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Sample records for mesoderm

  1. FGF signaling induces mesoderm in the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii.

    PubMed

    Green, Stephen A; Norris, Rachael P; Terasaki, Mark; Lowe, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    FGFs act in vertebrate mesoderm induction and also play key roles in early mesoderm formation in ascidians and amphioxus. However, in sea urchins initial characterizations of FGF function do not support a role in early mesoderm induction, making the ancestral roles of FGF signaling and mechanisms of mesoderm specification in deuterostomes unclear. In order to better characterize the evolution of mesoderm formation, we have examined the role of FGF signaling during mesoderm development in Saccoglossus kowalevskii, an experimentally tractable representative of hemichordates. We report the expression of an FGF ligand, fgf8/17/18, in ectoderm overlying sites of mesoderm specification within the archenteron endomesoderm. Embryological experiments demonstrate that mesoderm induction in the archenteron requires contact with ectoderm, and loss-of-function experiments indicate that both FGF ligand and receptor are necessary for mesoderm specification. fgf8/17/18 gain-of-function experiments establish that FGF8/17/18 is sufficient to induce mesoderm in adjacent endomesoderm. These experiments suggest that FGF signaling is necessary from the earliest stages of mesoderm specification and is required for all mesoderm development. Furthermore, they suggest that the archenteron is competent to form mesoderm or endoderm, and that FGF signaling from the ectoderm defines the location and amount of mesoderm. When considered in a comparative context, these data support a phylogenetically broad requirement for FGF8/17/18 signaling in mesoderm specification and suggest that FGF signaling played an ancestral role in deuterostome mesoderm formation.

  2. Mesoderm induction: from caps to chips.

    PubMed

    Kimelman, David

    2006-05-01

    Vertebrate mesoderm induction is one of the classical problems in developmental biology. Various developmental biology approaches, particularly in Xenopus and zebrafish, have identified many of the key factors that are involved in this process and have provided major insights into how these factors interact as part of a signalling and transcription-factor network. These data are beginning to be refined by high-throughput approaches such as microarray assays. Future challenges include understanding how the prospective mesodermal cells integrate the various signals they receive and how they resolve this information to regulate their morphogenetic behaviours and cell-fate decisions.

  3. Histogenesis of ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, T J

    1990-01-01

    The histogenesis of ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours, which includes the concept of metaplastic carcinoma, is controversial. Four such tumours were examined for evidence of metaplastic transition from carcinoma to sarcoma using morphology and reticulin stains. Consecutive sections were stained immunohistochemically using cytokeratin and vimentin to determine whether cells at the interface between carcinoma and sarcoma expressed both cytokeratin and vimentin. There was no evidence of morphological, architectural, or immunohistochemical transitions from carcinoma to sarcoma in the four tumours studied. This suggests that ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours are not metaplastic carcinomas but are composed of histogenetically different elements. Images PMID:2160478

  4. The origin of mesoderm in phoronids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Gary; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2002-01-01

    Descriptive studies of phoronid development have concluded that the mesoderm of these animals originates from the endoderm during gastrulation. This interpretation has been tested by labeling one blastomere of 4- through 16-cell embryos and examining the position and germ layers occupied by the labeled clones of cells in the larva. No 2 injections gave rise to identical clones of cells, suggesting that the cleavage program does not generate cells of unique identity and that cell fates are established at later developmental time points. In many cases, a relatively large sector composed of ectodermal cells was labeled. When these labeled cells were adjacent to the mouth or anus of the larva, muscle and mesenchyme cells originated from the labeled clones. Under these circumstances, nerve cells also originated from these labeled sectors. These labeling studies also showed that endodermal cells can give rise to mesodermal and neural cells. These results suggest that nerve and muscle cells are induced to form at ectodermal-endodermal boundaries from both germ layers. These marking experiments also confirmed the observation that nerve cells originate both from the apical organ and the trunk region and show for the first time that the intestine originates by ingression of posterior ectoderm.

  5. A role for the Drosophila neurogenic genes in mesoderm differentiation.

    PubMed

    Corbin, V; Michelson, A M; Abmayr, S M; Neel, V; Alcamo, E; Maniatis, T; Young, M W

    1991-10-18

    The neurogenic genes of Drosophila have long been known to regulate cell fate decisions in the developing ectoderm. In this paper we show that these genes also control mesoderm development. Embryonic cells that express the muscle-specific gene nautilus are overproduced in each of seven neurogenic mutants (Notch, Delta, Enhancer of split, big brain, mastermind, neuralized, and almondex), at the apparent expense of neighboring, nonexpressing mesodermal cells. The mesodermal defect does not appear to be a simple consequence of associated neural hypertrophy, suggesting that the neurogenic genes may function similarly and independently in establishing cell fates in both ectoderm and mesoderm. Altered patterns of beta 3-tubulin and myosin heavy chain gene expression in the mutants indicate a role for the neurogenic genes in development of most visceral and somatic muscles. We propose that the signal produced by the neurogenic genes is a general one, effective in both ectoderm and mesoderm.

  6. Insights from diploblasts; the evolution of mesoderm and muscle.

    PubMed

    Burton, Patrick Michael

    2008-01-15

    The origin of both mesoderm and muscle are central questions in metazoan evolution. The majority of metazoan phyla are triploblasts, possessing three discrete germ layers. Attention has therefore been focused on two outgroups to triploblasts, Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Modern texts describe these taxa as diploblasts, lacking a mesodermal germ layer. However, some members of Medusozoa, one of two subphyla within Cnidaria, possess tissue independent of either the ectoderm or endoderm referred to as the entocodon. Furthermore, members of both Cnidaria and Ctenophora have been described as possessing striated muscle, a mesodermal derivative. While it is widely accepted that the ancestor of Eumetazoa was diploblastic, homology of the entocodon and mesoderm as well as striated muscle within Eumetazoa has been suggested. This implies a potential triploblastic ancestor of Eumetazoa possessing striated muscle. In the following review, I examine the evidence for homology of both muscle and mesoderm. Current data support a diploblastic ancestor of cnidarians, ctenophores, and triploblasts lacking striated muscle.

  7. Mesoderm layer formation in Xenopus and Drosophila gastrulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winklbauer, Rudolf; Müller, H.-Arno J.

    2011-08-01

    During gastrulation, the mesoderm spreads out between ectoderm and endoderm to form a mesenchymal cell layer. Surprisingly the underlying principles of mesoderm layer formation are very similar in evolutionarily distant species like the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the frog, Xenopus laevis, in which the molecular and the cellular basis of mesoderm layer formation have been extensively studied. Complementary expression of growth factors in the ectoderm and their receptors in the mesoderm act to orient cellular protrusive activities and direct cell movement, leading to radial cell intercalation and the spreading of the mesoderm layer. This mechanism is contrasted with generic physical mechanisms of tissue spreading that consider the adhesive and physical properties of the cells and tissues. Both mechanisms need to be integrated to orchestrate mesenchymal morphogenesis.

  8. The early neural plate rules over the mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Tam, P

    2001-07-01

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Richard Harland and colleagues describe evidence that an inductive interaction between the neural plate and the paraxial mesoderm regulates somite development and somite size.

  9. Axial mesodermal dysplasia complex: a new case with parental consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Mota, C R; Azevedo, M; Rocha, G; Manuela, F; Coelho, R; Lima, M R

    2000-01-01

    A female is described with axial mesodermal dysplasia complex (AMDC) born to a consanguineous couple. This is thought to be the first description of a patient with AMDC born to consanguineous parents.

  10. Induction of dorsal mesoderm by soluble, mature Vg1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D S; Melton, D A

    1995-07-01

    Mesoderm induction during Xenopus development has been extensively studied, and two members of the transforming growth factor-beta family, activin beta B and Vg1, have emerged as candidates for a natural inducer of dorsal mesoderm. Heretofore, analysis of Vg1 activity has relied on injection of hybrid Vg1 mRNAs, which have not been shown to direct efficient secretion of ligand and, therefore, the mechanism of mesoderm induction by processed Vg1 protein is unclear. This report describes injection of Xenopus oocytes with a chimeric activin-Vg1 mRNA, encoding the pro-region of activin beta B fused to the mature region of Vg1, resulting in the processing and secretion of mature Vg1. Treatment of animal pole explants with mature Vg1 protein resulted in differentiation of dorsal, but not ventral, mesodermal tissues and dose-dependent activation of both dorsal and ventrolateral mesodermal markers. At high doses, mature Vg1 induced formation of 'embryoids' with a rudimentary axial pattern, head structures including eyes and a functional neuromuscular system. Furthermore, truncated forms of the activin and FGF receptors, which block mesoderm induction in the intact embryo, fully inhibited mature Vg1 activity. To examine the mechanism of inhibition, we have performed receptor-binding assays with radiolabeled Vg1. Finally, follistatin, a specific inhibitor of activin beta B which is shown not to block endogenous dorsal mesoderm induction, failed to inhibit Vg1. The results support a role for endogenous Vg1 in dorsal mesoderm induction during Xenopus development.

  11. Genetic Tagging During Human Mesoderm Differentiation Reveals Tripotent Lateral Plate Mesodermal Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Jia; Cooper, Aaron R; Lill, Georgia R; Evseenko, Denis; Zhu, Yuhua; He, Chong Bin; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Kohn, Donald B; Crooks, Gay M

    2016-05-01

    Although clonal studies of lineage potential have been extensively applied to organ specific stem and progenitor cells, much less is known about the clonal origins of lineages formed from the germ layers in early embryogenesis. We applied lentiviral tagging followed by vector integration site analysis (VISA) with high-throughput sequencing to investigate the ontogeny of the hematopoietic, endothelial and mesenchymal lineages as they emerge from human embryonic mesoderm. In contrast to studies that have used VISA to track differentiation of self-renewing stem cell clones that amplify significantly over time, we focused on a population of progenitor clones with limited self-renewal capability. Our analyses uncovered the critical influence of sampling on the interpretation of lentiviral tag sharing, particularly among complex populations with minimal clonal duplication. By applying a quantitative framework to estimate the degree of undersampling we revealed the existence of tripotent mesodermal progenitors derived from pluripotent stem cells, and the subsequent bifurcation of their differentiation into bipotent endothelial/hematopoietic or endothelial/mesenchymal progenitors. Stem Cells 2016;34:1239-1250.

  12. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Ho, Lena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Bruneau, B. G.

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also required to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.

  13. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; ...

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also requiredmore » to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.« less

  14. Movers and shakers: evolution and development of the mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Brad

    2008-01-15

    Groundbreaking research in a wide variety of organisms has begun to address fundamental questions regarding the evolutionary origin of mesoderm and how patterning of this emergent tissue layer has played a central role in the diversification of metazoan body plans. However, attempts to synthesize this growing body of research have been limited. To address this perceived gap, a symposium entitled "Movers and Shakers: The Evolution and Development of Mesoderm" was held at the 2006 Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology Conference in Orlando, Florida. The papers derived from this symposium cover a broad range of organisms and approaches. It was our intention that integration of the data and methodologies from these diverse research programs would generate new hypotheses and collaborative efforts to decipher fundamental questions of mesoderm development and evolution.

  15. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Payumo, Alexander Y.; McQuade, Lindsey E.; Walker, Whitney J.; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16/Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. The mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic, and we describe here the application of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identify 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that are expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis, and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observe that loss of Tbx16 function precociously activates posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene is sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  16. T-Box Genes in Drosophila Mesoderm Development.

    PubMed

    Reim, I; Frasch, M; Schaub, C

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila there are eight genes encoding transcription factors of the T-box family, which are known to exert a variety of crucial developmental functions during ectodermal patterning processes, neuronal cell specification, mesodermal tissue development, and the development of extraembryonic tissues. In this review, we focus on the prominent roles of Drosophila T-box genes in mesodermal tissues. First, we describe the contributions of brachyenteron (byn) and optomotor-blind-related-gene-1 (org-1) to the development of the visceral mesoderm. Second, we provide an overview on the functions of the three Dorsocross paralogs (Doc1-3) and the two Tbx20-related paralogs (midline and H15) during Drosophila heart development. Third, we portray the roles of org-1 and midline/H15 in the specification of individual body wall and organ-attached muscles, including the function of org-1 in the transdifferentiation of certain heart-attached muscles during metamorphosis. The functional analysis of these evolutionarily conserved T-box genes, along with their interactions with other types of transcription factors and various signaling pathways, has provided key insights into the regulation of Drosophila visceral mesoderm, muscle, and heart development.

  17. Mesodermal Wnt signaling organizes the neural plate via Meis3.

    PubMed

    Elkouby, Yaniv M; Elias, Sarah; Casey, Elena S; Blythe, Shelby A; Tsabar, Nir; Klein, Peter S; Root, Heather; Liu, Karen J; Frank, Dale

    2010-05-01

    In vertebrates, canonical Wnt signaling controls posterior neural cell lineage specification. Although Wnt signaling to the neural plate is sufficient for posterior identity, the source and timing of this activity remain uncertain. Furthermore, crucial molecular targets of this activity have not been defined. Here, we identify the endogenous Wnt activity and its role in controlling an essential downstream transcription factor, Meis3. Wnt3a is expressed in a specialized mesodermal domain, the paraxial dorsolateral mesoderm, which signals to overlying neuroectoderm. Loss of zygotic Wnt3a in this region does not alter mesoderm cell fates, but blocks Meis3 expression in the neuroectoderm, triggering the loss of posterior neural fates. Ectopic Meis3 protein expression is sufficient to rescue this phenotype. Moreover, Wnt3a induction of the posterior nervous system requires functional Meis3 in the neural plate. Using ChIP and promoter analysis, we show that Meis3 is a direct target of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. This suggests a new model for neural anteroposterior patterning, in which Wnt3a from the paraxial mesoderm induces posterior cell fates via direct activation of a crucial transcription factor in the overlying neural plate.

  18. Trunk exoskeleton in teleosts is mesodermal in origin

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsuko; Kawanishi, Toru; Kaneko, Takuya; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Yano, Tohru; Inohaya, Keiji; Kinoshita, Masato; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Koji; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate mineralized skeleton is known to have first emerged as an exoskeleton that extensively covered the fossil jawless fish. The evolutionary origin of this exoskeleton has long been attributed to the emergence of the neural crest, but experimental evaluation for this is still poor. Here we determine the embryonic origin of scales and fin rays of medaka (teleost trunk exoskeletons) by applying long-term cell labelling methods, and demonstrate that both tissues are mesodermal in origin. Neural crest cells, however, fail to contribute to these tissues. This result suggests that the trunk neural crest has no skeletogenic capability in fish, instead highlighting the dominant role of the mesoderm in the evolution of the trunk skeleton. This further implies that the role of the neural crest in skeletogenesis has been predominant in the cephalic region from the early stage of vertebrate evolution. PMID:23535660

  19. Mesodermal Pten inactivation leads to alveolar capillary dysplasia- like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Al Alam, Denise; Baptista, Sheryl; Danopoulos, Soula; Li, Aimin; Lavarreda-Pearce, Maria; Li, Changgong; De Langhe, Stijn; Chan, Belinda; Borok, Zea; Bellusci, Saverio; Minoo, Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) is a congenital, lethal disorder of the pulmonary vasculature. Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) encodes a lipid phosphatase controlling key cellular functions, including stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation; however, the role of PTEN in mesodermal lung cell lineage formation remains unexamined. To determine the role of mesodermal PTEN in the ontogeny of various mesenchymal cell lineages during lung development, we specifically deleted Pten in early embryonic lung mesenchyme in mice. Pups lacking Pten died at birth, with evidence of failure in blood oxygenation. Analysis at the cellular level showed defects in angioblast differentiation to endothelial cells and an accompanying accumulation of the angioblast cell population that was associated with disorganized capillary beds. We also found decreased expression of Forkhead box protein F1 (Foxf1), a gene associated with the ACD human phenotype. Analysis of human samples for ACD revealed a significant decrease in PTEN and increased activated protein kinase B (AKT). These studies demonstrate that mesodermal PTEN has a key role in controlling the amplification of angioblasts as well as their differentiation into endothelial cells, thereby directing the establishment of a functional gas exchange interface. Additionally, these mice could serve as a murine model of ACD.

  20. Myogenic cytodifferentiation of the precardiac mesoderm in the rat.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, H S; Jensen, K L; Solursh, M

    1991-08-01

    The contractile cells of the primitive heart are derived from a subpopulation of the lateral plate splanchnic mesoderm. While the formation of the cardiac primordia has been studied in the avian embryo, little is known about this cell population in the mammal. To investigate the distribution and cellular differentiation of the myocardial precursors in the early mammalian embryo, we studied the sequential immunohistochemical appearance of desmin and myosin in whole mounts of rat embryos from the presomite (gestational day 9) through the 6-8 somite, straight heart tube (gestational day 10) stages of early cardiac morphogenesis. In contrast to the chicken, and previous reports in the mouse, our results show that myogenic differentiation of the muscle precursor cells of the heart begins in the presomite embryo prior to formation of the anterior intestinal portal or foregut. In addition, this cell population of the precardiac mesoderm appears as a single crescent-shaped population of cells in continuity across the midline which extends caudally during development and then fuses in the midline to form the primitive heart tube. Unlike skeletal myogenesis, desmin and myosin appear simultaneously and are codistributed throughout this initial period of heart development. These results suggest that myocardial differentiation in the rat is precocious when compared to the chicken and precedes the morphogenetic processes involved in formation of the primitive heart tube. Furthermore, this study provides the first description in the mammal of the spatial distribution of the myogenic precardiac mesoderm.

  1. Mesoderm patterning and morphogenesis in the polychaete Alitta virens (Spiralia, Annelida): Expression of mesodermal markers Twist, Mox, Evx and functional role for MAP kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Vitaly V; Filimonova, Daria A; Kupriashova, Ekaterina E; Kostyuchenko, Roman P

    2016-05-01

    Mesoderm represents the evolutionary youngest germ layer and forms numerous novel tissues in bilaterian animals. Despite the established conservation of the gene regulatory networks that drive mesoderm differentiation (e.g. myogenesis), mechanisms of mesoderm specification are highly variable in distant model species. Thus, broader phylogenetic sampling is required to reveal common features of mesoderm formation across bilaterians. Here we focus on a representative of Spiralia, the marine annelid Alitta virens, whose mesoderm development is still poorly investigated on the molecular level. We characterize three novel early mesodermal markers for A. virens - Twist, Mox, and Evx - which are differentially expressed within the mesodermal lineages. The Twist mRNA is ubiquitously distributed in the fertilized egg and exhibits specific expression in endomesodermal- and ectomesodermal-founder cells at gastrulation. Twist is expressed around the blastopore and later in a segmental metameric pattern. We consider this expression to be ancestral, and in support of the enterocoelic hypothesis of mesoderm evolution. We also revealed an early pattern of the MAPK activation in A. virens that is different from the previously reported pattern in spiralians. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway by U0126 disrupts the metameric Twist and Mox expression, indicating an early requirement of the MAPK cascade for proper morphogenesis of endomesodermal tissues.

  2. Heterogeneity of Mesp1+ mesoderm revealed by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Chan, Howe H W; Kyba, Michael

    2016-06-03

    Mesp1 is a transcription factor that promotes differentiation of pluripotent cells into different mesoderm lineages including hematopoietic, cardiac and skeletal myogenic. This occurs via at least two transient cell populations: a common hematopoietic/cardiac progenitor population and a common cardiac/skeletal myogenic progenitor population. It is not established whether Mesp1-induced mesoderm cells are intrinsically heterogeneous, or are simply capable of multiple lineage decisions. In the current study, we applied single-cell RNA-seq to analyze Mesp1+ mesoderm. Initial whole transcriptome analysis showed a surprising homogeneity among Mesp1-induced mesoderm cells. However, this apparent global homogeneity masked an intrinsic heterogeneity revealed by interrogating a panel of early mesoderm patterning factors. This approach enabled discovery of subpopulations primed for hematopoietic or cardiac development. These studies demonstrate the heterogeneic nature of Mesp1+ mesoderm.

  3. The functional relationship between ectodermal and mesodermal segmentation in the crustacean, Parhyale hawaiensis.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Price, Alivia L; Patel, Nipam H

    2012-01-15

    In arthropods, annelids and chordates, segmentation of the body axis encompasses both ectodermal and mesodermal derivatives. In vertebrates, trunk mesoderm segments autonomously and induces segmental arrangement of the ectoderm-derived nervous system. In contrast, in the arthropod Drosophila melanogaster, the ectoderm segments autonomously and mesoderm segmentation is at least partially dependent on the ectoderm. While segmentation has been proposed to be a feature of the common ancestor of vertebrates and arthropods, considering vertebrates and Drosophila alone, it is impossible to conclude whether the ancestral primary segmented tissue was the ectoderm or the mesoderm. Furthermore, much of Drosophila segmentation occurs before gastrulation and thus may not accurately represent the mechanisms of segmentation in all arthropods. To better understand the relationship between segmented germ layers in arthropods, we asked whether segmentation is an intrinsic property of the ectoderm and/or the mesoderm in the crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis by ablating either the ectoderm or the mesoderm and then assaying for segmentation in the remaining tissue layer. We found that the ectoderm segments autonomously. However, mesoderm segmentation requires at least a permissive signal from the ectoderm. Although mesodermal stem cells undergo normal rounds of division in the absence of ectoderm, they do not migrate properly in respect to migration direction and distance. In addition, their progeny neither divide nor express the mesoderm segmentation markers Ph-twist and Ph-Even-skipped. As segmentation is ectoderm-dependent in both Parhyale and holometabola insects, we hypothesize that segmentation is primarily a property of the ectoderm in pancrustacea.

