh for repair of inguinal hernia. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at the Department of Surgery; Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008. Patients were divided into two groups based on the type of mesh implanted for inguinal hernia repair. Group 1 included patients in whom light weight composite (VyproII®) mesh is implanted: Group 2 included patients in whom polypropylene (ProleneR) mesh is implanted. Data concerning the complications and post operative pain in the perioperative and postoperative period were collected and analyzed. Categorical data were presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals and compared using a χ2test and P<0.05 were considered significant. Results: Following allocation and exclusion of violating cases, 111 patients in group 1 and 138 patients in group 2 were analyzed. The mean age in group 1 was 38.20 ± 13.34 years and in group 2 was 39.55 ± 13.70 (P = 0.434). In group 1, hematoma formation was observed in four cases (3.6%), while it was observed in six cases (4.2%) in group 2 (P = 0.766). During the entire study, ten patients in all developed urinary retention, three of which required transient catheterization. One year post operation, there was a recurrence in only five cases overall, while only two patients complained of pain (P = 0.826). Conclusion: The frequency of postoperative pain and complications in patients was similar in both groups. PMID:20065567

  8. [Preliminary results in the use of a new composite prosthesis in incisional hernia repair].

    PubMed

    Bove, A; Pungente, S; Corradetti, L; Bongarzoni, G; Palone, G; Corbellini, L

    2007-01-01

    The repair of incisional hernias with the use of prosthetic biomaterials is the standard of care today. There are different prosthetic biomaterials that can be used to repair incisional hernias. These materials can be divided into products that are single component or a combination. Incisional hernia repair using the intraperitoneal implantation of a prosthesis requires mesh with impervious properties. This is preliminary study with a new composite non resorbable mesh in polyethylene terephthalate-polyurethane (HI-TEX PARP MP) used for incisional hernia repair in intraperitoneal implantation. This mesh has one permeable side in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) for rapid tissue fixation and another side in polyurethane (PEU), hydrophobic in order to avoid cell penetration. This is a preliminary study of medical records of 24 patients (17 women and 7 men) in whom intraperitoneal placement of composite prosthetics in polyethylene terephthalate-polyurethane (HI-TEX PARP MP) was used between September 2004 and September 2006. The incisional hernias were recurrent in 8 patients. The underside of the mesh was placed in direct contact with the visceral peritoneum, whereas the upper side made contact with the subcutaneous tissue. No intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperatively, 1 had seromas, 1 had phlegmon of the wound without removing prosthetics. There was 1 death but not dependent of the surgical performance. The follow-up, was 12 months (range 1 month-2 years); none had discomfort; only one patient had recurrence. Intraperitoneal placement of HI-TEX PARP MP has several advantages over other techniques including minimal adhesions, a decreased risk of infection and recurrences. In addition this mesh is more economics than the other prosthetics in use.

  9. New minimally invasive technique of parastomal hernia repair – methods and review

    PubMed Central

    Skoneczny, Paweł; Przywózka, Alicja; Czyżewski, Piotr; Bury, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parastomal hernia is described as the most common complication in patients with ostomy. It is reported that its incidence varies from 3% to 39% for colostomies and 0 to 6% for ileostomies. Surgical repair remains the treatment of choice. There are three types of surgical treatment – fascial repair, stoma relocation and repair using prosthetic mesh via a laparoscopic or open approach. Recently there have been several meta-analyses and systematic reviews aiming to compare the results of surgical treatment, and the authors agreed that the quality of evidence precludes firm conclusions. Aim To describe the novel concept of parastomal hernia repair – HyPER/SPHR technique (hybrid parastomal endoscopic re-do/Szczepkowski parastomal hernia repair) and its early results in 12 consecutive cases. Material and methods Twelve consecutive patients were operated on due to parastomal hernia using the new HyPER hybrid technique between June 2013 and May 2014. The patients’ condition was evaluated during the perioperative period, 6 weeks and then every 3 months after surgery. Results After 6 weeks of follow-up we have not observed any mesh-related complications. All 12 patients were examined 3 months and 6 months after repair surgery for evaluation. No recurrence, stoma site infection or stoma-related problems were found. None of the patients complained of pain and none of them needed to be hospitalized again. Reported quality of life on a 0–10 scale after 6 weeks of follow-up was 8 (range: 7–10). Conclusions The HyPER procedure for treatment of parastomal hernias proposed by the authors is a safe and feasible surgical technique with a high patient satisfaction rate and a low number of complications. The hybrid procedure seems to be a promising method for parastomal hernia repair. PMID:25960785

  10. Inguinal hernia repair: anaesthesia, pain and convalescence.

    PubMed

    Callesen, Torben

    2003-08-01

    Elective surgical repair of an inguinal or femoral hernia is one of the most common surgical procedures. The treatment, however, presents several challenges regarding anaesthesia for the procedure, the postoperative analgesic therapy and convalescence, as well as planning of the procedure. Local, general, and regional anaesthesia are all used for hernia repair, but to different degrees, primarily depending on traditions and whether the institution has specific interest in hernia surgery. Thus, the use of local anaesthesia varies from a few percent in Sweden, 18% in Denmark and up to almost 100% in specialised institutions, dedicated to hernia surgery. The feasibility of local anaesthesia is high, as judged by the rate of conversion to general anaesthesia (< 1%), although intraoperative pain is quite common. The generally low rate of serious complications does not allow firm conclusions, but the rate of less serious complications is lower by local anaesthesia, compared to other anaesthetic techniques. Of special interest is, that the rate of urinary retention can be eliminated by the use of local anaesthesia. Local anaesthesia results, in comparative studies, in a higher degree of patient satisfaction than other anaesthetic techniques. Local anaesthesia also facilitates faster mobilisation and earlier discharge/fulfilment of discharge criteria from post anaesthetic care units than other anaesthetic techniques. Pain after hernia repair is more pronounced at mobilisation or coughing than during rest, and younger patients seem to have more pain than older patients. The pain ceases over time, and it is most pronounced the day after surgery, where two thirds have moderate or severe pain during activity, while one third still have moderate or severe pain after one week, and approximately 10% after 4 weeks. Pain after laparoscopic surgery is less pronounced than after open surgery, while different open repair techniques do not exhibit significant differences. Postoperative

  11. A modified laparoscopic hernioplasty (TAPP) is the standard procedure for inguinal and femoral hernias: a retrospective 17-year analysis with 1,123 hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Peitsch, Werner K J

    2014-02-01

    hernias) represented the complete group of hernia sufferers. Patients with symptoms after hernia surgery (n = 5) were invited for a medical checkup by a specialist in hernia surgery at our outpatient unit. The sex, age, and the number of complex hernias of the patients did not differ significantly among the four patient subgroups or in comparison with the entire group. The patients who had received surgery in 1994, 1999, 2004, and 2009 were quizzed by a questionnaire and represented all patients who had hernia surgery from 1993 to 2009. The follow-up response of the living patients in each of the subgroups ranged from 89.5% of those who had hernia surgery 17 years earlier to 95.9% of those who had surgery 2 years earlier. The primary end point of the study was the hernia recurrence rate after a modified TAPP for primary, recurrent, and complex hernias performed 2, 7, 12, and 17 years earlier. The secondary end points of the study focused on the following questions: Is a modified TAPP practicable with acceptable recurrence rates for complex hernias? Do relapse rates show individual surgeon-dependent differences in relation to the learning curve? How many years of postoperative follow-up evaluation are required to determine quantitative recurrence rates (>90% recurrence)? All inguinal and femoral hernias were repaired with a modified TAPP procedure. Hernia defects larger than 1 × 1 cm were closed with nonabsorbable sutures before the mesh was implanted. Within 17 years after surgery, 4 (4.3%) of the 94 study participants treated with a modified TAPP procedure for primary or recurrent inguinal and femoral hernias experienced recurrent hernias (4 recurrences after 117 hernioplasties, 3.4%). Within 12 years after surgery, 4 (1 %) of 302 patients experienced recurrent hernias (4 recurrences after 398 modified TAPP procedures, 1%). Within 7 years after surgery for inguinal or femoral hernias, 8 (3.2%) of 251 patients had relapsed (8 recurrences after 337 modified TAPP

  12. Stapled Mesh stomA Reinforcement Technique (SMART) in the prevention of parastomal hernia: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Ng, Z Q; Tan, P; Theophilus, M

    2017-06-01

    Parastomal hernia remains a frequent complication following creation of an abdominal stoma. Previous interests have centred around the exploration of methods to repair; however, prophylactic mesh placement has demonstrated its efficacy in reduction of parastomal hernia. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the outcomes of Stapled Mesh stomA Reinforcement Technique (SMART) in terms of parastomal hernia occurrence rate and mesh-related complications. All patients operated with an abdominal perineal resection or Hartmann's procedure with SMART from November 2013 to March 2016 were included. Patient demographics, operative details and stoma-related symptoms were collected. Patients were examined clinically by the medical team and also reviewed independently by a specialist stoma care nurse for signs of stoma-related complications. As part of oncological follow-up, CT scans were available for review for evidence of parastomal herniation. 14 patients (mean age 76 years) were included in the analysis. All the SMART cases were successfully completed with no intraoperative or immediate post-operative complications. No cases of mesh-related complications such as infection, immediate stomal prolapse, stenosis, retraction, stomal obstruction, mesh erosion or fistulation were observed. No mesh removal was required. There were two cases of parastomal hernia detected on CT scan. Both cases have remained asymptomatic no intervention was required at this stage. Median follow-up was 24 months. Our medium-term experience has demonstrated the efficacy of SMART in the reduction of parastomal hernia occurrence. With appropriate learning curve, parastomal hernia can be prevented.

  13. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis following elective inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Sistla, S C; Sankar, G; Sistla, S

    2011-02-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs) following elective hernia repair are extremely uncommon, though they can occur following emergency surgery for complicated hernias. They are also usually seen in individuals with impaired immunity. We report a case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis following elective hernia repair in an otherwise healthy young patient. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this condition early, as it is difficult to differentiate it from superficial surgical site infection.

  14. Open Rives-Stoppa ventral hernia repair made simple and successful but not for everyone.

    PubMed

    Heartsill, L; Richards, M L; Arfai, N; Lee, A; Bingener-Casey, J; Schwesinger, W H; Sirinek, K R

    2005-05-01

    The Rives-Stoppa (RS) repair of ventral incisional hernias (VIHR) is technically difficult. It involves the retromuscular placement of mesh anterior to the posterior fascia and the primary closure of the anterior fascia. Recurrence rates are 0-8%. We proposed that the operation could be done with equal success by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position and primarily closing the fascia anterior to the mesh. 81 patients who had undergone an open RS-VIHR with intraperitoneal mesh were evaluated for hernia recurrence and factors associated with recurrence. 55 women and 26 men (mean BMI 38+/-9) underwent RS-VIHR (mean age 49+/-11 years). Of these patients, 44 (54%) had a prior VIHR, 30 (37%) had an incarcerated hernia and 34 (42%) had multiple fascial defects. PTFE was used in 83% and Prolene in 12%. Average LOS was 5.8+/-12 days. All received perioperative intravenous antibiotics and 28% were discharged on oral antibiotics. Follow-up averaged 30+/-24 months. Recurrent VIH developed in 12/81 (15%), with three occurring after removal of infected mesh and one after a laparotomy. Excluding these four, the recurrence rate was 10%. There was no correlation between hernia recurrence and age, BMI, hernia size, number of prior repairs, or LOS (t-test p>0.05). Hernia recurrence did not correlate with gender, prior peritoneal contamination, incarceration, multiple defects, adhesions, mesh type, oral antibiotics, cardiac disease, diabetes, tobacco use, or seroma (X(2) p>0.05). Those with a wound infection and/or abscess formation had a significantly higher recurrent hernia rate (60% vs. 8%, X(2) p<0.001). Patients with pulmonary disease had a significantly higher recurrence rate (50% vs. 12%, X(2) p=0.01). RS-VIHR with intraperitoneal mesh is a successful and less technically challenging method of repair than prior modifications. Aggressive efforts to identify infection and treat early may prevent abscess formation and subsequent recurrent hernia. Patients with chronic

  15. Durability of biologic implants for use in hernia repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Smart, Neil J; Bloor, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    In the past 10 years, hernia repair has evolved from primarily using suture closure to using mesh repair. Synthetic mesh implants were the initial gold standard, but the rate of complications such as infection, adhesions, and erosion was higher with synthetics than has been observed with newer biologic implants. As efforts to develop the ideal implant continue, the advantages of biologics for hernia and other soft-tissue repair become increasingly apparent. Animal-sourced biologics have the potential advantage over human dermis of being more amenable to standardization, and porcine dermal collagen architecture closely resembles that of human dermis. Cross-linking the collagen adds strength and durability to the implant that facilitates healing of surgical wounds, just as endogenous collagen, which is cross-linked, has innate durability that enhances natural wound healing. This review defines and assesses durability of the acellular collagen (biologic) implant options available for hernia repair. The factors that affect wound healing-and hernia repair--are summarized. Additionally, the particular features that enhance durability are described, and durability-related clinical outcomes discussed in the literature are cited to aid clinicians in making informed surgical choices.

