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Sample records for mesocestoides corti platyhelminthes

  1. Hox genes in the parasitic platyhelminthes Mesocestoides corti, Echinococcus multilocularis, and Schistosoma mansoni: evidence for a reduced Hox complement.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Uriel; Lalanne, Ana I; Castillo, Estela

    2009-02-01

    Little is known about the Hox gene complement in parasitic platyhelminthes (Neodermata). With the aim of identifying Hox genes in this group we performed two independent strategies: we performed a PCR survey with degenerate primers directed to the Hox homeobox in the cestode Mesocestoides corti, and we searched genomic assemblies of Echinococcus multilocularis and Schistosoma mansoni. We identified two Hox genes in M. corti, seven in E. multilocularis, and nine in S. mansoni (including five previously reported). The affinities of these sequences, and other previously reported Hox sequences from flatworms, were determined according to phylogenetic analysis, presence of characteristic parapeptide sequences, and unusual intron positions. Our results suggest that the last common ancestor of triclads and neodermatans had a Hox gene complement of at least seven genes, and that this was probably derived by gene loss from a larger ancestral Hox complement in lophotrochozoans.

  2. Expression of the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ during the strobilation process of Mesocestoides corti (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Costa, Caroline B; Monteiro, Karina M; Teichmann, Aline; da Silva, Edileuza D; Lorenzatto, Karina R; Cancela, Martín; Paes, Jéssica A; Benitz, André de N D; Castillo, Estela; Margis, Rogério; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-08-01

    The histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ is implicated in processes of chromatin remodelling and gene expression regulation. It has been associated with the control of developmental processes, but little is known about its function in helminth parasites. In Mesocestoides corti, a partial cDNA sequence related to SET/TAF-Iβ was isolated in a screening for genes differentially expressed in larvae (tetrathyridia) and adult worms. Here, the full-length coding sequence of the M. corti SET/TAF-Iβ gene was analysed and the encoded protein (McSET/TAF) was compared with orthologous sequences, showing that McSET/TAF can be regarded as a SET/TAF-Iβ family member, with a typical nucleosome-assembly protein (NAP) domain and an acidic tail. The expression patterns of the McSET/TAF gene and protein were investigated during the strobilation process by RT-qPCR, using a set of five reference genes, and by immunoblot and immunofluorescence, using monospecific polyclonal antibodies. A gradual increase in McSET/TAF transcripts and McSET/TAF protein was observed upon development induction by trypsin, demonstrating McSET/TAF differential expression during strobilation. These results provided the first evidence for the involvement of a protein from the NAP family of epigenetic effectors in the regulation of cestode development. PMID:25823644

  3. Expression of the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ during the strobilation process of Mesocestoides corti (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Costa, Caroline B; Monteiro, Karina M; Teichmann, Aline; da Silva, Edileuza D; Lorenzatto, Karina R; Cancela, Martín; Paes, Jéssica A; Benitz, André de N D; Castillo, Estela; Margis, Rogério; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-08-01

    The histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ is implicated in processes of chromatin remodelling and gene expression regulation. It has been associated with the control of developmental processes, but little is known about its function in helminth parasites. In Mesocestoides corti, a partial cDNA sequence related to SET/TAF-Iβ was isolated in a screening for genes differentially expressed in larvae (tetrathyridia) and adult worms. Here, the full-length coding sequence of the M. corti SET/TAF-Iβ gene was analysed and the encoded protein (McSET/TAF) was compared with orthologous sequences, showing that McSET/TAF can be regarded as a SET/TAF-Iβ family member, with a typical nucleosome-assembly protein (NAP) domain and an acidic tail. The expression patterns of the McSET/TAF gene and protein were investigated during the strobilation process by RT-qPCR, using a set of five reference genes, and by immunoblot and immunofluorescence, using monospecific polyclonal antibodies. A gradual increase in McSET/TAF transcripts and McSET/TAF protein was observed upon development induction by trypsin, demonstrating McSET/TAF differential expression during strobilation. These results provided the first evidence for the involvement of a protein from the NAP family of epigenetic effectors in the regulation of cestode development.

  4. Early post-larval development of the endoparasitic platyhelminth Mesocestoides corti: trypsin provokes reversible tegumental damage leading to serum-induced cell proliferation and growth.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, I; Galindo, M; Bizarro, C V; Ferreira, H B; Zaha, A; Galanti, N

    2005-11-01

    Mesocestoides corti is a suitable in vitro model for studying the development of human endoparasitic platyhelminthes. Treatment with trypsin, supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS), induces M. corti development from larvae (tetrathyridia) to segmented adult worm; however, the role of this protease and of FBS in post-larval development induction remains unknown. To characterize the participation of trypsin enzymatic activity and of FBS in the induction of tetrathyridia growth and development, both stimuli were added to the larvae either together or sequentially. Additionally, specific inhibition of trypsin activity was also monitored. Finally, the effect of the enzyme on the parasite tegument as well as the proliferative activity and location of proliferating cells after induction of tetrathyridia development were also studied. We conclude that trypsin-induced tetrathyridia development to adult worm is FBS-dependent and that the effect of serum factors is dependent upon a previous trypsin-induced reversible damage to the larva tegument. In dividing and non-dividing tetrathyridia, proliferative activity of cells is mainly located within the apical massif in the anterior region and nerve cords of larvae, respectively. In tetrathyridia stimulated to develop to adult worms, an intense proliferative activity is evident along the nerve cords. Our results suggest that in natural infections the tetrathyridia tegument is temporally made permeable to growth factors by proteolytic enzyme activity in the intestine juice of the definitive host, thus leading to development to adult worms. PMID:15887242

  5. In vitro segmentation induction of Mesocestoides corti (Cestoda) tetrathyridia.

    PubMed

    Markoski, Mellssa M; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Farias, Sandra; Espinoza, Ingrid; Galanti, Norbel; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2003-02-01

    Mesocestoides corti is a suitable model for studying cestode development because of its ability to reproduce asexually and segment in vitro. The cultured parasite is also capable of sexual differentiation and, probably, reproduction. To establish conditions that increase the efficiency of in vitro M. corti larvae (tetrathyridia) segmentation, we tested the effects of an inducing agent and some physical parameters in cultures. We found that a 5% CO2-95% N2 gas phase, an incubation temperature of 39 C (instead of 37 C), and a 24-hr pretreatment with trypsin (10(5) BAEE/ml, BAEE = Na-benzoil-L-arginine ethyl ester unit of trypsin activity) in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS) are able to increase individually or synergistically the segmentation rate of tetrathyridia. A segmentation rate of up to 100% was achieved on day 4 of culture, when all these conditions were used simultaneously, in comparison with an average rate of 40% obtained not before day 11 in cultures without any inducing treatment. Fetal bovine serum is essential for segmentation, and a concentration of 20% was established as the standard for induction. PMID:12659299

  6. In vitro culture of Mesocestoides corti metacestodes and isolation of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Vendelova, E; Hrčková, G; Lutz, M B; Brehm, K; Nono Komguep, J

    2016-07-01

    Cestode-mediated diseases hold the interesting feature of persisting metacestode larvae dwelling within the host tissues, in the midst of the immune response. Excretory-secretory (ES) products of the metacestode larval stage modulate the host immune response and modify the outcome of the disease. Therefore, isolation and analysis of axenic metacestode ES products are crucial to study their properties. Here, we report the development of a system for long-term in vitro cultivation of the metacestode of the parasitic cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae). Although feeder cells and host serum supported the early growth of the parasite, long-term survival was not dependent on host serum or host-derived factors enabling the collection of parasite released products in serum-free medium. Functionally, these axenic ES products recapitulated M. corti tetrathyridia's ability to inhibit LPS-driven IL-12p70 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, our new axenic culture system will simplify the identification and characterization of M. corti-derived immunomodulatory factors that will indirectly enable the identification and characterization of corresponding factors in the metacestode larvae of medically relevant cestodes such as Echinococcus multilocularis that are not yet amenable to serum-free cultivation.

  7. In vitro culture of Mesocestoides corti metacestodes and isolation of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory products.

    PubMed

    Vendelova, E; Hrčková, G; Lutz, M B; Brehm, K; Nono Komguep, J

    2016-07-01

    Cestode-mediated diseases hold the interesting feature of persisting metacestode larvae dwelling within the host tissues, in the midst of the immune response. Excretory-secretory (ES) products of the metacestode larval stage modulate the host immune response and modify the outcome of the disease. Therefore, isolation and analysis of axenic metacestode ES products are crucial to study their properties. Here, we report the development of a system for long-term in vitro cultivation of the metacestode of the parasitic cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae). Although feeder cells and host serum supported the early growth of the parasite, long-term survival was not dependent on host serum or host-derived factors enabling the collection of parasite released products in serum-free medium. Functionally, these axenic ES products recapitulated M. corti tetrathyridia's ability to inhibit LPS-driven IL-12p70 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, our new axenic culture system will simplify the identification and characterization of M. corti-derived immunomodulatory factors that will indirectly enable the identification and characterization of corresponding factors in the metacestode larvae of medically relevant cestodes such as Echinococcus multilocularis that are not yet amenable to serum-free cultivation. PMID:27120409

  8. Mesocestoides corti (syn. vogae, cestoda): characterization of genes encoding cysteine-rich secreted proteins (CRISP).

    PubMed

    Britos, Leticia; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Castillo, Estela; Cota, Germán; Señorale, Mario; Marín, Mónica

    2007-06-01

    With the aim of identifying genes involved in development and parasite adaptation in cestodes, four coding sequences were isolated from the cyclophyllidean Mesocestoides corti larval stage (tetrathyridium). Genes showed significant similarity to the cysteine-rich secreted protein (CRISP) encoding genes, a large family that includes stage and tissue-specific genes from diverse organisms, many associated with crucial biological processes. The full-length McCrisp2 cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 202 residues in length, containing 10 cysteines and a putative signal peptide. The expression level of McCrisp2 was estimated by Real-time PCR, relative to GAPDH, showing an increase of 75% in segmented worms compared to tetrathyridia. By in situ hybridization, McCrisp2 expression was localized mainly at the larvae apical region of tetrathyridia and in the proglottids of segmented worms. Taken together our results suggest a possible role for M. corti CRISP proteins as ES products, potentially involved in differentiation processes as proposed for homologs in other organisms.

  9. Maternal transmission of asexually proliferative Mesocestoides corti tetrathyridia (Cestoda) in mice.

    PubMed

    Conn, D B; Etges, F J

    1983-10-01

    Asexually proliferative Mesocestoides corti tetrathyridia were studied to test the hypothesis of in utero transmission in mice and define more clearly the path of transmammary transmission. In utero transmission was not observed in 132 fetuses (22 litters) taken by caesarean section from infected mothers. However, 19 of these mothers had tetrathyridia in their mammary glands at the time of operation, nine had worms in the uterine lumen, and one had a single worm in the maternal blood space of a placenta. No tetrathyridia were found in amniotic cavities. No infection was found in 32 young (7 litters) examined immediately after birth to infected mothers, but before nursing. No infection was found in 30 young (5 litters) removed from infected mothers before nursing and raised by uninfected fosters. Of 29 uninfected young (5 litters) allowed to nurse on infected mothers, 18 became infected. Whole mounts and sections of infected mammary glands showed proliferating tetrathyridia free in larger milk ducts and free and encapsulated in mammary parenchyma. These data suggest that maternal transmission of M. corti tetrathyridia in mice occurs primarily or perhaps exclusively by the transmammary route.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Excretory-Secretory Products of Mesocestoides corti Metacestodes Reveals Potential Suppressors of Dendritic Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vendelova, Emilia; Camargo de Lima, Jeferson; Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Mueller, Thomas; Veepaschit, Jyotishman; Grimm, Clemens; Brehm, Klaus; Hrčková, Gabriela; Lutz, Manfred B.; Ferreira, Henrique B.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have assigned a central role to parasite-derived proteins in immunomodulation. Here, we report on the proteomic identification and characterization of immunomodulatory excretory-secretory (ES) products from the metacestode larva (tetrathyridium) of the tapeworm Mesocestoides corti (syn. M. vogae). We demonstrate that ES products but not larval homogenates inhibit the stimuli-driven release of the pro-inflammatory, Th1-inducing cytokine IL-12p70 by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Within the ES fraction, we biochemically narrowed down the immunosuppressive activity to glycoproteins since active components were lipid-free, but sensitive to heat- and carbohydrate-treatment. Finally, using bioassay-guided chromatographic analyses assisted by comparative proteomics of active and inactive fractions of the ES products, we defined a comprehensive list of candidate proteins released by M. corti tetrathyridia as potential suppressors of DC functions. Our study provides a comprehensive library of somatic and ES products and highlight some candidate parasite factors that might drive the subversion of DC functions to facilitate the persistence of M. corti tetrathyridia in their hosts. PMID:27736880

  11. Stem cell proliferation during in vitro development of the model cestode Mesocestoides corti from larva to adult worm

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In free-living flatworms somatic differentiated cells do not divide, and a separate population of stem cells (called neoblasts) is responsible for cell proliferation and renewal. In cestodes, there is evidence that similar mechanisms of cell renewal exist. Results In this work, we have characterized proliferative cells during the development of the model cestode Mesocestoides corti from larva (tetrathyridium) to young segmented worm. This was done by two complementary strategies with congruent results: characterizing cells in S phase and their progeny by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, and characterizing cells in M phase by arresting mitotic cells with colchicine and studying their morphology and distribution. Proliferative cells are localized only in the inner parenchyma, particularly in close proximity to the inner muscle layer, but not in the cortical parenchyma nor in the sub-tegumental tissue. After proliferation some of these cells migrate to the outer regions were they differentiate. In the larvae, proliferative cells are more abundant in the anterior regions (scolex and neck), and their number diminishes in an antero-posterior way. During the development of adult segments periodic accumulation of proliferative cells are observed, including a central mass of cells that constitutes the genital primordium, which grows at least in part due to in situ proliferation. In later segments, the inner cells of genital primordia cease to proliferate and adopt a compact distribution, and proliferative cells are also found in the testes primordia. Conclusions Proliferative cells have a characteristic localization and morphology throughout development from larva to adult of Mesocestoides corti, which is similar, and probably evolutionary conserved, to that described in other model cestodes. The characteristics of proliferative cells suggest that these consist of undifferentiated stem cells. PMID:20626875

  12. Regulation of macrophage-mediated larvicidal activity in Echinococcus granulosus and Mesocestoides corti (Cestoda) infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P; Dixon, J B; Rakha, N K; Carter, S D

    1990-04-01

    Killing of metacestodes by normal or post-infection macrophages and the regulation of this activity by cytokines were studied in vitro. The protoscolecidal activity of normal macrophages against Echinococcus granulosus was inhibited by a product of naive T-enriched lymphocytes co-cultured with protoscoleces (PSC). By contrast, supernates from co-cultures of Mesocestoides corti tetrathyridia (MCT) and T-enriched or B-enriched normal lymphocytes increased killing of MCT by normal macrophages. Larvicidal activity (against both PSC and MCT) was enhanced by high concentrations of macrophage-activating factors produced by Con A-stimulated rat lymphocytes (Con A-LK), but was reduced by low concentrations of these factors. Activation by synergism between Con A-LK and recombinant interferon-gamma(r. IFN-gamma) was demonstrated in macrophage-mediated killing of MCT at high effector to target ratio. Cytokine-activation of normal or post-MCT infection macrophages was compared. Macrophages from both 8 and 20 week post-infection mice were refractory to lymphokines from lymphocyte-MCT cultures and displayed greatly reduced killing of MCT. Macrophage activation by Con A-LK and r.IFN-gamma was also impaired, implying a general defect in the ability of these post-infection macrophages to respond to macrophage activating signals. The data indicate that two different mechanisms may exist by which metacestodes regulate potentially larvicidal effector mechanisms. E. granulosus can elicit the production of lymphokines suppressive for PSC killing, whereas M. corti appears directly to induce a refractory state in effector macrophages.

  13. Praziquantel and liposomized glucan-treatment modulated liver fibrogenesis and mastocytosis in mice infected with Mesocestoides vogae (M. corti, Cestoda) tetrathyridia.

    PubMed

    Hrckova, G; Velebný, S; Daxnerová, Z; Solár, P

    2006-04-01

    Beta-glucans are immunomodulators able to activate innate immunity and to potentiate acquired immune reactions. We investigated the impact of co-administration of liposomized beta-glucan on the larvicidal effect of the anthelmintic praziquantel (PZQ) in the livers and peritoneal cavities in mice infected with Mesocestoides vogae (M. corti). Also, within 2 weeks following therapy (up to day 29 p.i.) we examined collagen synthesis in the livers of mice by means of biochemical determination of hydroxyproline concentration, total mast cell counts and cell proliferative capacity using immunohistochemical and radiometrical methods. After co-administration of liposomized glucan (LG) and PZQ efficacy (%) was significantly higher than after treatment with either compound alone, particularly in the peritoneal cavity compared to the liver. In comparison with the control, more intense collagenesis was found in the B-liver parts (high intensity of infection) and lowering of collagen content in the A-parts (very weak infection). This effect was strongest after LG treatment and co-administration of PZQ abolished the pro-fibrotic effect of LG. In all groups, mast cell counts were higher in the B-liver parts than in the A-parts and the dynamics of mastocytosis was profoundly modulated following therapy. Whereas the effect of PZQ was only moderate, early and very strong onset was seen after LG treatment. Administration of PZQ suppressed LG induced-elevation of mast cells counts in both liver parts. Using DNA S-phase markers (BrdU and 3H-thymidine) the proliferative capacity was shown to be associated with several kinds of liver cells. Therapy significantly stimulated [3H]-thymidine incorporation (cell proliferation) only in the A-parts over that in control, the most after LG administration. In summary (i) the anthelmintic effect of PZQ could be enhanced after simultaneous administration of the immunomodulator beta-glucan entrapped in a liposomal carrier, (ii) intense mastocytosis

  14. Effects of free and liposomized praziquantel on the surface morphology and motility of Mesocestoides vogae tetrathyridia (syn. M. corti; Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hrcková, G; Velebný, S; Corba, J

    1998-01-01

    The effects of in vitro exposure to praziquantel (PZQ), liposomized PZQ (lip.PZQ), and empty liposomes on the surface morphology and motility of Mesocestoides vogae tetrathyridia were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a motility apparatus. Examination of treated larvae showed an effect that was concentration- and time-dependent, involving morphological damage that was similar in character for all of the treated groups. The most marked effects were a flattening and elongation of the larval body accompanied by irregularities in the surface architecture involving the development of tegumental protuberances and depressions. Erosion of the surface microvillous layer occurred only after overnight incubation, being most pronounced after treatment with lip.PZQ. The motility index of treated tetrathyridia corresponded well to the SEM observations. The frequency of contractions was maximal in worms treated with free PZQ at 25 micrograms/ml in both regimens. However, after incubation with lip.PZQ the increase in motility was concentration-dependent and of a greater extent. Empty liposomes and lipid mixtures of the same concentration and composition resulted in increased motility in treated larvae as compared with controls. More extensive tegumental damage and higher motility of larvae occurred after lip.PZQ treatment, perhaps resulting from a synergistic action of the drug and its associated lipid.

  15. Occurrence of Mesocestoides canislagopodis (Rudolphi, 1810) (Krabbe, 1865) in mammals and birds in Iceland and its molecular discrimination within the Mesocestoides species complex.

    PubMed

    Skirnisson, Karl; Jouet, Damien; Ferté, Hubert; Nielsen, Ólafur K

    2016-07-01

    The life cycle of Mesocestoides tapeworms (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Mesocestoididae) requires three hosts. The first intermediate host is unknown but believed to be an arthropod. The second intermediate host is a vertebrate. The primary definitive host is a carnivore mammal, or a bird of prey, that eats the tetrathyridium-infected second intermediate host. One representative of the genus, Mesocestoides canislagopodis, has been reported from Iceland. It is common in the arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) and has also been detected in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis domestica). Recently, scolices of a non-maturing Mesocestoides sp. have also been detected in gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) intestines, and tetrathyridia in the body cavity of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta). We examined the taxonomic relationship of Mesocestoides from arctic fox, gyrfalcon, and rock ptarmigan using molecular methods, both at the generic level (D1 domain LSU ribosomal DNA) and at the specific level (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 12S mitochondrial DNA). All stages belonged to Mesocestoides canislagopodis. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined 12S-COI at the specific level confirmed that M. canislagopodis forms a distinct clade, well separated from three other recognized representatives of the genus, M. litteratus, M. lineatus, and M. corti/vogae. This is the first molecular description of this species. The rock ptarmigan is a new second intermediate host record, and the gyrfalcon a new primary definitive host record. However, the adult stage seemed not to be able to mature in the gyrfalcon, and successful development is probably restricted to mammalian hosts. PMID:26984208

  16. Occurrence of Mesocestoides canislagopodis (Rudolphi, 1810) (Krabbe, 1865) in mammals and birds in Iceland and its molecular discrimination within the Mesocestoides species complex.

    PubMed

    Skirnisson, Karl; Jouet, Damien; Ferté, Hubert; Nielsen, Ólafur K

    2016-07-01

    The life cycle of Mesocestoides tapeworms (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea: Mesocestoididae) requires three hosts. The first intermediate host is unknown but believed to be an arthropod. The second intermediate host is a vertebrate. The primary definitive host is a carnivore mammal, or a bird of prey, that eats the tetrathyridium-infected second intermediate host. One representative of the genus, Mesocestoides canislagopodis, has been reported from Iceland. It is common in the arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) and has also been detected in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis domestica). Recently, scolices of a non-maturing Mesocestoides sp. have also been detected in gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) intestines, and tetrathyridia in the body cavity of rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta). We examined the taxonomic relationship of Mesocestoides from arctic fox, gyrfalcon, and rock ptarmigan using molecular methods, both at the generic level (D1 domain LSU ribosomal DNA) and at the specific level (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 12S mitochondrial DNA). All stages belonged to Mesocestoides canislagopodis. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined 12S-COI at the specific level confirmed that M. canislagopodis forms a distinct clade, well separated from three other recognized representatives of the genus, M. litteratus, M. lineatus, and M. corti/vogae. This is the first molecular description of this species. The rock ptarmigan is a new second intermediate host record, and the gyrfalcon a new primary definitive host record. However, the adult stage seemed not to be able to mature in the gyrfalcon, and successful development is probably restricted to mammalian hosts.

  17. Platyhelminth FMRFamide-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C; Maule, A G; Halton, D W

    1996-04-01

    Platyhelminths are the most primitive metazoan phylum to possess a true central nervous system, comprising a brain and longitudinal nerve cords connected by commissures. Additional to the presence of classical neurotransmitters, the nervous systems of all major groups of flatworms examined have widespread and abundant peptidergic components. Decades of research on the major invertebrate phyla, Mollusca and Arthropoda, have revealed the primary structures and putative functions of several families of structurally related peptides, the best studied being the FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). Recently, the first platyhelminth FaRP was isolated from the tapeworm, Moniezia expansa, and was found to be a hexapeptide amide, GNFFRFamide. Two additional FaRPs were isolated from species of turbellarians; these were pentapeptides, RYIRFamide (Artioposthia triangulata) and GYIRFamide (Dugesia tigrina). The primary structure of a monogenean or digenean FaRP has yet to be deduced. Preliminary physiological studies have shown that both of the turbellarian FaRPs elicit dose-dependent contractions of isolated digenean and turbellarian somatic muscle fibres. Unlike the high structural diversity of FaRPs found in molluscs, arthropods and nematodes, the complement of FaRPs in individual species of platyhelminths appears to be restricted to 1 or 2 related molecules. Much remains to be learnt about platyhelminth FaRPs, particularly from peptide isolation, molecular cloning of precursor proteins, receptor localization, and physiological studies.

  18. Pumilio genes from the Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Uriel; Marín, Monica; Castillo, Estela

    2008-01-01

    Pumilio proteins are proposed to have a conserved primordial function in the maintenance of proliferation in stem cells through post-transcriptional regulation. In this work, a search for pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD) sequences of pumilio genes from several Platyhelminthes species was performed, including representatives form Cestoda, Trematoda and Tricladida. Only one PUM-HD sequence was found in each triclad species; however, two PUM-HD homologues were found in all the parasitic species. These sequences formed two clearly separated clades: PlatyPum1, with sequences from all species, and PlatyPum2, composed exclusively of neodermatan sequences. Therefore, at least one duplication of the pumilio gene must have occurred before the divergence of cestodes and trematodes. Further duplications of PUM-HD were found in Fasciola hepatica, but these consist of retropseudogenes. This is the first comparative analysis of PUM-HD sequences in the Platyhelminthes and, more generally, in any lophotrochozoan phylum.

  19. Modelling motions within the organ of Corti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Baumgart, Johannes; Elliott, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Most cochlear models used to describe the basilar membrane vibration along the cochlea are concerned with macromechanics, and often assume that the organ of Corti moves as a single unit, ignoring the individual motion of different components. New experimental technologies provide the opportunity to measure the dynamic behaviour of different components within the organ of Corti, but only for certain types of excitation. It is thus still difficult to directly measure every aspect of cochlear dynamics, particularly for acoustic excitation of the fully active cochlea. The present work studies the dynamic response of a model of the cross-section of the cochlea, at the microscopic level, using the finite element method. The elastic components are modelled with plate elements and the perilymph and endolymph are modelled with inviscid fluid elements. The individual motion of each component within the organ of Corti is calculated with dynamic pressure loading on the basilar membrane and the motions of the experimentally accessible parts are compared with measurements. The reticular lamina moves as a stiff plate, without much bending, and is pivoting around a point close to the region of the inner hair cells, as observed experimentally. The basilar membrane shows a slightly asymmetric mode shape, with maximum displacement occurring between the second-row and the third-row of the outer hair cells. The dynamics responses is also calculated, and compared with experiments, when driven by the outer hair cells. The receptance of the basilar membrane motion and of the deflection of the hair bundles of the outer hair cells is thus obtained, when driven either acoustically or electrically. In this way, the fully active linear response of the basilar membrane to acoustic excitation can be predicted by using a linear superposition of the calculated receptances and a defined gain function for the outer hair cell feedback.

  20. Clinical, cytological and molecular evidence of Mesocestoides sp. infection in a dog from Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, U; Bertazzolo, W; Pagliaro, L; Demarco, B; Venco, L; Casiraghi, M; Bandi, C

    2004-12-01

    A 12-year-old, 13 kg, mixed-breed male dog was referred for anorexia and depression. The dog showed discomfort on abdominal palpation. Abdominal ultrasound examination revealed multiple, small, round anechoic cystic structures. Cystic fluid obtained with fine needle aspiration contained several 2-4 mm white motile flecks. Microscopic examination of the fluid revealed numerous irregularly shaped organisms measuring several hundred microns to 3 mm, the morphology of which was suggestive of intact and fragmented acephalic metacestodes of the genus Mesocestoides sp. Molecular analysis confirmed that the peritoneal infection was caused by Mesocestoides sp.

  1. Identification of a platyhelminth neuropeptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hanan H; Humphries, Judith E; Larsen, Martha J; Kubiak, Teresa M; Geary, Timothy G; Maule, Aaron G; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2007-06-01

    We report the characterisation of the first neuropeptide receptor from the phylum Platyhelminthes, an early-diverging phylum which includes a number of important human and veterinary parasites. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was identified from the model flatworm Girardia tigrina (Tricladida: Dugesiidae) based on the presence of motifs widely conserved amongst GPCRs. In two different assays utilising heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the Girardia GPCR was most potently activated by neuropeptides from the FMRFamide-like peptide class. The most potent platyhelminth neuropeptide in both assays was GYIRFamide, a FMRFamide-like peptide known to be present in G. tigrina. There was no activation by neuropeptide Fs, another class of flatworm neuropeptides. Also active were FMRFamide-like peptides derived from other phyla but not known to be present in any platyhelminth. Most potent among these were nematode neuropeptides encoded by the Caenorhabditis elegans flp-1 gene which share a PNFLRFamide carboxy terminal motif. The ability of nematode peptides to stimulate a platyhelminth receptor demonstrates a degree of structural conservation between FMRFamide-like peptide receptors from these two distinct, distant phyla which contain parasitic worms.

  2. Epigenetics: a key regulator of platyhelminth developmental biology?

    PubMed

    Geyer, Kathrin K; Hoffmann, Karl F

    2012-01-01

    The Platyhelminthes (flukes/flatworms) are a large group of derived metazoans beautifully adapted for existence in diversely challenging ecosystems. As tractable examples of development and self-regeneration or as causative agents of aquacultural, veterinary and biomedically-relevant parasitic diseases, the platyhelminths are subject to intensive inter-disciplinary research. Given the complex lifestyles exhibited by individuals within this phylum, we postulate that epigenetic processes feature in many aspects of platyhelminth lifecycle diversity, development and environmentally-driven adaptations.

  3. Imaging Organ of Corti Vibration Using Fourier-Domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Niloy; Chen, Fangyi; Fridberger, Anders; Zha, Dingjun; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    Measuring the sound stimulated vibration from various structures in the organ of Corti is important in understanding how the small vibrations are amplified and detected. In this study we examine the feasibility of using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (PSFD-OCT) to measure vibration of the cellular structures of the organ of Corti. PSFD-OCT is a low coherence interferrometry system where the interferrogram is detected as a function of wavelength. The phase of the Fourier transformation of the detected spectra contains path deference (between the sample arm and the reference arm) information of the interferometer. In PSFD-OCT this phase is measured as a function of time and thus any time dependent change in the path difference between the sample arm and the reference arm can be detected. In the experiment, we used an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea and made a surgical opening at the apical end to access the organ of Corti. By applying tones with different frequencies via the intact middle ear, we recorded the structural vibration inside the organ of Corti. Vibration amplitude and phase of different substructures were mapped on a cross-section view of the organ of Corti. Although the measurements were made at the apical turn of the cochlea, it will be possible to make vibration measurement from various turns of the cochlea. The noise floor of the system was 0.3 nm, calibrated using a piezo stack as a calibrator.

  4. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  5. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Cystatin Superfamily in Platyhelminths

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution. PMID:25853513

  7. Hox genes from the Polystomatidae (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Badets, Mathieu; Verneau, Olivier

    2009-11-01

    Hox genes form a multigenic family that play a fundamental role during the early stages of development. They are organised in a single cluster and share a 60 amino acid conserved sequence that corresponds to the DNA binding domain, i.e. the homeodomain. Sequence conservation in this region has allowed investigators to explore Hox diversity in the metazoan lineages. Within parasitic flatworms only homeobox sequences of parasite species from the Cestoda and Digenea have been reported. In the present study we surveyed species of the Polyopisthocotylea (Monogenea) in order to clarify Hox identification and diversification processes in the neodermatan lineage. From cloning of degenerative PCR products of the central region of the homeobox, we report one ParaHox and 25 new Hox sequences from 10 species of the Polystomatidae and one species of the Diclidophoridae, which extend Hox gene diversity from 46 to 72 within Neodermata. Hox sequences from the Polyopisthocotylea were annotated and classified from sequence alignments and Bayesian inferences of 178 Hox, ParaHox and related gene families recovered from all available parasitic platyhelminths and other bilaterian taxa. Our results are discussed in the light of the recent Hox evolutionary schemes. They may provide new perspectives to study the transition from turbellarians to parasitic flatworms with complex life-cycles and outline the first steps for evolutionary developmental biological approaches within platyhelminth parasites.

  8. Environmental determinants of the spatial distribution of Mesocestoides spp. and sensitivity of flotation method for the diagnosis of mesocestoidosis.

    PubMed

    Széll, Z; Tolnai, Z; Sréter, T

    2015-09-15

    Mesocestoides spp. are zoonotic cestodes of wild and domesticated carnivores. Although the adult stages are relatively harmless intestinal parasites, the metacestode stages (tetrathyridia) can be responsible for life-threatening peritonitis and pleuritis in several species including dogs, cats, non-human primates and probably man. The aim of the present study was to reveal the spatial distribution pattern of Mesocestoides spp. in the most important final hosts, red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), to analyse the relationship of these patterns with landscape and climate by geographical information systems and to evaluate faecal flotation method for the detection of infection in the final host. Fox carcasses, representing 0.5% of the total fox population were randomly selected out of all the foxes of Hungary. The intestinal tract was examined by sedimentation and counting technique. The sensitivity of the flotation method was evaluated by the testing of the faecal samples of 180 foxes infected with Mesocestoides spp. The prevalence of infection was high in foxes (45.8%; 95% CI=41.0-50.6%), and the parasite was detected in all areas of Hungary. The high prevalence of the parasite in foxes suggests that the infection might also be common in outdoor dogs and cats. Mesocestoides infection could not be detected in any of the foxes by flotation method indicating that the sensitivity of the method is less than 0.6%. Therefore, almost all canine and feline infections remain undetected in the veterinary practice. Based on the statistical analysis, the altitude was the only determinant of the spatial distribution of Mesocestoides spp. indicating that infections in carnivores including dogs and cats can be expected mainly in midland regions (150-750 m above sea level). It might be attributed to the altitude-dependent species richness and abundance of the intermediate and final hosts of the parasite. PMID:26150263

  9. Three-dimensional motion of the organ of Corti.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmert, W; Zenner, H P; Gummer, A W

    2000-01-01

    The vibration of the organ of Corti, a three-dimensional micromechanical structure that incorporates the sensory cells of the hearing organ, was measured in three mutually orthogonal directions. This was achieved by coupling the light of a laser Doppler vibrometer into the side arm of an epifluorescence microscope to measure velocity along the optical axis of the microscope, called the transversal direction. Displacements were measured in the plane orthogonal to the transverse direction with a differential photodiode mounted on the microscope in the focal plane. Vibration responses were measured in the fourth turn of a temporal-bone preparation of the guinea-pig cochlea. Responses were corrected for a "fast" wave component caused by the presence of the hole in the cochlear wall, made to view the structures. The frequency responses of the basilar membrane and the reticular lamina were similar, with little phase differences between the vibration components. Their motion was rectilinear and vertical to the surface of their membranes. The organ of Corti rotated about a point near the edge of the inner limbus. A second vibration mode was detected in the motion of the tectorial membrane. This vibration mode was directed parallel to the reticular lamina and became apparent for frequencies above approximately 0.5 oct below the characteristic frequency. This radial vibration mode presumably controls the shearing action of the hair bundles of the outer hair cells. PMID:10777727

  10. Morphological characteristics of Mesocestoides canislagopodis (Krabbe 1865) tetrathyridia found in rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Skirnisson, Karl; Sigurðardóttir, Ólöf G; Nielsen, Ólafur K

    2016-08-01

    Necropsies of 1010 rock ptarmigans (Lagopus muta) sampled in autumn 2006-2015 in northeast Iceland revealed Mesocestoides canislagopodis tetrathyridia infections in six birds (0.6 %), two juvenile birds (3 month old), and four adult birds (15 months or older). Four birds had tetrathyridia in the body cavity, one bird in the liver, and one bird both in the body cavity and the liver. There were more tetrathyridia in the body cavity of the two juveniles (c. 50 in each) than in three adults (10-40), possibly indicating a host-age-related tetrathyridia mortality. Approximately, half of tetrathyridia in the body cavity were free or loosely attached to the serosa, the other half were encapsulated in a thin, loose connective tissue stroma, frequently attached to the lungs and the liver. Tetrathyridia in the liver parenchyma incited variably intense inflammation. Tetrathyridia from the juvenile hosts were whitish, heart-shaped, and flattened, with unsegmented bodies with a slightly pointed posterior end. In the adult hosts, tetrathyridia were sometimes almost rectangular-shaped, slightly wider compared to those in the juveniles, but more than twice as long as the younger-aged tetrathyridia. Tetrathyridia infections are most likely acquired during the brief insectivorous feeding phase of ptarmigan chicks, and the tetrathyridia persist throughout the lifespan of the birds. PMID:27117162

  11. Tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides lineatus in Chinese snakes and their adults recovered from experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Kim, Tong-Soo; Kong, Yoon; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2013-10-01

    Morphological characteristics of Mesocestoides lineatus tetrathyridia collected from Chinese snakes and their adults recovered from experimental animals were studied. The tetrathyridia were detected mainly in the mesentery of 2 snake species, Agkistrodon saxatilis (25%) and Elaphe schrenckii (20%). They were 1.73 by 1.02 mm in average size and had an invaginated scolex with 4 suckers. Adult tapeworms were recovered from 2 hamsters and 1 dog, which were orally infected with 5-10 larvae each. Adults from hamsters were about 32 cm long and those from a dog were about 58 cm long. The scolex was 0.56 mm in average width with 4 suckers of 0.17 by 0.15 mm in average size. Mature proglottids measured 0.29 by 0.91 mm (av.). Ovaries and vitellaria bilobed and located in the posterior portion of proglottids. The cirrus sac was oval-shaped and located median. Testes were follicular, distributed in both lateral fields of proglottids, and 41-52 in number per proglottid. Gravid proglottids were 1.84 by 1.39 mm (av.) with a characteristic paruterine organ. Eggs were 35 by 27 µm in average size with a hexacanth embryo. These morphological characteristics of adult worms were identical with those of M. lineatus reported previously. Therefore, it has been confirmed that the tetrathyridia detected in 2 species of Chinese snakes are the metacestodes of M. lineatus, and 2 snake species, A. saxatilis and E. schrenckii, play the role of intermediate hosts.

  12. Morphological characteristics of Mesocestoides canislagopodis (Krabbe 1865) tetrathyridia found in rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta) in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Skirnisson, Karl; Sigurðardóttir, Ólöf G; Nielsen, Ólafur K

    2016-08-01

    Necropsies of 1010 rock ptarmigans (Lagopus muta) sampled in autumn 2006-2015 in northeast Iceland revealed Mesocestoides canislagopodis tetrathyridia infections in six birds (0.6 %), two juvenile birds (3 month old), and four adult birds (15 months or older). Four birds had tetrathyridia in the body cavity, one bird in the liver, and one bird both in the body cavity and the liver. There were more tetrathyridia in the body cavity of the two juveniles (c. 50 in each) than in three adults (10-40), possibly indicating a host-age-related tetrathyridia mortality. Approximately, half of tetrathyridia in the body cavity were free or loosely attached to the serosa, the other half were encapsulated in a thin, loose connective tissue stroma, frequently attached to the lungs and the liver. Tetrathyridia in the liver parenchyma incited variably intense inflammation. Tetrathyridia from the juvenile hosts were whitish, heart-shaped, and flattened, with unsegmented bodies with a slightly pointed posterior end. In the adult hosts, tetrathyridia were sometimes almost rectangular-shaped, slightly wider compared to those in the juveniles, but more than twice as long as the younger-aged tetrathyridia. Tetrathyridia infections are most likely acquired during the brief insectivorous feeding phase of ptarmigan chicks, and the tetrathyridia persist throughout the lifespan of the birds.

  13. First record of metacestodes of Mesocestoides sp. in the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in Europe, with an 18S rDNA characterisation of the isolate.

    PubMed

    Literák, Ivan; Olson, Peter D; Georgiev, Boyko B; Spakulová, Marta

    2004-03-01

    Metacestodes of Mesocestoides sp. were recorded from Sturnus vulgaris (Passeriformes: Stumidae) in the Czech Republic in April 2002. They were found in a cutaneous cyst and in the thoracic region of the body cavity of the bird. This is the first record of metacestodes of Mesocestoides sp. in this host species in Europe as well as the first finding of the formation of a cutaneous cyst provoked by this parasite. Additional specimens from Apodemus agrarius (Mammalia: Rodentia) from Bulgaria and Lacerta agilis (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Czech Republic were compared with that from S. vulgaris. Sequence data from the V4 variable region (18S rDNA) were used to compare genetic variability among these and previously characterized isolates of Mesocestoides spp. A number of distinct clades were recognized, with metacestodes from L. agilis showing the highest degree of relative divergence. PMID:15139376

  14. Life-history studies on two molecular strains of mesocestoides (Cestoda: Mesocestoididae): identification of sylvatic hosts and infectivity of immature life stages.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Kerry A; Boyce, Walter M

    2004-02-01

    Life-cycle studies were conducted on 2 molecular strains of Mesocestoides tapeworms that represent different evolutionary lineages (clades A and B). Wild carnivores, reptiles, and rodents were examined for tapeworm infections at 2 enzootic sites: (1) San Miguel Island (SMI), a small island off the coast of southern California and (2) Hopland Research and Extension Center (HREC), a field station in northern California. Results indicate that deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) may play an important role in the life cycles of Mesocestoides (clades A and B) in California. Over half the coyotes at HREC and at least a third of the population of island fox (Urocyon littoralis) at SMI were found to harbor clade A adult Mesocestoides spp. One of every 4 Mesocestoides-infected coyotes had tapeworms representing both clades A and B. Experimental inoculations revealed that proglottids (clades A and B) were not directly infectious to rodents, reptiles, or dogs. On the other hand, mice, lizards, and hamsters fed tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides spp. (clades A or B) developed peritoneal tetrathyridial infections. A dog that was fed tetrathyridia (clade B) developed an adult tapeworm infection. Acephalic metacestodes given orally to western fence lizards, laboratory mice, or domestic dogs did not result in metacestode or adult tapeworm infections. Whereas most clade A acephalic metacestodes from dogs were asexually proliferative, clade A tetrathyridia isolated from wild deer mice did not show evidence of asexual replication. Our study supports the hypothesis that a second, as of yet unidentified, intermediate host is necessary to complete the life cycles of Mesocestoides spp., and that acephalic metacestodes represent an aberrant form, incapable of further development. PMID:15040675

  15. Tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides lineatus in Chinese snakes and their adults recovered from experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Kim, Tong-Soo; Kong, Yoon; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Sohn, Woon-Mok

    2013-10-01

    Morphological characteristics of Mesocestoides lineatus tetrathyridia collected from Chinese snakes and their adults recovered from experimental animals were studied. The tetrathyridia were detected mainly in the mesentery of 2 snake species, Agkistrodon saxatilis (25%) and Elaphe schrenckii (20%). They were 1.73 by 1.02 mm in average size and had an invaginated scolex with 4 suckers. Adult tapeworms were recovered from 2 hamsters and 1 dog, which were orally infected with 5-10 larvae each. Adults from hamsters were about 32 cm long and those from a dog were about 58 cm long. The scolex was 0.56 mm in average width with 4 suckers of 0.17 by 0.15 mm in average size. Mature proglottids measured 0.29 by 0.91 mm (av.). Ovaries and vitellaria bilobed and located in the posterior portion of proglottids. The cirrus sac was oval-shaped and located median. Testes were follicular, distributed in both lateral fields of proglottids, and 41-52 in number per proglottid. Gravid proglottids were 1.84 by 1.39 mm (av.) with a characteristic paruterine organ. Eggs were 35 by 27 µm in average size with a hexacanth embryo. These morphological characteristics of adult worms were identical with those of M. lineatus reported previously. Therefore, it has been confirmed that the tetrathyridia detected in 2 species of Chinese snakes are the metacestodes of M. lineatus, and 2 snake species, A. saxatilis and E. schrenckii, play the role of intermediate hosts. PMID:24327778

  16. Tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides lineatus in Chinese Snakes and Their Adults Recovered from Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Kim, Tong-Soo; Kong, Yoon; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2013-01-01

    Morphological characteristics of Mesocestoides lineatus tetrathyridia collected from Chinese snakes and their adults recovered from experimental animals were studied. The tetrathyridia were detected mainly in the mesentery of 2 snake species, Agkistrodon saxatilis (25%) and Elaphe schrenckii (20%). They were 1.73 by 1.02 mm in average size and had an invaginated scolex with 4 suckers. Adult tapeworms were recovered from 2 hamsters and 1 dog, which were orally infected with 5-10 larvae each. Adults from hamsters were about 32 cm long and those from a dog were about 58 cm long. The scolex was 0.56 mm in average width with 4 suckers of 0.17 by 0.15 mm in average size. Mature proglottids measured 0.29 by 0.91 mm (av.). Ovaries and vitellaria bilobed and located in the posterior portion of proglottids. The cirrus sac was oval-shaped and located median. Testes were follicular, distributed in both lateral fields of proglottids, and 41-52 in number per proglottid. Gravid proglottids were 1.84 by 1.39 mm (av.) with a characteristic paruterine organ. Eggs were 35 by 27 µm in average size with a hexacanth embryo. These morphological characteristics of adult worms were identical with those of M. lineatus reported previously. Therefore, it has been confirmed that the tetrathyridia detected in 2 species of Chinese snakes are the metacestodes of M. lineatus, and 2 snake species, A. saxatilis and E. schrenckii, play the role of intermediate hosts. PMID:24327778

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes; order Tricladida).

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masato; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2012-10-01

    We used two sequencing methods, namely long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and primer walking, to determine the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Dugesia japonica and most of the mtDNA sequence of Dugesia ryukyuensis. The genome of D. japonica contained 36 genes including 12 of the 13 protein-coding genes characteristic of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The genome of D. ryukyuensis contained 33 genes, including 12 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 19 transfer RNA genes. The gene order of the mitochondrial genome from the Dugesia species showed no clear homology with either the Neodermata or other free-living Rhabditophora. This indicates that the platyhelminths exhibit great variability in mitochondrial gene order. This is the first complete sequence analysis of the mitochondrial genome of a free-living member of Rhabditophora, which will facilitate further studies on the population genetics and genomic evolution of the Platyhelminthes.

  18. Primary culture and plasmid electroporation of the murine organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Parker, Mark; Brugeaud, Aurore; Edge, Albert S B

    2010-02-04

    In all mammals, the sensory epithelium for audition is located along the spiraling organ of Corti that resides within the conch shaped cochlea of the inner ear (fig 1). Hair cells in the developing cochlea, which are the mechanosensory cells of the auditory system, are aligned in one row of inner hair cells and three (in the base and mid-turns) to four (in the apical turn) rows of outer hair cells that span the length of the organ of Corti. Hair cells transduce sound-induced mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane into neural impulses that the brain can interpret. Most cases of sensorineural hearing loss are caused by death or dysfunction of cochlear hair cells. An increasingly essential tool in auditory research is the isolation and in vitro culture of the organ explant. Once isolated, the explants may be utilized in several ways to provide information regarding normative, anomalous, or therapeutic physiology. Gene expression, stereocilia motility, cell and molecular biology, as well as biological approaches for hair cell regeneration are examples of experimental applications of organ of Corti explants. This protocol describes a method for the isolation and culture of the organ of Corti from neonatal mice. The accompanying video includes stepwise directions for the isolation of the temporal bone from mouse pups, and subsequent isolation of the cochlea, spiral ligament, and organ of Corti. Once isolated, the sensory epithelium can be plated and cultured in vitro in its entirety, or as a further dissected micro-isolate that lacks the spiral limbus and spiral ganglion neurons. Using this method, primary explants can be maintained for 7-10 days. As an example of the utility of this procedure, organ of Corti explants will be electroporated with an exogenous DsRed reporter gene. This method provides an improvement over other published methods because it provides reproducible, unambiguous, and stepwise directions for the isolation, microdissection, and primary

  19. Primary culture and plasmid electroporation of the murine organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Parker, Mark; Brugeaud, Aurore; Edge, Albert S B

    2010-01-01

    In all mammals, the sensory epithelium for audition is located along the spiraling organ of Corti that resides within the conch shaped cochlea of the inner ear (fig 1). Hair cells in the developing cochlea, which are the mechanosensory cells of the auditory system, are aligned in one row of inner hair cells and three (in the base and mid-turns) to four (in the apical turn) rows of outer hair cells that span the length of the organ of Corti. Hair cells transduce sound-induced mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane into neural impulses that the brain can interpret. Most cases of sensorineural hearing loss are caused by death or dysfunction of cochlear hair cells. An increasingly essential tool in auditory research is the isolation and in vitro culture of the organ explant. Once isolated, the explants may be utilized in several ways to provide information regarding normative, anomalous, or therapeutic physiology. Gene expression, stereocilia motility, cell and molecular biology, as well as biological approaches for hair cell regeneration are examples of experimental applications of organ of Corti explants. This protocol describes a method for the isolation and culture of the organ of Corti from neonatal mice. The accompanying video includes stepwise directions for the isolation of the temporal bone from mouse pups, and subsequent isolation of the cochlea, spiral ligament, and organ of Corti. Once isolated, the sensory epithelium can be plated and cultured in vitro in its entirety, or as a further dissected micro-isolate that lacks the spiral limbus and spiral ganglion neurons. Using this method, primary explants can be maintained for 7-10 days. As an example of the utility of this procedure, organ of Corti explants will be electroporated with an exogenous DsRed reporter gene. This method provides an improvement over other published methods because it provides reproducible, unambiguous, and stepwise directions for the isolation, microdissection, and primary

  20. Acoel flatworms are not platyhelminthes: evidence from phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Hervé; Brinkmann, Henner; Martinez, Pedro; Riutort, Marta; Baguñà, Jaume

    2007-08-08

    Acoel flatworms are small marine worms traditionally considered to belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. However, molecular phylogenetic analyses suggest that acoels are not members of Platyhelminthes, but are rather extant members of the earliest diverging Bilateria. This result has been called into question, under suspicions of a long branch attraction (LBA) artefact. Here we re-examine this problem through a phylogenomic approach using 68 different protein-coding genes from the acoel Convoluta pulchra and 51 metazoan species belonging to 15 different phyla. We employ a mixture model, named CAT, previously found to overcome LBA artefacts where classical models fail. Our results unequivocally show that acoels are not part of the classically defined Platyhelminthes, making the latter polyphyletic. Moreover, they indicate a deuterostome affinity for acoels, potentially as a sister group to all deuterostomes, to Xenoturbellida, to Ambulacraria, or even to chordates. However, the weak support found for most deuterostome nodes, together with the very fast evolutionary rate of the acoel Convoluta pulchra, call for more data from slowly evolving acoels (or from its sister-group, the Nemertodermatida) to solve this challenging phylogenetic problem.

  1. Quantitative High-Resolution Cellular Map of the Organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Waldhaus, Jörg; Durruthy-Durruthy, Robert; Heller, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The organ of Corti harbors highly specialized sensory hair cells and surrounding supporting cells that are essential for the sense of hearing. Here, we report a single cell gene expression data analysis and visualization strategy that allows for the construction of a quantitative spatial map of the neonatal organ of Corti along its major anatomical axes. The map displays gene expression levels of 192 genes for all organ of Corti cell types ordered along the apex-to-base axis of the cochlea. Statistical interrogation of cell-type-specific gene expression patterns along the longitudinal gradient revealed features of apical supporting cells indicative of a propensity for proliferative hair cell regeneration. This includes reduced expression of Notch effectors, receptivity for canonical Wnt signaling, and prominent expression of early cell-cycle genes. Cochlear hair cells displayed expression gradients of genes indicative of cellular differentiation and the establishment of the tonotopic axis.

  2. Mitochondrial genome data support the basal position of acoelomorpha and the polyphyly of the platyhelminthes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Trillo, Inaki; Riutort, Marta; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Baguna, Jaume; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-05-01

    We determined 9.7, 5.2, and 6.8 kb, respectively, of the mitochondrial genomes of the acoel Paratomella rubra, the nemertodermatid Nemertoderma westbladi and the free-living rhabditophoran platyhelminth Microstomum lineare. The identified gene arrangements are unique among metazoans, including each other, sharing no more than one or two single gene boundaries with a few distantly related taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences inferred from the sequenced genes confirms that the acoelomorph flatworms (acoels + nemertodermatids) do not belong to the Platyhelminthes, but are, instead, the most basal extant bilaterian group. Therefore, the Platyhelminthes, as traditionally constituted, is a polyphyletic phylum.

  3. Mitochondrial genome data support the basal position of Acoelomorpha and the polyphyly of the Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Riutort, Marta; Fourcade, H Matthew; Baguñà, Jaume; Boore, Jeffrey L

    2004-11-01

    We determined 9.7, 5.2, and 6.8 kb, respectively, of the mitochondrial genomes of the acoel Paratomella rubra, the nemertodermatid Nemertoderma westbladi, and the free-living rhabditophoran platyhelminth Microstomum lineare. The identified gene arrangements are unique among metazoans, including each other, sharing no more than one or two single gene boundaries with a few distantly related taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences inferred from the sequenced genes confirms that the acoelomorph flatworms (acoels+nemertodermatids) do not belong to the Platyhelminthes, but are, instead, the most basal extant bilaterian group. Therefore, the Platyhelminthes, as traditionally constituted, is a polyphyletic phylum.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of the Argonaute protein family in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yadong

    2013-03-01

    Argonaute proteins (AGOs) are mediators of gene silencing via recruitment of small regulatory RNAs to induce translational regression or degradation of targeted molecules. Platyhelminths have been reported to express microRNAs but the diversity of AGOs in the phylum has not been explored. Phylogenetic relationships of members of this protein family were studied using data from six platyhelminth genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all cestode and trematode AGOs, along with some triclad planarian AGOs, were grouped into the Ago subfamily and its novel sister clade, here referred to as Cluster 1. These were very distant from Piwi and Class 3 subfamilies. By contrast, a number of planarian Piwi-like AGOs formed a novel sister clade to the Piwi subfamily. Extensive sequence searching revealed the presence of an additional locus for AGO2 in the cestode Echinococcus granulosus and exon expansion in this species and E. multilocularis. The current study suggests the absence of the Piwi subfamily and Class 3 AGOs in cestodes and trematodes and the Piwi-like AGO expansion in a free-living triclad planarian and the occurrence of exon expansion prior to or during the evolution of the most-recent common ancestor of the Echinococcus species studied.

  5. Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoliang; Lu, Lixia; Su, Hailong; Lou, Zhongzi; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yadong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of small regulatory RNAs that are involved in numerous biological processes through small RNA-induced silencing networks. In an attempt to explore the phylogeny of miRNAs across five platyhelminths, we integrated annotated miRNAs and their full genomes. We identified conserved miRNA clusters and, in particular, miR-71/2 was conserved from planarian to parasitic flatworms and was expanded in free-living Schmidtea mediterranea. Analysis of 22 miRNA loci provided compelling evidence that most known miRNAs are conserved across platyhelminths. Meanwhile, we also observed alterations of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNA(s), such as transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation, in around ~ 41% of 22 known miRNA loci. Compared with Echinococcus multilocularis, the majority of these events occurred in evolution-distant Hymenolepis microstoma, Schistosoma japonicum or/and S. mediterranea. These results imply rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes; order Tricladida).

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masato; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2012-10-01

    We used two sequencing methods, namely long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and primer walking, to determine the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Dugesia japonica and most of the mtDNA sequence of Dugesia ryukyuensis. The genome of D. japonica contained 36 genes including 12 of the 13 protein-coding genes characteristic of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The genome of D. ryukyuensis contained 33 genes, including 12 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 19 transfer RNA genes. The gene order of the mitochondrial genome from the Dugesia species showed no clear homology with either the Neodermata or other free-living Rhabditophora. This indicates that the platyhelminths exhibit great variability in mitochondrial gene order. This is the first complete sequence analysis of the mitochondrial genome of a free-living member of Rhabditophora, which will facilitate further studies on the population genetics and genomic evolution of the Platyhelminthes. PMID:23030340

  7. Harmonic Response of the Organ of Corti: Results for Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Michon, Guilhem; Morlier, Joseph; Gourinat, Yves

    2011-11-01

    Inner ear is a remarkable multiphysical system and its modelling is a great challenge. The approach used in this paper aims to reproduce physic with a realistic description of the radial cross section of the cochlea. A 2D-section of the organ of Corti is fully described. Wavenumbers and corresponding modes of propagation are calculated taking into account passive structural responses. The study is extended to six cross sections of the organ of Corti and a large frequency bandwidth from 100 Hz to 3 kHz. Dispersion curves reveal the influence of fluid structure interactions with a dispersive behavior at high frequencies. Longitudinal mechanical coupling provides new interacting modes of propagation.

  8. Corti's organ physiology-based cochlear model: a microelectronic prosthetic implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Francisco; Fernandez-Ramos, Raquel; Romero-Sanchez, Jorge; Martin, Jose Francisco

    2003-04-01

    Corti"s Organ is an Electro-Mechanical transducer that allows the energy coupling between acoustical stimuli and auditory nerve. Although the structure and funtionality of this organ are complex, state of the art models have been currently developed and tested. Cochlea model presented in this paper is based on the theories of Bekesy and others and concerns on the behaviour of auditory system on frequency-place domain and mechanisms of lateral inhibition. At the same time, present state of technology will permit us developing a microsystem that reproduce this phenomena applied to hearing aid prosthesis. Corti"s Organ is composed of more than 20.000 cilia excited by mean of travelling waves. These waves produce relative pressures distributed along the cochlea, exciting an specific number of cilia in a local way. Nonlinear mechanisms of local adaptation to the intensity (external cilia cells) and lateral inhibition (internal cilia cells) allow the selection of very few elements excited. These transmit a very precise intensity and frequency information. These signals are the only ones coupled to the auditory nerve. Distribution of pressure waves matches a quasilogaritmic law due to Cochlea morphology. Microsystem presented in this paper takes Bark"s law as an approximation to this behaviour consisting on grouped arbitrary elements composed of a set of selective coupled exciters (bank of filters according to Patterson"s model).These sets apply the intensity adaptation principles and lateral inhibition. Elements excited during the process generate a bioelectric signal in the same way than cilia cell. A microelectronic solution is presented for the development of an implantable prosthesis device.

  9. Characterization of the mouse organ of Corti cytoarchitecture using a stick representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soons, Joris A.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Steele, Charles R.; Puria, Sunil

    2015-02-01

    The supporting cells and hair cells (HCs) in the organ of Corti (OoC) are highly organized. The precise 3D micro-structure is hypothesized to play a critical role in cochlear function. Recently, we combined two techniques to obtain the organ of Corti cytoarchitecture. Two-photon imaging allowed us to perform in situ imaging without subjecting the tissue to other potential distortions, while genetically engineered mTmG mice have a fluorophore embedded in the cell membranes. In this contribution we discuss the parameterization step necessary to compare structures obtained with this technique at different locations and in different specimens. First, the z-axis is chosen perpendicular to the basilar membrane. Subsequently, base and apex of cells are indicated by landmarks. As such, the cells are approximated as a stick representation. This representation is used to calculate the 3D lengths and angles of all imaged cells. Since the OoC is not straight but spiral-shaped, the radial (y) and longitudinal (x) directions differ at each location. Therefore, circular arcs are fitted through the 3 rows of outer HCs to define the local radial (y) and longitudinal (x) direction. Novel in this approach is the 3D data of the cell position in the organ of Corti. Cell diameters and tissue areas cannot be quantified with this stick representation and need to be measured separately.

  10. Vibration responses of the organ of Corti and the tectorial membrane to electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Manuela; Gummer, Anthony W

    2011-12-01

    Coupling of somatic electromechanical force from the outer hair cells (OHCs) into the organ of Corti is investigated by measuring transverse vibration patterns of the organ of Cori and tectorial membrane (TM) in response to intracochlear electrical stimulation. Measurement places at the organ of Corti extend from the inner sulcus cells to Hensen's cells and at the lower (and upper) surface of the TM from the inner sulcus to the OHC region. These locations are in the neighborhood of where electromechanical force is coupled into (1) the mechanoelectrical transducers of the stereocilia and (2) fluids of the organ of Corti. Experiments are conducted in the first, second, and third cochlear turns of an in vitro preparation of the adult guinea pig cochlea. Vibration measurements are made at functionally relevant stimulus frequencies (0.48-68 kHz) and response amplitudes (<15 nm). The experiments provide phase relations between the different structures, which, dependent on frequency range and longitudinal cochlear position, include in-phase transverse motions of the TM, counterphasic transverse motions between the inner hair cell and OHCs, as well as traveling-wave motion of Hensen's cells in the radial direction. Mechanics of sound processing in the cochlea are discussed based on these phase relationships. PMID:22225042

  11. Reduction of oxidative stress and liver injury following silymarin and praziquantel treatment in mice with Mesocestoides vogae (Cestoda) infection.

    PubMed

    Velebný, Samuel; Hrčkova, Gabriela; Königová, Alžbeta

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to hepatic damage and fibrogenesis in a variety of liver disorders. The liver is the target organ for many parasitic infections, hence there is a great demand for the development of novel treatment strategies. In the present study conducted on mice infected with larval stage of Mesocestoides vogae, we investigated effects of therapy with praziquantel (PZQ) alone and in combination with silymarin on liver GSH content, lipid peroxidation and larval reduction. Proliferation of liver cells by means of BrdU incorporation into DNA and production of superoxide anions by peritoneal adherent cells was measured to assess the antioxidant activity of silymarin. Drug administration was carried on from day 15 post infection (p.i.) for ten consecutive days and examination was performed during 20 days of follow-up the therapy. Larval M. vogae infection caused liver damage and triggered extensive oxidative stress, resulting in the abolishment of GSH redox balance and ROS-induced lipid peroxidation. PZQ administration caused short-term decline of GSH levels in healthy mice. Low GSH levels in infected mice were elevated gradually in response to the drug, but respiratory burst in cells was not reduced. Silymarin in combination with PZQ showed strong direct antioxidant capacity and stimulated the larvicidal effect of praziquantel. Treatment with PZQ and silymarin downregulated the generation of superoxide anions, prevented lipid peroxidation, stimulated GSH synthesis and proliferation of hepatocytes in infected livers. These findings demonstrated that silymarin can markedly decrease the liver injury and its co-administration with PZQ potentiate effect of therapy, probably due to the down-regulation of fibrogenesis.

  12. Vibration of the organ of Corti within the cochlear apex in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Simon S.; Wang, Rosalie; Raphael, Patrick D.; Moayedi, Yalda; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    The tonotopic map of the mammalian cochlea is commonly thought to be determined by the passive mechanical properties of the basilar membrane. The other tissues and cells that make up the organ of Corti also have passive mechanical properties; however, their roles are less well understood. In addition, active forces produced by outer hair cells (OHCs) enhance the vibration of the basilar membrane, termed cochlear amplification. Here, we studied how these biomechanical components interact using optical coherence tomography, which permits vibratory measurements within tissue. We measured not only classical basilar membrane tuning curves, but also vibratory responses from the rest of the organ of Corti within the mouse cochlear apex in vivo. As expected, basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice. Interestingly, the vibratory response of the region lateral to the OHCs, the “lateral compartment,” demonstrated frequency-dependent phase differences relative to the basilar membrane. This was sharply tuned in both live and dead mice. We then measured basilar membrane and lateral compartment vibration in transgenic mice with targeted alterations in cochlear mechanics. Prestin499/499, Prestin−/−, and TectaC1509G/C1509G mice demonstrated no cochlear amplification but maintained the lateral compartment phase difference. In contrast, SfswapTg/Tg mice maintained cochlear amplification but did not demonstrate the lateral compartment phase difference. These data indicate that the organ of Corti has complex micromechanical vibratory characteristics, with passive, yet sharply tuned, vibratory characteristics associated with the supporting cells. These characteristics may tune OHC force generation to produce the sharp frequency selectivity of mammalian hearing. PMID:24920025

  13. Vibration of the organ of Corti within the cochlear apex in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Simon S; Wang, Rosalie; Raphael, Patrick D; Moayedi, Yalda; Groves, Andrew K; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E; Oghalai, John S

    2014-09-01

    The tonotopic map of the mammalian cochlea is commonly thought to be determined by the passive mechanical properties of the basilar membrane. The other tissues and cells that make up the organ of Corti also have passive mechanical properties; however, their roles are less well understood. In addition, active forces produced by outer hair cells (OHCs) enhance the vibration of the basilar membrane, termed cochlear amplification. Here, we studied how these biomechanical components interact using optical coherence tomography, which permits vibratory measurements within tissue. We measured not only classical basilar membrane tuning curves, but also vibratory responses from the rest of the organ of Corti within the mouse cochlear apex in vivo. As expected, basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice. Interestingly, the vibratory response of the region lateral to the OHCs, the "lateral compartment," demonstrated frequency-dependent phase differences relative to the basilar membrane. This was sharply tuned in both live and dead mice. We then measured basilar membrane and lateral compartment vibration in transgenic mice with targeted alterations in cochlear mechanics. Prestin(499/499), Prestin(-/-), and Tecta(C1509G/C1509G) mice demonstrated no cochlear amplification but maintained the lateral compartment phase difference. In contrast, Sfswap(Tg/Tg) mice maintained cochlear amplification but did not demonstrate the lateral compartment phase difference. These data indicate that the organ of Corti has complex micromechanical vibratory characteristics, with passive, yet sharply tuned, vibratory characteristics associated with the supporting cells. These characteristics may tune OHC force generation to produce the sharp frequency selectivity of mammalian hearing.

  14. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J; Day, Tim A; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-09-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era. PMID:19361512

  15. Discovery of multiple neuropeptide families in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Paul; Mair, Gunnar R; Atkinson, Louise; Ladurner, Peter; Zamanian, Mostafa; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Marks, Nikki J; Day, Tim A; Maule, Aaron G

    2009-09-01

    Available evidence shows that short amidated neuropeptides are widespread and have important functions within the nervous systems of all flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) examined, and could therefore represent a starting point for new lead drug compounds with which to combat parasitic helminth infections. However, only a handful of these peptides have been characterised, the rigorous exploration of the flatworm peptide signalling repertoire having been hindered by the dearth of flatworm genomic data. Through searches of both expressed sequence tags and genomic resources using the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), we describe 96 neuropeptides on 60 precursors from 10 flatworm species. Most of these (51 predicted peptides on 14 precursors) are novel and are apparently restricted to flatworms; the remainder comprise nine recognised peptide families including FMRFamide-like (FLPs), neuropeptide F (NPF)-like, myomodulin-like, buccalin-like and neuropeptide FF (NPFF)-like peptides; notably, the latter have only previously been reported in vertebrates. Selected peptides were localised immunocytochemically to the Schistosoma mansoni nervous system. We also describe several novel flatworm NPFs with structural features characteristic of the vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY) superfamily, previously unreported characteristics which support the common ancestry of flatworm NPFs with the NPY-superfamily. Our dataset provides a springboard for investigation of the functional biology and therapeutic potential of neuropeptides in flatworms, simultaneously launching flatworm neurobiology into the post-genomic era.

  16. [The scientism of racial theories in O cortiço and Canaã].

    PubMed

    Tamano, Luana Tieko Omena; dos Santos, Poliana; Magalhães, Gildo; Martins, Ana Claudia Aymoré

    2011-01-01

    This analysis of the introduction of racial theories to Brazil and their reception by Brazilian intellectuals in the late nineteenth/early twentieth centuries looks at miscegenation, racism, and whitening policies through the lenses of two novels that bear witness to the era's mentality: O cortiço (1890; A Brazilian tenement, 1976), by Aluísio Azevedo, and Canaã (1902; Canaan, 1920), by Graça Aranha. Through historical and literary analysis, the article examines how fiction has portrayed Brazil and the national dilemma aesthetically.

  17. Comparative selenoproteome analysis reveals a reduced utilization of selenium in parasitic platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Zhu, Hua-Zhang; Xu, Yin-Zhen; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Background. The selenocysteine(Sec)-containing proteins, selenoproteins, are an important group of proteins present in all three kingdoms of life. Although the selenoproteomes of many organisms have been analyzed, systematic studies on selenoproteins in platyhelminthes are still lacking. Moreover, comparison of selenoproteomes between free-living and parasitic animals is rarely studied. Results. In this study, three representative organisms (Schmidtea mediterranea, Schistosoma japonicum and Taenia solium) were selected for comparative analysis of selenoproteomes in Platyhelminthes. Using a SelGenAmic-based selenoprotein prediction algorithm, a total of 37 selenoprotein genes were identified in these organisms. The size of selenoproteomes and selenoprotein families were found to be associated with different lifestyles: free-living organisms have larger selenoproteome whereas parasitic lifestyle corresponds to reduced selenoproteomes. Five selenoproteins, SelT, Sel15, GPx, SPS2 and TR, were found to be present in all examined platyhelminthes as well as almost all sequenced animals, suggesting their essential role in metazoans. Finally, a new splicing form of SelW that lacked the first exon was found to be present in S. japonicum. Conclusions. Our data provide a first glance into the selenoproteomes of organisms in the phylum Platyhelminthes and may help understand function and evolutionary dynamics of selenium utilization in diversified metazoans.

  18. CMV-induced embryonic mouse organ of Corti dysplasia: network architecture of dysfunctional lateral inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Michael; Jaskoll, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital CMV infection is the major non-genetic cause of sensorineural hearing loss at birth and beyond. Among other pathologies, there is a striking dysplasia/hyperplasia of organ of Corti hair and supporting cells (HC/SC). Using an in vitro embryonic mouse model of CMV-induced cochlear teratogenesis that mimics the known human pathology, and functional signaling network modeling, we tested the hypothesis that CMV disrupts the highly ordered HC/SC pattern by dysregulating Notch and Fgfr3, their cognate ligands and downstream effectors. Several novel emergent properties of the critical lateral inhibition subnetwork became apparent. The subnetwork has classic small-world properties such as short paths between most gene pairs, few long-distance links, and considerable clustering. Concomitantly, the calculated probability that our specific gene expression dataset is from dysplastic organs of Corti is highly significant (p < 1 × 10−12). Further, we determined that the subnetwork has a highly heterogeneous scale-free topology in which the highly linked genes (hubs), Notch and Fgfr3, play a central role in mediating interactions among the less linked genes. This phenomenon has important biologic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26178632

  19. Impedance analysis of the organ of corti with magnetically actuated probes.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Marc P; Gummer, Anthony W

    2004-08-01

    An innovative method is presented to measure the mechanical driving point impedance of biological structures up to at least 40 kHz. The technique employs an atomic force cantilever with a ferromagnetic coating and an external magnetic field to apply a calibrated force to the cantilever. Measurement of the resulting cantilever velocity using a laser Doppler vibrometer yields the impedance. A key feature of the method is that it permits measurements for biological tissue in physiological solutions. The method was applied to measure the point impedance of the organ of Corti in situ, to elucidate the biophysical basis of cochlear amplification. The basilar membrane was mechanically clamped at its tympanic surface and the measurements conducted at different radial positions on the reticular lamina. The tectorial membrane was removed. The impedance was described by a generalized Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic model, in which the stiffness was real-valued and independent of frequency, but the viscosity was complex-valued with positive real part, which was dependent on frequency and negative imaginary part, which was independent of frequency. There was no evidence for an inertial component. The magnitude of the impedance was greatest at the tunnel of Corti, and decreased monotonically in each of the radial directions. In the absence of inertia, the mechanical load on the outer hair cells causes their electromotile displacement responses to be reduced by only 10-fold over the entire range of auditory frequencies. PMID:15298940

  20. Evidence for Outer Hair Cell Driven Oscillatory Fluid Flow in the Tunnel of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Karavitaki, K. Domenica; Mountain, David C.

    2007-01-01

    Outer hair cell (OHC) somatic motility plays a key role in mammalian cochlear frequency selectivity and hearing sensitivity, but the mechanism of cochlear amplification is not well understood and remains a matter of controversy. We have visualized and quantified the effects of electrically evoked OHC somatic motility within the gerbil organ of Corti using an excised cochlear preparation. We found that OHC motility induces oscillatory motion of the medial olivocochlear fibers where they cross the tunnel of Corti (ToC) in their course to innervate the OHCs. We show that this motion is present at physiologically relevant frequencies and remains at locations distal to the OHC excitation point. We interpret this fiber motion to be the result of oscillatory fluid flow in the ToC. We show, using a simple one-dimensional hydromechanical model of the ToC, that a fluid wave within the tunnel can travel without significant attenuation for distances larger than the wavelength of the cochlear traveling wave at its peak. This ToC fluid wave could interact with the cochlear traveling wave to amplify the motion of the basilar membrane. The ToC wave could also provide longitudinal coupling between adjacent sections of the basilar membrane, and such coupling may be critical for cochlear amplification. PMID:17277193

  1. Displacements of the organ of Corti by gel injections into the cochlear apex

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Alec N.; Brown, Daniel J.; Hartsock, Jared J.; Plontke, Stefan K.

    2009-01-01

    In order to transduce sounds efficiently, the stereocilia of hair cells in the organ of Corti must be positioned optimally. Mechanical displacements, such as pressure differentials across the organ caused by endolymphatic hydrops, may impair sensitivity. Studying this phenomenon has been limited by the technical difficulty of inducing sustained displacements of stereocilia in vivo. We have found that small injections (0.5 to 2 μL) of Healon gel into the cochlear apex of guinea pigs produced sustained changes of endocochlear potential (EP), summating potential (SP) and transducer operating point (OP) in a manner consistent with a mechanically-induced position change of the organ of Corti in the basal turn. Induced changes immediately recovered when injection ceased. In addition, effects of low-frequency bias tones on EP, SP and OP were enhanced during the injection of gel and remained hypersensitive after injection ceased. This is thought to result from the viscous gel mechanically limiting pressure shunting through the helicotrema. Cochlear microphonics measured as frequency was varied showed enhancement below 100 Hz but most notably in the sub-auditory range. Sensitivity to low-frequency biasing was also enhanced in animals with surgically-induced endolymphatic hydrops, suggesting that obstruction of the perilymphatic space by hydrops could contribute to the pathophysiology of this condition. PMID:19217935

  2. Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Mouse Organ of Corti Cytoarchitecture for Mechanical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puria, Sunil; Hartman, Byron; Kim, Jichul; Oghalai, John S.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2011-11-01

    Cochlear models typically use continuous anatomical descriptions and homogenized parameters based on two-dimensional images for describing the organ of Corti. To produce refined models based more closely on the actual cochlear cytoarchitecture, three-dimensional morphometric parameters of key mechanical structures are required. Towards this goal, we developed and compared three different imaging methods: (1) A fixed cochlear whole-mount preparation using the fluorescent dye Cellmask®, which is a molecule taken up by cell membranes and clearly delineates Deiters' cells, outer hair cells, and the phalangeal process, imaged using confocal microscopy; (2) An in situ fixed preparation with hair cells labeled using anti-prestin and supporting structures labeled using phalloidin, imaged using two-photon microscopy; and (3) A membrane-tomato (mT) mouse with fluorescent proteins expressed in all cell membranes, which enables two-photon imaging of an in situ live preparation with excellent visualization of the organ of Corti. Morphometric parameters including lengths, diameters, and angles, were extracted from 3D cellular surface reconstructions of the resulting images. Preliminary results indicate that the length of the phalangeal processes decreases from the first (inner most) to third (outer most) row of outer hair cells, and that their length also likely varies from base to apex and across species.

  3. Correlating early evolution of parasitic platyhelminths to Gondwana breakup.

    PubMed

    Badets, Mathieu; Whittington, Ian; Lalubin, Fabrice; Allienne, Jean-Francois; Maspimby, Jean-Luc; Bentz, Sophie; Du Preez, Louis H; Barton, Diane; Hasegawa, Hideo; Tandon, Veena; Imkongwapang, Rangpenyuba; Imkongwapang, Rangpenyubai; Ohler, Annemarie; Combes, Claude; Verneau, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Investigating patterns and processes of parasite diversification over ancient geological periods should involve comparisons of host and parasite phylogenies in a biogeographic context. It has been shown previously that the geographical distribution of host-specific parasites of sarcopterygians was guided, from Palaeozoic to Cainozoic times, mostly by evolution and diversification of their freshwater hosts. Here, we propose phylogenies of neobatrachian frogs and their specific parasites (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) to investigate coevolutionary processes and historical biogeography of polystomes and further discuss all the possible assumptions that may account for the early evolution of these parasites. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated rRNA nuclear genes (18S and partial 28S) supplemented by cophylogenetic and biogeographic vicariance analyses reveal four main parasite lineages that can be ascribed to centers of diversity, namely Australia, India, Africa, and South America. In addition, the relationships among these biogeographical monophyletic groups, substantiated by molecular dating, reflect sequential origins during the breakup of Gondwana. The Australian polystome lineage may have been isolated during the first stages of the breakup, whereas the Indian lineage would have arisen after the complete separation of western and eastern Gondwanan components. Next, polystomes would have codiverged with hyloid sensu stricto and ranoid frog lineages before the completion of South American and African plate separation. Ultimately, they would have undergone an extensive diversification in South America when their ancestral host families diversified. Therefore, the presence of polystome parasites in specific anuran host clades and in discrete geographic areas reveals the importance of biogeographic vicariance in diversification processes and supports the occurrence and radiation of amphibians over ancient and recent geological periods.

  4. Monogeneans (Platyhelminthes) from marine fishes of Tongyeong, Korea.

    PubMed

    Venmathi Maran, B A; Oh, Sung-Yong; Moon, Seong Yong; Soh, Ho Young; Kim, Chong-Kwan; Myoung, Jung-Goo

    2014-09-01

    Monogeneans (Platyhelminthes) mostly parasitize on fins, skin and gills of fishes. In Korea, the study on monogeneans is limited, although, fishes are frequently encountered with severe infection of monogeneans. Hence, some of ranched and wild fishes were collected from Tongyeong marine living resources research and conservation center, southern part of Korea to screen and understand the infection of monogeneans. All three fish hosts were found with the infection of monogeneans including five species from four different families. They are: (1) Anoplodiscus spari Yamaguti (Publ Seto Mar Biol Lab Kyoto Univ 7:53-88, 1958) (Anoplodiscidae) from the fins and body surface of blackhead seabream Acanthopagrus schlegelii schlegelii (Bleeker); (2) A. tai Ogawa (Fish Pathol 29:5-10, 1994) from the fins of red seabream Pagrus major (Temminck and Schlegel); (3) Benedenia sekii Yamaguti (Studies on the helminth fauna of Japan. Part 19. Fourteen new ectoparasitic trematodes of fishes. Published by the author, Kyoto, 1937), Meserve (Rep Allan Hancock Paci Exped (1932-1937) 2:31-89, 1938) (Capsalidae) from the body surface of P. major; (4) Choricotyle elongata Goto (J Coll Sci Imp Univ Tokyo 8:1-273, 1894) (Diclidophoridae) from the gills of P. major; (5) Udonella fugu Freeman and Ogawa (Int J Parasitol 40:255-264, 2010) (Udonellidae) hyperparasitized on the body of parasitic copepod Pseudocaligus fugu (Yamaguti 1936) (Caligidae) infecting the wild grass puffer Takifugu niphobles (Jordan and Snyder). Capsalids are commonly reported in Korea, except B. sekii, however, other reported genera are uncommon. Hence, all reported monogeneans are considered as a first record from Korea.