  4. FGF-stimulated outgrowth and proliferation of limb mesoderm is dependent on syndecan-3.

    PubMed

    Dealy, C N; Seghatoleslami, M R; Ferrari, D; Kosher, R A

    1997-04-15

    The outgrowth of the mesoderm of the developing limb bud in response to the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) is mediated at least in part by members of the FGF family. Recent studies have indicated that FGFs need to interact with heparan sulfate proteoglycans in order to bind to and activate their specific cell surface receptors. Syndecan-3 is an integral membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is highly expressed by the distal mesodermal cells of the chick limb bud that are undergoing proliferation and outgrowth in response to the AER. Here we report that maintenance of high-level syndecan-3 expression by the subridge mesoderm of the chick limb bud is directly or indirectly dependent on the AER, since its expression is severely impaired in the distal mesoderm of the limb buds of limbless and wingless mutant embryos which lack functional AERs capable of directing the outgrowth of limb mesoderm. We have also found that exogenous FGF-2 maintains a domain of high-level syndecan-3 expression in the outgrowing mesodermal cells of explants of the posterior mesoderm of normal limb buds cultured in the absence of the AER and in the outgrowing subapical mesoderm of explants of limbless mutant limb buds which lack a functional AER. These results suggest that the domain of high-level syndecan-3 expression in the subridge mesoderm of normal limb buds is maintained by FGFs produced by the AER. Finally, we report that polyclonal antibodies against a syndecan-3 fusion protein inhibit the ability of FGF-2 to promote the proliferation and outgrowth of the posterior subridge mesoderm of limb buds cultured in the absence of the AER. These results suggest that syndecan-3 plays an essential role in limb outgrowth by mediating the interaction of FGFs produced by the AER with the underlying mesoderm of the limb bud.

  5. Resolving Early Mesoderm Diversification through Single Cell Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicola K.; Macaulay, Iain C.; Marioni, John C.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Summary In mammals, specification of the three major germ layers occurs during gastrulation, when cells ingressing through the primitive streak differentiate into the precursor cells of major organ systems. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear, as numbers of gastrulating cells are very limited. In the E6.5 mouse embryo, cells located at the junction between the extra-embryonic region and the epiblast on the posterior side of the embryo undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and ingress through the primitive streak (PS). Subsequently, cells migrate, either surrounding the prospective ectoderm contributing to the embryo proper, or into the extra-embryonic region to form the yolk sac (YS), umbilical cord and placenta. Fate mapping has shown that mature tissues such as blood and heart originate from specific regions of the pre-gastrula epiblast1 but the plasticity of cells within the embryo and the function of key cell type-specific transcription factors remain unclear. Here we analyse 1,205 cells from the epiblast and nascent Flk1+ mesoderm of gastrulating mouse embryos using single cell RNA-sequencing, representing the first transcriptome-wide in vivo view of early mesoderm formation during mammalian gastrulation. Additionally, using knock-out mice, we study the function of Tal1, a key hematopoietic transcription factor (TF), and demonstrate, contrary to previous studies performed using retrospective assays2,3, that Tal1 knock out does not immediately bias precursor cells towards a cardiac fate. PMID:27383781

  6. Xwnt-8 modifies the character of mesoderm induced by bFGF in isolated Xenopus ectoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Christian, J L; Olson, D J; Moon, R T

    1992-01-01

    In Xenopus, growth factors of the TGF-beta, FGF and Wnt oncogene families have been proposed to play a role in generating embryonic pattern. In this paper we examine potential interactions between the bFGF and Xwnt-8 signaling pathways in the induction and dorsal-ventral patterning of mesoderm. Injection of Xwnt-8 mRNA into 2-cell Xenopus embryos does not induce mesoderm formation in animal cap ectoderm isolated from these embryos at the blastula stage, but alters the response of this tissue to mesoderm induction by bFGF. While animal cap explants isolated from non-injected embryos differentiate to form ventral types of mesoderm and muscle in response to bFGF, explants from Xwnt-8 injected embryos form dorsal mesodermal and neural tissues in response to the same concentration of bFGF, even if the ectoderm is isolated from the prospective ventral sides of embryos or from UV-ventralized animals. Our results support a model whereby dorso-ventral mesodermal patterning can be attained by a single mesoderm inducing agent, possibly bFGF, which is uniformly distributed across the prospective dorsal-ventral axis, and which acts in concert with a dorsally localized signal, possibly a Wnt protein, which either alters the response of ectoderm to induction or modifies the character of mesoderm after its induction. Images PMID:1740111

  7. An atlas of transcriptional, chromatin accessibility, and surface marker changes in human mesoderm development

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Pang Wei; Sinha, Rahul; Barkal, Amira A.; Morganti, Rachel M.; Chen, Angela; Weissman, Irving L.; Ang, Lay Teng; Kundaje, Anshul; Loh, Kyle M.

    2016-01-01

    Mesoderm is the developmental precursor to myriad human tissues including bone, heart, and skeletal muscle. Unravelling the molecular events through which these lineages become diversified from one another is integral to developmental biology and understanding changes in cellular fate. To this end, we developed an in vitro system to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells through primitive streak intermediates into paraxial mesoderm and its derivatives (somites, sclerotome, dermomyotome) and separately, into lateral mesoderm and its derivatives (cardiac mesoderm). Whole-population and single-cell analyses of these purified populations of human mesoderm lineages through RNA-seq, ATAC-seq, and high-throughput surface marker screens illustrated how transcriptional changes co-occur with changes in open chromatin and surface marker landscapes throughout human mesoderm development. This molecular atlas will facilitate study of human mesoderm development (which cannot be interrogated in vivo due to restrictions on human embryo studies) and provides a broad resource for the study of gene regulation in development at the single-cell level, knowledge that might one day be exploited for regenerative medicine. PMID:27996962

  8. Urodeles remove mesoderm from the superficial layer by subduction through a bilateral primitive streak.

    PubMed

    Shook, David R; Majer, Christina; Keller, Ray

    2002-08-15

    Urodeles begin gastrulation with much of their presumptive mesoderm in the superficial cell layer, all of which must move into the deep layers during development. We studied the morphogenesis of superficial mesoderm in the urodeles Ambystoma maculatum, Ambystoma mexicanum, and Taricha granulosa. In all three species, somitic, lateral, and ventral mesoderm move into the deep layer during gastrulation, ingressing through a "bilateral primitive streak" just inside the blastopore. The mesodermal epithelium appears to slide under the endodermal epithelium by a mechanism we term "subduction." Subduction removes the large expanse of superficial presumptive somitic and lateral-ventral mesoderm that initially separates the sub-blastoporal endoderm from the notochord, leaving the endoderm bounding the still epithelial notochord along the gastrocoel roof. Subduction may be a common feature of urodele gastrulation, differing in this regard from anurans. Subducting cells constrict their apices and become bottle-shaped as they approach the junction of the mesodermal and endodermal epithelia. Subducting bottle cells endocytose apical membrane and withdraw the tight junctional component cingulin from the contracting circumferential tight junctions. Either in conjunction with or immediately after subducting, the mesodermal cells undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The mechanism by which epithelial cells release their apical junctions to become mesenchymal, without disrupting the integrity of the epithelium, remains mysterious, but this system should prove useful in understanding this process in a developmental context.

  9. Mesodermal Nkx2.5 is necessary and sufficient for early second heart field development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Sultana, Nishat; Cai, Weibin; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Moon, Anne M; Cai, Chen-Leng

    2014-06-01

    The vertebrate heart develops from mesoderm and requires inductive signals secreted from early endoderm. During embryogenesis, Nkx2.5 acts as a key transcription factor and plays essential roles for heart formation from Drosophila to human. In mice, Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early first heart field, second heart field pharyngeal mesoderm, as well as pharyngeal endodermal cells underlying the second heart field. Currently, the specific requirements for Nkx2.5 in the endoderm versus mesoderm with regard to early heart formation are incompletely understood. Here, we performed tissue-specific deletion in mice to dissect the roles of Nkx2.5 in the pharyngeal endoderm and mesoderm. We found that heart development appeared normal after endodermal deletion of Nkx2.5 whereas mesodermal deletion engendered cardiac defects almost identical to those observed on Nkx2.5 null embryos (Nkx2.5(-/-)). Furthermore, re-expression of Nkx2.5 in the mesoderm rescued Nkx2.5(-/-) heart defects. Our findings reveal that Nkx2.5 in the mesoderm is essential while endodermal expression is dispensable for early heart formation in mammals.

  10. Mesodermal Nkx2.5 is necessary and sufficient for early second heart field development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Nomura-Kitabayashi, Aya; Sultana, Nishat; Cai, Weibin; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Moon, Anne M.; Cai, Chen-Leng

    2014-01-01

    Summary The vertebrate heart develops from mesoderm and requires inductive signals secreted from early endoderm. During embryogenesis, Nkx2.5 acts as a key transcription factor and plays essential roles for heart formation from Drosophila to human. In mice, Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early first heart field, second heart field pharyngeal mesoderm, as well as pharyngeal endodermal cells underlying the second heart field. Currently, the specific requirements for Nkx2.5 in the endoderm versus mesoderm with regard to early heart formation are incompletely understood. Here, we performed tissue-specific deletion in mice to dissect the roles of Nkx2.5 in the pharyngeal endoderm and mesoderm. We found that heart development appeared normal after endodermal deletion of Nkx2.5 whereas mesodermal deletion engendered cardiac defects almost identical to those observed on Nkx2.5 null embryos (Nkx2.5−/−). Furthermore, re-expression of Nkx2.5 in the mesoderm rescued Nkx2.5−/− heart defects. Our findings reveal that Nkx2.5 in the mesoderm is essential while endodermal expression is dispensable for early heart formation in mammals. PMID:24613616

  11. A type 1 serine/threonine kinase receptor that can dorsalize mesoderm in Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, D; Gurdon, J B

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned a type I serine/threonine kinase receptor, XTrR-I, from Xenopus. XTrR-I (Xenopus transforming growth factor beta-related receptor type I) is expressed in all regions of embryos throughout early development. Overexpression of this receptor does not affect ectoderm or endoderm but dorsalizes the mesoderm such that muscle appears in ventral mesoderm and notochord appears in lateral mesoderm normally fated to become muscle. In addition, overexpression of XTrR-I in UV-treated embryos is able to cause formation of a partial dorsal axis. These results suggest that XTrR-I encodes a receptor which responds in normal development to a transforming growth factor beta-like ligand so as to promote dorsalization. Its function would therefore be to direct mesodermalized tissue into muscle or notochord. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7604016

  12. Mapping the Pairwise Choices Leading from Pluripotency to Human Bone, Heart, and Other Mesoderm Cell Types.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kyle M; Chen, Angela; Koh, Pang Wei; Deng, Tianda Z; Sinha, Rahul; Tsai, Jonathan M; Barkal, Amira A; Shen, Kimberle Y; Jain, Rajan; Morganti, Rachel M; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B; George, Benson M; Wernig, Gerlinde; Salomon, Rachel E A; Chen, Zhenghao; Vogel, Hannes; Epstein, Jonathan A; Kundaje, Anshul; Talbot, William S; Beachy, Philip A; Ang, Lay Teng; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-07-14

    Stem-cell differentiation to desired lineages requires navigating alternating developmental paths that often lead to unwanted cell types. Hence, comprehensive developmental roadmaps are crucial to channel stem-cell differentiation toward desired fates. To this end, here, we map bifurcating lineage choices leading from pluripotency to 12 human mesodermal lineages, including bone, muscle, and heart. We defined the extrinsic signals controlling each binary lineage decision, enabling us to logically block differentiation toward unwanted fates and rapidly steer pluripotent stem cells toward 80%-99% pure human mesodermal lineages at most branchpoints. This strategy enabled the generation of human bone and heart progenitors that could engraft in respective in vivo models. Mapping stepwise chromatin and single-cell gene expression changes in mesoderm development uncovered somite segmentation, a previously unobservable human embryonic event transiently marked by HOPX expression. Collectively, this roadmap enables navigation of mesodermal development to produce transplantable human tissue progenitors and uncover developmental processes. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. The SCL gene specifies haemangioblast development from early mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Gering, M; Rodaway, A R; Göttgens, B; Patient, R K; Green, A R

    1998-01-01

    The SCL gene encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is essential for the development of all haematopoietic lineages. SCL is also expressed in endothelial cells, but its function is not essential for specification of endothelial progenitors and the role of SCL in endothelial development is obscure. We isolated the zebrafish SCL homologue and show that it was co-expressed in early mesoderm with markers of haematopoietic, endothelial and pronephric progenitors. Ectopic expression of SCL mRNA in zebrafish embryos resulted in overproduction of common haematopoietic and endothelial precursors, perturbation of vasculogenesis and concomitant loss of pronephric duct and somitic tissue. Notochord and neural tube formation were unaffected. These results provide the first evidence that SCL specifies formation of haemangioblasts, the proposed common precursor of blood and endothelial lineages. Our data also underline the striking similarities between the role of SCL in haematopoiesis/vasculogenesis and the function of other bHLH proteins in muscle and neural development. PMID:9670018

  14. Pharyngeal mesoderm regulatory network controls cardiac and head muscle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harel, Itamar; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Avraham, Roi; Rinon, Ariel; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Cross, Joe W; Leviatan, Noam; Hegesh, Julius; Roy, Achira; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Carvajal, Jaime; Tole, Shubha; Kioussi, Chrissa; Quaggin, Susan; Tzahor, Eldad

    2012-11-13

    The search for developmental mechanisms driving vertebrate organogenesis has paved the way toward a deeper understanding of birth defects. During embryogenesis, parts of the heart and craniofacial muscles arise from pharyngeal mesoderm (PM) progenitors. Here, we reveal a hierarchical regulatory network of a set of transcription factors expressed in the PM that initiates heart and craniofacial organogenesis. Genetic perturbation of this network in mice resulted in heart and craniofacial muscle defects, revealing robust cross-regulation between its members. We identified Lhx2 as a previously undescribed player during cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development. Lhx2 and Tcf21 genetically interact with Tbx1, the major determinant in the etiology of DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Furthermore, knockout of these genes in the mouse recapitulates specific cardiac features of this syndrome. We suggest that PM-derived cardiogenesis and myogenesis are network properties rather than properties specific to individual PM members. These findings shed new light on the developmental underpinnings of congenital defects.

  15. Pharyngeal mesoderm regulatory network controls cardiac and head muscle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Itamar; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Avraham, Roi; Rinon, Ariel; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Cross, Joe W.; Leviatan, Noam; Hegesh, Julius; Roy, Achira; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Carvajal, Jaime; Tole, Shubha; Kioussi, Chrissa; Quaggin, Susan; Tzahor, Eldad

    2012-01-01

    The search for developmental mechanisms driving vertebrate organogenesis has paved the way toward a deeper understanding of birth defects. During embryogenesis, parts of the heart and craniofacial muscles arise from pharyngeal mesoderm (PM) progenitors. Here, we reveal a hierarchical regulatory network of a set of transcription factors expressed in the PM that initiates heart and craniofacial organogenesis. Genetic perturbation of this network in mice resulted in heart and craniofacial muscle defects, revealing robust cross-regulation between its members. We identified Lhx2 as a previously undescribed player during cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development. Lhx2 and Tcf21 genetically interact with Tbx1, the major determinant in the etiology of DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Furthermore, knockout of these genes in the mouse recapitulates specific cardiac features of this syndrome. We suggest that PM-derived cardiogenesis and myogenesis are network properties rather than properties specific to individual PM members. These findings shed new light on the developmental underpinnings of congenital defects. PMID:23112163

  16. The significance of muscle cells for the origin of mesoderm in bilateria.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Reinhard M; Ladurner, Peter

    2003-02-01

    Muscle tissue may have played a central role in the early evolution of mesoderm. The first function of myocytes could have been to control swimming and gliding motion in ciliated vermiform organisms, as it still is in such present-day basal Bilateria as the Nemertodermatida. The only mesodermal cells between epidermis and gastrodermis in Nemertodermatida are myocytes, and conceivably the myocyte was, in fact, the original mesodermal cell type. In Nemertodermatida as well as the Acoela, myocytes are subepithelial fiber-type muscle cells and appear to originate from the gastrodermal epithelium by emigration of single cells. Other mesodermal cells in the acoels are the peripheral parenchyma (connective tissue) and tunica cells of the gonads, and these also arise from the gastrodermis. Musculature in many of the coelomate protostomes and deuterostomes, on the other hand, is in the form of epitheliomuscular (myoepithelial) cells, and this cell type may also have been an early form of the mesodermal myocyte. The mesodermal bands in the small annelid Polygordius and in juvenile enteropneusts have cells intermediate between mesenchymal and epithelial in their histological organization as they develop into myoepithelia. If acoelomates were derived from coelomates by progenesis, then the fiber-type muscles of acoelomates could be products of foreshortened differentiation of such tissue. The precise serial patterning of circular muscle cells along the anterior-posterior axis during embryonic development in the acoel Convoluta pulchra provides a model for early steps in the gradual evolution of segmentation from iterated organ systems.

  17. The expression pattern of Xenopus Mox-2 implies a role in initial mesodermal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Candia, A F; Wright, C V

    1995-07-01

    We have isolated a Xenopus homolog of the murine Mox-2 gene. As is the case for the mouse homolog, mesoderm specific expression of Xenopus Mox-2 (X. Mox-2) expression begins during gastrulation. Using whole mount in situ hybridization, we show that X. Mox-2 is expressed in undifferentiated dorsal, lateral and ventral mesoderm in the posterior of neurula/tailbud embryos, with expression more anteriorly detected in the dermatomes. In the tailbud tadpole, X. Mox-2 is expressed in tissues of the tailbud itself that represent a site of continued gastrulation-like processes resulting in mesoderm formation. X. Mox-2 is not expressed in the marginal zone of blastula, nor in the dorsal lip of gastrula, nor midline tissues (i.e. prospective notochord). Treatments that affect mesodermal patterning during embryonic development, including LiCl and ultraviolet light, and injection of mRNAs encoding BMP-4, or dominant negative activin and FGF receptors, produce changes in X. Mox-2 expression consistent with the types of tissues affected by these manipulations. X. Mox-2 expression is induced more in animal caps treated with FGF than those treated with activin. Together with the fact that X. Mox-2 activation in animal caps requires protein synthesis, our data suggest that X. Mox-2 is involved in initial mesodermal differentiation, downstream of molecules affecting mesoderm induction and determination such as Brachyury and goosecoid, and upstream of factors controlling terminal differentiation such as MyoD and myf5. X. Mox-2, therefore, is another useful marker for understanding the formation of mesoderm in amphibian development.

  18. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the Drosophila mesoderm requires the Rho GTP exchange factor Pebble.

    PubMed

    Smallhorn, Masha; Murray, Michael J; Saint, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Drosophila pebble (pbl) encodes a Rho-family GTP exchange factor (GEF) required for cytokinesis. The accumulation of high levels of PBL protein during interphase and the developmentally regulated expression of pbl in mesodermal tissues suggested that the primary cytokinetic mutant phenotype might be masking other roles. Using various muscle differentiation markers, we found that Even skipped (EVE) expression in the dorsal mesoderm is greatly reduced in pbl mutant embryos. EVE expression in the dorsalmost mesodermal cells is induced in response to DPP secreted by the dorsal epidermal cells. Further analysis revealed that this phenotype is likely to be a consequence of an earlier defect. pbl mutant mesodermal cells fail to undergo the normal epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and dorsal migration that follows ventral furrow formation. This phenotype is not a secondary consequence of failed cytokinesis, as it is rescued by a mutant form of pbl that does not rescue the cytokinetic defect. In wild-type embryos, newly invaginated cells at the lateral edges of the mesoderm extend numerous protrusions. In pbl mutant embryos, however, cells appear more tightly adhered to their neighbours and extend very few protrusions. Consistent with the dependence of the mesoderm EMT and cytokinesis on actin organisation, the GTP exchange function of the PBL RhoGEF is required for both processes. By contrast, the N-terminal BRCT domains of PBL are required only for the cytokinetic function of PBL. These studies reveal that a novel PBL-mediated intracellular signalling pathway operates in mesodermal cells during the transition from an epithelial to migratory mesenchymal morphology during gastrulation.

  19. HNF1(beta) is required for mesoderm induction in the Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed

    Vignali, R; Poggi, L; Madeddu, F; Barsacchi, G

    2000-04-01

    XHNF1(&bgr;) is a homeobox-containing gene initially expressed at the blastula stage in the vegetal part of the Xenopus embryo. We investigated its early role by functional ablation, through mRNA injection of an XHNF1(beta)/engrailed repressor fusion construct (XHNF1(beta)/EngR). Dorsal injections of XHNF1(beta)/EngR mRNA abolish dorsal mesoderm formation, leading to axial deficiencies; ventral injections disrupt ventral mesoderm formation without affecting axial development. XHNF1(beta)/EngR phenotypic effects specifically depend on the DNA-binding activity of its homeodomain and are fully rescued by coinjection of XHNF1(beta) mRNA. Vegetal injection of XHNF1(beta)/EngR mRNA blocks the mesoderm-inducing ability of vegetal explants. Both B-Vg1 and VegT maternal determinants trigger XHNF1(beta) expression in animal caps. XHNF1(beta)/EngR mRNA blocks B-Vg1-mediated, but not by eFGF-mediated, mesoderm induction in animals caps. However, wild-type XHNF1(beta) mRNA does not trigger Xbra expression in animal caps. We conclude that XHNF1(beta) function is essential, though not sufficient, for mesoderm induction in the Xenopus embryo.