  16. Hiatal Hernia Repair with Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Antonino, Agrusa; Giorgio, Romano; Giuseppe, Frazzetta; Giovanni, De Vita; Silvia, Di Giovanni; Daniela, Chianetta; Giuseppe, Di Buono; Vincenzo, Sorce; Gaspare, Gulotta

    2014-01-01

    Type I hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 50–90% of cases. Several trials strongly support surgery as an effective alternative to medical therapy. Today, laparoscopic fundoplication is considered as the procedure of choice. However, primary laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair is associated with upto 42% recurrence rate. Mesh reinforcement of the crural closure decreases the recurrence but can lead to complications, above all nonabsorbable ones. We experiment a new totally absorbable mesh by Gore. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female patient with a 6-year classic history of GERD. Endoscopy revealed a large hiatal hernia and esophagitis. pH study was positive for acid reflux; esophageal manometry revealed LES intrathoracic dislocation. With laparoscopic approach, the hiatal hernia defect was identified and primarily repaired, by crural closure. Gore Bio-A Tissue Reinforcement was trimmed to fit the defect accommodating the esophagus. Nissen fundoplication was performed. Result. Bio-A mesh was easily placed laparoscopically. It has good handling and could be cut and tailored intraoperatively for optimal adaptation. There were no short-term complications. Conclusion. Crural closure reinforcement can be done readily with this new totally absorbable mesh replaced by soft tissue over six months. However, further data and studies are needed to evaluate long-term outcomes. PMID:24864221

  17. [New aspects in hernia surgery].

    PubMed

    Lammers, B J; Goretzki, P E; Otto, T

    2005-07-01

    In the last 10 years in Germany we have seen a lot of hernia repairs using mesh.Meta-analysis shows the advantages of using meshes in hernia surgery; recurrence rates in inguinal hernia surgery are less than 3% in studies. There is some discussion about minimally invasive surgery in Germany.In incisional hernia surgery there is no discussion about using meshes. The role of minimally invasive surgery has not yet been defined.

  18. Current options in local anesthesia for groin hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, Hakan; Alptekin, Alp

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common procedures in general surgery. All anesthetic methods can be used in inguinal hernia repairs. Local anesthesia for groin hernia repair had been introduced at the very beginning of the last century, and gained popularity following the success reports from the Shouldice Hospital, and the Lichtenstein Hernia Institute. Today, local anesthesia is routinely used in specialized hernia clinics, whereas its use is still not a common practice in general hospitals, in spite of its proven advantages and recommendations by current hernia repair guidelines. In this review, the technical options for local anaesthesia in groin hernia repairs, commonly used local anaesthetics and their doses, potential complications related to the technique are evaluated. A comparison of local, general and regional anesthesia methods is also presented. Local anaesthesia technique has a short learning curve requiring simple training. It is easy to learn and apply, and its use is in open anterior repairs a nice way for health care economics. Local anesthesia has been shown to have certain advantages over general and regional anesthesia in inguinal hernia repairs. It is more economic and requires a shorter time in the operating room and shorter stay in the institution. It causes less postoperative pain, requires less analgesic consumption; avoids nausea, vomiting, and urinary retention. Patients can mobilize and take oral liquids and solid foods much earlier. Most importantly, local anesthesia is the most suitable type of anesthesia in elder, fragile patients and patients with ASA II-IV scores.

  19. EFFECTS OF ETHYLENE OXIDE RESTERILISATION AND IN-VITRO DEGRADATION ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF PARTIALLY ABSORBABLE COMPOSITE HERNIA MESHES.

    PubMed

    Endogan, T; Ozyaylali, I; Kulacoglu, H; Serbetci, K; Kiyak, G; Hasirci, N

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic mesh repair for abdominal wall hernias is widely used because of its technical simplicity and low hernia recurrence rates. The most commonly used material is pure polypropylene mesh, however newer composite materials are recommended by some centers because of their advantages. However, these meshes are more expensive than pure polypropylene meshes. Resterilisation of a pure polypropylene mesh has been shown to be quite safe, and many centers prefer slicing a large mesh into smaller pieces that suitable for hernia type or defect size. Nevertheless there is no data about the safety after resterilisation of the composite meshes. To search the effects of resterilisation and In vitro degradation in phosphate buffered saline solution on the physical structure and the mechanical properties of partially absorbable lightweigth meshes. Laboratory-based research. Two composite meshes were used in the study: One mesh is consisted of monofilament polypropylene and monofilament polyglecaprone--a copolymer of glycolide and epsilon (ε)-caprolactone--(Ultrapro®, 28 g/m2, Ethicon, Hamburg, Germany),andthe otherone consisted of multifilamentpolypropyleneandmultifilament polyglactine (Vypro II®, 30 g/m2,Ethicon, Hamburg, Germany). Two large meshes were cut into rectangular specimens sized 50x20 mm for mechanical testing and 20x20 mm for In vitro degradation experiments. Meshes were divided into control group with no resterilisation and gas resterilisation. Ethylene oxide gas sterilisation was performed at 55°C for 4.5 hours. In vitro degradation in 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution at 37 ± 1°C for 8 weeks was applied to one subgroup in each mesh group. Tensiometric measurements and scanning electron microscopyic evaluations were completed for control and resterilisation specimens. Regardless of resterilisation, when meshes were exposed to In vitro degradation, all mechanical parameters decreased significantly. Highest reduction in mechanical

  20. Laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. A 7-year two-center experience in 3017patients.

    PubMed

    Kapiris, S A; Brough, W A; Royston, C M; O'Boyle, C; Sedman, P C

    2001-09-01

    This report reviews our experience with 3530 transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repairs in 3017 patients (513 bilateral) over the 7-year period from May 1992 to July 1999. We have continually audited our practice and modified the techniques in response. Unless contraindicated, laparoscopic TAPP repair is considered the procedure of choice at our institution for all reducible inguinal hernias. We initially stapled an 11 x 6 cm polypropylene mesh in the preperitoneal space but now place a 15 x 10 cm mesh in the preperitoneal space with sutured peritoneal closure. There have been a total of 22 recurrences, of which 17 were identified in the first 325 repairs (5%) using the 11 x 6 cm mesh. Five recurrences occurred in the later 3205 repairs (0.16%) (median follow up of 45 months). There was one 30-day death unrelated to the procedure. There have been seven conversions (four due to irreducibility, two due to extensive adhesions, one due to bleeding). Bladder perforations have occurred in seven cases, of which six were recognized immediately and treated laparoscopically without sequelae. There have been seven cases of small bowel obstruction from herniation through the peritoneal closure. Sutured repair of the peritoneum has reduced the incidence of this complication. Four patients had mesh infections, of whom three were treated conservatively. The incidence of postoperative seroma and hematoma was 8%. Median operation time remains at 40 min with a mean hospitalization of 0.9 nights. Sixty percent of TAPP hernia repairs are now performed on the Day Surgical Unit with a 3% admission rate. Median return to normal activities is 7 days. Forty percent of patients require no postoperative analgesia. These figures remain the same whether the hernia is primary, recurrent, unilateral, or bilateral. Consultants performed most operations early in the series, but latterly surgical trainees have performed the majority of these procedures under supervision. Laparoscopic TAPP

  1. The influence of inguinal mesh repair on the spermatic cord: a pilot study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Peiper, Christian; Junge, Karsten; Klinge, Uwe; Strehlau, Eva; Krones, Carsten; Ottinger, A; Schumpelick, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The permanent implantation of a polypropylene mesh during inguinal hernia repair causes chronic inflammatory changes in the surrounding tissue. We investigated the effect of this foreign body reaction on the structures of the spermatic cord in the rabbit. Eight Chinchilla rabbits underwent unilateral inguinal hernia repair by the Lichtenstein technique using Marlex (n = 4) or Ultrapro (n = 4) mesh. The contralateral side was operated upon using the Shouldice repair. Three animals served as controls. Three months after operation we analyzed testicular size, testicular temperature, and arterial perfusion by excitation light of a 780-nm laser after injection of 0.5 mg/kg indocyanin green. Histological evaluation included spermatogenesis (Johnsen score) and foreign-body reaction. Testicular volume increased about 10% after each operation. The decrease of arterial perfusion and testicular temperature was more significant after mesh repair than following Shouldice operation. After mesh implantation we found fewer seminiferous tubules classified as Johnsen 10 (Marlex: 51.3%, Ultrapro: 45.0%) than after Shouldice repair (63.8%) or in the controls (65.8%). The spermatic cord showed a typical foreign-body reaction at the interface between mesh and surrounding tissue, which was not detectable after Shouldice repair. Preserved cremasteric muscle fibers protected the structures of the spermatic cord. The inflammatory foreign-body reaction of the surrounding tissue induced by the inguinal prosthetic mesh includes the structures of the spermatic cord. This may have an influence also on spermatogenesis. Therefore, we recommend strict indications for implantation of a prosthetic mesh during inguinal hernia repair.

  2. Rare complication after totally extraperitoneal endoscopic inguinal hernia repair: Small bowel perforation without peritoneal disruption.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shigehiro; Sakamoto, Tsuguo; Honda, Masayuki; Nishiguchi, Ryohei; Ogawa, Fumihiro

    2016-11-01

    We report a rare case of visceral injury after totally extraperitoneal endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A 48-year-old man underwent needlescopic totally extraperitoneal repair of a direct inguinal hernia. Bleeding from a branch of the inferior epigastric vessels occurred at the beginning of the extraperitoneal dissection with a monopolar electrosurgical device. Hemostasis was prolonged. However, herniorrhaphy and mesh repair were successfully performed, and no peritoneal disruption or pneumoperitoneum was visible. The patient was discharged home on the next day. However, 30 h after this operation, he underwent diagnostic and operative laparoscopy because of acute abdominal pain. Ileal perforation was found and repaired, and pathological examination indicated cautery artifact. Thus, thermal damage to the ileum during the initial operation may have caused the bowel perforation. To the best of our knowledge, no other cases of bowel perforation after totally extraperitoneal repair without peritoneal disruption have been reported.

  3. Pain and convalescence following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-12-01

    Severe pain is usual after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Mesh fixation with titanium tacks may play a key role in the development of acute and chronic pain and alternative fixation methods should therefore be investigated. This PhD thesis was based on three studies and aimed too: 1) assess the intensity and impact of postoperative pain by detailed patient-reported description of pain and convalescence after LVHR (Study I), 2) evaluate the feasibility of fibrin sealant (FS) for mesh fixation in an experimental pig model (Study II), and 3) investigate FS vs. tacks for mesh fixation in LVHR in a randomised, double-blinded, clinical controlled study with acute postoperative pain as the primary outcome (Study III). In Study I - a prospective descriptive study - 35 patients were prospectively included and underwent LVHR. Scores of pain, quality of life, convalescence, fatigue, and general well-being were obtained from each patient. Follow-up was six months. Average pain from postoperative day (POD) 0-2 and POD 0-6 measured on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) was 61 and 48, respectively. Pain scores reached preoperative values at POD 30. The incidence of severe chronic pain was 7%. No parameter predicted postoperative pain significantly. Significant correlations were found between pain, and general well-being (rS= -0.8, p < 0.001), satisfaction (rS= -0.67, p < quality of life score (rS= -0.63, p < 0.001) six months postoperatively. Patients resumed normal daily activity at POD 14. In Study II - a randomised experimental study in pigs - nine pigs were operated laparoscopically with insertion of two different meshes fixed with either FS or tacks. All pigs were euthanized on POD 30. The primary outcome parameter was strength of ingrowth between the mesh and the anterior abdominal wall. A mechanical peel test was performed for each tissue sample. The secondary outcome parameters were grade and strength of adhesions to the mesh, shrinkage and displacement

  4. Effects of ethylene oxide resterilization and in-vitro degradation on mechanical properties of partially absorbable composite hernia meshes.

    PubMed

    Endogan, T; Ozyaylali, I; Kulacoglu, H; Serbetci, K; Kiyak, G; Hasirci, N

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic mesh repair for abdominal wall hernias is widely used because of its technical simplicity and low hernia recurrence rates. The most commonly used material is pure polypropylene mesh, although newer composite materials are recommended by some centers due to their advantages.However, these meshes are more expensive than pure polypropylene meshes. Resterilization of a pure polypropylene mesh has been shown to be quite safe, and many centers prefer slicing a large mesh into smaller pieces, suitable for any hernia type or defect size. Nevertheless there is no data about the safety after resterilization of the composite meshes. The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of resterilization and in vitro degradation in phosphate buffered saline solution on the physical structure and the mechanical properties of partially absorbable lightweight meshes. Two composite meshes were used in the study: One mesh consists of monofilament polypropylene and monofilament polyglecaprone -a copolymer of glycolide and epsilon(ε)- caprolactone - (Ultrapro®, 28 g m2, Ethicon, Hamburg,Germany), and the other one consisted of multifilament polypropylene and multifilament polyglactine (Vypro II®, 30g m2, Ethicon, Hamburg, Germany). Two large meshes were cut into rectangular specimens sized 50 x 20 mm for mechanical testing and 20 x 20 mm for in vitro degradation experiments.Meshes were divided into control group with no resterilization and gas resterilization. Ethylene oxide gas sterilization was performed at 55°C for 4.5 hours. In vitro degradation in 0.01M phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution at 37 ± 1°C for 8 weeks was applied to one subgroup in each mesh group. Tensiometric measurements and scanning electronmicroscopic evaluations were completed for control and resterilization specimens. Regardless of resterilization, when the meshes were exposed to in vitro degradation, all mechanical parameters decreased significantly. Highest reduction in

  5. Randomized, controlled, prospective trial of the use of a mesh to prevent parastomal hernia.

    PubMed

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Bombardo-Junca, Jordi; Moreno-Matias, Juan; Darnell, Anna; Mora-Lopez, Laura; Alcantara-Moral, Manuel; Ayguavives-Garnica, Isidro; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2009-04-01

    The prevalence of terminal parastomal hernia (PH) after colostomy placement may be as high as 50%. The effect of the PH may range from discomfort to life-threatening complications. Surgical procedures for repairing PH are difficult to perform and present a high-failure rate. To reduce the incidence of PH by implanting a lightweight mesh in the sublay position. Randomized, controlled, prospective study. Patients were scheduled for permanent end colostomy surgery to treat cancer of the lower third of the rectum, performed by the same colorectal surgery team. An Ultrapro lightweight mesh was inserted in the sublay position in the study group. Using simple randomization, the sample size required was estimated to be 27 per group. Patients were followed-up clinically and radiologically with abdominal computed tomography by an independent clinician and a radiologist who were all blind to the aims of the study, 1 month and every 6 months after surgery. : The groups were homogeneous in terms of their clinical and demographic characteristics. Surgical time and postoperative morbidity were similar in the 2 groups. Mortality was 0. No mesh intolerance was reported. In the clinical follow-up (median: 29 months, range: 13-49), 11/27 (40.7%) hernias were recorded in the control group compared with 4/27 (14.8%) in the study group (P = 0.03). Abdominal computed tomography identified 14/27 (44.4%) hernias in the control group compared with 6/27 (22.2%) in the study group (P = 0.08). Parastomal placement of a mesh reduces the appearance of PH. The technique is safe, well-tolerated, and does not increase morbidity rates.