  5. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, U.; Fermin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  6. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, U; Fermin, C

    1996-05-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  7. Notch Signaling and Hes Labeling in the Normal and Drug-Damaged Organ of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Batts, Shelley A.; Shoemaker, Christopher R.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-01-01

    During the development of the inner ear, the Notch cell signaling pathway is responsible for the specification of the pro-sensory domain and influences cell fate decisions. It is assumed that Notch signaling ends during maturity and cannot be reinitiated to alter the fate of new or existing cells in the organ of Corti. This is in contrast to non-mammalian species which reinitiate Delta1-Notch1 signaling in response to trauma in the auditory epithelium, resulting in hair cell regeneration through transdifferentiation and/or mitosis. We report immunohistochemical data and Western protein analysis showing that in the aminoglycoside-damaged guinea pig organ of Corti, there is an increase in proteins involved in Notch activation occurring within 24 hours of a chemical hair cell lesion. The signaling response is characterized by the increased presence of Jagged1 ligand in pillar and Deiters cells, Notch1 signal in surviving supporting cell nuclei, and the absence of Jagged2 and Delta-like1. The pro-sensory bHLH protein Atoh1 was absent at all time points following an ototoxic lesion, while the repressor bHLH transcription factors Hes1 and Hes5 were detected in surviving supporting cell nuclei in the former inner and outer hair cell areas, respectively. Notch pathway proteins peaked at 2 weeks, decreased at 1 month, and nearly disappeared by 2 months. These results indicate that the mammalian auditory epithelium retains the ability to regulate Notch signaling and Notch-dependent Hes activity in response to cellular trauma and that the signaling is transient. Additionally, since Hes activity antagonizes the transcription of prosensory Atoh1, the presence of Hes after a lesion may prohibit the occurrence of transdifferentiation in the surviving supporting cells. PMID:19185606

  8. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genomes from Polycladida (Platyhelminthes) using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Aguado, M Teresa; Grande, Cristina; Gerth, Michael; Bleidorn, Christoph; Noreña, Carolina

    2016-01-10

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of three polycladids, the acotylean Hoploplana elisabelloi and the cotyleans Enchiridium sp. and Prosthiostomum siphunculus have been assembled with high coverage from Illumina sequencing data. The mt genomes contain 36 genes including 12 of the 13 protein-coding genes characteristic for metazoan mitochondrial genomes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. Gene annotation, gene order, genetic code, start and stop codons and codon bias have been identified. In comparison with the well investigated parasitic Neodermata, our analysis reveals a great diversity of gene orders within Polycladida and Platyhelminthes in general. By analyzing representative genomes of the main groups of Platyhelminthes we explored the phylogenetic relationships of this group. The phylogenetic analyses strongly supported the monophyly of Polycladida, and based on a small taxon sampling suggest the monophyly of Acotylea and Cotylea.

  9. Nuclear genomic signals of the 'microturbellarian' roots of platyhelminth evolutionary innovation.

    PubMed

    Laumer, Christopher E; Hejnol, Andreas; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-03-12

    Flatworms number among the most diverse invertebrate phyla and represent the most biomedically significant branch of the major bilaterian clade Spiralia, but to date, deep evolutionary relationships within this group have been studied using only a single locus (the rRNA operon), leaving the origins of many key clades unclear. In this study, using a survey of genomes and transcriptomes representing all free-living flatworm orders, we provide resolution of platyhelminth interrelationships based on hundreds of nuclear protein-coding genes, exploring phylogenetic signal through concatenation as well as recently developed consensus approaches. These analyses robustly support a modern hypothesis of flatworm phylogeny, one which emphasizes the primacy of the often-overlooked 'microturbellarian' groups in understanding the major evolutionary transitions within Platyhelminthes: perhaps most notably, we propose a novel scenario for the interrelationships between free-living and vertebrate-parasitic flatworms, providing new opportunities to shed light on the origins and biological consequences of parasitism in these iconic invertebrates.

  10. Regeneration in Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes): cellular dynamics in the neoblast stem cell system.

    PubMed

    Nimeth, Katharina Theresia; Egger, Bernhard; Rieger, Reinhard; Salvenmoser, Willi; Peter, Roland; Gschwentner, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Neoblasts are potentially totipotent stem cells and the only proliferating cells in adult Platyhelminthes. We have examined the cellular dynamics of neoblasts during the posterior regeneration of Macrostomum lignano. Double-labeling of neoblasts with bromodeoxyuridine and the anti-phospho histone H3 mitosis marker has revealed a complex cellular response in the first 48 h after amputation; this response is different from that known to occur during regeneration in triclad platyhelminths and in starvation/feeding experiments in M. lignano. Mitotic activity is reduced during the first 8 h of regeneration but, at 48 h after amputation, reaches almost twice the value of control animals. The total number of S-phase cells significantly increases after 1 day of regeneration. A subpopulation of fast-cycling neoblasts surprisingly shows the same dynamics during regeneration as those in control animals. Wound healing and regeneration are accompanied by the formation of a distinct blastema. These results present new insights, at the cellular level, into the early regeneration of rhabditophoran Platyhelminthes.

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography to Measure Sound-Induced Motions Within the Mouse Organ of Corti In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Jawadi, Zina; Applegate, Brian E; Oghalai, John S

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of mechanical vibrations within the living cochlea is critical to understanding the first nonlinear steps in auditory processing, hair cell stimulation, and cochlear amplification. However, it has proven to be a challenging endeavor. This chapter describes how optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to measure vibrations within the tissues of the organ of Corti. These experimental measurements can be performed within the unopened cochlea of living mice routinely and reliably. PMID:27259941

  12. In vivo measurement of differential motion inside the organ of Corti using a low coherence interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Fridberger, Anders; Zheng, Jiefu; Choudhury, Niloy; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-02-01

    The differential motion of the organ of Corti has been expected as a result of the outer hair cell force, believed to be necessary for the cochlear amplifier. In vitro experiments have been performed to demonstrate this motion but the in vivo data was unavailable due to the technical difficulties. Using a specially-designed time-domain optical coherence tomography system, we performed in vivo imaging and vibration measurement at the sensitive base of the guinea pig cochlea. This technique, for the first time, provides in vivo information about the internal vibration of the organ of Corti. At low sound level, when the cochlea is more sensitive, top surface of the organ of Corti, the reticular lamina (RL) showed tuning at a higher frequency than of the bottom surface, basilar membrane (BM) and its vibration amplitude is 2-3 times of that of the BM. Corresponding to the frequency difference, the phase of RL vibration is lead to that of the BM. Both the amplitude gain and the phase lead on RL is level dependent. This suggests that they are related to the cochlear amplification. The amplitude gain at the RL is an enhancement of the BM motion for stimulating the stereocillia. The advance in time of RL vibration can prepare proper timing of stereocillia stimulation for the cochlear amplification.

  13. Ultrastructure of the Odontocete organ of Corti: scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morell, Maria; Lenoir, Marc; Shadwick, Robert E; Jauniaux, Thierry; Dabin, Willy; Begeman, Lineke; Ferreira, Marisa; Maestre, Iranzu; Degollada, Eduard; Hernandez-Milian, Gema; Cazevieille, Chantal; Fortuño, José-Manuel; Vogl, Wayne; Puel, Jean-Luc; André, Michel

    2015-02-15

    The morphological study of the Odontocete organ of Corti, together with possible alterations associated with damage from sound exposure, represents a key conservation approach to assess the effects of acoustic pollution on marine ecosystems. By collaborating with stranding networks from several European countries, 150 ears from 13 species of Odontocetes were collected and analyzed by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Based on our analyses, we first describe and compare Odontocete cochlear structures and then propose a diagnostic method to identify inner ear alterations in stranded individuals. The two species analyzed by TEM (Phocoena phocoena and Stenella coeruleoalba) showed morphological characteristics in the lower basal turn of high-frequency hearing species. Among other striking features, outer hair cell bodies were extremely small and were strongly attached to Deiters cells. Such morphological characteristics, shared with horseshoe bats, suggest that there has been convergent evolution of sound reception mechanisms among echolocating species. Despite possible autolytic artifacts due to technical and experimental constraints, the SEM analysis allowed us to detect the presence of scarring processes resulting from the disappearance of outer hair cells from the epithelium. In addition, in contrast to the rapid decomposition process of the sensory epithelium after death (especially of the inner hair cells), the tectorial membrane appeared to be more resistant to postmortem autolysis effects. Analysis of the stereocilia imprint pattern at the undersurface of the tectorial membrane may provide a way to detect possible ultrastructural alterations of the hair cell stereocilia by mirroring them on the tectorial membrane.

  14. The Role of Organ of Corti Mass in Passive Cochlear Tuning

    PubMed Central

    de La Rochefoucauld, Ombeline; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism for passive cochlear tuning remains unsettled. Early models considered the organ of Corti complex (OCC) as a succession of spring-mass resonators. Later, traveling wave models showed that passive tuning could arise through the interaction of cochlear fluid mass and OCC stiffness without local resonators. However, including enough OCC mass to produce local resonance enhanced the tuning by slowing and thereby growing the traveling wave as it approached its resonant segment. To decide whether the OCC mass plays a role in tuning, the frequency variation of the wavenumber of the cochlear traveling wave was measured (in vivo, passive cochleae) and compared to theoretical predictions. The experimental wavenumber was found by taking the phase difference of basilar membrane motion between two longitudinally spaced locations and dividing by the distance between them. The theoretical wavenumber was a solution of the dispersion relation of a three-dimensional cochlear model with OCC mass and stiffness as the free parameters. The experimental data were only well fit by a model that included OCC mass. However, as the measurement position moved from a best-frequency place of 40 to 12 kHz, the role of mass was diminished. The notion of local resonance seems to only apply in the very high-frequency region of the cochlea. PMID:17905841

  15. High-Frequency Vibration of the Organ of Corti in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, M. P.; Nowotny, M.; Dalhoff, E.; Zenner, H.-P.; Gummer, A. W.

    2003-02-01

    The mechanism by which the electromechanical force generated by the outer hair cells (OHC) produces the exquisite sensitivity, frequency selectivity and dynamic range of the cochlea is unknown. To address this question, we measured the electrically induced radial vibration pattern at different levels within the organ of Corti of the guinea pig. Two in vitro preparations were used: 1) a half turn including modiolar bone and cochlear partition, without tectorial membrane (TM); the basilar membrane (BM) was supported from its tympanal side. 2) A temporal bone preparation, where the bony wall was removed above and below the measurement location to permit introduction of electrodes. In the latter case, the cochlear partition was in its normal mechanical environment, with free swinging BM and with TM. Velocity of BM, reticular lamina (RL), and upper and lower sides of the TM in response to broadband electrical stimulation of the OHCs was measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer. The interferometer was sensitive enough to permit measurement without reflective beads or the like. The frequency range of the stimulation was 480 Hz - 70 kHz. Displacement amplitudes were constant up to 10 kHz, after which they dropped with -14 to -17 dB/oct. Moving across the RL in the radial direction, phase reversals characteristic of pivoting points occurred above the pillar cells and the outer tunnel. No phase reversals were observed on the BM and TM.

  16. Characterizing Wave Propagation in the Organ of Corti with Stroboscopic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zosuls, Aleks; Rupprecht, Laura C.; Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Here we present the results from a new high-frequency mechanical stimulation system that was designed to provide more precise local excitation and motion sensing of the organ of Corti (OC/BM complex). It is based on mechanical tissue excitation via a small vibrating probe and measurement using stroboscopic video microscopy. The system is currently capable of measuring sub-micrometer motion at frequencies from DC to 60 kHz. Measurements were performed on excised Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) cochleae. The underside of the BM was mechanically stimulated in the direction normal to the membrane with a 20 μm diameter glass probe. Data was collected at multiple focal planes from the BM to the tectorial membrane in order to capture motion for cellular and extracellular structures. For this study, inner hair cell hair bundles and basilar membrane collagen fiber bundle regions of interest were selected and displacements quantified using a cross-correlation technique. Displacement magnitude and phase was measured as a function of distance from the probe and a function of stimulus frequency. At certain frequencies both magnitudes and phases decreased with distance from the probe in a manner that suggests that both direct longitudinal coupling and wave propagation were contributing to the responses.

  17. Imaging Electrically Evoked Micromechanical Motion within the Organ of Corti of the Excised Gerbil Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Karavitaki, K. Domenica; Mountain, David C.

    2007-01-01

    The outer hair cell (OHC) of the mammalian inner ear exhibits an unusual form of somatic motility that can follow membrane-potential changes at acoustic frequencies. The cellular forces that produce this motility are believed to amplify the motion of the cochlear partition, thereby playing a key role in increasing hearing sensitivity. To better understand the role of OHC somatic motility in cochlear micromechanics, we developed an excised cochlea preparation to visualize simultaneously the electrically-evoked motion of hundreds of cells within the organ of Corti (OC). The motion was captured using stroboscopic video microscopy and quantified using cross-correlation techniques. The OC motion at ∼2–6 octaves below the characteristic frequency of the region was complex: OHC, Deiter's cell, and Hensen's cell motion were hundreds of times larger than the tectorial membrane, reticular lamina (RL), and pillar cell motion; the inner rows of OHCs moved antiphasic to the outer row; OHCs pivoted about the RL; and Hensen's cells followed the motion of the outer row of OHCs. Our results suggest that the effective stimulus to the inner hair cell hair bundles results not from a simple OC lever action, as assumed by classical models, but by a complex internal motion coupled to the RL. PMID:17277194

  18. Organ of Corti explants direct tonotopically graded morphology of spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, Felicia L; Davis, Robin L

    2016-08-01

    The spiral ganglion is a compelling model system to examine how morphological form contributes to sensory function. While the ganglion is composed mainly of a single class of type I neurons that make simple one-to-one connections with inner hair cell sensory receptors, it has an elaborate overall morphological design. Specific features, such as soma size and axon outgrowth, are graded along the spiral contour of the cochlea. To begin to understand the interplay between different regulators of neuronal morphology, we cocultured neuron explants with peripheral target tissues removed from distinct cochlear locations. Interestingly, these "hair cell microisolates" were capable of both increasing and decreasing neuronal somata size, without adversely affecting survival. Moreover, axon characteristics elaborated de novo by the primary afferents in culture were systematically regulated by the sensory endorgan. Apparent peripheral nervous system (PNS)-like and central nervous system (CNS)-like axonal profiles were established in our cocultures allowing an analysis of putative PNS/CNS axon length ratios. As predicted from the in vivo organization, PNS-like axon bundles elaborated by apical cocultures were longer than their basal counterparts and this phenotype was methodically altered when neuron explants were cocultured with microisolates from disparate cochlear regions. Thus, location-dependent signals within the organ of Corti may set the "address" of neurons within the spiral ganglion, allowing them to elaborate the appropriate tonotopically associated morphological features in order to carry out their signaling function. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2182-2207, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The taxonomic status of Dugesiabiblica from Israel and Turkey (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dugesiidae).

    PubMed

    Solà, Eduard; Sluys, Ronald; Segev, Ori; Blaustein, Leon; Riutort, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomic status of Dugesiabiblica (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dugesiidae) from Israel and Turkey is problematic due to its morphological similarity with Dugesiasicula since these nominal species present overlapping characters. In this study we analyzed histological preparations of specimens of these two nominal species and also compared mitochondrial COI gene sequences from Israeli populations to the already known haplotype composition of Dugesiasicula. We concluded that these animals belong to the same species and therefore we consider Dugesiabiblica to be a junior synonym of Dugesiasicula. This implies that the distribution range of Dugesiasicula is even wider than previously thought, and that the species is present all around the Mediterranean Basin and on many of its islands.

  20. Near field fluid coupling between internal motion of the organ of Corti and the basilar membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Ni, Guangjian

    2015-12-31

    The pressure distribution in each of the fluid chambers of the cochlea can be decomposed into a 1D, or plane wave, component and a near field component, which decays rapidly away from the excitation point. The transverse motion of the basilar membrane, BM, for example, generates both a 1D pressure field, which couples into the slow wave, and a local near field pressure, proportional to the BM acceleration, that generates an added mass on the BM due to the fluid motion. When the organ of Corti, OC, undergoes internal motion, due for example to outer hair cell activity, this motion will not itself generate any 1D pressure if the OC is incompressible and the BM is constrained not to move volumetrically, and so will not directly couple into the slow wave. This motion will, however, generate a near field pressure, proportional to the OC acceleration, which will act on the OC and thus increases its effective mass. The near field pressure due to this OC motion will also act on the BM, generating a force on the BM proportional to the acceleration of the OC, and thus create a “coupling mass” effect. By reciprocity, this coupling mass is the same as that acting on the OC due to the motion of the BM. This near field fluid coupling is initially observed in a finite element model of a slice of the cochlea. These simulations suggest a simple analytical formulation for the fluid coupling, using higher order beam modes across the width of the cochlear partition. It is well known that the added mass due to the near field pressure dominates the overall mass of the BM, and thus significantly affects the micromechanical dynamics. This work not only quantifies the added mass of the OC due its own motion in the fluid, and shows that this is important, but also demonstrates that the coupling mass effect between the BM and OC significantly affects the dynamics of simple micromechanical models.

  1. Near field fluid coupling between internal motion of the organ of Corti and the basilar membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Ni, Guangjian

    2015-12-01

    The pressure distribution in each of the fluid chambers of the cochlea can be decomposed into a 1D, or plane wave, component and a near field component, which decays rapidly away from the excitation point. The transverse motion of the basilar membrane, BM, for example, generates both a 1D pressure field, which couples into the slow wave, and a local near field pressure, proportional to the BM acceleration, that generates an added mass on the BM due to the fluid motion. When the organ of Corti, OC, undergoes internal motion, due for example to outer hair cell activity, this motion will not itself generate any 1D pressure if the OC is incompressible and the BM is constrained not to move volumetrically, and so will not directly couple into the slow wave. This motion will, however, generate a near field pressure, proportional to the OC acceleration, which will act on the OC and thus increases its effective mass. The near field pressure due to this OC motion will also act on the BM, generating a force on the BM proportional to the acceleration of the OC, and thus create a "coupling mass" effect. By reciprocity, this coupling mass is the same as that acting on the OC due to the motion of the BM. This near field fluid coupling is initially observed in a finite element model of a slice of the cochlea. These simulations suggest a simple analytical formulation for the fluid coupling, using higher order beam modes across the width of the cochlear partition. It is well known that the added mass due to the near field pressure dominates the overall mass of the BM, and thus significantly affects the micromechanical dynamics. This work not only quantifies the added mass of the OC due its own motion in the fluid, and shows that this is important, but also demonstrates that the coupling mass effect between the BM and OC significantly affects the dynamics of simple micromechanical models.

  2. Organ of Corti explants direct tonotopically graded morphology of spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, Felicia L; Davis, Robin L

    2016-08-01

    The spiral ganglion is a compelling model system to examine how morphological form contributes to sensory function. While the ganglion is composed mainly of a single class of type I neurons that make simple one-to-one connections with inner hair cell sensory receptors, it has an elaborate overall morphological design. Specific features, such as soma size and axon outgrowth, are graded along the spiral contour of the cochlea. To begin to understand the interplay between different regulators of neuronal morphology, we cocultured neuron explants with peripheral target tissues removed from distinct cochlear locations. Interestingly, these "hair cell microisolates" were capable of both increasing and decreasing neuronal somata size, without adversely affecting survival. Moreover, axon characteristics elaborated de novo by the primary afferents in culture were systematically regulated by the sensory endorgan. Apparent peripheral nervous system (PNS)-like and central nervous system (CNS)-like axonal profiles were established in our cocultures allowing an analysis of putative PNS/CNS axon length ratios. As predicted from the in vivo organization, PNS-like axon bundles elaborated by apical cocultures were longer than their basal counterparts and this phenotype was methodically altered when neuron explants were cocultured with microisolates from disparate cochlear regions. Thus, location-dependent signals within the organ of Corti may set the "address" of neurons within the spiral ganglion, allowing them to elaborate the appropriate tonotopically associated morphological features in order to carry out their signaling function. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2182-2207, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26663318

  3. Structure and mechanics of supporting cells in the guinea pig organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Zetes, Deborah E; Tolomeo, Jason A; Holley, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the mammalian organ of Corti determine its sensitivity to sound frequency and intensity, and the structure of supporting cells changes progressively with frequency along the cochlea. From the apex (low frequency) to the base (high frequency) of the guinea pig cochlea inner pillar cells decrease in length incrementally from 75-55 µm whilst the number of axial microtubules increases from 1,300-2,100. The respective values for outer pillar cells are 120-65 µm and 1,500-3,000. This correlates with a progressive decrease in the length of the outer hair cells from >100 µm to 20 µm. Deiters'cell bodies vary from 60-50 µm long with relatively little change in microtubule number. Their phalangeal processes reflect the lengths of outer hair cells but their microtubule numbers do not change systematically. Correlations between cell length, microtubule number and cochlear location are poor below 1 kHz. Cell stiffness was estimated from direct mechanical measurements made previously from isolated inner and outer pillar cells. We estimate that between 200 Hz and 20 kHz axial stiffness, bending stiffness and buckling limits increase, respectively,~3, 6 and 4 fold for outer pillar cells, ~2, 3 and 2.5 fold for inner pillar cells and ~7, 20 and 24 fold for the phalangeal processes of Deiters'cells. There was little change in the Deiters'cell bodies for any parameter. Compensating for effective cell length the pillar cells are likely to be considerably stiffer than Deiters'cells with buckling limits 10-40 times greater. These data show a clear relationship between cell mechanics and frequency. However, measurements from single cells alone are insufficient and they must be combined with more accurate details of how the multicellular architecture influences the mechanical properties of the whole organ. PMID:23145154

  4. Deriving stereocilia displacement from the impedance of the organ of Corti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoè, Alessandro; Pulkki, Ville

    2015-12-01

    The response of an inner hair cell (IHC) to a sound stimulus varies in terms of phase and harmonic content depending nonlinearly on the stimulus level. This dependency can be explained by the two factor cancellation hypothesis: two excitatory components of the opposite sign, C1 and C2, regulate the IHC receptor potential. However, it is yet unknown whether C1 and C2 represent the contribution of different stereocilia rows to the transduction of a single IHC, or whether they represent different mechanical contributions to the displacement of a single stereocilia bundle. There are also diverse theories about the physical origin of the two components. This work presents a computational model of IHCs functionality having clear physical origins for C1 and C2. In the present model C1 represents the transduction component associated with the coupling between the stereocilia and the basilar membrane (BM), while C2 represents the transduction component associated with the coupling between the stereocilia and the outer hair cells (OHCs). C1 and C2 are derived from the nonlinear cochlear model by Verhulst et al. (2012). In particular, C1 is derived from the BM velocity vector and C2 is derived from the term representing the action of the organ of Corti (OC) on BM motion. The present model is capable to simulate the dynamic response of IHCs and to emulate the dependency of the phase and harmonic content of IHCs response, being in good agreement with animal data. Furthermore, this work introduces a simple physical interpretation of C2 to phenomenological models of two-factor cancellation.

  5. Effect of LLLT on the level of ATP and ROS from organ of corti cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, ChungKu; Chang, So-Young; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Suh, Myung-Whan; Jung, Jae Yun

    2014-03-01

    It is well established that ototoxic antibiotics and acoustic trauma can damage cochlear hair cells and cause hearing loss. Previous studies using transcanal LLLT (Low level laser therapy) showed that LLLT can promote recovery of hearing thresholds and cochlear hair cells. However, its mechanism has not been studied. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanism of hearing recovery from gentamicin induced ototoxic hearing loss by LLLT. Methods: HEI- OC1 (House ear institute organ of Corti) cells were cultured for 18 hours and ototoxicity was induced by gentamicin (GM) treatment to the cells. Cultured cells were divided into 6 groups, No treatment control, LLLT only, GM 6.6 mM and GM 13.1 mM, GM 6.6 mM+LLLT and GM 13.1 mM+LLLT cells. LD laser 808 nm, 15 mW, was irradiated to the cultured cells for 15 min, at 4 hours after GM treatment to the cells. ATP was assayed using the ATP assay Kit. ROS was measured using confocal microscope after application of H2DCFDA dye. Results: ATP was decreased in GM 13.1 mM cells and increased in LLLT only cells and GM 13.1 mM+LLLT cells compared to control and 13.1 mM cells. ROS was increased in GM 6.6 mM and GM 13.1 mM cells, and decreased in GM 6.6 mM+LLLT and GM 13.1 mM+LLLT cells compared to GM 6.6 and 13.1 mM cells immediately after laser irradiation. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that LLLT on GM treated HEI-OC1 cells increased ATP and decreased ROS that may contribute to the recovery of hearing.

  6. Platyhelminth Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) proteins: revealing structural diversity, class-specific features and biological associations across the phylum.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Iain W; Hoffmann, Karl F

    2012-09-01

    During platyhelminth infection, a cocktail of proteins is released by the parasite to aid invasion, initiate feeding, facilitate adaptation and mediate modulation of the host immune response. Included amongst these proteins is the Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) family, part of the larger sperm coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) superfamily. To explore the significance of this protein family during Platyhelminthes development and host interactions, we systematically summarize all published proteomic, genomic and immunological investigations of the VAL protein family to date. By conducting new genomic and transcriptomic interrogations to identify over 200 VAL proteins (228) from species in all 4 traditional taxonomic classes (Trematoda, Cestoda, Monogenea and Turbellaria), we further expand our knowledge related to platyhelminth VAL diversity across the phylum. Subsequent phylogenetic and tertiary structural analyses reveal several class-specific VAL features, which likely indicate a range of roles mediated by this protein family. Our comprehensive analysis of platyhelminth VALs represents a unifying synopsis for understanding diversity within this protein family and a firm context in which to initiate future functional characterization of these enigmatic members.

  7. Whole-Cell Patch-Clamp Recording of Mouse and Rat Inner Hair Cells in the Intact Organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Juan D; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamping is a widely applied method to record currents across the entire membrane of a cell. This protocol describes application of this method to record currents from the sensory inner hair cells in the intact auditory sensory epithelium, the organ of Corti, isolated from rats or mice. This protocol particularly outlines the basic equipment required, provides instructions for the preparation of solutions and small equipment items, and methodology for recording voltage-activated and evoked synaptic currents from the inner hair cells.

  8. Staining of Platyhelminthes by herbal dyes: An eco-friendly technique for the taxonomist

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niranjan; Mehul, Jadav; Das, Bhupamani; Solanki, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: An environment compatible technique to stain Platyhelminthes, Fasciola gigantica, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Taenia solium, and Moniezia expansa using aqueous and alcoholic extract of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), China rose (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis), and red rose (Rosa hybrida) were described to minimized the deleterious effects of the synthetic dyes. Materials and Methods: Aqueous/ethanolic extracts of roses were extracted from the flowers while red beet was extracted from the roots. Results: Stained helminthes acquired a comparable level of pigmentation with the distinction of their internal structure in these natural dyes. The flukes (liver and rumen) internal structure, oral and ventral/posterior sucker, cirrus sac, gravid uterus, testes, ovary, and vitallaria were appeared pink color in aqueous and alcoholic extract of either China or red rose and yellow to brown color in sugar beet stain. The interior of the proglottid of T. solium and M. expansa took yellow to brown color with good contrast in sugar beet stain and of pink to pink-red in China and red rose stain. Conclusion: The extract of roses (red rose followed by China rose) followed by red beet possess the potential to replace the conventional stains in the taxonomic study of Platyhelminthes parasites. PMID:27047037

  9. Nuclear genomic signals of the ‘microturbellarian’ roots of platyhelminth evolutionary innovation

    PubMed Central

    Laumer, Christopher E; Hejnol, Andreas; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms number among the most diverse invertebrate phyla and represent the most biomedically significant branch of the major bilaterian clade Spiralia, but to date, deep evolutionary relationships within this group have been studied using only a single locus (the rRNA operon), leaving the origins of many key clades unclear. In this study, using a survey of genomes and transcriptomes representing all free-living flatworm orders, we provide resolution of platyhelminth interrelationships based on hundreds of nuclear protein-coding genes, exploring phylogenetic signal through concatenation as well as recently developed consensus approaches. These analyses robustly support a modern hypothesis of flatworm phylogeny, one which emphasizes the primacy of the often-overlooked ‘microturbellarian’ groups in understanding the major evolutionary transitions within Platyhelminthes: perhaps most notably, we propose a novel scenario for the interrelationships between free-living and vertebrate-parasitic flatworms, providing new opportunities to shed light on the origins and biological consequences of parasitism in these iconic invertebrates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05503.001 PMID:25764302

  10. Microstructures in the organ of Corti help outer hair cells form traveling waves along the cochlear coil.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jong-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    According to the generally accepted theory of mammalian cochlear mechanics, the fluid in the cochlear scalae interacts with the elastic cochlear partition to generate transversely oscillating displacement waves that propagate along the cochlear coil. Using a computational model of cochlear segments, a different type of propagating wave is reported, an elastic propagating wave that is independent of the fluid-structure interaction. The characteristics of the propagating wave observed in the model, such as the wavelength, speed, and phase lag, are similar to those observed in the living cochlea. Three conditions are required for the existence of the elastic propagating wave in the cochlear partition without fluid-interaction: 1), the stiffness gradient of the cochlear partition; 2), the elastic longitudinal coupling; and 3), the Y-shaped structure in the organ of Corti formed by the outer hair cell, the Deiters cell, and the Deiters cell phalangeal process. The elastic propagating waves in the cochlear partition disappeared without the push-pull action provided by the outer hair cell and Deiters cell phalangeal process. The results suggest that the mechanical feedback of outer hair cells, facilitated by the organ of Corti microstructure, can control the tuning and amplification by modulating the cochlear traveling wave.

  11. Inner ear development: Building a spiral ganglion and an organ of Corti out of unspecified ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Pan, Ning; Jahan, Israt; Elliott, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear develops from a placodal thickening into a complex labyrinth of ducts with five sensory organs specialized to detect position and movement in space. In addition, the mammalian ear develops a spiraled cochlear duct containing the auditory organ, the organ of Corti (OC), specialized to translate sound into hearing. Developing the OC out of a uniform sheet of ectoderm requires an unparalleled precision in topological developmental engineering of four different general cell types, sensory neurons, hair cells, supporting cells, and general otic epithelium, into a mosaic of ten distinctly recognizable cell types in and around the OC, each with a unique distribution. In addition, the OC receives a unique innervation by ear-derived spiral ganglion afferents and brainstem-derived motor neurons as efferents, and requires neural crest-derived Schwann cells to form myelin and neural crest-derived cells to induce the stria vascularis. To achieve this transformation of a sheet of cells into a complicated interdigitating set of cells necessitates the orchestrated expression of multiple transcription factors that enable the cellular transformation from ectoderm into neurosensory cells forming the spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) while simultaneously transforming the flat epithelium into a tube, the cochlear duct housing the OC. In addition to the cellular and conformational changes to make the cochlear duct with the OC, additional changes in the surrounding periotic mesenchyme form passageways for sound to stimulate the OC. This article reviews molecular developmental data generated predominantly in mice. The available data are ordered into a plausible scenario that integrates the well described expression changes of transcription factors and their actions revealed in mouse mutants for formation of SGNs and OC in the right position and orientation with the right kind of innervation. Understanding the molecular basis of these developmental changes leading to

  12. Impact of treatment with praziquantel, silymarin and/or beta-glucan on pathophysiological markers of liver damage and fibrosis in mice infected with Mesocestoides vogae (Cestoda) tetrathyridia.

    PubMed

    Velebný, S; Hrckova, G; Kogan, G

    2008-09-01

    Mesocestoides vogae tetrathyridia infection in mice causes hepatocyte injury, hepatic granulomatous inflammmation, liver fibrosis and chronic peritonitis manifested with portal hypertension. To reduce the detrimental effect of parasites on the host liver, the effect of the anthelmintic drug praziquantel (PZQ) in combination with natural products silymarin (an antioxidant) and beta-glucan (an immunomodulator) was investigated. The therapeutic effect of drugs was assessed by means of aminotransferase (alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)) activities, content of albumin, total proteins and hyaluronic acid (HA) in sera of ICR mice infected with M. vogae larvae. Animals were treated with PZQ suspended in oil emulsion (Group 1), PZQ combined with silymarin incorporated into lipid microspheres (LMS) (Group 2), PZQ combined with beta-glucan incorporated into liposomes (LG) (Group 3), PZQ co-administered with LMS and LG (Group 4). Untreated animals (Group 5) served as the control. Treatment of animals started at the early chronic phase of infection (day 14 p.i.) and lasted 10 days; serum samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, 25, 28, 31, 35 and 45 p.i. ALT and AST activities were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in Groups 2, 3 and 4. HA content was significantly (P < 0.05 and 0.01) lower in Groups 2 and 4. Albumin levels were decreased in Groups 2 and 4, total protein concentration decreased in Groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 and 0.01). These results showed that combined treatment of PZQ with silymarin and/or beta-glucan was able to ameliorate or suppress fibrogenesis in the liver, protect liver cells from oxidative damage and, possibly, stimulate regeneration of the parenchyma.

  13. Bmi1 Loss in the Organ of Corti Results in p16ink4a Upregulation and Reduced Cell Proliferation of Otic Progenitors In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Aurélie; Avci, Hasan X.; Löwenheim, Hubert; Müller, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The mature mammalian organ of Corti does not regenerate spontaneously after injury, mainly due to the absence of cell proliferation and the depletion of otic progenitors with age. The polycomb gene B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi1) promotes proliferation and cell cycle progression in several stem cell populations. The cell cycle inhibitor p16ink4a has been previously identified as a downstream target of Bmi1. In this study, we show that Bmi1 is expressed in the developing inner ear. In the organ of Corti, Bmi1 expression is temporally regulated during embryonic and postnatal development. In contrast, p16ink4a expression is not detectable during the same period. Bmi1-deficient mice were used to investigate the role of Bmi1 in cochlear development and otosphere generation. In the absence of Bmi1, the postnatal organ of Corti displayed normal morphology at least until the end of the first postnatal week, suggesting that Bmi1 is not required for the embryonic or early postnatal development of the organ of Corti. However, Bmi1 loss resulted in the reduced sphere-forming capacity of the organ of Corti, accompanied by the decreased cell proliferation of otic progenitors in otosphere cultures. This reduced proliferative capacity was associated with the upregulation of p16ink4a in vitro. Viral vector-mediated overexpression of p16ink4a in wildtype otosphere cultures significantly reduced the number of generated otospheres in vitro. The findings strongly suggest a role for Bmi1 as a promoter of cell proliferation in otic progenitor cells, potentially through the repression of p16ink4a. PMID:27755610

  14. [The influence of Janicki cercomer theory on the development of platyhelminthes systematics and evolution investigations].

    PubMed

    Pojmańska, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article was to present the development of ideas about the provenience of parasitic helminths and the phylogenetical relationships within this taxon, since the publication of the "cercomer theory" just to nowadays. The following essentials of the Janicki theory are outlined: main differences between free-living Turbellaria and parasitic platyhelminths (ciliated epithelium in Turbellaria versus unciliated surface in the others); universality of the cercomer presence in Monogenea, Digenea and Cestoda; evolutionary changes in the morphology and function of the cercomer; homology of the caudal appendices of all parasitic helminths; the subsequent evolution of parasitic platyhelminthes from the ancestor to Monogena, Digenea and Cestoda; proposition to establish a new common taxon--Cercomerophora--for these three groups. In this background the evolution of evolutionary ideas is reviewed, divided into two periods: up to the eighties of the XX century, and up to date. The first period can be characterised by the criticism of some points of the "cercomer theory" and formulation of some new hypotheses; these are those of Fuhrmann, Bychovsky, Llewellyn, Price and Malmberg, which: questioned the homology of the cercarial tail with the caudal appendices of Monogenea and Cestoda; rejected Digenea from the common group; established the common taxon--Cercomeromorpha--comprising only Monogenea and Cestoda; opposed the idea of radial evolution of three main groups of Platyhelmithes (Turbellaria, Digenea and Cercomeromorpha) to the idea of subsequent evolution presented by Janicki. The differences between these last hypotheses are also underlined, arising mainly from the different ideas on the importance of particular features as the evolutionary indicators of affinities between and within the taxons. As to the hypotheses dealing with the evolution of particular groups of parasitic platyhelminths formulated at the same period, the publications of Freeman and Jarecka

  15. A new Paravortex (Platyhelminthes, Dalyellioida) endoparasite of Mesodesma mactroides (Bivalvia, Mesodesmatidae) from Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Francisco; Ponce de León, Rodrigo; Damborenea, Cristina

    2006-10-01

    Many species of turbellarians (Platyhelminthes) are known to live associated with other organisms, especially invertebrates, as commensals or parasites. The family Graffillidae (Rhabdocoela) includes two genera that parasitize mollusks, Graffílla and Paravortex. Within the latter genus, six species were described as associated with mollusks. In other instances, unnamed Paravortex species were mentioned as parasites of other bivalves and of the body surface of fishes. In the present work, a new Paravortex species that was found in the intestine of Mesodesma mactroides from the Atlantic coast of Uruguay is described. In addition, a bibliographical revision of the known Paravortex species with their respective hosts, location, and distribution is made. Paravortex nicolli, described by Szidat for the Argentinean coast, is mentioned for the first time after the original description, and the authorship and date of description of Paravortex tapetis Noury-Sraïri 1989 are elucidated.

  16. [The influence of Janicki cercomer theory on the development of platyhelminthes systematics and evolution investigations].

    PubMed

    Pojmańska, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article was to present the development of ideas about the provenience of parasitic helminths and the phylogenetical relationships within this taxon, since the publication of the "cercomer theory" just to nowadays. The following essentials of the Janicki theory are outlined: main differences between free-living Turbellaria and parasitic platyhelminths (ciliated epithelium in Turbellaria versus unciliated surface in the others); universality of the cercomer presence in Monogenea, Digenea and Cestoda; evolutionary changes in the morphology and function of the cercomer; homology of the caudal appendices of all parasitic helminths; the subsequent evolution of parasitic platyhelminthes from the ancestor to Monogena, Digenea and Cestoda; proposition to establish a new common taxon--Cercomerophora--for these three groups. In this background the evolution of evolutionary ideas is reviewed, divided into two periods: up to the eighties of the XX century, and up to date. The first period can be characterised by the criticism of some points of the "cercomer theory" and formulation of some new hypotheses; these are those of Fuhrmann, Bychovsky, Llewellyn, Price and Malmberg, which: questioned the homology of the cercarial tail with the caudal appendices of Monogenea and Cestoda; rejected Digenea from the common group; established the common taxon--Cercomeromorpha--comprising only Monogenea and Cestoda; opposed the idea of radial evolution of three main groups of Platyhelmithes (Turbellaria, Digenea and Cercomeromorpha) to the idea of subsequent evolution presented by Janicki. The differences between these last hypotheses are also underlined, arising mainly from the different ideas on the importance of particular features as the evolutionary indicators of affinities between and within the taxons. As to the hypotheses dealing with the evolution of particular groups of parasitic platyhelminths formulated at the same period, the publications of Freeman and Jarecka

  17. Telomere analysis of platyhelminths and acanthocephalans by FISH and Southern hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bombarová, Marta; Vítková, Magda; Spakulová, Marta; Koubková, Bozena

    2009-11-01

    We examined the composition of telomeres in chromosomes of parasitic worms, representatives of the flatworm groups Monogenea and Cestoda (Platyhelminthes), and thorny-headed worms (Syndermata: Acanthocephala) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with different telomeric repeat probes. Our results show that the (TTAGGG)n sequence, supposed to be the ancestral telomeric repeat motif of Metazoa, is conserved in Monogenea (Paradiplozoon homoion) and Cestoda (Caryophyllaeus laticeps, Caryophyllaeides fennica, and Nippotaenia mogurndae) but not in Acanthocephala (Pomphorhynchus laevis and Pomphorhynchus tereticollis). In the Pomphorhynchus species, no hybridization signals were obtained with the "nematode" (TTAGGC)n, "arthropod" (TTAGG)n, and bdelloid (TGTGGG)n telomeric probes using FISH with their chromosomes and Southern hybridization with P. laevis DNA. Therefore, we suggest that parasitic Acanthocephala have evolved yet unknown telomeric repeat motifs or different mechanisms of telomere maintenance.

  18. Chromosome polymorphism and complements in populations of Girardia species (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Paludicola) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Benya, E; Leal-Zanchet, A M; Santos, W H; Hauser, J; Erdtmann, B

    2007-12-01

    The karyotypes of four species of freshwater triclads of the genus Girardia (Platyhelminthes), i.e. G. schubarti, G. tigrina, G. anderlani, and G. biapertura, from populations of different localities of the Rio Grande do Sul State, in southern Brazil, were analyzed. The karyotype of G. biapertura is presented for the first time. Three basic complements of 4, 8, and 9 chromosomes were found. Diploids, triploids, or mixoploids (2n/3n) specimens were frequently detected in these populations. The basic chromosomal complement of n=9 was verified in two different species (G. biapertura and G. anderlani), presenting a large acrocentric chromosome which is rare in the family Dugesiidae. An intra and interspecific chromosomal variability was also detected and its evolutionary implications are discussed.

  19. New species of Gieysztoria (Platyhelminthes, Rhabdocoela) from Peruvian Amazon floodplain with description of their stylet ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Damborenea, Cristina; Brusa, Francisco; Noreña, Carolina

    2005-12-01

    The free-living Platyhelminthes of the Amazon basin are poorly known. Presently only four turbellarian species have been mentioned from the Amazon river, a fact that confirms the lack of information on this kind of faunas in this huge basin. Three new species of Gieysztoria from Amazonian floodplain in Peru are described herein: G. chiqchi n. sp., G. kasasapa n. sp. and G. sasa n. sp. The samples were taken in the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve (Peru) during September 2002. Besides the usual description of the stylet based on whole mounted specimens, we provide a complementary description using SEM, which allowed differentiation of the new species within the currently yet imperfect picture of the Amazonian turbellarian fauna. Although further research is desired, current findings are suggestive of high diversity of free-living Turbellaria in the surveyed region.

  20. Biogeography and karyotypes of freshwater planarians (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Paludicola) in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Knakievicz, Tanise; Lau, Adriana Helena; Prá, Daniel; Erdtmann, Bernardo

    2007-02-01

    In the Tricladida (Platyhelminthes), the incidence of different biotypes identified by several ploidy levels is very common. Planarians collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul were identified using cytogenetics. Different species distributions were observed with respect to Rio Grande do Sul's geomorphology, which could have been caused by their different microhabitats. Girardia tigrina and G. anderlani consisted of diploid and triploid individuals, whereas G. schubarti showed diploids, triploids, and mixoploids; for all these species, individuals of different ploidies were sympatric. Only for diploid G. anderlani were B chromosomes observed. These B chromosomes seem to have an irregular segregational behavior during mitosis, and possibly also during meiosis. However the processes (e.g., selection, mutation) of maintaining 2n, 3n, and 2n/3n individuals within natural populations of G. schubarti remain to be clarified.

  1. The taxonomic status of Dugesia biblica from Israel and Turkey (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dugesiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Solà, Eduard; Sluys, Ronald; Segev, Ori; Blaustein, Leon; Riutort, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The taxonomic status of Dugesia biblica (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dugesiidae) from Israel and Turkey is problematic due to its morphological similarity with Dugesia sicula since these nominal species present overlapping characters. In this study we analyzed histological preparations of specimens of these two nominal species and also compared mitochondrial COI gene sequences from Israeli populations to the already known haplotype composition of Dugesia sicula. We concluded that these animals belong to the same species and therefore we consider Dugesia biblica to be a junior synonym of Dugesia sicula. This implies that the distribution range of Dugesia sicula is even wider than previously thought, and that the species is present all around the Mediterranean Basin and on many of its islands. PMID:26085791

  2. Phylogenetic distribution of microRNAs supports the basal position of acoel flatworms and the polyphyly of Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Sempere, Lorenzo F; Martinez, Pedro; Cole, Charles; Baguñà, Jaume; Peterson, Kevin J

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on gene sequences suggest that acoel flatworms are not members of the phylum Platyhelminthes, but instead are the most basal branch of triploblastic bilaterians. Nonetheless, this result has been called into question. An alternative test is to use qualitative molecular markers that should, in principle, exclude the possibility of convergent (homoplastic) evolution in unrelated groups. microRNAs (miRNAs), noncoding regulatory RNA molecules that are under intense stabilizing selection, are a newly discovered set of phylogenetic markers that can resolve such taxonomic disputes. The acoel Childia sp. has recently been shown to possess a subset of the conserved core of miRNAs found across deuterostomes and protostomes, whereas a polyclad flatworm-in addition to this core subset-possesses miRNAs restricted to just protostomes. Here, we examine another acoel, Symsagittifera roscoffensis, and three other platyhelminths. Our results show that the distribution of miRNAs in S. roscoffensis parallels that of Childia. In addition, two of 13 new miRNAs cloned from a triclad flatworm are also found in other lophotrochozoan protostomes, but not in ecdysozoans, deuterostomes, or in basal metazoans including acoels. The limited set of miRNAs found in acoels, intermediate between the even more reduced set in cnidarians and the larger and expanding set in the rest of bilaterians, is compelling evidence for the basal position of acoel flatworms and the polyphyly of Platyhelminthes.

  3. Supervillin Is a Component of the Hair Cell’s Cuticular Plate and the Head Plates of Organ of Corti Supporting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Lana M.; Gupta, Nilay; Chen, Xi; Luna, Elizabeth J.; McDermott, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    The organ of Corti has evolved a panoply of cells with extraordinary morphological specializations to harness, direct, and transduce mechanical energy into electrical signals. Among the cells with prominent apical specializations are hair cells and nearby supporting cells. At the apical surface of each hair cell is a mechanosensitive hair bundle of filamentous actin (F-actin)-based stereocilia, which insert rootlets into the F-actin meshwork of the underlying cuticular plate, a rigid organelle considered to hold the stereocilia in place. Little is known about the protein composition and development of the cuticular plate or the apicolateral specializations of organ of Corti supporting cells. We show that supervillin, an F-actin cross-linking protein, localizes to cuticular plates in hair cells of the mouse cochlea and vestibule and zebrafish sensory epithelia. Moreover, supervillin localizes near the apicolateral margins within the head plates of Deiters’ cells and outer pillar cells, and proximal to the apicolateral margins of inner phalangeal cells, adjacent to the junctions with neighboring hair cells. Overall, supervillin localization suggests this protein may shape the surface structure of the organ of Corti. PMID:27415442

  4. [Peculiarities of ultrastructure of excretory system in Bothrioplana semperi (Platyhelminthes, Turbellaria)].

    PubMed

    Kornakova, E E

    2010-01-01

    Ultrastructural study of morphology of cirtocytes and excretory channels was performed in the free living turbellaria Bothrioplana semperi (Turbellaria, Seriata). It has been shown that cirtocytes of this species are formed by two cells--the terminal and the proximal cells of the channel. The fan is composed of two rod rows. The external row goes out from the terminal cell, the internal one is a derivate of the channel proximal cell. Inside each rod of the external row there runs a bundle of microfilaments; it originates in the cytoplasm of the channel proximal cell distal to bases of the external rods. On the internal rod membranes there are noted small electrondense granules disposed separately or fused in the solid layer continuing into a dense "membrane" connecting rods of the external and internal rows. Rare internal leptotrichiae go out from the cirtocyte cavity bottom. External leptotrichiae are absent. The septate desmosome at the level of the terminal cell is absent, but is present in the channel proximal cell at the level of terminal of cilia. The apical surface of the channel cell carries rare short microvilli. The basement membrane of cells of excretory channels forms deep invaginations almost reaching the apical membrane. Epithelium of excretory channels is deprived of cilia. Ultrastructure of cirtocytes and excretory channels of B. semperi is similar to those in representatives of the suborder Proseriata (Seriata). The significance of ultrastructure of the Proseriata cirtocytes, especially of the order of formation of versh, for construction of phylogeny of Platyhelminthes is discussed.

  5. Comparative study of adaptive radiations with an example using parasitic flatworms (Platyhelminthes): Cercomeria

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.R.; McLennan, D.A. )

    1993-11-01

    Studies of adaptive radiations require robust phylogenies, estimates of species numbers for monophyletic groups within clades, assessments of the adaptive value of putative key innovations, and estimates of the frequency of speciation modes. Four criteria are necessary to identify an adaptive radiation within the parasitic platyhelminths: (1) a group contains significantly more species than its sister group, (2) species richness is apomorphic, (3) apomorphic traits enhance the potential for adaptively driven modes of speciation (sympatric speciation and speciation by peripheral isolation via host switching), and (4) the frequency of adaptively driven speciation modes is high within the group when compared with data from free-living groups. Only the species-rich Monogenea fulfill all four criteria. The Digenea and Eucestoda also are more species rich than their sister groups, their species richness is derived, and they possess unique characters that increase the potential for host switching to occur. However, because there is not enough information to determine whether the frequency of adaptive modes of speciation is high for those groups, we cannot yet assert that their radiations have been adaptive. 102 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Myogenesis in two polyclad platyhelminths with indirect development, Pseudoceros canadensis and Stylostomum sanjuania.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Henrike; Wanninger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Myogenesis of two representatives of Platyhelminthes, Stylostomum sanjuania and Pseudoceros canadensis, was followed from egg deposition until well-differentiated free-swimming larval stages, using F-actin staining and confocal laserscanning microscopy. Zonulae adhaerentes are the only structures to stain before 50% of development between egg deposition and hatching in S. sanjuania, and before 67% of development in P. canadenis. Subsequently, irregular fibers appear in the embryo, followed by a helicoid muscle close to the apical pole. Three longitudinal muscle pairs form, of which the dorsal pair remains more pronounced than the others. Gradually, new muscles form by branching or from double-stranded muscle zones adjacent to existing muscles. This results in an elaborate muscular bodywall that consists of a single helicoid muscle as well as multiple circular and longitudinal muscles. Diverse retractor muscles insert at the sphincter muscles around the stomodeum. The overall arrangement and formation mode of the larval musculature appears very similar in both species, although only P. canadensis has a primary circular muscle posterior to the helicoid muscle. Muscle formation in the apical region of the embryo precedes that at the abapical pole and the primary longitudinal muscles form slightly later than the primary circular muscles. Myogenesis and larval myoanatomy appears highly conserved among polyclad flatworms, but differs significantly from that of other trochozoan clades. Our data suggest that the larval muscular ground pattern of polyclad larvae comprises a bodywall consisting of a helicoid muscle, circular and longitudinal muscles, several retractor muscles, and sphincter muscles around the stomodeum.

  7. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis and mature spermatozoon of the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (Platyhelminthes, Paludicola).

    PubMed

    Harrath, Abdul Halim; Alwasel, Saleh; Zghal, Fathia; Tekaya, Saïda

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize for the first time spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea using both light and electron microscopy. Starting from the border towards the testis lumen we found types I and II spermatogonia, clusters of primary and secondary spermatocytes, spermatids and free spermatozoa. Light microscope observations show that type I spermatogonia have a large and pale nucleus whereas type II spermatogonia are significantly smaller than the one of type I, and show a darker and central bulky nucleus. At the ultrastructure level, both type I and type II spermatogonia are characterized by a wide nucleus with scanty cytoplasm containing free ribosomes, mitochondria and a dense chromatoid body whereas endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were not observed. The cytoplasm of primary and secondary spermatocytes displays numerous free ribosomes and many endoplasmic reticulum cisternae and Golgi complexes, suggesting that the development of these organelles during spermatogenesis might contribute to the synthesis of hormones and proteins such as testosterone, transcription factors and tubulin. Mature spermatozoa structure closely resembles those of other freshwater triclads with a nucleus, a single fused mitochondrion, a row of cortical microtubules and a pair of flagella conforming to the 9+'1' microtubule pattern described for other Platyhelminthes.

  8. Molecular phylogeny of land and freshwater planarians (Tricladida, Platyhelminthes): from freshwater to land and back.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Presas, Marta; Baguñà, Jaume; Riutort, Marta

    2008-05-01

    The suborder Tricladida (phylum Platyhelminthes) comprises the well-known free-living flatworms, taxonomically grouped into three infraorders according to their ecology: Maricola (marine planarians), Paludicola (freshwater planarians), and Terricola (land planarians). Molecular analyses have demonstrated that the Paludicola are paraphyletic, the Terricola being the sister group of one of the three paludicolan families, the Dugesiidae. However, neither 18S rDNA nor COI based trees have been able to resolve the relationships among species of Terricola and Dugesiidae, particularly the monophyly of Terricola. Here, we present new molecular data including sequences of nuclear genes (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA) and a mitochondrial gene (COI) of a wider sample of dugesiid and terricolan species. The new sequences have been analyzed, together with those previously obtained, in independent and concatenated analyses using maximum likelihood and bayesian methods. The results show that, although some parts of the trees remain poorly resolved, they support a monophyletic origin for Terricola followed by a likely return of some species to freshwater habitats. Relationships within the monophyletic group of Dugesiidae are clearly resolved, and relationships among some terricolan subfamilies are also clearly established and point to the need for a thorough revision of Terricola taxonomy.

  9. Elucidating the phylogenetic position of Gnathostomulida and first mitochondrial genomes of Gnathostomulida, Gastrotricha and Polycladida (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Golombek, Anja; Tobergte, Sarah; Struck, Torsten H

    2015-05-01

    Gnathostomulida is a taxon of small marine worms, which exclusively inhabit the interstitium. The evolution of Gnathostomulida has been discussed for decades. Originally regarded as primitive animals with affinities to flatworms, the phylogenetic position of Gnathostomulida has been debated. Given the lack of an anus a close relationship to Platyhelminthes has been maintained (i.e., Plathelminthomorpha hypothesis). Alternative hypotheses proposed Gnathostomulida as being close to Gastrotricha due to the presence of a monociliary epidermis (i.e., Monokonta/Neotrichozoa hypothesis) or to Syndermata based on the complicated jaw apparatus (i.e., Gnathifera hypothesis). Molecular analyses using only few genes were inconclusive. Recent phylogenomic studies brought some progress by placing Gnathostomulida as sister to Syndermata, but support for this relationship was low and depended on the analytical strategy. Herein we present the first data of complete or nearly complete mitochondrial genomes for two gnathostomulids (Gnathostomula paradoxa &G. armata), one gastrotrich (Lepidodermella squamata) and one polyclad flatworm (Stylochoplana maculata) to address the uncertain phylogenetic affinity of Gnathostomulida. Our analyses found Gnathostomulida as sister to Syndermata (Gnathifera hypothesis). Thorough sensitivity analyses addressing taxon instability, branch length heterogeneity (also known as long branch attraction) and base composition heterogeneity showed that the position of Gnathostomulida is consistent across the different analyses and, hence, independent of potential misleading biases. Moreover, by ameliorating these different biases nodal support values could be increased to maximum values. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that the different jaw apparatuses of Syndermata and Gnathostomulida are indeed homologous structures as proposed by the Gnathifera hypothesis.

  10. Diseases of cultured marine fishes caused by Platyhelminthes (Monogenea, Digenea, Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Mariculture is a rapidly developing industrial sector. Generally, fish are maintained in net cages with high density. Cage culture systems allow uncontrolled flow of sea water containing potentially infectious stages of fish parasites. In such culture conditions, prevention of such parasitic infections is difficult for parasites with life cycles that complete within culture sites, among which monogeneans and blood flukes are the most important platyhelminthes. Intense monogenean infections induce respiratory and osmo-regulatory dysfunctions. A variety of control measures have been developed, including freshwater bath treatment and chemotherapy. The potential to control monogenean infections through selective breeding, modified culture techniques to avoid infection, and general fish health management are discussed. It should be noted that mariculture conditions have provided some host-specific monogeneans with a chance to expand their host ranges. Blood flukes sometimes induce mass mortality among farmed fish. In-feed administration of praziquantel is the best solution to treat infected fish. Some cases are described that show how international trade in marine fish has resulted in the spread of hitherto unknown parasites into indigenous farmed and wild fish.

  11. Ultrastructure of the intercalated body, a novel organelle associated with fluid forming cells in the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Sobkowicz, H M; Holy, J; Scott, G L

    1990-07-01

    The intercalated body is a newly discovered organelle in the inner and outer spiral sulcus cells of the mouse organ of Corti. The organelle was found in the cochleas of 14-day and older intact mice and in organs in culture of corresponding ages. The organelle consists of a stack of interconnected cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum and of membrane bound rodlets that are intercalated between, and run parallel to, the cisternae. The cisternal membranes are predominantly smooth, but some may display ribosomes. Most rodlets are from 1 to 2 microns long, about 0.1 micron wide, and contain electron dense material. Mitochondria are commonly associated with or incorporated into the organelle. Some electron micrographs suggest that the rodlets may originate from modified mitochondria. It is our impression that the formation of the organelle begins with the apposition of cisternae and mitochondria. Cisternal-associated mitochondria appear to constrict, elongate, and lose their inner membranes. In both the intact animal and in culture, the cells of the inner and outer spiral sulci display microvilli, apical junctional complexes, lateral intercellular spaces containing interdigitating cell processes, and appear to be involved in fluid formation. Moreover, in culture, the cells of inner and outer spiral sulci as well as some cells proliferating in the outgrowth zone participate in fluid formation, producing large fluid pockets. All these cells commonly contain intercalated bodies. It is possible that in the intact animal, as in culture, intercalated bodies may play a role in fluid regulation in the immediate vicinity of the hair cells.

  12. Biology and pathobiology of lipid droplets and their potential role in the protection of the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Raul A; Kalinec, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The current review article seeks to extend our understanding on the role of lipid droplets within the organ of Corti. In addition to presenting an overview of the current information about the origin, structure and function of lipid droplets we draw inferences from the collective body of knowledge about this cellular organelle to build a conceptual framework to better understanding their role in auditory function. This conceptual model considers that lipid droplets play a significant role in the synthesis, storage, and release of lipids and proteins for energetic use and/or modulating cell signaling pathways. We describe the role and mechanism by which LD play a role in human diseases, and we also review emerging data from our laboratory revealing the potential role of lipid droplets from Hensen cells in the auditory organ. We suggest that lipid droplets might help to develop rapidly and efficiently the resolution phase of inflammatory responses in the mammalian cochlea, preventing inflammatory damage of the delicate inner ear structures and, consequently, sensorineural hearing loss.

  13. Closing the mitochondrial circle on paraphyly of the Monogenea (Platyhelminthes) infers evolution in the diet of parasitic flatworms.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Elizabeth M; Donnellan, Steve C; Bertozzi, Terry; Whittington, Ian D

    2010-09-01

    Relationships between the three classes of Neodermata (parasitic Platyhelminthes) are much debated and restrict our understanding of the evolution of parasitism and contingent adaptations. The historic view of a sister relationship between Cestoda and Monogenea (Cercomeromorphae; larvae bearing posterior hooks) has been dismissed and the weight of evidence against monogenean monophyly has mounted. We present the nucleotide sequence of the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of Benedenia seriolae (Monogenea: Monopisthocotylea: Capsalidae), the first complete non-gyrodactylid monopisthocotylean mt genome to be reported. We also include nucleotide sequence data for some mt protein coding genes for a second capsalid, Neobenedenia sp. Analyses of the new mt genomes with all available platyhelminth mt genomes provide new phylogenetic hypotheses, which strongly influence perspectives on the evolution of diet in the Neodermata. Our analyses do not support monogenean monophyly but confirm that the Digenea and Cestoda are each monophyletic and sister groups. Epithelial feeding monopisthocotyleans on fish hosts are basal in the Neodermata and represent the first shift to parasitism from free-living ancestors. The next evolutionary step in parasitism was a dietary change from epithelium to blood. The common ancestor of Digenea+Cestoda was monogenean-like and most likely sanguinivorous. From this ancestral condition, adult digeneans and cestodes independently evolved dietary specialisations to suit their diverse microhabitats in their final vertebrate hosts. These improved perspectives on relationships fundamentally enhance our understanding of the evolution of parasitism in the Neodermata and in particular, the evolution of diet.

  14. Elucidating the phylogenetic position of Gnathostomulida and first mitochondrial genomes of Gnathostomulida, Gastrotricha and Polycladida (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Golombek, Anja; Tobergte, Sarah; Struck, Torsten H

    2015-05-01

    Gnathostomulida is a taxon of small marine worms, which exclusively inhabit the interstitium. The evolution of Gnathostomulida has been discussed for decades. Originally regarded as primitive animals with affinities to flatworms, the phylogenetic position of Gnathostomulida has been debated. Given the lack of an anus a close relationship to Platyhelminthes has been maintained (i.e., Plathelminthomorpha hypothesis). Alternative hypotheses proposed Gnathostomulida as being close to Gastrotricha due to the presence of a monociliary epidermis (i.e., Monokonta/Neotrichozoa hypothesis) or to Syndermata based on the complicated jaw apparatus (i.e., Gnathifera hypothesis). Molecular analyses using only few genes were inconclusive. Recent phylogenomic studies brought some progress by placing Gnathostomulida as sister to Syndermata, but support for this relationship was low and depended on the analytical strategy. Herein we present the first data of complete or nearly complete mitochondrial genomes for two gnathostomulids (Gnathostomula paradoxa &G. armata), one gastrotrich (Lepidodermella squamata) and one polyclad flatworm (Stylochoplana maculata) to address the uncertain phylogenetic affinity of Gnathostomulida. Our analyses found Gnathostomulida as sister to Syndermata (Gnathifera hypothesis). Thorough sensitivity analyses addressing taxon instability, branch length heterogeneity (also known as long branch attraction) and base composition heterogeneity showed that the position of Gnathostomulida is consistent across the different analyses and, hence, independent of potential misleading biases. Moreover, by ameliorating these different biases nodal support values could be increased to maximum values. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that the different jaw apparatuses of Syndermata and Gnathostomulida are indeed homologous structures as proposed by the Gnathifera hypothesis. PMID:25796325

  15. Septins of Platyhelminths: identification, phylogeny, expression and localization among developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Zeraik, Ana E; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Mann, Victoria H; Popratiloff, Anastas; Araujo, Ana P U; Demarco, Ricardo; Brindley, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Septins are a family of eukaryotic GTP binding proteins conserved from yeasts to humans. Originally identified in mutants of budding yeast, septins participate in diverse cellular functions including cytokinesis, organization of actin networks, cell polarity, vesicle trafficking and many others. Septins assemble into heteroligomers to form filaments and rings. Here, four septins of Schistosoma mansoni are described, which appear to be conserved within the phylum Platyhelminthes. These orthologues were related to the SEPT5, SEPT10 and SEPT7 septins of humans, and hence we have termed the schistosome septins SmSEPT5, SmSEPT10, SmSEPT7.1 and SmSEPT7.2. Septin transcripts were detected throughout the developmental cycle of the schistosome and a similar expression profile was observed for septins in the stages examined, consistent with concerted production of these proteins to form heterocomplexes. Immunolocalization analyses undertaken with antibodies specific for SmSEPT5 and SmSEPT10 revealed a broad tissue distribution of septins in the schistosomulum and colocalization of septin and actin in the longitudinal and circular muscles of the sporocyst. Ciliated epidermal plates of the miracidium were rich in septins. Expression levels for these septins were elevated in germ cells in the miracidium and sporocyst. Intriguingly, septins colocalize with the protonephridial system of the cercaria, which extends laterally along the length of this larval stage. Together, the findings revealed that schistosomes expressed several septins which likely form filaments within the cells, as in other eukaryotes. Identification and localization demonstrating a broad distribution of septins across organs and tissues of schistosome contributes towards the understanding of septins in schistosomes and other flatworms. PMID:24367716

  16. Septins of Platyhelminths: Identification, Phylogeny, Expression and Localization among Developmental Stages of Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Zeraik, Ana E.; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Mann, Victoria H.; Popratiloff, Anastas; Araujo, Ana P. U.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Brindley, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Septins are a family of eukaryotic GTP binding proteins conserved from yeasts to humans. Originally identified in mutants of budding yeast, septins participate in diverse cellular functions including cytokinesis, organization of actin networks, cell polarity, vesicle trafficking and many others. Septins assemble into heteroligomers to form filaments and rings. Here, four septins of Schistosoma mansoni are described, which appear to be conserved within the phylum Platyhelminthes. These orthologues were related to the SEPT5, SEPT10 and SEPT7 septins of humans, and hence we have termed the schistosome septins SmSEPT5, SmSEPT10, SmSEPT7.1 and SmSEPT7.2. Septin transcripts were detected throughout the developmental cycle of the schistosome and a similar expression profile was observed for septins in the stages examined, consistent with concerted production of these proteins to form heterocomplexes. Immunolocalization analyses undertaken with antibodies specific for SmSEPT5 and SmSEPT10 revealed a broad tissue distribution of septins in the schistosomulum and colocalization of septin and actin in the longitudinal and circular muscles of the sporocyst. Ciliated epidermal plates of the miracidium were rich in septins. Expression levels for these septins were elevated in germ cells in the miracidium and sporocyst. Intriguingly, septins colocalize with the protonephridial system of the cercaria, which extends laterally along the length of this larval stage. Together, the findings revealed that schistosomes expressed several septins which likely form filaments within the cells, as in other eukaryotes. Identification and localization demonstrating a broad distribution of septins across organs and tissues of schistosome contributes towards the understanding of septins in schistosomes and other flatworms. PMID:24367716

  17. Septins of Platyhelminths: identification, phylogeny, expression and localization among developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Zeraik, Ana E; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Mann, Victoria H; Popratiloff, Anastas; Araujo, Ana P U; Demarco, Ricardo; Brindley, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Septins are a family of eukaryotic GTP binding proteins conserved from yeasts to humans. Originally identified in mutants of budding yeast, septins participate in diverse cellular functions including cytokinesis, organization of actin networks, cell polarity, vesicle trafficking and many others. Septins assemble into heteroligomers to form filaments and rings. Here, four septins of Schistosoma mansoni are described, which appear to be conserved within the phylum Platyhelminthes. These orthologues were related to the SEPT5, SEPT10 and SEPT7 septins of humans, and hence we have termed the schistosome septins SmSEPT5, SmSEPT10, SmSEPT7.1 and SmSEPT7.2. Septin transcripts were detected throughout the developmental cycle of the schistosome and a similar expression profile was observed for septins in the stages examined, consistent with concerted production of these proteins to form heterocomplexes. Immunolocalization analyses undertaken with antibodies specific for SmSEPT5 and SmSEPT10 revealed a broad tissue distribution of septins in the schistosomulum and colocalization of septin and actin in the longitudinal and circular muscles of the sporocyst. Ciliated epidermal plates of the miracidium were rich in septins. Expression levels for these septins were elevated in germ cells in the miracidium and sporocyst. Intriguingly, septins colocalize with the protonephridial system of the cercaria, which extends laterally along the length of this larval stage. Together, the findings revealed that schistosomes expressed several septins which likely form filaments within the cells, as in other eukaryotes. Identification and localization demonstrating a broad distribution of septins across organs and tissues of schistosome contributes towards the understanding of septins in schistosomes and other flatworms.

  18. The Macrostomum lignano EST database as a molecular resource for studying platyhelminth development and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Morris, Joshua; Ladurner, Peter; Rieger, Reinhard; Pfister, Daniela; Del Mar De Miguel-Bonet, Maria; Jacobs, David; Hartenstein, Volker

    2006-11-01

    We report the development of an Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) resource for the flatworm Macrostomum lignano. This taxon is of interest due to its basal placement within the flatworms. As such, it provides a useful comparative model for understanding the development of neural and sensory organization. It was anticipated on the basis of previous studies [e.g., Sánchez-Alvarado et al., Development, 129:5659-5665, (2002)] that a wide range of developmental markers would be expressed in later-stage macrostomids, and this proved to be the case, permitting recovery of a range of gene sequences important in development. To this end, an adult Macrostomum cDNA library was generated and 7,680 Macrostomum ESTs were sequenced from the 5' end. In addition, 1,536 of these aforementioned sequences were sequenced from the 3' end. Of the roughly 5,416 non-redundant sequences identified, 68% are similar to previously reported genes of known function. In addition, nearly 100 specific clones were obtained with potential neural and sensory function. From these data, an annotated searchable database of the Macrostomum EST collection has been made available on the web. A major objective was to obtain genes that would allow reconstruction of embryogenesis, and in particular neurogenesis, in a basal platyhelminth. The sequences recovered will serve as probes with which the origin and morphogenesis of lineages and tissues can be followed. To this end, we demonstrate a protocol for combined immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization labeling in juvenile Macrostomum, employing homologs of lin11/lim1 and six3/optix. Expression of these genes is shown in the context of the neuropile/muscle system.

  19. Ultrastructure of the intercalated body, a novel organelle associated with fluid forming cells in the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Sobkowicz, H M; Holy, J; Scott, G L

    1990-07-01

    The intercalated body is a newly discovered organelle in the inner and outer spiral sulcus cells of the mouse organ of Corti. The organelle was found in the cochleas of 14-day and older intact mice and in organs in culture of corresponding ages. The organelle consists of a stack of interconnected cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum and of membrane bound rodlets that are intercalated between, and run parallel to, the cisternae. The cisternal membranes are predominantly smooth, but some may display ribosomes. Most rodlets are from 1 to 2 microns long, about 0.1 micron wide, and contain electron dense material. Mitochondria are commonly associated with or incorporated into the organelle. Some electron micrographs suggest that the rodlets may originate from modified mitochondria. It is our impression that the formation of the organelle begins with the apposition of cisternae and mitochondria. Cisternal-associated mitochondria appear to constrict, elongate, and lose their inner membranes. In both the intact animal and in culture, the cells of the inner and outer spiral sulci display microvilli, apical junctional complexes, lateral intercellular spaces containing interdigitating cell processes, and appear to be involved in fluid formation. Moreover, in culture, the cells of inner and outer spiral sulci as well as some cells proliferating in the outgrowth zone participate in fluid formation, producing large fluid pockets. All these cells commonly contain intercalated bodies. It is possible that in the intact animal, as in culture, intercalated bodies may play a role in fluid regulation in the immediate vicinity of the hair cells. PMID:2374037

  20. Neurog1 can partially substitute for Atoh1 function in hair cell differentiation and maintenance during organ of Corti development

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Israt; Pan, Ning; Kersigo, Jennifer; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Atoh1, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor (TF), is essential for the differentiation of hair cells (HCs), mechanotransducers that convert sound into auditory signals in the mammalian organ of Corti (OC). Previous work demonstrated that replacing mouse Atoh1 with the fly ortholog atonal rescues HC differentiation, indicating functional replacement by other bHLH genes. However, replacing Atoh1 with Neurog1 resulted in reduced HC differentiation compared with transient Atoh1 expression in a ‘self-terminating’ Atoh1 conditional null mouse (Atoh1-Cre; Atoh1f/f). We now show that combining Neurog1 in one allele with removal of floxed Atoh1 in a self-terminating conditional mutant (Atoh1-Cre; Atoh1f/kiNeurog1) mouse results in significantly more differentiated inner HCs and outer HCs that have a prolonged longevity of 9 months compared with Atoh1 self-terminating littermates. Stereocilia bundles are partially disorganized, disoriented and not HC type specific. Replacement of Atoh1 with Neurog1 maintains limited expression of Pou4f3 and Barhl1 and rescues HCs quantitatively, but not qualitatively. OC patterning and supporting cell differentiation are also partially disrupted. Diffusible factors involved in patterning are reduced (Fgf8) and factors involved in cell-cell interactions are affected (Jag1, Hes5). Despite the presence of many HCs with stereocilia these mice are deaf, possibly owing to HC and OC patterning defects. This study provides a novel approach to disrupt OC development through modulating the HC-specific intracellular TF network. The resulting disorganized OC indicates that normally differentiated HCs act as ‘self-organizers’ for OC development and that Atoh1 plays a crucial role to initiate HC stereocilia differentiation independently of HC viability. PMID:26209643

  1. Phylogenetic relationships and systematic position of the families Cortrematidae and Phaneropsolidae (Platyhelminthes: Digenea).

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Gerard; Zaleśny, Grzegorz; Sitko, Jiljí; Tkach, Vasyl V

    2014-12-01

    The systematic position and phylogenetic relationships of the family Cortrematidae Yamaguti, 1958 have always been controversial. In the present study, the phylogenetic relationships of this family and its constituent genera and families within the superfamily Microphalloidea were evaluated using previously published and newly obtained sequences of 28S rDNA of Cortrema magnicaudata (Bykhovskaya-Pavlovskaya, 1950) (Cortrematidae), Phaneropsolus praomydis Baer, 1971 and Microtrema barusi Sitko, 2013 (Phaneropsolidae). Results clearly demonstrate that the genus Cortrema Tang, 1951 is closest to Gyrabascus Macy 1935, both genera forming one of the clades within the family Pleurogenidae in the superfamily Microphalloidea and sharing several important morphological features. Thus, the family Cortrematidae should be considered among synonyms of the Pleurogenidae. Based on the analysis of morphology, C. corti Tang, 1951, C. testilobata (Bykhovskaya-Pavlovskaya, 1953) and C. niloticus Ashour, Ahmed et Lewis, 1994 are considered junior synonyms of C. magnicaudata. The phylogenetic position of P. praomydis as a family-level branch not showing close relationships with other families of the Microphalloidea, supports the status of the Phaneropsolidae as an independent family. The genus Parabascus Looss, 1907 previously considered within the Phaneropsolidae clearly belongs to the Pleurogenidae. In addition, the molecular phylogeny has demonstrated that the recently described phaneropsolid Microtrema barusi belongs to the microphallid genus Microphallus Ward, 1901. Therefore, Microtrema Sitko, 2013 is considered a junior synonym of Microphallus. Our analysis has also confirmed the status of Collyriclidae as a family within the Microphalloidea. Not yet sequenced representatives of other families within the Microphalloidea (e.g. Anenterotrematidae, Eumegacetidae, Renschtrematidae, Stomylotrematidae, etc.) need to be included in future molecular phylogenetic studies to better unravel

  2. The physiological response of the marine platyhelminth Macrostomum lignano to different environmental oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Ingraham, G A; Bickmeyer, U; Abele, D

    2013-07-15

    The respiration rate of meiofauna is difficult to measure, and the response to variations in the environmental oxygen concentration has so far been mainly addressed through behavioral investigation. We investigated the effect of different oxygen concentrations on the physiology of the marine platyhelminth Macrostomum lignano. Respiration was measured using batches of 20 animals in a glass microtiter plate equipped with optical oxygen sensor spots. At higher oxygen saturations (>12 kPa), the animals showed a clear oxyconforming behavior. However, below this value, the flatworms kept respiration rates constant at 0.064±0.001 nmol O2 l(-1) h(-1) individual(-1) down to 3 kPa PO2, and this rate was increased by 30% in animals that were reoxygenated after enduring a period of 1.5 h in anoxia. Physiological changes related to tissue oxygenation were assessed using live imaging techniques with different fluorophores in animals maintained in normoxic (21 kPa), hyperoxic (40 kPa) or near-anoxic (~0 kPa) conditions and subjected to anoxia-reoxygenation. The pH-sensitive dyes Ageladine-A and BCECF both indicated that pHi under near-anoxia increases by about 0.07-0.10 units. Mitochondrial membrane potential, Δψm, was higher in anoxic and hyperoxic than in normoxic conditions (JC1 dye data). Staining with ROS-sensitive dyes - DHE for detection of superoxide anion (O2•(-)) formation and C-H DFFDA for other ROS species aside from O2•(-) (H2O2, HOO• and ONOO) - showed increased ROS formation following anoxia-reoxygenation treatment. Animals exposed to hyperoxic, normoxic and anoxic treatments displayed no significant differences in O2•(-) formation, whereas mitochondrial ROS formation as detected by C-H2DFFDA was higher after hyperoxic exposure and lowest under near-anoxia conditions compared with the normoxic control group. Macrostomum lignano seems to be a species that is tolerant of a wide range of oxygen concentrations (being able to maintain aerobic metabolism from

  3. Venus kinase receptors control reproduction in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Gouignard, Nadège; Cailliau, Katia; Morel, Marion; Hahnel, Steffen; Leutner, Silke; Beckmann, Svenja; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dissous, Colette

    2014-05-01

    The Venus kinase receptor (VKR) is a single transmembrane molecule composed of an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptor and an extracellular Venus Flytrap (VFT) structure similar to the ligand binding domain of many class C G protein coupled receptors. This receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) was first discovered in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, then in a large variety of invertebrates. A single vkr gene is found in most genomes, except in S. mansoni in which two genes Smvkr1 and Smvkr2 exist. VKRs form a unique family of RTKs present only in invertebrates and their biological functions are still to be discovered. In this work, we show that SmVKRs are expressed in the reproductive organs of S. mansoni, particularly in the ovaries of female worms. By transcriptional analyses evidence was obtained that both SmVKRs fulfill different roles during oocyte maturation. Suppression of Smvkr expression by RNA interference induced spectacular morphological changes in female worms with a strong disorganization of the ovary, which was dominated by the presence of primary oocytes, and a defect of egg formation. Following expression in Xenopus oocytes, SmVKR1 and SmVKR2 receptors were shown to be activated by distinct ligands which are L-Arginine and calcium ions, respectively. Signalling analysis in Xenopus oocytes revealed the capacity of SmVKRs to activate the PI3K/Akt/p70S6K and Erk MAPK pathways involved in cellular growth and proliferation. Additionally, SmVKR1 induced phosphorylation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). Activation of JNK by SmVKR1 was supported by the results of yeast two-hybrid experiments identifying several components of the JNK pathway as specific interacting partners of SmVKR1. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the functions of SmVKR in gametogenesis, and particularly in oogenesis and egg formation. By eliciting signalling pathways potentially involved in oocyte proliferation, growth and migration

  4. The free energy of the metastable supersaturated vapor via restricted ensemble simulations. III. An extension to the Corti and Debenedetti subcell constraint algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chu; Geng, Jun; Marlow, William H

    2016-04-14

    In order to improve the sampling of restricted microstates in our previous work [C. Nie, J. Geng, and W. H. Marlow, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154505 (2007); 128, 234310 (2008)] and quantitatively predict thermal properties of supersaturated vapors, an extension is made to the Corti and Debenedetti subcell constraint algorithm [D. S. Corti and P. Debenedetti, Chem. Eng. Sci. 49, 2717 (1994)], which restricts the maximum allowed local density at any point in a simulation box. The maximum allowed local density at a point in a simulation box is defined by the maximum number of particles Nm allowed to appear inside a sphere of radius R, with this point as the center of the sphere. Both Nm and R serve as extra thermodynamic variables for maintaining a certain degree of spatial homogeneity in a supersaturated system. In a restricted canonical ensemble, at a given temperature and an overall density, series of local minima on the Helmholtz free energy surface F(Nm, R) are found subject to different (Nm, R) pairs. The true equilibrium metastable state is identified through the analysis of the formation free energies of Stillinger clusters of various sizes obtained from these restricted states. The simulation results of a supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor at reduced temperature 0.7 including the vapor pressure isotherm, formation free energies of critical nuclei, and chemical potential differences are presented and analyzed. In addition, with slight modifications, the current algorithm can be applied to computing thermal properties of superheated liquids. PMID:27083734

  5. The free energy of the metastable supersaturated vapor via restricted ensemble simulations. III. An extension to the Corti and Debenedetti subcell constraint algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Chu; Geng, Jun; Marlow, William H.