  20. Mixed mesodermal and mesenchymal origin of myotomal muscles in pike (Esox lucius: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Kacperczyk, A; Daczewska, M

    2006-02-01

    During the myotomal myogenesis in pike (Esox lucius) two phases of muscle differentiation can be distinguished. In the first phase, the somite cells-derived stock, the primary myoblasts (of mesodermal origin), fuse to form multinucleate myotubes. Participation of myotomal cells of mesodermal origin is insufficient for further muscle development. In the second stage mesenchymal cells migrate, via myosepts, into the myotome between myotubes. Immunocytochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (marker of S phase of cell cycle) showed their mitotic activity. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that the differentiation of these cells depends on their position. Cells remaining in the myosepts develop into fibroblasts and produce collagen fibres, while those that have migrated into the myotomes transform into secondary myoblasts. Mesenchymal cells in the studied species are believed to participate in hypertrophy and hyperplasy of muscle fibres. Thus the muscle fibres in pike (E. lucius) are of mesodermal-mesenchymal origin.

  1. An essential role of even-skipped for homeotic gene expression in the Drosophila visceral mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Tremml, G; Bienz, M

    1989-01-01

    We have analysed homeotic gene expression in the embryonic visceral mesoderm of segmentation mutants by antibody staining against Ultrabithorax, Antennapedia and Sex combs reduced protein. We found that even-skipped (eve) function is crucially required for homeotic gene expression, whereas most other segmentation mutations have only minor effects on position and/or width of the homeotic expression domains in this germ layer. Analysis of pair-rule double mutants indicates that complete loss of homeotic gene activity in the visceral mesoderm, as observed in amorphic eve mutants, correlates with loss of engrailed (en) expression in the epidermis and loss of segmentation. We suggest that the establishment of parasegment borders, a consequence of eve expression and witnessed by subsequent en expression, is a necessary precondition for homeotic gene expression in the visceral mesoderm. Images PMID:2573527

  2. Mesp2: a novel mouse gene expressed in the presegmented mesoderm and essential for segmentation initiation.

    PubMed

    Saga, Y; Hata, N; Koseki, H; Taketo, M M

    1997-07-15

    We isolated a novel bHLH protein gene Mesp2 (for mesoderm posterior 2) that cross-hybridizes with Mesp1 expressed in the early mouse mesoderm. Mesp2 is expressed in the rostral presomitic mesoderm, but down-regulated immediately after the formation of the segmented somites. To determine the function of MesP2 protein (MesP2) in somitogenesis, we generated Mesp2-deficient mice by gene targeting. The homozygous Mesp2 (-/-) mice died shortly after birth and had fused vertebral columns and dorsal root ganglia, with impaired sclerotomal polarity. The earliest defect in the homozygous embryos was a lack of segmented somites. Their disruption of the metameric features, altered expression of Mox-1, Pax-1, and Dll1, and lack of expression of Notch1, Notch2, and FGFR1 suggested that MesP2 controls sclerotomal polarity by regulating the signaling systems mediated by notch-delta and FGF, which are essential for segmentation.

  3. Traffic jam in the primitive streak: the role of defective mesoderm migration in birth defects.

    PubMed

    Herion, Nils J; Salbaum, J Michael; Kappen, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    Gastrulation is the process in which the three germ layers are formed that contribute to the formation of all major tissues in the developing embryo. We here review mouse genetic models in which defective gastrulation leads to mesoderm insufficiencies in the embryo. Depending on severity of the abnormalities, the outcomes range from incompatible with embryonic survival to structural birth defects, such as heart defects, spina bifida, or caudal dysgenesis. The combined evidence from the mutant models supports the notion that these congenital anomalies can originate from perturbations of mesoderm specification, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and mesodermal cell migration. Knowledge about the molecular pathways involved may help to improve strategies for the prevention of major structural birth defects.

  4. FOXD3 AND GRG4 PHYSICALLY INTERACT TO REPRESS TRANSCRIPTION AND INDUCE MESODERM IN XENOPUS*

    PubMed Central

    Yaklichkin, Sergey; Steiner, Aaron B.; Lu, Qun; Kessler, Daniel S.

    2006-01-01

    FoxD3 is a forkhead-related transcriptional regulator that is essential for multiple developmental processes in the vertebrate embryo, including neural crest development and maintenance of mammalian stem cell lineages. Recent results demonstrate a requirement for FoxD3 in Xenopus mesodermal development. In the gastrula, FoxD3 functions as a transcriptional repressor in the Spemann organizer to maintain the expression of Nodal-related members of the TGFß superfamily that induce dorsal mesoderm formation. Here we report that the function of FoxD3 in mesoderm induction is dependent on the recruitment of transcriptional corepressors of the TLE/Groucho family. Structure-function analyses indicate that the transcriptional repression and mesoderm induction activities of FoxD3 are dependent on a C-terminal domain, as well as specific DNA-binding activity conferred by the forkhead domain. The C-terminal domain contains a heptapeptide similar to the eh1/GEH Groucho interaction motif. Deletion and point mutagenesis demonstrated that the FoxD3 eh1/GEH motif is required for both repression of transcription and induction of mesoderm, as well as the direct physical interaction of FoxD3 and Grg4 (Groucho-related gene-4). Consistent with a functional interaction of FoxD3 and Grg4, the transcriptional repression activity of FoxD3 is enhanced by Grg4, and reduced by Grg5, a dominant inhibitory Groucho protein. The results indicate that FoxD3 recruitment of Groucho corepressors is essential for the transcriptional repression of target genes and induction of mesoderm in Xenopus. PMID:17138566

  5. Endoderm/mesoderm multiplication rates in stage 5-12 chick embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenquist, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Multiplication rates for the endoderm/mesoderm layer of the head-process to 17-somite-stage chick embryo were studied by implanting essentially identical transplants labeled with tritiated thymidine into paired recipient embryos. One recipient was fixed as soon as the transplant had healed (after 30 min) and the other was reincubated an additional 3.5 to 22.5 hr; the ratios of labeled cells in the paired embryos provided points on a graph that indicated that doubling of endoderm/mesoderm cells in head-process-stage chick embryos occurs at approximately 4.0 and 17.2 hr of reincubation.

  6. Mesodermal Gene Expression in the Acoel Isodiametra pulchra Indicates a Low Number of Mesodermal Cell Types and the Endomesodermal Origin of the Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Chiodin, Marta; Børve, Aina; Berezikov, Eugene; Ladurner, Peter; Martinez, Pedro; Hejnol, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Acoelomorphs are bilaterally symmetric small marine worms that lack a coelom and possess a digestive system with a single opening. Two alternative phylogenetic positions of this group within the animal tree are currently debated. In one view, Acoelomorpha is the sister group to all remaining Bilateria and as such, is a morphologically simple stepping stone in bilaterian evolution. In the other, the group is a lineage within the Deuterostomia, and therefore, has derived a simple morphology from a more complex ancestor. Acoels and the closely related Nemertodermatida and Xenoturbellida, which together form the Acoelomorpha, possess a very limited number of cell types. To further investigate the diversity and origin of mesodermal cell types we describe the expression pattern of 12 orthologs of bilaterian mesodermal markers including Six1/2, Twist, FoxC, GATA4/5/6, in the acoel Isodiametra pulchra. All the genes are expressed in stem cells (neoblasts), gonads, and at least subsets of the acoel musculature. Most are expressed in endomesodermal compartments of I. pulchra developing embryos similar to what has been described in cnidarians. Our molecular evidence indicates a very limited number of mesodermal cell types and suggests an endomesodermal origin of the gonads and the stem cell system. We discuss our results in light of the two prevailing phylogenetic positions of Acoelomorpha. PMID:23405161

  7. Mesodermal Tbx1 is required for patterning the proximal mandible in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Carpenter, Courtney; Freyer, Laina; Liao, Jun; Petti, Marilena; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2010-01-01

    Defects in the lower jaw, or mandible, occur commonly either as isolated malformations or in association with genetic syndromes. Understanding its formation and genetic pathways required for shaping its structure in mammalian model organisms will shed light into the pathogenesis of malformations in humans. The lower jaw is derived from the mandibular process of the first pharyngeal arch (MdPA1) during embryogenesis. Integral to the development of the mandible, is the signaling interplay between Fgf8 and Bmp4 in the rostral ectoderm and their downstream effector genes in the underlying neural crest derived mesenchyme. The non-neural crest MdPA1 core mesoderm is needed to form muscles of mastication, but its role in patterning the mandible is unknown. Here, we show that mesoderm specific deletion of Tbx1, a T- box transcription factor and gene for velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, results in defects in formation of the proximal mandible by shifting expression of Fgf8, Bmp4 and their downstream effector genes in mouse embryos at E10.5. This occurs without significant changes in cell proliferation or apoptosis at the same stage. Our results elucidate a new function for the non-neural crest core mesoderm and specifically, mesodermal Tbx1, in shaping the lower jaw. PMID:20501333

  8. Early mesodermal expression of Hox genes in the polychaete Alitta virens (Annelida, Lophotrochozoa).

    PubMed

    Kulakova, Milana A; Bakalenko, Nadezhda I; Novikova, Elena L

    2017-01-01

    Hox genes are the key regulators of axial regionalization of bilaterian animals. However, their main function is fulfilled differently in the development of animals from different evolutionary branches. Early patterning of the developing embryos by Hox gene expression in the representatives of protostomes (arthropods, mollusks) starts in the ectodermal cells. On the contrary, the instructive role of the mesoderm in the axial patterning was demonstrated for vertebrates. This makes it difficult to understand if during the axial regionalization of ancestral bilaterians Hox genes first expressed in the developing mesoderm or the ectoderm. To resolve this question, it is necessary to expand the number of models for investigation of the early axial patterning. Here, we show that three Hox genes of the polychaete Alitta virens (formerly Nereis virens, Annelida, Lophotrochozoa)-Hox2, Hox4, and Lox5-are expressed in the mesodermal anlagen of the three future larval chaetigerous segments in spatially colinear manner before the initiation of Hox expression in the larval ectoderm. This is the first evidence of sequential Hox gene expression in the mesoderm of protostomes to date.

  9. Generation of an expandable intermediate mesoderm restricted progenitor cell line from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathan; Richter, Jenna; Cutts, Josh; Bush, Kevin T; Trujillo, Cleber; Nigam, Sanjay K; Gaasterland, Terry; Brafman, David; Willert, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering entered a new era with the development of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), which are capable of unlimited expansion whilst retaining the potential to differentiate into all mature cell populations. However, these cells harbor significant risks, including tumor formation upon transplantation. One way to mitigate this risk is to develop expandable progenitor cell populations with restricted differentiation potential. Here, we used a cellular microarray technology to identify a defined and optimized culture condition that supports the derivation and propagation of a cell population with mesodermal properties. This cell population, referred to as intermediate mesodermal progenitor (IMP) cells, is capable of unlimited expansion, lacks tumor formation potential, and, upon appropriate stimulation, readily acquires properties of a sub-population of kidney cells. Interestingly, IMP cells fail to differentiate into other mesodermally-derived tissues, including blood and heart, suggesting that these cells are restricted to an intermediate mesodermal fate. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08413.001 PMID:26554899

  10. Mesoderm is required for coordinated cell movements within zebrafish neural plate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis of the zebrafish neural tube requires the coordinated movement of many cells in both time and space. A good example of this is the movement of the cells in the zebrafish neural plate as they converge towards the dorsal midline before internalizing to form a neural keel. How these cells are regulated to ensure that they move together as a coherent tissue is unknown. Previous work in other systems has suggested that the underlying mesoderm may play a role in this process but this has not been shown directly in vivo. Results Here we analyze the roles of subjacent mesoderm in the coordination of neural cell movements during convergence of the zebrafish neural plate and neural keel formation. Live imaging demonstrates that the normal highly coordinated movements of neural plate cells are lost in the absence of underlying mesoderm and the movements of internalization and neural tube formation are severely disrupted. Despite this, neuroepithelial polarity develops in the abnormal neural primordium but the resulting tissue architecture is very disorganized. Conclusions We show that the movements of cells in the zebrafish neural plate are highly coordinated during the convergence and internalization movements of neurulation. Our results demonstrate that the underlying mesoderm is required for these coordinated cell movements in the zebrafish neural plate in vivo. PMID:24755297

  11. Limb-somite relationship: effect of removal of somitic mesoderm on the wing musculature.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, A; Kieny, M; Mauger, A

    1978-02-01

    The aim of this study is to test the ability of the intrinsic wing musculature to develop in the absence of somitic mesoderm. The experiments were performed on 2- to 2.5-day chick embryos either by replacing the somitic mesoderm adjacent to the wing field with a piece of 9-day chick embryonic midgut or by destroying, through local X-irradiation, not only the somitic mesoderm of the wing level, but also at least three somites (or presumptive somites) anterior and/or three presumptive somites posterior to the wing level. The replacemnt of somitic tissue scarcely affected the organogenesis of the forearm musculature, at least when both bones were present. In the other experiments, radio-destruction severely impaired the development of the forearm muscles, which were seldom all present and in most cases were entirely missing. The absence of a given muscle involves the simultaneous absence of the corresponding tendons. The possible origins of the muscles that formed despite the removal of the somitic mesoderm are discussed.

  12. How the sea squirt nucleus tells mesoderm Not to be endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Parton, Richard M.; Davis, Ilan

    2011-01-01

    Sea squirts are simple invertebrate chordates. In this issue, Takatori et al show nuclear migration within ascidian mesendodermal cells enables polarized localization of Not mRNA, which encodes a homeobox protein that distinguishes mesoderm from endoderm fates. The link between nuclear migration and mRNA localization suggests exciting parallels with protostomes. PMID:20951340

  13. Mesodermal retinoic acid signaling regulates endothelial cell coalescence in caudal pharyngeal arch artery vasculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Pashmforoush, Mohammad; Sucov, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of retinoic acid signaling causes a variety of pharyngeal arch artery and great vessel defects, as well as malformations in many other tissues, including those derived from the pharyngeal endoderm. Previous studies implied that arch artery defects in the context of defective RA signaling occur secondary to pharyngeal pouch segmentation defects, although this model has never been experimentally verified. In this study, we examined arch artery morphogenesis during mouse development, and the role of RA in this process. We show in normal embryos that the arch arteries form by vasculogenic differentiation of pharyngeal mesoderm. Using various genetic backgrounds and tissue-specific mutation approaches, we segregate pharyngeal arch artery and pharyngeal pouch defects in RA receptor mutants, and show that RA signal transduction only in pharyngeal mesoderm is required for arch artery formation. RA does not control pharyngeal mesodermal differentiation to endothelium, but instead promotes the aggregation of endothelial cells into nascent vessels. Expression of VE-cadherin was substantially reduced in RAR mutants, and this deficiency may underlie the arch artery defects. The consequences of disrupted mesodermal and endodermal RA signaling were restricted to the 4th and 6th arch arteries and to the 4th pharyngeal pouch, respectively, suggesting that different regulatory mechanisms control the formation of the more anterior arch arteries and pouches. PMID:22040871

  14. Two different network topologies yield bistability in models of mesoderm and anterior mesendoderm specification in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Brown, L E; King, J R; Loose, M

    2014-07-21

    Understanding the Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs) that underlie development is a major question for systems biology. The establishment of the germ layers is amongst the earliest events of development and has been characterised in numerous model systems. The establishment of the mesoderm is best characterised in the frog Xenopus laevis and has been well studied both experimentally and mathematically. However, the Xenopus network has significant differences from that in mouse and humans, including the presence of multiple copies of two key genes in the network, Mix and Nodal. The axolotl, a urodele amphibian, provides a model with all the benefits of amphibian embryology but crucially only a single Mix and Nodal gene required for the specification of the mesoderm. Remarkably, the number of genes within the network is not the only difference. The interaction between Mix and Brachyury, two transcription factors involved in the establishment of the endoderm and mesoderm respectively, is not conserved. While Mix represses Brachyury in Xenopus, it activates Brachyury in axolotl. Thus, whilst the topology of the networks in the two species differs, both are able to form mesoderm and endoderm in vivo. Based on current knowledge of the structure of the mesendoderm GRN we develop deterministic models that describe the time evolution of transcription factors in a single axolotl cell and compare numerical simulations with previous results from Xenopus. The models are shown to have stable steady states corresponding to mesoderm and anterior mesendoderm, with the in vitro model showing how the concentration of Activin can determine cell fate, while the in vivo model shows that β-catenin concentration can determine cell fate. Moreover, our analysis suggests that additional components must be important in the axolotl network in the specification of the full range of tissues.

  15. Axial elongation in mouse embryos involves mediolateral cell intercalation behavior in the paraxial mesoderm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, WeiWei; Burdsal, Carol; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sutherland, Ann E.

    2006-02-01

    The cell mechanical and signaling pathways involved in gastrulation have been studied extensively in invertebrates and amphibians, such as Xenopus, and more recently in non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish and chick. However, because culturing mouse embryos extra-utero is very difficult, this fundamental process has been least characterized in the mouse. As the primary mammalian model for genetics, biochemistry, and the study of human disease and birth defects, it is important to investigate how gastrulation proceeds in murine embryos. We have developed a method of using 4D multiphoton excitation microscopy and extra-utero culture to visualize and characterize the morphogenetic movements in mouse embryos dissected at 8.5 days of gestation. Cells are labeled by expression of an X chromosome-linked enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene. This method has provided a unique approach, where, for the first time, patterns of cell behavior in the notochord and surrounding paraxial mesoderm can be visualized and traced quantitatively. Our observations of mouse embryos reveal both distinct differences as well as striking similarities in patterned cell motility relative to other vertebrate models such as Xenopus, where axial extension is driven primarily by mediolateral oriented cell behaviors in the notochord and paraxial somitic mesoderm. Unlike Xenopus, the width of the mouse notochord remains the same between 4-somite stage and 8-somite stage embryos. This implies the mouse notochord plays a lesser role in driving axial extension compared to Xenopus, although intercalation may occur where the anterior region of the node becomes notochordal plate. In contrast, the width of mouse paraxial mesoderm narrows significantly during this period and cells within the paraxial mesoderm are both elongated and aligned perpendicular to the midline. In addition, these cells are observed to intercalate, consistent with a role for paraxial mesoderm in driving convergence

  16. Development of Bipotent Cardiac/Skeletal Myogenic Progenitors from MESP1+ Mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Hagen, Hannah R; Swanson, Scott A; Stewart, Ron; Boll, Karly A; Aho, Joy; Thomson, James A; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-12

    The branchiomeric skeletal muscles co-evolved with new chambers of the heart to enable predatory feeding in chordates. These co-evolved tissues develop from a common population in anterior splanchnic mesoderm, referred to as cardiopharyngeal mesoderm (CPM). The regulation and development of CPM are poorly understood. We describe an embryonic stem cell-based system in which MESP1 drives a PDGFRA+ population with dual cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation potential, and gene expression resembling CPM. Using this system, we investigate the regulation of these bipotent progenitors, and find that cardiac specification is governed by an antagonistic TGFβ-BMP axis, while skeletal muscle specification is enhanced by Rho kinase inhibition. We define transcriptional signatures of the first committed CPM-derived cardiac and skeletal myogenic progenitors, and discover surface markers to distinguish cardiac (PODXL+) from the skeletal muscle (CDH4+) CPM derivatives. These tools open an accessible window on this developmentally and evolutionarily important population.

  17. Qualitative Dynamical Modelling Can Formally Explain Mesoderm Specification and Predict Novel Developmental Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, E. Hilary; Ciglar, Lucia; Junion, Guillaume; Gonzalez, Aitor; Girardot, Charles; Perrin, Laurent; Furlong, Eileen E. M.; Thieffry, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Given the complexity of developmental networks, it is often difficult to predict the effect of genetic perturbations, even within coding genes. Regulatory factors generally have pleiotropic effects, exhibit partially redundant roles, and regulate highly interconnected pathways with ample cross-talk. Here, we delineate a logical model encompassing 48 components and 82 regulatory interactions involved in mesoderm specification during Drosophila development, thereby providing a formal integration of all available genetic information from the literature. The four main tissues derived from mesoderm correspond to alternative stable states. We demonstrate that the model can predict known mutant phenotypes and use it to systematically predict the effects of over 300 new, often non-intuitive, loss- and gain-of-function mutations, and combinations thereof. We further validated several novel predictions experimentally, thereby demonstrating the robustness of model. Logical modelling can thus contribute to formally explain and predict regulatory outcomes underlying cell fate decisions. PMID:27599298

  18. Mechanotransductive cascade of Myo-II-dependent mesoderm and endoderm invaginations in embryo gastrulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrossilis, Démosthène; Röper, Jens-Christian; Le Roy, Damien; Driquez, Benjamin; Michel, Aude; Ménager, Christine; Shaw, Gorky; Le Denmat, Simon; Ranno, Laurent; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Dempsey, Nora M.; Farge, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Animal development consists of a cascade of tissue differentiation and shape change. Associated mechanical signals regulate tissue differentiation. Here we demonstrate that endogenous mechanical cues also trigger biochemical pathways, generating the active morphogenetic movements shaping animal development through a mechanotransductive cascade of Myo-II medio-apical stabilization. To mimic physiological tissue deformation with a cell scale resolution, liposomes containing magnetic nanoparticles are injected into embryonic epithelia and submitted to time-variable forces generated by a linear array of micrometric soft magnets. Periodic magnetically induced deformations quantitatively phenocopy the soft mechanical endogenous snail-dependent apex pulsations, rescue the medio-apical accumulation of Rok, Myo-II and subsequent mesoderm invagination lacking in sna mutants, in a Fog-dependent mechanotransductive process. Mesoderm invagination then activates Myo-II apical accumulation, in a similar Fog-dependent mechanotransductive process, which in turn initiates endoderm invagination. This reveals the existence of a highly dynamic self-inductive cascade of mesoderm and endoderm invaginations, regulated by mechano-induced medio-apical stabilization of Myo-II.