  6. Stapled Mesh Reinforcement Technique (SMART) to Prevent Parastomal Hernias: Our Initial Experience and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Macina, Simona; Mandolfino, Francesca; Frascio, Marco; Casaccia, Marco; Stabilini, Cesare; Fornaro, Rosario; Testa, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    Parastomal hernia is one of the most common stoma related complication, with the correlated risk of incarceration, obstruction, and strangulation. The incidence is high (30-50%) and depends on the length of follow up. Different surgical options for repairing are defective with a 25-70% failure and recurrence rate. Prevention of parastomal hernia with mesh reinforcement seems to be effective. Three available trials are recruiting patients: Prism (with matrix porcine prothesis), Prevent (with preperitoneal polypropylene mesh), and the stapled polypropylene mesh stoma reinforcement technique (SMART). We performed the SMART procedure in six patients undergoing definitive colostomy. Our cases show that the procedure is rapid (duration range 15-20 minutes), cost effective (500 euro), and safe (in our experience, there are no post-surgical complications that are procedure-related). A long term follow-up and a higher number of patients will give us confirmation of the initial hopeful results.

  7. ULTRAPRO Hernia System versus lichtenstein repair in treatment of primary inguinal hernias: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Menekse, Ebru; Özdogan, Hatice; Kunt, Mevlüt; Bozkurt, Hilmi; Bali, İlhan; Özdogan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The Lichtenstein repair has been recommended as the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair. However, postoperative discomfort still constitutes a concern and an area for improvement. New mesh materials have been continuously introduced to achieve this goal. The goal of the present study was to investigate the outcomes of ULTRAPRO Hernia System (UHS) compared with Lichtenstein mesh repair. A total of 99 male patients with primary unilateral inguinal hernia were included in the study during the period of September 2010-January 2012. Patients with body mass index>30, comorbid diseases, and anesthetic risk of ASA-III and ASA-IV were excluded. The patients were randomly allocated to operation with the Lichtenstein technique (group L) or UHS. Demographics, operative and postoperative/recovery data, and short- and medium-term outcomes of the patients were recorded. A total of 50 patients in group L and 49 patients in group UHS were analyzed. The median follow-up time for the study was 33 months. There were no significant differences regarding demographics, complications, and rehabilitation between the groups. Overall, there was a prolonged operation time in the UHS group compared with the L group (UHS: 53.7±5.7 minutes; L: 44.5±5.5 minutes; P<0.001). UHS may provide results similar to those for the Lichtenstein technique in open repair of inguinal hernias regarding perioperative course, complications, recovery, and recurrence rates. However, because of reduced costs and the lack of need for the exploration of the preperitoneal space, we conclude that the Lichtenstein technique should be recommended as the first choice.

  8. Evaluation of port site hernias, chronic pain and recurrence rates after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: a monocentric long-term study.

    PubMed

    Liot, Emilie; Bréguet, Romain; Piguet, Valérie; Ris, Frédéric; Volonté, Francesco; Morel, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate hernia appearance at the trocar site after laparoscopic treatment of primary or incisional ventral hernias using an intraperitoneal prosthetic mesh. Chronic pain at the trocar site and primary hernia recurrence were also evaluated. Two-hundred and twenty-six consecutive patients who underwent a standardized laparoscopic hernia repair for primary or incisional ventral hernia at our centre between January 2000 and December 2008 were included. All patients had clinical and radiological examinations. Primary end points were port site hernia and the occurrence of chronic trocar site pain. Secondary end point was primary hernia recurrence. Seventy-eight patients were excluded: 6 declined to participate, 48 were unreachable, and 24 did not meet the inclusion criteria (nine underwent a single site laparoscopic approach, ten died of unrelated disease, three were unable to visit the hospital and two had relocated). After exclusion, 148 remained in our study. Mean follow-up was 49 ± 12.6 months. Mean age at the time of surgery was 60 years (range, 28-83) In total, 504 port sites were clinically and radiologically evaluated, and only one (0.02%) had secondary herniation. Three patients (2.0%) had a recurrent hernia, and 14 (9.5%) had developed chronic pain at time of assessment. Nine patients (6.1%) were re-operated for the recurrent hernia before the follow-up evaluation. The overall recurrence rate is, therefore, 8.1%. Only two minor complications and no major complications occurred after surgery. No mortality was observed. Laparoscopic repair for primary or incisional ventral hernias is a safe surgical approach, with low rates of hernia recurrence and a low morbidity rate. When fascial closure is maintained for 10 mm port sites, the incidence of port site hernias is very low. Five millimetre ports do not require closure.

  9. Single-Port Laparoscopic Parastomal Hernia Repair with Modified Sugarbaker Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turingan, Isidro; Zajkowska, Marta; Tran, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair with modified Sugarbaker technique has become increasingly the operation of choice because of its low recurrence rates. This study aimed to assess feasibility, safety, and efficiency of performing the same operation with single-incision laparoscopic surgery. Materials and Methods: All patients referred from March 2010 to February 2013 were considered for single-port laparoscopic repair with modified Sugarbaker technique. A SILS port (Covidien, Norwalk, Connecticut, USA) was used together with conventional straight dissecting instruments and a 5.5- mm/52-cm/30° laparoscope. Important technical aspects include modified dissection techniques, namely, “inline” and “chopsticks” to overcome loss of triangulation, insertion of a urinary catheter into an ostomy for ostomy limb identification, safe adhesiolysis by avoiding electocautery, saline -jet dissection to demarcate tissue planes, dissection of an entire laparotomy scar to expose incidental incisional hernias, adequate mobilization of an ostomy limb for lateralization, and wide overlapping of defect with antiadhesive mesh. Results: Of 6 patients, 5 underwent single-port laparoscopic repair, and 1 (whose body mass index [BMI] of 39.4 kg/m2 did not permit SILS port placement) underwent multiport repair. Mean defect size was 10 cm, and mean mesh size was 660 cm2 with 4 patients having incidental incisional hernias repaired by the same mesh. Mean operation time was 270 minutes, and mean hospital stay was 4 days. Appliance malfunction ceased immediately, and pain associated with parastomal hernia disappeared. There was no recurrence with a follow-up of 2 to 36 months. Conclusion: Compared with multiport repair, single-port laparoscopic parastomal repair with modified Sugarbaker technique is safe and efficient, and it may eventually become the standard of care. PMID:24680140

  10. Minilaparoscopic Technique for Inguinal Hernia Repair Combining Transabdominal Pre-Peritoneal and Totally Extraperitoneal Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Marcelo P.; Bonin, Eduardo A; Claus, Christiano P.; Silva, Frederico W.; Cury, Antonio M.; Fernandes, Flavio A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Endoscopic surgical repair of inguinal hernia is currently conducted using 2 techniques: the totally extraperitoneal (TEP) and the transabdominal (TAPP) hernia repair. The TEP procedure is technically advantageous, because of the use of no mesh fixation and the elimination of the peritoneal flap, leading to less postoperative pain and faster recovery. The drawback is that TEP is not performed as frequently, because of its complexity and longer learning curve. In this study, we propose a hybrid technique that could potentially become the gold standard of minimally invasive inguinal hernia surgery. This will be achieved by combining established advantages of TEP and TAPP associated with the precision and cosmetics of minilaparoscopy (MINI). Materials and Surgical Technique: Between January and July 2011, 22 patients were admitted for endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. The combined technique was initiated with TAPP inspection and direct visualization of a minilaparoscopic trocar dissection of the preperitoneum space. A10-mm trocar was then placed inside the previously dissected preperitoneal space, using the same umbilical TAPP skin incision. Minilaparoscopic retroperitoneal dissection was completed by TEP, and the surgical procedure was finalized with intraperitoneal review and correction of the preperitoneal work. Discussion: The minilaparoscopic TEP-TAPP combined approach for inguinal hernia is feasible, safe, and allows a simple endoscopic repair. This is achieved by combining features and advantages of both TAPP and TEP techniques using precise and sophisticated MINI instruments. Minilaparoscopic preperitoneal dissection allows a faster and easier creation of the preperitoneal space for the TEP component of the procedure. PMID:23484566

  11. Enterocutaneous fistula as a postoperative complication of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Klein, A M; Banever, T C

    1999-01-01

    Trocar injuries to the small bowel during laparoscopic hernia repair are a rare complication, the most common complications being postoperative neuralgias, scrotal swelling, scrotal ecchymosis, and hematoma. A 15-year-old boy was admitted 5 days status-post transabdominal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair of a symptomatic right pantaloon hernia, with signs and symptoms of a retrocecal abscess. Despite laparotic intervention and appendectomy, the next 2 years passed with almost daily, purulent, right lower quadrant wound drainage, in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. Superficial wound exploration and sinogram in 1996 revealed a sinus tract in direct communication with the small bowel. Elective laparotomy in December 1997 involved a successful resection of a 2.5-cm fistula with involved mesh, and the communicating small bowel through a midline incision, followed by a primary closure of the small-bowel opening. The patient has recovered without complications.

  12. Pain and quality of life after inguinal hernia surgery: a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing lightweight vs heavyweight mesh (Supermesh Study).

    PubMed

    Bona, Stefano; Rosati, Riccardo; Opocher, Enrico; Fiore, Barbara; Montorsi, Marco

    2017-08-08

    Mesh repair has significantly reduced recurrence rate after groin hernia surgery. Recently, attention has shifted to issues such as chronic pain and discomfort, leading to development of lightweight and partially re-absorbable meshes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of lightweight mesh vs heavyweight mesh on post-operative pain, discomfort and quality of life in short and medium term after inguinal hernia surgery. Eight hundred and eight patients with primary inguinal hernia were allocated to anterior repair (Lichtenstein technique) using a lightweight mesh (Ultrapro(®)) or a heavyweight mesh (Prolene(®)). Primary outcomes were incidence of chronic pain and discomfort at 6-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints were quality of life (QoL), pain and complication at 1 week, 1 and 6 months. At 6 months, 25% of patients reported pain of some intensity; severe pain was reported by 1% of patients in both groups. A statistically significant difference in favour of lightweight mesh was found at multivariable analysis for pain (1 week and 6 months after surgery: p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively) and QoL at 1 month and 6 months (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02, respectively). There was no difference in complication rate and no hernia recurrences were detected. The use of lightweight mesh in anterior Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair significantly reduced the incidence of pain and favourably affected the perceived quality of life at 6 months after surgery compared to heavyweight mesh.