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve the sampling of restricted microstates in our previous work [C. Nie, J. Geng, and W. H. Marlow, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154505 (2007); 128, 234310 (2008)] and quantitatively predict thermal properties of supersaturated vapors, an extension is made to the Corti and Debenedetti subcell constraint algorithm [D. S. Corti and P. Debenedetti, Chem. Eng. Sci. 49, 2717 (1994)], which restricts the maximum allowed local density at any point in a simulation box. The maximum allowed local density at a point in a simulation box is defined by the maximum number of particles Nm allowed to appear inside a sphere of radius R, with this point as the center of the sphere. Both Nm and R serve as extra thermodynamic variables for maintaining a certain degree of spatial homogeneity in a supersaturated system. In a restricted canonical ensemble, at a given temperature and an overall density, series of local minima on the Helmholtz free energy surface F(Nm, R) are found subject to different (Nm, R) pairs. The true equilibrium metastable state is identified through the analysis of the formation free energies of Stillinger clusters of various sizes obtained from these restricted states. The simulation results of a supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor at reduced temperature 0.7 including the vapor pressure isotherm, formation free energies of critical nuclei, and chemical potential differences are presented and analyzed. In addition, with slight modifications, the current algorithm can be applied to computing thermal properties of superheated liquids.

  6. Genetic network of the eye in Platyhelminthes: expression and functional analysis of some players during planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Saló, Emili; Pineda, David; Marsal, Maria; Gonzalez, Javier; Gremigni, Vittorio; Batistoni, Renata

    2002-04-01

    Planarians are the free-living members (order Tricladida) of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are triploblastic, acoelomate, unsegmented and located at the base of the Lophotrochozoa clade. Besides their huge regenerative capacity, planarians have simple eyes, considered similar to the prototypic eye suggested by Charles Darwin in his book 'On the Origin of Species'. The conserved genetic network that determines the initial steps of eye development across metazoans supports a monophyletic origin of the various eye types present in the animal kingdom. Here we summarise the pattern of expression of certain genes involved in the eye network that have been isolated in planarians, such as Otx, Pax-6, Six, Rax and opsin. We describe the effects of RNA interference-mediated loss of function on eye regeneration. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these findings for the evolution of the eye gene network. PMID:11992724

  7. Immunoenzymatic visualization of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in Cephalothrix species (Nemertea: Anopla: Palaeonemertea: Cephalotrichidae) and Planocera reticulata (Platyhelminthes: Turbellaria: Polycladida: Planoceridae).

    PubMed

    Tanu, Mohosena Begum; Mahmud, Yahia; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro; Kajihara, Hiroshi; Kawatsu, Kentaro; Hamano, Yonekazu; Asakawa, Manabu; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Noguchi, Tamao

    2004-10-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) was localized as brown color in different tissues of an undescribed species of the nemertean genus Cephalothrix (phylum Nemertea) and a turbellarian Planocera reticulata (phylum Platyhelminthes) on light microscopy by means of a monoclonal anti-TTX antibody. In the Cephalothrix sp., TTX was recognized in the vesicles apically arranged in the bacillary cells in the epidermis, basal lamina, the granular cells in the proboscis epithelium, rhynchocoel epithelium, and the vesicles in the basal portion of the intestinal wall near the blood vessels and rhynchocoel. The excretory system and the ovum also showed positive reaction of TTX antigen-antibody. On the other hand, the hermaphrodite flatworm P. reticulata exhibited TTX antigen-antibody complex only in their ovum. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental effort on micro-distribution of TTX in invertebrates.

  8. New Acotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) from the east coast of the North Atlantic Ocean with special mention of the Iberian littoral.

    PubMed

    Noreña, Carolina; Rodríguez, Jorge; Pérez, Jacinto; Almon, Bruno

    2015-11-03

    Polyclad species diversity, although generally well known for European North Atlantic waters, is nearly unknown for the Iberian Peninsula. The "Ría de Arousa", located on the Atlantic coast of Galicia (Spain), is a place where many positive biological factors for species biodiversity converge. Therefore, it is an ideal location to study polyclad diversity. This research, which describes new records and new species, contributes to the knowledge of the distribution of Polycladida (Platyhelminthes), particularly of the suborder Acotylea, in the Atlantic waters of the Iberian Peninsula. The new records include the re-descriptions of Cryptocelis compacta Lang, 1884, Stylochus neapolitanus (Delle Chiaje, 1841-1844) and Discocelis tigrina (Blanchard, 1847), while the two newly described species are Hoploplana elisabelloi n. sp. and Armatoplana celta n. sp.

  9. Genetic network of the eye in Platyhelminthes: expression and functional analysis of some players during planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Saló, Emili; Pineda, David; Marsal, Maria; Gonzalez, Javier; Gremigni, Vittorio; Batistoni, Renata

    2002-04-01

    Planarians are the free-living members (order Tricladida) of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are triploblastic, acoelomate, unsegmented and located at the base of the Lophotrochozoa clade. Besides their huge regenerative capacity, planarians have simple eyes, considered similar to the prototypic eye suggested by Charles Darwin in his book 'On the Origin of Species'. The conserved genetic network that determines the initial steps of eye development across metazoans supports a monophyletic origin of the various eye types present in the animal kingdom. Here we summarise the pattern of expression of certain genes involved in the eye network that have been isolated in planarians, such as Otx, Pax-6, Six, Rax and opsin. We describe the effects of RNA interference-mediated loss of function on eye regeneration. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these findings for the evolution of the eye gene network.

  10. Two dimensional vibrations of the guinea pig apex organ of Corti measured in vivo using phase sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Zhang, Yuan; Petrie, Tracy; Fridberger, Anders; Ren, Tianying; Wang, Ruikang; Jacques, Steven L.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we measure the in vivo apical-turn vibrations of the guinea pig organ of Corti in both axial and radial directions using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. The apical turn in guinea pig cochlea has best frequencies around 100 - 500 Hz which are relevant for human speech. Prior measurements of vibrations in the guinea pig apex involved opening the otic capsule, which has been questioned on the basis of the resulting changes to cochlear hydrodynamics. Here this limitation is overcome by measuring the vibrations through bone without opening the otic capsule. Furthermore, we have significantly reduced the surgery needed to access the guinea pig apex in the axial direction by introducing a miniature mirror inside the bulla. The method and preliminary data are discussed in this article.

  11. Taxonomy of Cotylea (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida) from Cabo Frio, southeastern Brazil, with the description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Juliana; Padula, Vinicius; Lavrado, Helena Passeri; Quiroga, Sigmer

    2014-01-01

    Polyclads are free-living Platyhelminthes with a simple, dorsoventrally flattened body and a much ramified intestine. In Brazil, 66 species are reported; only three from Rio de Janeiro State (RJ). The main objective of this study is to describe and illustrate coloration pattern, external morphology, reproductive system morphology and, when possible, biological and ecological aspects of species of the suborder Cotylea found in Cabo Frio, RJ. Of the 13 cotylean polyclad species found, Pseudobiceros pardalis, Cycloporus variegatus and Eurylepta aurantiaca are new records from the Brazilian coast and one species is new to science, Pseudoceros juani sp. nov. Feeding observations were made of four species. It is the first time that Lurymare utarum, Cycloporus gabriellae, C. variegatus and E. aurantiaca are illustrated with digital photographs of live specimens and histological preparations. This study increases to 70 the number of Brazilian Polycladida and to 14 the number of species known from Rio de Janeiro State. However, the knowledge about Polycladida in Brazil still has gaps, with great parts of the coast remaining unsampled. 

  12. No Evidence for a Culturable Bacterial Tetrodotoxin Producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida)

    PubMed Central

    Salvitti, Lauren R.; Wood, Susanna A.; McNabb, Paul; Cary, Stephen Craig

    2015-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes). Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0), suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely. PMID:25635464

  13. Evolutionary history of the Tricladida and the Platyhelminthes: an up-to-date phylogenetic and systematic account.

    PubMed

    Riutort, Marta; Álvarez-Presas, Marta; Lázaro, Eva; Solà, Eduard; Paps, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Within the free-living platyhelminths, the triclads, or planarians, are the best-known group, largely as a result of long-standing and intensive research on regeneration, pattern formation and Hox gene expression. However, the group's evolutionary history has been long debated, with controversies ranging from their phyletic structure and position within the Metazoa to the relationships among species within the Tricladida. Over the the last decade, with the advent of molecular phylogenies, some of these issues have begun to be resolved. Here, we present an up-to-date summary of the main phylogenetic changes and novelties with some comments on their evolutionary implications. The phylum has been split into two groups, and the position of the main group (the Rhabdithophora and the Catenulida), close to the Annelida and the Mollusca within the Lophotrochozoa, is now clear. Their internal relationships, although not totally resolved, have been clarified. Tricladida systematics has also experienced a revolution since the implementation of molecular data. The terrestrial planarians have been demonstrated to have emerged from one of the freshwater families, giving a different view of their evolution and greatly altering their classification. The use of molecular data is also facilitating the identification of Tricladida species by DNA barcoding, allowing better knowledge of their distribution and genetic diversity. Finally, molecular phylogenetic and phylogeographical analyses, taking advantage of recent data, are beginning to give a clear picture of the recent history of the Dugesia and Schmidtea species in the Mediterranean. PMID:22450992

  14. Complete Sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta: Gene arrangements indicate that platyhelminths are eutrochozoans

    SciTech Connect

    von Nickisch-Rosenegk, Markus; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    Using ''long-PCR'' we have amplified in overlapping fragments the complete mitochondrial genome of the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) and determined its 13,900 nucleotide sequence. The gene content is the same as that typically found for animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) except that atp8 appears to be lacking, a condition found previously for several other animals. Despite the small size of this mtDNA, there are two large non-coding regions, one of which contains 13 repeats of a 31 nucleotide sequence and a potential stem-loop structure of 25 base pairs with an 11-member loop. Large potential secondary structures are identified also for the non-coding regions of two other cestode mtDNAs. Comparison of the mitochondrial gene arrangement of H. diminuta with those previously published supports a phylogenetic position of flatworms as members of the Eutrochozoa, rather than being basal to either a clade of protostomes or a clade of coelomates.

  15. No evidence for a culturable bacterial tetrodotoxin producer in Pleurobranchaea maculata (Gastropoda: Pleurobranchidae) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida).

    PubMed

    Salvitti, Lauren R; Wood, Susanna A; McNabb, Paul; Cary, Stephen Craig

    2015-01-28

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin found in the tissues of many taxonomically diverse organisms. Its origin has been the topic of much debate, with suggestions including endogenous production, acquisition through diet, and symbiotic bacterial synthesis. Bacterial production of TTX has been reported in isolates from marine biota, but at lower than expected concentrations. In this study, 102 strains were isolated from Pleurobranchaea maculata (Opisthobranchia) and Stylochoplana sp. (Platyhelminthes). Tetrodotoxin production was tested utilizing a recently developed sensitive method to detect the C9 base of TTX via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bacterial strains were characterized by sequencing a region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. To account for the possibility that TTX is produced by a consortium of bacteria, a series of experiments using marine broth spiked with various P. maculata tissues were undertaken. Sixteen unique strains from P. maculata and one from Stylochoplana sp. were isolated, representing eight different genera; Pseudomonadales, Actinomycetales, Oceanospirillales, Thiotrichales, Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, and Vibrionales. Molecular fingerprinting of bacterial communities from broth experiments showed little change over the first four days. No C9 base or TTX was detected in isolates or broth experiments (past day 0), suggesting a culturable microbial source of TTX in P. maculata and Stylochoplana sp. is unlikely.

  16. Suppression of the tapeworm order Pseudophyllidea (Platyhelminthes: Eucestoda) and the proposal of two new orders, Bothriocephalidea and Diphyllobothriidea.

    PubMed

    Kuchta, R; Scholz, T; Brabec, J; Bray, R A

    2008-01-01

    Pseudophyllidea van Beneden in Carus, 1863, a well recognised order of tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Eucestoda), is suppressed because it is composed of two phylogenetically unrelated groups, for which the new names Bothriocephalidea and Diphyllobothriidea are proposed. The new orders differ from each other in the following characters: (i) position of the genital pore: on the dorsal, dorso-lateral or lateral aspects and posterior to the ventral uterine pore in the Bothriocephalidea versus on the ventral aspect of segments and anterior to the uterine pore in the Diphyllobothriidea; (ii) the presence of a muscular external seminal vesicle in the Diphyllobothriidea, which is absent in the Bothriocephalidea; (iii) the presence of a uterine sac in the Bothriocephalidea, which is absent in the Diphyllobothriidea; and (iv) the spectrum of definitive hosts: mainly teleost fishes, never homoiothermic vertebrates in the Bothriocephalidea, versus tetrapods, most frequently mammals, in the Diphyllobothriidea, with species of Diphyllobothrium, Spirometra and Diplogonoporus parasitic in humans. The Diphyllobothriidea, which includes 17 genera in four families (Digramma is synonymised with Ligula), is associated with cestode groups that have a range of plesiomorphic characters (Haplobothriidea and Caryophyllidea), whereas the Bothriocephalidea, consisting of 41 genera grouped in four families, is the sister-group to the 'acetabulate' or 'tetrafossate' cestodes, which are generally regarded as having derived characters.

  17. State of knowledge of the Acotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) from the Mediterranean coasts of Spain: new records and new species.

    PubMed

    Marquina, Daniel; Osca, David; Rodríguez, Jorge; Fernández-Despiau, Estrella; Noreña, Carolina

    2014-03-20

    Along the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula, great species diversity is thought to exist, but our knowledge of Iberian polyclads is, in fact, very limited. This study contributes to the Polycladida (Platyhelminthes) of the Iberian Peninsula, in particular those of the Mediterranean coast. Nine species, mainly new species or new records, are described. Imogine stellae sp. nov. from Mar Menor (Murcia, Spain) is described, while I. mediterranea Galleni, 1976 is recorded for the first time in Spain. The genus Planocera Blainville, 1828 within the Mediterranean basin is reviewed: Planocera graffi Lang, 1879 is redescribed, and its synonymisation with Planocera pellucida (Mertens, 1833) considered. Also, the genus Notoplanella Bock, 1931 is represented by two species in Spain, N. inarmata Bock, 1931 type species, from Formentera Island and N. estelae sp. nov., from Mar Menor. Trigonoporus cephalophtalmus Lang, 1884 is rediscovered after the description of Lang (1884). Stylochus neapolitanus (Delle Chiaje, 1841-1844) Lang, 1884 is recorded and S. pilidium (Goette, 1881) is also redescribed, and Leptoplana mediterranea (Bock, 1913) is newly recorded for the Iberian Peninsula.

  18. Evolutionary history of the Tricladida and the Platyhelminthes: an up-to-date phylogenetic and systematic account.

    PubMed

    Riutort, Marta; Álvarez-Presas, Marta; Lázaro, Eva; Solà, Eduard; Paps, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Within the free-living platyhelminths, the triclads, or planarians, are the best-known group, largely as a result of long-standing and intensive research on regeneration, pattern formation and Hox gene expression. However, the group's evolutionary history has been long debated, with controversies ranging from their phyletic structure and position within the Metazoa to the relationships among species within the Tricladida. Over the the last decade, with the advent of molecular phylogenies, some of these issues have begun to be resolved. Here, we present an up-to-date summary of the main phylogenetic changes and novelties with some comments on their evolutionary implications. The phylum has been split into two groups, and the position of the main group (the Rhabdithophora and the Catenulida), close to the Annelida and the Mollusca within the Lophotrochozoa, is now clear. Their internal relationships, although not totally resolved, have been clarified. Tricladida systematics has also experienced a revolution since the implementation of molecular data. The terrestrial planarians have been demonstrated to have emerged from one of the freshwater families, giving a different view of their evolution and greatly altering their classification. The use of molecular data is also facilitating the identification of Tricladida species by DNA barcoding, allowing better knowledge of their distribution and genetic diversity. Finally, molecular phylogenetic and phylogeographical analyses, taking advantage of recent data, are beginning to give a clear picture of the recent history of the Dugesia and Schmidtea species in the Mediterranean.

  19. Origin and evolution of paralogous rRNA gene clusters within the flatworm family Dugesiidae (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida).

    PubMed

    Carranza, S; Baguñà, J; Riutort, M

    1999-08-01

    Analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences of five species of the family Dugesiidae (phylum Platyhelminthes, suborder Tricladida, infraorder Paludicola) and eight species belonging to families Dendrocoelidae and Planaridae and to the infraorder Maricola showed that members of the family Dugesiidae have two types of 18S rDNA genes, while the rest of the species have only one. The duplication event also affected the ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2 region and probably the 28S gene. The mean divergence value between the type I and the type II sequences is 9% and type II 18S rDNA genes are evolving 2.3 times more rapidly than type I. The evolutionary rates of type I and type II genes were calibrated from biogeographical data, and an approximate date for the duplication event of 80-120 million years ago was calculated. The type II gene was shown, by RT-PCR, to be transcribed in adult individuals of Schmidtea polychroa, though at very low levels. This result, together with the fact that most of the functionally important positions for small-subunit rRNA in prokaryotes have been conserved, indicates that the type II gene is probably functional.

  20. Bryoplana xerophila n. g. n. sp., a new limnoterrestrial microturbellarian (Platyhelminthes, Typhloplanidae, Protoplanellinae) from epilithic mosses, with notes on its ecology.

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Niels; Davison, Paul; Artois, Tom

    2010-03-01

    Bryoplana xerophila, a new genus and species of limnoterrestrial protoplanelline platyhelminth, was found in moss and soil covering a concrete wall in northern Alabama, USA. Bryoplana xerophila is the first taxon of limnoterrestrial Protoplanellinae recorded from North America and is one of the few rhabdocoels known from dry habitats. It is unique within Protoplanellinae in lacking rhabdites, having a pharynx rosulatus in the frontal half of the body, and lacking sclerotized parts in the male system. Notes on encystment, reproduction and feeding behavior are given. An updated identification key to all known genera of Protoplanellinae is presented.

  1. [New occurrences of metacercariae of Austrodiplostomum compactum (Lutz, 1928) (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) eye flukes of fish from the Paraná Basin].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Fábio Hideki; Moreira, Luis Henrique De A; Ceschini, Tiago L; Takemoto, Ricardo Massato; Pavanelli, Gilberto Cezar

    2008-01-01

    Austrodiplostomum compactum (Platyhelminthes, Digenea) eye flukes of several species of fishes. The presence of this parasite, in extreme cases, can cause swelling of the eyelids, displacement of the retina, opacity of the crystalline lens and blindness or even death. The present study it registers new occurrences of this metacercariae infecting the eyes of four new hosts of fish, Serrasalmus maculatus collected in the Rosana reservoir in the Paranapanema river and Hypostomus regani, Schizodon borellii and Auchenipterus osteomystax collected in the the Upper Paraná River floodplain.

  2. Effects of pulsed Er:YSGG and Ho:YAG laser on the organ of Corti of the guinea pig cochlea: a scanning electron microscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Yasmin; Jovanovic, Sergije; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Anft, D.; Ertl, Thomas P.; Scherer, Hans H.; Berghaus, A.; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1998-01-01

    Laser stapedotomy has now become an established method in the surgical treatment of otosclerosis. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that, apart from the continuous wave lasers, several pulsed laser systems are also suitable for stapes management. Experiments were performed in guinea pigs to clarify which, if any, of the pulsed lasers used can damage the inner ear on application of the laser parameters required for the stapedotomy. The basal convolution of the guinea-pig cochlea was chosen as the application site. Acoustic evoked potentials (compound action potentials) yielded information on inner-ear function. With the Er:YSGG laser (energy: 85 J/pulse, energy density: 36 J/cm2, total energy: 0.425 J), five applications to the cochlea are necessary for a foot plate perforation of 500 - 600 micrometers . With the Ho:YAG laser, an adequately large perforation can be achieved with at least 10 applications of an energy of 210 mJ per pulse (energy density: 90 J/cm2, total energy: 2.1 J). The aim of this study was: (1) to clarify whether the Er:YSGG and Ho:YAG laser could cause morphological changes in the organ of Corti of the guinea pig on application of the laser parameters required for stapedotomy, and (2) to verify our experimental electrophysiological results and correlate them with the morphological changes detected in the organ of Corti in the guinea pig cochlea by scanning-electron-microscopic examination. It shows that the effective laser parameters (5 X 85 mJ) of the Er:YSGG-laser cause no changes of the guinea pig cochlea. Even with the application of 25 pulses with the same energy the guinea pig cochlea shows normal appearance. The effective laser parameters of the Ho:YAG laser (10 X 210 mJ) show changes in the outer hair cells in the form of stereocilie fusion and giant hair cell formation while the inner hair cells and supporting cells are showing normal appearance. Our results clearly demonstrate a high application safety for the Er:YSGG laser

  3. Traveling waves on the organ of Corti of the chinchilla cochlea: spatial trajectories of inner hair cell depolarization inferred from responses of auditory-nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Temchin, Andrei N.; Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Cai, Hongxue; Ruggero, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial magnitude and phase profiles for inner hair cell depolarization throughout the chinchilla cochlea were inferred from responses of auditory-nerve fibers to threshold- and moderate-level tones and tone complexes. Firing-rate profiles for frequencies ≤ 2 kHz are bimodal, with the major peak at the characteristic place and a secondary peak at 3–5 mm from the extreme base. Response-phase trajectories are synchronous with peak outward stapes displacement at the extreme cochlear base and accumulate 1.5-period lags at the characteristic places. High-frequency phase trajectories are very similar to the trajectories of basilar-membrane peak velocity toward scala tympani. Low-frequency phase trajectories undergo a polarity flip in a region, 6.5–9 mm from the cochlear base, where traveling-wave phase velocity attains a local minimum and a local maximum and where the onset latencies of near-threshold impulse responses computed from responses to near-threshold white noise exhibit a local minimum. That region is the same where frequency-threshold tuning curves of auditory-nerve fibers undergo a shape transition. Since depolarization of inner hair cells presumably indicates the mechanical stimulus to their stereocilia, the present results suggest that distinct low-frequency forward waves of organ of Corti vibration are launched simultaneously at the extreme base of the cochlea and at the 6.5–9 mm transition region, from where antiphasic reflections arise. PMID:22855802

  4. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography imaging of the tissue motion within the organ of Corti at a subnanometer scale: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2010-09-01

    Hearing loss can mean severe impairment to the quality of life. However, the biomechanical mechanisms of how the hearing organ, i.e., the organ of Corti (OC), responds to sound are still elusive, largely because there is currently no means available to image the 3-D motion characteristics of the OC. We present a novel use of the phase-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) to characterize the motion of cellular compartments within the OC at a subnanometer scale. The PSOCT system operates at 1310 nm with a spatial resolution of ~16 μm and an imaging speed of 47,000 A-lines/s. The phase changes of the spectral interferograms induced by the localized tissue motion are used to quantify the vibration magnitude. Fourier transform analysis of the phase changes improves the system sensitivity to sense minute vibrations smaller than 1 nm. We demonstrate that the PSOCT system is feasible to image the meaningful vibration of cellular compartments within the OC with an unprecedented sensitivity down to ~0.5 A˚.

  5. Diversity, specificity and speciation in larval Diplostomidae (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) in the eyes of freshwater fish, as revealed by DNA barcodes.

    PubMed

    Locke, Sean A; Al-Nasiri, Fatima S; Caffara, Monica; Drago, Fabiana; Kalbe, Martin; Lapierre, Angela Rose; McLaughlin, J Daniel; Nie, Pin; Overstreet, Robin M; Souza, Geza T R; Takemoto, Ricardo M; Marcogliese, David J

    2015-11-01

    Larvae (metacercariae) in some species of Diplostomidae (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) inhabit fish eyes and are difficult to identify to species based on morphology. DNA barcoding has clarified the diversity and life cycles of diplostomids in North America, Europe and Africa, but has seldom been used in parasites sampled in large numbers or at large spatial scales. Here, distance-based analysis of cytochrome c oxidase 1 barcodes and, in some specimens, internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2) sequences was performed for over 2000 diplostomids from Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Asia and the Americas. Fifty-two species of Diplostomum, Tylodelphys and Austrodiplostomum (Digenea: Diplostomidae) were distinguished. The 52 species comprise 12 identified species, six species in two species complexes and 34 putative species, and 33/52 had been delineated in previous studies. Most (23/40) of the unidentified, putative species distinguished by cytochrome c oxidase 1 distances were supported by at least one additional line of evidence. As the intensity of sampling of the 52 species increased, variation in cytochrome c oxidase 1 decreased between and increased within species, while the spatial scale at which species were sampled had no effect. Nonetheless, variation between species always exceeded variation within species. New life-cycle linkages, geographic and host records, and genetic data were recorded in several species, including Tylodelphys jenynsiae, Tylodelphys immer and Diplostomum ardeae. Species of Diplostomum inhabiting the lens are less host-specific and less numerous than those infecting other tissues, suggesting that reduced immune activity in the lens has influenced rates of speciation. PMID:26276524

  6. Diversity, specificity and speciation in larval Diplostomidae (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) in the eyes of freshwater fish, as revealed by DNA barcodes.

    PubMed

    Locke, Sean A; Al-Nasiri, Fatima S; Caffara, Monica; Drago, Fabiana; Kalbe, Martin; Lapierre, Angela Rose; McLaughlin, J Daniel; Nie, Pin; Overstreet, Robin M; Souza, Geza T R; Takemoto, Ricardo M; Marcogliese, David J

    2015-11-01

    Larvae (metacercariae) in some species of Diplostomidae (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) inhabit fish eyes and are difficult to identify to species based on morphology. DNA barcoding has clarified the diversity and life cycles of diplostomids in North America, Europe and Africa, but has seldom been used in parasites sampled in large numbers or at large spatial scales. Here, distance-based analysis of cytochrome c oxidase 1 barcodes and, in some specimens, internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2) sequences was performed for over 2000 diplostomids from Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Asia and the Americas. Fifty-two species of Diplostomum, Tylodelphys and Austrodiplostomum (Digenea: Diplostomidae) were distinguished. The 52 species comprise 12 identified species, six species in two species complexes and 34 putative species, and 33/52 had been delineated in previous studies. Most (23/40) of the unidentified, putative species distinguished by cytochrome c oxidase 1 distances were supported by at least one additional line of evidence. As the intensity of sampling of the 52 species increased, variation in cytochrome c oxidase 1 decreased between and increased within species, while the spatial scale at which species were sampled had no effect. Nonetheless, variation between species always exceeded variation within species. New life-cycle linkages, geographic and host records, and genetic data were recorded in several species, including Tylodelphys jenynsiae, Tylodelphys immer and Diplostomum ardeae. Species of Diplostomum inhabiting the lens are less host-specific and less numerous than those infecting other tissues, suggesting that reduced immune activity in the lens has influenced rates of speciation.

  7. MAP3K1 function is essential for cytoarchitecture of the mouse organ of Corti and survival of auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Rizwan; Meng, Qinghang; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Xia, Ying; Puligilla, Chandrakala; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT MAP3K1 is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by a diverse set of stimuli and exerts its effect through various downstream effecter molecules, including JNK, ERK1/2 and p38. In humans, mutant alleles of MAP3K1 are associated with 46,XY sex reversal. Until recently, the only phenotype observed in Map3k1tm1Yxia mutant mice was open eyelids at birth. Here, we report that homozygous Map3k1tm1Yxia mice have early-onset profound hearing loss accompanied by the progressive degeneration of cochlear outer hair cells. In the mouse inner ear, MAP3K1 has punctate localization at the apical surface of the supporting cells in close proximity to basal bodies. Although the cytoarchitecture, neuronal wiring and synaptic junctions in the organ of Corti are grossly preserved, Map3k1tm1Yxia mutant mice have supernumerary functional outer hair cells (OHCs) and Deiters' cells. Loss of MAP3K1 function resulted in the downregulation of Fgfr3, Fgf8, Fgf10 and Atf3 expression in the inner ear. Fgfr3, Fgf8 and Fgf10 have a role in induction of the otic placode or in otic epithelium development in mice, and their functional deficits cause defects in cochlear morphogenesis and hearing loss. Our studies suggest that MAP3K1 has an essential role in the regulation of these key cochlear morphogenesis genes. Collectively, our data highlight the crucial role of MAP3K1 in the development and function of the mouse inner ear and hearing. PMID:26496772

  8. MAP3K1 function is essential for cytoarchitecture of the mouse organ of Corti and survival of auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Rizwan; Meng, Qinghang; Hufnagel, Robert B; Xia, Ying; Puligilla, Chandrakala; Ahmed, Zubair M; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-12-01

    MAP3K1 is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by a diverse set of stimuli and exerts its effect through various downstream effecter molecules, including JNK, ERK1/2 and p38. In humans, mutant alleles of MAP3K1 are associated with 46,XY sex reversal. Until recently, the only phenotype observed in Map3k1(tm1Yxia) mutant mice was open eyelids at birth. Here, we report that homozygous Map3k1(tm1Yxia) mice have early-onset profound hearing loss accompanied by the progressive degeneration of cochlear outer hair cells. In the mouse inner ear, MAP3K1 has punctate localization at the apical surface of the supporting cells in close proximity to basal bodies. Although the cytoarchitecture, neuronal wiring and synaptic junctions in the organ of Corti are grossly preserved, Map3k1(tm1Yxia) mutant mice have supernumerary functional outer hair cells (OHCs) and Deiters' cells. Loss of MAP3K1 function resulted in the downregulation of Fgfr3, Fgf8, Fgf10 and Atf3 expression in the inner ear. Fgfr3, Fgf8 and Fgf10 have a role in induction of the otic placode or in otic epithelium development in mice, and their functional deficits cause defects in cochlear morphogenesis and hearing loss. Our studies suggest that MAP3K1 has an essential role in the regulation of these key cochlear morphogenesis genes. Collectively, our data highlight the crucial role of MAP3K1 in the development and function of the mouse inner ear and hearing.

  9. Transplantation and survival of mouse inner ear progenitor/stem cells in the organ of Corti after cochleostomy of hearing-impaired guinea pigs: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, L.C.M.; Lezirovitz, K.; Zanatta, D.B.; Strauss, B.E.; Mingroni-Netto, R.C.; Oiticica, J.; Haddad, L.A.; Bento, R.F.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, damage to sensory receptor cells (hair cells) of the inner ear results in permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Here, we investigated whether postnatal mouse inner ear progenitor/stem cells (mIESCs) are viable after transplantation into the basal turns of neomycin-injured guinea pig cochleas. We also examined the effects of mIESC transplantation on auditory functions. Eight adult female Cavia porcellus guinea pigs (250-350g) were deafened by intratympanic neomycin delivery. After 7 days, the animals were randomly divided in two groups. The study group (n=4) received transplantation of LacZ-positive mIESCs in culture medium into the scala tympani. The control group (n=4) received culture medium only. At 2 weeks after transplantation, functional analyses were performed by auditory brainstem response measurement, and the animals were sacrificed. The presence of mIESCs was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of sections of the cochlea from the study group. Non-parametric tests were used for statistical analysis of the data. Intratympanic neomycin delivery damaged hair cells and increased auditory thresholds prior to cell transplantation. There were no significant differences between auditory brainstem thresholds before and after transplantation in individual guinea pigs. Some mIESCs were observed in all scalae of the basal turns of the injured cochleas, and a proportion of these cells expressed the hair cell marker myosin VIIa. Some transplanted mIESCs engrafted in the cochlear basilar membrane. Our study demonstrates that transplanted cells survived and engrafted in the organ of Corti after cochleostomy. PMID:27007652

  10. Molecular characterization of Gastrothylax crumenifer (Platyhelminthes: Gastrothylacidae) from goats in the western part of India by LSU of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Chaudhary, Anshu; Verma, Chandni; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2014-12-01

    The rumen parasite, Gastrothylax crumenifer (Platyhelminthes: Gastrothylacidae), is a highly pathogenic trematode parasite of goat (Capra hircus). It sucks blood that causes acute disease like anemia, and severe economic losses occur due to morbidity and mortality of the ruminant infected by these worms. The study of these rumen paramphistomes, their infection, and public health importance remains unclear in India especially in the western part of state Uttar Pradesh (U.P.), Meerut, India, where the goat meat consumption is very high. This paper provides the molecular characterization of G. crumenifer recovered from the rumen of Capra hircus from Meerut, U.P., India by the partial sequence of 28S rDNA. Nucleotide sequence similarity searching on BLAST of 28S rDNA from parasites showed the highest identity with those of G. crumenifer from the same host Capra hircus. This is the first report of molecular identification of G. crumenifer from this part of India.

  11. Cytoskeletal integration in a highly ordered sensory epithelium in the organ of Corti: reponse to loss of cell partners in the Bronx waltzer mouse.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J B; Mackie, J B; Bussoli, T J; Steel, K P

    1999-12-01

    This report is concerned with control of cell shaping, positioning, and cytoskeletal integration in a highly ordered cochlear neuroepithelium. It is largely based on investigations of events that occur during abnormal morphogenesis of the organ of Corti in the Bronx waltzer (bv/bv) mutant mouse. The organ's sensory hair cells and adjacent supporting cells ordinarily construct a spatially elaborate and supracellularly integrated cytoskeletal framework. Large microtubule bundles are connected to cytoskeletal components in neighbouring cells by actin-containing meshworks that link them to substantial arrays of adherens junctions. In bv/bv mice, degeneration and loss of most inner hair cells and outer pillar cells occurs during organ development. These cells flank each side of a row of inner pillar cells that respond by upregulating assembly of their actin-containing meshworks. This only occurs in surface regions where they no longer contact cell types involved in construction of the cytoskeletal framework. The meshworks are larger and exhibit a more extensive sub-surface deployment than is normally the case. Hence, assembly of intercellular cytoskeletal connecting components can proceed without contact with appropriate cell neighbours but termination of assembly is apparently subject to a negative feedback control triggered by successful completion of intercellular connection with the correct cell neighbours. In addition, inner pillar cells compensate for loss of cell neighbours by interdigitating and overlapping each other more extensively than is usually the case to increase opportunities for generating adherens junctions. Certain adherens junctions in the organs of +/+ and bv/bv mice exhibit features that distinguish them from all previously described cell junctions. The dense plaques on their cytoplasmic faces are composed of aligned ridges. We suggest that they are called ribbed adherens junctions. Perturbations of cell shaping and positioning indicate that loss

  12. News Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

  13. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  14. Transfection of Platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J.; Carrero, Julio C.; Laclette, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species. PMID:26090388

  15. Transfection of Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J; Carrero, Julio C; Laclette, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species.

  16. Light and electron microscopic studies of the intestinal epithelium in Notoplana humilis (Platyhelminthes, Polycladida): the contribution of mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts to intestinal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Okano, Daisuke; Ishida, Sachiko; Ishiguro, Sei-ichi; Kobayashi, Kazuya

    2015-12-01

    Some free-living flatworms in the phylum Platyhelminthes possess strong regenerative capability that depends on putative pluripotent stem cells known as neoblasts. These neoblasts are defined based on several criteria, including their proliferative capacity and the presence of cellular components known as chromatoid bodies. Polyclads, which are marine flatworms, have the potential to be a good model system for stem cell research, yet little information is available regarding neoblasts and regeneration. In this study, transmission electron microscopy and immunostaining analyses, using antibodies against phospho-histone H3 and BrdU, were used to identify two populations of neoblasts in the polyclad Notoplana humilis: mesodermal neoblasts (located in the mesenchymal space) and gastrodermal neoblasts (located within the intestine, where granular club cells and phagocytic cells are also located). Light and electron microscopic analyses also suggested that phagocytic cells and mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts, but not granular club cells, migrated into blastemas and remodeled the intestine during regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that, in polyclads, intestinal regeneration is accomplished by mechanisms underlying both morphallaxis (remodeling of pre-existing tissues) and epimorphosis (de novo tissue formation derived from mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts). Based on the assumption that gastrodermal neoblasts, which are derived from mesodermal neoblasts, are intestinal stem cells, we propose a model to study intestinal regeneration.

  17. Immunogold-labeled S-phase neoblasts, total neoblast number, their distribution, and evidence for arrested neoblasts in Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Rhabditophora).

    PubMed

    Bode, A; Salvenmoser, W; Nimeth, K; Mahlknecht, M; Adamski, Z; Rieger, R M; Peter, R; Ladurner, P

    2006-09-01

    Neoblasts in Platyhelminthes are the only cells to proliferate and differentiate into all cell types. In Macrostomum lignano, the incorporation of 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in neoblasts confirmed the distribution of S-phase cells in two lateral bands. BrdU labeling for light and for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) identified three populations of proliferating cells: somatic neoblasts located between the epidermis and gastrodermis (mesodermal neoblasts), neoblasts located within the gastrodermis (gastrodermal neoblasts), and gonadal S-phase cells. In adults, three stages of mesodermal neoblasts (2, 2-3, and 3) defined by their ultrastructure were found. Stage 1 neoblasts where only seen in hatchlings. These stages either were phases within the S-phase of one neoblast pool or were subsequent stages of differentiating neoblasts, each with its own cell cycle. Regular TEM and immunogold labeling provided the basis for calculating the total number of neoblasts and the ratio of labeled to non-labeled neoblasts. Somatic neoblasts represented 6.5% of the total number of cells. Of these, 27% were labeled in S-phase. Of this fraction, 33% were in stage 2, 46% in stage 2-3, and 21% in stage 3. Immunogold labeling substantiated results concerning the differentiation of neoblasts into somatic cells. Non-labeled stage 2 neoblasts were present, even after a 2-week BrdU exposure. Double labeling of mitoses and FMRF-amide revealed a close spatial relationship of mesodermal neoblasts with the nervous system. Immunogold-labeled sections showed that nearly 70% of S-phase cells were in direct contact or within 5 microm from nerve cords.

  18. Evolutionary processes involved in the diversification of chelonian and mammal polystomatid parasites (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Polystomatidae) revealed by palaeoecology of their hosts.

    PubMed

    Héritier, Laurent; Badets, Mathieu; Du Preez, Louis H; Aisien, Martins S O; Lixian, Fan; Combes, Claude; Verneau, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Polystomatid flatworms (Platyhelminthes) are monogenean parasites that infect exclusively aquatic or semi-aquatic sarcopterygians such as the Australian lungfish, amphibians, freshwater turtles and the African common hippopotamus. Previous studies on the phylogenetic relationships of these parasites, excluding Oculotrema hippopotami infecting common hippos, showed a global coevolution between hosts and their parasites at a macroevolutionary scale. These studies also demonstrated a strong correlation between the diversification of early neobatrachian polystomes and Gondwana breakup in the Mesozoic period. However the origin of chelonian polystomes is still in question as a switch from presumably primitive aquatic amniotes to turtles at the time of their first appearance, or soon after during their radiation, was assumed. In order to resolve this sticking point, we extended the phylogeny of polystomes with broader parasite sampling, i.e. 55 polystome species including Nanopolystoma tinsleyi a polystome infecting caecilians and O. hippopotami, and larger set of sequence data covering two nuclear and two mitochondrial genes coding for the ribosomal RNA 18S and 28S, the Cytochrome c Oxidase I and the ribosomal RNA 12S, respectively. The secondary structure of nuclear rRNAs genes (stems and loops) was taken into account for sequence alignments and Bayesian analyses were performed based on the appropriate models of evolution selected independently for the four designed partitions. Molecular calibrations were also conducted for dating the main speciation events in the polystome tree. The phylogenetic position of chelonian parasites that are phylogenetically closer to N. tinsleyi than all other amphibian polystomes and molecular time estimates suggest that these parasites originated following a switch from caecilians, at a geological period when primitive turtles may already have adapted to an aquatic life style, i.e. at about 178Million years ago, or a little later when

  19. Evolutionary processes involved in the diversification of chelonian and mammal polystomatid parasites (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Polystomatidae) revealed by palaeoecology of their hosts.

    PubMed

    Héritier, Laurent; Badets, Mathieu; Du Preez, Louis H; Aisien, Martins S O; Lixian, Fan; Combes, Claude; Verneau, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Polystomatid flatworms (Platyhelminthes) are monogenean parasites that infect exclusively aquatic or semi-aquatic sarcopterygians such as the Australian lungfish, amphibians, freshwater turtles and the African common hippopotamus. Previous studies on the phylogenetic relationships of these parasites, excluding Oculotrema hippopotami infecting common hippos, showed a global coevolution between hosts and their parasites at a macroevolutionary scale. These studies also demonstrated a strong correlation between the diversification of early neobatrachian polystomes and Gondwana breakup in the Mesozoic period. However the origin of chelonian polystomes is still in question as a switch from presumably primitive aquatic amniotes to turtles at the time of their first appearance, or soon after during their radiation, was assumed. In order to resolve this sticking point, we extended the phylogeny of polystomes with broader parasite sampling, i.e. 55 polystome species including Nanopolystoma tinsleyi a polystome infecting caecilians and O. hippopotami, and larger set of sequence data covering two nuclear and two mitochondrial genes coding for the ribosomal RNA 18S and 28S, the Cytochrome c Oxidase I and the ribosomal RNA 12S, respectively. The secondary structure of nuclear rRNAs genes (stems and loops) was taken into account for sequence alignments and Bayesian analyses were performed based on the appropriate models of evolution selected independently for the four designed partitions. Molecular calibrations were also conducted for dating the main speciation events in the polystome tree. The phylogenetic position of chelonian parasites that are phylogenetically closer to N. tinsleyi than all other amphibian polystomes and molecular time estimates suggest that these parasites originated following a switch from caecilians, at a geological period when primitive turtles may already have adapted to an aquatic life style, i.e. at about 178Million years ago, or a little later when

  20. Vitellogenesis of diphyllobothriidean cestodes (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Yoneva, Aneta; Scholz, Tomáš; Bruňanská, Magdaléna; Kuchta, Roman

    2015-03-01

    The recently erected cestode order Diphyllobothriidea is unique among all tapeworm orders in that its species infect all major groups of tetrapods, including man. In the present paper, the vitellogenesis of representatives of all three currently recognized families of this order was evaluated, based on ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) and cytochemical (detection of glycogen) observations. Vitelline follicles of all taxa studied, i.e. Cephalochlamys namaquensis from clawed frogs (Xenopus), Duthiersia expansa from monitors (Varanus) and Schistocephalus solidus that matures in fish-eating birds, contain vitelline cells at various stages of development and interstitial cells. Developing vitellocytes are characterized by the presence of mitochondria, granular endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complexes involved in the synthesis of shell globules and formation of shell globule clusters. Mature vitellocytes contain lipids and glycogen in different proportions. The most significant differences among the three diphyllobothriidean families were found in the presence or absence of lamellar bodies. Variations of vitelline clusters morphology and types of lipid droplets are described and discussed in relation to the presumed evolutionary history of diphyllobothriideans, which belong to the most basal cestode groups.

  1. Release of O2- and LTC4 by murine eosinophils: role of intra- and extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    de Andres, B; del Pozo, V; Martin, E; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1990-01-01

    Using an experimental model of mouse peritoneal eosinophilia, we investigated the role of Ca2+ in the in vitro activation of these cells challenged with specific Mesocestoides corti antigen. We have detected LTC4, a metabolite derived from arachidonic acid by way of 5'lipo-oxygenase and superoxide anion from the oxidative burst, as inflammatory mediators produced by activated eosinophils. Preincubation with hyperimmune mice serum increases the amount of LTC4 and superoxide anion in response to the antigenic extract. Release of O2- is inhibited by Verapamil (a voltage-gated calcium channel) and Quin 2 (an intracellular trapped chelator of calcium). Also, LTC4 produced by preincubated eosinophils challenged with M. corti is dramatically inhibited by Quin 2. Our results suggest an intact mechanism for calcium control for the release of these inflammatory mediators by eosinophils, after specific antigenic stimulation. PMID:1689695

  2. Comparative spermatology of selected polyclad flatworms (platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Liana, Marcin K; Litvaitis, Marian K

    2007-10-01

    Sperm ultrastructure of four acotylean (Idioplana atlantica, Armatoplana leptalea, Styloplanocera fasciata, Melloplana ferruginea) and three cotylean polyclads (Pseudoceros bicolor, Phrikoceros mopsus, Enchiridium evelinae) was investigated. All spermatozoa are biflagellate, exhibiting a 9+"1" axoneme pattern. All acotylean axonemes originate and extend within the sperm shaft, and once exiting the shaft, remain attached to it. The flagella of all cotylean spermatozoa exit the shaft immediately and remain free. Structures shared by all species include: an elongated nucleus, in acotyleans located only in the posterior part of the shaft, whereas in cotyleans it extends along the entire sperm body; mitochondria along with small and large dense bodies arranged in a specific pattern; and a ring of microtubules that extends along the entire sperm shaft just beneath the cell membrane. A unique spermatozoon has been found in E. evelinae, where round vesicle-like structures fill the anterior part of the nucleus, and a different type of large dense bodies is present. The spermatozoa of all studied species exhibit numerous characters (axoneme/flagella position, distribution and position of large and small dense bodies, of mitochondria, presence of nuclear vesicles) that may be of phylogenetic value at the family and higher taxonomic levels.

  3. Differential release and phagocytosis of tegument glycoconjugates in neurocysticercosis: implications for immune evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jorge I; Rivera, Jennifer; Teale, Judy M

    2008-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by the metacestode of the helminth Taenia solium. The severity of the symptoms is associated with the intensity of the immune response. First, there is a long asymptomatic period where host immunity seems incapable of resolving the infection, followed by a chronic hypersensitivity reaction. Since little is known about the initial response to this infection, a murine model using the cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae) was employed to analyze morphological changes in the parasite early in the infection. It was found that M. corti material is released from the tegument making close contact with the nervous tissue. These results were confirmed by infecting murine CNS with ex vivo-labeled parasites. Because more than 95% of NCC patients exhibit humoral responses against carbohydrate-based antigens, and the tegument is known to be rich in glycoconjugates (GCs), the expression of these types of molecules was analyzed in human, porcine, and murine NCC specimens. To determine the GCs present in the tegument, fluorochrome-labeled hydrazides as well as fluorochrome-labeled lectins with specificity to different carbohydrates were used. All the lectins utilized labeled the tegument. GCs bound by isolectinB4 were shed in the first days of infection and not resynthesized by the parasite, whereas GCs bound by wheat germ agglutinin and concavalinA were continuously released throughout the infectious process. GCs bound by these three lectins were taken up by host cells. Peanut lectin-binding GCs, in contrast, remained on the parasite and were not detected in host cells. The parasitic origin of the lectin-binding GCs found in host cells was confirmed using antibodies against T. solium and M. corti. We propose that both the rapid and persistent release of tegumental GCs plays a key role in the well-known immunomodulatory effects of helminths, including immune evasion and life

  4. Differential Release and Phagocytosis of Tegument Glycoconjugates in Neurocysticercosis: Implications for Immune Evasion Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Jorge I.; Rivera, Jennifer; Teale, Judy M.

    2008-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by the metacestode of the helminth Taenia solium. The severity of the symptoms is associated with the intensity of the immune response. First, there is a long asymptomatic period where host immunity seems incapable of resolving the infection, followed by a chronic hypersensitivity reaction. Since little is known about the initial response to this infection, a murine model using the cestode Mesocestoides corti (syn. Mesocestoides vogae) was employed to analyze morphological changes in the parasite early in the infection. It was found that M. corti material is released from the tegument making close contact with the nervous tissue. These results were confirmed by infecting murine CNS with ex vivo–labeled parasites. Because more than 95% of NCC patients exhibit humoral responses against carbohydrate-based antigens, and the tegument is known to be rich in glycoconjugates (GCs), the expression of these types of molecules was analyzed in human, porcine, and murine NCC specimens. To determine the GCs present in the tegument, fluorochrome-labeled hydrazides as well as fluorochrome-labeled lectins with specificity to different carbohydrates were used. All the lectins utilized labeled the tegument. GCs bound by isolectinB4 were shed in the first days of infection and not resynthesized by the parasite, whereas GCs bound by wheat germ agglutinin and concavalinA were continuously released throughout the infectious process. GCs bound by these three lectins were taken up by host cells. Peanut lectin-binding GCs, in contrast, remained on the parasite and were not detected in host cells. The parasitic origin of the lectin-binding GCs found in host cells was confirmed using antibodies against T. solium and M. corti. We propose that both the rapid and persistent release of tegumental GCs plays a key role in the well-known immunomodulatory effects of helminths, including immune evasion and life

  5. Helminth species diversity and biology in the bobcat, Lynx rufus (Schreber), from Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Tiekotter, K L

    1985-04-01

    Cestodes of 4 species and nematodes of 9 species were collected from 75 bobcats, Lynx rufus (Schreber), in Nebraska from 1977 to 1979. Of these 75, 11 were trapped from 6 border counties in 3 border states: South Dakota, 7 carcasses/3 counties; Kansas, 3/2; and Wyoming, 1/1. Helminths recovered included: Mesocestoides corti Hoeppli, 1925 (15% prevalence), Taenia rileyi Loewen, 1929 (67%), Taenia pisiformis (Bloch, 1780) Gmelin, 1790 (27%), Taenia macrocystis (Diesing, 1850) Lühe, 1910 (19%), Physaloptera praeputialis von Linstow, 1889 (55%), Physaloptera rara Hall and Wigdor, 1918 (32%), Toxascaris leonina (von Linstow, 1902) Leiper, 1907 (31%), Toxocara cati (Schrank, 1780) (39%), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (Zeder, 1800) von Linstow, 1885 (5%), Pterygodermatites (Multipectines) cahirensis (Jägerskiöld, 1909) Quentin, 1969 (1%), Vogeloides felis (Vogel, 1928) Davtian, 1933 (7%), Cylicospirura felineus (Chandler, 1925) Sandground, 1932 (12%), and Capillaria aerophila (Creplin, 1839) (4%). One bobcat was not infected; 74 had 1 to 7 species (means = 3). Simpson's index for helminth species was moderately low (0.12), indicating a relatively diverse helminth fauna. Mean levels of infection between prominent species pairs and within each species were compared with bobcat sex and age differences using Student's t-test. Mean intensity of Physaloptera praeputialis was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than that of Toxocara cati; mean intensity of Mesocestoides corti was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than that of all other prominent species. No significant intensity differences were indicated among bobcat sex and age categories. G-tests computed for prevalence of prominent species with bobcat age indicated no significance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. [Phylogenetic analyses of the family Tetraonchidae (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea)].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, P I

    2004-01-01

    A phylogenetic reconstruction of the monogenean family Tetraonchidae was carried out by methods of parsimony-based cladistics. The analysis included 20 species of tetraonchids and two out-groups (Sundanonchus tomanorum and Dactylogyrus amphibothrium) and was based on 34 morphofunctional characters. Software PAUP 4.0 and Winclada were used for the phylogenetic reconstructions. Obtained results allow proposing a preliminary phylogenetic hypothesis of the family Tetraonchidae along with the discussion of host-parasite association. According to the current taxonomic view, the family Tetraonchidae included two genera. Cladistic analysis showed a monophyly of the family and the genus Tetraonchus Diesing, 1858. Two representative of the former genus, Tetraoncus monenteron and T. borealis, parasitize the pikes (Esocoformes: Esocidae) and the grayling (Salmonidae: Thymallinae) respectively. The genus Salmonchus Spassky et Roytman, 1958 has a complicated structure and its intrageneric relationships were not completely resolved; in general, the analysis allows to recognise several species groups: Salmonchus oncorhynchi--the parasite of the Oncorhynchus masou smolt living during the first year of life in fresh water; four species (S. variabilis, S. gussevi, S. grumosus, S. alaskensis) inhabiting specifically the whitefishes (Salmonidae: Coregoninae); all reminder of Salmonchus species occurring on the salmons (Salmonidae: Salmoninae). The bootstrap test gives a support only for the following clades: family Tetraonchidae (75%), genus Tetraonchus (88%); a group of Salmonchus species associated with the whitefishes (93%) and grouping of four species (S. huhonis, S. pseudolenoki, S. skrjabini and S. lenoki) from the lenoks (Brachymystax) and taimens (Hucho) (61%). PMID:15553772

  7. Checklist of tapeworms (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda) of vertebrates in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Haukisalmi, Voitto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A checklist of tapeworms (Cestoda) of vertebrates (fishes, birds and mammals) in Finland is presented, based on published observations, specimens deposited in the collections of the Finnish Museum of Natural History (Helsinki) and the Zoological Museum of the University of Turku, and additional specimens identified by the present author. The checklist includes 170 tapeworm species from 151 host species, comprising 447 parasite species/host species combinations. Thirty of the tapeworm species and 96 of the parasite/host species combinations have not been previously reported from Finland. The total number of tapeworm species in Finland (170 spp.) is significantly lower than the corresponding figure for the Iberian Peninsula (257 spp.), Slovakia (225 spp.) and Poland (279 spp.). The difference between Finland and the other three regions is particularly pronounced for anseriform, podicipediform, charadriiform and passeriform birds, reflecting inadequate and/or biased sampling of these birds in Finland. It is predicted that there are actually ca. 270 species of tapeworms in Finland, assuming that true number of bird tapeworms in Finland corresponds to that in other European countries with more comprehensive knowledge of the local tapeworm fauna. The other main pattern emerging from the present data is the seemingly unexplained absence in (northern) Fennoscandia of several mammalian tapeworms that otherwise have extensive distributions in the Holarctic region or in Eurasia, including the northern regions. Previously unknown type specimens, that is, the holotype of Bothrimonus nylandicus Schneider, 1902 (a junior synonym of Diplocotyle olrikii Krabbe, 1874) (MZH 127096) and the syntypes of Caryophyllaeides fennica (Schneider, 1902) (MZH 127097) were located in the collections of the Finnish Museum of Natural History. PMID:26668540

  8. New primers for DNA barcoding of digeneans and cestodes (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Niels; Locke, Sean A; Castelin, Magalie; Marcogliese, David J; Abbott, Cathryn L

    2015-07-01

    Digeneans and cestodes are species-rich taxa and can seriously impact human health, fisheries, aqua- and agriculture, and wildlife conservation and management. DNA barcoding using the COI Folmer region could be applied for species detection and identification, but both 'universal' and taxon-specific COI primers fail to amplify in many flatworm taxa. We found that high levels of nucleotide variation at priming sites made it unrealistic to design primers targeting all flatworms. We developed new degenerate primers that enabled acquisition of the COI barcode region from 100% of specimens tested (n = 46), representing 23 families of digeneans and 6 orders of cestodes. This high success rate represents an improvement over existing methods. Primers and methods provided here are critical pieces towards redressing the current paucity of COI barcodes for these taxa in public databases.

  9. Embryonic development of Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850) (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Paludicola).

    PubMed

    Vara, D C; Leal-Zanchet, A M; Lizardo-Daudt, H m

    2008-11-01

    The embryonic development of freshwater triclads is mainly known from studies of species of Dendrocoelum, Planaria, Polycelis, and, more recently, Schmidtea. The present study characterizes the development of Girardia tigrina (Girard, 1850) by means of optical microcopy using glycol methacrylate semi-thin sections. 94 cocoons were collected in the period from laying to hatching, with intervals of up to twenty-four hours. The sequence of morphological changes occurring in the embryo permitted the identification of nine embryonic stages. At the time of cocoon laying, numerous embryos were dispersed among many yolk cells, with a rigid capsule covering the entire cocoon. In the first stage (approx. up to 6 hours after cocoon laying), yolk cells and embryonic cells showed random distribution. Stage II (between 12 and 24 hours after cocoon laying) is characterized by aggregates of blastomeres, which later aggregate forming an enteroblastula. Approximately 2 days after cocoon laying (stage III), formation of the embryonic epidermis and embryonic digestive system took place, the latter degenerating during the subsequent stage. Stage V (until the fourth day) is characterized by the formation of the definitive epidermis. Between 4 and 6 days after laying, organogenesis of the definitive inner organs starts (stage VI). Approximately 14 days after laying (stage IX), formation of the nervous system is completed. At this stage, the embryo shows similar characteristics to those of newly hatched juveniles. The hatching of Girardia tigrina occurs in the period between twelve to twenty-two days after cocoon laying.

  10. Marine macrostomorpha (platyhelminthes, rhabditophora) from the algarve (southern portugal).

    PubMed

    Schockaert, Ernest R

    2014-10-13

    Ten species of Macrostomorpha were found in marine environments of the Algarve (Portugal). Six of them were found in the Ria Formosa, a vast intertidal euryhaline lagoon system that dominates the most Eastern coast of the Algarve: two unidentified species of Microstomum Schmidt, 1848, Macrostomum cf. rubrocinctum Ax, 1951 and two unidentified species of Macrostomum Schmidt, 1848, Paromalostomum dubium (de Beauchamps, 1927), Paromalostomum minutum Rieger, 1971 and Cylindromacrostomum faroensis n.sp.. Comparison of this species with C. mediterraneum (Ax, 1955) and the species from Venice, considered to be C. mediterraneum by Rieger (1977), leads to the conclusion that the individuals studied by Rieger are in fact representatives of a separate species, C. riegeri n.sp.. Acanthomacrostomum spiculiferum Papi & Swedmark, 1959 was found in the Atlantic, 10-15 m deep, near the western coast of the Algarve. Haplopharynx papii n. sp. occurs on the beach exposed to the Atlantic as well as in the Ria Formosa. All identified and previously known (marine) species found in the Algarve had been found before, either in the Atlantic or in the Mediterranean basin. 

  11. Evolution and Functional Morphology of the Proboscis in Kalyptorhynchia (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Smith, Julian P S; Litvaitis, Marian K; Gobert, Stefan; Uyeno, Theodore; Artois, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Predatory flatworms belonging to the taxon Kalyptorhynchia are characterized by an anterior muscular proboscis that they use to seize prey. In many cases, the proboscis is armed with hooks, derived either from the extracellular matrix that surrounds the muscles or from intracellular deposits in the epithelium covering the proboscis. Glands associated with the proboscis reportedly are venomous; however, there are few direct tests of this hypothesis. This article reviews the structure and current knowledge of the function of the proboscis in the Kalyptorhynchia, points to areas in which the current understanding of phylogenetic relationships within this taxon is incongruent with our hypothesis of how the proboscis evolved, and addresses areas in need of further research, especially as regards functional morphology and biomechanics.

  12. Microturbellarians (Platyhelminthes and Acoelomorpha) in Brazil: invisible organisms?

    PubMed

    Braccini, J A L; Amaral, S V; Leal-Zanchet, A M

    2016-06-01

    Microturbellarians typically belong to the benthos and may occur in a wide variety of environments. They are abundant in freshwater and marine ecosystems and may occur in moist terrestrial habitats. However, turbellarians are seldom taken into account in studies of biodiversity. Most studies on Brazilian microturbellarians had taxonomical purposes and were done in the years 1940-1950. Thus, information on their occurrence and ecological aspects are dispersed throughout several papers. We intend here to summarize the biogeographical distribution and ecological aspects of microturbellarians recorded for Brazil, indicating the main gaps in their knowledge and possible actions to enhance studies on this group. There are 239 species of microturbellarians registered for Brazil, with records distributed in 12 states. However, just three states located in southern Brazil have records of 94% of microturbellarian species. Thus, knowledge on the systematics and geographical distribution of Brazilian microturbellarians clearly reflect the scientific activity over many years or decades in two states of southeastern and southern Brazil. Considering the scant information on this group in Brazil, which is also the situation of the Neotropical microturbellarians in general, some actions should be proposed. First, it would be necessary to sample in the diverse biomes, as well as in the various river and sea basins, based on standardized sampling protocols. Second, it would be necessary to encourage diverse research groups to include microturbellarians and/or turbellarians in general into biodiversity inventories and studies on community structure of invertebrates. Third, it is necessary to increase the number of research groups on microturbellarians, in order to augment the studies on their morphology, systematics, and ecology. Considering their abundance, species richness and ecological importance in aquatic environments, despite some peculiarities regarding their sampling, sorting and identification procedures, the challenge to study microturbellarians and enhance knowledge about them in Brazilian ecosystems should be faced.

  13. Motion of organ of Corti in the apical turn of a living guinea pig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Shyam M.; Decraemer, Willem F.; Hao, L. F.

    1998-06-01

    Vibration of Reissner's membrane and reticular lamina were measured at a set of radial positions in the apical turn of a living guinea pig cochlea, in response to sound applied to the ear canal. The cochlea was sealed and the Reissner's membrane was intact. A slit confocal microscope was used to identify the measurement site and confocal heterodyne interferometer was used for measuring the amplitude and phase of vibration. The X, Y, and Z coordinates of each measurement site were recorded. Using the experiment data, the motion of Reissner's membrane and the reticular lamina was animated. This animation allows us to study the relative motion of the key cochlear structures along the cochlear cross section. At the reticular lamina the amplitude of the vibration increases with distance radially from the osseous spiral lamina, reaching a maximum at the Hensen's cells. Except near the two end points, where it is attached, radial phase differences were small. The Reissner's membrane vibration amplitude is high. Phase changes rapidly with radial position, therefore different portions of the membrane do not vibrate together. The motion of the Reissner's membrane and the reticular lamina is dramatically different in amplitude and phase at each radial position. This is in contrast to the accepted concept that the motion of the two structures is the same, and raises questions as to the reason for the differences.

  14. Using stroboscopic imaging to visualize micromechanical motion within the organ of Corti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.; Zosuls, Aleks; Rupprecht, Laura

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a stroboscopic imaging technique that can simultaneously measure displacement of different structures in an imaging plane that is approximately parallel to the basilar membrane (BM). A vibrating probe was used to stimulate the basilar membrane and radial and longitudinal displacement were measured in many structures including the inner hair cell hair bundles (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC) using a cross correlation technique. Magnitude and phase of the motion of different structures measured were compared to each other in the frequency and spatial domains. For frequencies near the characteristic frequency (CF), evidence of traveling waves propagating away from the probe towards both the cochlear apex and base were observed in all preparations and in multiple structures. This was seen as a magnitude that decreased slowly with increased distance from the probe accompanied with linearly decreasing phase. In addition, a longitudinal compressional mode of wave propagation was observed in the OHC motion for frequencies near and above CF.

  15. Dugesia sicula (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida): the colonizing success of an asexual Planarian

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dugesia sicula is the only species of its genus not presenting an endemic or restricted distribution within the Mediterranean area. It mostly comprises fissiparous populations (asexual reproduction by body division and regeneration), most likely sexually sterile, and characterized by an extremely low genetic diversity interpreted as the consequence of a recent anthropic expansion. However, its fissiparous reproduction can result in an apparent lack of diversity within the species, since genetic variation within individuals can be as large as between them because most individuals within a population are clones. We have estimated haplotype and nucleotide diversity of cytochrome oxidase I within and among individuals along the species distribution of a broad sample of D. sicula, including asexual and the two only sexual populations known today; and predicted its potential distribution based on climatic variables. Our aim was to determine the centre of colonisation origin, whether the populations are recent, and whether the species is expanding. Results The species presents 3 most frequent haplotypes, differing in a maximum of 11 base pairs. As expected from their fissiparous mode of reproduction, in half of all the analysed localities many individuals have multiple heteroplasmic haplotypes. The distribution of haplotypes is not geographically structured; however, the distribution of haplotypes and heteroplasmic populations shows higher diversity in the central Mediterranean region. The potential distribution predicted by climatic variables based modelling shows a preference for coastal areas and fits well with the observed data. Conclusions The distribution and frequency of the most frequent haplotypes and the presence of heteroplasmic individuals allow us to gain an understanding of the recent history of the species, together with previous knowledge on its phylogenetic relationships and age: The species most probably originated in Africa and dispersed through the central Mediterranean. After one or multiple populations became triploid and fissiparous, the species colonized the Mediterranean basin, likely both by its own means and helped by human activities. Its present distribution practically fulfils its potential distribution as modelled with climatic variables. Its prevalence in coastal regions with higher water temperatures predicts a likely future expansion to northern and more interior areas following the increase in temperatures due to climate change. PMID:24330464

  16. Description of a New Temnocephala Species (Platyhelminthes) from the Southern Neotropical Region.

    PubMed

    de León, Rodrigo Ponce; Vera, Bárbara Berón; Volonterio, Odile

    2015-08-01

    The genus Temnocephala is endemic to the Neotropical region. Temnocephala mexicana and Temnocephala chilensis are the only 2 temnocephalans whose known distribution ranges extend to the south beyond Parallel 40°S. No Temnocephala species has ever been recorded from the extensive area between Parallel 43°S and the southern end of the South American continent, which makes the study of the southern limit of the distribution of the genus a topic of great interest. The southernmost report corresponds to T. chilensis from the Telsen River, Chubut Province, Argentina. In March 2000, several temnocephalans were found on the freshwater anomuran crustacean Aegla neuquensis from the same locality; the specimens were identified as belonging to a new species, which is described here. This species is characterized by possessing an unusually thin-walled, narrow zone that has the appearance of a deep groove connecting the introvert to the shaft of the penial stylet; an introvert with 36 longitudinal rows of spines, each bearing 6-8 spines that are progressively smaller towards the distal end; a distal end of the introvert with a very thin, sclerotized wall without spines; a seminal vesicle that opens sub-polarly into the contractile vesicle; a pair of paranephrocytes at the level of the pharynx and a second pair at the level of the anterior portion of the anterior testes, and eggs with very long stalks. On the basis of their overall morphology, host preference, and geographical distribution, T. chilensis and the new species are closely related, so a diagnostic key for the southern species of Temnocephala is also included. The type locality of the new species is in the southern limit of the known distribution area of T. chilensis, so after this work there are 2 known species marking the southern limit of the distribution of the genus. PMID:25871978

  17. Redescription and designation of a neotype of Temnocephala talicei Dioni, 1967 (Platyhelminthes: Temnocephalida).

    PubMed

    Volonterio, Odile

    2009-04-01

    Temnocephala talicei was described from Uruguayan material found mainly on Aegla prado. Its original description was based principally on its distinctive penial stylet, and, therefore, many aspects of the species anatomy that are now important in the taxonomy of the genus were not contemplated; type specimens were never designated; and the material used to describe the species has been lost. The present work provides a redescription of the species based upon material collected from the type host and in the type locality. Given the possibility of confusion in its identification, and in order to preserve its taxonomic stability, a neotype of T. talicei is designated. The closest species to T. talicei is Temnocephala mertoni, from which it can be separated by the presence of conspicuous intestinal septa, a markedly asymmetrical sphincter in the vagina, markedly lobed testes, a straight penial stylet with a non-sinuous distal portion of the shaft, a characteristic large, 'mouthpiece'-shaped introvert without discrete thickenings, and approximately 10 crowns of well-developed spines of decreasing length placed throughout the whole extension of the introvert. A comparison of material from Uruguay, Argentina, and Paraguay shows that there is little variation in the morphometry of the species. Finally, a comparison of the post-tentacular syncytia of T. talicei and T. mertoni shows that this is not always a species-specific character. PMID:18844436

  18. Historical analysis of the type species of the genus Trichobilharzia Skrjabin et Zakharov, 1920 (Platyhelminthes: Schistosomatidae).

    PubMed

    Aldhoun, Jitka; Kment, Petr; Horák, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Trichobilharzia Skrjabin & Zakharov, 1920 is known as the most species-rich genus of the blood fluke family Schistosomatidae. To date, more than 40 species have been described, even though validity of some of them is questionable (Horák et al. 2002). Members of the genus use various birds as final hosts, but they attract attention mostly as causative agents of hypersensitive skin reaction (cercarial dermatitis or swimmer's itch) in mammals including humans. As this is one of the. PMID:27394285

  19. Two new species of freshwater flatworms (Platyhelminthes: Tricladida: Continenticola) from South American caves.

    PubMed

    Souza, Stella; Morais, Ana Laura; Bichuette, Maria Elina; Leal-Zanchet, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of freshwater triclads in the Neotropical region is considered to be low, but extensive areas of South America remain almost unexplored. Herein we describe two cave-dwelling, new species of Girardia, one from a transition zone of the Cerrado and Caatinga phytophysiognomies and the other from the Cerrado phytophysiognomy. The species from the Cerrado-Caatinga transition is a troglobite, eyeless and whitish; the species from the Cerrado area is possibly a troglophile, since it shows heavily pigmented body and eyes. Each species is easily recognized by a unique combination of features in its external morphology and copulatory apparatus. The two new species of Girardia show a restricted distribution, even the troglophile, and occur in caves without legal protection. Therefore, they must be considered as vulnerable organisms in a conservation context. PMID:27394369

  20. Gill monogenean communities (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Dactylogyridae) of butterflyfishes from tropical Indo-West Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Reverter, Miriam; Cutmore, Scott C; Bray, Rodney; Cribb, Thomas H; Sasal, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We studied the monogenean communities of 34 species of butterflyfish from the tropical Indo-West Pacific, identifying 13 dactylogyrid species (including two species that are presently undescribed). Monogenean assemblages differed significantly between host species in terms of taxonomic structure, intensity and prevalence. Parasite richness ranged from 0 (Chaetodon lunulatus) to 11 (C. auriga, C. citrinellus and C. lunula). Host specificity varied between the dactylogyrids species, being found on 2-29 of the 34 chaetodontid species examined. Sympatric butterflyfish species were typically parasitized by different combinations of dactylogyrid species, suggesting the existence of complex host-parasite interactions. We identified six clusters of butterflyfish species based on the similarities of their dactylogyrid communities. Dactylogyrid richness and diversity were not related to host size, diet specialization, depth range or phylogeny of butterflyfish species. However, there was a weak positive correlation between monogenean richness and diversity and host geographical range. Most communities of dactylogyrids were dominated by Haliotrema aurigae and H. angelopterum, indicating the importance of the genus Haliotrema in shaping monogenean communities of butterflyfishes. This study casts light on the structure of the monogenean communities of butterflyfishes, suggesting that the diversity and complexity of community structures arises from a combination of host species-specific parameters. PMID:27573880

  1. Land flatworms of the genus Pasipha (Platyhelminthes, Geoplanidae) in Argentina, with description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Negrete, Lisandro; Brusa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The genus Pasipha Ogren & Kawakatsu, 1990 currently includes 22 species, most of them recorded in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Recently, Pasipha hauseri was documented in north-eastern Argentina, thus extending its distribution range. This paper reports new records of the genus Pasipha in the Interior Atlantic Forest ecoregion in Argentina, with the description of three new species: Pasipha atla sp. nov., Pasipha johnsoni sp. nov., and Pasipha mbya sp. nov. These new species exhibit similarities in internal anatomy, such as pharynx cylindrical, extrabulbar prostatic vesicle with folded walls and proximally forked, male atrium highly folded, being at least two times longer than the female atrium and with small folds in their proximal portion. However, they can be distinguished from each other mainly by the secretion types discharged into the prostatic vesicle as well as into the male and female atria. In addition, they have different colour patterns on the dorsal surface. PMID:27470715

  2. Monorchiids (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) of chaetodontid fishes (Perciformes): biogeographical patterns in the tropical Indo-West Pacific.

    PubMed

    McNamara, M K A; Adlard, R D; Bray, R A; Sasal, P; Cribb, T H

    2012-06-01

    Species richness and biogeography of the monorchiid genus Hurleytrematoides was studied by the examination of 2834 individuals of 45 species of Chaetodontidae at six major sites in the tropical Indo-West Pacific: Heron Island, Lizard Island, Ningaloo (Western Australia), Palau, New Caledonia and Moorea (French Polynesia). In total, 18 species were distributed among six sites; descriptions are provided for eight new species: H. boucheti n. sp., H. combesi n. sp., H. deblocki n. sp., H. dollfusi n. sp., H. euzeti n. sp., H. kulbickii n. sp., H. pasteuri n. sp., and H. planesi n. sp. Overall richness ranged from zero to five Hurleytrematoides species per chaetodontid species. Seven Hurleytrematoides species were found at only one locality and eleven were found at multiple localities. Only one species, H. morandi, was found at all localities. Individual localities had between six (Moorea) and 10 (Heron Island) species; we attribute Moorea's depauperate parasite fauna to its isolation and distance from the Indo-Philippine centre of biological diversity. Using cluster analysis of 18 species of Hurleytrematoides and 45 species of chaetodontids sampled in the Indo-West Pacific, we show that the localities on the Great Barrier Reef (Heron Island and Lizard Island) and New Caledonia have the most similar chaetodontid and parasite fauna of any locality pairs. Cluster analysis results also show that the similarity of the chaetodontid assemblages at five of the six localities is relatively high and that Ningaloo has the most distinct fauna. Similarity values based on sharing of species of Hurleytrematoides are generally lower than those for their hosts; Moorea, Ningaloo and Palau all have low similarity to New Caledonia and Great Barrier Reef sites. We attribute these distinctions to the differential dispersal capability of the fish and their parasites. Chaetodontids have long-lived mobile pelagic larvae, the dispersal of which would be most affected by prominent biogeographical barriers, such as that between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. In contrast, monorchiids have no obvious dispersal stage, and vast distances have the capacity to act as effective barriers to dispersal. We conclude that the present distributions of species of Hurleytrematoides in the Indo-Pacific are driven by historical opportunity and capacity to disperse, and that some disjunct distributions are sculpted by stochasticity. PMID:22154425

  3. Land flatworms of the genus Pasipha (Platyhelminthes, Geoplanidae) in Argentina, with description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Negrete, Lisandro; Brusa, Francisco

    2016-07-11

    The genus Pasipha Ogren & Kawakatsu, 1990 currently includes 22 species, most of them recorded in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Recently, Pasipha hauseri was documented in north-eastern Argentina, thus extending its distribution range. This paper reports new records of the genus Pasipha in the Interior Atlantic Forest ecoregion in Argentina, with the description of three new species: Pasipha atla sp. nov., Pasipha johnsoni sp. nov., and Pasipha mbya sp. nov. These new species exhibit similarities in internal anatomy, such as pharynx cylindrical, extrabulbar prostatic vesicle with folded walls and proximally forked, male atrium highly folded, being at least two times longer than the female atrium and with small folds in their proximal portion. However, they can be distinguished from each other mainly by the secretion types discharged into the prostatic vesicle as well as into the male and female atria. In addition, they have different colour patterns on the dorsal surface.