  19. Serum response factor is essential for mesoderm formation during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arsenian, S; Weinhold, B; Oelgeschläger, M; Rüther, U; Nordheim, A

    1998-01-01

    The transcription factor serum response factor (SRF), a phylogenetically conserved nuclear protein, mediates the rapid transcriptional response to extracellular stimuli, e.g. growth and differentiation signals. DNA- protein complexes containing SRF or its homologues function as nuclear targets of the Ras/MAPK signalling network, thereby directing gene activities associated with processes as diverse as pheromone signalling, cell-cycle progression (transitions G0-G1 and G2-M), neuronal synaptic transmission and muscle cell differentiation. So far, the activity of mammalian SRF has been studied exclusively in cultured cells. To study SRF function in a multicellular organism we generated an Srf null allele in mice. SRF-deficient embryos (Srf -/-) have a severe gastrulation defect and do not develop to term. They consist of misfolded ectodermal and endodermal cell layers, do not form a primitive streak or any detectable mesodermal cells and fail to express the developmental marker genes Bra (T), Bmp-2/4 and Shh. Activation of the SRF-regulated immediate early genes Egr-1 and c-fos, as well as the alpha-Actin gene, is severely impaired. Our study identifies SRF as a new and essential regulator of mammalian mesoderm formation. We therefore suggest that in mammals Ras/MAPK signalling contributes to mesoderm induction, as is the case in amphibia. PMID:9799237

  20. Mechanotransductive cascade of Myo-II-dependent mesoderm and endoderm invaginations in embryo gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Mitrossilis, Démosthène; Röper, Jens-Christian; Le Roy, Damien; Driquez, Benjamin; Michel, Aude; Ménager, Christine; Shaw, Gorky; Le Denmat, Simon; Ranno, Laurent; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Dempsey, Nora M.; Farge, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Animal development consists of a cascade of tissue differentiation and shape change. Associated mechanical signals regulate tissue differentiation. Here we demonstrate that endogenous mechanical cues also trigger biochemical pathways, generating the active morphogenetic movements shaping animal development through a mechanotransductive cascade of Myo-II medio-apical stabilization. To mimic physiological tissue deformation with a cell scale resolution, liposomes containing magnetic nanoparticles are injected into embryonic epithelia and submitted to time-variable forces generated by a linear array of micrometric soft magnets. Periodic magnetically induced deformations quantitatively phenocopy the soft mechanical endogenous snail-dependent apex pulsations, rescue the medio-apical accumulation of Rok, Myo-II and subsequent mesoderm invagination lacking in sna mutants, in a Fog-dependent mechanotransductive process. Mesoderm invagination then activates Myo-II apical accumulation, in a similar Fog-dependent mechanotransductive process, which in turn initiates endoderm invagination. This reveals the existence of a highly dynamic self-inductive cascade of mesoderm and endoderm invaginations, regulated by mechano-induced medio-apical stabilization of Myo-II. PMID:28112149

  1. Mesodermal Pten inactivation leads to alveolar capillary dysplasia-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Al Alam, Denise; Baptista, Sheryl; Danopoulos, Soula; Li, Aimin; Lavarreda-Pearce, Maria; Li, Changgong; De Langhe, Stijn; Chan, Belinda; Borok, Zea; Bellusci, Saverio; Minoo, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) is a congenital, lethal disorder of the pulmonary vasculature. Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) encodes a lipid phosphatase controlling key cellular functions, including stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation; however, the role of PTEN in mesodermal lung cell lineage formation remains unexamined. To determine the role of mesodermal PTEN in the ontogeny of various mesenchymal cell lineages during lung development, we specifically deleted Pten in early embryonic lung mesenchyme in mice. Pups lacking Pten died at birth, with evidence of failure in blood oxygenation. Analysis at the cellular level showed defects in angioblast differentiation to endothelial cells and an accompanying accumulation of the angioblast cell population that was associated with disorganized capillary beds. We also found decreased expression of Forkhead box protein F1 (Foxf1), a gene associated with the ACD human phenotype. Analysis of human samples for ACD revealed a significant decrease in PTEN and increased activated protein kinase B (AKT). These studies demonstrate that mesodermal PTEN has a key role in controlling the amplification of angioblasts as well as their differentiation into endothelial cells, thereby directing the establishment of a functional gas exchange interface. Additionally, these mice could serve as a murine model of ACD. PMID:23023706

  2. Stochastic specification of primordial germ cells from mesoderm precursors in axolotl embryos

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield, Jodie; O'Reilly, Marie-Anne; Bachvarova, Rosemary F.; Ferjentsik, Zoltan; Redwood, Catherine; Walmsley, Maggie; Patient, Roger; Loose, Mathew; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    A common feature of development in most vertebrate models is the early segregation of the germ line from the soma. For example, in Xenopus and zebrafish embryos primordial germ cells (PGCs) are specified by germ plasm that is inherited from the egg; in mice, Blimp1 expression in the epiblast mediates the commitment of cells to the germ line. How these disparate mechanisms of PGC specification evolved is unknown. Here, in order to identify the ancestral mechanism of PGC specification in vertebrates, we studied PGC specification in embryos from the axolotl (Mexican salamander), a model for the tetrapod ancestor. In the axolotl, PGCs develop within mesoderm, and classic studies have reported their induction from primitive ectoderm (animal cap). We used an axolotl animal cap system to demonstrate that signalling through FGF and BMP4 induces PGCs. The role of FGF was then confirmed in vivo. We also showed PGC induction by Brachyury, in the presence of BMP4. These conditions induced pluripotent mesodermal precursors that give rise to a variety of somatic cell types, in addition to PGCs. Irreversible restriction of the germ line did not occur until the mid-tailbud stage, days after the somatic germ layers are established. Before this, germline potential was maintained by MAP kinase signalling. We propose that this stochastic mechanism of PGC specification, from mesodermal precursors, is conserved in vertebrates. PMID:24917499

  3. Folded gastrulation and T48 drive the evolution of coordinated mesoderm internalization in flies

    PubMed Central

    Urbansky, Silvia; González Avalos, Paula; Wosch, Maike; Lemke, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Gastrulation constitutes a fundamental yet diverse morphogenetic process of metazoan development. Modes of gastrulation range from stochastic translocation of individual cells to coordinated infolding of an epithelial sheet. How such morphogenetic differences are genetically encoded and whether they have provided specific developmental advantages is unclear. Here we identify two genes, folded gastrulation and t48, which in the evolution of fly gastrulation acted as a likely switch from an ingression of individual cells to the invagination of the blastoderm epithelium. Both genes are expressed and required for mesoderm invagination in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster but do not appear during mesoderm ingression of the midge Chironomus riparius. We demonstrate that early expression of either or both of these genes in C.riparius is sufficient to invoke mesoderm invagination similar to D.melanogaster. The possible genetic simplicity and a measurable increase in developmental robustness might explain repeated evolution of similar transitions in animal gastrulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18318.001 PMID:27685537

  4. Mechanism of cell fate choice between neural and mesodermal development during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2013-06-01

    During early embryogenesis, Sox2 expression distinguishes the neural plate from other embryonic domains, suggesting that the mechanism underlying the activation of the Sox2 gene is highly relevant to the development of this tissue. At the earliest stages of neural plate development, the Sox2 enhancer N1 regulates Sox2 expression in the extending posterior end of the neural plate. The N1 enhancer is initially activated in the axial stem cells, bipotential precursors of both neural and mesodermal lineages, therefore the activation does not immediately lead to Sox2 expression. A population of axial stem cells that remains in the superficial layer starts expressing Sox2, whereas another population that migrates through the primitive streak loses the N1 activity and becomes mesoderm. Multiple signaling cascades and transcription factors, including Wnt, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Tbx6, are responsible for the regulation of Sox2 expression in axial stem cells to guide the development of the posterior neural plate and paraxial mesoderm.

  5. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Shokri, Leila; Tansey, Terese R; Gamble, Caitlin E; Bulyk, Martha L; Michelson, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Homeodomain (HD) proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs) having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs), but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs)). Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs) for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin) as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory networks

  6. Differential and overlapping functions of two closely related Drosophila FGF8-like growth factors in mesoderm development.

    PubMed

    Klingseisen, Anna; Clark, Ivan B N; Gryzik, Tanja; Müller, H-Arno J

    2009-07-01

    Thisbe (Ths) and Pyramus (Pyr), two closely related Drosophila homologues of the vertebrate fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 8/17/18 subfamily, are ligands for the FGF receptor Heartless (Htl). Both ligands are required for mesoderm development, but their differential expression patterns suggest distinct functions during development. We generated single mutants and found that ths or pyr loss-of-function mutations are semi-lethal and mutants exhibit much weaker phenotypes as compared with loss of both ligands or htl. Thus, pyr and ths display partial redundancy in their requirement in embryogenesis and viability. Nevertheless, we find that pyr and ths single mutants display defects in gastrulation and mesoderm differentiation. We show that localised expression of pyr is required for normal cell protrusions and high levels of MAPK activation in migrating mesoderm cells. The results support the model that Pyr acts as an instructive cue for mesoderm migration during gastrulation. Consistent with this function, mutations in pyr affect the normal segmental number of cardioblasts. Furthermore, Pyr is essential for the specification of even-skipped-positive mesodermal precursors and Pyr and Ths are both required for the specification of a subset of somatic muscles. The results demonstrate both independent and overlapping functions of two FGF8 homologues in mesoderm morphogenesis and differentiation. We propose that the integration of Pyr and Ths function is required for robustness of Htl-dependent mesoderm spreading and differentiation, but that the functions of Pyr have become more specific, possibly representing an early stage of functional divergence after gene duplication of a common ancestor.

  7. Mesoderm-specific Stat3 deletion affects expression of Sox9 yielding Sox9-dependent phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael D.; Murray, Caroline A.; Perantoni, Alan O.

    2017-01-01

    To date, mutations within the coding region and translocations around the SOX9 gene both constitute the majority of genetic lesions underpinning human campomelic dysplasia (CD). While pathological coding-region mutations typically result in a non-functional SOX9 protein, little is known about what mechanism(s) controls normal SOX9 expression, and subsequently, which signaling pathways may be interrupted by alterations occurring around the SOX9 gene. Here, we report the identification of Stat3 as a key modulator of Sox9 expression in nascent cartilage and developing chondrocytes. Stat3 expression is predominant in tissues of mesodermal origin, and its conditional ablation using mesoderm-specific TCre, in vivo, causes dwarfism and skeletal defects characteristic of CD. Specifically, Stat3 loss results in the expansion of growth plate hypertrophic chondrocytes and deregulation of normal endochondral ossification in all bones examined. Conditional deletion of Stat3 with a Sox9Cre driver produces palate and tracheal irregularities similar to those described in Sox9+/- mice. Furthermore, mesodermal deletion of Stat3 causes global embryonic down regulation of Sox9 expression and function in vivo. Mechanistic experiments ex vivo suggest Stat3 can directly activate the expression of Sox9 by binding to its proximal promoter following activation. These findings illuminate a novel role for Stat3 in chondrocytes during skeletal development through modulation of a critical factor, Sox9. Importantly, they further provide the first evidence for the modulation of a gene product other than Sox9 itself which is capable of modeling pathological aspects of CD and underscore a potentially valuable therapeutic target for patients with the disorder. PMID:28166224

  8. Efficient differentiation of embryonic stem cells into mesodermal precursors by BMP, retinoic acid and Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Torres, Josema; Prieto, Javier; Durupt, Fabrice C; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M

    2012-01-01

    The ability to direct differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into specific lineages not only provides new insights into the pathways that regulate lineage selection but also has translational applications, for example in drug discovery. We set out to develop a method of differentiating ES cells into mesodermal cells at high efficiency without first having to induce embryoid body formation. ES cells were plated on a feeder layer of PA6 cells, which have membrane-associated stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA), the molecular basis of which is currently unknown. Stimulation of ES/PA6 co-cultures with Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4) both favoured self-renewal of ES cells and induced differentiation into a Desmin and Nestin double positive cell population. Combined stimulation with BMP4 and all-trans Retinoic Acid (RA) inhibited self-renewal and resulted in 90% of cells expressing Desmin and Nestin. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis confirmed that the cells were of mesodermal origin and expressed markers of mesenchymal and smooth muscle cells. BMP4 activation of a MAD-homolog (Smad)-dependent reporter in undifferentiated ES cells was attenuated by co-stimulation with RA and co-culture with PA6 cells. The Notch ligand Jag1 was expressed in PA6 cells and inhibition of Notch signalling blocked the differentiation inducing activity of PA6 cells. Our data suggest that mesodermal differentiation is regulated by the level of Smad activity as a result of inputs from BMP4, RA and the Notch pathway.

  9. Efficient Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells into Mesodermal Precursors by BMP, Retinoic Acid and Notch Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Josema; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to direct differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into specific lineages not only provides new insights into the pathways that regulate lineage selection but also has translational applications, for example in drug discovery. We set out to develop a method of differentiating ES cells into mesodermal cells at high efficiency without first having to induce embryoid body formation. ES cells were plated on a feeder layer of PA6 cells, which have membrane-associated stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA), the molecular basis of which is currently unknown. Stimulation of ES/PA6 co-cultures with Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4) both favoured self-renewal of ES cells and induced differentiation into a Desmin and Nestin double positive cell population. Combined stimulation with BMP4 and all-trans Retinoic Acid (RA) inhibited self-renewal and resulted in 90% of cells expressing Desmin and Nestin. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis confirmed that the cells were of mesodermal origin and expressed markers of mesenchymal and smooth muscle cells. BMP4 activation of a MAD-homolog (Smad)-dependent reporter in undifferentiated ES cells was attenuated by co-stimulation with RA and co-culture with PA6 cells. The Notch ligand Jag1 was expressed in PA6 cells and inhibition of Notch signalling blocked the differentiation inducing activity of PA6 cells. Our data suggest that mesodermal differentiation is regulated by the level of Smad activity as a result of inputs from BMP4, RA and the Notch pathway. PMID:22558462

  10. Development of the head and trunk mesoderm in the dogfish, Scyliorhinus torazame: II. Comparison of gene expression between the head mesoderm and somites with reference to the origin of the vertebrate head.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Noritaka; Takechi, Masaki; Hirai, Tamami; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate mesoderm differs distinctly between the head and trunk, and the evolutionary origin of the head mesoderm remains enigmatic. Although the presence of somite-like segmentation in the head mesoderm of model animals is generally denied at molecular developmental levels, the appearance of head cavities in elasmobranch embryos has not been explained, and the possibility that they may represent vestigial head somites once present in an amphioxus-like ancestor has not been ruled out entirely. To examine whether the head cavities in the shark embryo exhibit any molecular signatures reminiscent of trunk somites, we isolated several developmentally key genes, including Pax1, Pax3, Pax7, Pax9, Myf5, Sonic hedgehog, and Patched2, which are involved in myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation in somites, and Pitx2, Tbx1, and Engrailed2, which are related to the patterning of the head mesoderm, from an elasmobranch species, Scyliorhinus torazame. Observation of the expression patterns of these genes revealed that most were expressed in patterns that resembled those found in amniote embryos. In addition, the head cavities did not exhibit an overt similarity to somites; that is, the similarity was no greater than that of the unsegmented head mesoderm in other vertebrates. Moreover, the shark head mesoderm showed an amniote-like somatic/visceral distinction according to the expression of Pitx2, Tbx1, and Engrailed2. We conclude that the head cavities do not represent a manifestation of ancestral head somites; rather, they are more likely to represent a derived trait obtained in the lineage of gnathostomes.

  11. Differential mesodermal expression of two amphioxus MyoD family members (AmphiMRF1 and AmphiMRF2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Michael; Meulemans, Daniel; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne; Holland, Linda Z.; Holland, Nicholas D.

    2003-01-01

    To explore the evolution of myogenic regulatory factors in chordates, we isolated two MyoD family genes (AmphiMRF1 and AmphiMRF2) from amphioxus. AmphiMRF1 is first expressed at the late gastrula in the paraxial mesoderm. As the first somites form, expression is restricted to their myotomal region. In the early larva, expression is strongest in the most anterior and most posterior somites. AmphiMRF2 transcription begins at mid/late gastrula in the paraxial mesoderm, but never spreads into its most anterior region. Through much of the neurula stage, AmphiMRF2 expression is strong in the myotomal region of all somites except the most anterior pair; by late neurula expression is downregulated except in the most posterior somites forming just rostral to the tail bud. These two MRF genes of amphioxus have partly overlapping patterns of mesodermal expression and evidently duplicated independent of the diversification of the vertebrate MRF family.

  12. Repression of mesodermal fate by foxa, a key endoderm regulator of the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Paola; Walton, Katherine D; Davidson, Eric H; McClay, David R

    2006-11-01

    The foxa gene is an integral component of the endoderm specification subcircuit of the endomesoderm gene regulatory network in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Its transcripts become confined to veg2, then veg1 endodermal territories, and, following gastrulation, throughout the gut. It is also expressed in the stomodeal ectoderm. gatae and otx genes provide input into the pregastrular regulatory system of foxa, and Foxa represses its own transcription, resulting in an oscillatory temporal expression profile. Here, we report three separate essential functions of the foxa gene: it represses mesodermal fate in the veg2 endomesoderm; it is required in postgastrular development for the expression of gut-specific genes; and it is necessary for stomodaeum formation. If its expression is reduced by a morpholino, more endomesoderm cells become pigment and other mesenchymal cell types, less gut is specified, and the larva has no mouth. Experiments in which blastomere transplantation is combined with foxa MASO treatment demonstrate that, in the normal endoderm, a crucial role of Foxa is to repress gcm expression in response to a Notch signal, and hence to repress mesodermal fate. Chimeric recombination experiments in which veg2, veg1 or ectoderm cells contained foxa MASO show which region of foxa expression controls each of the three functions. These experiments show that the foxa gene is a component of three distinct embryonic gene regulatory networks.

  13. Mesodermal expression of the C. elegans HMX homolog mls-2 requires the PBC homolog CEH-20.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Amin, Nirav M; Sultan, Ibrahim; Liu, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan development proceeds primarily through the regulated expression of genes encoding transcription factors and components of cell signaling pathways. One way to decipher the complex developmental programs is to assemble the underlying gene regulatory networks by dissecting the cis-regulatory modules that direct temporal-spatial expression of developmental genes and identify corresponding trans-regulatory factors. Here, we focus on the regulation of a HMX homoebox gene called mls-2, which functions at the intersection of a network that regulates cleavage orientation, cell proliferation and fate specification in the Caenorhabditis elegans postembryonic mesoderm. In addition to its transient expression in the postembryonic mesodermal lineage, the M lineage, mls-2 expression is detected in a subset of embryonic cells, in three pairs of head neurons and transiently in the somatic gonad. Through mutational analysis of the mls-2 promoter, we identified two elements (E1 and E2) involved in regulating the temporal-spatial expression of mls-2. In particular, we showed that one of the elements (E1) required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage contains two critical putative PBC-Hox binding sites that are evolutionarily conserved in C. briggsae and C. remanei. Furthermore, the C. elegans PBC homolog CEH-20 is required for mls-2 expression in the M lineage. Our data suggest that mls-2 might be a direct target of CEH-20 in the M lineage and that the regulation of CEH-20 on mls-2 is likely Hox-independent.

  14. The splicing factor PQBP1 regulates mesodermal and neural development through FGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yasuno; Thomsen, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is an important means of regulating developmental processes, yet the molecular mechanisms governing alternative splicing in embryonic contexts are just beginning to emerge. Polyglutamine-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is an RNA-splicing factor that, when mutated, in humans causes Renpenning syndrome, an X-linked intellectual disability disease characterized by severe cognitive impairment, but also by physical defects that suggest PQBP1 has broader functions in embryonic development. Here, we reveal essential roles for PQBP1 and a binding partner, WBP11, in early development of Xenopus embryos. Both genes are expressed in the nascent mesoderm and neurectoderm, and morpholino knockdown of either causes defects in differentiation and morphogenesis of the mesoderm and neural plate. At the molecular level, knockdown of PQBP1 in Xenopus animal cap explants inhibits target gene induction by FGF but not by BMP, Nodal or Wnt ligands, and knockdown of either PQBP1 or WBP11 in embryos inhibits expression of fgf4 and FGF4-responsive cdx4 genes. Furthermore, PQBP1 knockdown changes the alternative splicing of FGF receptor-2 (FGFR2) transcripts, altering the incorporation of cassette exons that generate receptor variants (FGFR2 IIIb or IIIc) with different ligand specificities. Our findings may inform studies into the mechanisms underlying Renpenning syndrome. PMID:25209246

  15. Hand2 inhibits kidney specification while promoting vein formation within the posterior mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Perens, Elliot A; Garavito-Aguilar, Zayra V; Guio-Vega, Gina P; Peña, Karen T; Schindler, Yocheved L; Yelon, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Proper organogenesis depends upon defining the precise dimensions of organ progenitor territories. Kidney progenitors originate within the intermediate mesoderm (IM), but the pathways that set the boundaries of the IM are poorly understood. Here, we show that the bHLH transcription factor Hand2 limits the size of the embryonic kidney by restricting IM dimensions. The IM is expanded in zebrafish hand2 mutants and is diminished when hand2 is overexpressed. Within the posterior mesoderm, hand2 is expressed laterally adjacent to the IM. Venous progenitors arise between these two territories, and hand2 promotes venous development while inhibiting IM formation at this interface. Furthermore, hand2 and the co-expressed zinc-finger transcription factor osr1 have functionally antagonistic influences on kidney development. Together, our data suggest that hand2 functions in opposition to osr1 to balance the formation of kidney and vein progenitors by regulating cell fate decisions at the lateral boundary of the IM. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19941.001 PMID:27805568

  16. Nodal signaling is required for mesodermal and ventral but not for dorsal fates in the indirect developing hemichordate, Ptychodera flava

    PubMed Central

    Röttinger, Eric; DuBuc, Timothy Q.; Amiel, Aldine R.; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nodal signaling plays crucial roles in vertebrate developmental processes such as endoderm and mesoderm formation, and axial patterning events along the anteroposterior, dorsoventral and left-right axes. In echinoderms, Nodal plays an essential role in the establishment of the dorsoventral axis and left-right asymmetry, but not in endoderm or mesoderm induction. In protostomes, Nodal signaling appears to be involved only in establishing left-right asymmetry. Hence, it is hypothesized that Nodal signaling has been co-opted to pattern the dorsoventral axis of deuterostomes and for endoderm, mesoderm formation as well as anteroposterior patterning in chordates. Hemichordata, together with echinoderms, represent the sister taxon to chordates. In this study, we analyze the role of Nodal signaling in the indirect developing hemichordate Ptychodera flava. In particular, we show that during gastrulation nodal transcripts are detected in a ring of cells at the vegetal pole that gives rise to endomesoderm and in the ventral ectoderm at later stages of development. Inhibition of Nodal function disrupts dorsoventral fates and also blocks formation of the larval mesoderm. Interestingly, molecular analysis reveals that only mesodermal, apical and ventral gene expression is affected while the dorsal side appears to be patterned correctly. Taken together, this study suggests that the co-option of Nodal signaling in mesoderm formation and potentially in anteroposterior patterning has occurred prior to the emergence of chordates and that Nodal signaling on the ventral side is uncoupled from BMP signaling on the dorsal side, representing a major difference from the molecular mechanisms of dorsoventral patterning events in echinoderms. PMID:25979707

  17. Nodal signaling is required for mesodermal and ventral but not for dorsal fates in the indirect developing hemichordate, Ptychodera flava.