  13. Comparison of outcomes of synthetic mesh vs suture repair of elective primary ventral herniorrhaphy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mylan T; Berger, Rachel L; Hicks, Stephanie C; Davila, Jessica A; Li, Linda T; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2014-05-01

    More than 350,000 ventral hernias are repaired in the United States annually, of which 75% are primary ventral hernias (eg, umbilical or epigastric hernias). Despite the volume, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of sutures vs mesh for primary ventral hernia repairs. To compare suture vs mesh repairs for 3 outcomes: hernia recurrence, surgical site infection (SSI), and seromas. Randomized controlled trials, case-control, and cohort studies were identified from OVID, PubMed, and reference lists from January 1, 1980, through June 1, 2012. English-language studies with adult patients were eligible for review if there was mention of both suture and mesh techniques used during elective repair of a primary ventral hernia. Two study authors independently reviewed the 1492 articles originally identified and selected 9 for analysis. The Downs and Black 26-item checklist was used to critically assess the risk of bias. Year of publication, study design, inclusion and exclusion criteria, number of patients, follow-up duration, use of preoperative antibiotics, size of hernias repaired, age, body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, repair techniques, incidence of hernia recurrence, seroma, and SSI. Three separate univariate meta-analyses for each end point followed by a multivariate meta-analysis were performed. Across all 9 studies, there were 637 mesh repairs and 1145 suture repairs. The pooled mesh repairs demonstrated a 2.7% recurrence rate, 7.7% seroma rate, and 7.3% SSI rate The pooled suture repairs demonstrated an 8.2% recurrence rate, 3.8% seroma rate, and 6.6% SSI rate. On the basis of results from the multivariate meta-analysis, recurrences (log odds ratio , −1.04; 95% CI, −1.58 to −0.52) were more common with suture repair, whereas seromas (0.84; 0.27-1.41) and SSIs (0.65; 0.12-1.18) were more common with mesh repair. Mesh repair has a small reduction in

  14. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Lysostaphin-Coated Hernia Repair Meshes▿

    PubMed Central

    Satishkumar, Rohan; Sankar, Sriram; Yurko, Yuliya; Lincourt, Amy; Shipp, John; Heniford, B. Todd; Vertegel, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infections by antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains are among the most common postoperative complications in surgical hernia repair with synthetic mesh. Surface coating of medical devices/implants using antibacterial peptides and enzymes has recently emerged as a potentially effective method for preventing infections. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of hernia repair meshes coated by the antimicrobial enzyme lysostaphin at different initial concentrations. Lysostaphin was adsorbed on pieces of polypropylene (Ultrapro) mesh with binding yields of ∼10 to 40% at different coating concentrations of between 10 and 500 μg/ml. Leaching of enzyme from the surface of all the samples was studied in 2% (wt/vol) bovine serum albumin in phosphate-buffered saline buffer at 37°C, and it was found that less than 3% of adsorbed enzyme desorbed from the surface after 24 h of incubation. Studies of antibacterial activity against a cell suspension of S. aureus were performed using turbidity assay and demonstrated that the small amount of enzyme leaching from the mesh surface contributes to the lytic activity of the lysostaphin-coated samples. Colony counting data from the broth count (model for bacteria in wound fluid) and wash count (model for colonized bacteria) for the enzyme-coated samples showed significantly decreased numbers of CFU compared to uncoated samples (P < 0.05). A pilot in vivo study showed a dose-dependent efficacy of lysostaphin-coated meshes in a rat model of S. aureus infection. The antimicrobial activity of the lysostaphin-coated meshes suggests that such enzyme-leaching surfaces could be efficient at actively resisting initial bacterial adhesion and preventing subsequent colonization of hernia repair meshes. PMID:21709102

  15. Anterior Tension-Free Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernia Under Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Gianetta, Ezio; Cuneo, Sonia; Vitale, Bruno; Camerini, Giovanni; Marini, Paola; Stella, Mattia

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe a 7-year experience with recurrent inguinal hernia repair performed mainly with tension-free mesh or plug technique under local anesthesia through the anterior approach, and to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this method of treatment. Methods One hundred forty-five elective and 1 emergency herniorrhaphies for recurrent groin hernia were performed in 141 subjects (134 men and 7 women) with a mean age of 65 years (range 30–89). Concomitant medical and surgical problems were present in 73% and 8% of subjects, respectively. In 28 instances, the relapsed hernia had already been operated on once or twice for recurrence. A traditional hernioplasty had been previously performed in the vast majority of cases (136). Tension-free mesh or plug techniques through an anterior approach under local anesthesia were performed in 144 reoperations. Preperitoneal mesh repair and general or spinal anesthesia were used in all but one case when herniorrhaphy was performed during simultaneous operations. Results Mean hospital stay after surgery was 1.5 days (range 3 hours–14 days). No perioperative deaths occurred in this series. General complications were one case of acute intestinal bleeding and two cases of urinary retention. Local complications consisted of eight (5.5%) minor complications and one case of orchitis (0.7%) followed by testicular atrophy. In no instance was postoperative neuralgia or chronic pain reported. Two re-recurrences occurred. Conclusions Given the low complication rate in this and other reported series and the absence of surgical or general complications described after preperitoneal open or laparoscopic repair and after general and spinal anesthesia, anterior mesh repair under local anesthesia seems to be a low-cost surgical technique that can be safely and effectively used even in a teaching hospital for the treatment of the majority of patients with recurrent groin hernias. PMID:10636113

  16. Long-term anisotropic mechanical response of surgical meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gascón, B; Peña, E; Pascual, G; Rodríguez, M; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B

    2012-01-01

    Routine hernia repair surgery involves the implant of synthetic mesh. However, this type of procedure may give rise to pain and bowel incarceration and strangulation, causing considerable patient disability. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term behaviour of three commercial meshes used to repair the partially herniated abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits: the heavyweight (HW) mesh, Surgipro(®) and lightweight (LW) mesh, Optilene(®), both made of polypropylene (PP), and a mediumweight (MW) mesh, Infinit(®), made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The implanted meshes were mechanical and histological assessed at 14, 90 and 180 days post-implant. This behaviour was compared to the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the unrepaired abdominal wall in control non-operated rabbits. Both uniaxial mechanical tests conducted in craneo-caudal and perpendicular directions and histological findings revealed substantial collagen growth over the repaired hernial defects causing stiffness in the repair zone, and thus a change in the original properties of the meshes. The mechanical behaviour of the healthy tissue in the craneo-caudal direction was not reproduced by any of the implanted meshes after 14 days or 90 days of implant, whereas in the perpendicular direction, SUR and OPT achieved similar behaviour. From a mechanical standpoint, the anisotropic PP-lightweight meshes may be considered a good choice in the long run, which correlates with the structure of the regenerated tissue.

  17. Outcomes of an innovative training course in laparoscopic hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Light, D; Bawa, S; Gallagher, P; Horgan, L

    2017-07-06

    INTRODUCTION The Ethicon™ laparoscopic inguinal groin hernia training (LIGHT) course is an educational course based on three days of teaching on laparoscopic hernia surgery. The first day involves didactic lectures with tutorials. The second day involves practical cadaveric procedures in laparoscopic hernia surgery. The third day involves direct supervision by a consultant surgeon during laparoscopic hernia surgery on a real patient. We reviewed our outcomes for procedures performed on real patients on the final day of the course for early complications and outcomes. METHODS A retrospective study was undertaken of patients who had laparoscopic hernia surgery as part of the LIGHT course from 2013 to 2015. A matched control cohort of patients who had elective laparoscopic hernia surgery over the study period was identified. These patients had their surgery performed by the same consultant general surgeons involved in delivering the course. All patients were followed up at 6 weeks postoperatively. RESULTS A total of 60 patients had a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair and 23 patients had a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair during the course. The mean operative time for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair was 48 minutes for trainees (range 22-90 minutes) and 35 minutes for consultant surgeons (range 18-80 minutes). There were no intraoperative injuries or returns to theatre in either group. All the patients operated on during the course were successfully performed as daycase procedures. The mean operative time for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair was 64 minutes for trainees (range 40-120 minutes) and 51 minutes for consultant surgeons (range 30-130 minutes). CONCLUSIONS The outcomes of patients operated on during the LIGHT course are comparable to procedures performed by a consultant. Supervised operating by trainees is a safe and effective educational model in hernia surgery.

  18. [Repair in situ of parastomal hernia with modified sublay-keyhole technique].

    PubMed

    Fei, Yang; Li, Jiye; Yao, Sheng

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the procedure and the effectiveness of modified Sublay-Keyhole technique for repair in situ of parastomal hernia. Between October 2007 and March 2010, 11 patients with parastomal hernia underwent modified Sublay-Keyhole technique for repair in situ. There were 5 males and 6 females with an average age of 63 years (range, 55-72 years). The average body mass index was 28.2 (range, 23.5-32.5). All stomas in patients were permanent, including 6 end colostomies caused by abdominal perineal resection for rectal cancer, 2 end ileostomies secondary to total colon resection for ulcerative colitis, and 3 end ileostomies following ileal conduit for bladder resection. One patient underwent previous prothetic repair with polypropylene mesh. The average time from last operation to admission was 2.5 years (range, 1-4.5 years). According to classification criteria of George Eliot hospital, 3 cases were classified as grade 2b, 2 as grade 3a, 5 as grade 3b, and 1 as grade 4. The average longest diameter of hernia ring was 9.5 cm (range, 6-12 cm). Reconstructions of abdominal wall in all patients were performed successfully through modified Sublay-Keyhole technique. The average size of hernia ring was 75.5 cm2 (range, 30-112 cm2), and the average size of polypropylene mesh was 280.5 cm2 (range, 175-360 cm2). The average operative time was 165 minutes (range, 120-195 minutes) and the average postoperative hospitalization days were 11 days (range, 9-14 days). All patients achieved healing of incision by first intention with no abdominal wall infection. Seroma and hematoma occurred in 2 patients and 1 patient, respectively, and were cured by needle aspiration and pressure bandaging. All patients were followed up 26.3 months on average (range, 10-39 months). One case suffered from parastomal hernia recurrence at 11 months postoperatively because of suture loosening and too wide aperture in mesh; and re-sutures in both mesh aperture and myofascial dehiscence were given and

  19. Laparoscopic repair of complex ventral hernia facilitated by pre-operative chemical component relaxation using Botulinum Toxin A.

    PubMed

    Elstner, K E; Jacombs, A S W; Read, J W; Rodriguez, O; Edye, M; Cosman, P H; Dardano, A N; Zea, A; Boesel, T; Mikami, D J; Craft, C; Ibrahim, N

    2016-04-01

    The operative management of complex ventral hernia poses a formidable challenge, despite recent advances in surgical techniques. Recurrence rates after complex ventral hernia repair remain high, and increase with each failed attempt. This study examines the effect of pre-operative abdominal wall chemical component relaxation using Botulinum Toxin A (BTA) to induce temporary flaccid paralysis in order to facilitate laparoscopic repair of large complex ventral hernia. This is a prospective evaluation of 27 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 who underwent ultrasound guided BTA injections to the lateral abdominal wall muscles prior to elective complex ventral hernia repair. Non-contrast serial CT imaging was obtained pre- and post-BTA injection to measure change in fascial defect size and abdominal wall muscle thickness and length. Fascial defects were closed and hernias repaired using laparoscopic or laparoscopic-assisted intra-peritoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) techniques. 27 patients received pre-operative BTA injections which were well tolerated with no complications. Comparison of pre-BTA and post-BTA CT imaging demonstrated a significant increase in mean length of the lateral abdominal wall from 15.7 cm pre-BTA to 19.9 cm post-BTA (p < 0.0001), with mean unstretched length gain of 4.2 cm/side (range 0-11.7 cm/side). All hernias were surgically reduced and repaired with mesh, with no early recurrences. Pre-operative administration of BTA is a safe and effective technique in the pre-operative preparation of patients undergoing elective complex ventral hernia repair. This technique lengthens and relaxes the laterally retracted abdominal muscles and enables laparoscopic closure of large complex ventral hernia.

  20. Quality of life and outcomes for femoral hernia repair: does laparoscopy have an advantage?

    PubMed

    Cox, T C; Huntington, C R; Blair, L J; Prasad, T; Heniford, B T; Augenstein, V A

    2017-02-01

    Due to their relative scarcity and to limit single-center bias, multi-center data are needed to study femoral hernias. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes and quality of life (QOL) following laparoscopic vs. open repair of femoral hernias. The International Hernia Mesh Registry was queried for femoral hernia repairs. Laparoscopic vs. open techniques were assessed for outcomes and QOL, as quantified by the Carolinas Comfort Scale (CCS), preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Outcomes were evaluated using the standard statistical analysis. A total of 80 femoral hernia repairs were performed in 73 patients: 37 laparoscopic and 43 open. There was no difference in mean age (54.7 ± 14.6 years), body mass index (24.2 ± 3.8 kg/m(2)), gender (60.3 % female), or comorbidities (p > 0.05). The hernias were recurrent in 21 % of the cases with an average of 1.23 ± 0.6 prior repairs (p > 0.1). Preoperative CCS scores were similar for both groups and indicated that 59.7 % of patients reported pain and 46.4 % had movement limitations (p > 0.05). Operative time was equivalent (47.2 ± 21.2 vs. 45.9 ± 14.8 min, p = 0.82). There was no difference in postoperative complications, with an overall 8.2 % abdominal wall complications rate (p > 0.05). The length of stay was shorter in the laparoscopic group (0.5 ± 0.6 vs. 1.3 ± 1.6 days, p = 0.02). Follow-up was somewhat longer in the open group (23.8 ± 10.2 vs. 17.3 ± 10.9 months, p = 0.02). There was one recurrence, which was in the laparoscopic group (3.1 vs. 0 %, p = 0.4). QOL outcomes at all time points demonstrated no difference for pain, movement limitation, or mesh sensation. Postoperative QOL scores improved for both groups when compared to preoperative scores. In this prospective international multi-institution study of 80 femoral hernia repairs, no difference was found for operative times, long-term outcomes, or QOL in the treatment of femoral

  1. The Burnia: Laparoscopic Sutureless Inguinal Hernia Repair in Girls.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Nathan M; Puentes, Maria C; Leopold, Rodrigo; Ortega, Mabel; Godoy-Lenz, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in children is in evolution. Multiple methods of passing the suture around the peritoneum at the level of the internal inguinal ring exist. Cauterization of the peritoneum at the internal ring is thought to increase scarring and decrease recurrence. We have employed a sutureless, cautery only, laparoscopic single port repair of inguinal hernias and patent processus vaginalis (PPV) in girls. After institutional ethical review was obtained, a retrospective review of sutureless laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs in girls by 4 surgeons at separate institutions was performed. Patient demographics, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcomes were recorded and analyzed. The technique involves an umbilical 30° camera and either a separate 3 mm stab incision in the midclavicular line or a 3 mm Maryland grasper placed next to the camera, and the distal most portion of the hernia sac is grasped and pulled into the abdomen and cauterized obliterating the sac. Eighty inguinal hernias were repaired using this technique in 67 girls between July 2009 and September 2015. The ages and weights ranged from 1 month to 16 years and from 2 to 69 kg, respectively. There was one conversion to open approach because an incarcerated ovary was too close to the ring. A single umbilical incision was utilized in 85%. Fifty-seven percent patients had hernias on the right whereas 42% had hernias on the left. Of the patients with presumed unilateral hernias, 22 patients were found to have PPV and were treated through the same incisions, 17/22 were found during a contralateral hernia surgery and 5/22 were found incidentally during appendectomy. Average operative time for unilateral and bilateral hernias was 22 minutes (5-38 minutes) and 31 minutes (11-65 minutes), respectively. No patient required a hospital stay because of the hernia repair. At an average of 25 months follow-up (1.6-75 months), there were no recurrences. The only complication was