  4. First report of the land planarian Diversibipalium multilineatum (Makino & Shirasawa, 1983) (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Continenticola) in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Menchetti, Mattia; Sluys, Ronald; Solà, Eduard; Riutort, Marta; Tricarico, Elena; Justine, Jean-Lou; Cavigioli, Luca; Mori, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of alien species may significantly affect soil ecosystems, through predation or disruption of components of native ecosystems (Winsor et al. 2004; Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014; Justine et al. 2014). Land planarians have been reported as alien species in soils throughout the world and, among those, some species are considered to be successful invaders, e.g. Platydemus manokwari de Beauchamp, 1963, Arthurdendyus triangulatus (Dendy, 1894), Bipalium adventitium Hyman, 1943, Bipalium kewense Moseley, 1878 and Dolichoplana striata Moseley, 1877 (Winsor et al. 2004; Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014; Justine et al. 2014, 2015). Soil moisture status seems to be an important element for their successful invasion (Fraser & Boag 1998). In Europe at least 18 species of alien land planarians have been recorded since now and some of them are considered as invasive ones, e.g. P. manokwari (cf. Justine et al. 2014). Although the alien land planarian B. kewense has been reported to occur in many greenhouses in Italy (Bello et al. 1995), no data are available on its establishment and/or impact on natural environments. On 28th September 2014, 20 specimens (~1 individual/m2) of the land planarian Diversibipalium multilineatum (Makino & Shirasawa, 1983) (Fig. 1), native to Japan, were collected under pots, branches and plastic materials in a private garden located in the center of Bologna (Emilia Romagna, Central Italy), near the urban park Giardini Margherita (44°29' N, 11°21' E; WGS84). Thirty plant species (both indigenous and alien), mainly cultivated as bonsai (e.g. Lagerstroemia indica L., Juniperus procumbens (Siebold ex Endl.) Miquel), were present in this shady, wet garden (25 m2). Between March 2014 and June 2015, 70 more specimens of D. multilineatum were collected at the same site, mainly at dusk and dawn after rain. Reproduction by fission and regeneration processes were observed in several of those specimens, which were kept for some time in captivity. A specimen of D. multilineatum was also collected in a garden in Léguevin (Haute-Garonne, France), which will be described in a forthcoming paper by Justine et al. (in prep.) (see also Kawakatsu et al. 2014). Specimens without a genital pore were initially ascribed to D. multilineatum on the basis of their external appearance: the dorsal surface was brownish yellow and presented five longitudinal stripes at the head plate and the neck, showing the typical appearance of the species. The middorsal stripe was widened at its anterior end, on the head plate, and at the pharynx level. The ventral pattern of the animals at the pharyngeal region was also characteristic, with the middorsal stripe widened at this level. The Italian Diversibipalium specimens used for the molecular analysis were fixed and preserved in absolute ethanol. Fragments of the mitochondrial gene COI and 28S ribosomal RNA nuclear gene (GenBank Acc. Numbers KU245358 and KU245357, respectively) were obtained using the procedure and COI primers described in Álvarez-Presas et al. (2008) and Solà et al. (2013). The French specimen's COI (Specimen MNHN JL177, GenBank Acc. Number KT922162) was obtained as described in Justine et al. (2015). 28S sequences of 14 Bipaliinae specimens and four Microplana species (outgroup) retrieved from GenBank were included in the phylogenetic analyses (Fig. 2). Sequence alignment was obtained by using the online software MAFFT version 7 (Katoh & Standley 2013), while ambiguously aligned positions were removed using the program Gblocks (Talavera & Castresana 2007) with default settings, excepting the minimum number of sequences for a flank position at the minimum value (set at 10) and with half of the allowed gap positions. The final alignment had a length of 1589 bp. We used two phylogenetic inference approaches: maximum likelihood (ML), using the RaxML 8.2.3 software (Stamatakis 2014), and Bayesian inferences (BI), using MrBayes 3.2.4 (Ronquist et al. 2012). The evolutionary model used, GTR+I+G, was estimated to be the best with the software jModeltest 2.1.7 (Darriba et al. 2012; Guindon & Gascuel 2003), using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). MrBayes analyses were performed for 10-milion generation with sampling parameters every 103 and a 25% default burn-in value for the final trees. Convergence of the two runs (average standard deviation of split frequencies << 0.01) and likelihood stationarity were checked. The maximum likelihood analyses were performed under 1000 bootstrap pseudoreplicates. The phylogenetic results show a close and highly supported relationship of the Italian Diversibipalium specimens with those from Japan and South Korea that have been identified as D. multilineatum (Fig. 2). Diversibipalium multilineatum is the sister-group of B. nobile Kawakatsu & Makino, 1982, but with low support. The COI sequences of the French (MNHN JL177) and the Italian Diversibipalium specimens were compared in Geneious v. 8.0.5 (http://www.geneious.com, Kearse et al. 2012) and were found to be identical. These results indicate that the species introduced in both countries is the same, and most probably concerns the species D. multilineatum. The pathways of introduction of D. multilineatum are currently unknown, although a relationship between the horticultural trade and the introduction of alien land planarians is well known (Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014 and references therein). Here we report the first occurrence of individuals of D. multilineatum outside Asia. The GenBank sequence of D. multilineatum from South Korea is not yet supported by a published description of the specimen, while it is debatable whether South Korea should be considered part of the natural range of D. multilineatum, which only seems to include Japan. In the present paper, we consider the South Korean animal to be an introduced specimen. Soil moisture status, temperature, and food availability are considered to be the main factors determining the presence of terrestrial planarians (Boag et al. 1998); the microclimatic conditions of the Italian garden were similar to plant nurseries and greenhouses, while an abundance of food was available, such as isopods [Porcellionides pruinosus (Brandt, 1833)], oligochaetes [Dendrobaena attemsi (Michaelsen, 1902) and several juveniles of Lumbricus spp.] and gastropods [Cernuella cisalpina (Rossmassler, 1837), Cornu aspersum (O.F. Müller 1774), Deroceras reticulatum (O.F. Müller, 1774), Discus rotundatus (O.F. Müller, 1774), Limacus flavus (Linnaeus, 1758), Milax nigricans (Philippi, 1836), Papillifera papillaris (Linnaeus, 1758), Pomatias elegans (O.F. Müller, 1774)]. Moreover, winter 2014 reached the highest temperatures and rainfall of the last two decades (source: CNR-ISAC, Bologna), thus favouring establishment and spread of D. multilineatum. The potential environmental impacts of some invasive flatworms are well documented (Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014; Justine et al. 2014) and, even if these effects have not yet been assessed for D. multilineatum, the adoption of precautionary measures and of early intervention is here strongly recommended (Genovesi & Shine 2004). Finally, knowledge of the introduction pathway(s), together with the analysis of prey preference and possible impact on the invertebrate fauna, will be essential to halt or at least to limit the spread of this introduced land flatworm. PMID:27395897

  5. Reproductive strategies, karyology, parasites, and taxonomic status of Dugesia populations from Yemen (Platyhelminthes: Tricladida: Dugesiidae).

    PubMed

    Harrath, Abdul Halim; Sluys, Ronald; Aldahmash, Waleed; Al-Razaki, Abdulkarim; Alwasel, Saleh

    2013-06-01

    We present new data on the distribution, reproductive strategies, karyology, and taxonomic status of populations of freshwater planarians from Yemen. Nine populations were sampled and significant differences in their reproductive strategies and karyology are reported. The present study presents the first fully documented record of a naturally sexual, diploid (2n = 18) population of a Dugesia species in the eastern part of the Afrotropical region. Morphological characters combined with karyological data suggest that these Dugesia populations from Yemen represent a new species, which is herein described as Dugesia arabica Harrath and Sluys, sp. nov. This new species is mainly distinguishable from other Dugesia species that are distributed exclusively in the Mediterranean basin and in the eastern part of the Afrotropical region by the presence of the following features: well-developed and cone-shaped penis papilla, housing an ejaculatory duct that runs ventrally and has a subterminal and ventral opening; a considerably expanded and folded section of the bursal canal at the level of the oviducal openings; absence of a layer of longitudinal muscles on the copulatory bursa and the bursal canal. Specimens from two populations from Yemen were infested with a gregarine Protozoon.

  6. Coevolution of the Monogenoidea (Platyhelminthes) based on a revised hypothesis of parasite phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Boeger, W A; Kritsky, D C

    1997-12-01

    A revised hypothesis for the phylogeny of the Subclass Polyonchoinea (Monogenoidea) was constructed employing phylogenetic systematics. The Acanthocotylidae (formerly of the Order Capsalidea) is transferred to the Order Gyrodactylidea based on this analysis. The new phylogeny is used to determine coevolutionary relationships of the familial taxa of Monogenoidea with their hosts. The coevolutionary analysis suggests that the Monogenoidea apparently underwent sympatric speciation or dispersal while parasitic on ancestral Gnathostomata, resulting in two primary clades: the Polyonchoinea and the Oligonchoinea + Polystomatoinea. The two parasite clades apparently cospeciated independently with divergence of the Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes. In the Polyonchoinea, the clade associated with Chondrichthyes experienced primary extinction within the Holocephala, but coevolved into the Loimoidae and Monocotylidae in the Galeomorphii and Squalea (Elasmobranchii), respectively. Within the Osteichthyes, polyonchoineans experienced primary extinction with the divergence of Sarcopterygii, Polypteriformes and Acipenseriformes. They demonstrate primary dispersal from the Neopterygii into the Squalea (as Amphibdellatinea), Actinistia (as Neodactylodiscinea) and Urodela (as Lagarocotylidea). Secondary dispersals of polyonchoineans occurred in the Gyrodactylidae to the Polypteriformes, Urodela and Anura; in the Acanthocotylidae to the Myxinoidea and Squalea; in the Capsalidae to the Acipenseriformes and Elasmobranchii; and in the Monocotylidae to the Holocephala. The Oligonchoinea and Polystomatoinea developed upon divergence of the Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes. Oligonchoineans cospeciated within the Chondrichthyes, with the Chimaericolidea developing within the Holocephala and the ancestor of the Diclybothriidea + Mazocraeidea within the Elasmobranchii. Two cases of primary dispersal occurred within this clade: the Diclybothriidae to the Acipenseriformes and the ancestor of mazocraeidean families to the Neopterygii (both Osteichthyes). Secondary dispersal within the Oligonchoinea includes host switching of the common ancestor of Callorhynchocotyle (Hexabothriidae) to the Holocephala. Polystomatoineans coevolved within the Osteichthyes, but experienced primary extinctions in the Actinopterygii, Actinistia, Dipnoi and Amniota. Coevolution of the Sphyranuridae and Polystomatidae occurred with divergence of the Urodela and Anura, respectively. Secondary dispersal of Polystomatids to the Urodela, Dipnoi and Amniota is suggested. A preliminary phylogenetic analysis of the Polystomatoinea suggests that primary extinction with secondary dispersal of polystomatids to the Dipnoi may not be necessary to explain extant parasite distributions, since Concinnocotyla (Concinnocotylinae) appears to represent the sister taxon of the remaining Polystomatidae + Sphyranuridae.

  7. Co-Speciation of the Ectoparasite Gyrodactylus teuchis (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes) and Its Salmonid Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christoph; Weiss, Steven J.; Stojanovski, Stojmir; Bachmann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Co-speciation is a fundamental concept of evolutionary biology and intuitively appealing, yet in practice hard to demonstrate as it is often blurred by other evolutionary processes. We investigate the phylogeographic history of the monogenean ectoparasites Gyrodactylus teuchis and G. truttae on European salmonids of the genus Salmo. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 were sequenced for 189 Gyrodactylus individuals collected from 50 localities, distributed across most major European river systems, from the Iberian- to the Balkan Peninsula. Despite both anthropogenic and naturally caused admixture of the principal host lineages among major river basins, co-phylogenetic analyses revealed significant global congruence for host and parasite phylogenies, providing firm support for co-speciation of G. teuchis and its salmonid hosts brown trout (S. trutta) and Atlantic salmon (S. salar). The major split within G. teuchis, coinciding with the initial divergence of the hosts was dated to ~1.5 My BP, using a Bayesian framework based on an indirect calibration point obtained from the host phylogeny. The presence of G. teuchis in Europe thus predates some of the major Pleistocene glaciations. In contrast, G. truttae exhibited remarkably low intraspecific genetic diversity. Given the direct life cycle and potentially high transmission potential of gyrodactylids, this finding is interpreted as indication for a recent emergence (<60 ky BP) of G. truttae via a host-switch. Our study thus suggests that instances of two fundamentally different mechanisms of speciation (co-speciation vs. host-switching) may have occurred on the same hosts in Europe within a time span of less than 1.5 My in two gyrodactylid ectoparasite species. PMID:26080029

  8. Comparative Genomics of Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) Reveals Shared Genomic Features of Ecto- and Endoparastic Neodermata

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christoph; Fromm, Bastian; Bachmann, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The ectoparasitic Monogenea comprise a major part of the obligate parasitic flatworm diversity. Although genomic adaptations to parasitism have been studied in the endoparasitic tapeworms (Cestoda) and flukes (Trematoda), no representative of the Monogenea has been investigated yet. We present the high-quality draft genome of Gyrodactylus salaris, an economically important monogenean ectoparasite of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). A total of 15,488 gene models were identified, of which 7,102 were functionally annotated. The controversial phylogenetic relationships within the obligate parasitic Neodermata were resolved in a phylogenomic analysis using 1,719 gene models (alignment length of >500,000 amino acids) for a set of 16 metazoan taxa. The Monogenea were found basal to the Cestoda and Trematoda, which implies ectoparasitism being plesiomorphic within the Neodermata and strongly supports a common origin of complex life cycles. Comparative analysis of seven parasitic flatworm genomes identified shared genomic features for the ecto- and endoparasitic lineages, such as a substantial reduction of the core bilaterian gene complement, including the homeodomain-containing genes, and a loss of the piwi and vasa genes, which are considered essential for animal development. Furthermore, the shared loss of functional fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and the absence of peroxisomes, the latter organelles presumed ubiquitous in eukaryotes except for parasitic protozoans, were inferred. The draft genome of G. salaris opens for future in-depth analyses of pathogenicity and host specificity of poorly characterized G. salaris strains, and will enhance studies addressing the genomics of host–parasite interactions and speciation in the highly diverse monogenean flatworms. PMID:24732282

  9. The first troglobitic species of freshwater flatworm of the suborder Continenticola (Platyhelminthes) from South America

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Stella Teles; Morais, Ana Laura Nunes; Cordeiro, Lívia Medeiros; Leal-Zanchet, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brazilian cave diversity, especially of invertebrates, is poorly known. The Bodoquena Plateau, which is located in the Cerrado Biome in central Brazil, has approximately 200 recorded caves with a rich system of subterranean water resources and high troglobitic diversity. Herein we describe a new troglobitic species of Girardia that represents the first obligate cave-dwelling species of the suborder Continenticola in South America. Specimens of the new species, which occur in a limestone cave in the Bodoquena Plateau, in the Cerrado biome, are unpigmented and eyeless. Species recognition in the genus Girardia is difficult, due to their great morphological resemblance. However, the new species can be easily recognized by a unique feature in its copulatory apparatus, namely a large, branched bulbar cavity with multiple diverticula. PMID:25632242

  10. A standardised terminology of the embryonic envelopes and associated developmental stages of tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Conn, David Bruce; Swiderski, Zdzisław

    2008-03-01

    Over the past 40 years, much has been published on the ultrastructure and cellular development of embryonic structures in a wide range of cestodes. However, the literature contains many discrepancies in both terminology and interpretations because of the facts that these organisms are phylogenetically diverse within their respective orders and families, the habitats that affect embryonic envelope structure are diverse, and the work has been done in various laboratories around the world. This review and synthesis was initiated by a working group of biologists from around the world convened at the Fifth International Workshop on Cestode Systematics and Phylogeny in Ceské Budejovice, at the Institute of Parasitology of the Biology Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. It brings together the data from published work and establishes a uniform terminology and interpretation based on the data as they are presented. A consensus was reached for standardised definitions of the oncosphere, hexacanth, coracidium, embryonic envelopes, outer envelope, inner envelope, embryophore, vitelline capsule, shell, and outer coat. All of these are defined as components of the embryo or its vitellocyte-derived or uterine-derived coatings.

  11. Two new species of Gieysztoria (Platyhelminthes, Rhabdocoela, Dalyelliidae) from a freshwater artificial lake in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-Hong; Wu, Cheng-Chen; Xia, Xiao-Jie; Wang, An-Tai

    2013-12-09

    Two new species of the "Aequales" of genus Gieysztoria were collected and described from an artificial lake on the Shenzhen University campus. Gieysztoria bimaculata n. sp., is distinguished based on two groups clavate pigmentations dorsally between the pharynx and intestine, and has a sclerotic stylet comprising a proximal girdle with 40-46 distal dagger-shape spines, thus has the maximum number of spines within "Aequales" group. Gieysztoria guangdongensis n. sp. has a sclerotic stylet with a proximal girdle and 18 distal blade-shaped spines. Comparison with similar species based mainly on stylet morphology suggests that Gieysztoria bimaculata n. sp. and Gieysztoria guangdongensis n. sp. are apparently different from the known species of Gieysztoria in this moment. In addition, the stability of the amount of distal spines of "Aequales" species is briefly discussed.

  12. Patterns of interaction between Neotropical freshwater fishes and their gill Monogenoidea (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Braga, Mariana P; Araújo, Sabrina B L; Boeger, Walter A

    2014-02-01

    Using network analysis, we looked for broad patterns of distribution of Monogenoidea gill parasites on Neotropical freshwater fishes within a host phylogenetic framework. We analyzed a database of Monogenoidea parasitizing fishes from Neotropical rivers, from 23 watersheds, based on species descriptions published until 2011. Host-parasite interactions were organized into five matrices grouping species at different taxonomic levels. The network of interactions between host families and parasite genera was significantly modular and revealed that each fish order has a unique composition of parasite genera. Hence, interactions between lower taxa were analyzed separately for the largest fish orders (Perciformes, Siluriformes, and Characiformes). Networks tended to be loosely connected and organized in modules. Despite the putative high host specificity of monogenoids, some have a wider host range that includes distantly related host species. Among the hosts, the clade composed by the piranhas (Serrasalmus spp. and related species, Serrasalmidae) stands out in terms of parasite richness per host species, resulting in a more connected network. The history of the lineages of each host order within Neotropical freshwaters seems to have a great influence on the extent of parasite sharing. The observed modularity was influenced by both spatial structure and phylogenetic relatedness of species. In average, 37 % of modules of networks between host species and parasite genera were associated with a particular river basin and 63 % of modules were associated with a host family. Hence, spatial structure determines the co-occurrence of host and parasite species, but their evolutionary history is the main factor defining which interactions are possible.

  13. Biogeographical implications of Zambezian Cichlidogyrus species (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) parasitizing Congolian cichlids.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Maarten P M; Van Steenberge, Maarten; Dessein, Steven; Volckaert, Filip A M; Snoeks, Jos; Huyse, Tine; Pariselle, Antoine

    2013-01-22

    Fishes normally restricted to inland waters are valuable model systems for historical biogeography, inter alia, because of their limited dispersal abilities and concordance with the distribution patterns of other freshwater taxa (Zogaris et al. 2009). The comparison of fish species assemblages has been the major biogeographical tool for delineating African aquatic ecoregions as the fossil record is often meagre and merely offers complementary information. This is, for example, the case for the Zambezian and Congolian ichthyofaunal provinces, which display substantial contemporary fish diversity (Stewart 2001). Between both regions lies the Bangweulu-Mweru ecoregion (sensu Scott 2005), known for its high percentage of endemicity. Although hydrographically belonging to the Congo Basin, the Bangweulu-Mweru ecoregion has a high affinity with the Zambezi province (Scott 2005), due to historical river connections (Tweddle 2010). Studies comparing the Zambezi and Congo ichthyofaunal provinces are rare and hampered by lack of data from the Congo Basin. The latter harbours more than 1250 fish species (Snoeks et al. 2011) while in the Zambezi, only 120 freshwater fishes are found (Tweddle 2010). Indeed, species richness declines in all major African teleost families from the Congo Basin southwards, riverine haplochromine cichlids forming a notable exception to this rule (Joyce et al. 2005). Although it was hypothesized by Tweddle (2010) that the origin of many Zambezian fish species is in the Congo Basin, the haplochromines Serranochromis Regan, Sargochromis Regan, Pharyngochromis Greenwood and Chetia Trewavas, together forming the serranochromines, have their centre of diversity in the rivers of the Zambezian ichthyofaunal province (Joyce et al. 2005). Therefore, the biogeographical history of Cichlidae across the Zambezi- Congo watershed is not only key to cichlid biogeography on an African scale, but also complementary to biogeography of all other teleosts in the region. Yet, colonisation and speciation patterns are difficult to unravel due to complex hydrological history (Katongo et al. 2007; Schwarzer et al. 2012).

  14. A new genus with six new species of Typhlopolycystidinae Evdonin, 1977 (Platyhelminthes, Kalyptorhynchia, Polycystididae).

    PubMed

    Schockaert, Ernest R; Martens, Paul M; Revis, Nathalie; Janssen, Toon; Willems, Wim; Artois, Tom J

    2014-01-22

    Five new species of the new taxon Brunetorhynchus n. gen. are described: B. deconincki n. sp., B. microstylis n. sp. and B. complicatus n. sp. are from the Mediterranean, B. canariensis n. sp. is from the Canary Island Lanzarote, B. cannoni n. sp. is from the Australian East coast and one species from the Galapagos, formerly described as Limipolycystis spec., is transferred to the new genus as B. dubius n. sp.. As in Limipolycystis, these species have a single stylet, (accessory stylet type II), an accessory secretion vesicle (type II) and a prostate vesicle (type III) in the male atrium, although the latter vesicle is absent in some species. Unlike the species of Limipolycystis, where the seminal receptacle is a sclerotized tubule, the species of the new taxon have a pear-shaped seminal receptacle on the oviduct. 

  15. Molecular phylogeny and evolution of the Trypanorhyncha Diesing, 1863 (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Palm, Harry W; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Olson, Peter D; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2009-08-01

    Complete ssrDNA and partial lsrDNA (D1-D3) of 31 species, mainly from the Indo-Pacific region, were sequenced and added to 66 species of the marine cestode order Trypanorhyncha; thus 35% of the 277 known species were sampled. The resulting phylogenetic tree resolved two major clades that represent trypanorhynchs originally parasitizing rajiform (skate and ray) or galeoform hosts. The tree topology supports an earlier classification based on morphology that splits the order into the superfamily Eutetrarhynchoidea together with the Tentacularioidea, and the Gymnorhynchoidea together with the Lacistorhynchoidea and Otobothrioidea. Three of the five recognized superfamilies are monophyletic (Tentacularioidea, Gymnorhynchoidea, Otobothrioidea). Nodal support for the Eutetrarhynchidae and Lacistorhynchidae was poor and resulted in paraphyletic clades. Mapping of morphological characters showed the tentacular armature of the scolex to be highly variable within clades, demonstrating that armature patterns used traditionally in classification, are homoplasious. Similarly, the tetrabothriate scolex, currently utilized as a family-distinguishing character in traditional classifications, has developed independently in multiple groups. Synapomorphies for the higher taxa are detailed. Sequence data from duplicate taxa confirmed interoceanic distribution patterns and low intraspecific genetic divergence and host specificity for nine trypanorhynch species belonging to five families and four superfamilies. Four distinct lineages of trypanorhynchs can be recognized with one mainly infecting rajiform hosts whereas the others infecting both, sharks and rays. Eutetrarhynchoids and tentacularioids have secondarily invaded shark hosts whilst utilising the marine food web involving teleost fishes as intermediate hosts. Three cases of host switching from sharks to rays can be inferred within the lacistorhynchoids, in one case caused by a switch from perciform to gadiform intermediate hosts. This likely enabled a radiation into the deep sea environment. Implications of the molecular phylogeny for the classification and evolutionary developments within the order are discussed.

  16. [Fauna of monogeneans (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes) of gudgeons (Gobioninae, Cyprininae). 2. Coevolution].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, P I

    2009-01-01

    Coevolution of parasites and in particular monogeneans and fishes, was characterized from two related angles--parallel coevolution and host switches, lead to the acquisition of new hosts from taxonomically distant but ecologically similar groups. Modern views on the evolution and taxonomy of gudgeons are discussed. This group is very heterogeneous by morphology and biology, tales unclear taxonomic position in the family Cyprynidae, and can be divided into two tribes or four groups of genera. Analysis of coevolution of dactylogirids, ancyrocephalids, gyrodactylids, and diplozoids with their hosts was carried out. Dactylogyrus spp. and gudgeons show coevolutional connections; in Ancyrocephalus s. l. spp. coevolution and host switches take place; most of Gyrodactylus spp. parasitize fishes of the genus Gobio and are the colonists of gudgeons; and none of the diplozoids parasitize exceptionally gudgeons. From 130 species of 30 genera of the World fauna of gudgeons 31 species 13 genera proved to be infected with monogeneans. We divided the dactylogyrids from gudgeons (49 species) into 13 evolution levels and 30 morphological groups, which were found equal in number with taxonomic groups of hosts. Ancyrocephalids were divided into two evolution levels, which can not be reduced to one initial type, and eight monophyletic groups. Fourteen of 18 species of these monogeneans occurred on the host from the genera Hemibarbus and Squalidus. Different directions of evolution connected with forming of different types of copulatory organ, ventral additional bar, and type of attachment on gills were revealed for Dactylogyrus spp. from different groups of genera of gudgeons (Yang et al., 2006). Monogeneans have lower evolutionary rates, as compared with their hosts, that are expressed in the taxonomic ranks (groups of species in monogeneans and genera or groups of genera in their hosts). Number of species in Dactylogyrus and Ancyrocephalus s. l. usually the same as the number of their host species. However this proportion increases in favor of the parasites owing to the explosion-like speciation of monogeneans parasitizing Hemibarbus and Saurogobio. Distribution of morphological groups of monogeneans on gudgeons in general confirms their grouping into four groups of genera on the base of molecular data. At the same time, in some cases parasitological data agree with the gudgeons' classification based on morphological characters to a greater extent (Banarescu, 1992; Naseca, 1998). The genera Sarcocheilichthys and Gnathopogon take the crucial position in the Sarcocheilichthys group of genera according to the analysis of occurrence of monophyletic groups of Dactylogyrus spp. In the Pseudogobio group of genera, the largest number of the Dactylogyrus spp. groups was found on the genera Saurogobio and Abbottina. The genus Hemibarbus, being the host of some original groups of Dactylogyrus spp. and Ancyrocephalus spp., takes the most isolated position among gudgeons by morphological, molecular, and parasitological data. Relationships of Hemibarbus and Squalidus (both from the Hemibarbus group of genera) are need in further investigations. The Sarcocheilichthys group of genera, which contains the genera Coreius and Paracanthobrama with unclear and ambiguous positions, is situated apart from the Hemibarbus group of genera. High-specialized groups of Dactylogyrus spp. are predominating on the former. The Pseudogobio group of genera is parasitized by numerous primitive groups of Dactylogyrus spp. Groups of Dactylogyrus spp. from the Gobio group of genera are derived undoubtedly from the monogeneans parasitizing the Pseudogobio group of genera, and the Gobio group of genera either derived from the Pseudogobio group of genera or must be included into the latter. Thus, we have one phylum of gudgeons with separate groups of monogeneans (Hemibarbus group of genera) and, contrariwise, other phylum of fish hosts with ancient and specialized monogeneans (Sarcocheilichthys group of genera), which ends in the gudgeons with primitive monogeneans (Pseudogobio group of genera) and evolutionary young monogeneans (Gobio group of genera). The pattern of distribution of the morphological groups of monogeneans by gudgeons is a mirror reflection of modern contradictory views on the taxonomy and evolution of these fishes and may contribute to a more profound understanding of the place of gudgeons in Cyprinidae, their taxonomy and evolution.

  17. Prey-tracking behavior in the invasive terrestrial planarian Platydemus manokwari (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Noriko; Sugiura, Shinji; Chiba, Satoshi

    2010-11-01

    Platydemus manokwari is a broadly distributed invasive terrestrial flatworm that preys heavily on land snails and has been credited with the demise of numerous threatened island faunas. We examined whether P. manokwari tracks the mucus trails of land snail prey, investigated its ability to determine trail direction, and evaluated prey preference among various land snail species. A plastic treatment plate with the mucus trail of a single species and a control plate without the trail were placed side by side at the exit of cages housing P. manokwari. All trials were then videotaped overnight. The flatworms moved along plates with mucus trails, but did not respond to plates without trails, blank control (distilled water), or with conspecific flatworm trails. When presented at the midpoint of a snail mucus trail, the flatworms followed the trail in a random direction. The flatworms showed a preference when choosing between two plates, each with a mucus trail of different land snail species. Our results suggest that P. manokwari follows snail mucus trails based on chemical cues to increase the chance of encountering prey; however, trail-tracking behavior showed no directionality.

  18. Three new species of freshwater Macrostomum (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomida) from southern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting; Zhang, Lv; Wang, An-Tai; Zhang, Yu

    2015-09-02

    Macrostomum is a diverse genus of turbellarians with more than 180 species described from around the world. However, the Macrostomum fauna in China is poorly known. In this study, three new species of freshwater Macrostomum were described from southern China based on morphology of the penis stylet, an important character for species identification in this genus. In M. heyuanensis n. sp., the penis stylet bends 108° leftwards at its 1/2 length then backwards besides the distal opening, and the terminal region is thicker than other parts of penis stylet. In M. dongyuanensis n. sp., the penis stylet is J-shaped, with the opening at the tail end. In M. bicaudatum n. sp., the penis stylet is C-shaped, with the upper margin of the distal end longer but slimmer than the lower margin. In addition, molecular phylogenetic analyses were conducted to aid the classification of the novel species. Finally, their habitat and taxonomic status are compared and discussed.

  19. First report of Gyrodactylus spp. (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) in the western Mediterranean Sea: molecular and morphological descriptions.

    PubMed

    Huyse, T; Pampoulie, C; Audenaert, V; Volckaert, F A M

    2006-08-01

    The Gyrodactylus spp. fauna on species of gobies, Pomatoschistus, Gobiusculus, and Knipowitschia (Gobiidae: Teleostei), from the western Mediterranean and Adriatic seas is strikingly similar to that found in the Baltic Sea and eastern Atlantic Ocean, both in morphology and in internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA. The fauna consisted of Gyrodactylus branchialis, G. ostendicus, G. gondae, G. rugiensis, G. rugiensoides, and G. arcuatus. No new species have been found. A morphometric comparison between G. branchialis from the Mediterranean and Adriatic seas and its type locality in Ostend (Belgium) showed significant differences in ventral bar and marginal hook features. The morphometric variation was lower in G. rugiensis, whereas no significant differences were found in G. ostendicus. Gyrodactylus branchialis and G. ostendicus collected on P. microps were slightly different in the ITS rDNA (-0.6%) compared with specimens on the closely related P. marmoratus, probably reflecting ongoing speciation. A hybrid zone was identified in the Vaccarès lagoon complex (France) where both host species are sympatric. There was no clear geographic or host-related pattern in the variation found in the ITS2 rDNA in G. arcuatus sampled from P. microps, G. flavescens, Pungitius pungitius, K. panizzae, and its original host Gasterosteus aculeatus (2 polymorphic sites). Of all studied species, only G. arcuatus, G. rugiensis, and G. rugiensoides showed minor intraspecific variation in the ITS rDNA. Hence, the physical separation by a shoreline of more than 10,000 km is hardly reflected in the parasite ITS rDNA.

  20. New Dalyelliidae (Platyhelminthes, Rhabditophora) from Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, and their stylet ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Damborenea, Cristina; Brusa, Francisco; Noreña, Carolina

    2007-08-01

    Two new species of Dalyellidae, Dalyellia callvucurai n. sp. and Gieysztoria namuncurai n. sp., are described from temporary freshwater environments in central Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. The ultrastructure of the stylets of both species is also described. The new species of the genus Dalyellia is the second species of the genus found in the neotropics and the first whose stylet has been studied with scanning electron microscopy. Gieysztoria namuncurai n. sp. joins the seven species of the genus known in Argentina. The ultrastructural characteristics of the stylet place it in the Inaequales group, with complex stylets.

  1. [Fauna of monogeneans (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes) of gudgeons (Gobioninae, Cyprinidae). 1. Composition, structure, and characteristics of distribution].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, P I

    2008-01-01

    Monogeneans parasitize 31 gudgeon species of 130, and 13 gudgeon genera of 30 known. Monogenea from gudgeon comprise 48 species of the genus Dactylogyrus, 1 Bivaginogyrus (Dactylogyridae), 18 Ancyrocephalus s. l. (Ancyrocephalidae), 6 Gyrodactylus (Gyrodactylidae), 3 Paradiplozoon, and 1 species of the genus Sindiplozoon (Diplozoidae). The following characters were used in the morphological analysis: (1) structure of the copulatory organ, (2) morphology of the anchors, marginal hooks and bars, (3) characteristic of attachment on gills. Among the Dactylogyrus species parasitizing gudgeon, 30 monophyletic species groups and 13 levels of morphological organization were established. The first level comprises dactylogyrids without the additional ventral bar of haptor. It includes species with the copulatory organ of pro-cryptomeres type. This type is ancestral for dactylogyrids of the Amur/China fauna. Levels II-IV; VI, etc. are derivates of level I. Levels VII-VIII can be characterized by the jamming type of attachment characteristic for Dactylogyrus sphyrna or D. anchoratus, when marginal hooks penetrate gill filaments towards the anchors. Levels IX-XII include species with the attachment by clasping, when the anchors directed towards each other. Some species groups of Dactylogyrus (V, XIII) switched onto gudgeons from other fishes (Cultrinae, Xenocyprininae, Hypophthalmichthinae). Species of the genus Ancyrocephalus s. l. form two levels of morphological organization and 8 monophyletic groups. Repeated switches of ancyrocephalids from freshwater gobies to gudgeons and their switches from gudgeons to other fishes were shown. Species of the genus Hemibarbus serve as hosts for morphologically peculiar species groups of Dactylogyrus and Ancyrocephalus s. l. We can conclude that gyrodactylids from gudgeons do not form a natural monophyletic group. This parasite fauna originated as a result of multiple switches from phylogenetically distant but ecologically similar hosts, for example sticklebacks, bitterlings, chars, spined loaches, etc. Species of the family Diplozoidae parasitizing gudgeons may invade also many species from other fish taxa.

  2. The mitochondrial genome of Gyrodactylus salaris (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea), a pathogen of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Huyse, T; Plaisance, L; Webster, B L; Mo, T A; Bakke, T A; Bachmann, L; Littlewood, D T J

    2007-05-01

    In the present study, we describe the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of the Atlantic salmon parasite Gyrodactylus salaris, the first for any monogenean species. The circular genome is 14,790 bp in size. All of the 35 genes recognized from other flatworm mitochondrial genomes were identified, and they are transcribed from the same strand. The protein-coding and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes share the same gene arrangement as those published previously for neodermatan mt genomes (representing cestodes and digeneans only), and the genome has an overall A+T content of 65%. Three transfer RNA (tRNA) genes overlap with other genes, whereas the secondary structure of 3 tRNA genes lack the DHU arm and 1 tRNA gene lacks the TphiC arm. Eighteen regions of non-coding DNA ranging from 4 to 112 bp in length, totalling 278 bp, were identified as well as 2 large non-coding regions (799 bp and 768 bp) that were almost identical to each other. The completion of the mt genome offers the opportunity of defining new molecular markers for studying evolutionary relationships within and among gyrodactylid species.

  3. Cicerina debrae n. sp. (Platyhelminthes: Kalyptorhynchia, Cicerinidae) from the Southern Atlantic Coast, USA.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Kea; Stevens, Craig; Smith, Julian P S

    2014-06-24

    Cicerina debrae is described as a new species of kalyptorhynch flatworm belonging to the Cicerinidae. This species was found in surface sediment from the lower half of the beach at two sites in North Carolina and is identical to museum material previously collected from North Carolina and from the Atlantic coast of Florida. C. debrae differs from its congeners in the shape of the ductus spermatici and the copulatory cirrus.

  4. Investigation of the ultrastructure of Dendrocoelum constrictum (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida) spermatogenesis and mature spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Harrath, Abdel Halim; Gammoudi, Mehrez; Mansour, Lamjed; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Sirotkin, Alexander V; Al Omar, Suliman Y; Ibrahim, Khalid E; Alwasel, Saleh H

    2014-09-01

    To add to our understanding of dendrocoelid spermatozoa and to describe additional phylogenetic characters, the ultrastructure of the testis was investigated in the subterranean freshwater planarian Dendrocoelum constrictum. This is the first study investigating spermatogenesis and spermatozoon ultrastructure in a subterranean freshwater planarian species. We found that the basic structure of spermatozoa in D. constrictum is similar to that of other Tricladida that have been studied previously. In fact, D. constrictum spermatozoa possess an elongated nucleus, one giant mitochondrion, and two subterminal flagella with a 9+'1' pattern. The flagella emerge together from one side of the spermatozoon. However, D. constrictum has some characteristics that have not yet been described for other freshwater planarians. In fact, the number of cortical microtubules reaches the maximum number in the anterior and middle part of region I, and then decrease until they disappear towards the posterior extremity of the spermatozoon. The extreme tip of the anterior region of the spermatozoon exhibits a specific external ornamentation of the plasma membrane.

  5. Embryonic muscle development in direct and indirect developing marine flatworms (Platyhelminthes, Polycladida).

    PubMed

    Bolaños, D Marcela; Litvaitis, Marian K

    2009-01-01

    We compared embryonic myogenesis of the direct-developing acotylean polyclad Melloplana ferruginea with that of Maritigrella crozieri, a cotylean that develops via a larval stage. Fluorescently labeled F-actin was visualized with laser confocal microscopy. Developmental times are reported as percentages of the time from oviposition to hatching: 7 days for M. crozieri and 22 days for M. ferruginea. The epithelium began to form at 30% development in M. crozieri and at 15% development in M. ferruginea. Random myoblasts appeared in peripheral areas of the embryo at 36% and 22-30% development in M. crozeri and M. ferruginea, respectively. Circular and longitudinal muscle bands formed synchronously at 37-44% development in M. crozieri; yolk obscured observations of early myogenesis in M. ferruginea. An orthogonal muscle grid was established by 45-50% development in both species. Diagonal muscles developed in M. ferruginea at 60-71% development. Hence, juveniles of this species hatch with the same basic body-wall musculature as adults. Larvae of M. crozieri did not hatch with diagonal muscles; these muscles are acquired postmetamorphosis. Additionally, a specialized musculature developed in the larval lobes of M. crozieri. Oral musculature was complex and established by 72% development in both species. Our results are comparable to the muscle differentiation reported for other indirect-developing polyclads and for direct-developing species of macrostomid flatworms. Furthermore, they provide additional support that the orthogonal muscle pattern of circular and longitudinal muscles is a symplesiomorphy of Spiralia.

  6. Ultrastructural and cytochemical aspects of the germarium and the vitellarium in Syndesmis patagonica (Platyhelminthes, Rhabdocoela, Umagillidae).

    PubMed

    Falleni, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Paolo; Ghezzani, Claudio; Brogger, Martín I

    2014-06-01

    The cytoarchitecture of the female gonad of the endosymbiont umagillid Syndesmis patagonica has been investigated using electron microscopy and cytochemical techniques. The female gonad consists of paired germaria and vitellaria located behind the pharynx in the mid-posterior region of the body. Both the germaria and the vitellaria are enveloped by an outer extracellular lamina and an inner sheath of accessory cells which contribute to the extracellular lamina. Oocyte maturation occurs completely during the prophase of the first meiotic division. Oocyte differentiation is characterized by the appearance of chromatoid bodies and the development of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complexes. These organelles appear to be involved in the production of round granules, about 2-2.5 μm in diameter, with a homogeneous electron-dense core surrounded by a granular component and a translucent halo delimited by a membrane. These egg granules migrate to the periphery of mature oocytes, are positive to the cytochemical test for polyphenol detection, are unaffected by protease and have been interpreted as eggshell granules. The mature oocytes also contain a small number of yolk granules, lipid droplets, and glycogen particles scattered throughout the ooplasm. The vitellaria are branched organs composed of vitelline follicles with vitellocytes at different stages of maturation. Developing vitellocytes contain well-developed rough endoplasmic reticulum and small Golgi complexes involved in the production of eggshell and yolk globules. Eggshell globules are round, measure 4-5 μm in diameter, and have a mosaic-like patterned content which contains polyphenols. The yolk globules, 2-3 μm in diameter, show a homogeneous protein content of medium electron density, devoid of polyphenols, and completely digested by protease. The mature vitellocytes also contain glycogen as further reserve material. The presence of polyphenolic eggshell granules in the oocytes and of polyphenolic eggshell globules with a mosaic-like pattern in the vitellocytes have been considered apomorphic features of the Rhabdocoela + Prolecithophora.

  7. Alternative development in Polystoma gallieni (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) and life cycle evolution.

    PubMed

    Badets, Mathieu; Du Preez, Louis; Verneau, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    Considering the addition of intermediate transmission steps during life cycle evolution, developmental plasticity, canalization forces and inherited parental effect must be invoked to explain new host colonization. Unfortunately, there is a lack of experimental procedures and relevant models to explore the adaptive value of alternative developmental phenotypes during life cycle evolution. However, within the monogeneans that are characterized by a direct life cycle, an extension of the transmission strategy of amphibian parasites has been reported within species of Polystoma and Metapolystoma (Polyopisthocotylea; Polystomatidae). In this study, we tested whether the infection success of Polystoma gallieni within tadpoles of its specific host, the Stripeless Tree Frog Hyla meridionalis, differs depending on the parental origin of the oncomiracidium. An increase in the infection success of the parasitic larvae when exposed to the same experimental conditions as their parents was expected as an adaptive pattern of non-genetic inherited information. Twice as many parasites were actually recorded from tadpoles infected with oncomiracidia hatching from eggs of the bladder parental phenotype (1.63 ± 0.82 parasites per host) than from tadpoles infected with oncomiracidia hatching from eggs of the branchial parental phenotype (0.83 ± 0.64 parasites per host). Because in natural environments the alternation of the two phenotypes is likely to occur due to the ecology of its host, the differential infection success within young tadpoles could have an adaptive value that favors the parasite transmission over time.

  8. Co-Speciation of the Ectoparasite Gyrodactylus teuchis (Monogenea, Platyhelminthes) and Its Salmonid Hosts.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christoph; Weiss, Steven J; Stojanovski, Stojmir; Bachmann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Co-speciation is a fundamental concept of evolutionary biology and intuitively appealing, yet in practice hard to demonstrate as it is often blurred by other evolutionary processes. We investigate the phylogeographic history of the monogenean ectoparasites Gyrodactylus teuchis and G. truttae on European salmonids of the genus Salmo. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 were sequenced for 189 Gyrodactylus individuals collected from 50 localities, distributed across most major European river systems, from the Iberian- to the Balkan Peninsula. Despite both anthropogenic and naturally caused admixture of the principal host lineages among major river basins, co-phylogenetic analyses revealed significant global congruence for host and parasite phylogenies, providing firm support for co-speciation of G. teuchis and its salmonid hosts brown trout (S. trutta) and Atlantic salmon (S. salar). The major split within G. teuchis, coinciding with the initial divergence of the hosts was dated to ~1.5 My BP, using a Bayesian framework based on an indirect calibration point obtained from the host phylogeny. The presence of G. teuchis in Europe thus predates some of the major Pleistocene glaciations. In contrast, G. truttae exhibited remarkably low intraspecific genetic diversity. Given the direct life cycle and potentially high transmission potential of gyrodactylids, this finding is interpreted as indication for a recent emergence (<60 ky BP) of G. truttae via a host-switch. Our study thus suggests that instances of two fundamentally different mechanisms of speciation (co-speciation vs. host-switching) may have occurred on the same hosts in Europe within a time span of less than 1.5 My in two gyrodactylid ectoparasite species.

  9. Description of a New Temnocephala Species (Platyhelminthes) from the Southern Neotropical Region.

    PubMed

    de León, Rodrigo Ponce; Vera, Bárbara Berón; Volonterio, Odile

    2015-08-01

    The genus Temnocephala is endemic to the Neotropical region. Temnocephala mexicana and Temnocephala chilensis are the only 2 temnocephalans whose known distribution ranges extend to the south beyond Parallel 40°S. No Temnocephala species has ever been recorded from the extensive area between Parallel 43°S and the southern end of the South American continent, which makes the study of the southern limit of the distribution of the genus a topic of great interest. The southernmost report corresponds to T. chilensis from the Telsen River, Chubut Province, Argentina. In March 2000, several temnocephalans were found on the freshwater anomuran crustacean Aegla neuquensis from the same locality; the specimens were identified as belonging to a new species, which is described here. This species is characterized by possessing an unusually thin-walled, narrow zone that has the appearance of a deep groove connecting the introvert to the shaft of the penial stylet; an introvert with 36 longitudinal rows of spines, each bearing 6-8 spines that are progressively smaller towards the distal end; a distal end of the introvert with a very thin, sclerotized wall without spines; a seminal vesicle that opens sub-polarly into the contractile vesicle; a pair of paranephrocytes at the level of the pharynx and a second pair at the level of the anterior portion of the anterior testes, and eggs with very long stalks. On the basis of their overall morphology, host preference, and geographical distribution, T. chilensis and the new species are closely related, so a diagnostic key for the southern species of Temnocephala is also included. The type locality of the new species is in the southern limit of the known distribution area of T. chilensis, so after this work there are 2 known species marking the southern limit of the distribution of the genus.

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of aspartic proteases in eight parasitic platyhelminths: insights into functions and evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Wei, Wei; Luo, Xuenong; Wang, Sen; Hu, Songnian; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-03-15

    We performed genome-wide identifications and comparative genomic analyses of the predicted aspartic proteases (APs) from eight parasitic flatworms, focusing on their evolution, potentials as drug targets and expression patterns. The results revealed that: i) More members of family A01 were identified from the schistosomes than from the cestodes; some evidence implied gene loss events along the class Cestoda, which may be related to the different ways to ingest host nutrition; ii) members in family A22 were evolutionarily highly conserved among all the parasites; iii) one retroviral-like AP in family A28 shared a highly similar predicted 3D structure with the HIV protease, implying its potential to be inhibited by HIV inhibitor-like molecules; and iiii) retrotransposon-associated APs were extensively expanded among these parasites. These results implied that the evolutionary histories of some APs in these parasites might relate to adaptations to their parasitism and some APs might have potential serving as intervention targets.

  11. Comparative genomics of flatworms (platyhelminthes) reveals shared genomic features of ecto- and endoparastic neodermata.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christoph; Fromm, Bastian; Bachmann, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    The ectoparasitic Monogenea comprise a major part of the obligate parasitic flatworm diversity. Although genomic adaptations to parasitism have been studied in the endoparasitic tapeworms (Cestoda) and flukes (Trematoda), no representative of the Monogenea has been investigated yet. We present the high-quality draft genome of Gyrodactylus salaris, an economically important monogenean ectoparasite of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). A total of 15,488 gene models were identified, of which 7,102 were functionally annotated. The controversial phylogenetic relationships within the obligate parasitic Neodermata were resolved in a phylogenomic analysis using 1,719 gene models (alignment length of >500,000 amino acids) for a set of 16 metazoan taxa. The Monogenea were found basal to the Cestoda and Trematoda, which implies ectoparasitism being plesiomorphic within the Neodermata and strongly supports a common origin of complex life cycles. Comparative analysis of seven parasitic flatworm genomes identified shared genomic features for the ecto- and endoparasitic lineages, such as a substantial reduction of the core bilaterian gene complement, including the homeodomain-containing genes, and a loss of the piwi and vasa genes, which are considered essential for animal development. Furthermore, the shared loss of functional fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and the absence of peroxisomes, the latter organelles presumed ubiquitous in eukaryotes except for parasitic protozoans, were inferred. The draft genome of G. salaris opens for future in-depth analyses of pathogenicity and host specificity of poorly characterized G. salaris strains, and will enhance studies addressing the genomics of host-parasite interactions and speciation in the highly diverse monogenean flatworms.

  12. Prey-tracking behavior in the invasive terrestrial planarian Platydemus manokwari (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida).

    PubMed

    Iwai, Noriko; Sugiura, Shinji; Chiba, Satoshi

    2010-11-01

    Platydemus manokwari is a broadly distributed invasive terrestrial flatworm that preys heavily on land snails and has been credited with the demise of numerous threatened island faunas. We examined whether P. manokwari tracks the mucus trails of land snail prey, investigated its ability to determine trail direction, and evaluated prey preference among various land snail species. A plastic treatment plate with the mucus trail of a single species and a control plate without the trail were placed side by side at the exit of cages housing P. manokwari. All trials were then videotaped overnight. The flatworms moved along plates with mucus trails, but did not respond to plates without trails, blank control (distilled water), or with conspecific flatworm trails. When presented at the midpoint of a snail mucus trail, the flatworms followed the trail in a random direction. The flatworms showed a preference when choosing between two plates, each with a mucus trail of different land snail species. Our results suggest that P. manokwari follows snail mucus trails based on chemical cues to increase the chance of encountering prey; however, trail-tracking behavior showed no directionality.

  13. The first troglobitic species of freshwater flatworm of the suborder Continenticola (Platyhelminthes) from South America.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Stella Teles; Morais, Ana Laura Nunes; Cordeiro, Lívia Medeiros; Leal-Zanchet, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Brazilian cave diversity, especially of invertebrates, is poorly known. The Bodoquena Plateau, which is located in the Cerrado Biome in central Brazil, has approximately 200 recorded caves with a rich system of subterranean water resources and high troglobitic diversity. Herein we describe a new troglobitic species of Girardia that represents the first obligate cave-dwelling species of the suborder Continenticola in South America. Specimens of the new species, which occur in a limestone cave in the Bodoquena Plateau, in the Cerrado biome, are unpigmented and eyeless. Species recognition in the genus Girardia is difficult, due to their great morphological resemblance. However, the new species can be easily recognized by a unique feature in its copulatory apparatus, namely a large, branched bulbar cavity with multiple diverticula.

  14. Two new species of freshwater flatworms (Platyhelminthes: Tricladida: Continenticola) from South American caves.

    PubMed

    Souza, Stella; Morais, Ana Laura; Bichuette, Maria Elina; Leal-Zanchet, Ana

    2016-03-14

    The diversity of freshwater triclads in the Neotropical region is considered to be low, but extensive areas of South America remain almost unexplored. Herein we describe two cave-dwelling, new species of Girardia, one from a transition zone of the Cerrado and Caatinga phytophysiognomies and the other from the Cerrado phytophysiognomy. The species from the Cerrado-Caatinga transition is a troglobite, eyeless and whitish; the species from the Cerrado area is possibly a troglophile, since it shows heavily pigmented body and eyes. Each species is easily recognized by a unique combination of features in its external morphology and copulatory apparatus. The two new species of Girardia show a restricted distribution, even the troglophile, and occur in caves without legal protection. Therefore, they must be considered as vulnerable organisms in a conservation context.

  15. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of the Echinostomatoidea Looss, 1899 (Platyhelminthes: Digenea).

    PubMed

    Tkach, Vasyl V; Kudlai, Olena; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2016-03-01

    The Echinostomatoidea is a large, cosmopolitan group of digeneans currently including nine families and 105 genera, the vast majority parasitic, as adults, in birds with relatively few taxa parasitising mammals, reptiles and, exceptionally, fish. Despite the complex structure, diverse content and substantial species richness of the group, almost no attempt has been made to elucidate its phylogenetic relationships at the suprageneric level based on molecules due to the lack of data. Herein, we evaluate the consistency of the present morphology-based classification system of the Echinostomatoidea with the phylogenetic relationships of its members based on partial sequences of the nuclear lsrRNA gene for a broad diversity of taxa (80 species, representing eight families and 40 genera), including representatives of five subfamilies of the Echinostomatidae, which currently exhibits the most complex taxonomic structure within the superfamily. This first comprehensive phylogeny for the Echinostomatoidea challenged the current systematic framework based on comparative morphology. A morphology-based evaluation of this new molecular framework resulted in a number of systematic and nomenclatural changes consistent with the phylogenetic estimates of the generic and suprageneric boundaries and a new phylogeny-based classification of the Echinostomatoidea. In the current systematic treatment: (i) the rank of two family level lineages, the former Himasthlinae and Echinochasminae, is elevated to full family status; (ii) Caballerotrema is distinguished at the family level; (iii) the content and diagnosis of the Echinostomatidae (sensu stricto) (s. str.) are revised to reflect its phylogeny, resulting in the abolition of the Nephrostominae and Chaunocephalinae as synonyms of the Echinostomatidae (s. str.); (iv) Artyfechinostomum, Cathaemasia, Rhopalias and Ribeiroia are re-allocated within the Echinostomatidae (s. str.), resulting in the abolition of the Cathaemasiidae, Rhopaliidae and Ribeiroiinae, which become synonyms of the Echinostomatidae (s. str.); and (v) refinements of the generic boundaries within the Echinostomatidae (s. str.), Psilostomidae and Fasciolidae are made.

  16. Identification of thyroid hormone receptor homologs in the fluke Opisthorchis felineus (Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Pakharukova, Maria Y; Ershov, Nikita I; Vorontsova, Elena V; Shilov, Alexander G; Merkulova, Tatyana I; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2014-01-01

    The liver fluke, Opisthorchis felineus of the Opisthorchiidae family, is a well-known causative agent of opisthorchiasis in Russia and Europe. The aim of this work was to identify genes encoding thyroid hormone receptors in O. felineus, and to analyze the expression of possible target genes in response to treatment with exogenous thyroid hormones. We identified two genes encoding thyroid hormone receptors in the O. felineus genome, THRA and THRB. The genes were differentially expressed through the life cycle. The maximal level of mRNA expression of THRA1 and THRB was observed in adult worms. Treatment of the worms with triiodothyronine and thyroxine resulted in an increase in glucose 6-phosphatase mRNA expression and a decrease in malate dehydrogenase mRNA expression, potential gene targets of thyroid hormones. These data indicate that thyroid hormone receptors may perform essential roles in physiological processes in adult O. felineus.

  17. First report of the land planarian Diversibipalium multilineatum (Makino & Shirasawa, 1983) (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Continenticola) in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Giuseppe; Menchetti, Mattia; Sluys, Ronald; Solà, Eduard; Riutort, Marta; Tricarico, Elena; Justine, Jean-Lou; Cavigioli, Luca; Mori, Emiliano

    2016-01-26

    Introduction of alien species may significantly affect soil ecosystems, through predation or disruption of components of native ecosystems (Winsor et al. 2004; Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014; Justine et al. 2014). Land planarians have been reported as alien species in soils throughout the world and, among those, some species are considered to be successful invaders, e.g. Platydemus manokwari de Beauchamp, 1963, Arthurdendyus triangulatus (Dendy, 1894), Bipalium adventitium Hyman, 1943, Bipalium kewense Moseley, 1878 and Dolichoplana striata Moseley, 1877 (Winsor et al. 2004; Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014; Justine et al. 2014, 2015). Soil moisture status seems to be an important element for their successful invasion (Fraser & Boag 1998). In Europe at least 18 species of alien land planarians have been recorded since now and some of them are considered as invasive ones, e.g. P. manokwari (cf. Justine et al. 2014). Although the alien land planarian B. kewense has been reported to occur in many greenhouses in Italy (Bello et al. 1995), no data are available on its establishment and/or impact on natural environments. On 28th September 2014, 20 specimens (~1 individual/m2) of the land planarian Diversibipalium multilineatum (Makino & Shirasawa, 1983) (Fig. 1), native to Japan, were collected under pots, branches and plastic materials in a private garden located in the center of Bologna (Emilia Romagna, Central Italy), near the urban park Giardini Margherita (44°29' N, 11°21' E; WGS84). Thirty plant species (both indigenous and alien), mainly cultivated as bonsai (e.g. Lagerstroemia indica L., Juniperus procumbens (Siebold ex Endl.) Miquel), were present in this shady, wet garden (25 m2). Between March 2014 and June 2015, 70 more specimens of D. multilineatum were collected at the same site, mainly at dusk and dawn after rain. Reproduction by fission and regeneration processes were observed in several of those specimens, which were kept for some time in captivity. A specimen of D. multilineatum was also collected in a garden in Léguevin (Haute-Garonne, France), which will be described in a forthcoming paper by Justine et al. (in prep.) (see also Kawakatsu et al. 2014). Specimens without a genital pore were initially ascribed to D. multilineatum on the basis of their external appearance: the dorsal surface was brownish yellow and presented five longitudinal stripes at the head plate and the neck, showing the typical appearance of the species. The middorsal stripe was widened at its anterior end, on the head plate, and at the pharynx level. The ventral pattern of the animals at the pharyngeal region was also characteristic, with the middorsal stripe widened at this level. The Italian Diversibipalium specimens used for the molecular analysis were fixed and preserved in absolute ethanol. Fragments of the mitochondrial gene COI and 28S ribosomal RNA nuclear gene (GenBank Acc. Numbers KU245358 and KU245357, respectively) were obtained using the procedure and COI primers described in Álvarez-Presas et al. (2008) and Solà et al. (2013). The French specimen's COI (Specimen MNHN JL177, GenBank Acc. Number KT922162) was obtained as described in Justine et al. (2015). 28S sequences of 14 Bipaliinae specimens and four Microplana species (outgroup) retrieved from GenBank were included in the phylogenetic analyses (Fig. 2). Sequence alignment was obtained by using the online software MAFFT version 7 (Katoh & Standley 2013), while ambiguously aligned positions were removed using the program Gblocks (Talavera & Castresana 2007) with default settings, excepting the minimum number of sequences for a flank position at the minimum value (set at 10) and with half of the allowed gap positions. The final alignment had a length of 1589 bp. We used two phylogenetic inference approaches: maximum likelihood (ML), using the RaxML 8.2.3 software (Stamatakis 2014), and Bayesian inferences (BI), using MrBayes 3.2.4 (Ronquist et al. 2012). The evolutionary model used, GTR+I+G, was estimated to be the best with the software jModeltest 2.1.7 (Darriba et al. 2012; Guindon & Gascuel 2003), using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). MrBayes analyses were performed for 10-milion generation with sampling parameters every 103 and a 25% default burn-in value for the final trees. Convergence of the two runs (average standard deviation of split frequencies << 0.01) and likelihood stationarity were checked. The maximum likelihood analyses were performed under 1000 bootstrap pseudoreplicates. The phylogenetic results show a close and highly supported relationship of the Italian Diversibipalium specimens with those from Japan and South Korea that have been identified as D. multilineatum (Fig. 2). Diversibipalium multilineatum is the sister-group of B. nobile Kawakatsu & Makino, 1982, but with low support. The COI sequences of the French (MNHN JL177) and the Italian Diversibipalium specimens were compared in Geneious v. 8.0.5 (http://www.geneious.com, Kearse et al. 2012) and were found to be identical. These results indicate that the species introduced in both countries is the same, and most probably concerns the species D. multilineatum. The pathways of introduction of D. multilineatum are currently unknown, although a relationship between the horticultural trade and the introduction of alien land planarians is well known (Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014 and references therein). Here we report the first occurrence of individuals of D. multilineatum outside Asia. The GenBank sequence of D. multilineatum from South Korea is not yet supported by a published description of the specimen, while it is debatable whether South Korea should be considered part of the natural range of D. multilineatum, which only seems to include Japan. In the present paper, we consider the South Korean animal to be an introduced specimen. Soil moisture status, temperature, and food availability are considered to be the main factors determining the presence of terrestrial planarians (Boag et al. 1998); the microclimatic conditions of the Italian garden were similar to plant nurseries and greenhouses, while an abundance of food was available, such as isopods [Porcellionides pruinosus (Brandt, 1833)], oligochaetes [Dendrobaena attemsi (Michaelsen, 1902) and several juveniles of Lumbricus spp.] and gastropods [Cernuella cisalpina (Rossmassler, 1837), Cornu aspersum (O.F. Müller 1774), Deroceras reticulatum (O.F. Müller, 1774), Discus rotundatus (O.F. Müller, 1774), Limacus flavus (Linnaeus, 1758), Milax nigricans (Philippi, 1836), Papillifera papillaris (Linnaeus, 1758), Pomatias elegans (O.F. Müller, 1774)]. Moreover, winter 2014 reached the highest temperatures and rainfall of the last two decades (source: CNR-ISAC, Bologna), thus favouring establishment and spread of D. multilineatum. The potential environmental impacts of some invasive flatworms are well documented (Álvarez-Presas et al. 2014; Justine et al. 2014) and, even if these effects have not yet been assessed for D. multilineatum, the adoption of precautionary measures and of early intervention is here strongly recommended (Genovesi & Shine 2004). Finally, knowledge of the introduction pathway(s), together with the analysis of prey preference and possible impact on the invertebrate fauna, will be essential to halt or at least to limit the spread of this introduced land flatworm.

  18. Historical analysis of the type species of the genus Trichobilharzia Skrjabin et Zakharov, 1920 (Platyhelminthes: Schistosomatidae).

    PubMed

    Aldhoun, Jitka; Kment, Petr; Horák, Petr

    2016-02-29

    Trichobilharzia Skrjabin & Zakharov, 1920 is known as the most species-rich genus of the blood fluke family Schistosomatidae. To date, more than 40 species have been described, even though validity of some of them is questionable (Horák et al. 2002). Members of the genus use various birds as final hosts, but they attract attention mostly as causative agents of hypersensitive skin reaction (cercarial dermatitis or swimmer's itch) in mammals including humans. As this is one of the.

  19. Gill monogenean communities (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Dactylogyridae) of butterflyfishes from tropical Indo-West Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Reverter, Miriam; Cutmore, Scott C; Bray, Rodney; Cribb, Thomas H; Sasal, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We studied the monogenean communities of 34 species of butterflyfish from the tropical Indo-West Pacific, identifying 13 dactylogyrid species (including two species that are presently undescribed). Monogenean assemblages differed significantly between host species in terms of taxonomic structure, intensity and prevalence. Parasite richness ranged from 0 (Chaetodon lunulatus) to 11 (C. auriga, C. citrinellus and C. lunula). Host specificity varied between the dactylogyrids species, being found on 2-29 of the 34 chaetodontid species examined. Sympatric butterflyfish species were typically parasitized by different combinations of dactylogyrid species, suggesting the existence of complex host-parasite interactions. We identified six clusters of butterflyfish species based on the similarities of their dactylogyrid communities. Dactylogyrid richness and diversity were not related to host size, diet specialization, depth range or phylogeny of butterflyfish species. However, there was a weak positive correlation between monogenean richness and diversity and host geographical range. Most communities of dactylogyrids were dominated by Haliotrema aurigae and H. angelopterum, indicating the importance of the genus Haliotrema in shaping monogenean communities of butterflyfishes. This study casts light on the structure of the monogenean communities of butterflyfishes, suggesting that the diversity and complexity of community structures arises from a combination of host species-specific parameters.

  20. MicroRNA loci support conspecificity of Gyrodactylus salaris and Gyrodactylus thymalli (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Fromm, Bastian; Burow, Susann; Hahn, Christoph; Bachmann, Lutz

    2014-10-01

    The monogenean flatworm Gyrodactylus salaris is a serious threat to wild and farmed Atlantic salmon stocks in Norway. Morphologically, the closely related but harmless Gyrodactylus thymalli on grayling can hardly be distinguished from G. salaris. Until now, molecular approaches could not resolve unambiguously whether G. salaris and G. thymalli represent just one polytypic species, two polytypic species or a complex of more than two species. In the first known genome-wide analysis utilizing 37 conserved microRNA loci, the genetic differentiation of seven populations of G. salaris and G. thymalli was assessed. The concatenated alignment spanned 21,742bp including 62 variable positions. A neighbor-joining cluster analysis did not support any host-based or mitochondrial haplotype-based grouping of strains. We conclude that a two species concept for G. salaris and G. thymalli does not reflect meaningful biological entities. Instead, G. salaris and G. thymalli are just one species comprising several pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains on various primary hosts. Following the International Code for Zoological Nomenclature, G. salaris Malmberg, 1957 is the valid species name with G. thymalli Žitňan, 1960 becoming the junior synonym. Accordingly, the range of G. salaris is significantly increased, given that formerly G. salaris-free countries such as e.g., Great Britain are now within the species' natural range. The synonymization of G. salaris and G. thymalli implies severe challenges to current disease management routines, which assume that G. salaris and G. thymalli are readily distinguishable. Protocols for reliable identification of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of G. salaris need to be developed.

  1. A new and aberrant species of Dugesia (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Dugesiidae) from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Stocchino, Giacinta Angela; Sluys, Ronald; Manconi, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we report a new species of Dugesia of the family Dugesiidae from Madagascar, representing the fourth species of freshwater planarian known from this global biodiversity hotspot. In some respects the new species is aberrant, when compared with its congeners, being characterized by a head with smoothly rounded auricles, a peculiar course of the oviducts, including the presence of a common posterior extension, and by the asymmetrical openings of the vasa deferentia at about halfway along the seminal vesicle. Further, it is characterized by a ventral course of the ejaculatory duct with a terminal opening, very long spermiducal vesicles and unstalked cocoons. Its diploid chromosome complement with 18 chromosomes represents an uncommon feature among fissiparous species of Dugesia. PMID:25147450

  2. Comparison of the hemoglobins of the platyhelminths Gastrothylax crumenifer and Paramphistomum epiclitum (Trematoda: Paramphistomatidae).

    PubMed

    Haque, M; Rashid, K A; Stern, M S; Sharma, P K; Siddiqi, A H; Vinogradov, S N; Walz, D A

    1992-04-01

    1. Gastrothylax crumenifer and Paramphistomum epiclitum parasitize the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis. 2. Gastrothylas hemoglobin consisted of two fractions of ca 30,000 and ca 18,000 by gel filtration. SDS-electrophoresis showed both to be single, ca 15,000 chains. 3. Paramphistomum hemoglobin was ca 16,000 by both gel filtration and SDS-electrophoresis. 4. Reversed-phase chromatography of carboxymethylated trematode and buffalo globins gave single peaks and two peaks, respectively. Although Paramphistomum hemoglobin provided and N-terminal sequence, Gastrothylax hemoglobin did not, suggesting blocked N-terminals. The buffalo sequences were found to be identical to the sequences of the alpha and beta chains of bovine hemoglobin. 5. Although Paramphistomum hemoglobin consists of only one chain, Gastrothylax hemoglobin consists either of one chain which aggregates to a dimer or of two different chains, only one of which aggregates to a dimer.

  3. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of the Echinostomatoidea Looss, 1899 (Platyhelminthes: Digenea).

    PubMed

    Tkach, Vasyl V; Kudlai, Olena; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2016-03-01

    The Echinostomatoidea is a large, cosmopolitan group of digeneans currently including nine families and 105 genera, the vast majority parasitic, as adults, in birds with relatively few taxa parasitising mammals, reptiles and, exceptionally, fish. Despite the complex structure, diverse content and substantial species richness of the group, almost no attempt has been made to elucidate its phylogenetic relationships at the suprageneric level based on molecules due to the lack of data. Herein, we evaluate the consistency of the present morphology-based classification system of the Echinostomatoidea with the phylogenetic relationships of its members based on partial sequences of the nuclear lsrRNA gene for a broad diversity of taxa (80 species, representing eight families and 40 genera), including representatives of five subfamilies of the Echinostomatidae, which currently exhibits the most complex taxonomic structure within the superfamily. This first comprehensive phylogeny for the Echinostomatoidea challenged the current systematic framework based on comparative morphology. A morphology-based evaluation of this new molecular framework resulted in a number of systematic and nomenclatural changes consistent with the phylogenetic estimates of the generic and suprageneric boundaries and a new phylogeny-based classification of the Echinostomatoidea. In the current systematic treatment: (i) the rank of two family level lineages, the former Himasthlinae and Echinochasminae, is elevated to full family status; (ii) Caballerotrema is distinguished at the family level; (iii) the content and diagnosis of the Echinostomatidae (sensu stricto) (s. str.) are revised to reflect its phylogeny, resulting in the abolition of the Nephrostominae and Chaunocephalinae as synonyms of the Echinostomatidae (s. str.); (iv) Artyfechinostomum, Cathaemasia, Rhopalias and Ribeiroia are re-allocated within the Echinostomatidae (s. str.), resulting in the abolition of the Cathaemasiidae, Rhopaliidae and Ribeiroiinae, which become synonyms of the Echinostomatidae (s. str.); and (v) refinements of the generic boundaries within the Echinostomatidae (s. str.), Psilostomidae and Fasciolidae are made. PMID:26699402

  4. Preparation and surface labeling of murine eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A W; Cruise, K M; Mitchell, G F; Watt, S M

    1980-01-01

    Eosinophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice infected with the parasite Mesocestoides corti. Approximately 4 X 10(7) eosinophils (purity, 50%) could be harvested from each mouse. A high yield and purity of eosinophils was obtained from the peritoneal cells of infected male BALB/c mice using density centrifugation on a gradient of slightly hypotonic colloidal silica sol (Percoll). After initial irradiation of the mice to lower the lymphocyte contamination, subsequent density gradient (and where necessary sedimentation velocity) centrifugation yielded 10(8) eosinophils (purity > 95%) from six to eight mice. It was also possible to isolate small numbers of eosinophils (2 X 10(4) cells/minute, purity > 99%) without irradiating the mice. This could be achieved by separating the density gradient purified peritoneal cells by light-scatter on a Becton-Dickinson cell sorter (FACS II). Analysis of proteins extracted from eosinophils using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed a group of high molecular weight proteins (bwtween 250K and 160K) which were not as distinctive in the neutrophil profile. Surface labeling was performed, before the cell separation by using 125I and 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3 alpha, 6 alpha-diphenylglycoluril. Only five 125I-labeled proteins were detected initially (all with apparent molecular weights > 50,000). No 125I appeared to be associated with actin under the conditions used for surface labeling. Four of the eosinophil surface labeled proteins corresponded to surface labeled proteins on neutrophils, but the major surface component of the eosinophils (MW 79,000) appeared to be smaller than the major neutrophil protein (MW 90,000). PMID:7409032

  5. The invasive land planarian Platydemus manokwari (Platyhelminthes, Geoplanidae): records from six new localities, including the first in the USA.

    PubMed

    Justine, Jean-Lou; Winsor, Leigh; Barrière, Patrick; Fanai, Crispus; Gey, Delphine; Han, Andrew Wee Kien; La Quay-Velázquez, Giomara; Lee, Benjamin Paul Yi-Hann; Lefevre, Jean-Marc; Meyer, Jean-Yves; Philippart, David; Robinson, David G; Thévenot, Jessica; Tsatsia, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The land planarian Platydemus manokwari de Beauchamp, 1963 or "New Guinea flatworm" is a highly invasive species, mainly in the Pacific area, and recently in Europe (France). We report specimens from six additional countries and territories: New Caledonia (including mainland and two of the Loyalty Islands, Lifou and Maré), Wallis and Futuna Islands, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Puerto Rico, and Florida, USA. We analysed the COI gene (barcoding) in these specimens with two sets of primers and obtained 909 bp long sequences. In addition, specimens collected in Townsville (Australia) were also sequenced. Two haplotypes of the COI sequence, differing by 3.7%, were detected: the "World haplotype" found in France, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, Singapore, Florida and Puerto Rico; and the "Australian haplotype" found in Australia. The only locality with both haplotypes was in the Solomon Islands. The country of origin of Platydemus manokwari is New Guinea, and Australia and the Solomon Islands are the countries closest to New Guinea from which we had specimens. These results suggest that two haplotypes exist in the area of origin of the species, but that only one of the two haplotypes (the "World haplotype") has, through human agency, been widely dispersed. However, since P. manokwari is now recorded from 22 countries in the world and we have genetic information from only 8 of these, with none from New Guinea, this analysis provides only partial knowledge of the genetic structure of the invasive species. Morphological analysis of specimens from both haplotypes has shown some differences in ratio of the genital structures but did not allow us to interpret the haplotypes as different species. The new reports from Florida and Puerto Rico are firsts for the USA, for the American continent, and the Caribbean. P. manokwari is a known threat for endemic terrestrial molluscs and its presence is a matter of concern. While most of the infected territories reported until now were islands, the newly reported presence of the species in mainland US in Florida should be considered a potential major threat to the whole US and even the Americas.

  6. Two new species of Temnocephala (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalida) from the South American snake-necked turtle Hydromedusa tectifera (Testudines, Chelidae).

    PubMed

    Volonterio, Odile

    2010-12-01

    Temnocephala brevicornis Monticelli, 1889 is the only species of the genus Temnocephala Blanchard, 1849 reported from chelonians to date. During a survey of the species of Temnocephala extant in southern Uruguay, two new species were found on the chelonian Hydromedusa tectifera Cope, 1869. They are described here as Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. and Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. Both resemble T. brevicornis, but differ in the morphometry of the penial stylet, and in qualitative details of the reproductive complex. Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. differs from T. brevicornis by having a massive, cylindrical sphincter in the distal portion of the vagina, and a seminal vesicle that opens into the subpolar to equatorial portion of the contractile vesicle. In addition, the penial stylet in Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. is large in relation to body size, straight and more slender, having the distal portion of its shaft slightly sinuous, and a smaller introvert equipped with about 16 distal crowns of smaller spines. Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. is most similar to T. brevicornis, but differs by having a smaller, curved penial stylet that has a smaller introvert in relation to stylet size, with about 10 distal crowns of smaller spines. A key to the species of the Temnocephala from chelonians is provided. This study supports the validity of the following characters previously proposed for the taxonomy of the genus Temnocephala: the shape of the sphincters in the female reproductive system, the shape of the penial stylet, and the number, size, and position of spines in the introvert. PMID:21110724

  7. The invasive land planarian Platydemus manokwari (Platyhelminthes, Geoplanidae): records from six new localities, including the first in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Leigh; Barrière, Patrick; Fanai, Crispus; Gey, Delphine; Han, Andrew Wee Kien; La Quay-Velázquez, Giomara; Lee, Benjamin Paul Yi-Hann; Lefevre, Jean-Marc; Meyer, Jean-Yves; Philippart, David; Robinson, David G.; Thévenot, Jessica; Tsatsia, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The land planarian Platydemus manokwari de Beauchamp, 1963 or “New Guinea flatworm” is a highly invasive species, mainly in the Pacific area, and recently in Europe (France). We report specimens from six additional countries and territories: New Caledonia (including mainland and two of the Loyalty Islands, Lifou and Maré), Wallis and Futuna Islands, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Puerto Rico, and Florida, USA. We analysed the COI gene (barcoding) in these specimens with two sets of primers and obtained 909 bp long sequences. In addition, specimens collected in Townsville (Australia) were also sequenced. Two haplotypes of the COI sequence, differing by 3.7%, were detected: the “World haplotype” found in France, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, Singapore, Florida and Puerto Rico; and the “Australian haplotype” found in Australia. The only locality with both haplotypes was in the Solomon Islands. The country of origin of Platydemus manokwari is New Guinea, and Australia and the Solomon Islands are the countries closest to New Guinea from which we had specimens. These results suggest that two haplotypes exist in the area of origin of the species, but that only one of the two haplotypes (the “World haplotype”) has, through human agency, been widely dispersed. However, since P. manokwari is now recorded from 22 countries in the world and we have genetic information from only 8 of these, with none from New Guinea, this analysis provides only partial knowledge of the genetic structure of the invasive species. Morphological analysis of specimens from both haplotypes has shown some differences in ratio of the genital structures but did not allow us to interpret the haplotypes as different species. The new reports from Florida and Puerto Rico are firsts for the USA, for the American continent, and the Caribbean. P. manokwari is a known threat for endemic terrestrial molluscs and its presence is a matter of concern. While most of the infected territories reported until now were islands, the newly reported presence of the species in mainland US in Florida should be considered a potential major threat to the whole US and even the Americas. PMID:26131377

  8. Development of Mitochondrial Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of the Small Liver Fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Opisthorchiidae; Trematoda; Platyhelminthes)

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nga Thi Bich; Truong, Nam Hai; De, Nguyen Van

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences offer major advantages over the more usual nuclear targets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification approaches (mito-LAMP) because multiple copies occur in every cell. Four LAMP primers [F3, FIP(F1c+F2), BIP(B1c+B2), and B3] were designed based on the mitochondrial nad1 sequence of Opisthorchis viverrini and used for a highly specific assay (mito-OvLAMP) to distinguish DNA of O. viverrini from that of another opisthorchiid (Clonorchis sinensis) and other trematodes (Haplorchis pumilio, Haplorchis taichui, Fasciola hepatica, and Fasciola gigantica). Conventional PCR was applied using F3/B3 primer pairs to verify the specificity of the primers for O. viverrini DNA templates. All LAMP-positive samples could be detected with the naked eye in sunlight, by gel electrophoresis (stained with ethidium bromide), and by addition of SYBR green I to the product in sunlight or under UV light. Only DNA from O. viverrini yielded amplification products by LAMP (and by PCR verification), and the LAMP limit of detection was as little as 100 fg (10−4 ng DNA), indicating that this assay is 10 to 100 times more sensitive than PCR. Field testing was done using representative egg and metacercarial samples collected from localities where the fluke is endemic. With the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity, and cost effectiveness, mito-OvLAMP is a good tool for molecular detection and epidemiology studies in regions or countries where O. viverrini is endemic, which can lead to more effective control of opisthorchiasis and trematodiasis. PMID:22322346

  9. Development of mitochondrial loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of the small liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Opisthorchiidae; Trematoda; Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Le, Thanh Hoa; Nguyen, Nga Thi Bich; Truong, Nam Hai; De, Nguyen Van

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences offer major advantages over the more usual nuclear targets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification approaches (mito-LAMP) because multiple copies occur in every cell. Four LAMP primers [F3, FIP(F1c+F2), BIP(B1c+B2), and B3] were designed based on the mitochondrial nad1 sequence of Opisthorchis viverrini and used for a highly specific assay (mito-OvLAMP) to distinguish DNA of O. viverrini from that of another opisthorchiid (Clonorchis sinensis) and other trematodes (Haplorchis pumilio, Haplorchis taichui, Fasciola hepatica, and Fasciola gigantica). Conventional PCR was applied using F3/B3 primer pairs to verify the specificity of the primers for O. viverrini DNA templates. All LAMP-positive samples could be detected with the naked eye in sunlight, by gel electrophoresis (stained with ethidium bromide), and by addition of SYBR green I to the product in sunlight or under UV light. Only DNA from O. viverrini yielded amplification products by LAMP (and by PCR verification), and the LAMP limit of detection was as little as 100 fg (10(-4) ng DNA), indicating that this assay is 10 to 100 times more sensitive than PCR. Field testing was done using representative egg and metacercarial samples collected from localities where the fluke is endemic. With the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity, and cost effectiveness, mito-OvLAMP is a good tool for molecular detection and epidemiology studies in regions or countries where O. viverrini is endemic, which can lead to more effective control of opisthorchiasis and trematodiasis. PMID:22322346

  10. Spot the difference: Two cryptic species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) infecting Astyanax aeneus (Actinopterygii, Characidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Razo-Mendivil, Ulises; García-Vásquez, Adriana; Rubio-Godoy, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Over the course of one year, undescribed specimens of Gyrodactylus were recovered from banded tetra, Astyanax aeneus collected in the La Antigua and Nautla river basins in central Veracruz, Mexico. Parasites were processed for morphometric and molecular analyses. Morphometrically, Gyrodactylus samples collected in the La Antigua river had slightly smaller haptoral structures than those collected from the Nautla river. During the 12month-collection of samples, however, water temperature varied considerably (ca. 20°C to 30°C), and this abiotic factor is known to affect the size of gyrodactylid attachment structures. Moreover, no clear discrimination was possible between individual parasites collected from the two rivers based on the morphology of the marginal hook, which is recognised as a very informative character to discriminate between species. The morphology of the ventral bar, however, differed between specimens from both rivers: worms from Nautla all had long, rounded processes on the ventral bar, which formed a relatively closed angle with the dorsal edge of the bar proper, while most - but not all - specimens from La Antigua had comparatively slender processes forming a more open angle with respect to the ventral bar. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of the ITS1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS2 of gyrodactylids indicated the existence of two distinct, well-supported lineages whose sequences differ by >4%, one of which was only found in the Nautla basin, while the other was collected in both river systems. A posteriori, principal component analysis (PCA) of the morphometric data of sequenced specimens indicated that features of the dorsal bar, the hamuli and the ventral bar enable discrimination between the two phylogenetic lineages. Based on these independent sources of information (morphometric and molecular data), two new species of Gyrodactylus are described: Gyrodactyluspakan n. sp. and Gyrodactylusteken n. sp. The phylogenetic relationships of both new species to other gyrodactylids infecting characiformes (for which molecular data are available) are presented, which suggests that their closest relative is Gyrodactylus carolinae, a parasite of Characidium lanei in Brazil. PMID:27208885

  11. Massive parasitism by Gussevia tucunarense (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) in fingerlings of bujurqui-tucunare cultured in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Patrick D; Mertins, Omar; Mathews, John P D; Orbe, Rosa I

    2013-06-01

    A high infestation of the monogenean Gussevia tucunarense in a cultivation of bujurqui-tucunare was reported. The prevalence was 100%. The mean intensity and abundance of the parasite was 164.4 of parasites per individual. This is the first report of a high infestation by G. tucunarense in C. semifasciatus cultured from the Peruvian Amazon. PMID:23666660

  12. Light and electron microscopy observations of embryogenesis and egg development in the human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini (Platyhelminthes, Digenea).