    PubMed

    Röttinger, Eric; DuBuc, Timothy Q; Amiel, Aldine R; Martindale, Mark Q

    2015-05-15

    Nodal signaling plays crucial roles in vertebrate developmental processes such as endoderm and mesoderm formation, and axial patterning events along the anteroposterior, dorsoventral and left-right axes. In echinoderms, Nodal plays an essential role in the establishment of the dorsoventral axis and left-right asymmetry, but not in endoderm or mesoderm induction. In protostomes, Nodal signaling appears to be involved only in establishing left-right asymmetry. Hence, it is hypothesized that Nodal signaling has been co-opted to pattern the dorsoventral axis of deuterostomes and for endoderm, mesoderm formation as well as anteroposterior patterning in chordates. Hemichordata, together with echinoderms, represent the sister taxon to chordates. In this study, we analyze the role of Nodal signaling in the indirect developing hemichordate Ptychodera flava. In particular, we show that during gastrulation nodal transcripts are detected in a ring of cells at the vegetal pole that gives rise to endomesoderm and in the ventral ectoderm at later stages of development. Inhibition of Nodal function disrupts dorsoventral fates and also blocks formation of the larval mesoderm. Interestingly, molecular analysis reveals that only mesodermal, apical and ventral gene expression is affected while the dorsal side appears to be patterned correctly. Taken together, this study suggests that the co-option of Nodal signaling in mesoderm formation and potentially in anteroposterior patterning has occurred prior to the emergence of chordates and that Nodal signaling on the ventral side is uncoupled from BMP signaling on the dorsal side, representing a major difference from the molecular mechanisms of dorsoventral patterning events in echinoderms.

  18. Sirenomelia in Bmp7 and Tsg compound mutant mice: requirement for Bmp signaling in the development of ventral posterior mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Zakin, Lise; Reversade, Bruno; Kuroda, Hiroki; Lyons, Karen M; De Robertis, Eddy M

    2005-05-01

    Sirenomelia or mermaid-like phenotype is one of the principal human congenital malformations that can be traced back to the stage of gastrulation. Sirenomelia is characterized by the fusion of the two hindlimbs into a single one. In the mouse, sirens have been observed in crosses between specific strains and as the consequence of mutations that increase retinoic acid levels. We report that the loss of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7) in combination with a half dose or complete loss of twisted gastrulation (Tsg) causes sirenomelia in the mouse. Tsg is a Bmp- and chordin-binding protein that has multiple effects on Bmp metabolism in the extracellular space; Bmp7 is one of many Bmps and is shown here to bind to Tsg. In Xenopus, co-injection of Tsg and Bmp7 morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) has a synergistic effect, greatly inhibiting formation of ventral mesoderm and ventral fin tissue. In the mouse, molecular marker studies indicate that the sirenomelia phenotype is associated with a defect in the formation of ventroposterior mesoderm. These experiments demonstrate that dorsoventral patterning of the mouse posterior mesoderm is regulated by Bmp signaling, as is the case in other vertebrates. Sirens result from a fusion of the hindlimb buds caused by a defect in the formation of ventral mesoderm.

  19. Ultrabithorax protein is necessary but not sufficient for full activation of decapentaplegic expression in the visceral mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B; Hursh, D A; Jackson, D; Beachy, P A

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms by which homeotic selector (HOM) genes specify the unique features of Drosophila segments, we have analyzed the regulation of decapentaplegic (dpp), a transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta superfamily member, and have found that the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) HOM protein directly activates dpp expression in parasegment 7 (PS7) of the embryonic visceral mesoderm. Other factors are also required, including one that appears to act through homeodomain protein binding sites and may be encoded by extradenticle (exd). The exd protein binds in a highly co-operative manner to regulatory sequences mediating PS7-specific dpp expression, consistent with a genetic requirement for exd function in normal visceral mesoderm expression of dpp. A second mechanism contributing to PS7 expression of dpp appears not to require Ubx protein directly, and involves a general visceral mesoderm enhancer coupled to a spatially specific repression element. Thus, even in an apparently simple case where visceral mesoderm expression of the dpp target gene mirrors that of the Ubx HOM protein, full activation by Ubx protein requires at least one additional factor. In addition, a distinct regulatory mode not directly involving Ubx protein also appears to contribute to PS7-specific expression. Images PMID:7859741

  20. Spatiotemporal Analysis of a Glycolytic Activity Gradient Linked to Mouse Embryo Mesoderm Development.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, Vinay; Prior, Nicole; Snaebjornsson, Marteinn T; Kuehne, Andreas; Sonnen, Katharina F; Kress, Jana; Stein, Frank; Schultz, Carsten; Sauer, Uwe; Aulehla, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    How metabolism is rewired during embryonic development is still largely unknown, as it remains a major technical challenge to resolve metabolic activities or metabolite levels with spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we investigated metabolic changes during development of organogenesis-stage mouse embryos, focusing on the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). We measured glycolytic labeling kinetics from (13)C-glucose tracing experiments and detected elevated glycolysis in the posterior, more undifferentiated PSM. We found evidence that the spatial metabolic differences are functionally relevant during PSM development. To enable real-time quantification of a glycolytic metabolite with spatiotemporal resolution, we generated a pyruvate FRET-sensor reporter mouse line. We revealed dynamic changes in cytosolic pyruvate levels as cells transit toward a more anterior PSM state. Combined, our approach identifies a gradient of glycolytic activity across the PSM, and we provide evidence that these spatiotemporal metabolic changes are intrinsically linked to PSM development and differentiation.

  1. Ectoderm-mesoderm crosstalk in the embryonic limb: The role of fibroblast growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Francesca V; Fernandez-Teran, Marian; Ros, Maria A

    2017-04-01

    In this commentary we focus on the function of FGFs during limb development and morphogenesis. Our goal is to understand, interpret and, when possible, reconcile the interesting findings and conflicting results that remain unexplained. For example, the cell death pattern observed after surgical removal of the AER versus genetic removal of the AER-Fgfs is strikingly different and the field is at an impasse with regard to an explanation. We also discuss the idea that AER function may involve signaling components in addition to the AER-FGFs and that signaling from the non-AER ectoderm may also have a significant contribution. We hope that a re-evaluation of current studies and a discussion of outstanding questions will motivate new experiments, especially considering the availability of new technologies, that will fuel further progress toward understanding the intricate ectoderm-to-mesoderm crosstalk during limb development. Developmental Dynamics 246:208-216, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. ProNodal acts via FGFR3 to govern duration of Shh expression in the prechordal mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Pamela S.; Burbridge, Sarah; Soubes, Sandrine; Ohyama, Kyoji; Ben-Haim, Nadav; Chen, Canhe; Dale, Kim; Shen, Michael M.; Constam, Daniel; Placzek, Marysia

    2015-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the prechordal mesoderm, where it plays a crucial role in induction and patterning of the ventral forebrain. Currently little is known about how Shh is regulated in prechordal tissue. Here we show that in the embryonic chick, Shh is expressed transiently in prechordal mesoderm, and is governed by unprocessed Nodal. Exposure of prechordal mesoderm microcultures to Nodal-conditioned medium, the Nodal inhibitor CerS, or to an ALK4/5/7 inhibitor reveals that Nodal is required to maintain both Shh and Gsc expression, but whereas Gsc is largely maintained through canonical signalling, Nodal signals through a non-canonical route to maintain Shh. Further, Shh expression can be maintained by a recombinant Nodal cleavage mutant, proNodal, but not by purified mature Nodal. A number of lines of evidence suggest that proNodal acts via FGFR3. ProNodal and FGFR3 co-immunoprecipitate and proNodal increases FGFR3 tyrosine phosphorylation. In microcultures, soluble FGFR3 abolishes Shh without affecting Gsc expression. Further, prechordal mesoderm cells in which Fgfr3 expression is reduced by Fgfr3 siRNA fail to bind to proNodal. Finally, targeted electroporation of Fgfr3 siRNA to prechordal mesoderm in vivo results in premature Shh downregulation without affecting Gsc. We report an inverse correlation between proNodal-FGFR3 signalling and pSmad1/5/8, and show that proNodal-FGFR3 signalling antagonises BMP-mediated pSmad1/5/8 signalling, which is poised to downregulate Shh. Our studies suggest that proNodal/FGFR3 signalling governs Shh duration by repressing canonical BMP signalling, and that local BMPs rapidly silence Shh once endogenous Nodal-FGFR3 signalling is downregulated. PMID:26417042

  3. Regulation of Drosophila mesoderm migration by phosphoinositides and the PH domain of the Rho GTP exchange factor Pebble.

    PubMed

    Murray, Michael J; Ng, Michelle M; Fraval, Hamilton; Tan, Julie; Liu, Wenjie; Smallhorn, Masha; Brill, Julie A; Field, Seth J; Saint, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The Drosophila RhoGEF Pebble (Pbl) is required for cytokinesis and migration of mesodermal cells. In a screen for genes that could suppress migration defects in pbl mutants we identified the phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PtdInsP) regulator pi5k59B. Genetic interaction tests with other PtdInsP regulators suggested that PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels are important for mesoderm migration when Pbl is depleted. Consistent with this, the leading front of migrating mesodermal cells was enriched for PtdIns(4,5)P2. Given that Pbl contains a Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain, a known PtdInsP-binding motif, we examined PtdInsP-binding of Pbl and the importance of the PH domain for Pbl function. In vitro lipid blot assays showed that Pbl binds promiscuously to PtdInsPs, with binding strength associated with the degree of phosphorylation. Pbl was also able to bind lipid vesicles containing PtdIns(4,5)P2 but binding was strongly reduced upon deletion of the PH domain. Similarly, in vivo, loss of the PH domain prevented localisation of Pbl to the cell cortex and severely affected several aspects of early mesoderm development, including flattening of the invaginated tube onto the ectoderm, extension of protrusions, and dorsal migration to form a monolayer. Pbl lacking the PH domain could still localise to the cytokinetic furrow, however, and cytokinesis failure was reduced in pbl(ΔPH) mutants. Taken together, our results support a model in which interaction of the PH-domain of Pbl with PtdIns(4,5)P2 helps localise it to the plasma membrane which is important for mesoderm migration.

  4. An FGF autocrine loop initiated in second heart field mesoderm regulates morphogenesis at the arterial pole of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eon Joo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Smyth, Graham; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Meyers, Erik; Klingensmith, John; Camenisch, Todd; Buckingham, Margaret; Moon, Anne M.

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand how secreted signals regulate complex morphogenetic events, it is crucial to identify their cellular targets. By conditional inactivation of Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 and overexpression of the FGF antagonist sprouty 2 in different cell types, we have dissected the role of FGF signaling during heart outflow tract development in mouse. Contrary to expectation, cardiac neural crest and endothelial cells are not primary paracrine targets. FGF signaling within second heart field mesoderm is required for remodeling of the outflow tract: when disrupted, outflow myocardium fails to produce extracellular matrix and TGFβ and BMP signals essential for endothelial cell transformation and invasion of cardiac neural crest. We conclude that an autocrine regulatory loop, initiated by the reception of FGF signals by the mesoderm, regulates correct morphogenesis at the arterial pole of the heart. These findings provide new insight into how FGF signaling regulates context-dependent cellular responses during development. PMID:18832392

  5. Knockout of the PKN Family of Rho Effector Kinases Reveals a Non-redundant Role for PKN2 in Developmental Mesoderm Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Quétier, Ivan; Marshall, Jacqueline J.T.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Lachmann, Sylvie; Casamassima, Adele; Franco, Claudio; Escuin, Sarah; Worrall, Joseph T.; Baskaran, Priththivika; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Howell, Michael; Copp, Andrew J.; Stamp, Gordon; Rosewell, Ian; Cutillas, Pedro; Gerhardt, Holger; Parker, Peter J.; Cameron, Angus J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In animals, the protein kinase C (PKC) family has expanded into diversely regulated subgroups, including the Rho family-responsive PKN kinases. Here, we describe knockouts of all three mouse PKN isoforms and reveal that PKN2 loss results in lethality at embryonic day 10 (E10), with associated cardiovascular and morphogenetic defects. The cardiovascular phenotype was not recapitulated by conditional deletion of PKN2 in endothelial cells or the developing heart. In contrast, inducible systemic deletion of PKN2 after E7 provoked collapse of the embryonic mesoderm. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which arise from the embryonic mesoderm, depend on PKN2 for proliferation and motility. These cellular defects are reflected in vivo as dependence on PKN2 for mesoderm proliferation and neural crest migration. We conclude that failure of the mesoderm to expand in the absence of PKN2 compromises cardiovascular integrity and development, resulting in lethality. PMID:26774483

  6. The contribution of Islet1-expressing splanchnic mesoderm cells to distinct branchiomeric muscles reveals significant heterogeneity in head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Elisha; Monovich, Amir; Tirosh-Finkel, Libbat; Harrelson, Zachary; Rousso, Tal; Rinon, Ariel; Harel, Itamar; Evans, Sylvia M; Tzahor, Eldad

    2008-02-01

    During embryogenesis, paraxial mesoderm cells contribute skeletal muscle progenitors, whereas cardiac progenitors originate in the lateral splanchnic mesoderm (SpM). Here we focus on a subset of the SpM that contributes to the anterior or secondary heart field (AHF/SHF), and lies adjacent to the cranial paraxial mesoderm (CPM), the precursors for the head musculature. Molecular analyses in chick embryos delineated the boundaries between the CPM, undifferentiated SpM progenitors of the AHF/SHF, and differentiating cardiac cells. We then revealed the regionalization of branchial arch mesoderm: CPM cells contribute to the proximal region of the myogenic core, which gives rise to the mandibular adductor muscle. SpM cells contribute to the myogenic cells in the distal region of the branchial arch that later form the intermandibular muscle. Gene expression analyses of these branchiomeric muscles in chick uncovered a distinct molecular signature for both CPM- and SpM-derived muscles. Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in the SpM/AHF and branchial arch in both chick and mouse embryos. Lineage studies using Isl1-Cre mice revealed the significant contribution of Isl1(+) cells to ventral/distal branchiomeric (stylohyoid, mylohyoid and digastric) and laryngeal muscles. By contrast, the Isl1 lineage contributes to mastication muscles (masseter, pterygoid and temporalis) to a lesser extent, with virtually no contribution to intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles or extraocular muscles. In addition, in vivo activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in chick embryos resulted in marked inhibition of Isl1, whereas inhibition of this pathway increased Isl1 expression. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the contribution of Isl1(+) SpM cells to a subset of branchiomeric skeletal muscles.

  7. Chordin forms a self-organizing morphogen gradient in the extracellular space between ectoderm and mesoderm in the Xenopus embryo

    PubMed Central

    Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; Zakin, Lise; Moriyama, Yuki; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate body plan follows stereotypical dorsal–ventral (D-V) tissue differentiation controlled by bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and secreted BMP antagonists, such as Chordin. The three germ layers—ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm—are affected coordinately by the Chordin–BMP morphogen system. However, extracellular morphogen gradients of endogenous proteins have not been directly visualized in vertebrate embryos to date. In this study, we improved immunolocalization methods in Xenopus embryos and analyzed the distribution of endogenous Chordin using a specific antibody. Chordin protein secreted by the dorsal Spemann organizer was found to diffuse along a narrow region that separates the ectoderm from the anterior endoderm and mesoderm. This Fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix is called “Brachet’s cleft” in the Xenopus gastrula and is present in all vertebrate embryos. Chordin protein formed a smooth gradient that encircled the embryo, reaching the ventral-most Brachet cleft. Depletion with morpholino oligos showed that this extracellular gradient was regulated by the Chordin protease Tolloid and its inhibitor Sizzled. The Chordin gradient, as well as the BMP signaling gradient, was self-regulating and, importantly, was able to rescale in dorsal half-embryos. Transplantation of Spemann organizer tissue showed that Chordin diffused over long distances along this signaling highway between the ectoderm and mesoderm. Chordin protein must reach very high concentrations in this narrow region. We suggest that as ectoderm and mesoderm undergo morphogenetic movements during gastrulation, cells in both germ layers read their positional information coordinately from a single morphogen gradient located in Brachet’s cleft. PMID:24284174

  8. Mesodermal cell displacements during avian gastrulation are due to both individual cell-autonomous and convective tissue movements.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Evan A; Czirók, András; Cui, Cheng; Little, Charles D; Rongish, Brenda J

    2006-12-26

    Gastrulation is a fundamental process in early development that results in the formation of three primary germ layers. During avian gastrulation, presumptive mesodermal cells in the dorsal epiblast ingress through a furrow called the primitive streak (PS), and subsequently move away from the PS and form adult tissues. The biophysical mechanisms driving mesodermal cell movements during gastrulation in amniotes, notably warm-blooded embryos, are not understood. Until now, a major challenge has been distinguishing local individual cell-autonomous (active) displacements from convective displacements caused by large-scale (bulk) morphogenetic tissue movements. To address this problem, we used multiscale, time-lapse microscopy and a particle image velocimetry method for computing tissue displacement fields. Immunolabeled fibronectin was used as an in situ marker for quantifying tissue displacements. By imaging fluorescently labeled mesodermal cells and surrounding extracellular matrix simultaneously, we were able to separate directly the active and passive components of cell displacement during gastrulation. Our results reveal the following: (i) Convective tissue motion contributes significantly to total cell displacement and must be subtracted to measure true cell-autonomous displacement; (ii) Cell-autonomous displacement decreases gradually after regression from the PS; and (iii) There is an increasing cranial-to-caudal (head-to-tail) cell-autonomous motility gradient, with caudal cells actively moving away from the PS faster than cranial cells. These studies show that, in some regions of the embryo, total mesodermal cell displacements are mostly due to convective tissue movements; thus, the data have profound implications for understanding cell guidance mechanisms and tissue morphogenesis in warm-blooded embryos.

  9. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  10. Ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumor with neuroectodermal differentiation: a multifaceted evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mott, Ryan T; Murphy, Bettina A; Geisinger, Kim R

    2010-05-01

    Malignant mixed mesodermal tumors (MMMTs) of the ovary are rare, highly aggressive neoplasms that arise most commonly in postmenopausal women. Histologically, they consist of a mixed population of malignant epithelial and mesenchymal elements. Neuroectodermal differentiation in ovarian MMMTs is exceedingly uncommon, with only a few case reports in the literature. We present a case of an ovarian MMMT with neuroectodermal differentiation in a 78-year-old female patient. Histologically, the tumor was composed of epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuroectodermal elements. The neuroectodermal component was predominantly that of a medulloepithelioma, with scattered areas displaying features of an anaplastic astrocytoma, including rare ganglion cell differentiation. The neuroectodermal component showed immunoreactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein, synaptophysin, and S100 protein. Ultrastructurally, the neuroectodermal component was populated by cells with irregular nuclei, finely dispersed chromatin, rudimentary cell junctions, and a delicate basement membrane, all of which have been described in medulloepitheliomas. DNA ploidy analysis was also performed on the various components of the tumor and compared with 3 additional cases of MMMT without neuroectodermal differentiation and 2 ovarian immature teratomas. Our findings suggest that the neuroectodermal component may arise from a separate clone or at least evolves at an earlier stage of tumor development.

  11. Tsukushi expression is dependent on Notch signaling and oscillated in the presomitic mesoderm during chick somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Uzzal Kumar; Gejima, Ryu; Felemban Athary Abdulhaleem, M; Riyadh, M Asrafuzzaman; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-09-25

    During somitogenesis, segmentation of the body axis occurs by epithelial somites budding off from the rostral end of the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM), and its molecular regulation is achieved by a molecular oscillator and signaling molecules. Tsukushi (TSK) is a unique secreted protein and involved in diverse biological cascades in vertebrate embryos by modulating several signaling pathways at the extracellular region. However, the involvement of TSK in somitogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the detailed expression patterns of TSK at different developmental stages of a chick embryo. Chick-TSK (C-TSK) is expressed in the PSM and shows an oscillation pattern with three phases. The oscillation pattern of C-TSK in the PSM is similar to that of c-Notch1 and c-hairy1, but not to c-Delta1. Our in vitro data showed that Notch signaling is necessary for the normal expression of C-TSK and that expression of C-TSK is an intrinsic property of the anterior PSM. These data suggest that TSK plays a role in chick somitogenesis.