  2. WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery with the goal of defining recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. PMID:24289453

  3. Pectus excavatum repair using Prolene polypropylene mesh.

    PubMed

    Rasihashemi, Seyed Ziaeddin; Ramouz, Ali

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to assess the clinical outcomes of our surgical technique for repair of pectus excavatum using Prolene polypropylene mesh. Among 29 patients with pectus excavatum, the major complaint was cosmetic dissatisfaction, and the main symptom was exercise dyspnea in 15 patients. The Haller index used to assess pectus excavatum severity; it was significant in 22 patients. In all patients, a 2-layer sheet of Prolene polypropylene mesh was placed behind the sternum. No serious complication was observed postoperatively, and all patients were satisfied with the cosmetic result. Mitral valve prolapse improved in all cases after 3 months. Spirometry revealed improved pulmonary function after surgery. With due attention to the advantages of Prolene polypropylene mesh, such as remaining permanently in place, adapting to various stresses encountered in the body, resisting degradation by tissue enzymes, and trimming without unraveling, we concluded that this mesh is suitable for use as posterior sternal support in pectus excavatum patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Hiatal Hernia Repair Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Victoria; Kuwada, Timothy; Gersin, Keith; Simms, Connie; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    Large hiatal hernias are notorious for their high recurrence rates after conventional repair. Recurrence rates have been described to be higher in obese patients due to increased intra-abdominal pressure. We hypothesized that patients who undergo hiatal hernia repair (HHR) with bariatric surgery (BAR) will have a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with fundoplication (FP) due to the decrease in intra-abdominal pressure observed with weight loss. This was an Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review. The outcomes of patients who underwent HHR+BAR as well as patients who had HHR+FP only from 2007 to 2014 were reviewed. Patients who had small hiatal hernias (<2 cm), underwent an anterior repair, or had gastropexy only were excluded. The primary outcome was hernia recurrence and reflux resolution. The outcomes of 58 patients who had HHR+BAR were compared with 30 patients with HHR+FP. Hernia recurrence rate for HHR+BAR was 12 per cent, whereas hernia recurrence rate for HHR+FP was 38 per cent (P < 0.01). Reflux resolution for HHR+FP was 78 per cent, whereas reflux improvement rate for HHR+BAR was 84 per cent (P = n.s.). Combining HHR with BAR leads to a lower hernia recurrence rate when compared to patients who undergo HHR with FP.

  5. Online patient resources for hernia repair: analysis of readability.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Christina R; Chuang, Danielle J; Lee, Bernard T

    2014-07-01

    The limited functional health literacy of a significant portion of the adult US population negatively affects their access to appropriate online health information about hernia repair surgery. The National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association recommend that patient-directed content should be written at a sixth-grade reading level. This study aims to evaluate readability of the most frequently used Internet resources for patient information about hernia repair relative to average American literacy. A web search for "hernia repair surgery" was performed, and the top 12 Web sites were identified. Relevant articles (n=102) with patient-directed content immediately available from the main sites were downloaded. The 12 most popular consumer magazines in circulation were also identified, and using the same method, the first 10 articles were downloaded from each magazine's Web site for comparison. Readability was assessed using 10 established analyses. A t-test was used to compare the average grade level of hernia repair and magazine articles for each readability test. Web-based information about hernia repair had an overall average reading grade level of 13.6. All 102 articles were above the recommended sixth-grade reading level; these were significantly more difficult to read than the comparison group of articles from popular magazines. Online patient-directed information about hernia repair uniformly exceeds the recommended reading level and may be too difficult to be understood by a large portion of the US population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Testicular atrophy as a consequence of inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Reid, I; Devlin, H B

    1994-01-01

    Testicular atrophy is an uncommon but well recognized complication of inguinal hernia repair and one that frequently results in litigation. A series of ten cases of testicular atrophy occurring after hernia repair in nine patients is presented. Identifiable risk factors were present in eight instances. Surgeons should make careful enquiries as to previous groin or scrotal surgery and, when indicated, warn the patient before surgery of the increased risk of testicular atrophy. Overzealous dissection of a distal hernia sac, dislocation of the testis from the scrotum into the wound and concomitant scrotal surgery should all be avoided.

  7. Planned hernia repair and late abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, Ari; Tukiainen, Erkki

    2012-03-01

    Planned ventral hernia is a management strategy in which the abdominal fascial layer has been left unclosed and the viscera are covered only with original or grafted skin. Leaving the fascia open can be deliberate or unavoidable and most commonly results from staged repair of the abdominal wall due to trauma, peritonitis, pancreatitis, abdominal vascular emergencies, or abdominal compartment syndrome. The abdominal wall defects can be categorized as type I or II defects depending on whether there is intact, stable skin coverage. In defects with intact skin coverage, the most commonly used methods are the components separation technique and a prosthetic repair, sometimes used in combination. The advantages of the components separation technique is the ability to close the linea alba at the midline, creating a better functional result than a repair with inert mesh. Although the reherniation risk seems higher after components separation, the risk of infection is considerably lower. With a type II defect, with absent or unstable skin coverage, fascial repair alone is inadequate. Of the more complex reconstruction techniques, the use of a free tensor fasciae latae (TFL) flap utilizing a saphenous vein arteriovenous loop is the most promising. The advantages of the TFL flap include constant anatomy of the pedicle, a strong fascial layer, large-caliber vessels matching the size of the AV loop, and the ability to use large flaps (up to 20 × 35 cm). Whatever technique is used, the repair of complex abdominal wall defects requires close collaboration with plastic and abdominal surgeons, which is best managed in specialized centers.

  8. Laparoscopic approach to recurrent incisional hernia repair: a 3-year experience.

    PubMed

    Verbo, Alessandro; Petito, Luigi; Manno, Alberto; Coco, Claudio; Mattana, Claudio; Lurati, Massimo; Pedretti, Giorgio; Rizzo, Gianluca; Sermoneta, Daniel; Lodoli, Claudio; Nunziata, Joseph; D'Ugo, Domenico

    2007-10-01

    Incisional hernias are one of the most frequent complications of open abdominal surgery. The incidence of relapses after a conventional repair procedure is higher in recurrent than in primary cases (30%-50% vs. 11%-20%). The laparoscopic approach can prevent the complications associated with the conventional approach when dealing with recurrent incisional hernias. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic treatment in such cases. We prospectively analyzed data from 41 consecutive patients with recurrent incisional hernias, who submitted to a laparoscopic repair procedure with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene Dual Mesh (Gore-Tex Dual Mesh Plus Biomaterial; W.L. Gore 8 Associates) from December 2001 to December 2004. All of the patients underwent clinical follow-up at 1, 6, and 12 months and then yearly. An ultrasound scan of the abdominal wall was performed at 6 and 12 months after the procedure. The parameters considered for the analysis were: mesh size, operating time, hospital stay, postoperative complications, and recurrences. The defects were usually localized along midline laparotomies. The mean mesh size was 400 cm2, the mean operating time was 68 minutes, and the mean length of hospital stay was 2.7 days. Complications were encountered in 17% of patients. The mean follow-up was 38 months (range, 18-54). Recurrence was reported in 1 case only (2.4%), which occurred within the first 6 months after the operation. The laparoscopic repair of recurrent incisional hernia seems to be an effective alternative to the conventional approach, as it can give lower recurrence and complication rates.

  9. Titanium Mesh Nasal Repair without Nasal Lining.

    PubMed

    Zenga, Joseph; Kao, Katherine; Chen, Collin; Gross, Jennifer; Hahn, Samuel; Chi, John J; Branham, Gregory H

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe outcomes for patients who underwent titanium mesh reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects without internal lining repair. This is a retrospective cohort study. Patients with through-and-through nasal defects were identified at a single academic institution between 2008 and 2016. Nasal reconstruction was performed with either titanium mesh and external skin reconstruction without repair of the intranasal lining or traditional three-layer closure. Five patients underwent titanium mesh reconstruction and 11 underwent traditional three-layer repair. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-66 months). The only significant difference between groups was older age in patients undergoing titanium reconstruction (mean, 81 vs. 63 years; difference of 18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4-32 years). Defect extent including overall size and structures removed was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Paramedian forehead flap was the most common external reconstruction in both groups (100% for titanium mesh and 73% for three-layer closure). Time under anesthesia was significantly shorter for titanium mesh reconstruction (median, 119 vs. 314 minutes; difference of 195; 95% CI, 45-237). Estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay were similar between groups (p > 0.05). Complication rates were substantial although not significantly different, 40 and 36% in titanium and three-layer reconstruction, respectively (p > 0.05). All patients with complications after titanium reconstruction had prior or postoperative radiotherapy. Titanium mesh reconstruction of through-and-through nasal defects can successfully be performed without reconstruction of the intranasal lining, significantly decreasing operative times. This reconstructive technique may not be suitable for patients who undergo radiotherapy.

  10. Laparoscopic Repair of a Traumatic Intrapericardial Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Kuy, SreyRam; Weigelt, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare injury. We present a case of an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia from blunt trauma. In this report we will review the current literature and also describe the first report of a primary laparoscopic repair of the defect. Case Description: A 38-year-old unrestrained male passenger had blunt chest and abdominal trauma from a motor vehicle collision. Two months later, on a computed tomography scan, he was found to have an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia. The defect was repaired primarily through a laparoscopic approach. Discussion: Symptoms of intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia are chest pain, upper abdominal pain, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Chest computed tomography is the most useful diagnostic test to define the defect. Even when the injury is diagnosed late, laparoscopy can be used for primary and patch repair. PMID:24960502

  11. Tumescent local anesthetic technique for inguinal hernia repairs

    PubMed Central

    Chyung, Ju Won; Kwon, Yujin; Cho, Dong Hui; Lee, Kyung Bok; Park, Sang Soo; Yoon, Jin; Jang, Yong Seog

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the adequacy and feasibility of a tumescent solution containing lidocaine and bupivacaine for inguinal hernia repairs. Methods The medical records of 146 consecutive inguinal hernia patients with 157 hernia repairs using the tumescent local anesthesia technique performed by a single surgeon between September 2009 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Results The mean operation time (±standard deviation) and hospital stay were 64.5 ± 17.6 minutes and 2.7 ± 1.5 days. The postoperative complication rate was 17.8%. There were four cases of recurrences (2.5%) at a mean follow-up of 24 ± 14 months. Conclusion Our results suggest that local anesthesia with the tumescent technique is an effective and safe modality for inguinal hernia repairs. PMID:25485241

  12. Simultaneous Umbilical Hernia Repair with Transumbilical Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Placement.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Michael J; Loukas, Marios; Oakes, W Jerry; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-01-01

    Recently, placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt via a transumbilical approach has been reported. Herein, we report the repair of an umbilical hernia via the same incision and introduction of the distal end of a ventricultoperitoneal shunt into the peritoneal cavity in 3 patients. A case illustration is included. Both hernia repair and placement of the distal end of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt were uncomplicated in our small case series. To our knowledge, simultaneous repair of an umbilical hernia followed by transumbilical shunt placement has not been reported. As umbilical hernias are so common in infants, this finding, based on our experience, should not exclude placement of peritoneal tubing in the same setting. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Complications of groin hernia repair: their prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Gaines, R D

    1978-03-01

    An estimated overall complication rate of approximately ten percent is found in the half million patients who annually undergo groin hernia repair in the United States. Certain features in the operative technique are emphasized which should prevent many of these complications.Intraoperative complications during the groin hernia repair are primarily hemorrhage and injury to the vas deferens, the three nerves in the area, the vascular supply of the testis, and the abdominal and pelvic viscera. Miscellaneous intraoperative complications relate to problems associated with the repair of massive hernias, missed hernia, and the loss of strangulated bowel into the abdominal cavity.Early postoperative complications may be either systemic or local with cardiac and respiratory conditions comprising the former group. The early local complications are primarily wound problems of infection, hematoma formation, and scrotal swelling involving the skin and testis. High ligation in excision of the sac in all hernias, repair of the defect in the plane of its occurrence, and suture of fascia to fascia in the same plane without tension are the basic tenets of inguinal hernia repair which should result in a low incidence of recurrence.The most effective prophylactic measures necessary for the prevention of complications considered are a thorough knowledge of inguinofemoral anatomy, mature surgical judgment, and meticulous surgical technique.