    PubMed

    Khampoosa, Panita; Jones, Malcolm K; Lovas, Erica M; Srisawangwong, Tuanchai; Laha, Thewarach; Piratae, Supawadee; Thammasiri, Chalida; Suwannatrai, Apiporn; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn; Eursitthichai, Veerachai; Tesana, Smarn

    2012-02-01

    Eggs of most species digenean flukes hatch in the external environment to liberate larvae that seek and penetrate a snail intermediate host. Those of the human liver flukes, Opisthorchis viverrini, hatch within the gastrointestinal canal of their snail hosts. While adult parasites are primarily responsible for the pathology in cases of human opisthorchiasis, their eggs also contribute by inducing granulomata and in serving as nidi for gallstone formation. In view of the peculiar biology of O. viverrini eggs and their contribution to pathology, we investigated embryogenesis in this species by light and transmission electron microscopy. Egg development was traced from earliest stages of coalescence in the ootype until full embryonation in the distal region of the uterus. Fully mature eggs were generally impermeable to resin and could not be examined by conventional electron microscopy methods. However, the use of high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution fixation of previously fixed eggs enabled the internal structure of mature eggs, particularly the subshell envelopes, to be elucidated. Fertilization occurs in the ootype, and the large zygote is seen therein with a single spermatozoon wrapped around its plasma membrane. As the zygote begins to divide, the spent vitellocytes are pushed to the periphery of the eggs, where they progressively degrade. The early eggshell is formed in the ootype by coalescing eggshell precursor material released by approximately six vitelline cells. The early eggs have a thinner eggshell and are larger than, but lack the characteristic shape of, mature eggs. Characteristic shell ornamentation, the "muskmelon" appearance of eggs, appears after eggshell polymerization in the ootype. Pores are not present in the shell of O. viverrini eggs. The inner and outer envelopes are poorly formed in this species, with the outer envelope evident beneath the eggshell at the opercular pole of the mature egg. The miracidium has a conical anterior end that lacks the distinctive lamellar appearance of the terebratorium of other digeneans, such as the schistosomes. The miracidium is richly glandular, containing an apical gland in the anterior end, large cephalic gland, and posterior secretory glands. Each gland contains a secretory product with different structure. The paucity of vitelline cells associating with eggs, the reduced size of eggs, and reduced complexity of the extraembryonic envelopes are interpreted as adaptations to the peculiar hatching biology of the miracidia. PMID:21786067

  13. On the systematic position of Collyricloides massanae Vaucher, 1969 (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) with notes on distribution of this trematode species.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Gerard; Zaleśny, Grzegorz; Czujkowska, Agnieszka; Sitko, Jiljí; Harris, Philip D

    2015-04-01

    The systematic position of the Collyricloides massanae, a rare cyst-dwelling parasite, located on intestinal wall of European birds and rodents, have always been controversial. Based on newly obtained sequences of the 28 sDNA of C. massanae from avian and rodent host from Central Europe, and on the previously published sequences of several genera and families among Microphalloidea, we evaluate its taxonomic position and the phylogenetic relationships within the genera Collyriclum Kossack, 1911 and Collyricloides Vaucher, 1969 which form the family Collyriclidae Ward, 1917. In the cladogram, C. massanae appears among the Pleurogenidae, forming a clade with Gyrabascus amphoraeformis (Modlinger, 1930) and Cortrema magnicaudata (Bykhovskaya-Pavlovskaya, 1950). We reject the commonly accepted placement of Collyricloides as the sister genus to Collyriclum within the Collyriclidae. Besides, we present and discuss the unusual records of C. massanae in the bank vole Myodes glareolus from northeastern Poland. PMID:25638231

  14. First documentation and molecular confirmation of three trematode species (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda) infecting the polychaete Marenzelleria viridis (Annelida: Spionidae).

    PubMed

    Phelan, Krystin; Blakeslee, April M H; Krause, Maureen; Williams, Jason D

    2016-01-01

    Polychaete worms are hosts to a wide range of marine parasites; yet, studies on trematodes using these ecologically important species as intermediate hosts are lacking. During examination of the spionid polychaete Marenzelleria viridis collected on the north shore of Long Island, New York, putative trematode cysts were discovered in the body cavity of these polychaetes. In order to verify these cysts as metacercariae of trematodes, specimens of the eastern mudsnail Ilyanassa obsoleta (a very common first intermediate host of trematodes in the region) were collected for molecular comparison. DNA barcoding using cytochrome C oxidase I regions confirmed the presence of three species of trematodes (Himasthla quissetensis, Lepocreadium setiferoides, and Zoogonus lasius) in both M. viridis and I. obsoleta hosts. Brown bodies were also recovered from polychaetes, and molecular testing confirmed the presence of L. setiferoides and Z. lasius, indicating an immune response of the polychaete leading to encapsulation of the cysts. From the 125 specimens of M. viridis collected in 2014, 95 (76.8 %) were infected with trematodes; of these 95 infected polychaetes, 86 (90.5 %) contained brown bodies. This is the first confirmation that trematodes use M. viridis as a second intermediate host and that this intermediate host demonstrates a clear immune response to metacercarial infection. Future research should explore the role of these polychaetes in trematode life cycles, the effectiveness of the immune response, and transmission pathways to vertebrate definitive hosts.

  15. Spermatozoon and spermiogenesis in Mesocoelium monas (Platyhelminthes:Digenea): ultrastructure and epifluorescence microscopy of labelling of tubulin and nucleus.

    PubMed

    Iomini, C; Mollaret, I; Albaret, J L; Justine, J L

    1997-01-01

    Spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon were studied in the digenean Mesocoelium monas Rudolphi, 1819 (from the toad Bufo sp. in Gabon). An ultrastructural study revealed that spermiogenesis follows the usual pattern found in digeneans, i.e. proximo-distal fusion of axonemes with a median cytoplasmic process followed by elongation. The spermatozoon has two fully incorporated axonemes with the 9 +"1" trepaxonematan pattern. Indirect immunofluorescence localization of tubulin and fluorescent labelling of the nucleus were used to obtain additional information on the structure of the spermatozoon. It was thus shown that one of the axonemes is slightly shorter than the other (190 versus 220 microns) and that the filiform nucleus (65 microns in length) is located at the distal extremity of the spermatozoon (220 microns in length). Various monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, specific to alpha, beta, acetylated-alpha, or general tubulin, were used and produced similar labelling.

  16. Ribosomal DNA as molecular markers and their applications in the identification of fish parasites (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from India

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Anshu; Verma, Chandni; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2014-01-01

    The development of molecular techniques for taxonomic analysis of monogenean parasites has led to a great increase for proper identification and factualness. These molecular techniques, in particular the use of molecular markers, have been used to identify and validate the monogenean parasites. Although, improvements in marker detection systems particularly of elements of rDNA like 18S, ITS and 28S used in monogeneans parasites have enabled great advances to be made in recent years in India. However, the molecular sequence analysis and phylogenetic relationships among the parasitic helminthes is unconventional in India. Many workers have been always questioned the validity of Indian species of monogeneans and emphasized the need to ascertain the status of species from Indian fish. Here we would like to provide additional resolution for the interpretation of use of molecular markers in study of monogeneans in India. This review provides an overview of current stage of studies in India that have been used in applying molecular techniques to monogenean.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of dicyemid mesozoans (phylum Dicyemida) from innexin amino acid sequences: dicyemids are not related to Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito G; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-06-01

    Dicyemid mesozoans are endoparasites, or endosymbionts, found only in the renal sac of benthic cephalopod molluscs. The body organization of dicyemids is very simple, consisting of usually 10 to 40 cells, with neither body cavities nor differentiated organs. Dicyemids were considered as primitive animals, and the out-group of all metazoans, or as occupying a basal position of lophotrochozoans close to flatworms. We cloned cDNAs encoding for the gap junction component proteins, innexin, from the dicyemids. Its expression pattern was observed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In adult individuals, the innexin was expressed in calottes, infusorigens, and infusoriform embryos. The unique temporal pattern was observed in the developing infusoriform embryos. Innexin amino acid sequences had taxon-specific indels which enabled identification of the 3 major protostome lineages, i.e., 2 ecdysozoans (arthropods and nematodes) and the lophotrochozoans. The dicyemids show typical, lophotrochozoan-type indels. In addition, the Bayesian and maximum likelihood trees based on the innexin amino acid sequences suggested dicyemids to be more closely related to the higher lophotrochozoans than to the flatworms. Flatworms were the sister group, or consistently basal, to the other lophotrochozoan clade that included dicyemids, annelids, molluscs, and brachiopods.

  18. On the systematic position of Collyricloides massanae Vaucher, 1969 (Platyhelminthes: Digenea) with notes on distribution of this trematode species.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Gerard; Zaleśny, Grzegorz; Czujkowska, Agnieszka; Sitko, Jiljí; Harris, Philip D

    2015-04-01

    The systematic position of the Collyricloides massanae, a rare cyst-dwelling parasite, located on intestinal wall of European birds and rodents, have always been controversial. Based on newly obtained sequences of the 28 sDNA of C. massanae from avian and rodent host from Central Europe, and on the previously published sequences of several genera and families among Microphalloidea, we evaluate its taxonomic position and the phylogenetic relationships within the genera Collyriclum Kossack, 1911 and Collyricloides Vaucher, 1969 which form the family Collyriclidae Ward, 1917. In the cladogram, C. massanae appears among the Pleurogenidae, forming a clade with Gyrabascus amphoraeformis (Modlinger, 1930) and Cortrema magnicaudata (Bykhovskaya-Pavlovskaya, 1950). We reject the commonly accepted placement of Collyricloides as the sister genus to Collyriclum within the Collyriclidae. Besides, we present and discuss the unusual records of C. massanae in the bank vole Myodes glareolus from northeastern Poland.

  19. A new and alien species of ``oyster leech'' (Platyhelminthes, Polycladida, Stylochidae) from the brackish North Sea Canal, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluys, Ronald; Faubel, Anno; Rajagopal, Sanjeevi; Velde, Gerard Van Der

    2005-11-01

    A new species of polyclad flatworm, Imogine necopinata Sluys, sp. nov., is described from a brackish habitat in The Netherlands. Taxonomic affinities with Asian species and the ecology of the animals suggest that the species is an introduced, exotic component of the Dutch fauna. The new species belongs to a group of worms with species that are known to predate on oysters.

  20. Morphological and molecular characterisation of Gyrodactylus salmonis (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) isolates collected in Mexico from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Rubio-Godoy, Miguel; Paladini, Giuseppe; Freeman, Mark A; García-Vásquez, Adriana; Shinn, Andrew P

    2012-05-25

    Gyrodactylus salmonis (Yin et Sproston, 1948) isolates collected from feral rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) in Veracruz, southeastern Mexico are described. Morphological and molecular variation of these isolates to G. salmonis collected in Canada and the U.S.A. is characterised. Morphologically, the marginal hook sickles of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis closely resemble those of Canadian specimens - their shaft and hook regions align closely with one another; only features of the sickle base and a prominent bridge to the toe permit their separation. The 18S sequence determined from the Mexican specimens was identical to two variable regions of SSU rDNA obtained from a Canadian population of G. salmonis. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions (spanning ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2) of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis are identical to ITS sequences of an American population of G. salmonis and to Gyrodactylus salvelini Kuusela, Ziętara et Lumme, 2008 from Finland. Analyses of the ribosomal RNA gene of Mexican isolates of G. salmonis show 98-99% similarity to those of Gyrodactylus gobiensis Gläser, 1974, Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957, and Gyrodactylus rutilensis Gläser, 1974. Mexican and American isolates of G. salmonis are 98% identical, as assessed by sequencing the mitochondrial cox1 gene. Oncorhynchus mykiss is one of the most widely-dispersed fish species in the world and has been shown to be an important vector for parasite/disease transmission. Considering that Mexican isolates of G. salmonis were collected well outside the native distribution range of all salmonid fish, we discuss the possibility that the parasites were translocated with their host through the aquacultural trade. In addition, this study includes a morphological review of Gyrodactylus species collected from rainbow trout and from other salmonid fish of the genus Oncorhynchus which occur throughout North America.

  1. Two new species of Temnocephala (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalida) from the South American snake-necked turtle Hydromedusa tectifera (Testudines, Chelidae).

    PubMed

    Volonterio, Odile

    2010-12-01

    Temnocephala brevicornis Monticelli, 1889 is the only species of the genus Temnocephala Blanchard, 1849 reported from chelonians to date. During a survey of the species of Temnocephala extant in southern Uruguay, two new species were found on the chelonian Hydromedusa tectifera Cope, 1869. They are described here as Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. and Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. Both resemble T. brevicornis, but differ in the morphometry of the penial stylet, and in qualitative details of the reproductive complex. Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. differs from T. brevicornis by having a massive, cylindrical sphincter in the distal portion of the vagina, and a seminal vesicle that opens into the subpolar to equatorial portion of the contractile vesicle. In addition, the penial stylet in Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. is large in relation to body size, straight and more slender, having the distal portion of its shaft slightly sinuous, and a smaller introvert equipped with about 16 distal crowns of smaller spines. Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. is most similar to T. brevicornis, but differs by having a smaller, curved penial stylet that has a smaller introvert in relation to stylet size, with about 10 distal crowns of smaller spines. A key to the species of the Temnocephala from chelonians is provided. This study supports the validity of the following characters previously proposed for the taxonomy of the genus Temnocephala: the shape of the sphincters in the female reproductive system, the shape of the penial stylet, and the number, size, and position of spines in the introvert.

  2. Ultrastructural study of the male gamete of Pleurogonius truncatus Prudhoe, 1944 (Platyhelminthes, Digenea, Pronocephalidae) parasite of Eretmochelys imbricata (Linnaeus, 1766).

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Quilichini, Yann; Sène, Aminata; Tkach, Vasyl V; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2012-04-01

    In Pronocephaloidea, the spermatozoa of only two species have been studied today. Because of this, we present in this work data concerning to a third specie, Pleurogonius truncatus Prudhoe, 1944. The mature spermatozoon of P. truncatus possesses two axonemes with the 9+"1" pattern typical of Trepaxonemata, mitochondrion, nucleus, parallel cortical microtubules, spinelike bodies, cytoplasmic expansion and an external ornamentation of the plasma membrane. A particularity of the spermatozoon of P. truncatus is in the ultrastructure of the anterior spermatozoon extremity with only cortical microtubules and ornamentation of the plasma membrane. This type of anterior extremity has never been described until today in Pronocephaloidea. On the other hand, the ultrastructure of the posterior extremity of the spermatozoon confirms that already described in Pronocephalidae.

  3. Macrostomida (Platyhelminthes: Rhabditophora) from Argentina, with descriptions of two new species of Macrostomum and of stylet ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Franscisco

    2006-10-01

    In this work, two new species of the genus Macrostomum (M. velastylum n. sp. and M. puntapiedrensis n. sp.) are described from the littoral benthos of the Río de la Plata estuary, Argentina. This is the first description of members of the Macrostomidae from Argentina, and of a species documented from both limnic and brackish-water environments. Macrostomum velastylum differs from its congeners in the fine details of its stylet, which are described using a new technique for stylet isolation and observation (scanning electron microscope). This method provides new information on stylet structure relative to traditional whole-mount techniques. Macrostomum puntapiedrensis differs from others species of the M. orthostylum group in the length and morphology of the distal tip of the stylet. Further details are provided on additional macrostomids from Argentina, including potential conspecifics of M. vejdovskyi, M. viride, and M. lineare.

  4. Sperm ultrastructure of the digenean Aphallus tubarium (Rudolphi, 1819) Poche, 1926 (Platyhelminthes, Cryptogonimidae) intestinal parasite of Dentex dentex (Pisces, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Foata, J; Quilichini, Y; Greani, S; Marchand, B

    2012-02-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of a cryptogonimid digenean, Aphallus tubarium, a parasite of Dentex dentex, is described. The spermatozoon possesses the elements found in other digeneans: two axonemes with 9+"1" pattern, a mitochondrion, a nucleus, cortical microtubules, external ornamentation and spine-like bodies. However, the mitochondrion appears as a cord with a bulge; this characteristic has never been described in other studied cryptogonimid and in other digeneans except in one lepocreadiid, Holorchis micracanthum. Likewise, the presence of a thin cytoplasm termination in the anterior part of the spermatozoon has never been pointed out in the cryptogonimids.

  5. Massive parasitism by Gussevia tucunarense (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) in fingerlings of bujurqui-tucunare cultured in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Patrick D; Mertins, Omar; Mathews, John P D; Orbe, Rosa I

    2013-06-01

    A high infestation of the monogenean Gussevia tucunarense in a cultivation of bujurqui-tucunare was reported. The prevalence was 100%. The mean intensity and abundance of the parasite was 164.4 of parasites per individual. This is the first report of a high infestation by G. tucunarense in C. semifasciatus cultured from the Peruvian Amazon.

  6. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the monogenean Gyrodactylus thymalli (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea), a parasite of grayling (Thymallus thymallus).

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Laetitia; Huyse, Tine; Littlewood, D T J; Bakke, Tor A; Bachmann, Lutz

    2007-08-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of Gyrodactylus thymalli, a monogenean ectoparasite on grayling (Thymallus thymallus). The circular genome is 14788 bp in size and includes all 35 genes recognized from other flatworm mt genomes. The overall A+T content of the mt genome is 62.8%. Twenty regions of non-coding DNA ranging from 1 to 111 bp in length were identified in addition to 2 highly conserved large non-coding regions 799 bp and 767 bp in size. Compared to the recently described mt DNA of the closely related G. salaris from Atlantic salmon from Signaldalselva, Norway, the mitochondrial genome of G. thymalli from Hnilec, Slovakia, differs on average by 2.2%.

  7. Mitochondrial haplotype diversity of Gyrodactylus thymalli (Platyhelminthes; Monogenea): extended geographic sampling in United Kingdom, Poland, and Norway reveals further lineages.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Haakon; Bakke, Tor A; Bachmann, Lutz

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, the mitochondrial haplotype diversity of the monogenean ectoparasites Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 on Atlantic salmon and G. thymalli Zitnan, 1960 on grayling has been studied intensively to understand the taxonomy and phylogeography of the two species. According to these studies, neither species can be considered monophyletic, but unfortunately, the geographic sampling has mostly been restricted to Fennoscandia. Only few samples from continental Europe have been analysed, and samples from the United Kingdom have not been included at all. Gyrodactylosis is a notifiable disease in Europe and is in the UK considered the most important exotic disease threat to wild Atlantic salmon populations. In this study, we report six new mitochondrial haplotypes of G. thymalli from England, Poland, and Norway detected by sequencing 745 bp of the cytochrome oxidase I gene. The six new haplotypes add five new clades to a neighbor-joining dendrogram deduced on the basis of the currently known 44 mitochondrial haplotypes for G. thymalli and G. salaris. We conclude that G. thymalli established in the UK along with the immigration of grayling. There is currently no reason to suspect that this parasite is a threat to Atlantic salmon in the UK, although its infectivity to salmon stocks in the UK has not been tested.

  8. Cryptostylochus hullensis sp. nov. (Polycladida, Acotylea, Platyhelminthes): A possible case of transoceanic dispersal on a ship's hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, A.; Gollasch, S.

    1996-12-01

    In July 1993, the car carrier “Faust” entered Bremerhaven after a voyage from the North-American Atlantic coast to Europe. In a dockyard, five living specimens of the order Polycladida were collected from the hull of the ship. This could be a possible case of trans-atlantic dispersal of plathelminths living as fouling organisms of ships. The specimens found represent a new species of the genus Cryptostylochus Faubel, 1983, Cryptostylochus hullensis sp. nov.

  9. Reproduction and survival under different water temperatures of Gyrodactylus mexicanus (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea), a parasite of Girardinichthys multiradiatus in Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sereno-Uribe, Ana L; Zambrano, Luis; García-Varela, Martín

    2012-12-01

    Gyrodactylid population growth may depend on abiotic variables such as temperature. We tested the survival and reproductive rate of Gyrodactylus mexicanus, a parasite infecting fins of Girardinichthys multiradiatus, at 3 different water temperatures, 10-13, 19-22, and 24 C. The temporal sequence of birth and age at death of each parasite isolated from the hosts was recorded through at least 8 generations. Our results showed that the average number of offspring per parasite was 2.0 when averaged across all temperatures. However, the generation time was negatively correlated with temperature. The innate capacity for increase (r(m)) was positively correlated with water temperature: from 0.29 parasite/day at 13 C to 0.48 parasite/day at 24 C. These data confirm that water temperature has a direct influence on parasite population dynamics. The current study represents the first contribution to understanding the population ecology of the monogenean G. mexicanus in central Mexico.

  10. A comprehensive molecular phylogeny of dalytyphloplanida (platyhelminthes: rhabdocoela) reveals multiple escapes from the marine environment and origins of symbiotic relationships.

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Niels; Tessens, Bart; Willems, Wim; Backeljau, Thierry; Jondelius, Ulf; Artois, Tom

    2013-01-01

    In this study we elaborate the phylogeny of Dalytyphloplanida based on complete 18S rDNA (156 sequences) and partial 28S rDNA (125 sequences), using a Maximum Likelihood and a Bayesian Inference approach, in order to investigate the origin of a limnic or limnoterrestrial and of a symbiotic lifestyle in this large group of rhabditophoran flatworms. The results of our phylogenetic analyses and ancestral state reconstructions indicate that dalytyphloplanids have their origin in the marine environment and that there was one highly successful invasion of the freshwater environment, leading to a large radiation of limnic and limnoterrestrial dalytyphloplanids. This monophyletic freshwater clade, Limnotyphloplanida, comprises the taxa Dalyelliidae, Temnocephalida, and most Typhloplanidae. Temnocephalida can be considered ectosymbiotic Dalyelliidae as they are embedded within this group. Secondary returns to brackish water and marine environments occurred relatively frequently in several dalyeliid and typhloplanid taxa. Our phylogenies also show that, apart from the Limnotyphloplanida, there have been only few independent invasions of the limnic environment, and apparently these were not followed by spectacular speciation events. The distinct phylogenetic positions of the symbiotic taxa also suggest multiple origins of commensal and parasitic life strategies within Dalytyphloplanida. The previously established higher-level dalytyphloplanid clades are confirmed in our topologies, but many of the traditional families are not monophyletic. Alternative hypothesis testing constraining the monophyly of these families in the topologies and using the approximately unbiased test, also statistically rejects their monophyly.

  11. Host-based identification is not supported by morphometrics in natural populations of Gyrodactylus salaris and G. thymalli (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Olstad, K; Shinn, A P; Bachmann, L; Bakke, T A

    2007-12-01

    Gyrodactylus salaris is a serious pest of wild pre-smolt Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Norway. The closely related G. thymalli, originally described from grayling (Thymallus thymallus), is assumed harmless to both grayling and salmon. The 2 species are difficult to distinguish using traditional, morphometric methods or molecular approaches. The aim of this study was to explore whether there is a consistent pattern of morphometrical variation between G. salaris and G. thymalli and to analyse the morphometric variation in the context of 'diagnostic realism' (in natural populations). Specimens from the type-material for the 2 species are also included. In total, 27 point-to-point measurements from the opisthaptoral hard parts were used and analysed by digital image processing and uni- and multivariate morphometry. All populations most closely resembled its respective type material, as expected from host species, with the exception of G. thymalli from the Norwegian river Trysilelva. We, therefore, did not find clear support in the morphometrical variation among G. salaris and G. thymalli for an a priori species delineation based on host. The present study also indicates an urgent need for more detailed knowledge on the influence of environmental factors on the phenotype of gyrodactylid populations.

  12. Molecular cloning, functional characterization and localization of an annexin from a fish gill fluke Microcotyle sebastis (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kwon, Se Ryun; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, Ki Hong

    2009-01-01

    The full cDNA of an annexin gene from Microcotyle sebastis (MsANX) was cloned for the first time in monogeneans. The cDNA of MsANX comprises 1199bp with a 29bp 5' untranslated region, an open reading frame of 1062bp, and a 108bp 3' untranslated region. The recombinantly produced MsANX bound phosphatidylserine vesicles in the presence of Ca2+, whereas no MsANX was precipitated in the absence of free Ca2+. Phylogenetically, MsANX formed a cluster with human annexin A13, known as the earliest annexin in vertebrates and expressed mainly in the intestine. The localization of MsANX in M. sebastis was analyzed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry using the antiserum raised against the recombinant MsANX. In Western blot analysis, rat antiserum bound to a protein corresponding to the MsANX in size when worm crude extracts were used as antigens, but no bands were detected by the antiserum when the excretory/secretory proteins of worms were used as antigens. In immunohistochemistry analysis, significant antibody binding annexin was found in the ovarian region, the pharynx and the intestinal caecum of the worm. Interestingly, the alimentary canal location of MsANX was similar to the location of human annexin A13, and further research is needed to trace evolutionary relationship among helminthic annexins and human annexin A13. Also it remains to be investigated whether immunization of naïve fish with the recombinant MsANX can induce protective immune responses against M. sebastis infection.

  13. The mitochondrial genome of Gyrodactylus derjavinoides (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea)--a mitogenomic approach for Gyrodactylus species and strain identification.

    PubMed

    Huyse, Tine; Buchmann, Kurt; Littlewood, D T J

    2008-07-01

    Systematists and evolutionary biologists are constantly on the lookout for new sources of characters to discriminate amongst taxa and estimate interrelationships within and between taxa. Entire mitochondrial genomes provide a wealth of data, both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. Molecular markers are of particular utility when applied to small, morphologically conserved taxa, as is the case for many monogenean ectoparasites of fish. Gyrodactylus species display a considerable degree of anatomical conservatism, complicating diagnostics based solely on morphology, and some are significant pests of wild and cultured fish. Here we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Gyrodactylus derjavinoides Malmberg, Collins, Cunningham & Behiar 2007, one of the most frequently found gyrodactylid species on salmonids in Scandinavia, and compared it with the recently published genomes of Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg, 1957 and Gyrodactylus thymalli Zitnan 1960. Through comparative sliding window analysis we identified regions of high sequence variability and designed new primer sequences. In total, 6 new primer pairs have been developed, amplifying fragments of cox1, cox3, nad1, nad2, nad4, nad5 and atp6. Together, they amplify regions capturing almost half the nucleotide variability present in the complete mitochondrial genome. These degenerate primers should also work for other Gyrodactylus species parasitizing salmonids. In addition, we developed a multiplex assay that simultaneously amplifies four fragments in a single PCR reaction. Besides the diagnostic value, these fragments can be used for studying the transmission dynamics of Gyrodactylus, providing crucial information for an improved understanding of the spread and epidemiology of these important fish pathogens.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of Neobenedenia melleni (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea): mitochondrial gene content, arrangement and composition compared with two Benedenia species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Xiangyun; Li, Yanwei; Zhao, Mengwei; Xie, Mingquan; Li, Anxing

    2014-10-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences of Neobenedenia melleni were determined and compared with those of Benedenia seriolae and B. hoshinai. This circular genome comprises 13,270 bp and includes all 36 typical mt genes found in flatworms. Total AT content of N. melleni is 75.9 %. ATG is the most common start codon, while nad4L is initiated by GTG. All protein-coding genes are predicted to terminate with TAG and TAA. N. melleni has the trnR with a TCG anticodon, which is the same to B. seriolae but different from B. hoshinai (ACG). The mt gene arrangement of N. melleni is similar to that of B. seriolae and B. hoshinai with the exception of three translocations (trnF, trnT and trnG). The overlapped region between nad4L and nad4 was found in the N. melleni mt genome, which was also reported for the published Gyrodactylus species, but it was not found in those of B. seriolae and B. hoshinai, which are non-coding regions instead. The present study provides useful molecular characters for species or strain identification and systematic studies of this parasite.

  15. Development of mitochondrial loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of the small liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Opisthorchiidae; Trematoda; Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Le, Thanh Hoa; Nguyen, Nga Thi Bich; Truong, Nam Hai; De, Nguyen Van

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences offer major advantages over the more usual nuclear targets for loop-mediated isothermal amplification approaches (mito-LAMP) because multiple copies occur in every cell. Four LAMP primers [F3, FIP(F1c+F2), BIP(B1c+B2), and B3] were designed based on the mitochondrial nad1 sequence of Opisthorchis viverrini and used for a highly specific assay (mito-OvLAMP) to distinguish DNA of O. viverrini from that of another opisthorchiid (Clonorchis sinensis) and other trematodes (Haplorchis pumilio, Haplorchis taichui, Fasciola hepatica, and Fasciola gigantica). Conventional PCR was applied using F3/B3 primer pairs to verify the specificity of the primers for O. viverrini DNA templates. All LAMP-positive samples could be detected with the naked eye in sunlight, by gel electrophoresis (stained with ethidium bromide), and by addition of SYBR green I to the product in sunlight or under UV light. Only DNA from O. viverrini yielded amplification products by LAMP (and by PCR verification), and the LAMP limit of detection was as little as 100 fg (10(-4) ng DNA), indicating that this assay is 10 to 100 times more sensitive than PCR. Field testing was done using representative egg and metacercarial samples collected from localities where the fluke is endemic. With the advantages of simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity, and cost effectiveness, mito-OvLAMP is a good tool for molecular detection and epidemiology studies in regions or countries where O. viverrini is endemic, which can lead to more effective control of opisthorchiasis and trematodiasis.

  16. Spathebothriidea: survey of species, scolex and egg morphology, and interrelationships of a non-segmented, relictual tapeworm group (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Kuchta, Roman; Pearson, Rebecca; Scholz, Tomás; Ditrich, Oleg; Olson, Peter D

    2014-08-01

    Tapeworms of the order Spathebothriidea Wardle et McLeod, 1952 (Cestoda) are reviewed. Molecular data made it possible to assess, for the first time, the phylogenetic relationships of all genera and to confirm the validity of Bothrimonus Duvernoy, 1842, Diplocotyle Krabbe, 1874 and Didymobothrium Nybelin, 1922. A survey of all species considered to be valid is provided together with new data on egg and scolex morphology and surface ultrastructure (i.e. microtriches). The peculiar morphology of the members of this group, which is today represented by five effectively monotypic genera whose host associations and geographical distribution show little commonality, indicate that it is a relictual group that was once diverse and widespread. The order potentially represents the earliest branch of true tapeworms (i.e. Eucestoda) among extant forms.

  17. Structural and Population Polymorphism of RT-Like Sequences in Avian Schistosomes Trichobilharzia szidati (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Schistosomatidae).

    PubMed

    Semyenova, S K; Chrisanfova, G G; Guliaev, A S; Yesakova, A P; Ryskov, A P

    2015-01-01

    Recently we developed the genus-specific markers of the avian schistosomes of the genus Trichobilharzia, the causative agents of human cercarial dermatitis. The 7 novel genome sequences of T. franki, T. regenti, and T. szidati revealed similarity with genome repeat region of African schistosome Schistosoma mansoni. In the present work we analyzed the 37 new T. szidati sequences to study intragenome variability and host specificity for the parasite from three localities of East Europe. DNAs were isolated from cercariae or single sporocysts obtained from 6 lymnaeid snails Lymnaea stagnalis and L. palustris from Belarus and Russia. All sequences formed three diverged groups, one of which consists of the sequences with multiple deletions; other groups involved two paralogous copies with stop codons and frameshift mutations. Strong association between geographical distribution and snail host specificity cannot be established. All studied sequences have homology with the reverse transcriptase domain (RT) of Penelope-like elements (PLE) of S. mansoni and S. japonicum and new members of RT family were identified. We proposed that three diverged groups RT sequences of T. szidati are results of duplication or transposition of PLE during parasite evolution. Implications of the retroelement dynamics in the life history of avian schistosomes are discussed.

  18. When proglottids and scoleces conflict: phylogenetic relationships and a family-level classification of the Lecanicephalidea (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten; Caira, Janine N; Cielocha, Joanna J; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Waeschenbach, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the interrelationships of the morphologically diverse elasmobranch-hosted tapeworm order Lecanicephalidea, based on molecular sequence data. With almost half of current generic diversity having been erected or resurrected within the last decade, an apparent conflict between scolex morphology and proglottid anatomy has hampered the assignment of many of these genera to families. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of two nuclear markers (D1-D3 of lsrDNA and complete ssrDNA) and two mitochondrial markers (partial rrnL and partial cox1) for 61 lecanicephalidean species representing 22 of the 25 valid genera were conducted; new sequence data were generated for 43 species and 11 genera, including three undescribed genera. The monophyly of the order was confirmed in all but the analyses based on cox1 data alone. Sesquipedalapex placed among species of Anteropora and was thus synonymized with the latter genus. Based on analyses of the concatenated dataset, eight major groups emerged which are herein formally recognised at the familial level. Existing family names (i.e., Lecanicephalidae, Polypocephalidae, Tetragonocephalidae, and Cephalobothriidae) are maintained for four of the eight clades, and new families are proposed for the remaining four groups (Aberrapecidae n. fam., Eniochobothriidae n. fam., Paraberrapecidae n. fam., and Zanobatocestidae n. fam.). The four new families and the Tetragonocephalidae are monogeneric, while the Cephalobothriidae, Lecanicephalidae and Polypocephalidae comprise seven, eight and four genera, respectively. As a result of their unusual morphologies, the three genera not included here (i.e., Corrugatocephalum, Healyum and Quadcuspibothrium) are considered incertae sedis within the order until their familial affinities can be examined in more detail. All eight families are newly circumscribed based on morphological features and a key to the families is provided. Aspects of morphological evolution and host associations are discussed in a phylogenetic context for each family and for the order as a whole. Lecanicephalidean genera lacking apical structures were confirmed as the earliest diverging lineages. Proglottid anatomy was determined to be much more conserved and indicative of phylogenetic affinities than scolex morphology. Collectively, the Lecanicephalidea parasitize three of the four orders of Batoidea-their almost exclusive absence from skates (Order Rajiformes) appears to be real; only a few records from sharks exist. At the family level, the breadth of host associations is correlated with taxonomic diversity of the family. The degree to which factors such as intermediate host use or host specificity at any stage in the life-cycle shape these patterns is currently unknown.

  19. Spot the difference: Two cryptic species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) infecting Astyanax aeneus (Actinopterygii, Characidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Razo-Mendivil, Ulises; García-Vásquez, Adriana; Rubio-Godoy, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Over the course of one year, undescribed specimens of Gyrodactylus were recovered from banded tetra, Astyanax aeneus collected in the La Antigua and Nautla river basins in central Veracruz, Mexico. Parasites were processed for morphometric and molecular analyses. Morphometrically, Gyrodactylus samples collected in the La Antigua river had slightly smaller haptoral structures than those collected from the Nautla river. During the 12month-collection of samples, however, water temperature varied considerably (ca. 20°C to 30°C), and this abiotic factor is known to affect the size of gyrodactylid attachment structures. Moreover, no clear discrimination was possible between individual parasites collected from the two rivers based on the morphology of the marginal hook, which is recognised as a very informative character to discriminate between species. The morphology of the ventral bar, however, differed between specimens from both rivers: worms from Nautla all had long, rounded processes on the ventral bar, which formed a relatively closed angle with the dorsal edge of the bar proper, while most - but not all - specimens from La Antigua had comparatively slender processes forming a more open angle with respect to the ventral bar. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of the ITS1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS2 of gyrodactylids indicated the existence of two distinct, well-supported lineages whose sequences differ by >4%, one of which was only found in the Nautla basin, while the other was collected in both river systems. A posteriori, principal component analysis (PCA) of the morphometric data of sequenced specimens indicated that features of the dorsal bar, the hamuli and the ventral bar enable discrimination between the two phylogenetic lineages. Based on these independent sources of information (morphometric and molecular data), two new species of Gyrodactylus are described: Gyrodactyluspakan n. sp. and Gyrodactylusteken n. sp. The phylogenetic relationships of both new species to other gyrodactylids infecting characiformes (for which molecular data are available) are presented, which suggests that their closest relative is Gyrodactylus carolinae, a parasite of Characidium lanei in Brazil.

  20. When proglottids and scoleces conflict: phylogenetic relationships and a family-level classification of the Lecanicephalidea (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten; Caira, Janine N; Cielocha, Joanna J; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Waeschenbach, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the interrelationships of the morphologically diverse elasmobranch-hosted tapeworm order Lecanicephalidea, based on molecular sequence data. With almost half of current generic diversity having been erected or resurrected within the last decade, an apparent conflict between scolex morphology and proglottid anatomy has hampered the assignment of many of these genera to families. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of two nuclear markers (D1-D3 of lsrDNA and complete ssrDNA) and two mitochondrial markers (partial rrnL and partial cox1) for 61 lecanicephalidean species representing 22 of the 25 valid genera were conducted; new sequence data were generated for 43 species and 11 genera, including three undescribed genera. The monophyly of the order was confirmed in all but the analyses based on cox1 data alone. Sesquipedalapex placed among species of Anteropora and was thus synonymized with the latter genus. Based on analyses of the concatenated dataset, eight major groups emerged which are herein formally recognised at the familial level. Existing family names (i.e., Lecanicephalidae, Polypocephalidae, Tetragonocephalidae, and Cephalobothriidae) are maintained for four of the eight clades, and new families are proposed for the remaining four groups (Aberrapecidae n. fam., Eniochobothriidae n. fam., Paraberrapecidae n. fam., and Zanobatocestidae n. fam.). The four new families and the Tetragonocephalidae are monogeneric, while the Cephalobothriidae, Lecanicephalidae and Polypocephalidae comprise seven, eight and four genera, respectively. As a result of their unusual morphologies, the three genera not included here (i.e., Corrugatocephalum, Healyum and Quadcuspibothrium) are considered incertae sedis within the order until their familial affinities can be examined in more detail. All eight families are newly circumscribed based on morphological features and a key to the families is provided. Aspects of morphological evolution and host associations are discussed in a phylogenetic context for each family and for the order as a whole. Lecanicephalidean genera lacking apical structures were confirmed as the earliest diverging lineages. Proglottid anatomy was determined to be much more conserved and indicative of phylogenetic affinities than scolex morphology. Collectively, the Lecanicephalidea parasitize three of the four orders of Batoidea-their almost exclusive absence from skates (Order Rajiformes) appears to be real; only a few records from sharks exist. At the family level, the breadth of host associations is correlated with taxonomic diversity of the family. The degree to which factors such as intermediate host use or host specificity at any stage in the life-cycle shape these patterns is currently unknown. PMID:26994689

  1. Experimental infection of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha (Mollusca:Bivalvia) by metacercariae of Echinoparyphium sp. (Platyhelminthes:Trematoda).

    PubMed

    Conn, D B; Conn, D A

    1995-04-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha a species recently introduced to North America from Europe, was studied to determine whether it could potentially serve as host for echinostomatid metacercariae. Forty adult mussels were collected from the St. Lawrence River and exposed to cercariae of Echinoparyphium sp. that was emerging from naturally infected Physa sp. collected from a native population in northern New York state. When necropsied 24-30 hr postexposure, 2 (5%) of the 40 harbored a metacercaria of Echinoparyphium sp. in the gonad. None of 200 control mussels collected from the same site was infected. This is the first report of any species or stage of echinostomatid from this host species worldwide. This is also the first report of an echinostomatid metacercaria from the gonad of any host species.

  2. Inhibitors of differentiation and DNA binding (Ids) regulate Math1 and hair cell formation during the development of the organ of Corti.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer M; Montcouquiol, Mireille; Dabdoub, Alain; Woods, Chad; Kelley, Matthew W

    2006-01-11

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Math1 (also called Atoh1) is both necessary and sufficient for hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea (Bermingham et al., 1999; Zheng and Gao, 2000). Previous studies have demonstrated that a dynamic pattern of Math1 expression plays a key role in regulating the number and position of mechanosensory hair cells. However, the factors that regulate the temporal and spatial expression of Math1 within the cochlea are unknown. The bHLH-related inhibitors of differentiation and DNA binding (Id) proteins are known to negatively regulate many bHLH transcription factors, including Math1, in a number of different systems. Therefore, Id proteins are good candidates for regulating Math1 in the cochlea. Results from PCR and in situ hybridization indicate that Id1, Id2, and Id3 are expressed within the cochlear duct in a pattern that is consistent with a role in regulation of hair cell development. In particular, expression of Ids and Math1 overlapped in cochlear progenitor cells before cellular differentiation, but a specific downregulation of Id expression was observed in individual cells that differentiated as hair cells. In addition, progenitor cells in which the expression of Ids was maintained during the time period for hair cell differentiation were inhibited from developing as hair cells. These results indicate a key role for Ids in the regulation of expression of Math1 and hair cell differentiation in the developing cochlea.

  3. Development of a phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system to measure mouse organ of Corti vibrations in two cochlear turns

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Zhang, Yuan; Jacques, Steven; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2015-12-31

    In this study, we have developed a phase-sensitive Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system to simultaneously measure the in vivo inner ear vibrations in the hook area and second turn of the mouse cochlea. This technical development will enable measurement of intra-cochlear distortion products at ideal locations such as the distortion product generation site and reflection site. This information is necessary to un-mix the complex mixture of intra-cochlear waves comprising the DPOAE and thus leads to the non-invasive identification of the local region of cochlear damage.

  4. Selection of cell fate in the organ of Corti involves the integration of Hes/Hey signaling at the Atoh1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Abdolazimi, Yassan; Stojanova, Zlatka; Segil, Neil

    2016-03-01

    Determination of cell fate within the prosensory domain of the developing cochlear duct relies on the temporal and spatial regulation of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. Auditory hair cells and supporting cells arise in a wave of differentiation that patterns them into discrete rows mediated by Notch-dependent lateral inhibition. However, the mechanism responsible for selecting sensory cells from within the prosensory competence domain remains poorly understood. We show in mice that rather than being upregulated in rows of cells, Atoh1 is subject to transcriptional activation in groups of prosensory cells, and that highly conserved sites for Hes/Hey repressor binding in the Atoh1 promoter are needed to select the hair cell and supporting cell fate. During perinatal supporting cell transdifferentiation, which is a model of hair cell regeneration, we show that derepression is sufficient to induce Atoh1 expression, suggesting a mechanism for priming the 3' Atoh1 autoregulatory enhancer needed for hair cell expression. PMID:26932672

  5. The first report of peritoneal tetrathyridiosis in squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Taira, Kensuke; Yamazaki, Mutsumi; Kashimura, Akane; Une, Yumi

    2014-10-01

    This report describes a case of peritoneal larval cestodiasis caused by tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides sp. in an adult female squirrel monkey. The monkey had lived in a zoological garden in Japan and had a clinical history of wasting. At necropsy, numerous whitish oval masses were found in the liver and peritoneal cavity. These masses contained larval cestodes. Morphological observation and molecular analyses of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene sequences allowed us to identify the larva as the tetrathyridium of Mesocestoides sp. This is the first report of Mesocestoides larvae in a squirrel monkey in Japan.

  6. Reduced Leukocyte Infiltration in Absence of Eosinophils Correlates with Decreased Tissue Damage and Disease Susceptibility in ΔdblGATA Mice during Murine Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pramod K.; Li, Qun; Munoz, Luis E.; Mares, Chris A.; Morris, Elizabeth G.; Teale, Judy M.; Cardona, Astrid E.

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the most common helminth parasitic diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and the leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. NCC is caused by the presence of the metacestode larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium within brain tissues. NCC patients exhibit a long asymptomatic phase followed by a phase of symptoms including increased intra-cranial pressure and seizures. While the asymptomatic phase is attributed to the immunosuppressive capabilities of viable T. solium parasites, release of antigens by dying organisms induce strong immune responses and associated symptoms. Previous studies in T. solium-infected pigs have shown that the inflammatory response consists of various leukocyte populations including eosinophils, macrophages, and T cells among others. Because the role of eosinophils within the brain has not been investigated during NCC, we examined parasite burden, disease susceptibility and the composition of the inflammatory reaction in the brains of infected wild type (WT) and eosinophil-deficient mice (ΔdblGATA) using a murine model of NCC in which mice were infected intracranially with Mesocestoides corti, a cestode parasite related to T. solium. In WT mice, we observed a time-dependent induction of eosinophil recruitment in infected mice, contrasting with an overall reduced leukocyte infiltration in ΔdblGATA brains. Although, ΔdblGATA mice exhibited an increased parasite burden, reduced tissue damage and less disease susceptibility was observed when compared to infected WT mice. Cellular infiltrates in infected ΔdblGATA mice were comprised of more mast cells, and αβ T cells, which correlated with an abundant CD8+ T cell response and reduced CD4+ Th1 and Th2 responses. Thus, our data suggest that enhanced inflammatory response in WT mice appears detrimental and associates with increased disease susceptibility, despite the reduced parasite burden in the CNS. Overall reduced leukocyte infiltration due to

  7. Reduced Leukocyte Infiltration in Absence of Eosinophils Correlates with Decreased Tissue Damage and Disease Susceptibility in ΔdblGATA Mice during Murine Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pramod K; Li, Qun; Munoz, Luis E; Mares, Chris A; Morris, Elizabeth G; Teale, Judy M; Cardona, Astrid E

    2016-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the most common helminth parasitic diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and the leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. NCC is caused by the presence of the metacestode larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium within brain tissues. NCC patients exhibit a long asymptomatic phase followed by a phase of symptoms including increased intra-cranial pressure and seizures. While the asymptomatic phase is attributed to the immunosuppressive capabilities of viable T. solium parasites, release of antigens by dying organisms induce strong immune responses and associated symptoms. Previous studies in T. solium-infected pigs have shown that the inflammatory response consists of various leukocyte populations including eosinophils, macrophages, and T cells among others. Because the role of eosinophils within the brain has not been investigated during NCC, we examined parasite burden, disease susceptibility and the composition of the inflammatory reaction in the brains of infected wild type (WT) and eosinophil-deficient mice (ΔdblGATA) using a murine model of NCC in which mice were infected intracranially with Mesocestoides corti, a cestode parasite related to T. solium. In WT mice, we observed a time-dependent induction of eosinophil recruitment in infected mice, contrasting with an overall reduced leukocyte infiltration in ΔdblGATA brains. Although, ΔdblGATA mice exhibited an increased parasite burden, reduced tissue damage and less disease susceptibility was observed when compared to infected WT mice. Cellular infiltrates in infected ΔdblGATA mice were comprised of more mast cells, and αβ T cells, which correlated with an abundant CD8+ T cell response and reduced CD4+ Th1 and Th2 responses. Thus, our data suggest that enhanced inflammatory response in WT mice appears detrimental and associates with increased disease susceptibility, despite the reduced parasite burden in the CNS. Overall reduced leukocyte infiltration due to

  8. Nanoporous Structures Similar to Those Reported from Squid Sucker Teeth are also Present in Egg Shells of a Terrestrial Flatworm (Platyhelminthes; Rhabditophora; Geoplanidae) from Hachijojima (Izu Islands, Japan).

    PubMed

    Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Miinalainen, Ilkka

    2016-07-01

    Shells of the egg cocoon of a terrestrial planarian (Diversibipalium sp.) from Hachijojima were found to be composed of a lattice of parallel nanotubes of ca. 120 nm diameter oriented perpendicular to the shell's surface. The arrangement of the porous proteinaceous tubes closely resembles that has recently been reported from the sucker teeth of squid and to date is the only other example of this kind of structure. Although the array of nanotubes undoubtedly contributes to the stiffness of the shell and helps protecting the embryo, questions such as to how the planary worm produces the array of nanotubes and what exactly their chemical and physical properties are versus those of the squid sucker tooth still remain to be answered.

  9. First report of the genus Cratera (Platyhelminthes, Geoplanidae) in Argentina, with description of a new species and comments on the species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Negrete, Lisandro; Brusa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A new species of land planarians of the genus Cratera is described. Cratera viridimaculata sp. n. was recorded in the Atlantic Forest Ecoregion, in north-eastern Argentina, and represents the first report of the genus Cratera outside Brazil. The new species is about 50 mm in length and externally characterized by a color pattern consisting of a light green olive pigmentation on the dorsum, stippled with dark gray fine spots, and dorsal eyes. Other features regarding the internal anatomy are the presence of a glandular margin, Cutaneous Muscular Index (CMI) of 10-13%, pharynx cylindrical, prostatic vesicle extrabulbar, tubular and C-shaped, with a proximal bifurcated portion, penis papilla protrusible with ejaculatory duct widened in its distal portion, and female atrium funnel-shaped. The new species is compared and discussed with its congeners. PMID:27587974

  10. Type material of Platyhelminthes (Monogenoidea) housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Daniela A; Mainenti, Adriana; Sanches, Magda; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    A catalogue of type material of monogenoids deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, given that the last list of types was produced in 1979. The monogenoid collection comprises type lots for 203 species, distributed across 14 families and 68 genera. Specific names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality, specimens with the collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated. PMID:27667946

  11. Nanoporous Structures Similar to Those Reported from Squid Sucker Teeth are also Present in Egg Shells of a Terrestrial Flatworm (Platyhelminthes; Rhabditophora; Geoplanidae) from Hachijojima (Izu Islands, Japan).

    PubMed

    Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Miinalainen, Ilkka

    2016-07-01

    Shells of the egg cocoon of a terrestrial planarian (Diversibipalium sp.) from Hachijojima were found to be composed of a lattice of parallel nanotubes of ca. 120 nm diameter oriented perpendicular to the shell's surface. The arrangement of the porous proteinaceous tubes closely resembles that has recently been reported from the sucker teeth of squid and to date is the only other example of this kind of structure. Although the array of nanotubes undoubtedly contributes to the stiffness of the shell and helps protecting the embryo, questions such as to how the planary worm produces the array of nanotubes and what exactly their chemical and physical properties are versus those of the squid sucker tooth still remain to be answered. PMID:27278842

  12. A large 28S rDNA-based phylogeny confirms the limitations of established morphological characters for classification of proteocephalidean tapeworms (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda)

    PubMed Central

    de Chambrier, Alain; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Fisseha, Makda; Scholz, Tomáš; Mariaux, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Proteocephalidean tapeworms form a diverse group of parasites currently known from 315 valid species. Most of the diversity of adult proteocephalideans can be found in freshwater fishes (predominantly catfishes), a large proportion infects reptiles, but only a few infect amphibians, and a single species has been found to parasitize possums. Although they have a cosmopolitan distribution, a large proportion of taxa are exclusively found in South America. We analyzed the largest proteocephalidean cestode molecular dataset to date comprising more than 100 species (30 new), including representatives from 54 genera (80%) and all subfamilies, thus significantly improving upon previous works to develop a molecular phylogeny for the group. The Old World origin of proteocephalideans is confirmed, with their more recent expansion in South America. The earliest diverging lineages are composed of Acanthotaeniinae and Gangesiinae but most of the presently recognized subfamilies (and genera) appear not to be monophyletic; a deep systematic reorganization of the order is thus needed and the present subfamilial system should be abandoned. The main characters on which the classical systematics of the group has been built, such as scolex morphology or relative position of genital organs in relation to the longitudinal musculature, are of limited value, as demonstrated by the very weak support for morphologically-defined subfamilies. However, new characters, such as the pattern of uterus development, relative ovary size, and egg structure have been identified, which may be useful in defining phylogenetically well-supported subgroups. A strongly supported lineage infecting various snakes from a wide geographical distribution was found. Although several improvements over previous works regarding phylogenetic resolution and taxon coverage were achieved in this study, the major polytomy in our tree, composed largely of siluriform parasites from the Neotropics, remained unresolved and possibly reflects a rapid radiation. The genus Spasskyellina Freze, 1965 is resurrected for three species of Monticellia bearing spinitriches on the margins of their suckers. PMID:25987870

  13. Type material of Platyhelminthes (Monogenoidea) housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Daniela A; Mainenti, Adriana; Sanches, Magda; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    A catalogue of type material of monogenoids deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, given that the last list of types was produced in 1979. The monogenoid collection comprises type lots for 203 species, distributed across 14 families and 68 genera. Specific names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality, specimens with the collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated.

  14. First report of the genus Cratera (Platyhelminthes, Geoplanidae) in Argentina, with description of a new species and comments on the species of the genus

    PubMed Central

    Negrete, Lisandro; Brusa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of land planarians of the genus Cratera is described. Cratera viridimaculata sp. n. was recorded in the Atlantic Forest Ecoregion, in north-eastern Argentina, and represents the first report of the genus Cratera outside Brazil. The new species is about 50 mm in length and externally characterized by a color pattern consisting of a light green olive pigmentation on the dorsum, stippled with dark gray fine spots, and dorsal eyes. Other features regarding the internal anatomy are the presence of a glandular margin, Cutaneous Muscular Index (CMI) of 10–13%, pharynx cylindrical, prostatic vesicle extrabulbar, tubular and C-shaped, with a proximal bifurcated portion, penis papilla protrusible with ejaculatory duct widened in its distal portion, and female atrium funnel-shaped. The new species is compared and discussed with its congeners. PMID:27587974

  15. The description of Gyrodactylus corleonis sp. n. and G. neretum sp. n. (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) with comments on other gyrodactylids parasitising pipefish (Pisces: Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    Paladini, Giuseppe; Cable, Joanne; Fioravanti, Maria Letizia; Faria, Patricia J; Shinn, Andrew P

    2010-03-01

    The current work describes two new species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 collected from pipefish Syngnathus scovelli (Evermann et Kendall) and Syngnathus typhle L. during two separate gyrodactylosis episodes on fish held in a public aquarium located in northern Italy. The gyrodactylids collected from the skin, fins and gills of pipefish were subjected to a morphological analysis of the attachment hooks and the morphometric data were compared to the four species of Gyrodactylus previously described from syngnathid hosts, namely G. eyipayipi Vaughan, Christison, Hansen et Shinn, 2010, G. pisculentui Williams, Kritsky, Dunnigan, Lash et Klein, 2008, G. shorti Holliman, 1963 and G. syngnathi Appleby, 1996. Principal components analysis (PCA) of the morphological data indicated six clusters; two discrete groups among the specimens taken from the pipefisli held in the Italian aquarium and four further groups representing G. eyipayipi, G. pisculentus, G. shorti and G. syngnathi. Molecular sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene for the new species considered here were then compared with those available for other species in GenBank. The comparison did not reveal any identical match, supporting the morphological analysis that Gyrodactylus corleonis sp. n. from S. typhle and Gyrodactylus neretum sp. n. from S. scovelli represent distinct species. Both G. corleonis and G. neretum possess robust hamuli, marginal hook blades that curve smoothly from their sickle base to a point beyond the toe and, ventral bars with a broad median portion and a reduced membrane. Gyrodactylus corleonis, however, can be distinguished on the basis of its heart-shaped ventral bar; G. neretum has a 1:2 hamulus point:shaft ratio and a rectangular-shaped ventral bar. A redescription of the haptoral hard parts of the four species previously recorded on pipefish is also presented.

  16. An analysis of the calcium-binding protein 1 of Fasciola gigantica with a comparison to its homologs in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Subpipattana, Pornpimol; Sobhon, Prasert; Viyanant, Vithoon; Grams, Rudi

    2006-03-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the Fasciola gigantica calcium-binding protein 1 (FgCaBP1) was cloned from an adult stage cDNA expression library in an immunoscreen using rabbit immune serum against the parasite's excretion/secretion antigens. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 96.3% identity to Fh22CBP of Fasciola hepatica. During development in the mammalian host FgCaBP1 RNA was detected in metacercariae, juveniles and adults and was exclusively localized to the tegumental cell bodies. Immune serum of a rabbit infected with F. gigantica detected recombinant FgCaBP1 starting from the sixth week of infection. Immune sera of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma mekongi cross-reacted with recombinant FgCaBP1 in immunoblots. Recombinant FgCaBP1 showed calcium and magnesium-binding activity by a mobility shift during non-denaturing PAGE in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+, respectively. A polyclonal mouse anti-rFgCaBP1 antiserum detected the native protein as a major component of the parasite's tegumental antigens in immunoblots and as a strictly tegumental antigen in tissue cross-sections of adult and juvenile parasites. Comparative sequence analysis of homologs from Fasciola and Schistosoma present in the GenBank database revealed sequence signatures specific to these trematode proteins and thereby indicates their origin from a single ancestor. FgCaBP1 contains two adjacent, N-terminal located EF-hands and a C-terminal located domain similar to dynein light chain type 1. Independent structure predictions of the two domains suggest that they will fold according to the already determined structures of the EF-hand motif and the dynein light chain type 1 proteins.

  17. Ultrastructural study of the spermatozoon of the digenean Enodiotrema reductum Looss, 1901 (Platyhelminthes, Plagiorchioidea, Plagiorchiidae), parasite of the green turtle Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758) in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Papa Ibnou; Quilichini, Yann; Sène, Aminata; Tkach, Vasyl V; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2012-08-01

    This study describes the ultrastructural organisation of the spermatozoon of a digenean Enodiotrema reductum (Pligiorchiida: Plagiorchiidae) from the green turtle Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758). This is the first report of E. reductum from Senegal. The mature spermatozoon of E. reductum is filiform and exhibits two axonemes of the 9 + "1" pattern of the Trepaxonemata, a nucleus, parallel cortical microtubules, an extramembranar ornamentation associated with spine-like bodies and granules of glycogen, among other ultrastructural features. The spermatozoon of E. reductum is distinguished by the presence of a moniliform mitochondrion composed of a bulge associated with a long cord and of a central cytoplasmic expansion. This work represents the first utrastructural study of any representative of the large family Plagiorchiidae. Our results are compared with previously published data on spermatozoa of other digenean taxa.

  18. Two new marine flatworms (Platyhelminthes: Rhabditophora: Proseriata) of the genus Otoplana Du Plessis, 1889 from the upper Tuscany sandy shores (Italy).

    PubMed

    Meini, Gianluca

    2013-01-24

    Two new otoplanid species, from the interstitial habitats of the North-Western Mediterranenan sea coast, are described. The specimens show the typical morphological peculiarities of the subfamily Otoplaninae ("Turbellaria", Otoplanidae), but clearly differ from other species described in this group. Otoplana labronica sp. nov. is characterized by a body length of 1.2-1.5 mm, different features of the testes and vitellaries, the male sclerotic apparatus composed of a median aculeus (52-53 μm long) and 16 peculiar spines (19-44 μm long). This new species has the smallest number of spines (17) and the smaller body length, in comparison to all the species of the genus. Otoplana falcataspina sp. nov. is characterized by a body length of 2.3-2.4 mm, distinctive dimensions and arrangement of the vitellaries, the male sclerotic apparatus composed of a median aculeus (50-51 μm long) and 20-21 spines (22-44 μm long). This new species has a limited body length, and only the sexually mature specimens of the new species O. labronica exhibit a smaller size. They were collected below the low water mark on the sandy beaches at Calambrone and Marina di Vecchiano (Pisa, Ligurian Sea, Italy), respectively.

  19. Identification of putative insulin-like peptides and components of insulin signaling pathways in parasitic platyhelminths by the use of genome-wide screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Yin, Cai; Dou, Yongxi; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-02-01

    No endogenous insulin-like peptides in parasitic flatworms have been reported. Insulin receptors from flukes and tapeworms have been shown to interact directly with the host-derived insulin molecule, which suggests the exploitation of host-derived insulin. In this study, a strategy of genome-wide searches followed by comprehensive analyses of strictly conserved features of the insulin family was used to demonstrate the presence of putative insulin-like peptides in the genomes of six tapeworms and two flukes. In addition, whole insulin signaling pathways were annotated on a genome-wide scale. Two putative insulin-like peptide genes in each genome of tapeworms and one insulin-like peptide gene in each genome of flukes were identified. The comprehensive analyses revealed that all of these peptides showed the common features shared by other members of the insulin family, and the phylogenetic analysis implied a putative gene duplication event in the Cestoda during the evolution of insulin-like peptide genes. The quantitative expression analysis and immunolocalization results suggested a putative role of these peptides in reproduction. Entire sets of major components of the classic insulin signaling pathway were successfully identified, suggesting that this pathway in parasitic flatworms might also regulate many other important biological activities. We believe that the identification of the insulin-like peptides gives us a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway in these parasites, as well as host-parasite interactions.

  20. A new species of Unilatus (Platyhelminthes: Monogenoidea) from the gills of Leporacanthicus galaxias Isbrücker et Nijssen (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Branches, Bárbara; Domingues, Marcus V

    2014-03-01

    Unilatus irae sp. nov. (Dactylogyridae) is described from the gills of the armored catfish, Leporacanthicus galaxias Isbrücker et Nijssen (Loricariidae: Ancistrinae), from Guamá river, Pará State, Brazil. The new species can be differentiated from its cogeneners by the combination of the following features: anterior anchor with well-developed superficial root, inconspicuous deep root, shaft bent at midpoint, forming angle of approximately 60°, evenly short curved point; posterior anchor with inconspicuous roots, sclerotized cap of base with small protuberance for articulation to posterior bar; evenly curved shaft and short point; anterior bar broadly V-shaped, with small posteromedial projection; and posterior bar anteriorly expanded on it midportion, with expanded ends slightly curved in posterior direction.

  1. Escape from an evolutionary dead end: a triploid clone of Gyrodactylus salaris is able to revert to sex and switch host (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea, Gyrodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Zietara, Marek S; Kuusela, Jussi; Lumme, Jaakko

    2006-12-01

    Diploid parthenogenesis, with rare sex, is considered as the basic mode of reproduction among the hermaphroditic and viviparous Gyrodactylus. A particular strain of the monogenean parasite Gyrodactylus salaris (RBT clone) was recognized by an invariable, unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) farms. The RBT clone was shown to be triploid and asexual by analyzing a 493 bp sequence of a nuclear DNA marker. Three alleles were present as heterozygous in all 237 individuals sampled in years 2001-2005 from five isolated Finnish farms. The triploid clone probably originated from a diploid oocyte fertilized by a non-self hermaphrodite, most probably in a fish farm. Identical mitochondrial COI gene (1606 bp) was also found in G. salaris parasites on landlocked salmon (Salmo salar) in two rivers draining to the lake Kuitozero, Russian Karelia. In the river Pisto, the clone was triploid, but the diagnostic "short" nuclear allele of the RBT clone was replaced by an allele typical for salmon specific parasites in the Lake Onega. The clone in the river Kurzhma was diploid, having lost the "short" allele, but still heterozygous for the other two alleles of the RBT clone. Evidently, the triploid parthenogenetic RBT clone had produced diploid oocytes, when (as a female) stimulated by a non-self mate in the new environment. The genetic reorganization coincided with a switch to the salmon host. Participation of triploids into the gene pool of the species is rarely reported in animals, and the triploidy is generally considered as an irreversible dead-end of the evolution. Liberalism in ploidy level may significantly add to the evolutionary options available for a parasite in ever-changing environments.

  2. The use of geometric morphometrics in understanding shape variability of sclerotized haptoral structures of monogeneans (Platyhelminthes) with insights into biogeographic variability.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Matthias; Sasal, Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The sclerotized attachment organ of monogeneans has been widely used to address fundamental questions in ecology and evolution. However, traditional morphometric techniques appear to be partially inadequate and non-optimal. Traditional linear measurements mainly provide information on the size of sclerites but provide very little information, if any, on their shape. The shape of sclerites is indeed virtually unexplored and its implication for ecological and evolutionary processes remains to be analyzed. This study aims to both introduce and illustrate the use of geometric morphometrics in order to study sclerites of monogeneans in a biogeographic context. To do this, we investigated morphological variation patterns among four populations from the Pacific Ocean and six monogenean species through traditional and geometric morphometric techniques. Unlike the traditional method, the geometric morphometric method yielded a high percentage of individuals correctly classified to the four populations, providing strong evidence for phenotypic variability, divergence and local adaptation among islands without evolutionary constraint. Moreover, the traditional method also resulted in inconsistent interpretations of shape variations. This study highlighted the limitations that may arise when using traditional morphometric techniques and emphasizes that considerable information about the shape of sclerotized haptoral parts is added by using geometric morphometrics. Given the prominent taxonomic, ecological and evolutionary role of the haptor for characterizing monogeneans, we ultimately discuss the potential broad use of geometric morphometrics in a wide variety of ecological and evolutionary contexts. This powerful approach might allow a more robust estimation of the extent to which traditional evolutionary theories based on size of sclerites are congruent with their shape.

  3. Land planarians (Platyhelminthes) as a model organism for fine-scale phylogeographic studies: understanding patterns of biodiversity in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest hotspot.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Presas, M; Carbayo, F; Rozas, J; Riutort, M

    2011-04-01

    The Brazilian Atlantic Forest is one of the richest biodiversity hotspots of the world. Paleoclimatic models have predicted two large stability regions in its northern and central parts, whereas southern regions might have suffered strong instability during Pleistocene glaciations. Molecular phylogeographic and endemism studies show, nevertheless, contradictory results: although some results validate these predictions, other data suggest that paleoclimatic models fail to predict stable rainforest areas in the south. Most studies, however, have surveyed species with relatively high dispersal rates whereas taxa with lower dispersion capabilities should be better predictors of habitat stability. Here, we have used two land planarian species as model organisms to analyse the patterns and levels of nucleotide diversity on a locality within the Southern Atlantic Forest. We find that both species harbour high levels of genetic variability without exhibiting the molecular footprint of recent colonization or population expansions, suggesting a long-term stability scenario. The results reflect, therefore, that paleoclimatic models may fail to detect refugia in the Southern Atlantic Forest, and that model organisms with low dispersal capability can improve the resolution of these models.

  4. Seussapex, a new genus of lecanicephalidean tapeworm (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) from the stingray genus Himantura (Myliobatiformes: Dasyatidae) in the Indo-West Pacific with investigation of mode of attachment.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten; Russell, Shelbi L

    2014-06-01

    A new lecanicephalidean genus, Seussapex gen. n., is erected for specimens collected from stingrays from the Indo-West Pacific resembling the little known species Tenia [sic] narinari MacCallum, 1917 from the spotted eagle ray, Aetobatus narinari (Euphrasen). Members of this new genus are unique in their possession of a multi-tiered apical structure comprising a bipartite apical modification of the scolex proper, and an externally bipartite apical organ with anterior and posterior glandular compartments internally. The appearance of the scolex varies dramatically depending on state of protrusion and/or evagination of these different parts which appear to be able to function independently. Seussapex karybares sp. n. parasitizing Himantura uarnak 2 (sensu Naylor et al., 2012) in northern Australia is described as the type species and Tenia [sic] narinari is transferred to the new genus. The two species differ in scolex length and width of the posterior dome-shaped portion of the apical organ. Histological sections of scoleces stained using the periodic acid-Schiff(PAS) reaction showed the surface of the anterior part of the apical organ and the anterior glandular compartment to stain PAS positive, suggesting a chemical mode of attachment to the host's intestinal mucosal surface. Extensive collecting efforts of stingrays in the Indo-West Pacific shows Seussapex gen. n. to be restricted to species of Himantura Miller et Henle and suggests additional diversity in this group of hosts. In addition, the host identity of Seussapex narinari (MacCallum, 1917) comb. n. is called into question. PMID:25065129

  5. Molecular identification of larvae of a tetraphyllidean tapeworm (Platyhelminthes: Eucestoda) in a razor clam as an alternative intermediate host in the life cycle of Acanthobothrium brevissime.

    PubMed

    Holland, Nicholas D; Wilson, Nerida G

    2009-10-01

    Dwarf razor clams (Ensis minor) in the Gulf of Mexico are known to be infected with plerocercoid larvae of a tetraphyllidean tapeworm. Here, we show that these larvae live unencysted in the intestinal lumen of the clam. Morphologically, the larvae are similar to (although significantly larger than) tapeworm larvae previously described living in the gut of amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae) from the same habitat. Sequence data from the D2 region of the 28S rDNA from clam-infecting larvae were identical to the sequence of Acanthobothrium brevissime isolated as larvae from amphioxus and as adults from a stingray (Dasyatis say). The sequence data leave little doubt that the dwarf razor clam and the amphioxus are alternative intermediate hosts in the life cycle of A. brevissime. PMID:19366282

  6. Intraspecific pairing of planaria,Dugesia tigrina andDugesia dorotocephala (Platyhelminthes: Turbellaria), and observations on lipophilic excretory-secretory worm products.

    PubMed

    Perkins, C; Fried, B

    1982-06-01

    Intraspecific pairing of the planaria,Dugesia tigrina andD. dorotocephala, was studied for 24 hr at 22 ± 1 °C in Petri dish cultures containing an agar substrate and a water overlay. Pairing of fed planaria in the light and dark and starved planaria in the light was studied, and worms in contact or within 5 mm of each other were considered paired. Fed planaria of both species paired significantly in the light and dark, whereas starved planaria did not pair. Our results suggest that worm-emitted chemical factors are involved in intraspecific pairing of planaria. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis was used to study the release of lipophilic worm products. Phospholipids, free sterols, and free fatty acids were detected in all trials, and triglycerides in most. Thin-layer densitometric analysis was used to quantitate the weight of free sterols released by planaria.

  7. An ultrastructural study of oogenesis and cell dynamics during cocoon shell secretion in the subterranean freshwater planarian Dendrocoelum constrictum (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida).

    PubMed

    Harrath, A H; Ahmed, M; Sayed, S R; Saifi, M A; Alwasel, S H

    2013-02-01

    The ultrastructure of the ovary and the female atrium during cocoon formation was investigated in the subterranean freshwater planarian Dendrocoelum constrictum. In the peripheral portion of the ovary, the oogonia are recognized as undifferentiated germ cells, which are morphologically similar to neoblasts that have a high nucleus/cytoplasm ratio. Oocyte maturation is characterized by a marked growth of the cytoplasm because of the accumulation of cytoplasmic organelles and inclusions. The Golgi complexes begin to increase within the ooplasm and produce vesicles with an electron-dense content that fuse to produce larger spherical globules with homogeneous and electron-dense material. In the mature oocyte, the spherical globules migrate toward the cortical ooplasm, forming a continuous monolayer. We confirm that these spherical globules, which represent cortical granules rather than eggshell globules, vary in size up to 2μm and their electron-dense content shows concentric thin bands. After leaving the ovary through the oviduct, the mature and fertilized oocytes reach the female atrium where they are packaged with thousands of vitelline cells in the cocoon shell. Based on our ultrastructural analysis, we demonstrate that the wall of the cocoon shell is composed of two layers, each of which has a different origin. The shell granules extruded from the vitelline cells are involved in the secretion of the inner layer of the cocoon shell, whereas the outer layer of the cocoon shell is synthesized by the epithelial cells in the genital atrium.

  8. Species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from cichlids from Zambezi and Limpopo river basins in Zimbabwe and South Africa: evidence for unexplored species richness.

    PubMed

    Zahradníčková, Petra; Barson, Maxwell; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J; Přikrylová, Iva

    2016-09-01

    New findings on Gyrodactylus spp. parasitising African cichlids in southern Africa are presented, comprising data from Zimbabwe and South Africa. Morphometry of opisthaptoral hard parts in combination with nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences confirmed the presence of six species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832. Three new species are described from fishes in Zimbabwe: Gyrodactylus chitandiri n. sp. from the gill arches of Coptodon rendalli (Boulenger) and Pseudocrenilabrus philander (Weber); Gyrodactylus occupatus n. sp. from the fins of Oreochromis niloticus (L.), Pharyngochromis acuticeps (Steindachner) and P. philander; and Gyrodactylus parisellei n. sp. from the fins of O. niloticus, P. philander and Tilapia sp. Gyrodactylus nyanzae Paperna, 1973 was also identified from the gills of O. niloticus and C. rendalli collected from two localities in Zimbabwe; these findings represent new host and locality records for this parasite. Gyrodactylus sturmbaueri Vanhove, Snoeks, Volckaert & Huyse, 2011 was identified from P. philander collected in South Africa and Zimbabwe thereby providing new host and locality records for this parasite. Finally, Gyrodactylus yacatli García-Vásquez, Hansen, Christison, Bron & Shinn, 2011 was collected from the fins of O. niloticus and P. philander studied in Zimbabwe; this represents the first record of this species from the continent of Africa. Notably, this study improves upon the knowledge of Gyrodactylus spp. parasitising cichlids from these southern African regions. All species studied were recorded from at least two different cichlid host species indicating trend for a wide range of Gyrodactylus hosts in Africa. Accordingly, this supports the idea of intensive host switching in the course of their evolution. PMID:27522367

  9. Type material of Platyhelminthes (Monogenoidea) housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Daniela A.; Mainenti, Adriana; Sanches, Magda; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A catalogue of type material of monogenoids deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, given that the last list of types was produced in 1979. The monogenoid collection comprises type lots for 203 species, distributed across 14 families and 68 genera. Specific names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality, specimens with the collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated. PMID:27667946

  10. Species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from cichlids from Zambezi and Limpopo river basins in Zimbabwe and South Africa: evidence for unexplored species richness.

    PubMed

    Zahradníčková, Petra; Barson, Maxwell; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J; Přikrylová, Iva

    2016-09-01

    New findings on Gyrodactylus spp. parasitising African cichlids in southern Africa are presented, comprising data from Zimbabwe and South Africa. Morphometry of opisthaptoral hard parts in combination with nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences confirmed the presence of six species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832. Three new species are described from fishes in Zimbabwe: Gyrodactylus chitandiri n. sp. from the gill arches of Coptodon rendalli (Boulenger) and Pseudocrenilabrus philander (Weber); Gyrodactylus occupatus n. sp. from the fins of Oreochromis niloticus (L.), Pharyngochromis acuticeps (Steindachner) and P. philander; and Gyrodactylus parisellei n. sp. from the fins of O. niloticus, P. philander and Tilapia sp. Gyrodactylus nyanzae Paperna, 1973 was also identified from the gills of O. niloticus and C. rendalli collected from two localities in Zimbabwe; these findings represent new host and locality records for this parasite. Gyrodactylus sturmbaueri Vanhove, Snoeks, Volckaert & Huyse, 2011 was identified from P. philander collected in South Africa and Zimbabwe thereby providing new host and locality records for this parasite. Finally, Gyrodactylus yacatli García-Vásquez, Hansen, Christison, Bron & Shinn, 2011 was collected from the fins of O. niloticus and P. philander studied in Zimbabwe; this represents the first record of this species from the continent of Africa. Notably, this study improves upon the knowledge of Gyrodactylus spp. parasitising cichlids from these southern African regions. All species studied were recorded from at least two different cichlid host species indicating trend for a wide range of Gyrodactylus hosts in Africa. Accordingly, this supports the idea of intensive host switching in the course of their evolution.

  11. Nomina nova in Platyhelminthes pro Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882 (non [Gmelin, 1801]; non Dunker, 1843), and Leptocleidus Mueller, 1936 (non Andrews, 1922).

    PubMed

    Hornung, Jahn J

    2016-08-19

    Two genus-group names of flat-worms-Leptocleidus Mueller, 1936 and Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882-are junior homonyms that are preoccupied by fossil diapsid reptile genera-Leptocleidus Andrews, 1922, and Macrorhynchus Dunker, 1843-and an extant teleost fish genus-Macrorhynchus [Gmelin, 1801] ex La Cépède, 1800. These are replaced by nomina nova (Pharyngodytes nom. nov.; Graffiellus nom. nov.). Macrorhynchus [Gmelin, 1801] is an objective senior synonym of Macrorhyncus Dumeríl, 1805 ex La Cépède, 1800 (syn. nov.), and a senior homonym of Macrorhynchus Dunker, 1843, and Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882.

  12. First report of the genus Cratera (Platyhelminthes, Geoplanidae) in Argentina, with description of a new species and comments on the species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Negrete, Lisandro; Brusa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A new species of land planarians of the genus Cratera is described. Cratera viridimaculata sp. n. was recorded in the Atlantic Forest Ecoregion, in north-eastern Argentina, and represents the first report of the genus Cratera outside Brazil. The new species is about 50 mm in length and externally characterized by a color pattern consisting of a light green olive pigmentation on the dorsum, stippled with dark gray fine spots, and dorsal eyes. Other features regarding the internal anatomy are the presence of a glandular margin, Cutaneous Muscular Index (CMI) of 10-13%, pharynx cylindrical, prostatic vesicle extrabulbar, tubular and C-shaped, with a proximal bifurcated portion, penis papilla protrusible with ejaculatory duct widened in its distal portion, and female atrium funnel-shaped. The new species is compared and discussed with its congeners.