  12. Transcription factor KLF7 regulates differentiation of neuroectodermal and mesodermal cell lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Esposito, Maria T.; Parisi, Silvia; Stifani, Stefano; Ramirez, Francesco; Porzio, Umberto di

    2010-08-15

    Previous gene targeting studies in mice have implicated the nuclear protein Krueppel-like factor 7 (KLF7) in nervous system development while cell culture assays have documented its involvement in cell cycle regulation. By employing short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene silencing, here we demonstrate that murine Klf7 gene expression is required for in vitro differentiation of neuroectodermal and mesodermal cells. Specifically, we show a correlation of Klf7 silencing with down-regulation of the neuronal marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and the nerve growth factor (NGF) tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA) using the PC12 neuronal cell line. Similarly, KLF7 inactivation in Klf7-null mice decreases the expression of the neurogenic marker brain lipid-binding protein/fatty acid-binding protein 7 (BLBP/FABP7) in neural stem cells (NSCs). We also report that Klf7 silencing is detrimental to neuronal and cardiomyocytic differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), in addition to altering the adipogenic and osteogenic potential of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Finally, our results suggest that genes that are key for self-renewal of undifferentiated ESCs repress Klf7 expression in ESCs. Together with previous findings, these results provide evidence that KLF7 has a broad spectrum of regulatory functions, which reflect the discrete cellular and molecular contexts in which this transcription factor operates.

  13. Reciprocal regulatory interactions between the Notch and Ras signaling pathways in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Ana; Buff, Eugene; Halfon, Marc S; Gisselbrecht, Stephen; Jiménez, Fernando; Baylies, Mary K; Michelson, Alan M

    2002-04-15

    Convergent intercellular signals must be precisely integrated in order to elicit specific biological responses. During specification of muscle and cardiac progenitors from clusters of equivalent cells in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm, the Ras/MAPK pathway--activated by both epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptors--functions as an inductive cellular determination signal, while lateral inhibition mediated by Notch antagonizes this activity. A critical balance between these signals must be achieved to enable one cell of an equivalence group to segregate as a progenitor while its neighbors assume a nonprogenitor identity. We have investigated whether these opposing signals directly interact with each other, and we have examined how they are integrated by the responding cells to specify their unique fates. Our findings reveal that Ras and Notch do not function independently; rather, we have uncovered several modes of cross-talk between these pathways. Ras induces Notch, its ligand Delta, and the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist, Argos. We show that Delta and Argos then synergize to nonautonomously block a positive autoregulatory feedback loop that amplifies a fate-inducing Ras signal. This feedback loop is characterized by Ras-mediated upregulation of proximal components of both the epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptor pathways. In turn, Notch activation in nonprogenitors induces its own expression and simultaneously suppresses both Delta and Argos levels, thereby reinforcing a unidirectional inhibitory response. These reciprocal interactions combine to generate the signal thresholds that are essential for proper specification of progenitors and nonprogenitors from groups of initially equivalent cells.

  14. Mesogenin 1 is a master regulator of paraxial presomitic mesoderm differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B; Garriock, Robert J; Dunty, William C; Kennedy, Mark W; Jailwala, Parthav; Si, Han; Yamaguchi, Terry P

    2014-11-01

    Neuromesodermal (NM) stem cells generate neural and paraxial presomitic mesoderm (PSM) cells, which are the respective progenitors of the spinal cord and musculoskeleton of the trunk and tail. The Wnt-regulated basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor mesogenin 1 (Msgn1) has been implicated as a cooperative regulator working in concert with T-box genes to control PSM formation in zebrafish, although the mechanism is unknown. We show here that, in mice, Msgn1 alone controls PSM differentiation by directly activating the transcriptional programs that define PSM identity, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, motility and segmentation. Forced expression of Msgn1 in NM stem cells in vivo reduced the contribution of their progeny to the neural tube, and dramatically expanded the unsegmented mesenchymal PSM while blocking somitogenesis and notochord differentiation. Expression of Msgn1 was sufficient to partially rescue PSM differentiation in Wnt3a(-/-) embryos, demonstrating that Msgn1 functions downstream of Wnt3a as the master regulator of PSM differentiation. Our data provide new insights into how cell fate decisions are imposed by the expression of a single transcriptional regulator.

  15. Advanced Mesodermal (Müllerian) Adenosarcoma of the Ovary: Metastases to the Lungs, Mouth, and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Daskalaki, A.; Xenaki, S.; Athanasakis, E.; Chrysos, E.; Chalkiadakis, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A malignant mixed Müllerian tumor (MMMT) is a malignant neoplasm found in the uterus, the ovaries, the fallopian tubes, and other parts of the body that contains both carcinomatous (epithelial tissue) and sarcomatous (connective tissue) components. Outcome of MMMTs is determined primarily by depth of invasion and stage. The metastatic background of these lesions is controversial and unknown. Case Report. A 75-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with anorexia, weakness, and persistent coughing. The imaging exams revealed a solid, promiscuous lesion of 16 × 14 cm in dimensions located into the small pelvis, surrounding the uterus and the ovaries. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy. The mass was removed and the histological examination of the specimen revealed an advanced mesodermal adenocarcinoma of the ovary (MMMT). Nine days after the operation the patient presented with metastatic lesions in the mouth as well as the lungs. Within a month after the discharge from the hospital metastatic lesions of the MMMT were also depicted in the CT brain scan. Conclusion. Despite the fact that sarcomas have a long-term metastatic potential, to our knowledge this is the first case of Müllerian adenosarcoma presenting with such extraperitoneal metastases. PMID:26844003

  16. Unexpected activities of Smad7 in Xenopus mesodermal and neural induction

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Irene; Rolo, Ana; Batut, Julie; Hill, Caroline; Stern, Claudio D.; Linker, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Neural induction is widely believed to be a direct consequence of inhibition of BMP pathways. Because of conflicting results and interpretations, we have reexamined this issue in Xenopus and chick embryos using the powerful and general TGFβ inhibitor, Smad7, which inhibits both Smad1- (BMP) and Smad2- (Nodal/Activin) mediated pathways. We confirm that Smad7 efficiently inhibits phosphorylation of Smad1 and Smad2. Surprisingly, however, over-expression of Smad7 in Xenopus ventral epidermis induces expression of the dorsal mesodermal markers Chordin and Brachyury. Neural markers are induced, but in a non-cell-autonomous manner and only when Chordin and Brachyury are also induced. Simultaneous inhibition of Smad1 and Smad2 by different approaches does not acount for Smad7 effects, indicating that Smad7 has activities other than inhibition of the TGFβ pathway. We provide evidence that these effects are independent of Wnt, FGF, Hedgehog and retinoid signalling. We also show that these effects are due to elements outside of the MH2 domain of Smad7. Together, these results indicate that BMP inhibition is not sufficient for neural induction even when Nodal/Activin is also blocked, and that Smad7 activity is considerably more complex than had previously been assumed. We suggest that experiments relying on Smad7 as an inhibitor of TGFβ-pathways should be interpreted with considerable caution. PMID:18359614

  17. A Wide Spectrum of Axial Mesodermal Dysplasia Complex With Rhombencephalic Anomaly: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang-Won; Seo, Jeoung-Hwan; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Won, Yu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Axial mesodermal dysplasia complex (AMDC) arises in variable combinations of craniocaudal anomalies such as musculoskeletal deformities, neuroschisis, or rhombencephalic developmental disorders. To the best of our knowledge, the co-existence of AMDC with associated musculoskeletal anomalies, medullary neuroschisis with mirror movements, and cranial nerve anomalies has not yet been reported. Here, we report the case of a 4-year-old boy whose clinical features were suggestive of Goldenhar syndrome and Poland syndrome with Sprengel deformity. Moreover, he showed mirror movements in his hands suspected of rhombencephalic malformation, and infranuclear-type facial nerve palsy of the left side of his face, the opposite side to the facial anomalies of Goldenhar syndrome. After conducting radiological studies, he was diagnosed with medullary neuroschisis without pontine malformations and Klippel-Feil syndrome with rib anomalies. Based on these findings, we propose that clinical AMDC can be accompanied by a wide variety of musculoskeletal defects and variable degrees of central nervous system malformations. Therefore, in addition to detailed physical and neurological examinations, imaging studies should be considered in AMDC. PMID:26949683

  18. Activation of Notch1 signaling in cardiogenic mesoderm induces abnormal heart morphogenesis in mouse.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Kokubo, Hiroki; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Endo, Maho; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Aisaki, Ken ichi; Kanno, Jun; Saga, Yumiko

    2006-05-01

    Notch signaling is implicated in many developmental processes. In our current study, we have employed a transgenic strategy to investigate the role of Notch signaling during cardiac development in the mouse. Cre recombinase-mediated Notch1 (NICD1) activation in the mesodermal cell lineage leads to abnormal heart morphogenesis, which is characterized by deformities of the ventricles and atrioventricular (AV) canal. The major defects observed include impaired ventricular myocardial differentiation, the ectopic appearance of cell masses in the AV cushion, the right-shifted interventricular septum (IVS) and impaired myocardium of the AV canal. However, the fates of the endocardium and myocardium were not disrupted in NICD1-activated hearts. One of the Notch target genes, Hesr1, was found to be strongly induced in both the ventricle and the AV canal of NICD1-activated hearts. However, a knockout of the Hesr1 gene from NICD-activated hearts rescues only the abnormality of the AV myocardium. We searched for additional possible targets of NICD1 activation by GeneChip analysis and found that Wnt2, Bmp6, jagged 1 and Tnni2 are strongly upregulated in NICD1-activated hearts, and that the activation of these genes was also observed in the absence of Hesr1. Our present study thus indicates that the Notch1 signaling pathway plays a suppressive role both in AV myocardial differentiation and the maturation of the ventricular myocardium.

  19. Scl binds to primed enhancers in mesoderm to regulate hematopoietic and cardiac fate divergence

    PubMed Central

    Org, Tõnis; Duan, Dan; Ferrari, Roberto; Montel-Hagen, Amelie; Van Handel, Ben; Kerényi, Marc A; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pellegrini, Matteo; Orkin, Stuart H; Kurdistani, Siavash K; Mikkola, Hanna KA

    2015-01-01

    Scl/Tal1 confers hemogenic competence and prevents ectopic cardiomyogenesis in embryonic endothelium by unknown mechanisms. We discovered that Scl binds to hematopoietic and cardiac enhancers that become epigenetically primed in multipotent cardiovascular mesoderm, to regulate the divergence of hematopoietic and cardiac lineages. Scl does not act as a pioneer factor but rather exploits a pre-established epigenetic landscape. As the blood lineage emerges, Scl binding and active epigenetic modifications are sustained in hematopoietic enhancers, whereas cardiac enhancers are decommissioned by removal of active epigenetic marks. Our data suggest that, rather than recruiting corepressors to enhancers, Scl prevents ectopic cardiogenesis by occupying enhancers that cardiac factors, such as Gata4 and Hand1, use for gene activation. Although hematopoietic Gata factors bind with Scl to both activated and repressed genes, they are dispensable for cardiac repression, but necessary for activating genes that enable hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development. These results suggest that a unique subset of enhancers in lineage-specific genes that are accessible for regulators of opposing fates during the time of the fate decision provide a platform where the divergence of mutually exclusive fates is orchestrated. PMID:25564442

  20. Identification of mesoderm development (mesd) candidate genes by comparative mapping and genome sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Wines, M E; Lee, L; Katari, M S; Zhang, L; DeRossi, C; Shi, Y; Perkins, S; Feldman, M; McCombie, W R; Holdener, B C

    2001-02-15

    The proximal albino deletions identify several functional regions on mouse Chromosome 7 critical for differentiation of mesoderm (mesd), development of the hypothalamus neuroendocrine lineage (nelg), and function of the liver (hsdr1). Using comparative mapping and genomic sequence analysis, we have identified four novel genes and Il16 in the mesd deletion interval. Two of the novel genes, mesdc1 and mesdc2, are located within the mesd critical region defined by BAC transgenic rescue. We have investigated the fetal role of genes located outside the mesd critical region using BAC transgenic complementation of the mesd early embryonic lethality. Using human radiation hybrid mapping and BAC contig construction, we have identified a conserved region of human chromosome 15 homologous to the mesd, nelg, and hsdr1 functional regions. Three human diseases cosegregate with microsatellite markers used in construction of the human BAC/YAC physical map, including autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ENFL2; also known as ADNFLE), a syndrome of mental retardation, spasticity, and tapetoretinal degeneration (MRST); and a pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne syndrome (PAPA).

  1. Overlapping roles of two Hox genes and the exd ortholog ceh-20 in diversification of the C. elegans postembryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Fire, A

    2000-12-01

    Members of the Hox family of homeoproteins and their cofactors play a central role in pattern formation of all germ layers. During postembryonic development of C. elegans, non-gonadal mesoderm arises from a single mesoblast cell M. Starting in the first larval stage, M divides to produce 14 striated muscles, 16 non-striated muscles, and two non-muscle cells (coelomocytes). We investigated the role of the C. elegans Hox cluster and of the exd ortholog ceh-20 in patterning of the postembryonic mesoderm. By examining the M lineage and its differentiation products in different Hox mutant combinations, we found an essential but overlapping role for two of the Hox cluster genes, lin-39 and mab-5, in diversification of the postembryonic mesoderm. This role of the two Hox gene products required the CEH-20 cofactor. One target of these two Hox genes is the C. elegans twist ortholog hlh-8. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, we demonstrated that twist is a direct target of Hox activation. We present evidence from mutant phenotypes that twist is not the only target for Hox genes in the M lineage: in particular we show that lin-39 mab-5 double mutants exhibit a more severe M lineage defect than the hlh-8 null mutant.

  2. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  3. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-05

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages.

  4. MyoD expression in the forming somites is an early response to mesoderm induction in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, N D; Pluck, A; Gurdon, J B

    1989-01-01

    We describe the cloning, cDNA sequence and embryonic expression of a Xenopus homologue of MyoD, a mouse gene encoding a DNA-binding protein that can activate muscle gene expression in cultured cells. The predicted Xenopus MyoD protein sequence is remarkably similar to mouse MyoD. Zygotic expression of MyoD begins in early gastrulae, but there is a low level of unlocalized maternal message. Northern blot analysis of dissected embryos and in situ hybridization show that MyoD RNA is restricted to the gastrula mesoderm and to the somites of neurulae and tailbud embryos. The time and place of MyoD expression are consistent with a role for MyoD in the activation of other muscle genes in the somites of the frog embryo. However, MyoD is skeletal muscle-specific and is not expressed even in the early embryonic heart, which co-expresses cardiac and skeletal actin isoforms. Striated muscle genes can therefore be activated in some embryonic tissues in the absence of MyoD. The concentration of MyoD in the somites falls once they have formed, suggesting that MyoD may act there transiently to establish muscle gene expression. MyoD transcription is activated following mesoderm induction, and is the earliest muscle-specific response to mesoderm-inducing factors so far described. Images PMID:2555164

  5. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  6. FGF and canonical Wnt signaling cooperate to induce paraxial mesoderm from tailbud neuromesodermal progenitors through regulation of a two-step EMT.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hana; Kimmey, Samuel C; Row, Richard H; Matus, David Q; Martin, Benjamin L

    2017-02-27

    Mesoderm induction begins during gastrulation. Recent evidence from several vertebrate species indicates mesoderm induction continues after gastrulation in neuromesodermal progenitor cells (NMPs) within the posterior-most embryonic structure called the tailbud. It is unclear to what extent the molecular mechanisms of mesoderm induction are conserved between gastrula and post-gastrula stages of development. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is required for mesoderm induction during gastrulation through positive transcriptional regulation of the t-box transcription factor brachyury (ntla in zebrafish). We find that FGF is continuously required for paraxial mesoderm (PM) induction in post-gastrula NMPs, but has the opposite effect on brachyury expression. FGF signaling represses brachyury and the NMP marker sox2 through regulation of tbx16 and msgn1, thereby committing cells to a PM fate. FGF mediated PM induction in NMPs functions in tight coordination with canonical Wnt signaling during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition from NMP to mesodermal progenitor. Wnt signaling initiates the EMT, while FGF signaling terminates this event. Our results indicate that germ layer induction in the tailbud is not a simple continuation of gastrulation events.

  7. From Dynamic Expression Patterns to Boundary Formation in the Presomitic Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Hendrik B.; Schneltzer, Elida; Zeiser, Stefan; Hoesel, Bastian; Beckers, Johannes; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě

    2012-01-01

    The segmentation of the vertebrate body is laid down during early embryogenesis. The formation of signaling gradients, the periodic expression of genes of the Notch-, Fgf- and Wnt-pathways and their interplay in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm (PSM) precedes the rhythmic budding of nascent somites at its anterior end, which later develops into epithelialized structures, the somites. Although many in silico models describing partial aspects of somitogenesis already exist, simulations of a complete causal chain from gene expression in the growth zone via the interaction of multiple cells to segmentation are rare. Here, we present an enhanced gene regulatory network (GRN) for mice in a simulation program that models the growing PSM by many virtual cells and integrates WNT3A and FGF8 gradient formation, periodic gene expression and Delta/Notch signaling. Assuming Hes7 as core of the somitogenesis clock and LFNG as modulator, we postulate a negative feedback of HES7 on Dll1 leading to an oscillating Dll1 expression as seen in vivo. Furthermore, we are able to simulate the experimentally observed wave of activated NOTCH (NICD) as a result of the interactions in the GRN. We esteem our model as robust for a wide range of parameter values with the Hes7 mRNA and protein decays exerting a strong influence on the core oscillator. Moreover, our model predicts interference between Hes1 and HES7 oscillators when their intrinsic frequencies differ. In conclusion, we have built a comprehensive model of somitogenesis with HES7 as core oscillator that is able to reproduce many experimentally observed data in mice. PMID:22761566

  8. Human embryonic stem cell-derived mesoderm-like epithelium transitions to mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Nolan L; Robbins, Kelly R; Dhara, Sujoy K; West, Franklin D; Stice, Steven L

    2009-08-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have the potential to produce all of the cells in the body. They are able to self-renew indefinitely, potentially making them a source for large-scale production of therapeutic cell lines. Here, we developed a monolayer differentiation culture that induces hESC (WA09 and BG01) to form epithelial sheets with mesodermal gene expression patterns (BMP4, RUNX1, and GATA4). These E-cadherin+ CD90low cells then undergo apparent epithelial-mesenchymal transition for the derivation of mesenchymal progenitor cells (hESC-derived mesenchymal cells [hES-MC]) that by flow cytometry are negative for hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, and CD133) and endothelial (CD31 and CD146) markers, but positive for markers associated with mesenchymal stem cells (CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD166). To determine their functionality, we tested their capacity to produce the three lineages associated with mesenchymal stem cells and found they could form osteogenic and chondrogenic, but not adipogenic lineages. The derived hES-MC were able to remodel and contract collagen I lattice constructs to an equivalent degree as keloid fibroblasts and were induced to express alpha-smooth muscle actin when exposed to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, but not platelet derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B). These data suggest that the derived hES-MC are multipotent cells with potential uses in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and for providing a highly reproducible cell source for adult-like progenitor cells.

  9. Visualizing late insect embryogenesis: extraembryonic and mesodermal enhancer trap expression in the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Koelzer, Stefan; Kölsch, Yvonne; Panfilio, Kristen A

    2014-01-01

    The beetle Tribolium castaneum has increasingly become a powerful model for comparative research on insect development. One recent resource is a collection of piggyBac transposon-based enhancer trap lines. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of three selected lines and demonstrate their value for investigations in the second half of embryogenesis, which has thus far lagged behind research on early stages. Two lines, G12424 and KT650, show enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression throughout the extraembryonic serosal tissue and in a few discrete embryonic domains. Intriguingly, both lines show for the first time a degree of regionalization within the mature serosa. However, their expression profiles illuminate distinct aspects of serosal biology: G12424 tracks the tissue's rapid maturation while KT650 expression likely reflects ongoing physiological processes. The third line, G04609, is stably expressed in mesodermal domains, including segmental muscles and the heart. Genomic mapping followed by in situ hybridization for genes near to the G04609 insertion site suggests that the transposon has trapped enhancer information for the Tribolium orthologue of midline (Tc-mid). Altogether, our analyses provide the first live imaging, long-term characterizations of enhancer traps from this collection. We show that EGFP expression is readily detected, including in heterozygote crosses that permit the simultaneous visualization of multiple tissue types. The tissue specificity provides live, endogenous marker gene expression at key developmental stages that are inaccessible for whole mount staining. Furthermore, the nonlocalized EGFP in these lines illuminates both the nucleus and cytoplasm, providing cellular resolution for morphogenesis research on processes such as dorsal closure and heart formation. In future work, identification of regulatory regions driving these enhancer traps will deepen our understanding of late developmental control, including in the

  10. Different Concentrations of FGF Ligands, FGF2 or FGF8 Determine Distinct States of WNT-Induced Presomitic Mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, Smita; Liu, Jinhua; Marks, Matthias; Koch, Frederic; Anurin, Anna; Scholze, Manuela; Senft, Anna Dorothea; Wittler, Lars; Macura, Karol; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G

    2016-07-01

    Presomitic mesoderm (PSM) cells are the precursors of the somites, which flank both sides of the neural tube and give rise to the musculo-skeletal system shaping the vertebrate body. WNT and FGF signaling control the formation of both the PSM and the somites and show a graded distribution with highest levels in the posterior PSM. We have used reporters for the mesoderm/PSM control genes T, Tbx6, and Msgn1 to investigate the differentiation of mouse ESCs from the naïve state via EpiSCs to PSM cells. Here we show that the activation of WNT signaling by CHIR99021 (CH) in combination with FGF ligand induces embryo-like PSM at high efficiency. By varying the FGF ligand concentration, the state of PSM cells formed can be altered. High FGF concentration supports posterior PSM formation, whereas low FGF generates anterior/differentiating PSM, in line with in vivo data. Furthermore, the level of Msgn1 expression depends on the FGF ligand concentration. We also show that Activin/Nodal signaling inhibits CH-mediated PSM induction in EpiSCs, without affecting T-expression. Inversely, Activin/Nodal inhibition enhances PSM induction by WNT/high FGF signaling. The ability to generate PSM cells of either posterior or anterior PSM identity with high efficiency in vitro will promote the investigation of the gene regulatory networks controlling the formation of nascent PSM cells and their switch to differentiating/somitic paraxial mesoderm. Stem Cells 2016;34:1790-1800.