  14. LAPAROSCOPIC REPAIR OF LUMBAR HERNIA (GRYNFELT): TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION.

    PubMed

    Claus, Christiano Marlo Paggi; Nassif, Lucas Thá; Aguilera, Yan Sacha; Ramos, EduardoJose Brommelstroet; Coelho, Julio Cesar Uili

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are rare. Usually manifest with reducible volume increase in the post-lateral region of the abdomen and may occur in two specific anatomic defects: the triangles of Grynfelt (upper) and Petit (lower). Despite controversies with better repair, laparoscopic approach, following the same principle of the treatment of inguinal hernias, seems to present significant advantages compared to conventional/open surgeries. However, some technical and anatomical details of the region, non usual to general surgeons, are fundamental for proper repair. To present systematization of laparoscopic transabdominal technique for repair of lumbar hernias with emphasis on anatomical details. : Patient is placed in the lateral decubitus. Laparoscopic access to abdominal cavity is performed by open technique on the left flank, 1.5 cm incision, followed by introduction of 11 mm trocar for a 30º scope. Two other 5 mm trocars, in the left anterior axillary line, are inserted into the abdominal cavity. The peritoneum of the left paracolic gutter is incised from the 10th rib to the iliac crest. Peritoneum and retroperitoneal is dissected. Reduction of all hernia contents is performed to demonstrate the hernia and its size. A 10x10 cm polypropylene mesh is introduced into the retroperitoneal space and fixed with absorbable staples covering the defect with at least 3-4 cm overlap. Subsequently, is carried out the closure of the peritoneum of paracolic gutter. This technique was used in one patient with painful increased volume in the left lower back and bulging on the left lumbar region. CT scan was performed and revealed left superior lumbar hernia. Operative time was 45 min and there were no complications and hospitalization time of 24 h. As in inguinal hernia repair, laparoscopic approach is safe and effective for the repair of lumbar hernias, especially if the anatomical details are adequately respected. As hérnias lombares são raras. Geralmente se manifestam com aumento de

  15. [Median incisional hernias and coexisting parastomal hernias : new surgical strategies and an algorithm for simultaneous repair].

    PubMed

    Köhler, G

    2014-08-01

    The co-occurrence of incisional and parastomal hernias (PSH) remains a surgical challenge. Standardized treatment guidelines are missing, and the patients concerned require an individualized surgical approach. The laparoscopic techniques can be performed with incised and/or stoma-lateralizing flat meshes with intraperitoneal onlay placement. The purely laparoscopic and laparoscopic-assisted approaches with 3-D meshes offer advantages regarding the complete coverage of the edges of the stomal areas and the option of equilateral or contralateral stoma relocation in cases of PSH, which are difficult to handle due to scarring, adhesions, and large fascial defects > 5 cm with intestinal hernia sac contents. A relevant stoma prolapse can be relocated by tunnel-like preformed 3-D meshes and shortening the stoma bowel. The positive effect on prolapse prevention arises from the dome of the 3-D mesh, which is directed toward the abdominal cavity and tightly fits to the bowel. In cases of large incisional hernias (> 8-10 cm in width) or young patients with higher physical demands, an open abdominal wall reconstruction in sublay technique is required. Component separation techniques that enable tension-free ventral fascial closure should be preferred to mesh-supported defect bridging methods. The modified posterior component separation with transversus abdominis release (TAR) and the minimally invasive anterior component separation are superior to the original Ramirez technique with respect to wound morbidity. By using 3-D textile implants, which were specially designed for parastomal hernia prevention, the stoma can be brought out through the lateral abdominal wall without increased risk of parastomal hernia or prolapse development. An algorithm for surgical treatment, in consideration of the complexity of combined hernias, is introduced for the first time.

  16. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair by the hook method in emergency setting in children presenting with incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kin Wai Edwin; Lee, Kim Hung; Tam, Yuk Him; Sihoe, Jennifer Dart Yin; Cheung, Sing Tak; Mou, Jennifer Wai Cheung

    2011-10-01

    The development of laparoscopic hernia repair has provided an alternative approach to the management of incarcerated inguinal hernia in children. Different laparoscopic techniques for hernia repair have been described. However, we hereby review the role of laparoscopic hernia repair using the hook method in the emergency setting for incarcerated inguinal hernias in children. A retrospective review was conducted of all children who presented with incarcerated inguinal hernia and underwent laparoscopic hernia repair using the hook method in emergency setting between 2004 and 2010. There were a total of 15 boys and 1 girl with a mean age of 30 ± 36 months (range, 4 months to 12 years). The hernia was successfully reduced after sedation in 7 children and after general anesthesia in 4 children. In 5 children, the hernia was reduced by a combined manual and laparoscopic-assisted approach. Emergency laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using the hook method was performed after reduction of the hernia. The presence of preperitoneal fluid secondary to recent incarceration facilitated the dissection of the preperitoneal space by the hernia hook. All children underwent successful reduction and hernia repair. The median operative time was 37 minutes. There was no postoperative complication. The median hospital stay was 3 days. At a median follow-up of 40 months, there was no recurrence of the hernia or testicular atrophy. Emergency laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair by the hook method is safe and feasible. Easier preperitoneal dissection was experienced, and repair of the contralateral patent processus vaginalis can be performed in the same setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair more effective than open repair?

    PubMed

    O, Aly; A, Green; M, Joy; H, Wong C; Al-Kandari A; S, Cheng; M, Malik

    2011-05-01

    To systematically review randomized controlled trials, (RCT) evidence comparing Lichtenstein to total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness. Case series. The study was conducted at University of Abderdeen, U.K. A comprehensive online literature search was undertaken using databases such as MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and Springerlink. Studies were then shortlisted according to the selection criteria (RCT with over 100 subject and English language publications from 1995 onwards) and appraised using the SIGN Methodology Checklist. A metaanalysis of the data was also performed using RevMan software. Analysis of reported data shows that TEP has less postoperative pain and return to work than Lichtenstein method. Operation time is shown to be longer in the TEP but this difference is shortened with increasing surgeon experience. The meta-analysis of the data on complications shows that there are no significant differences between the two types of procedures. TEP causes more short-term recurrences which are attributed to the learning curve effect. Longterm recurrence rates on the other hand show no significant differences. At present TEP is slightly more expensive than Lichtenstein repair. Both TEP and Lichtenstein repair are clinically effective procedures. The choice between them should be made on a case-by-case basis; which depends on the patients' preference and characteristics such as age, work and health status.

  18. A new prosthetic implant for inguinal hernia repair: its features in a porcine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Amato, Giuseppe; Lo Monte, Attilio I; Cassata, Giovanni; Damiano, Giuseppe; Romano, Giorgio; Bussani, Rossana

    2011-08-01

    Even after more than 100 years of inguinal hernia repair, the rate of complications and recurrence remains unacceptably high. In the last decades, few effective advances in surgical technique and materials have been made. The authors see them as minor adjustments in the shape and materials of the prosthetic implants. Still, the underlying genesis of inguinal hernia remains undefined. Based upon this, it seems the surgical repair of inguinal protrusions cannot be based upon the pathogenesis because the etiology to date has not been addressed. Most hernia repairs are performed with some degree of point fixation (sutures/tacks) to stop the mesh from migrating and creating high recurrence rates. This should be a priority for our considerations, as fixating mesh puts it in stark contrast to the physiology and dynamics of the myotendineal structures of the groin. Following years of surgical practice, implant fixation, mesh shrinkage, and poor quality of tissue ingrowth still represent an unresolved issue in modern hernia repair. Conventional prosthetics used for inguinal hernia repair are static and passive. They do not move in harmony with the dynamic elements of the groin structure and, as a result, induce the ingrowth of thin scar plates or shrinking regressive tissue that colonizes the implants. The authors strongly believe that these characteristics may be a contributing factor for recurrences and patient discomfort. Other complications are reported in the literature to be a direct result of fixation of the implants, such as bleeding, nerve entrapment, hematoma, pain, discomfort, and testicular complications. To improve results by respecting the physiology and kinetics of the inguinal region, we felt that a new type of prosthesis should be designed that induces a more structured tissue ingrowth similar to the natural biologic components of the abdominal wall. This prosthetic device was specifically designed to be placed with no point fixation. This was achieved by

  19. Outcome and cost comparison of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair versus Open Lichtenstein technique.

    PubMed

    Anadol, Ziya A; Ersoy, Emin; Taneri, Ferit; Tekin, Ercüment

    2004-06-01

    Laparoscopic hernia repair has all the advantages of a tension free repair. This study compares the laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) approach with tension-free open hernia repair in terms of operative time, postoperative pain, hospital stay, complications, and cost. Open and TAPP repairs using polypropylene mesh were performed in two groups of 25 male patients. The difference in operative times between the groups was not significant. Mean pain scores (0-100) for the open group were 54.12 +/- 13.06 at 12 hours and 37.24 +/- 11.38 at 24 hours, significantly higher than the corresponding scores of 38.36 +/- 8.21 at 12 hours and 20.92 +/- 8.73 at 24 hours for the TAPP group (P < 0.05). The mean postoperative analgesic dose was 6.72 +/- 2.72 in the TAPP group, which was insignificantly lower than 7.52 +/- 2.00 in the open group. Mean hospital stay was 2.24 +/- 0.97 days in the open group and 1.52 +/- 0.51 in the TAPP group, which was significant (P < 0.05). Twenty patients (80%) in the TAPP group rated themselves highly satisfied with the surgery as compared to 11 patients (44%) in the open group (P < 0.05). There was no recurrence in either group during a mean followup period of 13.5 months (range, 8-28 months). Laparoscopic hernia repair was significantly more expensive than open (1100 US dollars versus 629 US dollars). TAPP repair is superior to open repair in terms of shorter hospital stay, lower postoperative pain, and better patient satisfaction. It is also safe, with no recurrence in a short-term period. This technique will be the operation of choice for the treatment of groin hernia after long-term results have been established in our center.

  20. Prosthetic repair of umbilical hernias in adults with local anesthesia in a day-case setting: a comprehensive report from a specialized hernia center.

    PubMed

    Kulacoglu, H; Yazicioglu, D; Ozyaylali, I

    2012-04-01

    Umbilical hernia is a common surgical problem. However, there seems to be a certain discrepancy between its importance and the attention it has received in the literature to date. This prospective study aimed to report a detailed analysis of prosthetic umbilical hernia repairs with local anesthesia in a day-case setting. It was planned to enroll 100 consecutive patients who underwent an elective umbilical hernia repair with local anesthesia. Patients who required general anesthesia and simultaneous hernia repairs were excluded. The procedure including local anesthesia and intravenous sedation was explained to the patients in detail by the operating surgeons and the anesthesiologist. The following parameters were strictly recorded: gender, age, body mass index (BMI), concomitant diseases, history of hernia (primary/recurrent), size of fascial defect, duration of operation, level of intravenous sedation (light/moderate), discharge time, and complications. There were 54 male and 46 female patients. The mean age was 48.6 years (24-78 years). Four patients were older than 70 years of age. Forty-one patients had 84 concomitant diseases. Eleven patients had a recurrent hernia. Female patients more frequently presented with a recurrent hernia than male patients (19.6 vs. 3.7%, P = 0.009). A standard polypropylene mesh was used in the onlay position in 91 cases. In nine cases, a light mesh was placed in the preperitoneal space. A closed vacuum drain was left in situ in 37 cases. Light sedation was set in 86 cases, whereas 12 patients received a moderate sedation. Monitored anesthesia care was used in two cases. When moderate sedation was needed, a concurrent increase in lidocaine dose and total volume was recorded. There was a positive correlation between increased lidocaine use and high midazolam dose and additional propofol requirement. The mean total local anesthetic volume was 33 ml (10-63 ml). Lidocaine doses displayed a large range between the cases (70-600 mg). The

  1. Mechanical properties of the abdominal wall and biomaterials utilized for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Deeken, Corey R; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are one of the most common and long-standing surgical applications for biomaterials engineering. Yet, despite over 50 years of standard use of hernia repair materials, revision surgery is still required in nearly one third of patients due to hernia recurrence. To date, hernia mesh designs have focused on maximizing tensile strength to prevent structural failure of the implant. However, most recurrences occur at the biomaterial-tissue interface. There is a fundamental gap in understanding the degree to which a mechanical mismatch between hernia repair materials and host tissue contributes to failure at this interface. This review summarizes the current literature related to the anatomy and mechanics of both human and animal abdominal wall tissues, as well as the mechanical properties of many commonly-utilized hernia repair materials. The studies reviewed here reported greater compliance of the linea alba, larger strains for the intact abdominal wall, and greater stiffness for the rectus sheath and umbilical fascia when the tissues were loaded in the longitudinal direction compared to transverse. Additionally, greater stresses were observed in the linea alba when loaded in the transverse direction compared to longitudinal. Given these trends, a few recommendations can be made regarding orientation of mesh. The most compliant axis of the biomaterial should be oriented in the cranio-caudal (longitudinal) direction, and the strongest axis of the biomaterial should be oriented in the medial-lateral (transverse) direction. The human abdominal wall is also anisotropic, with anisotropy ratios as high as 8-9 reported for the human linea alba. Current biomaterial designs exhibit anisotropy ratios in the range of 1-3, and it is unclear whether an ideal ratio exists for optimal match between mesh and tissue. This is likely dependent on implantation location as the linea alba, rectus sheath, and other tissues of the abdominal wall exhibit different