  13. Seussapex, a new genus of lecanicephalidean tapeworm (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) from the stingray genus Himantura (Myliobatiformes: Dasyatidae) in the Indo-West Pacific with investigation of mode of attachment.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten; Russell, Shelbi L

    2014-06-01

    A new lecanicephalidean genus, Seussapex gen. n., is erected for specimens collected from stingrays from the Indo-West Pacific resembling the little known species Tenia [sic] narinari MacCallum, 1917 from the spotted eagle ray, Aetobatus narinari (Euphrasen). Members of this new genus are unique in their possession of a multi-tiered apical structure comprising a bipartite apical modification of the scolex proper, and an externally bipartite apical organ with anterior and posterior glandular compartments internally. The appearance of the scolex varies dramatically depending on state of protrusion and/or evagination of these different parts which appear to be able to function independently. Seussapex karybares sp. n. parasitizing Himantura uarnak 2 (sensu Naylor et al., 2012) in northern Australia is described as the type species and Tenia [sic] narinari is transferred to the new genus. The two species differ in scolex length and width of the posterior dome-shaped portion of the apical organ. Histological sections of scoleces stained using the periodic acid-Schiff(PAS) reaction showed the surface of the anterior part of the apical organ and the anterior glandular compartment to stain PAS positive, suggesting a chemical mode of attachment to the host's intestinal mucosal surface. Extensive collecting efforts of stingrays in the Indo-West Pacific shows Seussapex gen. n. to be restricted to species of Himantura Miller et Henle and suggests additional diversity in this group of hosts. In addition, the host identity of Seussapex narinari (MacCallum, 1917) comb. n. is called into question.

  14. Two new Otoplanid species (Platyhelminthes: Rhabditophora: Proseriata) of the genera Orthoplana Steinböck, 1932 and Postbursoplana Ax, 1956 from the Tuscan coast (Italy).

    PubMed

    Meini, Gianluca

    2015-04-16

    Two new species of marine flatworms, collected on the sandy shores of Tuscany, are described. These species exhibit the morphological characteristics of the subfamilies Otoplaninae and Parotoplaninae ("Turbellaria", Otoplanidae), but clearly differ from other described species. Orthoplana lunae sp. nov., is characterized by a body length of 1.4-1.6 mm, distinctive features of the testes and vitellaries, the male sclerotic apparatus composed of a median stylet (48-49 μm long), and 19 spines (17-44 μm long). Postbursoplana donoraticensis sp. nov., is characterized by a body length of 1.6-1.8 mm, the distribution of testes and vitellaries, the male sclerotic apparatus composed of 10 spines (46-70 μm). This new species has a greater body length relative to other species in this genus. They were collected along the sandy shores at low water mark at Partaccia (Marina di Massa, Ligurian Sea, Italy) and Marina di Donoratico (Livorno, Ligurian Sea, Italy), respectively.

  15. Development and evaluation of a single-step duplex PCR for simultaneous detection of Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica (family Fasciolidae, class Trematoda, phylum Platyhelminthes).

    PubMed

    Le, Thanh Hoa; Nguyen, Khue Thi; Nguyen, Nga Thi Bich; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Le, Xuyen Thi Kim; Hoang, Chau Thi Minh; De, Nguyen Van

    2012-08-01

    A single-step multiplex PCR (here referred to as a duplex PCR) has been developed for simultaneous detection and diagnosis of Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica. These species overlap in distribution in many countries of North and East Africa and Central and Southeast Asia and are similar in egg morphology, making identification from fecal samples difficult. Based on a comparative alignment of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) spanning the region of cox1-trnT-rrnL, two species-specific forward primers were designed, FHF (for F. hepatica) and FGF (for F. gigantica), and a single reverse primer, FHGR (common for both species). Conventional PCR followed by sequencing was applied using species-specific primer pairs to verify the specificity of primers and the identity of Fasciola DNA templates. Duplex PCR (using three primers) was used for testing with the DNA extracted from adult worms, miracidia, and eggs, producing amplicons of 1,031 bp for F. hepatica and 615 bp for F. gigantica. The duplex PCR failed to amplify from DNA of other common liver and intestinal trematodes, including two opisthorchiids, three heterophyids, an echinostomid, another fasciolid, and a taeniid cestode. The sensitivity assay showed that the duplex PCR limit of detection for each Fasciola species was between 0.012 ng and 0.006 ng DNA. Evaluation using DNA templates from 32 Fasciola samples (28 adults and 4 eggs) and from 25 field-collected stools of ruminants and humans revealed specific bands of the correct size and the presence of Fasciola species. This novel mtDNA duplex PCR is a sensitive and fast tool for accurate identification of Fasciola species in areas of distributional and zonal overlap.

  16. Discoplana malagasensis sp. nov., a new turbellarian (Platyhelminthes: Polycladida: Leptoplanidae) symbiotic in an ophiuroid (Echinodermata), with a cladistic analysis of the Discoplana/Euplana species.

    PubMed

    Doignon, Gilles; Artois, Tom; Deheyn, Dimitri

    2003-03-01

    A new species of polyclad flatworm from Papua New Guinea is described. It is found symbiotic in the ophiuroid Ophiothrix purpurea von Martens, 1867 (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea). Apparently it belongs to the taxon Discoplana Bock, 1913 and can be distinguished from the six previously described Discoplana species by its very short ejaculatory duct and a penial papilla covered with a penial sheath, but without any true sclerotised structures such as a stylet or spines. The cladistic analysis of the Discoplana/ Euplana species, based on morphological features and including two outgroups, reveals that all species of Discoplana, except D. pacificola, form a monophyletic taxon, that is not a synonym of Euplana Girard, 1893. Therefore the name Discoplana is conserved and the new species will be described as Discoplana malagasensis sp. nov. A key for the Discoplana/Euplana group is provided. In this key the biogeographical distribution and possible synonyms are given.

  17. Nomina nova in Platyhelminthes pro Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882 (non [Gmelin, 1801]; non Dunker, 1843), and Leptocleidus Mueller, 1936 (non Andrews, 1922).

    PubMed

    Hornung, Jahn J

    2016-01-01

    Two genus-group names of flat-worms-Leptocleidus Mueller, 1936 and Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882-are junior homonyms that are preoccupied by fossil diapsid reptile genera-Leptocleidus Andrews, 1922, and Macrorhynchus Dunker, 1843-and an extant teleost fish genus-Macrorhynchus [Gmelin, 1801] ex La Cépède, 1800. These are replaced by nomina nova (Pharyngodytes nom. nov.; Graffiellus nom. nov.). Macrorhynchus [Gmelin, 1801] is an objective senior synonym of Macrorhyncus Dumeríl, 1805 ex La Cépède, 1800 (syn. nov.), and a senior homonym of Macrorhynchus Dunker, 1843, and Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882. PMID:27615836

  18. A large 28S rDNA-based phylogeny confirms the limitations of established morphological characters for classification of proteocephalidean tapeworms (Platyhelminthes, Cestoda).

    PubMed

    de Chambrier, Alain; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Fisseha, Makda; Scholz, Tomáš; Mariaux, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Proteocephalidean tapeworms form a diverse group of parasites currently known from 315 valid species. Most of the diversity of adult proteocephalideans can be found in freshwater fishes (predominantly catfishes), a large proportion infects reptiles, but only a few infect amphibians, and a single species has been found to parasitize possums. Although they have a cosmopolitan distribution, a large proportion of taxa are exclusively found in South America. We analyzed the largest proteocephalidean cestode molecular dataset to date comprising more than 100 species (30 new), including representatives from 54 genera (80%) and all subfamilies, thus significantly improving upon previous works to develop a molecular phylogeny for the group. The Old World origin of proteocephalideans is confirmed, with their more recent expansion in South America. The earliest diverging lineages are composed of Acanthotaeniinae and Gangesiinae but most of the presently recognized subfamilies (and genera) appear not to be monophyletic; a deep systematic reorganization of the order is thus needed and the present subfamilial system should be abandoned. The main characters on which the classical systematics of the group has been built, such as scolex morphology or relative position of genital organs in relation to the longitudinal musculature, are of limited value, as demonstrated by the very weak support for morphologically-defined subfamilies. However, new characters, such as the pattern of uterus development, relative ovary size, and egg structure have been identified, which may be useful in defining phylogenetically well-supported subgroups. A strongly supported lineage infecting various snakes from a wide geographical distribution was found. Although several improvements over previous works regarding phylogenetic resolution and taxon coverage were achieved in this study, the major polytomy in our tree, composed largely of siluriform parasites from the Neotropics, remained unresolved and possibly reflects a rapid radiation. The genus Spasskyellina Freze, 1965 is resurrected for three species of Monticellia bearing spinitriches on the margins of their suckers. PMID:25987870

  19. Assessment of platyhelminth diversity within amphibians of French Guiana revealed a new species of Nanopolystoma (Monogenea: Polystomatidae) in the caecilian Typhlonectes compressicauda.

    PubMed

    du Preez, Louis H; Badets, Mathieu; Verneau, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    An expedition was undertaken to French Guiana in search of amphibian parasites. Of the 23 anuran species collected and screened for polystomes, the toad Rhinella margaritifera (Laurenti) was the sole species found to be infected with a polystome, namely Wetapolystoma almae Gray, 1983. Of the two caecilian species collected, a new species of Nanopolystoma du Preez, Huyse et Wilkinson, 2008 was discovered from the urinary bladder of the aquatic caecilian Typhlonectes compressicauda (Duméril et Bibron). The small size of the mature worm, two non-diverticulated caeca of equal length that are non-confluent posteriorly, vitelline follicles in two dense lateral fields, a single follicular testis in the middle of the body, small ovary and a single operculated egg in utero, vaginae present and the caecilian host allowed the identification of the specimen as Nanopolystoma. Larger body size, hamulus length, egg diameter and occurrence in the caecilian family Typhlonectidae distinguishes the new species from the two other known polystomes in Nanopolystoma; thus, the description of Nanopolystoma tinsleyi sp. n. is provided within this paper.

  20. The first multi-gene phylogeny of the Macrostomorpha sheds light on the evolution of sexual and asexual reproduction in basal Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Toon; Vizoso, Dita B; Schulte, Gregor; Littlewood, D Timothy J; Waeschenbach, Andrea; Schärer, Lukas

    2015-11-01

    The Macrostomorpha-an early branching and species-rich clade of free-living flatworms-is attracting interest because it contains Macrostomum lignano, a versatile model organism increasingly used in evolutionary, developmental, and molecular biology. We elucidate the macrostomorphan molecular phylogeny inferred from both nuclear (18S and 28S rDNA) and mitochondrial (16S rDNA and COI) marker genes from 40 representatives. Although our phylogeny does not recover the Macrostomorpha as a statistically supported monophyletic grouping, it (i) confirms many taxa previously proposed based on morphological evidence, (ii) permits the first placement of many families and genera, and (iii) reveals a number of unexpected placements. Specifically, Myozona and Bradynectes are outside the three classic families (Macrostomidae, Microstomidae and Dolichomacrostomidae) and the asexually fissioning Myomacrostomum belongs to a new subfamily, the Myozonariinae nov. subfam. (Dolichomacrostomidae), rather than diverging early. While this represents the first evidence for asexuality among the Dolichomacrostomidae, we show that fissioning also occurs in another Myozonariinae, Myozonaria fissipara nov. sp. Together with the placement of the (also fissioning) Microstomidae, namely as the sister taxon of Dolichomacrostomidae, this suggests that fissioning is not basal within the Macrostomorpha, but rather restricted to the new taxon Dolichomicrostomida (Dolichomacrostomidae+Microstomidae). Furthermore, our phylogeny allows new insights into the evolution of the reproductive system, as ancestral state reconstructions reveal convergent evolution of gonads, and male and female genitalia. Finally, the convergent evolution of sperm storage organs in the female genitalia appears to be linked to the widespread occurrence of hypodermic insemination among the Macrostomorpha.

  1. Type material of Platyhelminthes (Monogenoidea) housed in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute/ FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1979 to 2016

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Daniela A.; Mainenti, Adriana; Sanches, Magda; Knoff, Marcelo; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A catalogue of type material of monogenoids deposited in the Helminthological Collection of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute, FIOCRUZ (CHIOC), between 1979 and 2016, is presented, given that the last list of types was produced in 1979. The monogenoid collection comprises type lots for 203 species, distributed across 14 families and 68 genera. Specific names are listed systematically, followed by type host, infection site, type locality, specimens with the collection numbers and references. The classification and the nomenclature of the species have been updated.

  2. Intraspecific pairing of planaria,Dugesia tigrina andDugesia dorotocephala (Platyhelminthes: Turbellaria), and observations on lipophilic excretory-secretory worm products.

    PubMed

    Perkins, C; Fried, B

    1982-06-01

    Intraspecific pairing of the planaria,Dugesia tigrina andD. dorotocephala, was studied for 24 hr at 22 ± 1 °C in Petri dish cultures containing an agar substrate and a water overlay. Pairing of fed planaria in the light and dark and starved planaria in the light was studied, and worms in contact or within 5 mm of each other were considered paired. Fed planaria of both species paired significantly in the light and dark, whereas starved planaria did not pair. Our results suggest that worm-emitted chemical factors are involved in intraspecific pairing of planaria. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis was used to study the release of lipophilic worm products. Phospholipids, free sterols, and free fatty acids were detected in all trials, and triglycerides in most. Thin-layer densitometric analysis was used to quantitate the weight of free sterols released by planaria. PMID:24415246

  3. Dactylogyrids (Platyhelminthes: Monogenoidea) parasitizing butterfly fishes (Teleostei: Chaetodontidae) from the coral reefs of Palau, Moorea, Wallis, New Caledonia, and Australia: species of Euryhaliotrematoides n. gen. and Aliatrema n. gen.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Laetitia; Kritsky, Delane C

    2004-04-01

    Seven species of Euryhaliotrematoides n. gen. and 1 species of Aliatrema n. gen. (Monogenoidea; Dactylogyridae) are described and reported from the gills of 15 species of butterfly fishes (Chaetodontidae) from the coral reefs of Moorea (French Polynesia), Wallis (Wallis and Futuna), Heron and Lizard (Australia), Palau (Micronesia), and New Caledonia: Aliatrema cribbi n. sp. from Chaetodon auriga, Chaetodon lunula, Chaetodon trifasciatus, Chaetodon ulietensis, Chaetodon vagabundus, Forcipiger flavisissimus, and Heniochus chrysostomus; Euryhaliotrematoides annulocirrus n. comb. from C. auriga, C. lunula, and C. vagabundus; Euryhaliotrematoides aspistis n. sp. from C. auriga, Chaetodon citrinellus, C. lunula, Chaetodon reticulatus, C. ulietensis, and C. vagabundus; Euryhaliotrematoides berenguelae n. sp. from C. citrinellus, Chaetodon ornatissimus, and F. flavisissimus; Euryhaliotrematoides grandis n. comb. from C. auriga, C. citrinellus, Chaetodon ephippium, Chaetodon kleinii, Chaetodon lineolatus, C. lunula, C. ornatissimus, C. trifasciatus, C. vagabundus, and H. chrysostomus; Euryhaliotrematoides microphallus n. comb. from C. auriga, C. citrinellus, C. ephippium, C. kleinii, C. lunula, C. ornatissimus, C. reticulatus, Chaetodon trifascialis, C. trifasciatus, C. vagabundus, F. flavisissimus, and H. chrysostomus; Euryhaliotrematoides pirulum n. sp. from C. auriga, C. citrinellus, C. lunula, C. trifasciatus, and C. vagabundus; and Euryhaliotrematoides triangulovagina n. comb. from C. auriga, C. citrinellus, C. kleinii, C. lunula, C. ornatissimus, C. vagabundus, F. flavisissimus, H. chrysostomus, and Hemitaurichthys polylepis. All reports of previously described species are new locality records. With exceptions of E. grandis and E. annulocirrus on C. auriga and C. lunula and E. triangulovagina and E. microphallus on C. auriga, all reports are new host records. Haliotrema hainanensis and H. affinis are considered junior subjective synonyms of E. triangulovagina and E. annulocirrus, respectively. Aliatrema n. gen. is characterized by marine dactylogyrids with tandem gonads (germarium pretesticular), haptoral hooks with upright acute thumbs, a coiled copulatory organ with counterclockwise rings and funnel-shaped base but lacking an accessory piece, and a dextral vaginal pore. Euryhaliotrematoides n. gen. is characterized by marine dactylogyrids having tandem gonads (germarium pretesticular), haptoral hooks with upright acute thumbs, a coiled copulatory organ with counterclockwise rings and funnel-shaped base, a vas deferens looping the left intestinal cecum, and a dextral vaginal pore.

  4. New records of Cotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with remarks on the distribution of the Pseudoceros Lang, 1884 and Pseudobiceros Faubel, 1984 species of the Indo-Pacific Marine Region.

    PubMed

    Marquina, Daniel; Aguado, M Teresa; Noreña, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    In the present work eleven polyclad species of Lizard Island are studied. Seven of them are new records for this locality of the Australian coral reef and one is new to science, Lurymare clavocapitata n. sp. (Family Prosthiostomidae). The remaining recorded species belong to the genera Pseudoceros (P. bimarginatus, P. jebborum, P. stimpsoni, P. zebra, P. paralaticlavus and P. prudhoei) and Pseudobiceros (Pb. hancockanus, Pb. hymanae, Pb. flowersi and Pb. uniarborensis). Regardless of the different distribution patterns, all pseudocerotid species show brilliant colours, but similar internal morphology. Furthermore, differences in the form and size of the stylet are characteristic, because it is a sclerotic structure that is not affected during fixation. In Pseudoceros, the distance between the sucker and the female pore also differs among species. These features do not vary enough to be considered as diagnostic, but they provide information that can help to disentangle similarly coloured species complexes. A key of the genera Pseudoceros and Pseudobiceros of the Indo-Pacific region is provided, in order to facilitate the identification of species from this area. PMID:26624074

  5. A new species of Acanthocotyle Monticelli, 1888 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Acanthocotylidae) from the ventral skin of the banded stingaree, Urolophus cruciatus (Lacépède, 1804), from Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kearn, Graham; Whittington, Ian; Chisholm, Leslie; Evans-Gowing, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Acanthocotyle urolophi sp. nov. is described from the skin of the banded stingaree, Urolophus cruciatus (Lacépède, 1804). This is the first acanthocotylid to be described from Australian waters. Acanthocotyle urolophi sp. nov. is distinguished from other species of Acanthocotyle by a combination of the number of vitelline follicles 38 (33-46) and the number of rows 35 (32-37) of sclerites on the pseudohaptor. In addition, Acanthocotyle urolophi sp. nov. has no germarial appendix and no uterine "arm". A uterine receptaculum seminis was not identified in whole mounts. There is no penis papilla and no penis sclerite associated with the male reproductive opening. A brief description of the larva is provided. The diagnosis of the Acanthocotylidae Price, 1936 is amended and we review the Allacanthocotylinae Yamaguti, 1963, Lophocotylinae Yamaguti, 1963 and Pseudacanthocotylinae Yamaguti, 1963. We deem that these subfamilies are invalid and that the family now comprises only the subfamily Acanthocotylinae and the genus Acanthocotyle. The validity of species previously assigned to the Acanthocotylidae (sensu Yamaguti, 1963) is discussed and a key to what we consider to be the valid species in the family is also provided. PMID:27447227

  6. New records of Cotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with remarks on the distribution of the Pseudoceros Lang, 1884 and Pseudobiceros Faubel, 1984 species of the Indo-Pacific Marine Region.

    PubMed

    Marquina, Daniel; Aguado, M Teresa; Noreña, Carolina

    2015-09-18

    In the present work eleven polyclad species of Lizard Island are studied. Seven of them are new records for this locality of the Australian coral reef and one is new to science, Lurymare clavocapitata n. sp. (Family Prosthiostomidae). The remaining recorded species belong to the genera Pseudoceros (P. bimarginatus, P. jebborum, P. stimpsoni, P. zebra, P. paralaticlavus and P. prudhoei) and Pseudobiceros (Pb. hancockanus, Pb. hymanae, Pb. flowersi and Pb. uniarborensis). Regardless of the different distribution patterns, all pseudocerotid species show brilliant colours, but similar internal morphology. Furthermore, differences in the form and size of the stylet are characteristic, because it is a sclerotic structure that is not affected during fixation. In Pseudoceros, the distance between the sucker and the female pore also differs among species. These features do not vary enough to be considered as diagnostic, but they provide information that can help to disentangle similarly coloured species complexes. A key of the genera Pseudoceros and Pseudobiceros of the Indo-Pacific region is provided, in order to facilitate the identification of species from this area.

  7. Monogenoideans (Platyhelminthes) from the gill lamellae of the spotted sea trout, Cynoscion nebulosus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae), from the western coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, with redescription of Diplectanum bilobatus Hargis 1955 (Diplectanidae).

    PubMed

    Franco, Edgar F Mendoza; Rodríguez, R E del Rio; Tun, M del C Rosado

    2013-08-01

    The gill lamellae ectoparasites of the spotted sea trout, Cynoscion nebulosus (Sciaenidae), in the western coast of the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico, revealed three species of Monogenoidea: Cynoscionicola heteracantha (Manter 1938) Price, 1962 (Microcotylidae); Choricotyle cynoscioni (MacCallum, 1917) Llewellyn, 1941 (Diclidophoridae); and Diplectanum bilobatus Hargis, 1955 (Diplectanidae). Brief comments about the current taxonomic status as well as supplemental observations of all these monogenoids originally described and/or reported from the same host fish species found in the USA are provided. New illustrations, prevalence and mean intensity of infection, as well morphological and biometric data based on new specimens are shown. C. heteracantha and C. cynoscioni collected in this study represent the second and first records of the species of these genera for the Atlantic coast of Mexico. The specimens of D. bilobatus are provisionally retained within Diplectanum until an emendation of the genus and a formal revision of all named species of this monogenoidean genus are undertaken.

  8. First report of gastrocotylinean post-oncomiracidia (Platyhelminthes: Monogenoidea: Heteronchoinea) on gills of flyingfish (Exocoetidae), snapper (Lutjanidae), dolphinfish (Coryphaenidae), and amberjack (Carangidae) from the Gulf of Mexico: decoy hosts and the dilution effect.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Delane C; Bullard, Stephen A; Bakenhaster, Micah D

    2011-09-01

    Larvae, identified as post-oncomiracidia of the suborder Gastrocotylinea (Monogenoidea), were collected from formalin-fixed gills excised from six species of marine fishes captured from the Gulf of Mexico off Mississippi and Florida: common dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus and pompano dolphinfish, Coryphaena equiselis (both Perciformes, Coryphaenidae); gray snapper, Lutjanus griseus (Perciformes, Lutjanidae); greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili (Perciformes, Carangidae); and Atlantic flyingfish, Cheilopogon melanurus and sailfin flyingfish, Parexocoetus hillianus (both Beloniformes and Exocoetidae). Based on a combination of diagnostic morphological features, the specimens were divided into two basic forms, each of which was further subdivided into two morphotypes. No gastrocotylinean post-oncomiracidium had been reported previously from these hosts. Of the six host species, only C. hippurus serves as a host (unconfirmed) for the adult of a gastrocotylinean species, suggesting that the recorded fishes from the Gulf of Mexico comprise dead-end hosts acting as decoys for the oncomiracidia. These comparatively non-susceptible "decoy hosts" apparently dilute the susceptible fish-host population and by intercepting infective larvae (oncomiracidia) decrease the abundance of parasites on their typical hosts.

  9. A new species of Acanthocotyle Monticelli, 1888 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea: Acanthocotylidae) from the ventral skin of the banded stingaree, Urolophus cruciatus (Lacépède, 1804), from Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kearn, Graham; Whittington, Ian; Chisholm, Leslie; Evans-Gowing, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Acanthocotyle urolophi sp. nov. is described from the skin of the banded stingaree, Urolophus cruciatus (Lacépède, 1804). This is the first acanthocotylid to be described from Australian waters. Acanthocotyle urolophi sp. nov. is distinguished from other species of Acanthocotyle by a combination of the number of vitelline follicles 38 (33-46) and the number of rows 35 (32-37) of sclerites on the pseudohaptor. In addition, Acanthocotyle urolophi sp. nov. has no germarial appendix and no uterine "arm". A uterine receptaculum seminis was not identified in whole mounts. There is no penis papilla and no penis sclerite associated with the male reproductive opening. A brief description of the larva is provided. The diagnosis of the Acanthocotylidae Price, 1936 is amended and we review the Allacanthocotylinae Yamaguti, 1963, Lophocotylinae Yamaguti, 1963 and Pseudacanthocotylinae Yamaguti, 1963. We deem that these subfamilies are invalid and that the family now comprises only the subfamily Acanthocotylinae and the genus Acanthocotyle. The validity of species previously assigned to the Acanthocotylidae (sensu Yamaguti, 1963) is discussed and a key to what we consider to be the valid species in the family is also provided.

  10. First report of gastrocotylinean post-oncomiracidia (Platyhelminthes: Monogenoidea: Heteronchoinea) on gills of flyingfish (Exocoetidae), snapper (Lutjanidae), dolphinfish (Coryphaenidae), and amberjack (Carangidae) from the Gulf of Mexico: decoy hosts and the dilution effect.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Delane C; Bullard, Stephen A; Bakenhaster, Micah D

    2011-09-01

    Larvae, identified as post-oncomiracidia of the suborder Gastrocotylinea (Monogenoidea), were collected from formalin-fixed gills excised from six species of marine fishes captured from the Gulf of Mexico off Mississippi and Florida: common dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus and pompano dolphinfish, Coryphaena equiselis (both Perciformes, Coryphaenidae); gray snapper, Lutjanus griseus (Perciformes, Lutjanidae); greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili (Perciformes, Carangidae); and Atlantic flyingfish, Cheilopogon melanurus and sailfin flyingfish, Parexocoetus hillianus (both Beloniformes and Exocoetidae). Based on a combination of diagnostic morphological features, the specimens were divided into two basic forms, each of which was further subdivided into two morphotypes. No gastrocotylinean post-oncomiracidium had been reported previously from these hosts. Of the six host species, only C. hippurus serves as a host (unconfirmed) for the adult of a gastrocotylinean species, suggesting that the recorded fishes from the Gulf of Mexico comprise dead-end hosts acting as decoys for the oncomiracidia. These comparatively non-susceptible "decoy hosts" apparently dilute the susceptible fish-host population and by intercepting infective larvae (oncomiracidia) decrease the abundance of parasites on their typical hosts. PMID:21497672

  11. Morphological and molecular description of eight new species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from poeciliid fishes, collected in their natural distribution range in the Gulf of Mexico slope, Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Vásquez, Adriana; Razo-Mendivil, Ulises; Rubio-Godoy, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Eight new species of Gyrodactylus are described from Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliopsis gracilis, Pseudoxiphophorus bimaculatus [syn. = Heterandria bimaculata], and Xiphophorus hellerii collected in the Nautla and La Antigua River Basins in Veracruz, and in the Tecolutla River Basin in Puebla, Mexico. Analyzing the morphology of the marginal hooks, Gyrodactylus pseudobullatarudis n. sp. and Gyrodactylus xtachuna n. sp. are both very similar to Gyrodactylus bullatarudis; Gyrodactylus takoke n. sp. resembles Gyrodactylus xalapensis; Gyrodactylus lhkahuili n. sp. is similar to Gyrodactylus jarocho; and both Gyrodactylus microdactylus n. sp. and Gyrodactylus actzu n. sp. are similar to Gyrodactylus poeciliae in that all three species possess extremely short shaft points. A hypothesis of the systematic relationships of the eight new Gyrodactylus species and some of the known gyrodactylids infecting poeciliids was constructed with sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S ribosomal gene of the rRNA. Phylogenetic trees showed that the new and previously described species of Gyrodactylus infecting poeciliid fishes do not form a monophyletic assemblage. Trees also showed that the eight new species described morphologically correspond to well-supported monophyletic groups; and that morphologically similar species are also phylogenetically close. Additionally, we correct previous erroneous records of the presence of Gyrodactylus bullatarudis on wild Poecilia mexicana and Xiphophorus hellerii collected in Mexico, as re-examination of the original specimens indicated that these corresponded to Gyrodactylus pseudobullatarudis n. sp. (infecting Poecilia mexicana and Xiphophorus hellerii) and to Gyrodactylus xtachuna n. sp. (on Xiphophorus hellerii). Finally, given the widespread anthropogenic translocation of poeciliid fishes for the aquarium trade and mosquito control programs, as well as the existence of invasive, feral poeciliid populations worldwide, we discuss the possibility that gyrodactylid parasites could be introduced along with the fish hosts-this work provides taxonomic information to assess that possibility, as it describes parasites collected from poeciliid fishes within their native distribution range.

  12. Morphological and molecular description of eight new species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from poeciliid fishes, collected in their natural distribution range in the Gulf of Mexico slope, Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Vásquez, Adriana; Razo-Mendivil, Ulises; Rubio-Godoy, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Eight new species of Gyrodactylus are described from Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliopsis gracilis, Pseudoxiphophorus bimaculatus [syn. = Heterandria bimaculata], and Xiphophorus hellerii collected in the Nautla and La Antigua River Basins in Veracruz, and in the Tecolutla River Basin in Puebla, Mexico. Analyzing the morphology of the marginal hooks, Gyrodactylus pseudobullatarudis n. sp. and Gyrodactylus xtachuna n. sp. are both very similar to Gyrodactylus bullatarudis; Gyrodactylus takoke n. sp. resembles Gyrodactylus xalapensis; Gyrodactylus lhkahuili n. sp. is similar to Gyrodactylus jarocho; and both Gyrodactylus microdactylus n. sp. and Gyrodactylus actzu n. sp. are similar to Gyrodactylus poeciliae in that all three species possess extremely short shaft points. A hypothesis of the systematic relationships of the eight new Gyrodactylus species and some of the known gyrodactylids infecting poeciliids was constructed with sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S ribosomal gene of the rRNA. Phylogenetic trees showed that the new and previously described species of Gyrodactylus infecting poeciliid fishes do not form a monophyletic assemblage. Trees also showed that the eight new species described morphologically correspond to well-supported monophyletic groups; and that morphologically similar species are also phylogenetically close. Additionally, we correct previous erroneous records of the presence of Gyrodactylus bullatarudis on wild Poecilia mexicana and Xiphophorus hellerii collected in Mexico, as re-examination of the original specimens indicated that these corresponded to Gyrodactylus pseudobullatarudis n. sp. (infecting Poecilia mexicana and Xiphophorus hellerii) and to Gyrodactylus xtachuna n. sp. (on Xiphophorus hellerii). Finally, given the widespread anthropogenic translocation of poeciliid fishes for the aquarium trade and mosquito control programs, as well as the existence of invasive, feral poeciliid populations worldwide, we discuss the possibility that gyrodactylid parasites could be introduced along with the fish hosts-this work provides taxonomic information to assess that possibility, as it describes parasites collected from poeciliid fishes within their native distribution range. PMID:26091759

  13. Cleavage patterns, cell-lineages and cell specification are clues to phyletic lineages in Spiralia.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, J A; Dictus, W J; van Loon, A E

    1997-08-01

    Embryos of molluscs, annelids, nemerteans and platyhelminthes show remarkable intra- and interphyletic resemblances and differences in mesentoblast, dorso-ventral axis and trochoblast specification. These variations have been used to investigate their evolutionary relationship. In molluscs and annelids a heterochronic shift parallels evolutionary relations based on adult characters. Nemerteans and platyhelminthes lack trochal cells and differ in the specification of the mesodermal precursor cell. Nemerteans also differ fundamentally with respect to axis specification related to the first cleavage. Therefore, close phylogenetic relations exist between molluscs and annelids, whereas nemerteans and platyhelminthes are only remotely related with each other and with molluscs and annelids. PMID:15001075

  14. Seven new species of helminths for reptiles from Armenia.

    PubMed

    Nelli, Sargsyan; Felix, Danielyan; Marine, Arakelyan

    2014-09-01

    Helminthic infections of reptiles habiting in the territory of Armenia are examined. Seven species of helminths new for reptiles from Armenia are registered: Parapharyngodon skrjabini, Oswaldocruzia goezei, Neoxysomatium sp., Telorchis assula, Nematotaenia tarentolae, Mesocestoides lineatus and Spirometra erinacei europea. Descriptions and pictures of them are given.

  15. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    PubMed

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  16. Phylogenetic position of Nemertea derived from phylogenomic data.

    PubMed

    Struck, Torsten H; Fisse, Frauke

    2008-04-01

    Nemertea and Platyhelminthes have traditionally been grouped together because they possess a so-called acoelomate organization, but lateral vessels and rhynchocoel of nemerteans have been regarded as coelomic cavities. Additionally, both taxa show spiral cleavage patterns prompting the placement of Nemertea as sister to coelomate Protostomia, that is, either to Neotrochozoa (Mollusca and Annelida) or to Teloblastica (Neotrochozoa plus Arthropoda). Some workers maintain a sister group relationship of Nemertea and Platyhelminthes as Parenchymia because of an assumed homology of Götte's and Müller's larvae of polyclad Platyhelminthes and the pilidium larvae of heteronemerteans. So far, molecular data were only able to significantly reject a sister group relationship to Teloblastica. Although phylogenomic data are available for Platyhelminthes, Annelida, Mollusca, and Arthropoda, they are lacking for Nemertea. Herein, we present the first analysis specifically addressing nemertean phylogenetic position using phylogenomic data. More specifically, we collected expressed sequence tag data from Lineus viridis (O.F. Müller, 1774) and combined it with available data to produce a data set of 9,377 amino acid positions from 60 ribosomal proteins. Maximum likelihood analyses and Bayesian inferences place Nemertea in a clade together with Annelida and Mollusca. Furthermore, hypothesis testing significantly rejected a sister group relationship to either Platyhelminthes or Teloblastica. The Coelomata hypothesis, which groups coelomate taxa together to the exclusion of acoelomate and pseudocoelomate taxa, is not congruent with our results. Thus, the supposed acoelomate organization evolved independently in Nemertea and Platyhelminthes. In Nemertea, evolution of acoely is most likely due to a secondary reduction of the coelom as it is found in certain species of Mollusca and Annelida. Though looking very similar, the Götte's and Müller's larvae of polyclad Platyhelminthes are

  17. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes.

  18. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    SciTech Connect

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  19. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D.; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-01

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  20. To be or not to be a flatworm: the acoel controversy.

    PubMed

    Egger, Bernhard; Steinke, Dirk; Tarui, Hiroshi; De Mulder, Katrien; Arendt, Detlev; Borgonie, Gaëtan; Funayama, Noriko; Gschwentner, Robert; Hartenstein, Volker; Hobmayer, Bert; Hooge, Matthew; Hrouda, Martina; Ishida, Sachiko; Kobayashi, Chiyoko; Kuales, Georg; Nishimura, Osamu; Pfister, Daniela; Rieger, Reinhard; Salvenmoser, Willi; Smith, Julian; Technau, Ulrich; Tyler, Seth; Agata, Kiyokazu; Salzburger, Walter; Ladurner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Since first described, acoels were considered members of the flatworms (Platyhelminthes). However, no clear synapomorphies among the three large flatworm taxa -- the Catenulida, the Acoelomorpha and the Rhabditophora -- have been characterized to date. Molecular phylogenies, on the other hand, commonly positioned acoels separate from other flatworms. Accordingly, our own multi-locus phylogenetic analysis using 43 genes and 23 animal species places the acoel flatworm Isodiametra pulchra at the base of all Bilateria, distant from other flatworms. By contrast, novel data on the distribution and proliferation of stem cells and the specific mode of epidermal replacement constitute a strong synapomorphy for the Acoela plus the major group of flatworms, the Rhabditophora. The expression of a piwi-like gene not only in gonadal, but also in adult somatic stem cells is another unique feature among bilaterians. These two independent stem-cell-related characters put the Acoela into the Platyhelminthes-Lophotrochozoa clade and account for the most parsimonious evolutionary explanation of epidermal cell renewal in the Bilateria. Most available multigene analyses produce conflicting results regarding the position of the acoels in the tree of life. Given these phylogenomic conflicts and the contradiction of developmental and morphological data with phylogenomic results, the monophyly of the phylum Platyhelminthes and the position of the Acoela remain unresolved. By these data, both the inclusion of Acoela within Platyhelminthes, and their separation from flatworms as basal bilaterians are well-supported alternatives.

  1. Substantial Loss of Conserved and Gain of Novel MicroRNA Families in Flatworms

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Bastian; Worren, Merete Molton; Hahn, Christoph; Hovig, Eivind; Bachmann, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on microRNA (miRNA) evolution focused mainly on the comparison of miRNA complements between animal clades. However, evolution of miRNAs within such groups is poorly explored despite the availability of comparable data that in some cases lack only a few key taxa. For flatworms (Platyhelminthes), miRNA complements are available for some free-living flatworms and all major parasitic lineages, except for the Monogenea. We present the miRNA complement of the monogenean flatworm Gyrodactylus salaris that facilitates a comprehensive analysis of miRNA evolution in Platyhelminthes. Using the newly designed bioinformatics pipeline miRCandRef, the miRNA complement was disentangled from next-generation sequencing of small RNAs and genomic DNA without a priori genome assembly. It consists of 39 miRNA hairpin loci of conserved miRNA families, and 22 novel miRNAs. A comparison with the miRNA complements of Schmidtea mediterranea (Turbellaria), Schistosoma japonicum (Trematoda), and Echinococcus granulosus (Cestoda) reveals a substantial loss of conserved bilaterian, protostomian, and lophotrochozoan miRNAs. Eight of the 46 expected conserved miRNAs were lost in all flatworms, 16 in Neodermata and 24 conserved miRNAs could not be detected in the cestode and the trematode. Such a gradual loss of miRNAs has not been reported before for other animal phyla. Currently, little is known about miRNAs in Platyhelminthes, and for the majority of the lost miRNAs there is no prediction of function. As suggested earlier they might be related to morphological simplifications. The presence and absence of 153 conserved miRNAs was compared for platyhelminths and 32 other metazoan taxa. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria + Neodermata [Monogenea {Trematoda + Cestoda}]). PMID:24025793

  2. Substantial loss of conserved and gain of novel MicroRNA families in flatworms.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Bastian; Worren, Merete Molton; Hahn, Christoph; Hovig, Eivind; Bachmann, Lutz

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies on microRNA (miRNA) evolution focused mainly on the comparison of miRNA complements between animal clades. However, evolution of miRNAs within such groups is poorly explored despite the availability of comparable data that in some cases lack only a few key taxa. For flatworms (Platyhelminthes), miRNA complements are available for some free-living flatworms and all major parasitic lineages, except for the Monogenea. We present the miRNA complement of the monogenean flatworm Gyrodactylus salaris that facilitates a comprehensive analysis of miRNA evolution in Platyhelminthes. Using the newly designed bioinformatics pipeline miRCandRef, the miRNA complement was disentangled from next-generation sequencing of small RNAs and genomic DNA without a priori genome assembly. It consists of 39 miRNA hairpin loci of conserved miRNA families, and 22 novel miRNAs. A comparison with the miRNA complements of Schmidtea mediterranea (Turbellaria), Schistosoma japonicum (Trematoda), and Echinococcus granulosus (Cestoda) reveals a substantial loss of conserved bilaterian, protostomian, and lophotrochozoan miRNAs. Eight of the 46 expected conserved miRNAs were lost in all flatworms, 16 in Neodermata and 24 conserved miRNAs could not be detected in the cestode and the trematode. Such a gradual loss of miRNAs has not been reported before for other animal phyla. Currently, little is known about miRNAs in Platyhelminthes, and for the majority of the lost miRNAs there is no prediction of function. As suggested earlier they might be related to morphological simplifications. The presence and absence of 153 conserved miRNAs was compared for platyhelminths and 32 other metazoan taxa. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria + Neodermata [Monogenea {Trematoda + Cestoda}]).

  3. Conditioned pain modulation in women with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more vigilant to pain-associated stimuli. The aims of this study were to compare women with IBS (n = 20) to healthy control (HC, n = 20) women on pain sensitivity, conditioned pain modulation (CPM) efficiency, and salivary corti...

  4. Acoustic Responses after Total Destruction of the Cochlear Receptor: Brainstem and Auditory Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazals, Yves; Aran, Jean-Marie; Erre, Jean-Paul; Guilhaume, Anne

    1980-10-01

    Acoustically evoked neural activity has been recorded from the brainstem and auditory cortex of guinea pigs after complete destruction of the organ of Corti by the aminoglycosidic antibiotic amikacin. These responses to sound differ in important respects from the evoked potentials normally recorded from the auditory pathways. At the brainstem level they resemble the potentials reported by others after stimulation of the vestibular nerve.

  5. Audiogenic seizures and cochlear damage in rats after perinatal antithyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Milllesworth, L.; Norris, C.H.

    1980-06-01

    The feeding of goitrogens during pregnancy and lactation causes the offspring of rats to be partially deaf and persistently sensitive to audiogenic seizures. The most potent goitrogen, propylthiouracil, caused severe dysfunction and disorganization of the organ of Corti. Adult seizure-susceptible rats showed increased sensitivity to audiogenic seizures when they were fed propylthiouracil.

  6. LMO4 functions as a negative regulator of sensory organ formation in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Deng, Min; Luo, Xiong-jian; Pan, Ling; Yang, Hua; Xie, Xiaoling; Liang, Guoqing; Huang, Liang; Hu, Fang; Kiernan, Amy E; Gan, Lin

    2014-07-23

    In mammals, formation of the auditory sensory organ (the organ of Corti) is restricted to a specialized area of the cochlea. However, the molecular mechanisms limiting sensory formation to this discrete region in the ventral cochlear duct are not well understood, nor is it known whether other regions of the cochlea have the competence to form the organ of Corti. Here we identify LMO4, a LIM-domain-only nuclear protein, as a negative regulator of sensory organ formation in the cochlea. Inactivation of Lmo4 in mice leads to an ectopic organ of Corti (eOC) located in the lateral cochlea. The eOC retains the features of the native organ, including inner and outer hair cells, supporting cells, and other nonsensory specialized cell types. However, the eOC shows an orientation opposite to the native organ, such that the eOC appears as a mirror-image duplication to the native organ of Corti. These data demonstrate a novel sensory competent region in the lateral cochlear duct that is regulated by LMO4 and may be amenable to therapeutic manipulation.

  7. Auditory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ades, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    The physical correlations of hearing, i.e. the acoustic stimuli, are reported. The auditory system, consisting of external ear, middle ear, inner ear, organ of Corti, basilar membrane, hair cells, inner hair cells, outer hair cells, innervation of hair cells, and transducer mechanisms, is discussed. Both conductive and sensorineural hearing losses are also examined.

  8. [Temporal bone histopathology of noise-induced hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Yoshinori; Iino, Yukiko; Kodera, Kazuoki

    2005-02-01

    To examine the relationship between hearing and changes in the inner ear, we investigated human temporal bone specimens from 2 patients with noise-induced hearing loss and prepared audio-cytocochleograms as described by Schuknecht et al. Patient 1 was a 50-year-old male who died of thyroid cancer and had worked at a printing house for 38 years. Patient 2 was a 58-year old male who died of maxillary sinus cancer and had worked in construction for 22 years. A pure-tone audiogram showed high-tone sensorineural hearing loss with c5-dip-type hearing disorder in both ears in Patient 1, and a high-tone abrupt form of sensorineural hearing loss in Patient 2. Pathological examination of the temporal bone revealed degeneration and disappearance of the organ of Corti at the basal turn and disappearance of cochlear neurons in both patients. Audio-cytocochleograms revealed hearing disorder consistent with the changes in the inner ear in both patients. Marked degeneration and disappearance of the organ of Corti and stria vascularis were present in patient 1. It is generally known that disorders of the organ of Corti for a long period is involved in the etiology of noise-induced hearing loss. This degeneration of the organ of Corti is produced at a basilar membrane with the maximum amplitude related to exposure to noise according to a physical and mechanical factors. Moreover, animal experiments have shown that exposure to noise decrease cochlear blood flow. In Patient 1 both the organ of Corti and the stria vascularis exhibited degeneration, suggesting that not only physical and mechanical factors but a cochlear circulatory disorder related to exposure to noise was involved in the etiology of the pathological changes in the temporal bone related to noise-induced hearing loss.

  9. The Parasite Fauna of the Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Nanna D; Skirnisson, Karl; Nielsen, Ólafur K

    2015-10-01

    We examined 46 Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) carcasses from Iceland for parasites, including 29 first-year birds and 17 second-year birds and older. Endoparasites observed were the trematodes Cryptocotyle lingua (prevalence 8%), Cryptocotyle concavum (4%), and Strigea sp. (8%); the cestode Mesocestoides sp. (27%); and the nematodes Eucoleus contortus (76%) and Serratospiculum guttatum (7%). Ectoparasites included the astigmatan mite Dubininia accipitrina (47%), a mesostigmatan rhynonyssid mite (4%), the tick Ixodes caledonicus (20%), the mallophagans Degeeriella rufa (90%) and Nosopon lucidum (7%), the flea Ceratophyllus vagabundus (7%), and the louse fly Ornithomya chloropus (7%). Cryptocotyle lingua, C. concavum, S. guttatum, D. accipitrina, I. caledonicus, and N. lucidum are new host records. Of the five most common parasites (prevalence ≥ 20%) only Mesocestoides sp. showed a significant age relationship, being more prevalent in adult falcons (P = 0.021). Eucoleus contortus was also more prevalent in adults with marginal statistical significance (P = 0.058). Frounce, caused by E. contortus (possibly also by Trichomonas gallinae, which was not searched for in the survey) was highly prevalent (43%), but did not show a relationship with host age (P = 0.210). Birds with frounce were in poorer body condition than healthy birds (P = 0.015).

  10. Levels of infection of intestinal helminth species in the golden jackal Canis aureus from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Ćirović, D; Pavlović, I; Penezić, A; Kulišić, Z; Selaković, S

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, golden jackal populations have substantially increased, yet little is known of their potential for transmitting parasites within animal and human hosts. In the present study, between 2005 and 2010, 447 jackals from six localities in Serbia were examined for intestinal parasites. Two species of trematodes (Alaria alata, Pseudamphistomum truncatum), three nematodes (Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Gongylonema sp.), and seven cestodes (Taenia pisiformis, Taenia hydatigena, Multiceps multiceps, Multiceps serialis, Mesocestoides lineatus, Mesocestoides litteratus, Dipylidium caninum) were identified. Pseudamphistomum truncatum and M. serialis species were recorded for the first time. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 10.3%. No significant differences were found in the prevalence of infection between males and females (P>0.817), between localities (P>0.502), or with regard to annual cycles (P>0.502). In the infected jackal population, 65% harboured multiple infections and one individual was a host to five different types of parasite species, the highest number of parasites we recorded in a single host. These findings indicate that although the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in the jackal population in Serbia is significantly lower than expected from earlier studies, further monitoring is required given the jackal's rapid population increase. PMID:23941681

  11. Levels of infection of intestinal helminth species in the golden jackal Canis aureus from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Ćirović, D; Pavlović, I; Penezić, A; Kulišić, Z; Selaković, S

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, golden jackal populations have substantially increased, yet little is known of their potential for transmitting parasites within animal and human hosts. In the present study, between 2005 and 2010, 447 jackals from six localities in Serbia were examined for intestinal parasites. Two species of trematodes (Alaria alata, Pseudamphistomum truncatum), three nematodes (Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Gongylonema sp.), and seven cestodes (Taenia pisiformis, Taenia hydatigena, Multiceps multiceps, Multiceps serialis, Mesocestoides lineatus, Mesocestoides litteratus, Dipylidium caninum) were identified. Pseudamphistomum truncatum and M. serialis species were recorded for the first time. The overall prevalence of parasitic infection was 10.3%. No significant differences were found in the prevalence of infection between males and females (P>0.817), between localities (P>0.502), or with regard to annual cycles (P>0.502). In the infected jackal population, 65% harboured multiple infections and one individual was a host to five different types of parasite species, the highest number of parasites we recorded in a single host. These findings indicate that although the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in the jackal population in Serbia is significantly lower than expected from earlier studies, further monitoring is required given the jackal's rapid population increase.

  12. The urbilaterian brain revisited: novel insights into old questions from new flatworm clades.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Xavier; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-05-01

    Flatworms are classically considered to represent the simplest organizational form of all living bilaterians with a true central nervous system. Based on their simple body plans, all flatworms have been traditionally grouped together in a single phylum at the base of the bilaterians. Current molecular phylogenomic studies now split the flatworms into two widely separated clades, the acoelomorph flatworms and the platyhelminth flatworms, such that the last common ancestor of both clades corresponds to the urbilaterian ancestor of all bilaterian animals. Remarkably, recent comparative neuroanatomical analyses of acoelomorphs and platyhelminths show that both of these flatworm groups have complex anterior brains with surprisingly similar basic neuroarchitectures. Taken together, these findings imply that fundamental neuroanatomical features of the brain in the two separate flatworm groups are likely to be primitive and derived from the urbilaterian brain.

  13. THE URBILATERIAN BRAIN REVISITED: NOVEL INSIGHTS INTO OLD QUESTIONS FROM NEW FLATWORM CLADES

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Xavier; Reichert, Heinrich; Hartenstein, Volker

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Flatworms are classically considered to represent the simplest organizational form of all living bilaterians with a true central nervous system. Based on their simple body plans, all flatworms have been traditionally grouped together in a single phylum at the base of the bilaterians. Current molecular phylogenomic studies now split the flatworms into two widely separated clades, the acoelomorph flatworms and the platyhelminth flatworms, such that the last common ancestor of both clades corresponds to the urbilaterian ancestor of all bilaterian animals. Remarkably, recent comparative neuroanatomical analyses of acoelomorphs and platyhelminths show that both of these flatworm groups have complex anterior brains with surprisingly similar basic neuroarchitectures. Taken together, these findings imply that fundamental neuroanatomical features of the brain in the two separate flatworm groups are likely to be primitive and derived from the urbilaterian brain. PMID:23143292

  14. DNA primers for amplification of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I from diverse metazoan invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Folmer, O; Black, M; Hoeh, W; Lutz, R; Vrijenhoek, R

    1994-10-01

    We describe "universal" DNA primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a 710-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) from 11 invertebrate phyla: Echinodermata, Mollusca, Annelida, Pogonophora, Arthropoda, Nemertinea, Echiura, Sipuncula, Platyhelminthes, Tardigrada, and Coelenterata, as well as the putative phylum Vestimentifera. Preliminary comparisons revealed that these COI primers generate informative sequences for phylogenetic analyses at the species and higher taxonomic levels.

  15. Proliferation pattern during rostrum regeneration of the symbiotic flatworm Paracatenula galateia: a pulse-chase-pulse analysis.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Ulrich; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Egger, Bernhard; Ott, Jörg A

    2012-08-01

    The remarkable totipotent stem-cell-based regeneration capacities of the Platyhelminthes have brought them into the focus of stem cell and regeneration research. Although selected platyhelminth groups are among the best-studied invertebrates, our data provide new insights into regenerative processes in the most basally branching group of the Platyhelminthes, the Catenulida. The mouth- and gutless free-living catenulid flatworm Paracatenula galateia harbors intracellular bacterial symbionts in its posterior body region, the trophosome region, accounting for up to 50% of the volume. Following decapitation of this flatworm, we have analyzed the behavior of the amputated fragments and any anterior and posterior regeneration. Using an EdU-pulse-chase/BrdU-pulse thymidine analog double-labeling approach combined with immunohistochemistry, we show that neoblasts are the main drivers of the regeneration processes. During anterior (rostrum) regeneration, EdU-pulse-chase-labeled cells aggregate inside the regenerating rostrum, whereas BrdU pulse-labeling before fixation indicates clusters of S-phase neoblasts at the same position. In parallel, serotonergic nerves reorganize and the brain regenerates. In completely regenerated animals, the original condition with S-phase neoblasts being restricted to the body region posterior to the brain is restored. In contrast, no posterior regeneration or growth of the trophosome region in anterior fragments cut a short distance posterior to the brain has been observed. Our data thus reveal interesting aspects of the cellular processes underlying the regeneration of the emerging catenulid-bacteria symbiosis model P. galateia and show that a neoblast stem cell system is indeed a plesiomorphic feature of basal platyhelminths.

  16. Retinoic Acid Stimulates Regeneration of Mammalian Auditory Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Philippe P.; Malgrange, Brigitte; Staecker, Hinrich; Moonen, Gustave; van de Water, Thomas R.

    1993-04-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss resulting from the loss of auditory hair cells is thought to be irreversible in mammals. This study provides evidence that retinoic acid can stimulate the regeneration in vitro of mammalian auditory hair cells in ototoxic-poisoned organ of Corti explants in the rat. In contrast, treatment with retinoic acid does not stimulate the formation of extra hair cells in control cultures of Corti's organ. Retinoic acid-stimulated hair cell regeneration can be blocked by cytosine arabinoside, which suggests that a period of mitosis is required for the regeneration of auditory hair cells in this system. These results provide hope for a recovery of hearing function in mammals after auditory hair cell damage.

  17. Involution of the auditory neuro-epithelium in a tiger (Panthera tigris) and a jaguar (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Ulehlová, L; Burda, H; Voldrich, L

    1984-01-01

    Numerical atrophy of the hair cells of the organ of Corti of the inner ear in a 14-year-old tiger and a 17-year-old jaguar is described. The decrease in number of sensory hair cells is considered to represent physiological atrophy caused by the process of ageing. The findings are compared with previous observations on man, guinea-pigs, shrews, and bats. The development of the physiological involution of the hearing neuro-epithelium is discussed.

  18. Transforming growth factor alpha treatment alters intracellular calcium levels in hair cells and protects them from ototoxic damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Staecker, H; Dazert, S; Malgrange, B; Lefebvre, P P; Ryan, A F; Van de Water, T R

    1997-07-01

    To determine if transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) pretreatment protects hair cells from aminoglycoside induced injury by modifying their intracellular calcium concentration, we assayed hair cell calcium levels in organ of Corti explants both before and after aminoglycoside (i.e. neomycin, 10(-3) M) exposure either with or without growth factor pretreatment. After TGF alpha (500 ng/ml) treatment, the intracellular calcium level of hair cells showed a five-fold increase as compared to the levels observed in the hair cells of control cultures. After ototoxin exposure, calcium levels in hair cells of control explants showed an increase relative to their baseline levels, while in the presence of growth factors pretreatment, hair cells showed a relative reduction in calcium levels. Pretreatment of organ of Corti explants afforded significant protection of hair cell stereocilia bundle morphology from ototoxic damage when compared to explants exposed to ototoxin alone. This study correlates a rise in hair cell calcium levels with the otoprotection of hair cells by TGF alpha in organ of Corti explants. PMID:9263032

  19. Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) Promotes the Differentiation of Mouse Cochlear Neural Progenitors via the Math1–Brn3.1 Signaling pathway in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaohua; Huang, Jianmin; Feng, Ling; Fukudome, Shinji; Hamajima, Yuki; Lin, Jizhen

    2009-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is essential for the development of the cochlear duct that harbors the organ of Corti. However, little is known about the molecular signaling pathway through which SHH promotes the development of the organ of Corti, especially cochlear sensory epithelial cells. In this study, we demonstrated that SHH contributes to the differentiation of cochlear neural progenitors (CNPs), which are derived from the postnatal day 1 organ of Corti in mice. Addition of SHH to CNPs increased the formation of epithelial cell islands, simultaneously activated the expression of Math1 that is a transcription factor for the initial differentiation of auditory hair cells. The increased expression of Math1 then regulated the promoter activity of Brn3.1, another transcription factor that controls the further differentiation and survival of auditory hair cells. Taken together, our data suggest that SHH plays an important role in the promotion of auditory hair cell differentiation via the Math1-Brn3.1 signaling pathway. PMID:19908278

  20. Growth factors have a protective effect on neomycin-induced hair cell loss.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiangxin; Yuan, Huihua; Xie, Jing; Wang, Xianliu; Yang, Liangliang; Zhang, Yanzhong

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that selected growth factors are involved in regulating survival and proliferation of progenitor cells derived from the neonatal rat organ of Corti (OC). The protective and regenerative effects of these defined growth factors on the injured organ of Corti were therefore investigated. The organ of Corti dissected from the Wistar rat pups (P3-P5) was split into apical, middle, and basal parts, explanted and cultured with or without neomycin and growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) protected the inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) from neomycin ototoxicity. Using EGF, IGF-1, and FGF-2 alone induced no protective effect on the survival of auditory hair cells. Combining 2 growth factors (EGF + IGF-1, EGF + FGF-2, or IGF-1 + FGF-2) gave statistically protective effects. Similarly, combining all three growth factors effectively protected auditory hair cells from the ototoxic insult. None of the growth factors induced regeneration of hair cells in the explants injured with neomycin. Thus various combinations of the three defined factors (IGF-1, FGF-2, and EGF) can protect the auditory hair cells from the neomycin-induced ototoxic damage, but no regeneration was seen. This offers a possible novel approach to the treatment of hearing loss.

  1. Otx2 is a target of N-myc and acts as a suppressor of sensory development in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, Victor; López-Hernández, Iris; Durán Alonso, María Beatriz; Feijoo-Redondo, Ana; Abello, Gina; Gálvez, Héctor; Giráldez, Fernando; Lamonerie, Thomas; Schimmang, Thomas

    2015-08-15

    Transcriptional regulatory networks are essential during the formation and differentiation of organs. The transcription factor N-myc is required for proper morphogenesis of the cochlea and to control correct patterning of the organ of Corti. We show here that the Otx2 gene, a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila orthodenticle homeobox gene, is a crucial target of N-myc during inner ear development. Otx2 expression is lost in N-myc mouse mutants, and N-myc misexpression in the chick inner ear leads to ectopic expression of Otx2. Furthermore, Otx2 enhancer activity is increased by N-myc misexpression, indicating that N-myc may directly regulate Otx2. Inactivation of Otx2 in the mouse inner ear leads to ectopic expression of prosensory markers in non-sensory regions of the cochlear duct. Upon further differentiation, these domains give rise to an ectopic organ of Corti, together with the re-specification of non-sensory areas into sensory epithelia, and the loss of Reissner's membrane. Therefore, the Otx2-positive domain of the cochlear duct shows a striking competence to develop into a mirror-image copy of the organ of Corti. Taken together, these data show that Otx2 acts downstream of N-myc and is essential for patterning and spatial restriction of the sensory domain of the mammalian cochlea. PMID:26160903

  2. Toward three-dimensional analysis of cochlear structure.

    PubMed

    Steele, C R

    1999-01-01

    Recent results from a three-dimensional model of the cochlea are summarized. The features include physically realistic values of basilar membrane stiffness, mass, and fluid viscosity. The simple 'feed-forward' principle for the active process yields results in qualitative agreement with recent measurements in the cochlea. The limitation is a simplified representation of the organ of Corti, with two degrees of freedom representing the motion of the pectinate and arcuate zones of the basilar membrane. However, the inner sulcus fluid flow is included. The new feature presented in this paper is an approach to treat all the structural detail of the organ of Corti, with the sole input to the calculation in a form easily understood by anyone familiar with the cochlea. Specific results are shown for the Pakistani water buffalo, since a fairly complete anatomical description of this cochlea is available. The static stiffness from the calculation, based on only the anatomy and known values for the protein elastic moduli, are in remarkable agreement with recent measurements in the gerbil cochlea. Only preliminary results for the dynamic response with inviscid fluid are reported. Of interest, however, are the propagation modes related to significant fluid displacement and pressure in the different compartments of the organ of Corti.

  3. Data on the parasitological status of golden jackal (Canis aureus L., 1758) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Takács, András; Szabó, László; Juhász, Lajos; Takács, András Attila; Lanszki, József; Takács, Péter Tamás; Heltai, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    In Hungary, twenty Canis aureus individuals were submitted to parasitological examinations in 2010-2012. Two Coccidia: Cystoisospora canis (15%) and Toxoplasma-type oocysts (5%), one Trematoda: Alaria alata (10%), six Cestoda: Mesocestoides lineatus (20%), Echinococcus granulosus (10%), Dipylidium caninums (5%), Taenia hydatigena (15%), Taenia pisiformis (20%), Taenia crassiceps (40%), and nine Nematoda: Angiostrongylus vasorum (10%), Crenosoma vulpis (30%), Capillaria aerophila (5%), Toxocara canis (20%), Toxascaris leonina (15%), Trichuris vulpis (10%), Ancylostoma caninum (45%), Uncinaria stenocephala (40%), Capillaria plica (45%) have been identified. Angiostronglyus vasorum has been reported from carnivores in Europe, Africa, South America and North America. The helminth A. vasorum or French heartworm is a metastrongylid nematode, widely distributed in Western Europe, that infects the pulmonary arterial tree of dogs, various species of foxes, wolves, Eurasian badgers, coyotes and stoats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural A. vasorum infection in golden jackal. PMID:24334089

  4. New genus, new species of Cestoda (Anoplocephalidae), new species of Nematoda (Cosmocercidae) and other helminths in Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2005-08-01

    Gekkotaenia novaeguineaensis n. gen., n. sp. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from the small intestine and Cosmocerca zugi n. sp. (Nematoda: Cosmocercidae) from the large intestine of the ring-tailed gecko, Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis (Sauria: Gekkonidae) are described and illustrated. Gekkotaenia novaeguineaensis n. gen., n. sp. is unique among the acraspedote Linstowiinae in possessing a poral female reproductory system. Cosmocerca zugi n. sp. is the 22nd species to be assigned to the genus and differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of rosette papillae on plectanes and having a gubernaculum longer than the spicules. It is the fifth species to be described from the Australian biogeographical region. Eight additional helminth species were found: the digenean, Allopharynx macallisteri; 2 cestodes, cysticercoids of Cyclophyllidea gen. sp. and tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides sp.; 5 nematodes, larvae in cysts of Abbreviata sp., Aplectana macintoshii, Oswaldocruzia bakeri, Parapharyngodon maplestonei, and an undescribed species of Physalopteroides. Cyrtodactylus louisiadensis represents a new host record for each of these helminths.

  5. [The raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis)--no zoonotic risk for Brandenburg?].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Sabine; Sutor, Astrid; Mattis, Roswitha; Conraths, Franz Josef

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of the raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris [B.] procyonis), a dangerous zoonotic pathogen for humans, in raccoons living in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany. In the years 2008 to 2013, a total of 762 raccoons, dating from hunting bags, were examined for intestinal helminths. No raccoon roundworm specimen was detected, but 27 samples were positive for Mesocestoides spp. Earlier studies had proved the presence of B. procyonis in Hesse and since 2005 the parasite has also been found in the western part of Saxony-Anhalt. The migration ability of raccoons may promote a further distribution of this parasite and could increase the risk for zoonotic infections in humans.

  6. Helminth parasites of the Mediterranean gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus (Sauria: Gekkonidae), from Texas, United States with a summary of helminths of this host.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Bursey, Charles R

    2016-09-01

    One hundred-thirty six Mediterranean geckos, Hemidactylus turcicus, were collected between December 1986 and March 2016 in Hardin (n = 7), Harris (n = 57), and Tom Green (n = 72) counties, Texas, USA., and examined for helminth parasites. Fifty-two H. turcicus (38%) were infected with at least one helminth species. Found were a trematode, Mesocoelium meggitti, three cestodes, Mesocestoides sp. (tetrathyridia), Oochoristica ameivae and Oochoristica scelopori, and four nematodes, Cosmocercoides variabilis, Oswaldocruzia pipiens, Parapharyngodon cubensis, and larvae of Physaloptera sp. Oochoristica ameivae, O. scelopori, P. cubensis, Physaloptera sp., and Os. pipiens represent new host records for H. turcicus and M. meggitti is reported from Texas for the first time. A summary of the helminth parasites of both native and non-native H. turcicus is presented. PMID:27447223

  7. Helminth parasites of the Mediterranean gecko, Hemidactylus turcicus (Sauria: Gekkonidae), from Texas, United States with a summary of helminths of this host.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Bursey, Charles R

    2016-09-01

    One hundred-thirty six Mediterranean geckos, Hemidactylus turcicus, were collected between December 1986 and March 2016 in Hardin (n = 7), Harris (n = 57), and Tom Green (n = 72) counties, Texas, USA., and examined for helminth parasites. Fifty-two H. turcicus (38%) were infected with at least one helminth species. Found were a trematode, Mesocoelium meggitti, three cestodes, Mesocestoides sp. (tetrathyridia), Oochoristica ameivae and Oochoristica scelopori, and four nematodes, Cosmocercoides variabilis, Oswaldocruzia pipiens, Parapharyngodon cubensis, and larvae of Physaloptera sp. Oochoristica ameivae, O. scelopori, P. cubensis, Physaloptera sp., and Os. pipiens represent new host records for H. turcicus and M. meggitti is reported from Texas for the first time. A summary of the helminth parasites of both native and non-native H. turcicus is presented.

  8. Helminths of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Bružinskaitė-Schmidhalter, Rasa; Šarkūnas, Mindaugas; Malakauskas, Alvydas; Mathis, Alexander; Torgerson, Paul R; Deplazes, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Red foxes and raccoon dogs are hosts for a wide range of parasites including important zoonotic helminths. The raccoon dog has recently invaded into Europe from the east. The contribution of this exotic species to the epidemiology of parasitic diseases, particularly parasitic zoonoses is unknown. The helminth fauna and the abundance of helminth infections were determined in 310 carcasses of hunted red foxes and 99 of raccoon dogs from Lithuania. Both species were highly infected with Alaria alata (94·8% and 96·5% respectively) and Trichinella spp. (46·6% and 29·3%). High and significantly different prevalences in foxes and raccoon dogs were found for Eucoleus aerophilus (97·1% and 30·2% respectively), Crenosoma vulpis (53·8% and 15·1%), Capillaria plica (93·3% and 11·3%), C. putorii (29·4% and 51·5%), Toxocara canis (40·5% and 17·6%) and Uncinaria stenocephala (76·9% and 98·8%). The prevalences of the rodent-transmitted cestodes Echinococcus multilocularis, Taenia polyacantha, T. crassiceps and Mesocestoides spp. were significantly higher in foxes than in raccoon dogs. The abundances of E. multilocularis, Mesocestoides, Taenia, C. plica and E. aerophilus were higher in foxes than those in raccoon dogs. A. alata, U. stenocephala, C. putorii and Echinostomatidae had higher abundances in raccoon dogs. The difference in prevalence and abundance of helminths in both animals may reflect differences in host ecology and susceptibility. The data are consistent with red foxes playing a more important role than raccoon dogs in the transmission of E. multilocularis in Lithuania.

  9. Developmental diversity in free-living flatworms.

    PubMed

    Martín-Durán, José María; Egger, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Flatworm embryology has attracted attention since the early beginnings of comparative evolutionary biology. Considered for a long time the most basal bilaterians, the Platyhelminthes (excluding Acoelomorpha) are now robustly placed within the Spiralia. Despite having lost their relevance to explain the transition from radially to bilaterally symmetrical animals, the study of flatworm embryology is still of great importance to understand the diversification of bilaterians and of developmental mechanisms. Flatworms are acoelomate organisms generally with a simple centralized nervous system, a blind gut, and lacking a circulatory organ, a skeleton and a respiratory system other than the epidermis. Regeneration and asexual reproduction, based on a totipotent neoblast stem cell system, are broadly present among different groups of flatworms. While some more basally branching groups - such as polyclad flatworms - retain the ancestral quartet spiral cleavage pattern, most flatworms have significantly diverged from this pattern and exhibit unique strategies to specify the common adult body plan. Most free-living flatworms (i.e. Platyhelminthes excluding the parasitic Neodermata) are directly developing, whereas in polyclads, also indirect developers with an intermediate free-living larval stage and subsequent metamorphosis are found. A comparative study of developmental diversity may help understanding major questions in evolutionary biology, such as the evolution of cleavage patterns, gastrulation and axial specification, the evolution of larval types, and the diversification and specialization of organ systems. In this review, we present a thorough overview of the embryonic development of the different groups of free-living (turbellarian) platyhelminths, including the Catenulida, Macrostomorpha, Polycladida, Lecithoepitheliata, Proseriata, Bothrioplanida, Rhabdocoela, Fecampiida, Prolecithophora and Tricladida, and discuss their main features under a consensus phylogeny

  10. Developmental diversity in free-living flatworms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Flatworm embryology has attracted attention since the early beginnings of comparative evolutionary biology. Considered for a long time the most basal bilaterians, the Platyhelminthes (excluding Acoelomorpha) are now robustly placed within the Spiralia. Despite having lost their relevance to explain the transition from radially to bilaterally symmetrical animals, the study of flatworm embryology is still of great importance to understand the diversification of bilaterians and of developmental mechanisms. Flatworms are acoelomate organisms generally with a simple centralized nervous system, a blind gut, and lacking a circulatory organ, a skeleton and a respiratory system other than the epidermis. Regeneration and asexual reproduction, based on a totipotent neoblast stem cell system, are broadly present among different groups of flatworms. While some more basally branching groups - such as polyclad flatworms - retain the ancestral quartet spiral cleavage pattern, most flatworms have significantly diverged from this pattern and exhibit unique strategies to specify the common adult body plan. Most free-living flatworms (i.e. Platyhelminthes excluding the parasitic Neodermata) are directly developing, whereas in polyclads, also indirect developers with an intermediate free-living larval stage and subsequent metamorphosis are found. A comparative study of developmental diversity may help understanding major questions in evolutionary biology, such as the evolution of cleavage patterns, gastrulation and axial specification, the evolution of larval types, and the diversification and specialization of organ systems. In this review, we present a thorough overview of the embryonic development of the different groups of free-living (turbellarian) platyhelminths, including the Catenulida, Macrostomorpha, Polycladida, Lecithoepitheliata, Proseriata, Bothrioplanida, Rhabdocoela, Fecampiida, Prolecithophora and Tricladida, and discuss their main features under a consensus phylogeny

  11. Endoparasites of some economically important food fishes of River Jhelum, Kashmir (India).

    PubMed

    Farooq, Taqdees; Khan, Imran; Tak, Irfan-Ur-Rauf; Dar, Shoaib Ali; Yousuf, A R

    2016-09-01

    During the present study endo-parasitic fauna of fish at different sites of River Jhelum were analysed. Four different species of endoparasites were recovered from Schizothorax species which include Adenoscolex kashmirensis Mehra, 1930, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi Yamaguti, 1934, Echinorhynchus sp., Pomphorhynchus kashmirensis Kaw, 1941, belong to Phylum Platyhelminths and Phylum Acanthocephala. Prevalence and generation time were inversely proportional to each other. Prevalence and mean abundance were highest at Qamarwari. Diversity was more at Tengpora. Cestodes including Adenoscolex kashmirensis and Bothriocephalus acheilognathi were more dominant than Pomphorhynchus kashmirensis and Echinorhynchus sp.

  12. Endoparasites of some economically important food fishes of River Jhelum, Kashmir (India).

    PubMed

    Farooq, Taqdees; Khan, Imran; Tak, Irfan-Ur-Rauf; Dar, Shoaib Ali; Yousuf, A R

    2016-09-01

    During the present study endo-parasitic fauna of fish at different sites of River Jhelum were analysed. Four different species of endoparasites were recovered from Schizothorax species which include Adenoscolex kashmirensis Mehra, 1930, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi Yamaguti, 1934, Echinorhynchus sp., Pomphorhynchus kashmirensis Kaw, 1941, belong to Phylum Platyhelminths and Phylum Acanthocephala. Prevalence and generation time were inversely proportional to each other. Prevalence and mean abundance were highest at Qamarwari. Diversity was more at Tengpora. Cestodes including Adenoscolex kashmirensis and Bothriocephalus acheilognathi were more dominant than Pomphorhynchus kashmirensis and Echinorhynchus sp. PMID:27605799

  13. Phylogenetic relationships among higher Nemertean (Nemertea) Taxa inferred from 18S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, P; Turbeville, J M; Lindh, S

    2001-09-01

    We estimated the phylogenetic relationships of 15 nemertean (phylum Nemertea) species from the four subclasses Hoplo-, Hetero-, Palaeo-, and Bdellonemertea with 18S rDNA sequence data. Three outgroup taxa were used for rooting: Annelida, Platyhelminthes, and Mollusca. Parsimony and maximum-likelihood analyses supported the monophyletic status of the Heteronemertea and a taxon consisting of hoplonemerteans and Bdellonemertea, while indicating that Palaeonemertea is paraphyletic. The monophyletic status of the two nemertean classes Anopla and Enopla is not supported by the data. The unambiguous clades are well supported, as assessed by a randomization test (bootstrapping) and branch support values.

  14. Phylogeny of protostome worms derived from 18S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Winnepenninckx, B; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1995-07-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of protostome worms were studied by comparing new complete 18S rRNA sequences of Vestimentifera, Pogonophora, Sipuncula, Echiura, Nemertea, and Annelida with existing 18S rRNA sequences of Mollusca, Arthropoda, Chordata, and Platyhelminthes. Phylogenetic trees were inferred via neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony analyses. These suggest that (1) Sipuncula and Echiura are not sister groups; (2) Nemertea are protostomes; (3) Vestimentifera and Pogonophora are protostomes that have a common ancestor with Echiura; and (4) Vestimentifera and Pogonophora are a monophyletic clade.

  15. Neurobehavioral toxicity of cadmium sulfate to the planarian Dugesia dorotocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Grebe, E.; Schaeffer, D.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The authors are developing bioassays which use planarians (free-living platyhelminthes) for the rapid determination of various types of toxicity, including acute mortality, tumorigenicity, and short-term neurobehavioral responses. Their motivation for using these animals is due to their importance as components of the aquatic ecology of unpolluted streams their sensitivity to low concentrations of environmental toxicants and the presence of a sensitive neurological system with a true brain which allows for complex social behavior. A previous paper described the results of a neurobehavioral bioassay using phenol in a crossover study. This paper reports a similar crossover study using cadmium sulfate.

  16. Understanding the evolution and development of neurosensory transcription factors of the ear to enhance therapeutic translation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ning; Kopecky, Benjamin; Jahan, Israt; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructing a functional organ of Corti is the ultimate target towards curing hearing loss. Despite the impressive technical gains made over the last few years, many complications remain ahead for the two main restoration avenues: in vitro transformation of pluripotent cells into hair cell-like cells and adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. Most notably, both approaches require a more complete understanding of the molecular networks that ensure specific cell types form in the correct places to allow proper function of the restored organ of Corti. Important to this understanding are the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) that are highly diverse and serve to increase functional complexity but their evolutionary implementation in the inner ear neurosensory development is less conspicuous. To this end, we review the evolutionary and developmentally dynamic interactions of the three bHLH TFs that have been identified as the main players in neurosensory evolution and development, Neurog1, Neurod1 and Atoh1. These three TFs belong to the neurogenin/atonal family and evolved from a molecular precursor that likely regulated single sensory cell development in the ectoderm of metazoan ancestors but are now also expressed in other parts of the body, including the brain. They interact extensively via intracellular and intercellular cross-regulation to establish the two main neurosensory cell types of the ear, the hair cells and sensory neurons. Furthermore, the level and duration of their expression affect the specification of hair cell subtypes (inner hair cells vs. outer hair cells). We propose that appropriate manipulation of these TFs through their characterized binding sites may offer a solution by itself, or in conjunction with the two other approaches currently pursued by others, to restore the organ of Corti. PMID:22688958

  17. Ecological correlates of cortisol levels in two bat species with contrasting feeding habits.

    PubMed

    Lewanzik, Daniel; Kelm, Detlev H; Greiner, Sabine; Dehnhard, Martin; Voigt, Christian C

    2012-05-15

    The immediate release of adrenal glucocorticoids can be crucial for an animal's survival when facing a stressor, but constantly elevated or exceptionally high glucocorticoid levels are usually detrimental for health. Although baseline and maximal secretion of glucocorticoids are regulated within narrow ranges within species, plasma glucocorticoid levels vary largely across vertebrates. We asked what ecological factors affect baseline plasma cortisol levels (CortI) and maximum levels (CortMax) following a physiological challenge through administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Specifically, we studied whether seasonal fluctuations in food abundance correlate with the capacity of cortisol increases in two phyllostomid bat species with contrasting feeding habits: the sanguinivorous vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) and the frugivorous short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata). Both species coexist in habitats with various levels of seasonality (dry and rainforest). On a seasonal basis, resource abundance is more stable for vampire than for fruit bats, but previous studies suggested that daily foraging success may vary more for vampire than for fruit bats. CortI and CortMax varied seasonally in C. perspicillata from dry and rainforests, with the exception of CortMax in rainforest bats. Although we expected food availability to be stable year-round for vampire bats, we found CortI and CortMax of vampires to be higher during the rainy season than during the dry season. Also, we found CortMax to be higher in vampires from the rainforest than in those from the dry forest. CortMax of vampires were among the highest measured for a free-ranging mammal; a pattern that could be related to the species' vulnerability to starvation. We conclude that food availability modulates cortisol levels in free-ranging species that face seasonally fluctuating resources; in species, however, that benefit from food which is constantly abundant, other factors than food may

  18. Enkephalin-like immunoreactivity of olivocochlear nerve fibers in cochlea of guinea pig and cat

    PubMed Central

    Fex, Jörgen; Altschuler, Richard A.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in the cochlea of the guinea pig and cat was studied. Indirect immunofluorescence immunohistochemistry using antisera generated against a methionine enkephalin-bovine thyroglobulin conjugate was applied to surface preparations of the organ of Corti and cryostat sections of the whole of the cochlea. In the cochlear osseous spiral lamina, immunofluorescence was localized to unmyelinated fibers of the intraganglionic spiral bundle. In the organ of Corti, immunofluorescence was localized to a small number of fibers at inner hair cells, the inner spiral bundle, and tunnel spiral bundle, to tunnel crossing fibers at the level of the tunnel floor, to an occasional spiral outer fiber, and to the synaptic region of outer hair cells in the three rows of the basal turn of the cochlea. Less immunofluorescence was found in this region as one progressed towards the apex, with none seen at the apex. At the most apical region the inner spiral bundle became patchy and the tunnel spiral bundle developed arcades. There was no immunofluorescence found in spiral ganglion cells, in auditory nerve fibers, or in the hair cells of the organ of Corti. The findings were the same in cat as in guinea pig, the latter being studied in more detail. It was concluded that efferent, olivocochlear neurons of the cochlea, synapsing predominantly with primary auditory nerve fibers from the inner sensory cells or with the sensory cells, contain enkephalin-like immunoreactivity. Also, the findings indicate that endings of olivocochlear neurons that synapse predominantly with outer hair cells contain enkephalin-like immunoreactivity. It has previously been shown that olivocochlear neurons are likely to be cholinergic. Images PMID:7015329

  19. Gentamicin alters Akt-expression and its activation in the guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, U-R; Strieth, S; Schmidtmann, I; Li, H; Helling, K

    2015-12-17

    Gentamicin treatment induces hair cell death or survival in the inner ear. Besides the well-known toxic effects, the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway was found to be involved in cell protection. After gentamicin application, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of Akt and its activated form (p-Akt) were determined in male guinea pigs. A single dose of 0.1 mL gentamicin (4 mg/ear/animal) was intratympanically injected. The auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded prior to application and 1, 2 and 7 days afterward. At these three time points the cochleae (n=10 in each case) were removed, transferred to fixative and embedded in paraffin. Seven ears were used as untreated controls. Gentamicin, Akt and p-Akt were identified immunohistochemically in various regions of the cochlea and their staining intensities were quantified on sections using digital image analysis. The application of gentamicin resulted in hearing loss with a concomitant up-regulation of Akt-expression in the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion cells and an additional activation in spiral ganglion cells. At the level of individual ears, clear intracellular correlations were found between Akt- and p-Akt-expression in the stria vascularis and interdental cells and, to a minor extent, in the spiral ligament and the organ of Corti. Furthermore, statistical evidence for the connection between gentamicin up-take and hearing loss was detected. The increase in Akt- and p-Akt-expression in the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion cells indicates a selected response of the cochlea against gentamicin toxicity.