  11. Development of head and trunk mesoderm in the dogfish, Scyliorhinus torazame: I. Embryology and morphology of the head cavities and related structures.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Noritaka; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate head segmentation has attracted the attention of comparative and evolutionary morphologists for centuries, given its importance for understanding the developmental body plan of vertebrates and its evolutionary origin. In particular, the segmentation of the mesoderm is central to the problem. The shark embryo has provided a canonical morphological scheme of the head, with its epithelialized coelomic cavities (head cavities), which have often been regarded as head somites. To understand the evolutionary significance of the head cavities, the embryonic development of the mesoderm was investigated at the morphological and histological levels in the shark, Scyliorhinus torazame. Unlike somites and some enterocoelic mesodermal components in other vertebrates, the head cavities in S. torazame appeared as irregular cyst(s) in the originally unsegmented mesenchymal head mesoderm, and not via segmentation of an undivided coelom. The mandibular cavity appeared first in the paraxial part of the mandibular mesoderm, followed by the hyoid cavity, and the premandibular cavity was the last to form. The prechordal plate was recognized as a rhomboid roof of the preoral gut, continuous with the rostral notochord, and was divided anteroposteriorly into two parts by the growth of the hypothalamic primordium. Of those, the posterior part was likely to differentiate into the premandibular cavity, and the anterior part disappeared later. The head cavities and somites in the trunk exhibited significant differences, in terms of histological appearance and timing of differentiation. The mandibular cavity developed a rostral process secondarily; its homology to the anterior cavity reported in some elasmobranch embryos is discussed.

  12. BMP and retinoic acid regulate anterior–posterior patterning of the non-axial mesoderm across the dorsal–ventral axis

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Richard W.; Skvarca, Lauren Brilli; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Hukriede, Neil A.; Davidson, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of patterning along the dorsal–ventral (DV) and anterior–posterior (AP) axes during embryogenesis, uncertainty exists in the orientation of these axes for the mesoderm. Here we examine the origin and formation of the zebrafish kidney, a ventrolateral mesoderm derivative, and show that AP patterning of the non-axial mesoderm occurs across the classic gastrula stage DV axis while DV patterning aligns along the animal–vegetal pole. We find that BMP signalling acts early to establish broad anterior and posterior territories in the non-axial mesoderm while retinoic acid (RA) functions later, but also across the classic DV axis. Our data support a model in which RA on the dorsal side of the embryo induces anterior kidney fates while posterior kidney progenitors are protected ventrally by the RA-catabolizing enzyme Cyp26a1. This work clarifies our understanding of vertebrate axis orientation and establishes a new paradigm for how the kidney and other mesodermal derivatives arise during embryogenesis. PMID:27406002

  13. An amphioxus nodal gene (AmphiNodal) with early symmetrical expression in the organizer and mesoderm and later asymmetrical expression associated with left-right axis formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Linda Z.; Holland, Nicholas D.

    2002-01-01

    The full-length sequence and zygotic expression of an amphioxus nodal gene are described. Expression is first detected in the early gastrula just within the dorsal lip of the blastopore in a region of hypoblast that is probably comparable with the vertebrate Spemann's organizer. In the late gastrula and early neurula, expression remains bilaterally symmetrical, limited to paraxial mesoderm and immediately overlying regions of the neural plate. Later in the neurula stage, all neural expression disappears, and mesodermal expression disappears from the right side. All along the left side of the neurula, mesodermal expression spreads into the left side of the gut endoderm. Soon thereafter, all expression is down-regulated except near the anterior and posterior ends of the animal, where transcripts are still found in the mesoderm and endoderm on the left side. At this time, expression also begins in the ectoderm on the left side of the head, in the region where the mouth later forms. These results suggest that amphioxus and vertebrate nodal genes play evolutionarily conserved roles in establishing Spemann's organizer, patterning the mesoderm rostrocaudally and setting up the asymmetrical left-right axis of the body.

  14. Chronic activation of pattern recognition receptors suppresses brown adipogenesis of multipotent mesodermal stem cells and brown pre-adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jiyoung; Chen, Jiangang; Zhao, Ling

    2015-06-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) holds promise to combat obesity through energy-spending, non-shivering thermogenesis. Understanding of regulation of BAT development can lead to novel strategies to increase BAT mass and function for obesity treatment and prevention. Here, we report the effects of chronic activation of PRR on brown adipogenesis of multipotent mesodermal stem C3H10T1/2 cells and immortalized brown pre-adipocytes from the classical interscapular BAT of mice. Activation of NOD1, TLR4, or TLR2 by their respective synthetic ligand suppressed brown marker gene expression and lipid accumulation during differentiation of brown-like adipocytes of C3H10T1/2. Activation of the PRR only during the commitment was sufficient to suppress the differentiation. PRR activation suppressed PGC-1α mRNA, but induced PRDM16 mRNA at the commitment. Consistently, PRR activation suppressed the differentiation of immortalized brown pre-adipocytes. Activation of PRR induced NF-κB activation in both cells, which correlated with their abilities to suppress PPARγ transactivation, a critical event for brown adipogenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that chronic PRR activation suppressed brown adipogenesis of multipotent mesodermal stem cells and brown pre-adipocytes, possibly through suppression of PPARγ transactivation. The results suggest that anti- inflammatory therapies targeting PRRs may be beneficial for the BAT development.

  15. CD13 and ROR2 Permit Isolation of Highly Enriched Cardiac Mesoderm from Differentiating Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rhys J.P.; Brady, Bevin; Khoja, Suhail; Sahoo, Debashis; Engel, James; Arasaratnam, Deevina; Saleh, Kholoud K.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Zhao, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Kwon, Murray; Elliott, David A.; Ardehali, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Summary The generation of tissue-specific cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is critical for the development of future stem cell-based regenerative therapies. Here, we identify CD13 and ROR2 as cell-surface markers capable of selecting early cardiac mesoderm emerging during hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that the CD13+/ROR2+ population encompasses pre-cardiac mesoderm, which efficiently differentiates to all major cardiovascular lineages. We determined the engraftment potential of CD13+/ROR2+ in small (murine) and large (porcine) animal models, and demonstrated that CD13+/ROR2+ progenitors have the capacity to differentiate toward cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells in vivo. Collectively, our data show that CD13 and ROR2 identify a cardiac lineage precursor pool that is capable of successful engraftment into the porcine heart. These markers represent valuable tools for further dissection of early human cardiac differentiation, and will enable a detailed assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac lineage cells for potential clinical applications. PMID:26771355

  16. CD13 and ROR2 Permit Isolation of Highly Enriched Cardiac Mesoderm from Differentiating Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Rhys J P; Brady, Bevin; Khoja, Suhail; Sahoo, Debashis; Engel, James; Arasaratnam, Deevina; Saleh, Kholoud K; Abilez, Oscar J; Zhao, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Kwon, Murray; Elliott, David A; Ardehali, Reza

    2016-01-12

    The generation of tissue-specific cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is critical for the development of future stem cell-based regenerative therapies. Here, we identify CD13 and ROR2 as cell-surface markers capable of selecting early cardiac mesoderm emerging during hESC differentiation. We demonstrate that the CD13+/ROR2+ population encompasses pre-cardiac mesoderm, which efficiently differentiates to all major cardiovascular lineages. We determined the engraftment potential of CD13+/ROR2+ in small (murine) and large (porcine) animal models, and demonstrated that CD13+/ROR2+ progenitors have the capacity to differentiate toward cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells in vivo. Collectively, our data show that CD13 and ROR2 identify a cardiac lineage precursor pool that is capable of successful engraftment into the porcine heart. These markers represent valuable tools for further dissection of early human cardiac differentiation, and will enable a detailed assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac lineage cells for potential clinical applications.

  17. Gata4 expression in lateral mesoderm is downstream of BMP4 and isactivated directly by Forkhead and GATA transcription factors through adistal enhancer element

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, Anabel; De Val, Sarah; Heidt, Analeah B.; Xu, Shan-Mei; Bristow, James; Black, Brian L.

    2005-05-20

    The GATA family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays key roles in the specification and differentiation of multiple cell types during development. GATA4 is an early regulator of gene expression during the development of endoderm and mesoderm, and genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that GATA4 is required for embryonic development.Despite the importance of GATA4 in tissue specification and differentiation, the mechanisms by which Gata4 expression is activated and the transcription factor pathways upstream of GATA4 remain largely undefined. To identify transcriptional regulators of Gata4 in the mouse,we screened conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Gata4 gene for enhancer activity in transgenic embryos. Here, we define the regulation of a distal enhancer element from Gata4 that is sufficient to direct expression throughout the lateral mesoderm, beginning at 7.5 days of mouse embryonic development. The activity of this enhancer is initially broad but eventually becomes restricted to the mesenchyme surrounding the liver. We demonstrate that the function of this enhancer in transgenic embryos is dependent upon highly conserved Forkhead and GATA transcription factor binding sites, which are bound by FOXF1 and GATA4,respectively. Furthermore, the activity of the Gata4 lateral mesoderm enhancer is attenuated by the BMP antagonist Noggin, and the enhancer is not activated in Bmp4-null embryos. Thus, these studies establish that Gata4 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead and GATA transcription factors in the lateral mesoderm, and demonstrate that Gata4lateral mesoderm enhancer activation requires BMP4, supporting a model in which GATA4 serves as a downstream effector of BMP signaling in the lateral mesoderm.

  18. Ectopic expression of Msx-2 in posterior limb bud mesoderm impairs limb morphogenesis while inducing BMP-4 expression, inhibiting cell proliferation, and promoting apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, D; Lichtler, A C; Pan, Z Z; Dealy, C N; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A

    1998-05-01

    During early stages of chick limb development, the homeobox-containing gene Msx-2 is expressed in the mesoderm at the anterior margin of the limb bud and in a discrete group of mesodermal cells at the midproximal posterior margin. These domains of Msx-2 expression roughly demarcate the anterior and posterior boundaries of the progress zone, the highly proliferating posterior mesodermal cells underneath the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) that give rise to the skeletal elements of the limb and associated structures. Later in development as the AER loses its activity, Msx-2 expression expands into the distal mesoderm and subsequently into the interdigital mesenchyme which demarcates the developing digits. The domains of Msx-2 expression exhibit considerably less proliferation than the cells of the progress zone and also encompass several regions of programmed cell death including the anterior and posterior necrotic zones and interdigital mesenchyme. We have thus suggested that Msx-2 may be in a regulatory network that delimits the progress zone by suppressing the morphogenesis of the regions of the limb mesoderm in which it is highly expressed. In the present study we show that ectopic expression of Msx-2 via a retroviral expression vector in the posterior mesoderm of the progress zone from the time of initial formation of the limb bud severely impairs limb morphogenesis. Msx-2-infected limbs are typically very narrow along the anteroposterior axis, are occasionally truncated, and exhibit alterations in the pattern of formation of skeletal elements, indicating that as a consequence of ectopic Msx-2 expression the morphogenesis of large portions of the posterior mesoderm has been suppressed. We further show that Msx-2 impairs limb morphogenesis by reducing cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis in the regions of the posterior mesoderm in which it is ectopically expressed. The domains of ectopic Msx-2 expression in the posterior mesoderm also exhibit ectopic

  19. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  20. Xwnt-8 and lithium can act upon either dorsal mesodermal or neurectodermal cells to cause a loss of forebrain in Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredieu, J. R.; Cui, Y.; Maier, D.; Danilchik, M. V.; Christian, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    When Xenopus gastrulae are made to misexpress Xwnt-8, or are exposed to lithium ions, they develop with a loss of anterior structures. In the current study, we have characterized the neural defects produced by either Xwnt-8 or lithium and have examined potential cellular mechanisms underlying this anterior truncation. We find that the primary defect in embryos exposed to lithium at successively earlier stages during gastrulation is a progressive rostral to caudal deletion of the forebrain, while hindbrain and spinal regions of the CNS remain intact. Misexpression of Xwnt-8 during gastrulation produces an identical loss of forebrain. Our results demonstrate that lithium and Wnts can act upon either prospective neural ectodermal cells, or upon dorsal mesodermal cells, to cause a loss of anterior pattern. Specifically, ectodermal cells isolated from lithium- or Wnt-exposed embryos are unable to form anterior neural tissue in response to inductive signals from normal dorsal mesoderm. In addition, although dorsal mesodermal cells from lithium- or Wnt-exposed embryos are specified properly, and produce normal levels of the anterior neural inducing molecules noggin and chordin, they show a greatly reduced capacity to induce anterior neural tissue in conjugated ectoderm. Taken together, our results are consistent with a model in which Wnt- or lithium-mediated signals can induce either mesodermal or ectodermal cells to produce a dominant posteriorizing morphogen which respecifies anterior neural tissue as posterior.

  1. Regulation of the Rac GTPase pathway by the multifunctional Rho GEF Pebble is essential for mesoderm migration in the Drosophila gastrula.

    PubMed

    van Impel, Andreas; Schumacher, Sabine; Draga, Margarethe; Herz, Hans-Martin; Grosshans, Jörg; Müller, H Arno J

    2009-03-01

    The Drosophila guanine nucleotide exchange factor Pebble (Pbl) is essential for cytokinesis and cell migration during gastrulation. In dividing cells, Pbl promotes Rho1 activation at the cell cortex, leading to formation of the contractile actin-myosin ring. The role of Pbl in fibroblast growth factor-triggered mesoderm spreading during gastrulation is less well understood and its targets and subcellular localization are unknown. To address these issues we performed a domain-function study in the embryo. We show that Pbl is localized to the nucleus and the cell cortex in migrating mesoderm cells and found that, in addition to the PH domain, the conserved C-terminal tail of the protein is crucial for cortical localization. Moreover, we show that the Rac pathway plays an essential role during mesoderm migration. Genetic and biochemical interactions indicate that during mesoderm migration, Pbl functions by activating a Rac-dependent pathway. Furthermore, gain-of-function and rescue experiments suggest an important regulatory role of the C-terminal tail of Pbl for the selective activation of Rho1-versus Rac-dependent pathways.

  2. Hedgehog–BMP signalling establishes dorsoventral patterning in lateral plate mesoderm to trigger gonadogenesis in chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Takashi; Murai, Hidetaka; Saito, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    The gonad appears in the early embryo after several events: cells at the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) undergo ingression, begin gonadal differentiation and then retain primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here we show that in the chicken embryo, these events are triggered on the basis of dorsoventral patterning at the medial LPM. Gonadal progenitor cells (GPCs) at the ventromedial LPM initiate gonadogenesis by undergoing ingression, whereas mesonephric capsule progenitor cells (MCPCs) at the dorsomedial LPM do not. These contrasting behaviours are caused by Hedgehog signalling, which is activated in GPCs but not in MCPCs. Inhibiting Hedgehog signalling prevents GPCs from forming gonadal structures and collecting PGCs. When activated by Hedgehog signalling, MCPCs form an ectopic gonad. This Hedgehog signalling is mediated by BMP4. These findings provide insight into embryonic patterning and gonadal initiation in the chicken embryo. PMID:27558761

  3. Transcriptomic and phenotypic analysis of murine embryonic stem cell derived BMP2+ lineage cells: an insight into mesodermal patterning

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Michael Xavier; Chen, Shuhua; Winkler, Johannes; Hippler-Altenburg, Rita; Odenthal, Margareta; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Balaraman, Sridevi; Schulz, Herbert; Hummel, Oliver; Hübner, Norbert; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2 is a late mesodermal marker expressed during vertebrate development and plays a crucial role in early embryonic development. The nature of the BMP2-expressing cells during the early stages of embryonic development, their transcriptome and cell phenotypes developed from these cells have not yet been characterized. Results We generated a transgenic BMP2 embryonic stem (ES) cell lineage expressing both puromycin acetyltransferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by the BMP2 promoter. Puromycin resistant and EGFP positive BMP2+ cells with a purity of over 93% were isolated. Complete transcriptome analysis of BMP2+ cells in comparison to the undifferentiated ES cells and the control population from seven-day-old embryoid bodies (EBs; intersection of genes differentially expressed between undifferentiated ES cells and BMP2+ EBs as well as differentially expressed between seven-day-old control EBs and BMP2+ EBs by t-test, p < 0.01, fold change >2) by microarray analysis led to identification of 479 specifically upregulated and 193 downregulated transcripts. Transcription factors, apoptosis promoting factors and other signaling molecules involved in early embryonic development are mainly upregulated in BMP2+ cells. Long-term differentiation of the BMP2+ cells resulted in neural crest stem cells (NCSCs), smooth muscle cells, epithelial-like cells, neuronal-like cells, osteoblasts and monocytes. Interestingly, development of cardiomyocytes from the BMP2+ cells requires secondary EB formation. Conclusion This is the first study to identify the complete transcriptome of BMP2+ cells and cell phenotypes from a mesodermal origin, thus offering an insight into the role of BMP2+ cells during embryonic developmental processes in vivo. PMID:17784959

  4. Dynamic transcription programs during ES cell differentiation towards mesoderm in serum versus serum-freeBMP4 culture

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Stephen J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Burke, Les J; Gongora, M Milena; Grimmond, Sean M; Perkins, Andrew C

    2007-01-01

    Background Expression profiling of embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation in the presence of serum has been performed previously. It remains unclear if transcriptional activation is dependent on complex growth factor mixtures in serum or whether this process is intrinsic to ES cells once the stem cell program has been inactivated. The aims of this study were to determine the transcriptional programs associated with the stem cell state and to characterize mesoderm differentiation between serum and serum-free culture. Results ES cells were differentiated as embryoid bodies in 10% FBS or serum-free media containing BMP4 (2 ng/ml), and expression profiled using 47 K Illumina(R) Sentrix arrays. Statistical methods were employed to define gene sets characteristic of stem cell, epiblast and primitive streak programs. Although the initial differentiation profile was similar between the two culture conditions, cardiac gene expression was inhibited in serum whereas blood gene expression was enhanced. Also, expression of many members of the Kruppel-like factor (KLF) family of transcription factors changed dramatically during the first few days of differentiation. KLF2 and KLF4 co-localized with OCT4 in a sub-nuclear compartment of ES cells, dynamic changes in KLF-DNA binding activities occurred upon differentiation, and strong bio-informatic evidence for direct regulation of many stem cell genes by KLFs was found. Conclusion Down regulation of stem cell genes and activation of epiblast/primitive streak genes is similar in serum and defined media, but subsequent mesoderm differentiation is strongly influenced by the composition of the media. In addition, KLF family members are likely to be important regulators of many stem cell genes. PMID:17925037

  5. Positional identity of murine mesenchymal stem cells resident in different organs is determined in the postsegmentation mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Sági, Bernadett; Maraghechi, Pouneh; Urbán, Veronika S; Hegyi, Beáta; Szigeti, Anna; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Kudlik, Gyöngyi; Német, Katalin; Monostori, Eva; Gócza, Elen; Uher, Ferenc

    2012-03-20

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of distinct tissue origin have a large number of similarities and differences, it has not been determined so far whether tissue-resident MSCs are the progenies of one ancestor cell lineage or the results of parallel cell developmental events. Here we compared the expression levels of 177 genes in murine MSCs derived from adult and juvenile bone marrow and adult adipose tissue, as well as juvenile spleen, thymus, and aorta wall by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and the results were partially validated at protein level. All MSC lines uniformly expressed a large set of genes including well-known mesenchymal markers, such as α-smooth muscle actin, collagen type I α-chain, GATA6, Mohawk, and vimentin. In contrast, pluripotency genes and the early mesodermal marker T-gene were not expressed. On the other hand, different MSC lines consistently expressed distinct patterns of Hox genes determining the positional identity of a given cell population. Moreover, MSCs of different origin expressed a few other transcription factors also reflecting their topological identity and so the body segment or organ to which they normally contributed in vivo: (1) thymus-derived cells specifically expressed Tbx5 and Pitx2; (2) spleen-derived MSCs were characterized with Tlx1 and Nkx2.5; (3) Pitx1 designated femoral bone marrow cells and (4) En2 appeared in aorta wall-derived MSCs. Thus, MSCs exhibited topographic identity and memory even after long-term cultivation in vitro. On the basis of these results, we suggest that postnatal MSCs isolated from different anatomical sites descend from precursor cells developing in the postsegmentation mesoderm.