  2. Five-year prospective follow-up of 430 laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs in 275 patients

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, DE; Aroori, S; Vipond, MN

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Favourable short-term results, with respect to less postoperative pain and earlier return to physical activity, have been demonstrated with laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair compared with open mesh repair. However, there is limited data regarding long-term results. PATIENTS AND METHODS The study cohort consisted of 275 consecutive patients undergoing TEP repair between 1996 and 2002. Patient demographics, details of surgery, postoperative complications, recurrence and chronic pain were collected from patient records and from a prospective database. All patients were seen at 6 weeks and then annually for 5 years following surgery. RESULTS A total of 430 repairs were performed in the 275 patients (median age, 56 years; range, 20–94 years; men, 97.5%). Bilateral repair was performed in 168 patients (61.1%) and recurrent hernia repair in 79 patients (28.7%). Two patients were converted to an open procedure. Five-year follow-up was achieved in 72% of patients. Eleven patients (4%) died during the follow-up period due to unrelated causes. Hernia recurrence rate at 5 years was 1.1% per patient (three repairs). Recurrences were noted at 7 months, 2 years and 4 years following surgery. Chronic groin pain was reported by 21 patients (7.6%), seven of whom required referral to the pain team. CONCLUSIONS TEP hernia repair is associated with a recurrence rate of 1% at 5 years in this series. Chronic groin symptoms are also acceptably few. This recurrence rate following TEP repair compares extremely favourably with open mesh repair, particularly as it includes a high proportion of recurrent repairs. As well as the proven early benefits, TEP repair can be considered a safe and durable procedure with excellent long-term results. PMID:20412671

  3. Long-term outcomes with transfascial sutures versus tacks in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Brill, Jason B; Turner, Patricia L

    2011-04-01

    Although most surgeons report using both transfascial sutures and laparoscopically placed tacks to secure prostheses in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, a significant minority have reported large series in which sutures were omitted. A systematic review of the available literature was conducted for large case series and controlled trials documenting long-term follow-up. Forty-three articles were identified, including 6015 patients whose prostheses were secured with transfascial sutures (with or without tacks), and 2450 patients receiving tacks or staples alone. The mean follow-up time reported was 30.1 months. No significant difference was found in rates of hernia recurrence, mesh removal, prolonged postoperative pain, patient body mass index, or hernia defect size between the two groups. The suture group did experience a significantly higher rate of surgical site infection. Although suture tensile strength is greater than that of tacks, and despite numerous anecdotal reports of hernia recurrence secondary to suture failure or omission, the existing literature does not show superiority of one mesh fixation technique over the other for recurrence, whereas infection rates increase when transfascial suture is used.

  4. A preclinical evaluation of alternative synthetic biomaterials for fascial defect repair using a rat abdominal hernia model.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Daniela; Edwards, Sharon L; White, Jacinta F; Supit, Tommy; Ramshaw, John A M; Lo, Camden; Rosamilia, Anna; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Gargett, Caroline E

    2012-01-01

    Fascial defects are a common problem in the abdominal wall and in the vagina leading to hernia or pelvic organ prolapse that requires mesh enhancement to reduce operation failure. However, the long-term outcome of synthetic mesh surgery may be unsatisfactory due to post-surgical complications. We hypothesized that mesh fabricated from alternative synthetic polymers may evoke a different tissue response, and provide more appropriate mechanical properties for hernia repair. Our aim was to compare the in vivo biocompatibility of new synthetic meshes with a commercial mesh. We have fabricated 3 new warp-knitted synthetic meshes from different polymers with different tensile properties polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyamide (PA) and a composite, gelatin coated PA (PA+G). The rat abdominal hernia model was used to implant the meshes (25 × 35 mm, n = 24/ group). After 7, 30, 60, 90 days tissues were explanted for immunohistochemical assessment of foreign body reaction and tissue integration, using CD31, CD45, CD68, alpha-SMA antibodies. The images were analysed using an image analysis software program. Biomechanical properties were uniaxially evaluated using an Instron Tensile® Tester. This study showed that the new meshes induced complex differences in the type of foreign body reaction over the time course of implantation. The PA, and particularly the composite PA+G meshes, evoked a milder early inflammatory response, and macrophages were apparent throughout the time course. Our meshes led to better tissue integration and new collagen deposition, particularly with the PA+G meshes, as well as greater and sustained neovascularisation compared with the PP meshes. PA, PA+G and PEEK appear to be well tolerated and are biocompatible, evoking an overlapping and different host tissue response with time that might convey mechanical variations in the healing tissue. These new meshes comprising different polymers may provide an alternative option for future treatment of fascial

  5. A Preclinical Evaluation of Alternative Synthetic Biomaterials for Fascial Defect Repair Using a Rat Abdominal Hernia Model

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Daniela; Edwards, Sharon L.; White, Jacinta F.; Supit, Tommy; Ramshaw, John A. M.; Lo, Camden; Rosamilia, Anna; Werkmeister, Jerome A.; Gargett, Caroline E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Fascial defects are a common problem in the abdominal wall and in the vagina leading to hernia or pelvic organ prolapse that requires mesh enhancement to reduce operation failure. However, the long-term outcome of synthetic mesh surgery may be unsatisfactory due to post-surgical complications. We hypothesized that mesh fabricated from alternative synthetic polymers may evoke a different tissue response, and provide more appropriate mechanical properties for hernia repair. Our aim was to compare the in vivo biocompatibility of new synthetic meshes with a commercial mesh. Methods We have fabricated 3 new warp-knitted synthetic meshes from different polymers with different tensile properties polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyamide (PA) and a composite, gelatin coated PA (PA+G). The rat abdominal hernia model was used to implant the meshes (25×35 mm, n = 24/ group). After 7, 30, 60, 90 days tissues were explanted for immunohistochemical assessment of foreign body reaction and tissue integration, using CD31, CD45, CD68, alpha-SMA antibodies. The images were analysed using an image analysis software program. Biomechanical properties were uniaxially evaluated using an Instron Tensile® Tester. Results This study showed that the new meshes induced complex differences in the type of foreign body reaction over the time course of implantation. The PA, and particularly the composite PA+G meshes, evoked a milder early inflammatory response, and macrophages were apparent throughout the time course. Our meshes led to better tissue integration and new collagen deposition, particularly with the PA+G meshes, as well as greater and sustained neovascularisation compared with the PP meshes. Conclusion PA, PA+G and PEEK appear to be well tolerated and are biocompatible, evoking an overlapping and different host tissue response with time that might convey mechanical variations in the healing tissue. These new meshes comprising different polymers may provide an

  6. Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in the Armed Forces: A 5-year single centre study

    PubMed Central

    Jakhmola, C.K.; Kumar, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgery for inguinal hernia continues to evolve. The most recent development in the field of surgery for inguinal hernia is the emergence of laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery (LIHS) which is challenging the gold standard Lichtenstein's tension free mesh repair. Our centre has the largest series of LIHS from any Armed Forces hospital. The aim of this study was to analyze the short and long term outcomes at our center since its inception. Methods Retrospective review of prospectively maintained data base of 501 LIHS done in 434 patients by a single surgeon between April 2008 and October 2013. Preoperative, intraoperative, postoperative and follow-up data was analyzed with emphasis on the recurrence rates and the incidence of inguinodynia. Results 402 (92.6%) patients had primary hernias and 367 (84.6%) patients had unilateral hernias. Of the 501 repairs, 453 (90.4 %) were done totally extraperitoneal approach and 48 (9.6 %) were done by the transabdominal preperitoneal approach. The mean operative time for unilateral and bilateral repairs was 40.9 ± 11.2 and 76.2 ± 15.0 minutes, respectively. The conversion rate to open surgery was 0.6%. The intraoperative, and early and late postoperative complication rates were 1.7%, 6.2% and 3%, respectively. The incidence of chronic groin pain was 0.7% and the recurrence rate was 1.6%. The median hospital stay was 1 day (1–5 days). Conclusion We, in this series of over 500 repairs have demonstrated that feasibility as well as safety of LIHS at our centre with good short and long term outcomes. PMID:26663957

  7. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair with Suprapubic Incision

    PubMed Central

    Turingan, Isidro; Tran, Mai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery promises truly scarless surgery, this has not progressed beyond the experimental setting and a few clinical cases in the field of ventral hernia repair. This is mainly because of the problem of sterilizing natural orifices, which prevents the use of any prosthetic material because of unacceptable risks of infection. Single-incision laparoscopic ventral hernia repair has gained more widespread acceptance by specialized hernia centers. Even so, there is a special subset of patients who are young and/or scar conscious and find any visible scar unacceptable. This study illustrates an innovative way of performing single-incision laparoscopic ventral hernia repair by a transverse suprapubic incision below the pubic hair/bikini line in 2 young male patients who had both umbilical and epigastric hernias as well as attenuated linea alba in the upper abdomen. Case Description: Both patients underwent successful laparoscopic repair, and both were highly satisfied with the procedure, which produced no visible scars on their abdomen. Discussion: Willingness to adopt new innovative procedures, such as single-incision laparoscopic surgery, has allowed modification of the incision site to produce invisible scars and hence become highly attractive to the young and scar-phobic segment of the population. PMID:23925028

  8. Two-center Analysis of Long-term Outcomes after High Ligation Inguinal Hernia Repair in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Alessandra C; Knott, E Marty; Kanters, Arielle; St Peter, Shawn D; Ponsky, Todd A

    2015-12-01

    High ligation of the inguinal hernia sac is standard practice for many pediatric surgeons in postpubertal adolescents. Most adult surgeons do not use this technique to repair indirect inguinal hernias because of concerns for higher recurrence rates compared with mesh repairs. Therefore, we examined long-term outcomes of adolescent high ligation hernia repair performed by pediatric surgeons. Telephone surveys were conducted on children over 12 years old at the time of repair, and patients and/or their parents were contacted 18 months postrepair. Patients were identified from two institutions between 1998 and 2010. The incidences of reoperation, recurrence, presence of bulge, chronic pain, or numbness were determined. A total of 210 patients (40.7% response rate) were available for phone interviews at 18.6 to 159.5 months postrepair. Mean age was 14.6 ± 1.8 (range: 12.0-19.0 years). Fourteen patients had pain (6.7%) and five had numbness (2.4%). There were four (1.9%) patients with a second operation, two of which confirmed a recurrent hernia. Three patients expressed concern about possible recurrence. Two report a bulge, but have not been evaluated. Pediatric hernia repair with high sac ligation appears effective in patients anatomically similar to adults with low recurrence rate and low incidence of chronic symptoms. These data suggest that prospective trials on the adequacy of high ligation in adults are warranted.

  9. Performance of simulated laparoscopic incisional hernia repair correlates with operating room performance.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Iman; Vaillancourt, Marilou; Sroka, Gideon; Kaneva, Pepa A; Seagull, F Jacob; George, Ivan; Sutton, Erica; Park, Adrian E; Vassiliou, Melina C; Fried, Gerald M; Feldman, Liane S

    2011-01-01

    the role of simulation for training in procedures such as laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether performance in simulated LIHR correlates with operating room (OR) performance. subjects performed LIHR in the University of Maryland Surgical Abdominal Wall (SAW) simulator and the OR. Trained observers used a LIHR-specific global rating scale (Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia) to assess performance. Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia includes 7 domains (trocar placement, adhesiolysis, mesh sizing, mesh positioning, mesh fixation, knowledge and autonomy in instrument use, and overall competence). The correlation between simulator and OR performance was assessed using the Pearson coefficient. fourteen surgeons from 2 surgical departments participated. Experienced surgeons (n = 9) were defined as attending surgeons and minimally invasive surgury (MIS) fellows, and novice surgeons (n = 5) were general surgery residents (postgraduate years 3-5). The correlation between performance in the OR and the simulator for the entire group was .87 (95% confidence interval, .63-.96; P < .001). there was an excellent correlation between LIHR performance in the simulator and clinical LIHR. This suggests that performance in the SAW simulator may predict performance in the operating room. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound detection of visceral adhesion after intraperitoneal ventral hernia treatment: a comparative study of protected versus unprotected meshes.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, J P; Hennekinne-Mucci, S; Pessaux, P; Tuech, J J; Aube, C

    2003-06-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) ventral hernia repair has been proposed with the advantages of reducing dissection, operative time, and postoperative pain. The IP position of the mesh is suspected of increasing the risk of visceral adhesion and inducing complications. To overcome these drawbacks, a mesh protected on one side by a hydrophilic resorbable film (Parietex Composite) has been validated. Using a previously described ultrasound procedure, the purpose of this study was to compare the rate of visceral adhesion after intraperitoneal placement of a polyester mesh versus this protected mesh. Fifty-one patients who received a Parietex Composite mesh were prospectively compared to a retrospective series of 22 consecutive asymptomatic patients who received a Mersilene mesh. To objectively assess visceral adhesion toward the abdominal wall, an ultrasound (US) specific examination was firstly validated and secondly used to evaluate the adhesion incidence in both groups. Both groups were equivalent in terms of inclusion criteria and body mass index (BMI). Pre-operative US versus perioperative macroscopical findings determined the following parameters: sensitivity 83%, accuracy 78%, negative predictive value 81%. Using this procedure, 77% of the patients exhibited visceral adhesion to the mesh in the Mersilene group, against 18% in the Parietex Composite group (P<0.001, chi-square). US examination represents a suitable tool to evaluate postoperative adhesions to the abdominal wall. Using this procedure, a significant reduction of visceral adhesion in the Parietex Composite group was shown.