  20. Ecological correlates of cortisol levels in two bat species with contrasting feeding habits.

    PubMed

    Lewanzik, Daniel; Kelm, Detlev H; Greiner, Sabine; Dehnhard, Martin; Voigt, Christian C

    2012-05-15

    The immediate release of adrenal glucocorticoids can be crucial for an animal's survival when facing a stressor, but constantly elevated or exceptionally high glucocorticoid levels are usually detrimental for health. Although baseline and maximal secretion of glucocorticoids are regulated within narrow ranges within species, plasma glucocorticoid levels vary largely across vertebrates. We asked what ecological factors affect baseline plasma cortisol levels (CortI) and maximum levels (CortMax) following a physiological challenge through administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Specifically, we studied whether seasonal fluctuations in food abundance correlate with the capacity of cortisol increases in two phyllostomid bat species with contrasting feeding habits: the sanguinivorous vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) and the frugivorous short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia perspicillata). Both species coexist in habitats with various levels of seasonality (dry and rainforest). On a seasonal basis, resource abundance is more stable for vampire than for fruit bats, but previous studies suggested that daily foraging success may vary more for vampire than for fruit bats. CortI and CortMax varied seasonally in C. perspicillata from dry and rainforests, with the exception of CortMax in rainforest bats. Although we expected food availability to be stable year-round for vampire bats, we found CortI and CortMax of vampires to be higher during the rainy season than during the dry season. Also, we found CortMax to be higher in vampires from the rainforest than in those from the dry forest. CortMax of vampires were among the highest measured for a free-ranging mammal; a pattern that could be related to the species' vulnerability to starvation. We conclude that food availability modulates cortisol levels in free-ranging species that face seasonally fluctuating resources; in species, however, that benefit from food which is constantly abundant, other factors than food may

  1. Deformation of the Outer Hair Cells and the Accumulation of Caveolin-2 in Connexin 26 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Takashi; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Fujimoto, Ayumi; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Nishikawa, Atena; Aoki, Toru; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kamiya, Kazusaku

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in GJB2, which encodes connexin 26 (Cx26), a cochlear gap junction protein, represent a major cause of pre-lingual, non-syndromic deafness. The degeneration of the organ of Corti observed in Cx26 mutant—associated deafness is thought to be a secondary pathology of hearing loss. Here we focused on abnormal development of the organ of Corti followed by degeneration including outer hair cell (OHC) loss. Methods We investigated the crucial factors involved in late-onset degeneration and loss of OHC by ultrastructural observation, immunohistochemistry and protein analysis in our Cx26-deficient mice (Cx26f/fP0Cre). Results In ultrastructural observations of Cx26f/fP0Cre mice, OHCs changed shape irregularly, and several folds or notches were observed in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the mutant OHCs had a flat surface compared with the characteristic wavy surface structure of OHCs of normal mice. Protein analysis revealed an increased protein level of caveolin-2 (CAV2) in Cx26f/fP0Cre mouse cochlea. In immunohistochemistry, a remarkable accumulation of CAV2 was observed in Cx26f/fP0Cre mice. In particular, this accumulation of CAV2 was mainly observed around OHCs, and furthermore this accumulation was observed around the shrunken site of OHCs with an abnormal hourglass-like shape. Conclusions The deformation of OHCs and the accumulation of CAV2 in the organ of Corti may play a crucial role in the progression of, or secondary OHC loss in, GJB2-associated deafness. Investigation of these molecular pathways, including those involving CAV2, may contribute to the elucidation of a new pathogenic mechanism of GJB2-associated deafness and identify effective targets for new therapies. PMID:26492081

  2. Deficiency of angulin-2/ILDR1, a tricellular tight junction-associated membrane protein, causes deafness with cochlear hair cell degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tomohito; Katsuno, Tatsuya; Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Tricellular tight junctions seal the extracellular spaces of tricellular contacts, where the vertices of three epithelial cells meet, and are required for the establishment of a strong barrier function of the epithelial cellular sheet. Angulins and tricellulin are known as specific protein components of tricellular tight junctions, where angulins recruit tricellulin. Mutations in the genes encoding angulin-2/ILDR1 and tricellulin have been reported to cause human hereditary deafness DFNB42 and DFNB49, respectively. To investigate the pathogenesis of DFNB42, we analyzed mice with a targeted disruption of Ildr1, which encodes angulin-2/ILDR1. Ildr1 null mice exhibited profound deafness. Hair cells in the cochlea of Ildr1 null mice develop normally, but begin to degenerate by two weeks after birth. Tricellulin localization at tricellular contacts of the organ of Corti in the cochlea was retained in Ildr1 null mice, but its distribution along the depth of tricellular contacts was affected. Interestingly, compensatory tricellular contact localization of angulin-1/LSR was observed in the organ of Corti in Ildr1 null mice although it was hardly detected in the organ of Corti in wild-type mice. The onset of hair cell degeneration in Ildr1 null mice was earlier than that in the reported Tric mutant mice, which mimic one of the tricellulin mutations in DFNB49 deafness. These results indicate that the angulin-2/ILDR1 deficiency causes the postnatal degenerative loss of hair cells in the cochlea, leading to human deafness DFNB42. Our data also suggest that angulin family proteins have distinct functions in addition to their common roles of tricellulin recruitment and that the function of angulin-2/ILDR1 for hearing cannot be substituted by angulin-1/LSR.

  3. The Digital Cytocochleogram.

    PubMed

    Santi, P A; Blair, A; Bohne, B A; Lukkes, J; Nietfeld, J

    2004-06-01

    The Mouse Cochlea Database (MCD) is a collection of resources that include digital images and bibliographic information on the mouse cochlea and is available at: http://mousecochlea.ccgb.umn.edu. The purpose of this communication is to report on the development of one MCD resource: the Digital Cytocochleogram. A cytocochleogram is a graphic representation of the anatomical state of the hair cells along the complete width and length of the organ of Corti. The Digital Cytocochleogram provides Internet users with a complete collection of digital images of one or more surface preparations of the mouse organ of Corti from which morphometric information can be obtained. By moving a mouse driven, screen cursor over a digital image, the location and approximate frequency region of the anatomical structure is displayed. Users can also measure the straight-line distance between any two structures on the image. The Digital Cytocochleogram resource uses two software programs, the Coordinate Finder and Viewer, which are written as CGI scripts. The Coordinate Finder program maps each digital image to an X,Y coordinate system. The total length of the organ of Corti from all tissue segments is computed using an arc-distance approximation formula, with the lateral border of the inner pillar cell headplates serving as a trace line or reference location. After all of the digital images of the tissue segments are mapped, they are placed on the MCD Website where users can use the Viewer program to view and morphometrically assess structures using a web browser. A single, complete surface preparation from a normal mouse is presently available on the MCD website. As the MCD grows, additional images of surface preparations at different magnifications from normal, mutant, and experimentally altered mouse cochleas will become available.

  4. Schistosome sex matters: a deep view into gonad-specific and pairing-dependent transcriptomes reveals a complex gender interplay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhigang; Sessler, Florian; Holroyd, Nancy; Hahnel, Steffen; Quack, Thomas; Berriman, Matthew; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2016-01-01

    As a key event for maintaining life cycles, reproduction is a central part of platyhelminth biology. In case of parasitic platyhelminths, reproductive processes can also contribute to pathology. One representative example is the trematode Schistosoma, which causes schistosomiasis, an infectious disease, whose pathology is associated with egg production. Among the outstanding features of schistosomes is their dioecious lifestyle and the pairing-dependent differentiation of the female gonads which finally leads to egg synthesis. To analyze the reproductive biology of Schistosoma mansoni in-depth we isolated complete ovaries and testes from paired and unpaired schistosomes for comparative RNA-seq analyses. Of >7,000 transcripts found in the gonads, 243 (testes) and 3,600 (ovaries) occurred pairing-dependently. Besides the detection of genes transcribed preferentially or specifically in the gonads of both genders, we uncovered pairing-induced processes within the gonads including stem cell-associated and neural functions. Comparisons to work on neuropeptidergic signaling in planarian showed interesting parallels but also remarkable differences and highlights the importance of the nervous system for flatworm gonad differentiation. Finally, we postulated first functional hints for 235 hypothetical genes. Together, these results elucidate key aspects of flatworm reproductive biology and will be relevant for basic as well as applied, exploitable research aspects. PMID:27499125

  5. Molecular phylogeny of metazoan intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Erber, A; Riemer, D; Bovenschulte, M; Weber, K

    1998-12-01

    We have cloned cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) proteins from a large number of invertebrate phyla using cDNA probes, the monoclonal antibody IFA, peptide sequence information, and various RT-PCR procedures. Novel IF protein sequences reported here include the urochordata and nine protostomic phyla, i.e., Annelida, Brachiopoda, Chaetognatha, Echiura, Nematomorpha, Nemertea, Platyhelminthes, Phoronida, and Sipuncula. Taken together with the wealth of data on IF proteins of vertebrates and the results on IF proteins of Cephalochordata, Mollusca, Annelida, and Nematoda, two IF prototypes emerge. The L-type, which includes 35 sequences from 11 protostomic phyla, shares with the nuclear lamins the long version of the coil 1b subdomain and, in most cases, a homology segment of some 120 residues in the carboxyterminal tail domain. The S-type, which includes all four subfamilies (types I to IV) of vertebrate IF proteins, lacks 42 residues in the coil 1b subdomain and the carboxyterminal lamin homology segment. Since IF proteins from all three phyla of the chordates have the 42-residue deletion, this deletion arose in a progenitor prior to the divergence of the chordates into the urochordate, cephalochordate, and vertebrate lineages, possibly already at the origin of the deuterostomic branch. Four phyla recently placed into the protostomia on grounds of their 18S rDNA sequences (Brachiopoda, Nemertea, Phoronida, and Platyhelminthes) show IF proteins of the L-type and fit by sequence identity criteria into the lophotrochozoic branch of the protostomia.

  6. Schistosome sex matters: a deep view into gonad-specific and pairing-dependent transcriptomes reveals a complex gender interplay

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhigang; Sessler, Florian; Holroyd, Nancy; Hahnel, Steffen; Quack, Thomas; Berriman, Matthew; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2016-01-01

    As a key event for maintaining life cycles, reproduction is a central part of platyhelminth biology. In case of parasitic platyhelminths, reproductive processes can also contribute to pathology. One representative example is the trematode Schistosoma, which causes schistosomiasis, an infectious disease, whose pathology is associated with egg production. Among the outstanding features of schistosomes is their dioecious lifestyle and the pairing-dependent differentiation of the female gonads which finally leads to egg synthesis. To analyze the reproductive biology of Schistosoma mansoni in-depth we isolated complete ovaries and testes from paired and unpaired schistosomes for comparative RNA-seq analyses. Of >7,000 transcripts found in the gonads, 243 (testes) and 3,600 (ovaries) occurred pairing-dependently. Besides the detection of genes transcribed preferentially or specifically in the gonads of both genders, we uncovered pairing-induced processes within the gonads including stem cell-associated and neural functions. Comparisons to work on neuropeptidergic signaling in planarian showed interesting parallels but also remarkable differences and highlights the importance of the nervous system for flatworm gonad differentiation. Finally, we postulated first functional hints for 235 hypothetical genes. Together, these results elucidate key aspects of flatworm reproductive biology and will be relevant for basic as well as applied, exploitable research aspects. PMID:27499125

  7. Functional visualization of the excretory system of adult Schistosoma mansoni by the fluorescent marker resorufin.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kusel, J R; Thornhill, J

    2002-12-01

    Excretion of metabolic wastes as well as xenobiotics is a major concern of all living organisms, and the Platyhelminthes including Schistosoma mansoni possess the protonephridial excretory system for their survival. Except for some ultra-structural and biochemical information, little is known about the protonephridium of platyhelminths due to a lack of established techniques for exploring the excretory activity. This study describes a new technique to assess the excretory activity of S. mansoni by use of the fluorescent marker resorufin, which is a potential substrate of the drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein. After simple diffusion into the schistosome body, fluorescent resorufin was concentrated in the excretory tubules by an energy-dependent mechanism and excreted via the nephridiopore. The present technique of labelling functionally the excretory system was applicable to adult worms, but not schistosomula or cercariae. A variety of modulators known to interfere with mammalian P-glycoprotein function perturbed resorufin excretion from male adult schistosomes, including cyclosporin A, Ro11-2933, verapamil, or nifedipine. This technique of labelling the excretory system with fluorescent resorufin has enabled us to study aspects of the physiological function, hitherto unknown, of the protonephridial system of S. mansoni.

  8. Structural analysis of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase genes in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Rahma; Rouault, J-D; Ayadi, Habib; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase is a ubiquitous pump coordinating the transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the membrane of cells and its role is fundamental to cellular functions. It is heteromer in eukaryotes including two or three subunits (α, β and γ which is specific to the vertebrates). The catalytic functions of the enzyme have been attributed to the α subunit. Several complete α protein sequences are available, but only few gene structures were characterized. We identified the genomic sequences coding the α-subunit of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, from the whole-genome shotgun contigs (WGS), NCBI Genomes (chromosome), Genomic Survey Sequences (GSS) and High Throughput Genomic Sequences (HTGS) databases across distinct phyla. One copy of the α subunit gene was found in Annelida, Arthropoda, Cnidaria, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Mollusca, Placozoa, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Urochordata, but the nematodes seem to possess 2 to 4 copies. The number of introns varied from 0 (Platyhelminthes) to 26 (Porifera); and their localization and length are also highly variable. Molecular phylogenies (Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony methods) showed some clusters constituted by (Chordata/(Echinodermata/Hemichordata)) or (Plathelminthes/(Annelida/Mollusca)) and a basal position for Porifera. These structural analyses increase our knowledge about the evolutionary events of the α subunit genes in the invertebrates.

  9. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing.

  10. The European eel may tolerate multiple infections at a low biological cost.

    PubMed

    Mayo-Hernández, Elvira; Serrano, Emmanuel; Peñalver, Jose; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Ruiz de Ybáñez, Rocío; Muñoz, Pilar

    2015-06-01

    Most animals are concurrently infected with multiple parasites, and interactions among them may influence both disease dynamics and host fitness. However, the sublethal costs of parasite infections are difficult to measure and the effects of concomitant infections with multiple parasite species on individual physiology and fitness are poorly described for wild hosts. To understand the costs of co-infection, we investigated the relationships among 189 European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from Mar Menor, parasites (richness and intensity) and eel's 'health status' (fluctuant asymmetry, splenic somatic index and the scaled mass index) by partial least squares regression. We found a positive relationship with 44% of the health status variance explained by parasites. Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) was the strongest predictor variable (44·72%) followed by Bucephalus anguillae (Platyhelminthes: Bucephalidae), (29·26%), considered the two most relevant parasites in the analysis. Subsequently, 15·67 and 12·01% of the response variables block were explained by parasite richness and Deropristis inflata (Platyhelminthes: Deropristiidae), respectively. Thus, the presence of multiple parasitic exposures with little effect on condition, strongly suggests that eels from Mar Menor tolerate multiparasitism.

  11. Lipid biosynthesis in the marine flatworm Convoluta roscoffensis and its algal symbiont Platymonas convoluta.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H; Provasoli, L; Meyer, F

    1979-06-21

    As a part of an investigations on the lipid metabolism in Platyhelminthes, the acoel Convoluta roscoffensis, which harbors the green alga Platymonas convoluta as a symbiont, was studied. Isotopic tracer experiments established that the acoel lacks the ability to synthesize de novo long-chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and depends on its algal symbiont for these compounds. The acoel's fatty acid composition closely resembles that of the alga but differs from those of other animals; the acoel's polyunsaturated fatty acids are of the plant type (omega 3 family) rather than of the animal type (omega 6 family). The acoel also lacks the ability to synthesize sterols de novo. It contains 24-methylenecholesterol synthesized by the algae and, in addition, significant amounts of cholesterol, which is probably a host modification product of the algal sterol. With fatty acids provided by the symbiont, the acoel has the ability to synthesize its own complex lipids. The acoel contains relatively large amounts of triglyceride, phosphatidylcholine, and ethanolamine plasmalogen. These compounds are either not present at all or present only in minute amounts in the symbiotic alga. Since acoels belong to the most primitive forms of the present-day flatworms, the observed metabolic defects in this organism suggest that mechanisms for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and sterols were lost early during the evolution of the Platyhelminthes, and that this phenomenon is widespread within the phylum.

  12. Phylogenetic position of phylum Nemertini, inferred from 18S rRNA sequences: molecular data as a test of morphological character homology.

    PubMed

    Turbeville, J M; Field, K G; Raff, R A

    1992-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA sequence of the nemertine Cerebratulus lacteus was obtained and compared with those of coelomate metazoans and acoelomate platyhelminths to test whether nemertines share a most recent common ancestor with the platyhelminths, as traditionally has been implied, or whether nemertines lie within a protostome coelomate clade, as suggested by more recent morphological analyses. Maximum-parsimony analysis supports the inclusion of the nemertine within a protostome-coelomate clade that falls within a more inclusive coelomate clade. Bootstrap analysis indicates strong support for a monophyletic Coelomata composed of a deuterostome and protostome-coelomate clade. Support for a monophyletic protostome Coelomata is weak. Inference by distance analysis is consistent with that of maximum parsimony. Analysis of down-weighted paired sites by maximum parsimony reveals variation in topology only within the protostome-coelomate clade. The relationships among the protostome coelomates cannot be reliably inferred from the partial sequences, suggesting that coelomate protostomes diversified rapidly. Results with evolutionary parsimony are consistent with the inclusion of the nemertine in a coelomate clade. The molecular inference corroborates recent morphological character analyses that reveal no synapomorphies of nemertines and flatworms but instead suggest that the circulatory system and rhynchocoel of nemertines are homologous to coelomic cavities of protostome coelomates, thus supporting the corresponding hypothesis that nemertines belong within a protostome-coelomate clade. The sequence data provide an independent test of morphological character homology.

  13. Structural analysis of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase genes in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Rahma; Rouault, J-D; Ayadi, Habib; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase is a ubiquitous pump coordinating the transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the membrane of cells and its role is fundamental to cellular functions. It is heteromer in eukaryotes including two or three subunits (α, β and γ which is specific to the vertebrates). The catalytic functions of the enzyme have been attributed to the α subunit. Several complete α protein sequences are available, but only few gene structures were characterized. We identified the genomic sequences coding the α-subunit of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, from the whole-genome shotgun contigs (WGS), NCBI Genomes (chromosome), Genomic Survey Sequences (GSS) and High Throughput Genomic Sequences (HTGS) databases across distinct phyla. One copy of the α subunit gene was found in Annelida, Arthropoda, Cnidaria, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Mollusca, Placozoa, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Urochordata, but the nematodes seem to possess 2 to 4 copies. The number of introns varied from 0 (Platyhelminthes) to 26 (Porifera); and their localization and length are also highly variable. Molecular phylogenies (Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony methods) showed some clusters constituted by (Chordata/(Echinodermata/Hemichordata)) or (Plathelminthes/(Annelida/Mollusca)) and a basal position for Porifera. These structural analyses increase our knowledge about the evolutionary events of the α subunit genes in the invertebrates. PMID:26812300

  14. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    PubMed

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  15. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    PubMed

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve. PMID:11615339

  16. [Effect of a 6-week vitamin A-deficient diet on the sensory cells of the inner ear. Light and electron microscopic studies].

    PubMed

    Löhle, E

    1980-09-01

    Histologic studies of the inner ear in rats with chronic vitamin A deficiency have produced contradicting results. In our own electronmicroscope investigations of the inner ear of young rats after a six week vitamin A deficit diet we found a lacking of the cuticle in the outer hair cells and a subtotally lacking of the cuticle in the inner hair cells. Furthermore, we found changes in the reticular system of the intermediate zone. These morphologic changes together with the recent findings of high concentrations of vitamin A in the corti organ support the hypothesis that the acoustic sensory receptors contain or functionally depend upon vitamin A.

  17. Histopathology of the Human Inner Ear in Alström Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nadol, Joseph B.; Marshall, Jan D.; Bronson, Roderick T.

    2015-01-01

    Alström syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndromic genetic disorder caused by mutations in the ALMS1 gene. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs in greater than 85% of patients. Histopathology of the inner ear abnormalities in the human has not previously been fully described. Histopathology of the inner ear in Alström syndrome is presented in two genetically confirmed cases. The predominant histopathologic correlates of the sensorineural loss were degeneration of the organ of Corti, both inner and outer hair cells, degeneration of spiral ganglion cells, and atrophy of the stria vascularis and spiral ligament. PMID:26111748

  18. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) inhibits electrically evoked neural responses in the deaf white cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Rajguru, Suhrud M.; Robinson, Alan; Young, Hunter K.

    2014-03-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been used in the past to evoke neural activity from hearing and partially deaf animals. All the responses were excitatory. In Aplysia californica, Duke and coworkers demonstrated that INS also inhibits neural responses [1], which similar observations were made in the vestibular system [2, 3]. In deaf white cats that have cochleae with largely reduced spiral ganglion neuron counts and a significant degeneration of the organ of Corti, no cochlear compound action potentials could be observed during INS alone. However, the combined electrical and optical stimulation demonstrated inhibitory responses during irradiation with infrared light.

  19. Vibration Measurement on Reticular Lamina and Basilar Membrane at Multiple Longitudinal Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Choudhury, Niloy; Fridberger, Anders; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The longitudinal distribution of the organ of Corti vibration is important for both understanding the energy delivery and the timing of the cochlear amplification. Recent development on low coherence interferomtry technique allows measuring vibration inside the cochlea. The reticular lamina (RL) vibration spectrum demonstrates that RL vibration leads the basilar membrane (BM). This phase lead is consistent with the idea that the active process may lead the BM vibration. In this study, measurements on multiple longitudinal locations demonstrated similar phase lead. Results on this study suggests that there may be another longitudinal coupling mechanism inside the cochlea other than the traveling wave on BM.

  20. Reduced Connexin26 in the Mature Cochlea Increases Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xing-Xing; Chen, Sen; Xie, Le; Ji, Yu-Zi; Wu, Xia; Wang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Qi; Yu, Jin-Tao; Sun, Yu; Lin, Xi; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Connexin26 (Cx26, encoded by GJB2) mutations are the most common cause of non-syndromic deafness. GJB2 is thought to be involved in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). However, the role of Cx26 in NIHL is still obscure. To explore the association between Cx26 and NIHL, we established a Cx26 knockdown (KD) mouse model by conditional knockdown of Cx26 at postnatal day 18 (P18), and then we observed the auditory threshold and morphologic changes in these mice with or without noise exposure. The Cx26 KD mice did not exhibit substantial hearing loss and hair cell degeneration, while the Cx26 KD mice with acoustic trauma experienced higher hearing loss than simple noise exposure siblings and nearly had no recovery. Additionally, extensive outer hair cell loss and more severe destruction of the basal organ of Corti were observed in Cx26 KD mice after noise exposure. These data indicate that reduced Cx26 expression in the mature mouse cochlea may increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss and facilitate the cell degeneration in the organ of Corti. PMID:26927086

  1. In vivo imaging and vibration measurement of Guinea pig cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Niloy; Chen, Fangyi; Zheng, Jiefu; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2008-02-01

    An optical coherence tomography (OCT) system was built to acquire in vivo, both images and vibration measurements of the organ of Corti of the guinea pig. The organ of Corti was viewed through a ~500-μm diameter hole in the bony wall of the scala tympani of the first cochlear turn. In imaging mode, the image was acquired as reflectance R(x,z). In vibration mode, the basilar membrane (BM) or reticular lamina (RL) was selected based on the image. Under software control, the system would move the scanning mirrors to bring the sensing volume of the measurement to the desired tissue location. To address the gain stability problem of the homodyne OCT system, arising from the system moving in and out of the quadrature point and also to resolve the 180 degree ambiguity in the phase measurement using an interferometer, a vibration calibration method is developed by adding a vibrating source to the reference arm to monitor the operating point of the interferometric system. Amplitude gain and phase of various cochlear membranes was measured for different sound pressure level (SPL) varying from 65dB SPL to 93 dB SPL.

  2. Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) expression in the human spiral ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kimanh D.; Mowlds, Donald; Lopez, Ivan A.; Hosokawa, Seiji; Ishiyama, Akira; Ishiyama, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their receptors have been localized to the inner ear of the rat and guinea pig mammalian models. The expression of mu opioid receptor (MOR) in the human and mouse cochlea is not yet known. We present MOR protein localization by immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression by in situ hybridization in the human and mouse spiral ganglia (SG) and organ of Corti. In the human most of the (SG) neurons were immunoreactive; a subset was non-immunoreactive. In situ hybridization revealed a similar labeling pattern across the neurons of the SG. A similar distribution MOR pattern was demonstrated in the mouse SG. In the mouse organ of Corti MOR was expressed in inner and outer hair cells. Fibers underneath the inner hair cells were also MOR immunoreactive. These results are consistent with a role of MOR in neuro-modulation of the auditory periphery. The present results show that the expression of MORs is well-conserved across multiple mammalian species, indicative of an important role in auditory processing. PMID:25278190

  3. Cockayne syndrome group B (Csb) and group a (Csa) deficiencies predispose to hearing loss and cochlear hair cell degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagtegaal, A Paul; Rainey, Robert N; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata M C; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Borst, J Gerard G; Segil, Neil

    2015-03-11

    Sensory hair cells in the cochlea, like most neuronal populations that are postmitotic, terminally differentiated, and non-regenerating, depend on robust mechanisms of self-renewal for lifelong survival. We report that hair cell homeostasis requires a specific sub-branch of the DNA damage nucleotide excision repair pathway, termed transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome (CS), caused by defects in TCR, is a rare DNA repair disorder with a broad clinical spectrum that includes sensorineural hearing loss. We tested hearing and analyzed the cellular integrity of the organ of Corti in two mouse models of this disease with mutations in the Csb gene (CSB(m/m) mice) and Csa gene (Csa(-/-) mice), respectively. Csb(m/m) and Csa(-/-) mice manifested progressive hearing loss, as measured by an increase in auditory brainstem response thresholds. In contrast to wild-type mice, mutant mice showed reduced or absent otoacoustic emissions, suggesting cochlear outer hair cell impairment. Hearing loss in Csb(m/m) and Csa(-/-) mice correlated with progressive hair cell loss in the base of the organ of Corti, starting between 6 and 13 weeks of age, which increased by 16 weeks of age in a basal-to-apical gradient, with outer hair cells more severely affected than inner hair cells. Our data indicate that the hearing loss observed in CS patients is reproduced in mouse models of this disease. We hypothesize that accumulating DNA damage, secondary to the loss of TCR, contributes to susceptibility to hearing loss.

  4. Quantitative imaging of platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to investigate toxic side effects of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Köppen, C; Reifschneider, O; Castanheira, I; Sperling, M; Karst, U; Ciarimboli, G

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a quantitative bioimaging method for platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and its application for a biomedical study concerning toxic side effects of cisplatin. To trace the histopathology back to cisplatin, platinum was localized and quantified in major functional units of testicle, cochlea, kidney, nerve and brain sections from cisplatin treated mice. The direct consideration of the histology enables precise interpretation of the Pt images and the novel quantitative evaluation approach allows significantly more precise investigations than the pure image. For the first time, platinum was detected and quantified in all major injured structures including organ of Corti of cochlea and seminiferous tubule of testicle. In this way, proximal tubule in kidney, Leydig cells in testicle, stria vascularis and organ of Corti in cochlea and nerve fibers in sciatic nerves are confirmed as targets of cisplatin in these organs. However, the accumulation of platinum in almost all investigated structures also raises questions about more complex pathogenesis including direct and indirect interruption of several biological processes.

  5. Virally-expressed connexin26 restores gap junction function in the cochlea of conditional Gjb2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Yunfeng; Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Gong, Shushen; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2, which codes for the gap junction protein connexin26, are the most common causes of human nonsyndromic hereditary deafness. We inoculated modified adeno-associated viral vectors into the scala media of early postnatal conditional Gjb2 knockout mice to drive exogenous connexin26 expression. We found extensive virally-expressed connexin26 in cells lining the scala media, and intercellular gap junction network was re-established in the organ of Corti of mutant mouse cochlea. Widespread ectopic connexin26 expression neither formed ectopic gap junctions nor affected normal hearing thresholds in wild type mice, suggesting that autonomous cellular mechanisms regulate proper membrane trafficking of exogenously-expressed connexin26 and govern the functional manifestation of them. Functional recovery of gap-junction-mediated coupling among the supporting cells was observed. We found that both cell death in the organ of Corti and degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea of mutant mice were substantially reduced, although auditory brainstem responses did not show significant hearing improvement. This is the first report demonstrating that virally-mediated gene therapy restored extensive gap junction intercellular network among cochlear non-sensory cells in vivo. Such a treatment performed at early postnatal stages resulted in a partial rescue of disease phenotypes in the cochlea of the mutant mice. PMID:24225640

  6. Hearing loss caused by progressive degeneration of cochlear hair cells in mice deficient for the Barhl1 homeobox gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengguo; Price, Sandy M; Cahill, Hugh; Ryugo, David K; Shen, Michael M; Xiang, Mengqing

    2002-07-01

    The cochlea of the mammalian inner ear contains three rows of outer hair cells and a single row of inner hair cells. These hair cell receptors reside in the organ of Corti and function to transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical signals that mediate hearing. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying the maintenance of these delicate sensory hair cells are unknown. We report that targeted disruption of Barhl1, a mouse homolog of the Drosophila BarH homeobox genes, results in severe to profound hearing loss, providing a unique model for the study of age-related human deafness disorders. Barhl1 is expressed in all sensory hair cells during inner ear development, 2 days after the onset of hair cell generation. Loss of Barhl1 function in mice results in age-related progressive degeneration of both outer and inner hair cells in the organ of Corti, following two reciprocal longitudinal gradients. Our data together indicate an essential role for Barhl1 in the long-term maintenance of cochlear hair cells, but not in the determination or differentiation of these cells. PMID:12091321

  7. Filtering of Acoustic Signals within the Hearing Organ

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Chen, Fangyi; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang; Choudhury, Niloy; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The detection of sound by the mammalian hearing organ involves a complex mechanical interplay among different cell types. The inner hair cells, which are the primary sensory receptors, are stimulated by the structural vibrations of the entire organ of Corti. The outer hair cells are thought to modulate these sound-evoked vibrations to enhance hearing sensitivity and frequency resolution, but it remains unclear whether other structures also contribute to frequency tuning. In the current study, sound-evoked vibrations were measured at the stereociliary side of inner and outer hair cells and their surrounding supporting cells, using optical coherence tomography interferometry in living anesthetized guinea pigs. Our measurements demonstrate the presence of multiple vibration modes as well as significant differences in frequency tuning and response phase among different cell types. In particular, the frequency tuning at the inner hair cells differs from other cell types, causing the locus of maximum inner hair cell activation to be shifted toward the apex of the cochlea compared with the outer hair cells. These observations show that additional processing and filtering of acoustic signals occur within the organ of Corti before inner hair cell excitation, representing a departure from established theories. PMID:24990925

  8. Finite element cochlea box model - Mechanical and electrical analysis of the cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Milica; Teal, Paul D.; Isailovic, Velibor; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    The primary role of the cochlea is to transform external sound stimuli into mechanical vibrations and then to neural impulses which are sent to the brain. A simplified cochlea box model was developed using the finite element method. Firstly, a mechanical model of the cochlea was analyzed. The box model consists of the basilar membrane and two fluid chambers - the scala vestibuli and scala tympani. The third chamber, the scala media, was neglected in the mechanical analysis. The best agreement with currently available analytical and experimental results was obtained when behavior of the fluid in the chambers was described using the wave acoustic equation and behavior of the basilar membrane was modeled with Newtonian dynamics. The obtained results show good frequency mapping. The second approach was to use an active model of the cochlea in which the Organ of Corti was included. The operation of the Organ of Corti involves the generation of current, caused by mechanical vibration. This current in turn causes a force applied to the basilar membrane, creating in this way an active feedback mechanism. A state space representation of the electro-mechanical model from existing literature was implemented and a first comparison with the finite element method is presented.

  9. The basilar membrane acts as a passive support structure at the cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Rebecca L.; Fridberger, Anders

    2015-12-01

    The precise mechanical behavior of the basilar membrane (BM) at low frequencies is still unknown. To address this issue we use an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig temporal bone to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the organ of Corti at the apex of the cochlea. Confocal laser interferometry is used to record the nanometre displacements of both Hensen's cells (HeC) and the BM in response to sound and electrical stimulation. We show that at low frequencies, the BM exhibits greatly reduced sound-evoked movement (˜35dB less) and no current-evoked movement, when compared to the HeC at the same position along the spiral. The BM best frequency is found to be an average of 52Hz (0.35 octave) higher than the HeC best frequency. In addition, we demonstrate that BM motion is not affected by inhibition of somatic electromotility or by blocking the mechanoelectrical transduction channels.We therefore propose that the BM primarily acts as a passive support structure at the cochlear apex. We suggest that the micromechanics of the cochlea that are vital to low-frequency amplification and frequency selectivity take place predominantly at the surface of the organ of Corti.

  10. Adiponectin deficiency exacerbates age-related hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, T; Shibata, R; Ouchi, N; Kondo, K; Ishii, M; Katahira, N; Kambara, T; Inoue, Y; Takahashi, R; Ikeda, N; Kihara, S; Ueda, H; Murohara, T

    2014-04-24

    Obesity-related disorders are closely associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI). Adiponectin (APN) exerts protective effects against obesity-related conditions including endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated the impact of APN on ARHI. APN-knockout (APN-KO) mice developed exacerbation of hearing impairment, particularly in the high frequency range, compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Supplementation with APN prevented the hearing impairment in APN-KO mice. At 2 months of age, the cochlear blood flow and capillary density of the stria vascularis (SV) were significantly reduced in APN-KO mice as compared with WT mice. APN-KO mice also showed a significant increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells in the organ of Corti in the cochlea at 2 months of age. At the age of 6 months, hair cells were lost at the organ of Corti in APN-KO mice. In cultured auditory HEI-OC1 cells, APN reduced apoptotic activity under hypoxic conditions. Clinically, plasma APN levels were significantly lower in humans with ARHI. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified APN as a significant and independent predictor of ARHI. Our observations indicate that APN has an important role in preventing ARHI.

  11. A Transcriptomic Analysis of Echinococcus granulosus Larval Stages: Implications for Parasite Biology and Host Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, John; Wasmuth, James D.; Salinas, Gustavo; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Sanford, Chris; Berriman, Matthew; Ferreira, Henrique B.; Zaha, Arnaldo; Blaxter, Mark L.; Maizels, Rick M.; Fernández, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Background The cestode Echinococcus granulosus - the agent of cystic echinococcosis, a zoonosis affecting humans and domestic animals worldwide - is an excellent model for the study of host-parasite cross-talk that interfaces with two mammalian hosts. To develop the molecular analysis of these interactions, we carried out an EST survey of E. granulosus larval stages. We report the salient features of this study with a focus on genes reflecting physiological adaptations of different parasite stages. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated ∼10,000 ESTs from two sets of full-length enriched libraries (derived from oligo-capped and trans-spliced cDNAs) prepared with three parasite materials: hydatid cyst wall, larval worms (protoscoleces), and pepsin/H+-activated protoscoleces. The ESTs were clustered into 2700 distinct gene products. In the context of the biology of E. granulosus, our analyses reveal: (i) a diverse group of abundant long non-protein coding transcripts showing homology to a middle repetitive element (EgBRep) that could either be active molecular species or represent precursors of small RNAs (like piRNAs); (ii) an up-regulation of fermentative pathways in the tissue of the cyst wall; (iii) highly expressed thiol- and selenol-dependent antioxidant enzyme targets of thioredoxin glutathione reductase, the functional hub of redox metabolism in parasitic flatworms; (iv) candidate apomucins for the external layer of the tissue-dwelling hydatid cyst, a mucin-rich structure that is critical for survival in the intermediate host; (v) a set of tetraspanins, a protein family that appears to have expanded in the cestode lineage; and (vi) a set of platyhelminth-specific gene products that may offer targets for novel pan-platyhelminth drug development. Conclusions/Significance This survey has greatly increased the quality and the quantity of the molecular information on E. granulosus and constitutes a valuable resource for gene prediction on the parasite genome

  12. Intestinal parasites of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Vergles Rataj, Aleksandra; Posedi, Janez; Zele, Diana; Vengušt, Gorazd

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, 428 foxes were collected and examined for intestinal helminths using the washing-out method. Parasites were found in 93.2% of the examined animals. The most frequently identified nematodes were Uncinaria stenocephala (58.9%), Toxocara canis (38.3%) and Molineus patens (30.6%). Other nematodes found were Pterygodermatites affinis (4.2%), Capillaria sp. (2.8%), Crenosoma vulpis (2.8%), Toxascaris leonina (2.5%), Trichuris vulpis (0.7%) and Physaloptera sp. (0.2%). Mesocestoides sp. (27.6%) and Taenia crassiceps (22.2%) were the most prevalent cestodes, followed by T. polyacantha (6.5%), Hymenolepis nana (2.1%), T. pisiformis (2.1%) and Dipylidium caninum (1.4%). The study also revealed four trematode species: Rossicotrema donicum (1.6%), Heterophyes heterophyes (1.1%), Metagonimus yokogawai (1.1%), Prohemistomum appendiculatum (0.4%) and two protozoan species: oocysts of Sarcocystis (2.8%) and Isospora (0.4%). This is the first extensive study on the intestinal parasites of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Slovenia. The 2.6% prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in the same sample population as investigated herein has been reported previously (Vergles Rataj et al., 2010).

  13. Wild Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as Sentinels of Parasitic Diseases in the Province of Soria, Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Lledó, Lourdes; Giménez-Pardo, Consuelo; Saz, José Vicente; Serrano, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Four hundred red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were examined for ecto- (arthropods) and endoparasites (Leishmania spp., Trichinella spp., and intestinal parasites). Different species of flea (total prevalence, 40.50%), tick (16.25%), mite (7.25%), and fly (1.50%) were identified. The most prevalent flea was Pulex irritans (found on 29% of the foxes); the most prevalent tick, mite, and fly were Ixodes canisuga (on 5%), Sarcoptes scabiei (on 5.25%), and Hippobosca equina (on 1%), respectively. The endoparasites identified included Leishmania spp. (found in 12% of the foxes), Trichinella spp. (in 15.5%, with T. britovi the most prevalent species in 15.25%), Cestoda (in 72.75%, with Mesocestoides spp. the most prevalent in 69.50%), and intestinal ascarids (in 73.25%, with Ancylostoma caninum the most prevalent in 12.50%). No animal was free of parasites. The present results suggest that foxes can act as sentinels of diseases transmitted by ecto- and endoparasites.

  14. Helminth fauna of Falconiform and Strigiform birds of prey in Galicia, Northwest Spain.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, M L; Alvarez, F; Barreiro, G; Leiro, J

    2004-02-01

    This is a survey of the helminth fauna of 285 individuals of 14 species of birds of prey (Falconiformes and Strigiformes) from Galicia (northwest Spain), namely Buteo buteo, Accipiter nisus, A. gentilis, Milvus migrans, M. milvus, Pernis apivorus, Circus pygargus, Falco tinnunculus, F. peregrinus, F. subbuteo, Tyto alba, Strix aluco, Asio otus and Athene noctua. A total of 15 helminth species were detected, namely 8 nematodes ( Eucoleus dispar, Capillaria tenuissima, Synhimantus laticeps, Microtetrameres sp., Physaloptera alata, Procyrnea leptoptera, Hovorkonema variegatum and Porrocaecum angusticolle), 4 cestodes ( Cladotaenia globifera, Paruterina candelabraria and Mesocestoides sp.), 2 trematodes ( Neodiplostomum attenuatum and Strigea falconis), and 1 acanthocephalan ( Centrorhynchus globocaudatus). The helminth communities observed were basically similar, although there were marked differences in species richness, which was higher in falconiforms (except for A. gentilis) than in strigiforms. More specifically, species richness was highest in B. buteo (13 species), followed by A. nisus (11 species). In the falconiforms, the helminth species present generally exhibited a clear relationship with host diet. In the strigiforms, by contrast, species richness was lower than expected given the host's diet, suggesting that a different explanation is needed. PMID:14714181

  15. Fecal shedding of Toxocara canis and other parasites in foxes and coyotes on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wapenaar, Wendela; Barkema, Herman W; O'Handley, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of parasites shed by wild canids can assist in recognizing risk to human and domestic animal health. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of patent infections with Toxocara canis and other parasites in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and coyotes (Canis latrans) in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Identification of parasite species was based on microscopic examination of feces, with the use of a sucrose fecal flotation method. Sample collection was performed in winter on carcasses of 271 and 185 hunted or trapped foxes and coyotes, respectively. One or more parasite species were observed in 242 (89%) foxes and 128 (69%) coyotes. Toxocara canis, Uncinaria stenocephala, Capillaria spp., Mesocestoides, Taenidd spp., Alaria spp., Cryptocotyle lingua, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora caninum-like coccidia, and other coccidia were identified. A third of juvenile foxes were shedding T. canis and had a high prevalence of Capillaria spp., especially in juvenile foxes (69%). Taenidd eggs, Alaria spp. and Sarcocystis spp. were more common in coyotes (24, 18, and 9%, respectively) than foxes (8, 11, and 1%, respectively). Despite the limitations of fecal flotation to identify parasite species, the high prevalence of T. canis warrants the attention of public health professionals.

  16. Endoparasites of the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) in Finland.

    PubMed

    Deksne, Gunita; Laakkonen, Juha; Näreaho, Anu; Jokelainen, Pikka; Holmala, Katja; Kojola, Ilpo; Sukura, Antti

    2013-04-01

    We sampled 339 fecal samples, 296 intestines, and 82 lungs from 371 lynx hunted during the 2010-2011 season in Finland. The fecal samples were analyzed for endoparasites by a quantitative flotation method, and helminths from intestines were studied morphologically, while lungs were investigated for pulmonary parasites. From fecal samples, eggs and oocysts of at least 6 different endoparasite species were identified, with a mean of 1.5 (range 0-4) parasite species per host. In the intestines, at least 4 different helminth species were found, with the mean of 2.0 (range 1-4) species per infected host. The prevalence of eggs in feces and the prevalence of worms in intestines were 71% and 93% for Toxocara cati , 29% and 68% for Taenia spp., and 5% and 2% for Diphyllobothrium sp., respectively. Only eggs were detected for Capillaria sp. (46%) and Uncinaria sp. (0.6%) nematodes, and only adults were detected for Mesocestoides sp. cestodes (0.3%). Significant positive correlations were evident between the number of T. cati (r = 0.664; P = 0.01) and Diphyllobothrium sp. (r = 0.645; P = 0.01) eggs per gram of feces and adult worms detected in intestine. In addition to the metazoan parasites, protozoan Isospora sp. oocysts were also found (0.6%). Pulmonary samples were all negative for parasites. These data demonstrate that lynx commonly harbor various endoparasites, some of which are zoonotic.

  17. Echinococcus metacestodes as laboratory models for the screening of drugs against cestodes and trematodes.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A; Stadelmann, B; Scholl, S; Müller, J; Spiliotis, M; Müller, N; Gottstein, B; Siles-Lucas, M

    2010-03-01

    Among the cestodes, Echinococcus granulosus, Echinococcus multilocularis and Taenia solium represent the most dangerous parasites. Their larval stages cause the diseases cystic echinococcosis (CE), alveolar echinococcosis (AE) and cysticercosis, respectively, which exhibit considerable medical and veterinary health concerns with a profound economic impact. Others caused by other cestodes, such as species of the genera Mesocestoides and Hymenolepis, are relatively rare in humans. In this review, we will focus on E. granulosus and E. multilocularis metacestode laboratory models and will review the use of these models in the search for novel drugs that could be employed for chemotherapeutic treatment of echinococcosis. Clearly, improved therapeutic drugs are needed for the treatment of AE and CE, and this can only be achieved through the development of medium-to-high throughput screening approaches. The most recent achievements in the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of E. multilocularis cells and metacestodes, and the accessability of the E. multilocularis genome and EST sequence information, have rendered the E. multilocularis model uniquely suited for studies on drug-efficacy and drug target identification. This could lead to the development of novel compounds for the use in chemotherapy against echinococcosis, and possibly against diseases caused by other cestodes, and potentially also trematodes.

  18. An epidemiological survey on intestinal helminths of stray dogs in Mashhad, North-east of Iran.

    PubMed

    Emamapour, Seyed Rasoul; Borji, Hassan; Nagibi, Abolghasem

    2015-06-01

    This research was conducted to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in stray dogs in the northeast of Iran, with special attention to those parasites that can be transmitted to human. In this experiment, a total of 72 adult and 18 juvenile stray dogs were collected and necropsied for the presence of helminth parasites from October 2011 to August 2012. The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths was 86 % (95 % CI: 79.2-92.8 %). The observed helminths of the gastrointestinal tract were listed as follows: Toxocara canis (29 %), Toxascaris leonina (7 %), Ancylostoma caninum (2 %), Taenia hydatigena (43 %), Dipylidium caninum (39 %), Echinococcus granulosus (38 %), Mesocestoides lineatus (16 %), Taenia multiceps (11 %), Taenia ovis (3 %). There were no significant differences for the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths between female (83.6 %) and male (89.7 %) and between young (89 %) and adult (72.2 %) animals. However, the prevalence of E. granulosus, T. hydatigena and D. caninum showed an increasing trend with increasing host age, significantly. Based on our data, it is important to point out the presence of zoonotic agents, namely E. granulosus and T. canis in stray dogs in the investigated area. Due to its impact on public health, appropriate control measures should be taken and it is recommended to determine the most appropriate preventive methods. PMID:26064015

  19. An epidemiological survey on intestinal helminths of stray dogs in Mashhad, North-east of Iran.

    PubMed

    Emamapour, Seyed Rasoul; Borji, Hassan; Nagibi, Abolghasem

    2015-06-01

    This research was conducted to determine the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in stray dogs in the northeast of Iran, with special attention to those parasites that can be transmitted to human. In this experiment, a total of 72 adult and 18 juvenile stray dogs were collected and necropsied for the presence of helminth parasites from October 2011 to August 2012. The overall prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths was 86 % (95 % CI: 79.2-92.8 %). The observed helminths of the gastrointestinal tract were listed as follows: Toxocara canis (29 %), Toxascaris leonina (7 %), Ancylostoma caninum (2 %), Taenia hydatigena (43 %), Dipylidium caninum (39 %), Echinococcus granulosus (38 %), Mesocestoides lineatus (16 %), Taenia multiceps (11 %), Taenia ovis (3 %). There were no significant differences for the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths between female (83.6 %) and male (89.7 %) and between young (89 %) and adult (72.2 %) animals. However, the prevalence of E. granulosus, T. hydatigena and D. caninum showed an increasing trend with increasing host age, significantly. Based on our data, it is important to point out the presence of zoonotic agents, namely E. granulosus and T. canis in stray dogs in the investigated area. Due to its impact on public health, appropriate control measures should be taken and it is recommended to determine the most appropriate preventive methods.

  20. Wild Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as Sentinels of Parasitic Diseases in the Province of Soria, Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Lledó, Lourdes; Giménez-Pardo, Consuelo; Saz, José Vicente; Serrano, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Four hundred red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were examined for ecto- (arthropods) and endoparasites (Leishmania spp., Trichinella spp., and intestinal parasites). Different species of flea (total prevalence, 40.50%), tick (16.25%), mite (7.25%), and fly (1.50%) were identified. The most prevalent flea was Pulex irritans (found on 29% of the foxes); the most prevalent tick, mite, and fly were Ixodes canisuga (on 5%), Sarcoptes scabiei (on 5.25%), and Hippobosca equina (on 1%), respectively. The endoparasites identified included Leishmania spp. (found in 12% of the foxes), Trichinella spp. (in 15.5%, with T. britovi the most prevalent species in 15.25%), Cestoda (in 72.75%, with Mesocestoides spp. the most prevalent in 69.50%), and intestinal ascarids (in 73.25%, with Ancylostoma caninum the most prevalent in 12.50%). No animal was free of parasites. The present results suggest that foxes can act as sentinels of diseases transmitted by ecto- and endoparasites. PMID:26565688

  1. Helminths of the ocelot from southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Pence, Danny B; Tewes, Michael E; Laack, Linda L

    2003-07-01

    In the USA, the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) is a highly endangered felid found only in a few remaining vestiges of native thornshrub brushland in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of extreme southern Texas. From 1987-1998, carcasses of 15 adult ocelots that died of vehicular accidents or natural causes were examined for helminths. All cats had 1-8 (mean = 3) helminth species. All were infected with 1-101 (mean +/- SE = 32 +/- 7) Toxascaris leonina. Other helminths from these ocelots were Alaria marcianae, Brachylaima sp., Mesocestoides lineatus, Taenia rileyi, Oncicola canis, Dirofilaria immitis, Physaloptera rara, Ancylostoma tubaeformae, Cylicospirura chevreuxi, Vogeloides felis, and Metathelazia californica. Additionally, two cats had scarring of the aorta with lesions typical of those caused by Spriocerca lupi, although larval nematodes were not seen. A clinal variation in size of nearly three orders of magnitude was noted in the diplostomatid trematodes in the small intestine of one adult male ocelot. Despite the differences in size, all specimens appeared morphologically identical and were regarded as A. marcianae. Helminth prevalences and abundances, including those of potentially pathogenic species like D. immitis, were low. Although a single heartworm infection may have contributed to the death of one ocelot, helminth infections in general seemed to be of no great consequence to this endangered ocelot population. The helminth fauna of ocelots in the LRGV is reflective of that from wild felids in general; all have been reported previously from the bobcat (Lynx rufus) and mountain lion (Puma concolor) elsewhere in Texas. PMID:14567231

  2. First detection of Echinococcus multilocularis in dogs in a highly endemic area of Poland.

    PubMed

    Karamon, Jacek; Samorek-Pierog, Malgorzata; Kochanowski, Maciej; Dabrowska, Joanna; Sroka, Jacek; Golab, Elzbieta; Umhang, Gerald; Cencek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to estimate the epizootic situation concerning infection by the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris Linnaeus) from a Polish region where this parasite is highly prevalent in red foxes. Faecal samples (n = 148) were collected from rural dogs in Podkarpackie Province. Samples were examined through nested PCR (for E. multilocularis), multiplex PCR (E. multilocularis, species of Taenia Linnaeus, 1758) and PCR [E. granulosus (Batsch, 1786)]. Specific products were sequenced. Faeces were also examined coproscopically. In samples from two dogs (1.4%), there were positive PCR results for E. multilocularis. Taenia-specific PCR products were found in nine dogs (6.1%). Sequencing identified Taenia serialis (Gervais, 1847), T. hydatigena Pallas, 1766, T. pisiformis (Bloch, 1780) and Hydatigera taeniaeformis (Batsch, 1786). One sample (0.7%) was identified as Mesocestoides litteratus (Batsch, 1786). All samples were negative for E. granulosus with PCR. Taking into account coproscopic and PCR results, 28% of dogs were infected with helminths (8% with tapeworms). It should be stressed that one of the infected with E. multilocularis dogs shed eggs of the Taenia type and had a habit of preying on rodents. This investigation revealed the presence of E. multilocularis in dogs for the first time in Poland. PMID:27311792

  3. Phylogenetic study of the oxytocin-like immunoreactive system in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, J; Takeda, N

    1988-01-01

    1. A phylogenetic study of oxytocin (OXT)-like immunoreactive cells was performed by the PAP method in the central nervous system of invertebrates. 2. The immunoreactivity was detected in the nerve cells of Hydra magnipapillata of the Coelenterata; Neanthes japonica and Pheretima communissima of the Annelida; Oncidium verrucosum, Limax marginatus and Meretrix lamarckii of the Mollusca; and Baratha brassica of the Arthropoda. 3. No immunoreactive cells were found in Bipalium sp. of the Platyhelminthes; Pomacea canaliculata, Aplysia kurodai, Bradybaena similaris and Achatina fulica of the Mollusca; and Gnorimosphaeroma rayi, Procambarus clarkii, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, Helice tridens and Gryllus bimaculatus of the Arthropoda; Asterina pectinifera of the Echinodermata; and Halocynthia roretzi of the Protochordata. 4. These results demonstrate that an OXT-immunoreactive substance is widely present not only in vertebrates but also in invertebrates. 5. OXT seems to have been introduced into these invertebrates at an early stage of their phylogenetic history.

  4. Phylogenetic study of the arginine-vasotocin/arginine-vasopressin-like immunoreactive system in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, J; Takeda, N

    1988-01-01

    1. A phylogenetic study of arg-vasotocin (AVT)/arg-vasopressin (AVP)-like immunoreactive cells was performed by the PAP method in the central nervous system of invertebrates. 2. The immunoreactivity was detected in the nerve cells of Hydra magnipapillata of the Coelenterata; Neanthes japonica and Pheretima communissima of the Annelida; Pomacea canaliculata, Aplysia kurodai, Oncidium verrucosum, Bradybaena similaris, Achatina fulica, Limax marginatus and Meretrix lamarckii of the Mollusca; Gnorimosphaeroma rayi, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, Gryllus bimaculatus and Baratha brassicae of the Arthropoda; Asterina pectinifera of the Echinodermata; and Halocynthia roretzi of the Protochordata. 3. No immunoreactivity was detected in Bipalium sp. of the Platyhelminthes, or in Procambarus clarkii and Helice tridens of the Arthropoda. 4. From these results, it appears that AVT/AVP is a phylogenetically ancient peptide which is present in a wide variety of invertebrates. 5. The actions of AVT/AVP and its presence in invertebrates are discussed.

  5. The phylogenetic position of Rhopalura ophiocomae (Orthonectida) based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, B; Van Schyndel, D; Adema, C M; Lewis, L A; Loker, E S

    1996-11-01

    The Orthonectida is a small, poorly known phylum of parasites of marine invertebrates. Their phylogenetic placement is obscure; they have been considered to be multicellular protozoans, primitive animals at a "mesozoan" grade of organization, or secondarily simplified flatworm-like organisms. The best known species in the phylum, Rhopalura ophiocomae, was collected on San Juan Island, Wash. and a complete 18S rDNA sequence was obtained. Using the models of minimum evolution and parsimony, phylogenetic analyses were undertaken and the results lend support to the following hypotheses about orthonectids: (1) orthonectids are more closely aligned with triploblastic metazoan taxa than with the protist or diploblastic metazoan taxa considered in this analysis; (2) orthonectids are not derived members of the phylum Platyhelminthes; and (3) orthonectids and rhombozoans are not each other's closest relatives, thus casting further doubt on the validity of the phylum Mesozoa previously used to encompass both groups. PMID:8896370

  6. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data. PMID:15012964

  7. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. PMID:23274056

  8. Parasite Cathepsin D-Like Peptidases and Their Relevance as Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Daniel; Hartmann, David; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Dvořák, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Inhibition of aspartic cathepsin D-like peptidases (APDs) has been often discussed as an antiparasite intervention strategy. APDs have been considered as virulence factors of Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania spp., and have been demonstrated to have important roles in protein trafficking mechanisms of apicomplexan parasites. APDs also initiate blood digestion as components of multienzyme proteolytic complexes in malaria, platyhelminths, nematodes, and ticks. Increasing DNA and RNA sequencing data indicate that parasites express multiple APD isoenzymes of various functions that can now be specifically evaluated using new functional-genomic and biochemical tools, from which we can further assess the potential of APDs as targets for novel effective intervention strategies against parasitic diseases that still pose an alarming threat to mankind. PMID:27344362

  9. 18S rRNA suggests that Entoprocta are protostomes, unrelated to Ectoprocta.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L Y; Winnepenninckx, B; De Wachter, R; Backeljau, T; Emschermann, P; Garey, J R

    1996-05-01

    The Ento- and Ectoprocta are sometimes placed together in the Bryozoa, which have variously been regarded as proto- or deuterostomes. However, Entoprocta have also been allied to the pseudocoelomates, while Ectoprocta are often united with the Brachiopoda and Phoronida in the (super)phylum Lophophorata. Hence, the phylogenetic relationships of these taxa are still much debated. We determined complete 18S rRNA sequences of two entoprocts, an ectoproct, an inarticulate brachiopod, a phoronid, two annelids, and a platyhelminth. Phylogenetic analyses of these data show that (1) entoprocts and lophophorates have spiralian, protostomous affinities, (2) Ento- and Ectoprocta are not sister taxa, (3) phoronids and brachiopods form a monophyletic clade, and (4) neither Ectoprocta or Annelida appear to be monophyletic. Both deuterostomous and pseudocoelomate features may have arisen at least two times in evolutionary history. These results advocate a Spiralia-Radialia-based classification rather than one based on the Protostomia-Deuterostomia concept.

  10. Regeneration in spiralians: evolutionary patterns and developmental processes.

    PubMed

    Bely, Alexandra E; Zattara, Eduardo E; Sikes, James M

    2014-01-01

    Animals differ markedly in their ability to regenerate, yet still little is known about how regeneration evolves. In recent years, important advances have been made in our understanding of animal phylogeny and these provide new insights into the phylogenetic distribution of regeneration. The developmental basis of regeneration is also being investigated in an increasing number of groups, allowing commonalities and differences across groups to become evident. Here, we focus on regeneration in the Spiralia, a group that includes several champions of animal regeneration, as well as many groups with more limited abilities. We review the phylogenetic distribution and developmental processes of regeneration in four major spiralian groups: annelids, nemerteans, platyhelminths, and molluscs. Although comparative data are still limited, this review highlights phylogenetic and developmental patterns that are emerging regarding regeneration in spiralians and identifies important avenues for future research. PMID:25690976

  11. Eukaryotic opportunists dominate the deep-subsurface biosphere in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Borgonie, G; Linage-Alvarez, B; Ojo, A O; Mundle, S O C; Freese, L B; Van Rooyen, C; Kuloyo, O; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C; Cason, E D; Vermeulen, J; Pienaar, C; Litthauer, D; Van Niekerk, H; Van Eeden, J; Sherwood Lollar, B; Onstott, T C; Van Heerden, E

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the first Eukarya in the deep subsurface, intense interest has developed to understand the diversity of eukaryotes living in these extreme environments. We identified that Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida and Arthropoda are thriving at 1.4 km depths in palaeometeoric fissure water up to 12,300 yr old in South African mines. Protozoa and Fungi have also been identified; however, they are present in low numbers. Characterization of the different species reveals that many are opportunistic organisms with an origin due to recharge from surface waters rather than soil leaching. This is the first known study to demonstrate the in situ distribution of biofilms on fissure rock faces using video documentation. Calculations suggest that food, not dissolved oxygen is the limiting factor for eukaryal population growth. The discovery of a group of Eukarya underground has important implications for the search for life on other planets in our solar system. PMID:26597082

  12. [Retroperitoneal hydatidosis secondary to hepatic hydatid cyst].

    PubMed

    Vizcaychipi, Katherina A; Sosa, Sonia; Camicia, Federico; Santillán, Graciela; Casalins, María; Nigro, María Del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a worldwide zoonosis. It is caused by a parasitic platyhelminth of the genus Echinococcus. We present a patient with a fluctuating lumbar tumor in the retroperitoneal space, secondary to a hepatic cyst. the initial diagnosis was made by identification of rostellar hooks from protoscoleces in the fluid aspirated from the abscess. We herein describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and medical and surgical treatment of this unusual case and conclude that the development of an accurate diagnosis requires a proper analysis of the patient's epidemiological history, clinical manifestations, imaging studies and laboratory tests. a multidisciplinary approach and differential diagnosis is paramount to be able to establish a cause of the disease to deliver appropriate treatment.

  13. Eukaryotic opportunists dominate the deep-subsurface biosphere in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Borgonie, G.; Linage-Alvarez, B.; Ojo, A. O.; Mundle, S.O.C.; Freese, L B.; Van Rooyen, C.; Kuloyo, O.; Albertyn, J.; Pohl, C.; Cason, E. D.; Vermeulen, J.; Pienaar, C.; Litthauer, D.; Van Niekerk, H.; Van Eeden, J.; Lollar, B. Sherwood.; Onstott, T. C.; Van Heerden, E.

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the first Eukarya in the deep subsurface, intense interest has developed to understand the diversity of eukaryotes living in these extreme environments. We identified that Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida and Arthropoda are thriving at 1.4 km depths in palaeometeoric fissure water up to 12,300 yr old in South African mines. Protozoa and Fungi have also been identified; however, they are present in low numbers. Characterization of the different species reveals that many are opportunistic organisms with an origin due to recharge from surface waters rather than soil leaching. This is the first known study to demonstrate the in situ distribution of biofilms on fissure rock faces using video documentation. Calculations suggest that food, not dissolved oxygen is the limiting factor for eukaryal population growth. The discovery of a group of Eukarya underground has important implications for the search for life on other planets in our solar system. PMID:26597082

  14. Biochemical and physiological effects of metazoan endoparasites on their host species.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S N

    1983-01-01

    1. The integrative nature of the parasite-host association was discussed, specifically with regard to the metabolic effects of parasitization as well as the physiological manifestation of infection in relation to the host's nutritional physiology. Endocrine interactions were also considered. 2. Relationships involving parasitic insects, including members of the orders Diptera, Hymenoptera and Strepsiptera, parasitic helminths, including members of the phyla Acanthocephala and Nematoda and the classes Cestoidea and Trematoda of the Platyhelminthes, as well as parasitic crustaceans in association with their invertebrate and/or vertebrate, intermediate, paratenic as well as definitive hosts were considered. 3. A broad conceptual or "topic" approach to understanding symbiotic relationships was emphasized. De-emphasis of descriptive categorization and the use of benefit/harm as criteria characterizing parasitic relationships was suggested. 4. The hypothetical concept of host regulation was briefly examined and the use of anthropometric descriptors such as "beneficial" and "harmonious" in parasitology discussed. PMID:6339157

  15. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  16. Eukaryotic opportunists dominate the deep-subsurface biosphere in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Borgonie, G; Linage-Alvarez, B; Ojo, A O; Mundle, S O C; Freese, L B; Van Rooyen, C; Kuloyo, O; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C; Cason, E D; Vermeulen, J; Pienaar, C; Litthauer, D; Van Niekerk, H; Van Eeden, J; Sherwood Lollar, B; Onstott, T C; Van Heerden, E

    2015-11-24

    Following the discovery of the first Eukarya in the deep subsurface, intense interest has developed to understand the diversity of eukaryotes living in these extreme environments. We identified that Platyhelminthes, Rotifera, Annelida and Arthropoda are thriving at 1.4 km depths in palaeometeoric fissure water up to 12,300 yr old in South African mines. Protozoa and Fungi have also been identified; however, they are present in low numbers. Characterization of the different species reveals that many are opportunistic organisms with an origin due to recharge from surface waters rather than soil leaching. This is the first known study to demonstrate the in situ distribution of biofilms on fissure rock faces using video documentation. Calculations suggest that food, not dissolved oxygen is the limiting factor for eukaryal population growth. The discovery of a group of Eukarya underground has important implications for the search for life on other planets in our solar system.

  17. The revised microRNA complement of Fasciola hepatica reveals a plethora of overlooked microRNAs and evidence for enrichment of immuno-regulatory microRNAs in extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Fromm, B; Trelis, M; Hackenberg, M; Cantalapiedra, F; Bernal, D; Marcilla, A

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that have recently been shown to down-regulate the immune response via extracellular vesicles in the mammalian host of helminthic parasites. Using the miRNA prediction pipeline miRCandRef, we expanded the current miRNA set of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (Platyhelminthes, Trematoda) from 16 to 54 miRNAs (42 conserved and 13 novel). Comparing the cellular expression levels with extracellular vesicles, we found all miRNAs expressed and enriched for miRNAs with immuno-regulatory function, tissue growth and cancer. Our findings support the hypothesis that miRNAs are the molecular mediators of the previously demonstrated immune modulatory function of extracellular vesicles.

  18. Why does infection with some helminths cause cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Brindley, Paul J.; da Costa, José M. Correia; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Opisthorchis viverrini, Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma haematobium are classified as Group 1 biological carcinogens: definitive causes of cancer. These worms are metazoan eukaryotes, unlike the other Group 1 carcinogens including human papilloma virus, hepatitis C virus, and Helicobacter pylori. By contrast, infections with phylogenetic relatives of these helminths, also trematodes of the phylum Platyhelminthes and major human pathogens, are not carcinogenic. These inconsistencies prompt several questions, including how might these infections cause cancer? And why is infection with only a few helminth species carcinogenic? Here we present an interpretation of mechanisms contributing to the carcinogenicity of these helminth infections, including roles for catechol estrogen- and oxysterol-metabolites of parasite origin as initiators of carcinogenesis. PMID:26618199

  19. Measurement of S-phase duration of adult stem cells in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano by double replication labelling and quantitative colocalization analysis.

    PubMed

    Verdoodt, Freija; Willems, Maxime; Dhondt, Ineke; Houthoofd, Wouter; Bert, Wim; De Vos, Winnok H

    2012-01-01

    Platyhelminthes are highly attractive models for addressing fundamental aspects of stem cell biology in vivo. These organisms possess a unique stem cell system comprised of neoblasts that are the only proliferating cells during adulthood. We have investigated Ts (S-phase duration) of neoblasts during homoeostasis and regeneration in the flatworm, Macrostomum lignano. A double immunohistochemical technique was used, performing sequential pulses with the thymidine analogues CldU (chlorodeoxyuridine) and IdU (iododeoxyuridine), separated by variable chase times in the presence of colchicine. Owing to the localized nature of the fluorescent signals (cell nuclei) and variable levels of autofluorescence, standard intensity-based colocalization analyses could not be applied to accurately determine the colocalization. Therefore, an object-based colocalization approach was devised to score the relative number of double-positive cells. Using this approach, Ts (S-phase duration) in the main population of neoblasts was ∼13 h. During early regeneration, no significant change in Ts was observed.

  20. The phylogenetic position of Rhopalura ophiocomae (Orthonectida) based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, B; Van Schyndel, D; Adema, C M; Lewis, L A; Loker, E S

    1996-11-01

    The Orthonectida is a small, poorly known phylum of parasites of marine invertebrates. Their phylogenetic placement is obscure; they have been considered to be multicellular protozoans, primitive animals at a "mesozoan" grade of organization, or secondarily simplified flatworm-like organisms. The best known species in the phylum, Rhopalura ophiocomae, was collected on San Juan Island, Wash. and a complete 18S rDNA sequence was obtained. Using the models of minimum evolution and parsimony, phylogenetic analyses were undertaken and the results lend support to the following hypotheses about orthonectids: (1) orthonectids are more closely aligned with triploblastic metazoan taxa than with the protist or diploblastic metazoan taxa considered in this analysis; (2) orthonectids are not derived members of the phylum Platyhelminthes; and (3) orthonectids and rhombozoans are not each other's closest relatives, thus casting further doubt on the validity of the phylum Mesozoa previously used to encompass both groups.

  1. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes.

  2. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences suggests significant molecular differences between Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida (Gastrotricha).

    PubMed

    Manylov, Oleg G; Vladychenskaya, Natalia S; Milyutina, Irina A; Kedrova, Olga S; Korokhov, Nikolai P; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady A; Aleshin, Vladimir V; Petrov, Nikolai B

    2004-03-01

    Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences of four macrodasyid and one chaetonotid gastrotrichs were obtained and compared with the available sequences of other gastrotrich species and representatives of various metazoan phyla. Contrary to the earlier molecular data, the gastrotrich sequences did not comprise a monophyletic group but formed two distinct clades, corresponding to the Macrodasyida and Chaetonotida, with the basal position occupied by the sequences of Tetranchyroderma sp. and Xenotrichula sp., respectively. Depending on the taxon sampling and methods of analysis, the two clades were separated by various combinations of clades Rotifera, Gnathostomulida, and Platyhelminthes, and never formed a clade with Nematoda. Thus, monophyly of the Gastrotricha is not confirmed by analysis of the presently available molecular data.

  3. Calcium channels of schistosomes: unresolved questions and unexpected answers

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Recatalà, Vicenta; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma are the causative agents of schistosomiasis, a highly prevalent, neglected tropical disease that causes significant morbidity in hundreds of millions of people worldwide. The current treatment of choice against schistosomiasis is praziquantel (PZQ), which is known to affect Ca2+ homeostasis in schistosomes, but which has an undefined molecular target and mode of action. PZQ is the only available antischistosomal drug in most parts of the world, making reports of PZQ resistance particularly troubling. Voltage-gated Ca2+ (Cav) channels have been proposed as possible targets for PZQ, and, given their central role in the neuromuscular system, may also serve as targets for new anthelmintic therapeutics. Indeed, ion channels constitute the majority of targets for current anthelmintics. Cav channel subunits from schistosomes and other platyhelminths have several unique properties that make them attractive as potential drug targets, and that could also provide insights into structure-function relationships in, and evolution of, Cav channels. PMID:22347719

  4. Repurposing pharma assets: an accelerated mechanism for strengthening the schistosomiasis drug development pipeline.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthi, Roopa; Graef, Katy M; Dent, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, one of 17 diseases deemed to be neglected by the World Health Organization, has received little attention from the biopharmaceutical industry. Due to this, only a handful of drugs have been developed to treat schistosomiasis, with only one, praziquantel, used in most endemic regions. Growing concern over resistance coupled with praziquantel's incomplete efficacy across all stages of the Schistosoma platyhelminth life cycle highlights the urgent need for new drugs. The WIPO Re:Search consortium is a platform whereupon biopharmaceutical company compounds are being repurposed to efficiently and cost-effectively develop new drugs for neglected diseases such as schistosomiasis. This article summarizes recent clinical-stage efforts to identify new antischistosomals and highlights biopharmaceutical company compounds with potential for repurposing to treat schistosomiasis.

  5. Venus Kinase Receptors: Prospects in Signaling and Biological Functions of These Invertebrate Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dissous, Colette; Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Venus kinase receptors (VKRs) form a family of invertebrate receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) initially discovered in the parasitic platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. VKRs are single transmembrane receptors that contain an extracellular venus fly trap structure similar to the ligand-binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors of class C, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptors. VKRs are found in a large variety of invertebrates from cnidarians to echinoderms and are highly expressed in larval stages and in gonads, suggesting a role of these proteins in embryonic and larval development as well as in reproduction. VKR gene silencing could demonstrate the function of these receptors in oogenesis as well as in spermatogenesis in S. mansoni. VKRs are activated by amino acids and are highly responsive to arginine. As many other RTKs, they form dimers when activated by ligands and induce intracellular pathways involved in protein synthesis and cellular growth, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/S6K pathways. VKRs are not present in vertebrates or in some invertebrate species. Questions remain open about the origin of this little-known RTK family in evolution and its role in emergence and specialization of Metazoa. What is the meaning of maintenance or loss of VKR in some phyla or species in terms of development and physiological functions? The presence of VKRs in invertebrates of economical and medical importance, such as pests, vectors of pathogens, and platyhelminth parasites, and the implication of these RTKs in gametogenesis and reproduction processes are valuable reasons to consider VKRs as interesting targets in new programs for eradication/control of pests and infectious diseases, with the main advantage in the case of parasite targeting that VKR counterparts are absent from the vertebrate host kinase panel. PMID:24860549

  6. Visualization and 3D Reconstruction of Flame Cells of Taenia solium (Cestoda)

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Islas, Laura E.; Arrangoiz, Esteban; Vega, Elio; Robert, Lilia; Villanueva, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Willms, Kaethe; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Fortoul, Teresa I.; Ambrosio, Javier R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Flame cells are the terminal cells of protonephridial systems, which are part of the excretory systems of invertebrates. Although the knowledge of their biological role is incomplete, there is a consensus that these cells perform excretion/secretion activities. It has been suggested that the flame cells participate in the maintenance of the osmotic environment that the cestodes require to live inside their hosts. In live Platyhelminthes, by light microscopy, the cells appear beating their flames rapidly and, at the ultrastructural, the cells have a large body enclosing a tuft of cilia. Few studies have been performed to define the localization of the cytoskeletal proteins of these cells, and it is unclear how these proteins are involved in cell function. Methodology/Principal Findings Parasites of two different developmental stages of T. solium were used: cysticerci recovered from naturally infected pigs and intestinal adults obtained from immunosuppressed and experimentally infected golden hamsters. Hamsters were fed viable cysticerci to recover adult parasites after one month of infection. In the present studies focusing on flame cells of cysticerci tissues was performed. Using several methods such as video, confocal and electron microscopy, in addition to computational analysis for reconstruction and modeling, we have provided a 3D visual rendition of the cytoskeletal architecture of Taenia solium flame cells. Conclusions/Significance We consider that visual representations of cells open a new way for understanding the role of these cells in the excretory systems of Platyhelminths. After reconstruction, the observation of high resolution 3D images allowed for virtual observation of the interior composition of cells. A combination of microscopic images, computational reconstructions and 3D modeling of cells appears to be useful for inferring the cellular dynamics of the flame cell cytoskeleton. PMID:21412407

  7. Ultrastructure and development of the rhabdomeric eyes in Lineus viridis (Heteronemertea, Nemertea).

    PubMed

    von Döhren, Jörn; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Nemerteans are undoubtedly members of the Spiralia, although their phylogenetic relationships are still a matter of debate. The apparently acoelomate organization suggests a relationship with the platyhelminths, whereas the blood-vascular system has been interpreted as an equivalent to coelomic cavities of annelids, indicating a close relation between annelids and nemerteans. Like other spiralians, most nemertean species are known to have one or several pairs of rhabdomeric and subepidermally situated eyes when adult. The development of these eyes as well as the mode in which the eyes are multiplied is as yet unknown. This is the first attempt to investigate eye formation in a nemertean. In the heteronemertean Lineus viridis (Müller, 1774) the everse rhabdomeric eyes are located deeply underneath the epidermis and consist of a few pigment cells that form a cup-like structure with interdigitating processes that contain numerous pigment granules. In hatchlings, the optical cavity contains processes of 12 sensory cells, each bearing a single cilium and various microvilli. The perikarya of these cells are located distally from the pigment cup. During further development the number of cells increases. Eye development starts with a small anlage situated underneath the epidermis, irrespective of whether this is the first eye or any additional one. The anlage consists of five unpigmented cells and three dendritic processes, each bearing apical microvilli and a single cilium. There is no evidence for an epidermal origin of the eyes. In L. viridis eye formation resembles that described in platyhelminths in which eyes also develop as cerebral derivatives. Although this result has the potential to influence the discussion on the position of Nemertea, the data have to be interpreted with care, since development of L. viridis is derived within the Nemertea.