  11. Single-Port Parastomal Hernia Repair by Using 3-D Textile Implants

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Klaus; Schrittwieser, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parastomal hernias (PSHs) are a frequent complication and remain a surgical challenge. We present a new option for single-port PSH repair with equilateral stoma relocation using preshaped, prosthetic 3-dimensional implants and flat mesh insertion in intraperitoneal onlay placement for additional augmentation of the abdominal wall. Methods: We describe our novel technique in detail and performed an analysis of prospectively collected data from patients who underwent single-port PSH repair, focusing on feasibility, conversions, and complications. Results: From September 2013 to January 2014, 9 patients with symptomatic PSHs were included. Two conversions to reduced-port laparoscopy using a second 3-mm trocar were required because of difficult adhesiolysis, dissection, and reduction of the hernia sac content. No major intra- or postoperative complications or reoperations were encountered. One patient incurred a peristomal wound healing defect that could be treated conservatively. Conclusion: We found that single-port PSH repair using preshaped, elastic 3-dimensional devices and additional flat mesh repair of the abdominal wall is feasible, safe, and beneficial, relating to optimal coverage of unstable stoma edges with wide overlap to all sides and simultaneous augmentation of the midline in the IPOM technique. The stoma relocation enables prolapse treatment and prevention. The features of a modular and rotatable multichannel port system offer benefits in clear dissection ongoing from a single port. Long-term follow-up data on an adequate number of patients are awaited to examine efficacy. PMID:25392655

  12. Evaluation of ECHO PS Positioning System in a Porcine Model of Simulated Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Erin M.; Voeller, Guy R.; Roth, J. Scott; Scott, Jeffrey R.; Gagne, Darcy H.; Iannitti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Operative efficiency improvements for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) have focused on reducing operative time while maintaining overall repair efficacy. Our objective was to evaluate procedure time and positioning accuracy of an inflatable mesh positioning device (Echo PS Positioning System), as compared to a standard transfascial suture technique, using a porcine model of simulated LVHR. Methods. The study population consisted of seventeen general surgeons (n = 17) that performed simulated LVHR on seventeen (n = 17) female Yorkshire pigs using two implantation techniques: (1) Ventralight ST Mesh + Echo PS Positioning System (Echo PS) and (2) Ventralight ST Mesh + transfascial sutures (TSs). Procedure time and mesh centering accuracy overtop of a simulated surgical defect were evaluated. Results. Echo PS demonstrated a 38.9% reduction in the overall procedure time, as compared to TS. During mesh preparation and positioning, Echo PS demonstrated a 60.5% reduction in procedure time (P < 0.0001). Although a trend toward improved centering accuracy was observed for Echo PS (16.2%), this was not significantly different than TS. Conclusions. Echo PS demonstrated a significant reduction in overall simulated LVHR procedure time, particularly during mesh preparation/positioning. These operative time savings may translate into reduced operating room costs and improved surgeon/operating room efficiency. PMID:23762628

  13. Single centre observational study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Proceed™ Ventral Patch to repair small ventral hernias.

    PubMed

    Bontinck, J; Kyle-Leinhase, I; Pletinckx, P; Vergucht, V; Beckers, R; Muysoms, F

    2014-10-01

    There is evidence that mesh repair for primary umbilical hernias results in less recurrences and similar wound complication rates compared to tissue repair. In recent years, several mesh devices for the repair of small ventral hernias have been developed, but some reports have been published on serious complications and adverse effects encountered with those mesh devices. The Proceed™ Ventral Patch (PVP™) is a partially absorbable lightweight polypropylene mesh. We introduced PVP™ in our department in April 2009 and collected patient data and outcome in an observational study of 101 consecutive patients until December 2011 (Clinical.Trials.gov: NCT01307696). In addition to the routine control 3 weeks postoperative, prospective follow-up included a questionnaire, clinical investigation and ultrasound after 12 months. The study included 91 primary (76 umbilical/15 epigastric) and 10 incisional ventral hernias (including 6 trocar hernias). In all patients a PVP™ with a diameter of 6.4 cm was used. Wound problems were the most frequent complication (n = 18). Follow-up of at least 12 months was achieved in 98 patients (97 %) and the mean follow-up time was 15.9 months. Follow-up by clinical examination diagnosed a recurrence in 11/92 patients (12.0 %). Only four patients were aware of their recurrent hernia, the seven others reported no problems in the questionnaire. The additional ultrasound performed did not reveal recurrences that were not already diagnosed by clinical examination. In five patients a reoperation for repair of the recurrence was performed (reoperation rate 5/98 = 5.1 %). Hernia defect size (p = 0.032) and type of hernia (p = 0.029) were found to be a significant risk factors for development of a recurrent hernia (Fisher's exact test). Hernia size was a significant risk factor both in a univariate (p = 0.005) and in a multivariate Cox model (p = 0.017). Incisional hernia was of borderline significance in a univariate (p

  14. Factors associated with early recurrence after congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Luke R; Gupta, Vikas; Tsao, Kuojen; Davis, Carl F; Lally, Pamela A; Lally, Kevin P; Harting, Matthew T

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patient and treatment characteristics associated with early (in hospital) hernia recurrence after congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) repair. Data from the Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Study Group registry were queried from 2007 to 2015. Recurrence of the diaphragmatic hernia after initial repair and prior to death or discharge was determined at the time of reoperation. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches included laparoscopy or thoracoscopy, and open approaches consisted of laparotomy or thoracotomy. Multivariate regression analysis was performed. Of 3984 patients, 3332 (84%) underwent CDH repair. 76 (2.3%) patients had an early recurrence. The rate of recurrence was less variable over time for patients undergoing laparotomy vs thoracoscopy (range: 1.1-3.7% vs 1.7-8.9% annually). Timing of repair, whether performed after, during, or before ECMO did not significantly alter recurrence rates (0% vs 4.2% vs 3.0%, p=0.116). Larger defect size (C: OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.2-15.4; D: OR 7.1, 95% CI 1.7-29.1) and an MIS approach (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.7-6.0) were the only independent predictors of recurrence. Larger defect size and an MIS approach were associated with higher rates of early recurrence, while ECMO use and timing of repair with ECMO were not. Treatment study. II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Basic fibroblast growth factor loaded polypropylene meshes in repair of abdominal wall defects in rats.

    PubMed

    Heybeli, T; Kulacoglu, H; Genc, V; Ergul, Z; Ensari, C; Kiziltay, A; Yilmazer, D; Serbetci, K; Hasirci, N

    2010-01-01

    Incisional hernia following laparotomy and recurrent herniation after its repair are still common problems in spite of mesh augmentation. The underlying biological mechanism may be related to collagen metabolism. Recently, some members of growth factors family have been tested in the prevention of wound failure and incisonal hernia formation. Growth factors may promote fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition. In the present study, we searched the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) loaded polypropylene meshes in an incisional hernia model in rats. A total of 80 Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into five groups. A uniform surgical procedure was employed in all groups: a 5 cm skin incision was made at the midline and a full segment of the abdominal wall sized 3 x 2 cm was excised. Abdominal wall was closed with rapidly absorbable 3/0 catgut. Following this standard surgery, five different procedures were applied to the groups before closing the skin with 4/0 monofilament polypropylene sutures. Control subjects (Group 1) received no extra procedure after abdominal wall suturing. Polypropylene meshes were used in onlay position by fixing 4/0 monofimalent polypropylene interrupted sutures in other four groups. A standard mesh with no chemical treatment was used in Group 2. Gelatin coated meshes were used in Group 3, while Group 4 and 5 received bFGF loaded meshes with 1 microgram (microg) and 5 microg doses respectively. All the groups then divided into 1st month (early: E) and 2nd month (late: L) subgroups (n=8 each) according to sacrification dates. Tensiometric and histopathological evaluations were done. The specimens for histopathology were obtained from the interface area of the meshes and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and also Masson trichrome. The variables were examined and evaluated by a single blinded pathologist under light microscopy in respect of inflammation, vascularization, fibroblast activity, collagen fibers and

  16. Abdominal closure reinforcement by using polypropylene mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers and growth factors for prevention of incisional hernia formation.

    PubMed

    Plencner, Martin; East, Barbora; Tonar, Zbyněk; Otáhal, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; Krejčí, Tomáš; Litvinec, Andrej; Buzgo, Matej; Míčková, Andrea; Nečas, Alois; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia affects up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Unlike other types of hernia, its prognosis is poor, and patients suffer from recurrence within 10 years of the operation. Currently used hernia-repair meshes do not guarantee success, but only extend the recurrence-free period by about 5 years. Most of them are nonresorbable, and these implants can lead to many complications that are in some cases life-threatening. Electrospun nanofibers of various polymers have been used as tissue scaffolds and have been explored extensively in the last decade, due to their low cost and good biocompatibility. Their architecture mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We tested a biodegradable polyester poly-ε-caprolactone in the form of nanofibers as a scaffold for fascia healing in an abdominal closure-reinforcement model for prevention of incisional hernia formation. Both in vitro tests and an experiment on a rabbit model showed promising results.

  17. Abdominal closure reinforcement by using polypropylene mesh functionalized with poly-ε-caprolactone nanofibers and growth factors for prevention of incisional hernia formation

    PubMed Central

    Plencner, Martin; East, Barbora; Tonar, Zbyněk; Otáhal, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; Krejčí, Tomáš; Litvinec, Andrej; Buzgo, Matej; Míčková, Andrea; Nečas, Alois; Hoch, Jiří; Amler, Evžen

    2014-01-01

    Incisional hernia affects up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Unlike other types of hernia, its prognosis is poor, and patients suffer from recurrence within 10 years of the operation. Currently used hernia-repair meshes do not guarantee success, but only extend the recurrence-free period by about 5 years. Most of them are nonresorbable, and these implants can lead to many complications that are in some cases life-threatening. Electrospun nanofibers of various polymers have been used as tissue scaffolds and have been explored extensively in the last decade, due to their low cost and good biocompatibility. Their architecture mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We tested a biodegradable polyester poly-ε-caprolactone in the form of nanofibers as a scaffold for fascia healing in an abdominal closure-reinforcement model for prevention of incisional hernia formation. Both in vitro tests and an experiment on a rabbit model showed promising results. PMID:25031534

  18. Randomised clinical trial: conventional Lichtenstein vs. hernioplasty with self-adhesive mesh in bilateral inguinal hernia surgery.

    PubMed

    Porrero, Jose L; Castillo, María J; Pérez-Zapata, Ana; Alonso, María T; Cano-Valderrama, Oscar; Quirós, Esther; Villar, Sol; Ramos, Beatriz; Sánchez-Cabezudo, Carlos; Bonachia, Oscar; Marcos, Alberto; Pérez, Brígido

    2015-10-01

    To compare the results of conventional Lichtenstein hernioplasty with polypropylene mesh (PLP) with a lightweight self-adhesive mesh (Parietene Progrip®; Covidien, Dublin, Ireland) (PPG) used in patients with bilateral inguinal hernia. Randomised clinical trial with 89 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Every patient had bilateral inguinal hernia and had both prostheses implanted randomly, one on each side. Early postoperative and chronic pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. Also recurrence rate and subjective evaluation of patients were analysed. Pain in the early postoperative period was inferior on the side where the self-adhesive mesh had been implanted (6.12 vs. 6.62, p=0.005 during the 1st postoperative day; 2.12 vs. 2.62, p=0.001 during the 7th postoperative day). Differences disappeared with the long-term evaluation (0.71 vs. 0.98, p=0.148 1 year after the surgery). The operative time was significantly shorter on the PPG mesh side (24.37 ± 5.1 in case of the PPG mesh and 29.66 ± 5.6 in case of the PLP mesh, p<0,001). Recurrence occurred in seven patients (7.8%), six of them (6.7%, CI 3.0-14.4) on the PPG mesh side and one (1.1%, CI 0.2-7.8) on the PLP side. These differences were not statistically significant (p=0.125) CONCLUSIONS: Although hernioplasty with self-adhesive mesh reduced early postoperative pain, this reduction was clinically irrelevant and it had no influence on chronic pain. There was a trend towards a higher recurrence rate when self-adhesive meshes were used, and although in this study differences were not statistically significant they should be confirmed in later studies using larger samples. Surgical procedures that do not need fixing sutures are promising, but further studies are needed before they become the gold standard of inguinal hernia repair.

  19. Colonization by human fibroblasts of polypropylene prosthesis in a composite form for hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Canuto, R A; Saracino, S; Oraldi, M; Festa, V; Festa, F; Muzio, G; Chiaravalloti, A

    2013-04-01

    Abdominal wall hernia is one of the commonest surgical disorders worldwide, and there is no single gold-standard operative technique to repair it. In an effort to improve techniques and technologies to reinforce hernia repair, synthetic meshes are employed. In this study, a new prosthesis (named composite) formed of two polypropylene layers, one macroporous (named mesh) and one transparent (named film), was examined to evaluate its capability to enable cell proliferation without inducing cell death. Inflammatory processes were also examined. Human fibroblasts BJ were seeded on multiwells, on which composite or film had been placed. After 7, 14, and 21 days, cell growth and viability, deposition of collagen, and release of IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α were evaluated. The "in vitro" protocol showed the composite to be colonized by human fibroblasts on the polypropylene macroporous mesh side; no cell growth occurred on the film. The slowdown of cell growth observed between 14 and 21 days was accompanied by an increase in type I collagen deposition and marked fibroblast activity. Inflammatory cytokines initially increased, followed by their reduction beginning at 14 days. The new prosthesis comprising two polypropylene layers of differing morphologies can be colonized by fibroblasts on the side facing the abdominal wall, whereas no cell growth occurs on the side facing the viscera. The transient inflammation, observed at early experimental times, is probably important for the healing process.