  8. A Transcriptomic-Phylogenomic Analysis of the Evolutionary Relationships of Flatworms

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Tomiczek, Bartłomiej; Müller, Steven; Dessimoz, Christophe; Girstmair, Johannes; Škunca, Nives; Rawlinson, Kate A.; Cameron, Christopher B.; Beli, Elena; Todaro, M. Antonio; Gammoudi, Mehrez; Noreña, Carolina; Telford, Maximilian J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The interrelationships of the flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) are poorly resolved despite decades of morphological and molecular phylogenetic studies [1, 2]. The earliest-branching clades (Catenulida, Macrostomorpha, and Polycladida) share spiral cleavage and entolecithal eggs with other lophotrochozoans. Lecithoepitheliata have primitive spiral cleavage but derived ectolecithal eggs. Other orders (Rhabdocoela, Proseriata, Tricladida and relatives, and Bothrioplanida) all have derived ectolecithal eggs but have uncertain affinities to one another. The orders of parasitic Neodermata emerge from an uncertain position from within these ectolecithal classes. To tackle these problems, we have sequenced transcriptomes from 18 flatworms and 5 other metazoan groups. The addition of published data produces an alignment of >107,000 amino acids with less than 28% missing data from 27 flatworm taxa in 11 orders covering all major clades. Our phylogenetic analyses show that Platyhelminthes consist of the two clades Catenulida and Rhabditophora. Within Rhabditophora, we show the earliest-emerging branch is Macrostomorpha, not Polycladida. We show Lecithoepitheliata are not members of Neoophora but are sister group of Polycladida, implying independent origins of the ectolecithal eggs found in Lecithoepitheliata and Neoophora. We resolve Rhabdocoela as the most basally branching euneoophoran taxon. Tricladida, Bothrioplanida, and Neodermata constitute a group that appears to have lost both spiral cleavage and centrosomes. We identify Bothrioplanida as the long-sought closest free-living sister group of the parasitic Neodermata. Among parasitic orders, we show that Cestoda are closer to Trematoda than to Monogenea, rejecting the concept of the Cercomeromorpha. Our results have important implications for understanding the evolution of this major phylum. PMID:25866392

  9. A transcriptomic-phylogenomic analysis of the evolutionary relationships of flatworms.

    PubMed

    Egger, Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Tomiczek, Bartłomiej; Müller, Steven; Dessimoz, Christophe; Girstmair, Johannes; Škunca, Nives; Rawlinson, Kate A; Cameron, Christopher B; Beli, Elena; Todaro, M Antonio; Gammoudi, Mehrez; Noreña, Carolina; Telford, Maximilian J

    2015-05-18

    The interrelationships of the flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes) are poorly resolved despite decades of morphological and molecular phylogenetic studies. The earliest-branching clades (Catenulida, Macrostomorpha, and Polycladida) share spiral cleavage and entolecithal eggs with other lophotrochozoans. Lecithoepitheliata have primitive spiral cleavage but derived ectolecithal eggs. Other orders (Rhabdocoela, Proseriata, Tricladida and relatives, and Bothrioplanida) all have derived ectolecithal eggs but have uncertain affinities to one another. The orders of parasitic Neodermata emerge from an uncertain position from within these ectolecithal classes. To tackle these problems, we have sequenced transcriptomes from 18 flatworms and 5 other metazoan groups. The addition of published data produces an alignment of >107,000 amino acids with less than 28% missing data from 27 flatworm taxa in 11 orders covering all major clades. Our phylogenetic analyses show that Platyhelminthes consist of the two clades Catenulida and Rhabditophora. Within Rhabditophora, we show the earliest-emerging branch is Macrostomorpha, not Polycladida. We show Lecithoepitheliata are not members of Neoophora but are sister group of Polycladida, implying independent origins of the ectolecithal eggs found in Lecithoepitheliata and Neoophora. We resolve Rhabdocoela as the most basally branching euneoophoran taxon. Tricladida, Bothrioplanida, and Neodermata constitute a group that appears to have lost both spiral cleavage and centrosomes. We identify Bothrioplanida as the long-sought closest free-living sister group of the parasitic Neodermata. Among parasitic orders, we show that Cestoda are closer to Trematoda than to Monogenea, rejecting the concept of the Cercomeromorpha. Our results have important implications for understanding the evolution of this major phylum.

  10. Pharmacology of FMRFamide-related peptides in helminths.

    PubMed

    Geary, T G; Marks, N J; Maule, A G; Bowman, J W; Alexander-Bowman, S J; Day, T A; Larsen, M J; Kubiak, T M; Davis, J P; Thompson, D P

    1999-01-01

    Nervous systems of helminths are highly peptidergic. Species in the phylum Nematoda (roundworms) possess at least 50 FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs), with more yet to be identified. To date, few non-FaRP neuropeptides have been identified in these organisms, though evidence suggests that other families are present. FaRPergic systems have important functions in nematode neuromuscular control. In contrast, species in the phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms) apparently utilize fewer FaRPs than do nematodes; those species examined possess one or two FaRPs. Other neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide F (NPF), play key roles in flatworm physiology. Although progress has been made in the characterization of FaRP pharmacology in helminths, much remains to be learned. Most studies on nematodes have been done with Ascaris suum because of its large size. However, thanks to the Caenorhabditis elegans genome project, we know most about the FaRP complement of this free-living animal. That essentially all C. elegans FaRPs are active on at least one A. suum neuromuscular system argues for conservation of ligand-receptor recognition features among the Nematoda. Structure-activity studies on nematode FaRPs have revealed that structure-activity relationship (SAR) "rules" differ considerably among the FaRPs. Second messenger studies, along with experiments on ionic dependence and anatomical requirements for activity, reveal that FaRPs act through many different mechanisms. Platyhelminth FaRPs are myoexcitatory, and no evidence exists of multiple FaRP receptors in flatworms. Interestingly, there are examples of cross-phylum activity, with some nematode FaRPs being active on flatworm muscle. The extent to which other invertebrate FaRPs show cross-phylum activity remains to be determined. How FaRPergic nerves contribute to the control of behavior in helminths, and are integrated with non-neuropeptidergic systems, also remains to be elucidated.

  11. The embryonic development of the bodywall and nervous system of the cestode flatworm Hymenolepis diminuta.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Jones, Malcolm

    2003-03-01

    Cestodes (tapeworms) are a derived, parasitic clade of the phylum Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The cestode body wall represents an adaptation to its endoparasitic lifestyle. The epidermis forms a non-ciliated syncytium, and both muscular and nervous system are reduced. Morphological differences between cestodes and free-living flatworms become apparent already during early embryogenesis. Cestodes have a complex life cycle that begins with an infectious larva, called the oncosphere. In regard to cell number, cestode oncospheres are among the simplest multicellular organisms, containing in the order of 50-100 cells. As part of our continuing effort to analyze embryonic development in flatworms, we describe here the staining pattern obtained with acTub in embryos and larvae of the cestode Hymenolepis diminuta and, briefly, the monogenean Neoheterocotyle rhinobatidis. In addition, we labeled the embryonic musculature of Hymenolepis with phalloidin. In Hymenolepis embryos, two different cell types that we interpret as neurons and epidermal gland cells express acTub. There exist only two neurons that develop close to the midline at the anterior pole of the embryo. The axons of these two neurons project posteriorly into the center of the oncosphere, where they innervate the complex of muscles that is attached to the hooklets. In addition to neurons, acTub labels a small and invariant set of epidermal gland cells that develop at superficial positions, anteriorly adjacent to the neurons, in the dorsal midline, and around the posteriorly located hooklets. During late stages of embryogenesis they spread and form a complete covering of the embryo. We discuss these data in the broader context of platyhelminth embryology.

  12. Venus kinase receptors: prospects in signaling and biological functions of these invertebrate kinases.

    PubMed

    Dissous, Colette; Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Venus kinase receptors (VKRs) form a family of invertebrate receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) initially discovered in the parasitic platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. VKRs are single transmembrane receptors that contain an extracellular venus fly trap structure similar to the ligand-binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors of class C, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptors. VKRs are found in a large variety of invertebrates from cnidarians to echinoderms and are highly expressed in larval stages and in gonads, suggesting a role of these proteins in embryonic and larval development as well as in reproduction. VKR gene silencing could demonstrate the function of these receptors in oogenesis as well as in spermatogenesis in S. mansoni. VKRs are activated by amino acids and are highly responsive to arginine. As many other RTKs, they form dimers when activated by ligands and induce intracellular pathways involved in protein synthesis and cellular growth, such as MAPK and PI3K/Akt/S6K pathways. VKRs are not present in vertebrates or in some invertebrate species. Questions remain open about the origin of this little-known RTK family in evolution and its role in emergence and specialization of Metazoa. What is the meaning of maintenance or loss of VKR in some phyla or species in terms of development and physiological functions? The presence of VKRs in invertebrates of economical and medical importance, such as pests, vectors of pathogens, and platyhelminth parasites, and the implication of these RTKs in gametogenesis and reproduction processes are valuable reasons to consider VKRs as interesting targets in new programs for eradication/control of pests and infectious diseases, with the main advantage in the case of parasite targeting that VKR counterparts are absent from the vertebrate host kinase panel.

  13. Characterization of the stem cell system of the acoel Isodiametra pulchra

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Tissue plasticity and a substantial regeneration capacity based on stem cells are the hallmark of several invertebrate groups such as sponges, cnidarians and Platyhelminthes. Traditionally, Acoela were seen as an early branching clade within the Platyhelminthes, but became recently positioned at the base of the Bilateria. However, little is known on how the stem cell system in this new phylum is organized. In this study, we wanted to examine if Acoela possess a neoblast-like stem cell system that is responsible for development, growth, homeostasis and regeneration. Results We established enduring laboratory cultures of the acoel Isodiametra pulchra (Acoela, Acoelomorpha) and implemented in situ hybridization and RNA interference (RNAi) for this species. We used BrdU labelling, morphology, ultrastructure and molecular tools to illuminate the morphology, distribution and plasticity of acoel stem cells under different developmental conditions. We demonstrate that neoblasts are the only proliferating cells which are solely mesodermally located within the organism. By means of in situ hybridisation and protein localisation we could demonstrate that the piwi-like gene ipiwi1 is expressed in testes, ovaries as well as in a subpopulation of somatic stem cells. In addition, we show that germ cell progenitors are present in freshly hatched worms, suggesting an embryonic formation of the germline. We identified a potent stem cell system that is responsible for development, homeostasis, regeneration and regrowth upon starvation. Conclusions We introduce the acoel Isodiametra pulchra as potential new model organism, suitable to address developmental questions in this understudied phylum. We show that neoblasts in I. pulchra are crucial for tissue homeostasis, development and regeneration. Notably, epidermal cells were found to be renewed exclusively from parenchymally located stem cells, a situation known only from rhabditophoran flatworms so far. For further

  14. Electrode array-eluted dexamethasone protects against electrode insertion trauma induced hearing and hair cell losses, damage to neural elements, increases in impedance and fibrosis: A dose response study.

    PubMed

    Bas, Esperanza; Bohorquez, Jorge; Goncalves, Stefania; Perez, Enrique; Dinh, Christine T; Garnham, Carolyn; Hessler, Roland; Eshraghi, Adrien A; Van De Water, Thomas R

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of dexamethasone base (DXMb) containing electrode arrays in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation to determine if eluted DXMb could protect the cochlea against electrode insertion trauma (EIT)-induced: 1) loss of hair cells; 2) disruption of neural elements; 3) increases in hearing thresholds; 4) increased electrical impedance and 5) fibrosis. A guinea pig model of EIT-induced hearing and hair cell losses was used to test silicone electrode arrays that contained either 10%, 1%, 0.1%, or 0% levels of micronized DXMb. These four types of electrode arrays were implanted into the scala tympani via basal turn cochleostomies and left in place for 3 months. Hearing thresholds were determined by ABR and CAP recordings in response to a series of defined pure tone stimuli (i.e. 16-0.5 kHz). Changes in impedance were measured between the implant electrode and a reference electrode. Hair cell counts and neural element integrity were determined by confocal microscopy analyses of stained organ of Corti whole mounts obtained from 90 day post-implantation animals. Fibrosis was measured in Masson trichrome stained cross-sections through the organ of Corti. The results showed that either 10% or 1.0% DXMb eluting electrode arrays protected; hearing thresholds, hair cells, and neural elements against EIT-induced losses and damage. Electrode arrays with 0.1% DXMb only partial protected against EIT-induced hearing loss and damage to the cochlea. Protection of hearing thresholds and organ of Corti sensory elements by electrode-eluted DXMb was still apparent at 3 months post-EIT. All three concentrations of DXMb in the electrode arrays prevented EIT-induced increases in impedance. EIT-initiated fibrosis was significantly reduced within the implanted cochlea of the two DXMb concentrations tested. In conclusion, DXMb eluting electrodes protected the cochlea against long term increases in hearing thresholds, loss of hair cells, damage to neural elements and

  15. Acoustic stimulation promotes DNA fragmentation in the Guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Tomonobu; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Okubo, Kimihiro

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis can be described as programmed cell death. Apoptosis regulates cell turnover and is involved in various pathological conditions. The characteristic features of apoptosis are shrinkage of the cell body, chromatin condensation, and nucleic acid fragmentation. During apoptosis, double-stranded DNA is broken down into single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by proteases. Acoustic trauma is commonly encountered in otorhinolaryngology clinics. Intense noise can cause inner ear damage, such as hearing disturbance, tinnitus, ear fullness, and decreased speech discrimination. In this study, we used immunohistochemical and electrophysiological methods to examine the fragmentation of DNA in the cochleas of guinea pigs that had been exposed to intense noise. Twenty-four guinea pigs weighing 250 to 350 g were used. The animals were divided into 4 groups: (I) a control group (n=6), (II) a group that was exposed to noise for 2 hours (n=6), (III) a group that was exposed to noise for 5 hours (n=6), and (IV) a group that was exposed to noise for 20 hours. The stimulus was a pure tone delivered at a frequency of 2 kHz. The sound pressure level was 120 dBSPL. No threshold shifts were apparent in group I. Group II showed a significant elevation of the hearing threshold (ANOVA, p<0.05(*)). The ABR threshold level was also significantly elevated immediately after the acoustic stimulation in groups III and IV (ANOVA, p<0.01(**)). In groups I, II, and IV, the lateral wall of the ear did not show immunoreactivity to ssDNA but did in group III. No immunoreactivity was apparent in the organ of Corti in group I or II. However, the supporting cells and outer hair cells in groups III and IV showed reactions for ssDNA. The fine structure of the organ of Corti had been destroyed in group IV. The lateral wall showed immunoreactivity for ssDNA only in group III, whereas the organ of Corti showed reactions for ssDNA in groups III and IV. Our study suggests that apoptotic changes occur in patients that

  16. Acoustic stimulation promotes DNA fragmentation in the Guinea pig cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Tomonobu; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Okubo, Kimihiro

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis can be described as programmed cell death. Apoptosis regulates cell turnover and is involved in various pathological conditions. The characteristic features of apoptosis are shrinkage of the cell body, chromatin condensation, and nucleic acid fragmentation. During apoptosis, double-stranded DNA is broken down into single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by proteases. Acoustic trauma is commonly encountered in otorhinolaryngology clinics. Intense noise can cause inner ear damage, such as hearing disturbance, tinnitus, ear fullness, and decreased speech discrimination. In this study, we used immunohistochemical and electrophysiological methods to examine the fragmentation of DNA in the cochleas of guinea pigs that had been exposed to intense noise. Twenty-four guinea pigs weighing 250 to 350 g were used. The animals were divided into 4 groups: (I) a control group (n=6), (II) a group that was exposed to noise for 2 hours (n=6), (III) a group that was exposed to noise for 5 hours (n=6), and (IV) a group that was exposed to noise for 20 hours. The stimulus was a pure tone delivered at a frequency of 2 kHz. The sound pressure level was 120 dBSPL. No threshold shifts were apparent in group I. Group II showed a significant elevation of the hearing threshold (ANOVA, p<0.05(*)). The ABR threshold level was also significantly elevated immediately after the acoustic stimulation in groups III and IV (ANOVA, p<0.01(**)). In groups I, II, and IV, the lateral wall of the ear did not show immunoreactivity to ssDNA but did in group III. No immunoreactivity was apparent in the organ of Corti in group I or II. However, the supporting cells and outer hair cells in groups III and IV showed reactions for ssDNA. The fine structure of the organ of Corti had been destroyed in group IV. The lateral wall showed immunoreactivity for ssDNA only in group III, whereas the organ of Corti showed reactions for ssDNA in groups III and IV. Our study suggests that apoptotic changes occur in patients that

  17. Electrode array-eluted dexamethasone protects against electrode insertion trauma induced hearing and hair cell losses, damage to neural elements, increases in impedance and fibrosis: A dose response study.

    PubMed

    Bas, Esperanza; Bohorquez, Jorge; Goncalves, Stefania; Perez, Enrique; Dinh, Christine T; Garnham, Carolyn; Hessler, Roland; Eshraghi, Adrien A; Van De Water, Thomas R

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of dexamethasone base (DXMb) containing electrode arrays in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation to determine if eluted DXMb could protect the cochlea against electrode insertion trauma (EIT)-induced: 1) loss of hair cells; 2) disruption of neural elements; 3) increases in hearing thresholds; 4) increased electrical impedance and 5) fibrosis. A guinea pig model of EIT-induced hearing and hair cell losses was used to test silicone electrode arrays that contained either 10%, 1%, 0.1%, or 0% levels of micronized DXMb. These four types of electrode arrays were implanted into the scala tympani via basal turn cochleostomies and left in place for 3 months. Hearing thresholds were determined by ABR and CAP recordings in response to a series of defined pure tone stimuli (i.e. 16-0.5 kHz). Changes in impedance were measured between the implant electrode and a reference electrode. Hair cell counts and neural element integrity were determined by confocal microscopy analyses of stained organ of Corti whole mounts obtained from 90 day post-implantation animals. Fibrosis was measured in Masson trichrome stained cross-sections through the organ of Corti. The results showed that either 10% or 1.0% DXMb eluting electrode arrays protected; hearing thresholds, hair cells, and neural elements against EIT-induced losses and damage. Electrode arrays with 0.1% DXMb only partial protected against EIT-induced hearing loss and damage to the cochlea. Protection of hearing thresholds and organ of Corti sensory elements by electrode-eluted DXMb was still apparent at 3 months post-EIT. All three concentrations of DXMb in the electrode arrays prevented EIT-induced increases in impedance. EIT-initiated fibrosis was significantly reduced within the implanted cochlea of the two DXMb concentrations tested. In conclusion, DXMb eluting electrodes protected the cochlea against long term increases in hearing thresholds, loss of hair cells, damage to neural elements and

  18. Mathematical Modelling of the Role of Outer Hair Cells in Cochlear Homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Beirne, G. A.; Patuzzi, R. B.

    2003-02-01

    To understand the ways in which the cochlea maintains its exquisite auditory sensitivity in the face of daily perturbations, we have constructed a mathematical model of the homeostatic mechanisms of the organ of Corti. In particular, the role of outer hair cells in this regulation, and how the failure of these regulatory mechanisms causes hearing loss and tinnitus. This poster presents an overview of the model. We show how various cochlear perturbations (including hydrostatic bias and exposure to a low-frequency tone) can cause the homeostatic regulation mechanisms of the outer hair cells to slowly oscillate, thereby changing the endocochlear potential and modulating transmitter release [1], and causing slow oscillations in cochlear gain (the "bounce" phenomenon; [2]).

  19. Quantitative polarized light microscopy of human cochlear sections

    PubMed Central

    Low, Jacob C. M.; Ober, Thomas J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the inner ear is the most common cause of sensorineural hearing loss, which is the most common sensory deficit worldwide. Conventional imaging modalities are unable to depict the microanatomy of the human inner ear, hence the need to explore novel imaging modalities. We provide the first characterization of the polarization dependent optical properties of human cochlear sections using quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM). Eight pediatric cadaveric cochlear sections, aged 0 (term) to 24 months, were selected from the US National Temporal Bone Registry, imaged with qPLM and analyzed using Image J. Retardance of the bony otic capsule and basilar membrane were substantially higher than that of the stria vascularis, spiral ganglion neurons, organ of Corti and spiral ligament across the half turns of the spiraling cochlea. qPLM provides quantitative information about the human inner ear, and awaits future exploration in vivo. PMID:25780749

  20. Interaural correlations in normal and traumatized cochleas: length and sensory cell loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bohne, B.A.; Bozzay, D.G.; Harding, G.W.

    1986-12-01

    Sizable intraspecies variations have been found in both the length of the organ of Corti (OC) and the amount of damage resulting from exposure to a particular ototraumatic agent. These variations have made it difficult to address certain research questions such as the susceptibility of the previously injured ear to further damage. If intra-animal correlation is high, the variability problem could be circumvented by using the two ears from a given animal for different aspects of the same study. Therefore, correlation coefficients were calculated for OC length and for percentage of missing inner (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) in a large sample of chinchillas which included controls and animals which had been exposed to noise or treated with ionizing radiation. The correlation coefficients were +0.96 for OC length, +0.93 for IHC loss, and +0.97 for OHC loss.

  1. A computational study on traveling waves in the gerbil cochlea generated by electrical impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jong-Hoon; Liu, Yanju; Gracewski, Sheryle M.

    2015-12-01

    Through model simulations, we investigated the cochlear traveling waves formed by outer hair cell (OHC) motility. Two sets of governing equations, one representing the solid domain of the organ of Corti complex (OCC) and the other representing the fluid domain, were solved simultaneously in the time domain. The OHCs incorporated electro-mechanical motility driven by prestin molecules. The combined fluid-solid interaction model was verified by simulating passive traveling waves along the cochlear coil. When stimulated with an electrical impulse, the OCC formed traveling waves propagating toward the apex. Without the Y-shaped structures in the OCC formed by the OHCs and the Deiter's cell processes, the active OHCs form dispersive waves rather than traveling waves upon electrical stimulation.

  2. The second filter’s second coming

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Jacques, Steven L.; Choudhoury, Niloy; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Wang, Ruikang; Fridberger, Anders

    2015-12-31

    We measured sound-evoked vibrations at the stereociliary side of inner and outer hair cells and their surrounding supporting cells, using optical coherence tomography interferometry in living anesthetized guinea pigs. Our measurements demonstrate a gradient in frequency tuning among different cell types, going from a high best frequency at the inner hair cells to a lower one at the Hensen cells. This causes the locus of maximum inner hair cell activation to be shifted toward the apex of the cochlea as compared to the outer hair cells. These observations show that additional processing and filtering of acoustic signals occurs within the organ of Corti prior to inner hair cell excitation, thus reinstating a transformed second filter as a mechanism contributing to cochlear frequency tuning.

  3. Visualizing Cochlear Mechanics Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulfendahl, M.; Boutet de Monvel, J.; Fridberger, A.

    2003-02-01

    The sound-evoked vibration pattern of the hearing organ is based on complex mechanical interactions between different cellular structures. To explore the structural changes occurring within the organ of Corti during basilar-membrane motion, stepwise alterations of the scala tympani pressure were applied in an in vitro preparation of the guinea-pig temporal bone. Confocal images were acquired at each pressure level. In this way, the motion of several structures could be simultaneously observed with high resolution in a nearly intact system. Images were analyzed using a novel wavelet-based optical-flow estimation algorithm. Under the present experimental conditions, the reticular lamina moved as a stiff plate with a center of rotation in the region of the inner hair cells. The outer hair cells appeared non-rigid and the basal, synaptic regions of these cells displayed significant radial motion indicative of cellular bending and internal shearing.

  4. The quest for restoring hearing: Understanding ear development more completely.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Israt; Pan, Ning; Elliott, Karen L; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Neurosensory hearing loss is a growing problem of super-aged societies. Cochlear implants can restore some hearing, but rebuilding a lost hearing organ would be superior. Research has discovered many cellular and molecular steps to develop a hearing organ but translating those insights into hearing organ restoration remains unclear. For example, we cannot make various hair cell types and arrange them into their specific patterns surrounded by the right type of supporting cells in the right numbers. Our overview of the topologically highly organized and functionally diversified cellular mosaic of the mammalian hearing organ highlights what is known and unknown about its development. Following this analysis, we suggest critical steps to guide future attempts toward restoration of a functional organ of Corti. We argue that generating mutant mouse lines that mimic human pathology to fine-tune attempts toward long-term functional restoration are needed to go beyond the hope generated by restoring single hair cells in postnatal sensory epithelia.

  5. A MEMS AlN transducer array with flexible interconnections for use as a cochlear implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knisely, Katherine; Zhao, Chuming; Grosh, Karl

    2015-12-01

    A completely implantable artificial organ of Corti (CIAO) was fabricated using batch MEMS processing techniques. A silicon backbone supports five piezoelectric cantilevers, each of which is designed to have an in vivo resonance corresponding to its tonotopic location in the guinea pig ST (20-40 kHz). An attachable polymer ribbon cable extends 4cm from the probe to an electrode bay, where electrical connections to each cantilever are accessed. The actuation responses of the fabricated devices were measured using laser vibrometry confirming the fluid-loaded resonance conforming to the straight section of the first turn of the guinea pig cochlea. First generation devices have been fabricated and the actuated resonances were measured to range from 80.3-134.2kHz in air and 24.3-41.0 kHz in water.

  6. Type IX collagen knock-out mouse shows progressive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuyoshi; Asamura, Kenji; Kikuchi, Yasutake; Takumi, Yutaka; Abe, Satoko; Imamura, Yasutada; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Aszodi, Attila; Fässler, Reinhard; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2005-03-01

    Type IX collagen is one of the important components, together with type II, V, and XI collagens, in the tectorial membrane of the organ of Corti. To confirm the significance of type IX collagen for normal hearing, we assessed the detailed morphological and electrophysiological features of type IX collagen knock-out mice, which have recently been reported as a deafness model. Through assessment by auditory brainstem response (ABR), knock-out mice were shown to have progressive hearing loss. At the light microscopic level, the tectorial membrane of knock-out mice was found to be abnormal in shape. These morphological changes started in the basal turn and were progressive toward the apical turn. Electron microscopy confirmed disturbance of organization of the collagen fibrils. These results suggest that mutations in type IX collagen genes may lead to abnormal integrity of collagen fibers in the tectorial membrane.

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Murphy-Lavoie, H; Piper, S; Moon, R E; Legros, T

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is the newest indication approved by the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society's Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Committee. Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss appears to be characterized by hypoxia in the perilymph and therefore the scala tympani and the organ of Corti. A review of the literature reveals more than 100 publications evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) for the treatment of ISSHL, including eight randomized controlled trials. The best and most consistent results are obtained when HBO2 is initiated within two weeks of symptom onset and combined with corticosteroid treatment. The average hearing gain is 19.3 dB for moderate hearing loss and 37.7 dB for severe cases. This improvement brings hearing deficits from the moderate/severe range into the slight/no impairment range. This is a significant gain that can markedly improve a patient's quality of life, both clinically and functionally.

  8. Exploring the living cochlea using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulfendahl, Mats; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Le Calvez, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    To obtain a more integrated view of the cellular behaviour of the cochlea it is essential to observe not only wider regions of the exposed turns but also to visualize structures below the reticular lamina. Using confocal microscopy and in vitro preparations of guinea pig and mouse inner ears, cellular structures within the intact organ of Corti can be visualized at high resolution. The approach thus offers a means to investigate detailed cellular events, e.g. structural reorganization following acoustic overstimulation. Confocal microscope images, although sharper than images acquired using regular light microscopy, are still subject to problems related to light scattering within the optical system and low signal-to-noise ratio. Significant image restoration can, however, be obtained by applying a combination of wavelet denoising techniques and deconvolution algorithms. Future work will focus both on more dynamical cellular events and on new in vivo models where the inner ear is visualized at a better functional state.

  9. Molecular mechanisms and potentials for differentiating inner ear stem cells into sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanwen; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jinfu

    2014-06-15

    In mammals, hair cells may be damaged or lost due to genetic mutation, infectious disease, chemical ototoxicity, noise and other factors, causing permanent sensorineural deafness. Regeneration of hair cells is a basic pre-requisite for recovery of hearing in deaf animals. The inner ear stem cells in the organ of Corti and vestibular utricle are the most ideal precursors for regeneration of inner ear hair cells. This review highlights some recent findings concerning the proliferation and differentiation of inner ear stem cells. The differentiation of inner ear stem cells into hair cells involves a series of signaling pathways and regulatory factors. This paper offers a comprehensive analysis of the related studies. PMID:24680894

  10. Mechanosensitive ion channels investigated simultaneously by scanning probe microscopy and patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Langer, Matthias G

    2007-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels play an important role for the perception of mechanical signals such as touch, balance, or sound. Here, a new experimental strategy is presented providing well-defined access to single mechanosensitive ion channels in living cells. As a representative example, the investigation of mechanosensitive transduction channels in cochlear hair cells is discussed in detail including all essential technical aspects. Three different techniques were combined: atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a device for local mechanical stimulation, patch clamp for recording the current response of mechanosensitive ion channels, and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy equipped with an upright water-immersion objective lens. A major challenge was to adapt the mechanical design of the AFM setup to the small working distance of the light microscope and the electrical design of the AFM electronics. Various protocols for the preparation and investigation of the organ of Corti with AFM are presented. PMID:18827992

  11. Instrumentation for Studies of Cochlear Mechanics: From von Békésy forward

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, Alfred L; Fridberger, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Georg von Békésy designed the instruments needed for his research. He also created physical models of the cochlea allowing him to manipulate the parameters (such as volume elasticity) that could be involved in controlling traveling waves. This review is about the specific devices that he used to study the motion of the basilar membrane thus allowing the analysis that lead to his Nobel Prize Award. The review moves forward in time mentioning the subsequent use of von Békésy’s methods and later technologies important for motion studies of the organ of Corti. Some of the seminal findings and the controversies of cochlear mechanics are mentioned in relation to the technical developments. PMID:22975360

  12. Is Stereocilia Velocity or Displacement Feedback Used in the Cochlear Amplifier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shan; Mountain, David; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-02-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) play an important role in cochlear amplification. The OHC senses stereocilia motion and creates a force feedback to the organ of Corti. It is largely accepted that the stereocilia displacement drives the OHC apical conductance change, which, in turn, drives somatic motility. Recent research shows that the tension gated OHC current exhibits fast adaptation in response to stereocilia displacement. Such an adaptation process resembles a high-pass filter or differentiator, at least for the inward current. Since velocity is the derivative of displacement, fast adaptation may indicate that it is the stereocilia velocity, rather than displacement is the more important driver of the OHC apical conductance. We changed our multi-compartment, piezo-electro-mechanical model to sense stereocilia velocity rather than displacement. This new model can well match measured basilar membrane velocity and our own cochlear microphonic data.

  13. A Physiological Signal Transmission Model to be Used for Specific Diagnosis of Cochlear Impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Many of the sophisticated characteristics of human auditory system are attributed to cochlea. Also, most of patients with a hearing loss suffer from impairments that originate from cochlea (sensorineural). Despite this, today's clinical diagnosis methods do not probe the specific origins of such cochlear lesions. The aim of this research is to introduce a physiological signal transmission model to be clinically used as a tool for diagnosis of cochlear losses. This model enables simulation of different bio-mechano-electrical processes which occur in the auditory organ of Corti inside the cochlea. What makes this model different from many available computational models is its loyalty to physiology since the ultimate goal is to model each single physiological phenomenon. This includes passive BM vibration, outer hair cells' performances such as nonlinear mechanoelectrical transduction (MET), active amplifications by somatic motor, as well as vibration to neural conversion at the inner hair cells.

  14. Dissection of the Mechanical Impedance Components of the Outer Hair Cell Using a Chloride-Channel Blocker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasztosi, Csaba; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2011-11-01

    The voltage-dependent chloride-channel blocker anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9AC) has been found to reduce the imaginary but not the real part of the mechanical impedance of the organ of Corti, suggesting that the effective stiffness of outer hair cells (OHCs) is reduced by 9AC. To examine whether 9AC interacts directly with the motor protein prestin to reduce the membrane component of the impedance, the patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration was used to measure the nonlinear capacitance (NLC) of isolated OHCs and, as control, prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Extracellular application of 9AC significantly reduced the NLC of both OHCs and HEK293 cells. Intracellular 9AC did not influence the blocking effect of the extracellular applied drug. These results suggest that 9AC interacts directly with prestin, reducing the effective stiffness of the motor, and that the interaction is extracellular.

  15. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) leading to more insight into cochlear mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Egbert de; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2015-12-31

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was used to measure vibrations of the basilar membrane (BM) and the Reticular Lamina (RL) in the cochlea of the guinea pig, at frequencies up to 25 kHz. Because of the difficulty of the experiments the data have limited sets of parameters and are subject to high noise levels. In a viable guinea-pig cochlea, the RL moves in the region of maximum response with a larger amplitude than the BM. We cannot rule out that some of that difference is due to a geometrical factor. We also found a consistent increase of this amplitude difference with frequency, which points to a low-pass filtering process. That process might be linked to the mass of the fluid contained in the Organ of Corti channel (OoC channel)

  16. Delayed effects of ionizing radiation on the ear

    SciTech Connect

    Bohne, B.A.; Marks, J.E.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1985-07-01

    The question of damage to the ear from exposure to ionizing radiation was addressed by exposing groups of chinchillas to fractioned doses of radiation (2 Gy per day) for total doses ranging from 40 to 90 Gy. In order to allow any delayed effects of radiation to become manifest, the animals were sacrificed two years after completion of treatment and their temporal bones were prepared for microscopic examination. The most pronounced effect of treatment was degeneration of sensory and supporting cells and loss of eighth nerve fibers in the organ of Corti. Damage increased with increasing dose of radiation. The degree of damage found in many of these ears was of sufficient magnitude to produce a permanent sensorineural hearing loss.

  17. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) leading to more insight into cochlear mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Egbert; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2015-12-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was used to measure vibrations of the basilar membrane (BM) and the Reticular Lamina (RL) in the cochlea of the guinea pig, at frequencies up to 25 kHz. Because of the difficulty of the experiments the data have limited sets of parameters and are subject to high noise levels. In a viable guinea-pig cochlea, the RL moves in the region of maximum response with a larger amplitude than the BM. We cannot rule out that some of that difference is due to a geometrical factor. We also found a consistent increase of this amplitude difference with frequency, which points to a low-pass filtering process. That process might be linked to the mass of the fluid contained in the Organ of Corti channel (OoC channel).

  18. The second filter's second coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang; Choudhoury, Niloy; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Fridberger, Anders

    2015-12-01

    We measured sound-evoked vibrations at the stereociliary side of inner and outer hair cells and their surrounding supporting cells, using optical coherence tomography interferometry in living anesthetized guinea pigs. Our measurements demonstrate a gradient in frequency tuning among different cell types, going from a high best frequency at the inner hair cells to a lower one at the Hensen cells. This causes the locus of maximum inner hair cell activation to be shifted toward the apex of the cochlea as compared to the outer hair cells. These observations show that additional processing and filtering of acoustic signals occurs within the organ of Corti prior to inner hair cell excitation, thus reinstating a transformed second filter as a mechanism contributing to cochlear frequency tuning.

  19. Absolute measurement of subnanometer scale vibration of cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using spectral-domain phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Choudhury, Niloy; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-01-01

    Direct measurement of absolute vibration parameters from different locations within the mammalian organ of Corti is crucial for understanding the hearing mechanics such as how sound propagates through the cochlea and how sound stimulates the vibration of various structures of the cochlea, namely, basilar membrane (BM), recticular lamina, outer hair cells and tectorial membrane (TM). In this study we demonstrate the feasibility a modified phase-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system to provide subnanometer scale vibration information from multiple angles within the imaging beam. The system has the potential to provide depth resolved absolute vibration measurement of tissue microstructures from each of the delay-encoded vibration images with a noise floor of ~0.3nm at 200Hz.

  20. Imaging vibration of the cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Niloy; Zeng, Yaguang; Fridberger, Anders; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-03-01

    Studying the sound stimulated vibrations of various membranes that form the complex structure of the organ of Corti in the cochlea of the inner ear is essential for understanding how the travelling sound wave of the basilar membrane couples its energy to the organ structures. In this paper we report the feasibility of using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to image the vibration of various micro-structures of the cochlea at the same time. An excised cochlea of a guinea pig was stimulated using sounds at various frequencies and vibration image was obtained. When measuring the apex area, vibration signal from different turns, which have different best response frequencies are obtained in the same image. The method has the potential to measure the response from a much wider region of the cochlea than any other currently used method. The noise floor for vibration image for the system at 200 Hz was ~0.3nm.

  1. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  2. Progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss induced by an antithyroid drug.

    PubMed

    Sano, Masaki; Kitahara, Nobuo; Kunikata, Ryutarou

    2004-01-01

    We report a patient with antithyroid drug-induced progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss associated with myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (MPO-ANCA). While antithyroid drugs have been linked to MPO-ANCA-associated small-vessel vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss rarely was noted. A 36-year-old man treated for hyperthyroidism with propylthiouracil (PTU) developed progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss accompanied by fever and arthritis. MPO-ANCA were demonstrated in serum. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions test results suggested dysfunction of outer hair cells of the organ of Corti. Inner ear blood flow impairment from ANCA-associated small-vessel vasculitis presumably caused cochlear dysfunction. PTU withdrawal and high-dose methylprednisolone administration greatly improved hearing on both sides.

  3. Ion Channel Gene Expression in the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Bernd H.A.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Giersch, Anne B.S.

    2007-01-01

    The ion channel genome is still being defined despite numerous publications on the subject. The ion channel transcriptome is even more difficult to assess. Using high-throughput computational tools, we surveyed all available inner ear cDNA libraries to identify genes coding for ion channels. We mapped over 100,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from human cochlea, mouse organ of Corti, mouse and zebrafish inner ear, and rat vestibular end organs to Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Danio rerio, and Rattus norvegicus genomes. A survey of EST data alone reveals that at least a third of the ion channel genome is expressed in the inner ear, with highest expression occurring in hair cell-enriched mouse organ of Corti and rat vestibule. Our data and comparisons with other experimental techniques that measure gene expression show that every method has its limitations and does not per se provide a complete coverage of the inner ear ion channelome. In addition, the data show that most genes produce alternative transcripts with the same spectrum across multiple organisms, no ion channel gene variants are unique to the inner ear, and many splice variants have yet to be annotated. Our high-throughput approach offers a qualitative computational and experimental analysis of ion channel genes in inner ear cDNA collections. A lack of data and incomplete gene annotations prevent both rigorous statistical analyses and comparisons of entire ion channelomes derived from different tissues and organisms. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10162-007-0082-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17541769

  4. Epigenetic regulation of Atoh1 guides hair cell development in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Zlatka P; Kwan, Tao; Segil, Neil

    2015-10-15

    In the developing cochlea, sensory hair cell differentiation depends on the regulated expression of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. In mammals, if hair cells die they do not regenerate, leading to permanent deafness. By contrast, in non-mammalian vertebrates robust regeneration occurs through upregulation of Atoh1 in the surviving supporting cells that surround hair cells, leading to functional recovery. Investigation of crucial transcriptional events in the developing organ of Corti, including those involving Atoh1, has been hampered by limited accessibility to purified populations of the small number of cells present in the inner ear. We used µChIP and qPCR assays of FACS-purified cells to track changes in the epigenetic status of the Atoh1 locus during sensory epithelia development in the mouse. Dynamic changes in the histone modifications H3K4me3/H3K27me3, H3K9ac and H3K9me3 reveal a progression from poised, to active, to repressive marks, correlating with the onset of Atoh1 expression and its subsequent silencing during the perinatal (P1 to P6) period. Inhibition of acetylation blocked the increase in Atoh1 mRNA in nascent hair cells, as well as ongoing hair cell differentiation during embryonic organ of Corti development ex vivo. These results reveal an epigenetic mechanism of Atoh1 regulation underlying hair cell differentiation and subsequent maturation. Interestingly, the H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent chromatin structure observed in progenitors persists at the Atoh1 locus in perinatal supporting cells, suggesting an explanation for the latent capacity of these cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells, and highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets in hair cell regeneration.

  5. Gingko biloba extracts protect auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity by inhibiting perturbation of gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Choi, S J; Kim, S W; Lee, J B; Lim, H J; Kim, Y J; Tian, C; So, H S; Park, R; Choung, Y-H

    2013-08-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) may play an important role in the hearing process. Cisplatin is an anticancer drug that causes hearing loss and Gingko biloba extracts (EGb 761) have been used as an antioxidant and enhancer for GJIC. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of EGb 761 in protecting against cisplatin-induced apoptosis and disturbance of GJIC. House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 auditory cells were cultured and treated with cisplatin (50 μM) and EGb (300 μg/ml) for 24h, and then analyzed by immunocytochemistry (Annexin V/propidium iodide) and Western blots. GJIC was evaluated by scrape-loading dye transfer (SLDT). Basal turn organ of Corti (oC) explants from neonatal (p3) rats were exposed to cisplatin (1-10 μM) and EGb (50-400 μg/ml). The number of intact hair cells was counted by co-labeling with phalloidin and MyoVIIa. EGb prevented cisplatin-induced apoptosis in immunostaining and decreased caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase bands, which were increased in cisplatin-treated cells in Western blots. EGb prevented abnormal intracellular locations of connexin (Cx) 26, 30, 31, and 43 in cells treated with cisplatin and increased quantities of Cx bands. EGb also prevented cisplatin-induced disturbance of GJIC in SLDT. In oC explants, EGb significantly prevented hair cell damage induced by cisplatin. In animal studies, EGb significantly prevented cisplatin-induced hearing loss across 16 and 32 kHz. These results show that cisplatin induces ototoxicity including hearing loss as well as down-regulation of GJIC and inhibition of Cxs in auditory cells. EGb prevents hearing loss in cisplatin-treated rats by inhibiting down-regulation of Cx expression and GJIC. The disturbance of GJIC or Cx expression may be one of the important mechanisms of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:23583760

  6. 4D time-frequency representation for binaural speech signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhael, Raed; Szu, Harold H.

    2006-04-01

    Hearing is the ability to detect and process auditory information produced by the vibrating hair cilia residing in the corti of the ears to the auditory cortex of the brain via the auditory nerve. The primary and secondary corti of the brain interact with one another to distinguish and correlate the received information by distinguishing the varying spectrum of arriving frequencies. Binaural hearing is nature's way of employing the power inherent in working in pairs to process information, enhance sound perception, and reduce undesired noise. One ear might play a prominent role in sound recognition, while the other reinforces their perceived mutual information. Developing binaural hearing aid devices can be crucial in emulating the working powers of two ears and may be a step closer to significantly alleviating hearing loss of the inner ear. This can be accomplished by combining current speech research to already existing technologies such as RF communication between PDAs and Bluetooth. Ear Level Instrument (ELI) developed by Micro-tech Hearing Instruments and Starkey Laboratories is a good example of a digital bi-directional signal communicating between a PDA/mobile phone and Bluetooth. The agreement and disagreement of arriving auditory information to the Bluetooth device can be classified as sound and noise, respectively. Finding common features of arriving sound using a four coordinate system for sound analysis (four dimensional time-frequency representation), noise can be greatly reduced and hearing aids would become more efficient. Techniques developed by Szu within an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Blind Source Separation (BSS), Adaptive Wavelets Transform (AWT), and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) hold many possibilities to the improvement of acoustic segmentation of phoneme, all of which will be discussed in this paper. Transmitted and perceived acoustic speech signal will improve, as the binaural hearing aid will emulate two ears in sound

  7. Transcriptome Characterization by RNA-Seq Reveals the Involvement of the Complement Components in Noise-Traumatized Rat Cochleae

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minal; Hu, Zihua; Bard, Jonathan; Jamison, Jennifer; Cai, Qunfeng; Hu, Bo Hua

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic trauma, a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss in adults, induces a complex degenerative process in the cochlea. Although previous investigations have identified multiple stress pathways, a comprehensive analysis of cochlear responses to acoustic injury is still lacking. In the current study, we used the next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technique to sequence the whole transcriptome of the normal and noise-traumatized cochlear sensory epithelia (CSE). CSE tissues were collected from rat inner ears 1 d after the rats were exposed to a 120-dB (sound pressure level) noise for 2 h. The RNA-seq generated over 176 million sequence reads for the normal CSE and over 164 million reads for the noise-traumatized CSE. Alignment of these sequences with the rat Rn4 genome revealed the expression of over 17000 gene transcripts in the CSE, over 2000 of which were exclusively expressed in either the normal or noise-traumatized CSE. Seventy-eight gene transcripts were differentially expressed (70 upregulated and 8 downregulated) after acoustic trauma. Many of the differentially expressed genes are related to the innate immune system. Further expression analyses using qRT-PCR confirmed the constitutive expression of multiple complement genes in the normal organ of Corti and the changes in the expression levels of the complement factor I (Cfi) and complement component 1, s subcomponent (C1s) after acoustic trauma. Moreover, protein expression analysis revealed strong expression of Cfi and C1s proteins in the organ of Corti. Importantly, these proteins exhibited expression changes following acoustic trauma. Collectively, the results of the current investigation suggest the involvement of the complement components in cochlear responses to acoustic trauma. PMID:23727008

  8. Sox2 and Jagged1 Expression in Normal and Drug-Damaged Adult Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R.; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R.

    2007-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear. PMID:18157569

  9. Efficacy of three drugs for protecting against gentamicin-induced hair cell and hearing losses

    PubMed Central

    Bas, E; Van De Water, TR; Gupta, C; Dinh, J; Vu, L; Martínez-Soriano, F; Láinez, JM; Marco, J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Exposure to an ototoxic level of an aminoglycoside can result in hearing loss. In this we study investigated the otoprotective efficacy of dexamethasone (DXM), melatonin (MLT) and tacrolimus (TCR) in gentamicin (GM)-treated animals and cultures. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Wistar rats were divided into controls (treated with saline); exposed to GM only (GM); and three GM-exposed groups treated with either DXM, MLT or TCR. Auditory function and cochlear surface preparations were studied. In vitro studies of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels, the MAPK pathway and caspase-3 activation were performed in organ of Corti explants from 3-day-old rats. KEY RESULTS DXM, MLT and TCR decreased levels of reactive oxygen species in GM-exposed explants. The mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and TNF-receptor type 1 were significantly reduced in GM + DXM and GM + MLT groups. Phospho-p38 MAPK levels decreased in GM + MLT and GM + TCR groups, while JNK phosphorylation was reduced in GM + DXM and GM + MLT groups. Caspase-3 activation decreased in GM + DXM, GM + MLT and GM + TCR groups. These results were consistent with in vivo results. Local treatment of GM-exposed rat cochleae with either DXM, MLT or TCR preserved auditory function and prevented auditory hair cell loss. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In organ of Corti explants, GM increased oxidative stress and initiated an inflammatory response that led to the activation of MAPKs and apoptosis of hair cells. The three compounds tested demonstrated otoprotective properties that could be beneficial in the treatment of ototoxicity-induced hearing loss. PMID:22320124

  10. Noise alters hair-bundle mechanics at the cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strimbu, C. Elliott; Fridberger, Anders

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to loud sounds can lead to both permanent and short term changes in auditory sensitivity. Permanent hearing loss is often associated with gross changes in cochlear morphology including the loss of hair cells and auditory nerve fibers while the mechanisms of short term threshold shifts are much less well understood and may vary at different locations across the cochlea. Previous reports suggest that exposure to loud sounds leads to a decrease in the cochlear microphonic potential and in the stiffness of the organ of Corti. Because the cochlear microphonic reflects changes in the membrane potential of the hair cells, this suggests that hair-bundle motion should be reversibly altered following exposure to loud sounds. Using an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig temporal bone we investigate changes in the micro-mechanical response near the cochlear apex following a brief (up to 10 - 20 minutes) exposure to loud (˜ 120 dB) tones near the best frequency at this location. We use time-resolved confocal imaging to record the motion of outer hair cell bundles before and after acoustic overstimulation. We have also recorded larger-scale structural views of the organ of Corti before and after exposure to the loud sound. Conventional electrophysiological techniques are used measure the cochlear microphonic potential. As has been previously reported, following acoustic overexposure the cochlear microphonic declines in value and typically recovers on the order of 30 - 60 minutes. Hair-bundle trajectories are affected following the loud sound and typically recover on a somewhat faster time scale than the microphonic potential, although the results vary considerably across preparations. Preliminary results also suggest reversible changes in the hair cell's resting potential following the loud sound.

  11. The paracrine effect of mesenchymal human stem cells restored hearing in β-tubulin induced autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yoo, T J; Du, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the activities of hASCs (Human Adipose tissue Derived Stem Cells) on experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) and how human stem cells regenerated mouse cochlea cells. We have restored hearing in 19 years old white female with autoimmune hearing loss with autologous adipose tissue derived stem cells and we wish to understand the mechanism of restoration of hearing in animal model. BALB/c mice underwent to develop EAHL; mice with EAHL were given hASCs intraperitoneally once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. ABR were examined over time. The helper type 1 autoreactive responses and T-reg cells were examined. H&E staining or immunostaining with APC conjugated anti-HLA-ABC antibody were conducted. The organ of Corti, stria vascularis, spira ligament and spiral ganglion in stem cell group are normal. In control group, without receiving stem cells, the organ of Corti is replaced by a single layer of cells, atrophy of stria vascularis. Systemic infusion of hASCs significantly improved hearing function and protected hair cells in established EAHL. The hASCs decreased the proliferation of antigen specific Th1/Th17 cells and induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin10 in splenocytes. They also induced the generation of antigen specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T-reg cells. The experiment showed the restoration is due to the paracrine activities of human stem cells, since there are newly regenerated mice spiral ganglion cells, not human mesenchymal stem cells derived tissue given by intraperitoneally.

  12. Efficacy of three drugs for protecting against gentamicin-induced hair cell and hearing losses.

    PubMed

    Bas, E; Van De Water, T R; Gupta, C; Dinh, J; Vu, L; Martínez-Soriano, F; Láinez, J M; Marco, J

    2012-07-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Exposure to an ototoxic level of an aminoglycoside can result in hearing loss. In this we study investigated the otoprotective efficacy of dexamethasone (DXM), melatonin (MLT) and tacrolimus (TCR) in gentamicin (GM)-treated animals and cultures. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Wistar rats were divided into controls (treated with saline); exposed to GM only (GM); and three GM-exposed groups treated with either DXM, MLT or TCR. Auditory function and cochlear surface preparations were studied. In vitro studies of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels, the MAPK pathway and caspase-3 activation were performed in organ of Corti explants from 3-day-old rats. KEY RESULTS DXM, MLT and TCR decreased levels of reactive oxygen species in GM-exposed explants. The mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and TNF-receptor type 1 were significantly reduced in GM + DXM and GM + MLT groups. Phospho-p38 MAPK levels decreased in GM + MLT and GM + TCR groups, while JNK phosphorylation was reduced in GM + DXM and GM + MLT groups. Caspase-3 activation decreased in GM + DXM, GM + MLT and GM + TCR groups. These results were consistent with in vivo results. Local treatment of GM-exposed rat cochleae with either DXM, MLT or TCR preserved auditory function and prevented auditory hair cell loss. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In organ of Corti explants, GM increased oxidative stress and initiated an inflammatory response that led to the activation of MAPKs and apoptosis of hair cells. The three compounds tested demonstrated otoprotective properties that could be beneficial in the treatment of ototoxicity-induced hearing loss. PMID:22320124

  13. Intestinal helminths of golden jackals and red foxes from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Lahmar, Samia; Boufana, Belgees; Ben Boubaker, Sarra; Landolsi, Faouzi

    2014-08-29

    Forty wild canids including 31 golden jackals (Canis aureus Linné, 1758) and 9 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes Linné, 1758) collected between 2008 and 2011 in the northeast, northwest and center of Tunisia were necropsied and examined for intestinal helminth parasites. All jackals and foxes were found infected with a prevalence rate of 95% for cestodes, 82.5% for nematodes and 7.5% for acanthocephalans. A total of twelve helminth species were recorded in red foxes: cestodes, Dipylidium caninum (55.6%), Diplopylidium noelleri (55.6%), Mesocestoïdes lineatus (55.6%), Mesocestoïdes litteratus (33%), Mesocestoïdes corti (22%); nematodes, Ancylostoma caninum (11%), Uncinaria stenocephala (44%), Spirura rytipleurites (11%), Trichuris vulpis (33%), Pterygodermatites affinis (67%), Oxynema linstowi (33%) and the acanthocephalan Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (22%). The fifteen recovered helminth species in jackals were Echinococcus granulosus (9.7%), D. caninum (16%), D. noelleri (16%), M. lineatus (74%), M. litteratus (23%), M. corti (12.9%), Taenia pisiformis (3.2%), Taenia spp. (19%), Toxocara canis (16%), Toxascaris leonina (6.5%), A. caninum (9.7%), U. stenocephala (68%), P. affinis (6.5%), O. linstowi (3.2%) and Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (3.2%). This is the first report on the presence of P. affinis, D. noelleri and O. linstowi in Tunisia. E. granulosus was found in young jackals, aged less than 4 years old, with a higher abundance in females (8.9 worms). M. lineatus presented the highest mean intensity of 231.86 and 108.8 tapeworms respectively in jackals and foxes. Canids from the northwest region had the highest prevalence (77.5%) and highest intensity (243.7) of helminth species compared to those from the northeast and central areas. U. stenocephala and O. linstowi had the highest mean intensity for nematodes in both jackals and foxes at 14.3 and 88 worms respectively. PMID:24938826

  14. Involvement of Ubiquitin-Editing Protein A20 in Modulating Inflammation in Rat Cochlea Associated with Silver Nanoparticle-Induced CD68 Upregulation and TLR4 Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hao; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Zou, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were shown to temporarily impair the biological barriers in the skin of the external ear canal, mucosa of the middle ear, and inner ear, causing partially reversible hearing loss after delivery into the middle ear. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism, emphasizing the TLR signaling pathways in association with the potential recruitment of macrophages in the cochlea and the modulation of inflammation by ubiquitin-editing protein A20. Molecules potentially involved in these signaling pathways were thoroughly analysed using immunohistochemistry in the rat cochlea exposed to AgNPs at various concentrations through intratympanic injection. The results showed that 0.4 % AgNPs but not 0.02 % AgNPs upregulated the expressions of CD68, TLR4, MCP1, A20, and RNF11 in the strial basal cells, spiral ligament fibrocytes, and non-sensory supporting cells of Corti's organ. 0.4 % AgNPs had no effect on CD44, TLR2, MCP2, Rac1, myosin light chain, VCAM1, Erk1/2, JNK, p38, IL-1β, TNF-α, TNFR1, TNFR2, IL-10, or TGF-β. This study suggested that AgNPs might confer macrophage-like functions on the strial basal cells and spiral ligament fibrocytes and enhance the immune activities of non-sensory supporting cells of Corti's organ through the upregulation of CD68, which might be involved in TLR4 activation. A20 and RNF11 played roles in maintaining cochlear homeostasis via negative regulation of the expressions of inflammatory cytokines.

  15. Loss of the Tectorial Membrane Protein CEACAM16 Enhances Spontaneous, Stimulus-Frequency, and Transiently Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, Richard J.; Homma, Kazuaki; Legan, P. Kevin; Korchagina, Julia; Naskar, Souvik; Siegel, Jonathan H.; Dallos, Peter; Zheng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    α-Tectorin (TECTA), β-tectorin (TECTB), and carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 16 (CEACAM) are secreted glycoproteins that are present in the tectorial membrane (TM), an extracellular structure overlying the hearing organ of the inner ear, the organ of Corti. Previous studies have shown that TECTA and TECTB are both required for formation of the striated-sheet matrix within which collagen fibrils of the TM are imbedded and that CEACAM16 interacts with TECTA. To learn more about the structural and functional significance of CEACAM16, we created a Ceacam16-null mutant mouse. In the absence of CEACAM16, TECTB levels are reduced, a clearly defined striated-sheet matrix does not develop, and Hensen's stripe, a prominent feature in the basal two-thirds of the TM in WT mice, is absent. CEACAM16 is also shown to interact with TECTB, indicating that it may stabilize interactions between TECTA and TECTB. Although brain-stem evoked responses and distortion product otoacoustic emissions are, for most frequencies, normal in young mice lacking CEACAM16, stimulus-frequency and transiently evoked emissions are larger. We also observed spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in 70% of the homozygous mice. This incidence is remarkable considering that <3% of WT controls have SOAEs. The predominance of SOAEs >15 kHz correlates with the loss of Hensen's stripe. Results from mice lacking CEACAM16 are consistent with the idea that the organ of Corti evolved to maximize the gain of the cochlear amplifier while preventing large oscillations. Changes in TM structure appear to influence the balance between energy generation and dissipation such that the system becomes unstable. PMID:25080593

  16. The Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation and graphical 'load-line' analysis of ionic flow through outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, R

    1998-11-01

    While the 'membrane potential' of a cell which has a homogeneous membrane and surrounding environment, and which is not pumping ions electrogenically (passing no net current through its membranes), can be estimated from the Goldman voltage equation, this equation is inappropriate for other cells. In the mammalian cochlea such problematic cells include the cells of stria vascularis and the sensory hair cells of the organ of Corti. Not only is the Goldman voltage equation inappropriate, but in asymmetric cells the concept of a single 'membrane potential' is misleading: a different transmembrane voltage is required to define the electrical state of each section of the cell's heterogeneous membrane. This paper presents a graphical 'load-line analysis' of currents through one such asymmetric cell, the outer hair cells of the organ of Corti. The approach is extremely useful in discussing the effects of various cochlear manipulations on the electrical potential within hair cells, even without a detailed knowledge of their membrane conductance. The paper discusses how modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equations can be used to describe stretch-activated channels, voltage-controlled channels, ligand-mediated channels, and how the combination of these channels and the extracellular ionic concentrations should affect the hair cell's resting intracellular potential and resting transcellular current, its receptor current and receptor potential, and the extracellular microphonic potential around these cells. Two other issues discussed are the role of voltage-controlled channels in genetically determining membrane potential, and the insensitivity of hair cells to changes of extracellular potassium concentration under some conditions.

  17. Cockayne Syndrome Group B (Csb) and Group A (Csa) Deficiencies Predispose to Hearing Loss and Cochlear Hair Cell Degeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagtegaal, A. Paul; Rainey, Robert N.; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata M.C.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells in the cochlea, like most neuronal populations that are postmitotic, terminally differentiated, and non-regenerating, depend on robust mechanisms of self-renewal for lifelong survival. We report that hair cell homeostasis requires a specific sub-branch of the DNA damage nucleotide excision repair pathway, termed transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome (CS), caused by defects in TCR, is a rare DNA repair disorder with a broad clinical spectrum that includes sensorineural hearing loss. We tested hearing and analyzed the cellular integrity of the organ of Corti in two mouse models of this disease with mutations in the Csb gene (CSBm/m mice) and Csa gene (Csa−/− mice), respectively. Csbm/m and Csa−/− mice manifested progressive hearing loss, as measured by an increase in auditory brainstem response thresholds. In contrast to wild-type mice, mutant mice showed reduced or absent otoacoustic emissions, suggesting cochlear outer hair cell impairment. Hearing loss in Csbm/m and Csa−/− mice correlated with progressive hair cell loss in the base of the organ of Corti, starting between 6 and 13 weeks of age, which increased by 16 weeks of age in a basal-to-apical gradient, with outer hair cells more severely affected than inner hair cells. Our data indicate that the hearing loss observed in CS patients is reproduced in mouse models of this disease. We hypothesize that accumulating DNA damage, secondary to the loss of TCR, contributes to susceptibility to hearing loss. PMID:25762674

  18. Involvement of Ubiquitin-Editing Protein A20 in Modulating Inflammation in Rat Cochlea Associated with Silver Nanoparticle-Induced CD68 Upregulation and TLR4 Activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Zou, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were shown to temporarily impair the biological barriers in the skin of the external ear canal, mucosa of the middle ear, and inner ear, causing partially reversible hearing loss after delivery into the middle ear. The current study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanism, emphasizing the TLR signaling pathways in association with the potential recruitment of macrophages in the cochlea and the modulation of inflammation by ubiquitin-editing protein A20. Molecules potentially involved in these signaling pathways were thoroughly analysed using immunohistochemistry in the rat cochlea exposed to AgNPs at various concentrations through intratympanic injection. The results showed that 0.4 % AgNPs but not 0.02 % AgNPs upregulated the expressions of CD68, TLR4, MCP1, A20, and RNF11 in the strial basal cells, spiral ligament fibrocytes, and non-sensory supporting cells of Corti's organ. 0.4 % AgNPs had no effect on CD44, TLR2, MCP2, Rac1, myosin light chain, VCAM1, Erk1/2, JNK, p38, IL-1β, TNF-α, TNFR1, TNFR2, IL-10, or TGF-β. This study suggested that AgNPs might confer macrophage-like functions on the strial basal cells and spiral ligament fibrocytes and enhance the immune activities of non-sensory supporting cells of Corti's organ through the upregulation of CD68, which might be involved in TLR4 activation. A20 and RNF11 played roles in maintaining cochlear homeostasis via negative regulation of the expressions of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27142878

  19. Transcriptome characterization by RNA-Seq reveals the involvement of the complement components in noise-traumatized rat cochleae.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; Hu, Z; Bard, J; Jamison, J; Cai, Q; Hu, B H

    2013-09-17

    Acoustic trauma, a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss in adults, induces a complex degenerative process in the cochlea. Although previous investigations have identified multiple stress pathways, a comprehensive analysis of cochlear responses to acoustic injury is still lacking. In the current study, we used the next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) technique to sequence the whole transcriptome of the normal and noise-traumatized cochlear sensory epithelia (CSE). CSE tissues were collected from rat inner ears 1d after the rats were exposed to a 120-dB (sound pressure level) noise for 2 h. The RNA-Seq generated over 176 million sequence reads for the normal CSE and over 164 million reads for the noise-traumatized CSE. Alignment of these sequences with the rat Rn4 genome revealed the expression of over 17,000 gene transcripts in the CSE, over 2000 of which were exclusively expressed in either the normal or noise-traumatized CSE. Seventy-eight gene transcripts were differentially expressed (70 upregulated and 8 downregulated) after acoustic trauma. Many of the differentially expressed genes are related to the innate immune system. Further expression analyses using quantitative real time PCR confirmed the constitutive expression of multiple complement genes in the normal organ of Corti and the changes in the expression levels of the complement factor I (Cfi) and complement component 1, s subcomponent (C1s) after acoustic trauma. Moreover, protein expression analysis revealed strong expression of Cfi and C1s proteins in the organ of Corti. Importantly, these proteins exhibited expression changes following acoustic trauma. Collectively, the results of the current investigation suggest the involvement of the complement components in cochlear responses to acoustic trauma. PMID:23727008

  20. Intestinal helminths of golden jackals and red foxes from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Lahmar, Samia; Boufana, Belgees; Ben Boubaker, Sarra; Landolsi, Faouzi

    2014-08-29

    Forty wild canids including 31 golden jackals (Canis aureus Linné, 1758) and 9 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes Linné, 1758) collected between 2008 and 2011 in the northeast, northwest and center of Tunisia were necropsied and examined for intestinal helminth parasites. All jackals and foxes were found infected with a prevalence rate of 95% for cestodes, 82.5% for nematodes and 7.5% for acanthocephalans. A total of twelve helminth species were recorded in red foxes: cestodes, Dipylidium caninum (55.6%), Diplopylidium noelleri (55.6%), Mesocestoïdes lineatus (55.6%), Mesocestoïdes litteratus (33%), Mesocestoïdes corti (22%); nematodes, Ancylostoma caninum (11%), Uncinaria stenocephala (44%), Spirura rytipleurites (11%), Trichuris vulpis (33%), Pterygodermatites affinis (67%), Oxynema linstowi (33%) and the acanthocephalan Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (22%). The fifteen recovered helminth species in jackals were Echinococcus granulosus (9.7%), D. caninum (16%), D. noelleri (16%), M. lineatus (74%), M. litteratus (23%), M. corti (12.9%), Taenia pisiformis (3.2%), Taenia spp. (19%), Toxocara canis (16%), Toxascaris leonina (6.5%), A. caninum (9.7%), U. stenocephala (68%), P. affinis (6.5%), O. linstowi (3.2%) and Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (3.2%). This is the first report on the presence of P. affinis, D. noelleri and O. linstowi in Tunisia. E. granulosus was found in young jackals, aged less than 4 years old, with a higher abundance in females (8.9 worms). M. lineatus presented the highest mean intensity of 231.86 and 108.8 tapeworms respectively in jackals and foxes. Canids from the northwest region had the highest prevalence (77.5%) and highest intensity (243.7) of helminth species compared to those from the northeast and central areas. U. stenocephala and O. linstowi had the highest mean intensity for nematodes in both jackals and foxes at 14.3 and 88 worms respectively.

  1. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Denmark assessed by necropsy and concentration McMaster technique.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi-Storm, N; Mejer, H; Al-Sabi, M N S; Olsen, C S; Thamsborg, S M; Enemark, H L

    2015-12-15

    The large population of feral cats in Denmark may potentially transmit pathogens to household cats and zoonotic parasites to humans. A total of 99 euthanized cats; feral cats (n=92) and household cats with outdoor access (n=7), were collected from March to May 2014 from the Zealand region, Denmark. The sedimentation and counting technique (SCT) was used to isolate helminths and coproscopy was done by concentration McMaster technique (c-McMaster). Overall, 90.1% of the cats were infected and a total of 10 species were recorded by SCT: 5 nematode species: Toxocara cati (84.8%), Ollulanus tricuspis (13.1%), Aonchotheca putorii (7.1%), Paersonema spp. (3.0%), Strongyloides spp. (1.0%); 3 cestodes: Hydatigera taeniaeformis (36.4%), Mesocestoides sp. (3.0%), Dipylidium caninum (1.0%); and 2 trematodes: Cryptocotyle spp. (5.1%) and Pseudamphistomum truncatum (1.0%). O. tricuspis was the second most common gastrointestinal nematode of cats but had the highest intensity of infection. For T. cati, prevalence and worm burden were significantly higher in feral than household cats. No juvenile cats were infected with H. taeniaeformis, and age thus had a significant effect on prevalence and worm burdens of this species. Rural cats had a higher prevalence and worm burden of A. putorii than urban cats. By c-McMaster, ascarid, capillarid, strongylid or taeniid type eggs were found in 77.9% of the cats while Cystoisospora felis was found in 2.1%. The sensitivity of the c-McMaster was 82.5% for T. cati but 26.5% for taeniid eggs, using the SCT as gold standard. A positive correlation between faecal egg counts and worm burdens was seen for T. cati, but not for taeniid eggs (assumed to be H. taeniaeformis). Coprological examination also detected the eggs of extraintestinal Capillariidae species including Eucoleus aerophilus and Eucoleus boehmi, but further necropsy studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  2. Effect of short-term coyote removal on populations of coyote helminths.

    PubMed

    Henke, Scott E; Pence, Danny B; Bryant, Fred C

    2002-01-01

    Coyote (Canis latrans) removal programs often are initiated despite the potential population regulatory mechanism of parasitism with increased coyote density. We investigated the effect of intensive, short-term coyote removal on population levels of helminths in juvenile and adult coyotes from western Texas. Coyotes were killed by aerial gunning every 3 mo for 2 yr on two 5,000 ha areas, which reduced the overall coyote density of these areas by about 50%. Two other 5,000 ha areas were used as comparison sites where a limited number of coyotes were killed each season. Densities on comparison sites remained stable throughout the study at a mean +/- 1 SE of 0.14 +/- 0.01 coyotes/km2. Twelve helminth species consisting of seven nematodes (Ancylostoma caninum, Physaloptera rara, Toxascaris leonina, Dirofilaria immitis, Spirocerca lupi, Oslerus osleri, and Capillaria aerophila), three cestodes (Taenia pisiformis, Taenia multiceps, and Mesocestoides sp.), one acanthocephalan (Oncicola canis), and one trematode (Alaria marcianae) were found in 252 coyotes. Of these, A. caninum, P. rara, T. multiceps, T. pisiformis, T. leonina, and S. lupi were common species. Rank-transformed values for the mean abundances of A. caninum and T. multiceps and A. caninum, T. multiceps, and S. lupi were reduced in juvenile and adult coyotes, respectively, from the removal sites compared to respective helminth abundances in similar age class coyotes from comparison sites. Because A. caninum has been suggested as a population regulator of coyotes, a coyote removal program that results in a reduced density of coyotes and at the same time causes a reduced abundance of A. caninum, may in fact negate the regulatory effect that A. caninum has on coyote populations.

  3. A study on intestinal helminthes of dogs, foxes and jackals in the western part of Iran.

    PubMed

    Dalimi, A; Sattari, A; Motamedi, Gh

    2006-11-30

    Human infection especially with helminth parasites is an emerging health issue, as the human environment is increasingly shared with infected animals, either pets or wild life. In this survey, the intestinal content of 83 stray dogs, 22 red foxes and 10 golden Jackals collected from the West Azarbaijan, Kordestan and Kermanshah provinces in the west of Iran, were studied for the presence of helminth parasites. The percentage of different species recovered from these animals is listed as follows: From stray dogs: Toxocara canis (6.02%), Toxascaris leonina (32.53%), Ancylostoma caninum (3.61%), Oxynema sp. (1.35%), Rictularia affinis (12.05%), Taenia hydatigena (53.01%), Taenia ovis (7.23%), Taenia multiceps (4.82%), Echinococcus granulosus (13.25%), Dipylidium caninum (38.55%), Mesocestoides lineatus (26.50%) and Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (4.82%). From red foxes: T. canis (4.54%), T. leonina (31.82%), A. caninum (4.54%), Uncinaria stenocephala (13.64%), Oxynema sp. (9.09%), R. affinis (54.54%), Strongyloides sp. (4.54%), Physaloptera sp. (4.54%), T. hydatigena (9.09%), E. granulosus (4.54%), D. caninum (9.09%), M. lineatus (81.82%), Joyeuxiella pasqalei (27.27%), Diplopylidium nolleri (4.54%), M. hirudinaceus (22.72%) and Macracanthorhynchus sp. (9.09%). From golden jackals: T. canis (10%), T. leonina (30%), R. affinis (50%), T. hydatigena (10%), D. caninum (20%), M. lineatus (70%), J. pasqalei (30%.), Alaria canis (10%), M. hirudinaceus (30%) and Macracanthomynchus sp. (10%). PMID:16899340

  4. Gastrointestinal helminths of free-ranging Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) and the efficacy of the current anthelmintic treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Foster, Garry W; Cunningham, Mark W; Kinsella, John M; McLaughlin, Grace; Forrester, Donald J

    2006-04-01

    Thirty-five Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi [Bangs, 1899]) collected from six counties in southern Florida between 1978 and 2003 were examined at necropsy for gastrointestinal helminths. The panthers were placed into two groups: 1) treated with anthelmintics (n = 17), and 2) untreated (n = 18). Nine species of helminths (one trematode, six nematodes, and two cestodes) were identified in the untreated panthers. The most prevalent helminths were Alaria marcianae (LaRue, 1917) (100%), Spirometra mansonoides (Mueller, 1935) (91%), and Ancylostoma pluridentatum (Alessandrini, 1905) (89%). Ancylostoma caninum (Ercolani, 1859) is reported from the Florida panther for the first time. The intensities of helminths with prevalences >10% did not differ between untreated panthers collected in 1978-1983 and 1996-2003. Treated panthers had helminth faunas similar to those of untreated panthers. The current anthelmintic treatment being used reduced the intensity of both A. marcianae and A. pluridentatum in panthers < or =6 mo posttreatment (PT); however, treated panthers between 6 and 9 mo PT, and >9 mo PT were similar to untreated panthers. Treatment was less effective on S. mansonoides and Taenia omissa Lühe, 1910. Treated panthers had slightly lower intensities of S. mansonoides at < or =6 mo PT; however, between 6 and 9 mo PT and >9 mo PT they had significantly higher intensities than untreated panthers. At all periods PT, the intensity of T. omissa for the treated panthers was similar to that of untreated panthers. We suggest that Mesocestoides sp. may not be present in the Florida panther population as reported earlier by Forrester et al. (1985), due to parasite misidentification by those authors.

  5. Development of novel valerolactam-benzimidazole hybrids anthelmintic derivatives: Diffusion and biotransformation studies in helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Munguía, Beatriz; Michelena, Mauricio; Melian, Elisa; Saldaña, Jenny; Ures, Ximena; Manta, Eduardo; Domínguez, Laura

    2015-06-01

    In the search for new anthelmintics able to overcome the resistance problem against all available drugs in livestock, the synthesis of novel valerolactam-benzimidazole hybrid compounds was reported. This allowed us to obtain these in vitro and in vivo bioactive compounds using Nippostrongylus brasiliensis rat model by integrating physiology-based assays and ex vivo diffusion studies. In order to further study those novel hybrid molecules, Haemonchus contortus (a sheep gastrointestinal nematode of interest) and Mesocestoides vogae tetrathyridia (a useful system to study the efficacy of anthelmintic drugs against cestoda) were used as parasite models to compare the ex vivo patterns of diffusion and biotransformation of benzimidazoles and their valerolactam-benzimidazole hybrid derivatives. On average, a nine-fold higher intraparasitic concentration of compounds was found in M. vogae compared with H.contortus, with similarities regarding the order of entry of compounds, highlighting febendazole (FEB) and its hybrid compound 10, while valerolactam compound 2 practically did not penetrate the parasites. Interestingly, sulphoxidation drug metabolism was observed and measured, revealing percentages of oxidation of 8.2% and 14.5% for albendazole (ABZ) and febendazole respectively in M. vogae, while this effect was more relevant in H. contortus parasite. More importantly, significant differences were observed between anthelmintic-susceptible adult parasites (Hc S) and those from sheep farms (Hc U). In fact, the percentages of oxidation of FEB and the hybrid compound 8 were higher in Hc U (25.5%, 54.1%, respectively) than in Hc S (8.8%, 38.2%). Interestingly, sulphoxidation of hybrid compound 10 was neither observed in M. vogae nor in H. contortus parasites, suggesting that increased drug metabolism (oxidation reactions) could not be used by these parasites as a defense mechanism against this novel drug.

  6. A study on intestinal helminthes of dogs, foxes and jackals in the western part of Iran.

    PubMed

    Dalimi, A; Sattari, A; Motamedi, Gh

    2006-11-30

    Human infection especially with helminth parasites is an emerging health issue, as the human environment is increasingly shared with infected animals, either pets or wild life. In this survey, the intestinal content of 83 stray dogs, 22 red foxes and 10 golden Jackals collected from the West Azarbaijan, Kordestan and Kermanshah provinces in the west of Iran, were studied for the presence of helminth parasites. The percentage of different species recovered from these animals is listed as follows: From stray dogs: Toxocara canis (6.02%), Toxascaris leonina (32.53%), Ancylostoma caninum (3.61%), Oxynema sp. (1.35%), Rictularia affinis (12.05%), Taenia hydatigena (53.01%), Taenia ovis (7.23%), Taenia multiceps (4.82%), Echinococcus granulosus (13.25%), Dipylidium caninum (38.55%), Mesocestoides lineatus (26.50%) and Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (4.82%). From red foxes: T. canis (4.54%), T. leonina (31.82%), A. caninum (4.54%), Uncinaria stenocephala (13.64%), Oxynema sp. (9.09%), R. affinis (54.54%), Strongyloides sp. (4.54%), Physaloptera sp. (4.54%), T. hydatigena (9.09%), E. granulosus (4.54%), D. caninum (9.09%), M. lineatus (81.82%), Joyeuxiella pasqalei (27.27%), Diplopylidium nolleri (4.54%), M. hirudinaceus (22.72%) and Macracanthorhynchus sp. (9.09%). From golden jackals: T. canis (10%), T. leonina (30%), R. affinis (50%), T. hydatigena (10%), D. caninum (20%), M. lineatus (70%), J. pasqalei (30%.), Alaria canis (10%), M. hirudinaceus (30%) and Macracanthomynchus sp. (10%).

  7. Endoparasites of Stray Dogs in Mashhad, Khorasan Razavi Province, Northeast Iran with Special Reference to Zoonotic Parasites

    PubMed Central

    ADINEZADEH, Amir; KIA, Eshrat Beigom; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; SHOJAEE, Saideh; ROKNI, Mohammad Bagher; ZAREI, Zabihollah; MOWLAVI, Golamreza

    2013-01-01

    Background To find out different species of helminthes and blood/tissue protozoan parasites of stray dogs and their potential role for transmission of zoonotic species to human in Mashhad, Khorasan Razavi Province, northeast Iran, during 2008-2009. Methods Totally, 100 stray dogs were selected among Mashhad municipal collection from different sites of the city. Internal organs were examined for any parasites. Helminthes were identified based on morphological characteristics. Smears prepared from peripheral blood as well as liver, spleen and any skin lesion were stained by Giemsa and examined microscopically. Samples obtained from spleen were aseptically cultured in three culture media including NNN, Schneider's Drosophila (HIMEDIA) and RPMI1640 (GIBCO) for isolation of Leishmania spp. The titer of anti-Leishmania and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were measured by direct agglutination test (DAT) and indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), respectively. Results 84% of dogs were infected at least with one species of intestinal helminthes. The species of parasites and rate of infection were as follows: Taenia hydatigena (61%), Dipylidium caninum (46%), Mesocestoides lineatus (19%), Echinococcus granulosus (10%), Toxascaris leonina (53%) and Toxocara canis (7%). Anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected by DAT in 8 dogs (8%) at 1:320 titers and higher. Forty seven dogs (47%) showed anti-Toxoplasma titer at 1:10 and 17 (17%) showed titer of ≥1:100. No blood parasites were found in prepared blood smears. Conclusion The high rate of parasitic infection and presence of zoonotic species especially E. granulosus and T. canis emphasizes the risk of diseases spread in urban areas by stray dogs PMID:24454441

  8. The invasive New Guinea flatworm Platydemus manokwari in France, the first record for Europe: time for action is now

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Leigh; Gey, Delphine; Gros, Pierre; Thévenot, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Non-indigenous terrestrial flatworms (Platyhelminthes) have been recorded in thirteen European countries. They include Bipalium kewense and Dolichoplana striata that are largely restricted to hothouses and may be regarded as non-invasive species. In addition there are species from the southern hemisphere such as the invasive New Zealand flatworm Arthurdendyus triangulatus in the United Kingdom, Eire and the Faroe Islands, the Australian flatworm Australoplana sanguinea alba in Eire and the United Kingdom, and the Australian Blue Garden flatworm Caenoplana coerulea in France, Menorca and the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom has some twelve or more non-indigenous species most of which are Australian and New Zealand species. These species may move to an invasive stage when optimum environmental and other conditions occur, and the flatworms then have the potential to cause economic or environmental harm. In this paper, we report the identification (from morphology and molecular analysis of COI sequences) of non-indigenous terrestrial flatworms found in a hothouse in Caen (France) as the New Guinea flatworm Platydemus manokwari de Beauchamp, 1963 (Platyhelminthes, Continenticola, Geoplanidae, Rhynchodeminae). Platydemus manokwari is among the “100 World’s Worst Invader Alien Species”. Lists of World geographic records, prey in the field and prey in laboratories of P. manokwari are provided. This species is considered a threat to native snails wherever it is introduced. The recent discovery of P. manokwari in France represents a significant extension of distribution of this Invasive Alien Species from the Indo-Pacific region to Europe. If it escaped the hothouse, the flatworm might survive winters and become established in temperate countries. The existence of this species in France requires an early warning of this incursion to State and European Union authorities, followed by the eradication of the flatworm in its locality, tightening of internal quarantine

  9. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,0