  6. Anterior migration of lateral plate mesodermal cells during embryogenesis of the pufferfish Takifugu niphobles: insight into the rostral positioning of pelvic fins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mikiko; Yu, Reiko; Kurokawa, Daisuke

    2015-07-01

    In vertebrates, paired appendages (limbs and fins) are derived from the somatic mesoderm subsequent to the separation of the lateral plate mesoderm into somatic and splanchnic layers. This is less clear for teleosts, however, because the developmental processes of separation into two layers and of extension over the yolk have rarely been studied. During teleost evolution, the position of pelvic fins has generally shifted rostrally (Rosen; Nelson, 1982, 1994), although at the early embryonic stage the presumptive pelvic fin cells are initially located near the future anus region - the anterior border of hoxc10a expression in the spinal cord - regardless of their final destination. Our previous studies in zebrafish (abdominal pelvic fins) and Nile tilapia (thoracic pelvic fins) showed that the presumptive pelvic fin cells shift their position with respect to the body trunk after its protrusion from the yolk surface. Furthermore, in Nile tilapia, presumptive pelvic fin cells migrate anteriorly on the yolk surface. Here, we examined the embryonic development of the lateral plate mesoderm at histological levels in the pufferfish Takifugu niphobles, which belongs to the highly derived teleost order Tetraodontiformes, and lacks pelvic fins. Our results show that, in T. niphobles, the lateral plate mesoderm bulges out as two separate layers of cells alongside the body trunk prior to its further extension to cover the yolk sphere. Once the lateral plate mesoderm extends laterally, it rapidly covers the surface of the yolk. Furthermore, cells located near the anterior border of hoxc10a expression in the spinal cord reach the anterior-most region of the yolk surface. In light of our previous and current studies, we propose that anterior migration of presumptive pelvic fin cells might be required for them to reach the thoracic or more anterior positions as is seen in other highly derived teleost groups.

  7. Two Hox cofactors, the Meis/Hth homolog UNC-62 and the Pbx/Exd homolog CEH-20, function together during C. elegans postembryonic mesodermal development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Shi, Herong; Liu, Jun

    2009-10-15

    The TALE homeodomain-containing PBC and MEIS proteins play multiple roles during metazoan development. Mutations in these proteins can cause various disorders, including cancer. In this study, we examined the roles of MEIS proteins in mesoderm development in C. elegans using the postembryonic mesodermal M lineage as a model system. We found that the MEIS protein UNC-62 plays essential roles in regulating cell fate specification and differentiation in the M lineage. Furthermore, UNC-62 appears to function together with the PBC protein CEH-20 in regulating these processes. Both unc-62 and ceh-20 have overlapping expression patterns within and outside of the M lineage, and they share physical and regulatory interactions. In particular, we found that ceh-20 is genetically required for the promoter activity of unc-62, providing evidence for another layer of regulatory interactions between MEIS and PBC proteins.

  8. Transient Downregulation of Nanog and Oct4 Induced by DETA/NO Exposure in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Leads to Mesodermal/Endodermal Lineage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mora-Castilla, Sergio; Tejedo, Juan R; Tapia-Limonchi, Rafael; Díaz, Irene; Hitos, Ana B; Cahuana, Gladys M; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    The function of pluripotency genes in differentiation is a matter of investigation. We report here that Nanog and Oct4 are reexpressed in two mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines following exposure to the differentiating agent DETA/NO. Both cell lines express a battery of both endoderm and mesoderm markers following induction of differentiation with DETA/NO-based protocols. Confocal analysis of cells undergoing directed differentiation shows that the majority of cells expressing Nanog express also endoderm genes such as Gata4 and FoxA2 (75.4% and 96.2%, resp.). Simultaneously, mRNA of mesodermal markers Flk1 and Mef2c are also regulated by the treatment. Acetylated histone H3 occupancy at the promoter of Nanog is involved in the process of reexpression. Furthermore, Nanog binding to the promoter of Brachyury leads to repression of this gene, thus disrupting mesendoderm transition.

  9. Tbx1 is required autonomously for cell survival and fate in the pharyngeal core mesoderm to form the muscles of mastication

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Racedo, Silvia E.; Macchiarulo, Stephania; Hu, Zunju; Carpenter, Courtney; Guo, Tingwei; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2014-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a congenital anomaly disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies including velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, facial muscle hypotonia and feeding difficulties, in part due to hypoplasia of the branchiomeric muscles. Inactivation of both alleles of mouse Tbx1, encoding a T-box transcription factor, deleted on chromosome 22q11.2, results in reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles. To identify downstream pathways, we performed gene profiling of microdissected pharyngeal arch one (PA1) from Tbx1+/+ and Tbx1−/− embryos at stages E9.5 (somites 20–25) and E10.5 (somites 30–35). Basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors were reduced, while secondary heart field genes were increased in expression early and were replaced by an increase in expression of cellular stress response genes later, suggesting a change in gene expression patterns or cell populations. Lineage tracing studies using Mesp1Cre and T-Cre drivers showed that core mesoderm cells within PA1 were present at E9.5 but were greatly reduced by E10.5 in Tbx1−/− embryos. Using Tbx1Cre knock-in mice, we found that cells are lost due to apoptosis, consistent with increase in expression of cellular stress response genes at E10.5. To determine whether Tbx1 is required autonomously in the core mesoderm, we used Mesp1Cre and T-Cre mesodermal drivers in combination with inactivate Tbx1 and found reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles from PA1. These mechanistic studies inform us that Tbx1 is required upstream of key myogenic genes needed for core mesoderm cell survival and fate, between E9.5 and E10.5, resulting in formation of the branchiomeric muscles. PMID:24705356

  10. Tbx1 is required autonomously for cell survival and fate in the pharyngeal core mesoderm to form the muscles of mastication.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Racedo, Silvia E; Macchiarulo, Stephania; Hu, Zunju; Carpenter, Courtney; Guo, Tingwei; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Deyou; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-08-15

    Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, is a congenital anomaly disorder characterized by craniofacial anomalies including velo-pharyngeal insufficiency, facial muscle hypotonia and feeding difficulties, in part due to hypoplasia of the branchiomeric muscles. Inactivation of both alleles of mouse Tbx1, encoding a T-box transcription factor, deleted on chromosome 22q11.2, results in reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles. To identify downstream pathways, we performed gene profiling of microdissected pharyngeal arch one (PA1) from Tbx1(+/+) and Tbx1(-/-) embryos at stages E9.5 (somites 20-25) and E10.5 (somites 30-35). Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors were reduced, while secondary heart field genes were increased in expression early and were replaced by an increase in expression of cellular stress response genes later, suggesting a change in gene expression patterns or cell populations. Lineage tracing studies using Mesp1(Cre) and T-Cre drivers showed that core mesoderm cells within PA1 were present at E9.5 but were greatly reduced by E10.5 in Tbx1(-/-) embryos. Using Tbx1(Cre) knock-in mice, we found that cells are lost due to apoptosis, consistent with increase in expression of cellular stress response genes at E10.5. To determine whether Tbx1 is required autonomously in the core mesoderm, we used Mesp1(Cre) and T-Cre mesodermal drivers in combination with inactivate Tbx1 and found reduction or loss of branchiomeric muscles from PA1. These mechanistic studies inform us that Tbx1 is required upstream of key myogenic genes needed for core mesoderm cell survival and fate, between E9.5 and E10.5, resulting in formation of the branchiomeric muscles.

  11. Generation of dispersed presomitic mesoderm cell cultures for imaging of the zebrafish segmentation clock in single cells.

    PubMed

    Webb, Alexis B; Soroldoni, Daniele; Oswald, Annelie; Schindelin, Johannes; Oates, Andrew C

    2014-07-24

    Segmentation is a periodic and sequential morphogenetic process in vertebrates. This rhythmic formation of blocks of tissue called somites along the body axis is evidence of a genetic oscillator patterning the developing embryo. In zebrafish, the intracellular clock driving segmentation is comprised of members of the Her/Hes transcription factor family organized into negative feedback loops. We have recently generated transgenic fluorescent reporter lines for the cyclic gene her1 that recapitulate the spatio-temporal pattern of oscillations in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Using these lines, we developed an in vitro culture system that allows real-time analysis of segmentation clock oscillations within single, isolated PSM cells. By removing PSM tissue from transgenic embryos and then dispersing cells from oscillating regions onto glass-bottom dishes, we generated cultures suitable for time-lapse imaging of fluorescence signal from individual clock cells. This approach provides an experimental and conceptual framework for direct manipulation of the segmentation clock with unprecedented single-cell resolution, allowing its cell-autonomous and tissue-level properties to be distinguished and dissected.

  12. The reaction time of organ-forming substance in goldfish EGG and its relationship with mesodermal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shicui; Wu, Shangqin

    1988-12-01

    Fertilized goldfish eggs were dechorionated with a pair of forceps and were cut off along or a little above the equator into animal and vegetative parts at desired stages with a glass needle or ligated into two connected fragments before cleavage with baby hair loop. Some of the ligated eggs were detached by further fastening soon after ligation, and some released later at different stages (2-cell, 16-cell, 128-cell, 512-cell, mid-blastula) to let the organ-forming substance (OFS) enter the blastoderm. The cholinesterase (ChE) in the resulting embryos was assayed. The results are as follows. 1. All the 142 embryos developed from the animal hemispheres cut off or ligated off before cleavage gave rise to hyperblastula in which no ChE activity was observed. 2. All 50 embryos obtained from animal halves isolated at the 8-cell stage produced ChE. 3. Embryos developed from the eggs released before the 512-cell stage formed ChE, but the later the releasing of the hair knots, the smaller the number of ChE-producing embryos. 4. After the 512-cell stage (excluding this stage), neither ChE nor tissue differentiation occurred in the embryos developed from the unfastened eggs though their OFS flow was set free. Since ChE is thought to be a muscle-specific enzyme in the early developmental stage, it is concluded that the OFS in goldfish egg appears to be indispensable for the establishment of the mesoderm.

  13. An Hh-dependent pathway in lateral plate mesoderm enables the generation of left/right asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Tsiairis, Charisios D; McMahon, Andrew P

    2009-12-01

    Breaking bilateral symmetry is critical for vertebrate morphogenesis. In the mouse, directional looping of the heart and rotation of the embryo, the first overt evidence of left/right asymmetry (L/R), are observed at early somite stages ( approximately E8.5) [1, 2]. Activation of a Nodal-Pitx2 regulatory pathway specifically within the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) is critical for these events [3-10]. Asymmetric expression of Nodal is thought to be triggered by left-oriented, cilia-generated flow within the ventral, midline node [11, 12]. Genetic removal of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in the mouse demonstrates a requirement for Hedgehog signals in the symmetry-breaking process [13], and analysis of node trafficking has suggested a mechanism of directional transport in the node that might relate to symmetry breaking in the LPM [14]. Here we provide evidence that Hedgehog signaling in the node is not essential for breaking bilateral symmetry. In contrast, direct Hh signaling in the LPM is critical. Evidence is presented that Sonic and Indian hedgehog signals act together, through a Foxf1/Bmp4 pathway, to enable the initiation and propagation of Nodal signaling within the LPM, regulating the competence of that tissue to respond to the Nodal pathway.

  14. A transgenic, mesodermal specific, Dkk1 mouse model recapitulates a spectrum of human congenital limb reduction defects.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, Filemon; Terry, Melissa; Matushansky, Igor

    2012-04-01

    Congenital limb reduction defects occurring in isolation of other developmental abnormalities continue to be an important medical problem in which little progress has been made. Herein we generated transgenic mice expressing Dkk1 in an appendicular mesodermal pattern. Prx1-Dkk1 mice recapitulate a full spectrum of human congenital limb reduction defects, without other developmental issues, and have normal life-spans. Importantly, a close examination of the inheritance pattern suggests that there is a significant degree of incomplete penetrance as progeny of phenotypically positive or phenotypically negative, but genotypically positive Prx1-Dkk1 mice, consistently give rise to both phenotypically positive mice and phenotypically normal-appearing mice. Thus, this heterogeneous phenotype is reproducible with each generation regardless of the phenotype of the parents. We further go on to identify that mesenchymal stem cells from Prx1-Dkk1 mice have limited proliferative ability, but normal differentiation potential, which may explain the mechanism for the limb reduction defects observed. We believe Prx1-Dkk1 mice may prove useful in the future to study the mechanisms underlying the development of congenital limb reduction defects.

  15. An exclusively mesodermal origin of fin mesenchyme demonstrates that zebrafish trunk neural crest does not generate ectomesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Knapik, Ela W; Thiery, Jean Paul; Carney, Thomas J

    2013-07-01

    The neural crest is a multipotent stem cell population that arises from the dorsal aspect of the neural tube and generates both non-ectomesenchymal (melanocytes, peripheral neurons and glia) and ectomesenchymal (skeletogenic, odontogenic, cartilaginous and connective tissue) derivatives. In amniotes, only cranial neural crest generates both classes, with trunk neural crest restricted to non-ectomesenchyme. By contrast, it has been suggested that anamniotes might generate derivatives of both classes at all axial levels, with trunk neural crest generating fin osteoblasts, scale mineral-forming cells and connective tissue cells; however, this has not been fully tested. The cause and evolutionary significance of this cranial/trunk dichotomy, and its absence in anamniotes, are debated. Recent experiments have disputed the contribution of fish trunk neural crest to fin osteoblasts and scale mineral-forming cells. This prompted us to test the contribution of anamniote trunk neural crest to fin connective tissue cells. Using genetics-based lineage tracing in zebrafish, we find that these fin mesenchyme cells derive entirely from the mesoderm and that neural crest makes no contribution. Furthermore, contrary to previous suggestions, larval fin mesenchyme cells do not generate the skeletogenic cells of the adult fin, but persist to form fibroblasts associated with adult fin rays. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish trunk neural crest does not generate ectomesenchymal derivatives and challenge long-held ideas about trunk neural crest fate. These findings have important implications for the ontogeny and evolution of the neural crest.

  16. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-irradiation inhibits mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm but promotes ectoderm differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taichi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation on living cells have been demonstrated, such as tissue sterilization, blood coagulation, angiogenesis, wound healing, and tumor elimination. However, the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) has not yet been clarified. A large number of reactive species are generated by plasma-irradiation in medium, of which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the main species generated. Here, we investigated the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mESCs using an embryoid body (EB) formation assay with plasma-irradiated medium or H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium. Our findings demonstrated that plasma-irradiated medium potently inhibits the differentiation from mESCs to mesoderm and endoderm by inhibiting Wnt signaling as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. In contrast, both the plasma-irradiated medium and H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium enhanced the differentiation to epiblastoid, ectodermal, and neuronal lineages by activation of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) signaling, suggesting that these effects are caused by the H2O2 generated by plasma-irradiation in medium. However, in each case, the differentiation to glial cells remained unaffected. This study is the first demonstration that plasma-irradiation affects the differentiation of mESCs by the regulation of Wnt and FGF4 signaling pathways.

  17. Developmental expression of COE across the Metazoa supports a conserved role in neuronal cell-type specification and mesodermal development.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Daniel J; Meyer, Néva P; Seaver, Elaine; Pang, Kevin; McDougall, Carmel; Moy, Vanessa N; Gordon, Kacy; Degnan, Bernard M; Martindale, Mark Q; Burke, Robert D; Peterson, Kevin J

    2010-12-01

    The transcription factor COE (collier/olfactory-1/early B cell factor) is an unusual basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor as it lacks a basic domain and is maintained as a single copy gene in the genomes of all currently analysed non-vertebrate Metazoan genomes. Given the unique features of the COE gene, its proposed ancestral role in the specification of chemosensory neurons and the wealth of functional data from vertebrates and Drosophila, the evolutionary history of the COE gene can be readily investigated. We have examined the ways in which COE expression has diversified among the Metazoa by analysing its expression from representatives of four disparate invertebrate phyla: Ctenophora (Mnemiopsis leidyi); Mollusca (Haliotis asinina); Annelida (Capitella teleta and Chaetopterus) and Echinodermata (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). In addition, we have studied COE function with knockdown experiments in S. purpuratus, which indicate that COE is likely to be involved in repressing serotonergic cell fate in the apical ganglion of dipleurula larvae. These analyses suggest that COE has played an important role in the evolution of ectodermally derived tissues (likely primarily nervous tissues) and mesodermally derived tissues. Our results provide a broad evolutionary foundation from which further studies aimed at the functional characterisation and evolution of COE can be investigated.

  18. Increased basal cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity inhibits the formation of mesoderm-derived structures in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Amieux, Paul S; Howe, Douglas G; Knickerbocker, Heidi; Lee, David C; Su, Thomas; Laszlo, George S; Idzerda, Rejean L; McKnight, G Stanley

    2002-07-26

    A targeted disruption of the RIalpha isoform of protein kinase A (PKA) was created by using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Unlike the other regulatory and catalytic subunits of PKA, RIalpha is the only isoform that is essential for early embryonic development. RIalpha homozygous mutant embryos fail to develop a functional heart tube at E8.5 and are resorbed at approximately E10.5. Mutant embryos show significant growth retardation and developmental delay compared with wild type littermates from E7.5 to E10.5. The anterior-posterior axis of RIalpha mutants is well developed, with a prominent head structure but a reduced trunk. PKA activity measurements reveal an increased basal PKA activity in these embryos. Brachyury mRNA expression in the primitive streak of RIalpha mutants is significantly reduced, consistent with later deficits in axial, paraxial, and lateral plate mesodermal derivatives. This defect in the production and migration of mesoderm can be completely rescued by crossing RIalpha mutants to mice carrying a targeted disruption in the Calpha catalytic subunit, demonstrating that unregulated PKA activity rather than a specific loss of RIalpha is responsible for the phenotype. Primary embryonic fibroblasts from RIalpha mutant embryos display an abnormal cytoskeleton and an altered ability to migrate in cell culture. Our results demonstrate that unregulated PKA activity negatively affects growth factor-mediated mesoderm formation during early mouse development.

  19. Nitric oxide determines mesodermic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells by activating class IIa histone deacetylases: potential therapeutic implications in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Spallotta, Francesco; Rosati, Jessica; Straino, Stefania; Nanni, Simona; Grasselli, Annalisa; Ambrosino, Valeria; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Farsetti, Antonella; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo; Illi, Barbara

    2010-03-31

    In human endothelial cells, nitric oxide (NO) results in class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) activation and marked histone deacetylation. It is unknown whether similar epigenetic events occur in embryonic stem cells (ESC) exposed to NO and how this treatment could influence ESC therapeutic potential during tissue regeneration.This study reports that the NO-dependent class IIa HDACs subcellular localization and activity decreases the global acetylation level of H3 histones in ESC and that this phenomenon is associated with the inhibition of Oct4, Nanog, and KLF4 expression. Further, a NO-induced formation of macromolecular complexes including HDAC3, 4, 7, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) have been detected. These processes correlated with the expression of the mesodermal-specific protein brachyury (Bry) and the appearance of several vascular and skeletal muscle differentiation markers. These events were abolished by the class IIa-specific inhibitor MC1568 and by HDAC4 or HDAC7 short interfering RNA (siRNA). The ability of NO to induce mesodermic/cardiovascular gene expression prompted us to evaluate the regenerative potential of these cells in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. We found that NO-treated ESCs injected into the cardiac left ventricle selectively localized in the ischemic hindlimb and contributed to the regeneration of muscular and vascular structures. These findings establish a key role for NO and class IIa HDACs modulation in ESC mesodermal commitment and enhanced regenerative potential in vivo.

  20. The expression pattern of the chicken homeobox-containing gene GHox-7 in developing polydactylous limb buds suggests its involvement in apical ectodermal ridge-directed outgrowth of limb mesoderm and in programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A

    1993-01-01

    The limb buds of the polydactylous mutant embryos, talpid2 and diplopodia-5, possess expanded distal apexes surmounted by prolongated thickened apical ectodermal ridges that promote the outgrowth and formation of digits from both the anterior and posterior mesoderm of the mutant limb buds. The chicken homeobox-containing gene GHox-7 exhibits an expanded domain of expression throughout the expanded subridge mesoderm of the mutant limb buds, providing support for the hypothesis that GHox-7 expression by subridge mesenchymal cells is involved in the outgrowth-promoting effect of the apical ectodermal ridge. During normal limb development GHox-7 is also expressed by the mesoderm in the proximal anterior nonchondrogenic periphery of the limb bud, which includes, but is not limited to the anterior necrotic zone. GHox-7 is also expressed in the posterior necrotic zone at the mid-proximal posterior edge of the limb bud. In contrast, GHox-7 is not expressed in either the proximal anterior or posterior peripheral mesoderm of talpid2 and diplopodia-5 limb buds which lack proximal anterior and posterior necrotic zones. Furthermore, retinoic acid-coated bead implants, which diminish cell death in the anterior necrotic zone, elicit a local inhibition of GHox-7 expression in the proximal anterior peripheral mesoderm. These results support the suggestion that GHox-7 may be involved in defining regions of programmed cell death during limb development. Furthermore, these studies indicate that the distal subridge and proximal anterior nonchondrogenic mesodermal domains of GHox-7 expression are independently regulated.

  1. FoxA4 Favours Notochord Formation by Inhibiting Contiguous Mesodermal Fates and Restricts Anterior Neural Development in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Murgan, Sabrina; Castro Colabianchi, Aitana Manuela; Monti, Renato José; Boyadjián López, Laura Elena; Aguirre, Cecilia E.; Stivala, Ernesto González; López, Silvia L.

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrates, the embryonic dorsal midline is a crucial signalling centre that patterns the surrounding tissues during development. Members of the FoxA subfamily of transcription factors are expressed in the structures that compose this centre. Foxa2 is essential for dorsal midline development in mammals, since knock-out mouse embryos lack a definitive node, notochord and floor plate. The related gene foxA4 is only present in amphibians. Expression begins in the blastula –chordin and –noggin expressing centre (BCNE) and is later restricted to the dorsal midline derivatives of the Spemann's organiser. It was suggested that the early functions of mammalian foxa2 are carried out by foxA4 in frogs, but functional experiments were needed to test this hypothesis. Here, we show that some important dorsal midline functions of mammalian foxa2 are exerted by foxA4 in Xenopus. We provide new evidence that the latter prevents the respecification of dorsal midline precursors towards contiguous fates, inhibiting prechordal and paraxial mesoderm development in favour of the notochord. In addition, we show that foxA4 is required for the correct regionalisation and maintenance of the central nervous system. FoxA4 participates in constraining the prospective rostral forebrain territory during neural specification and is necessary for the correct segregation of the most anterior ectodermal derivatives, such as the cement gland and the pituitary anlagen. Moreover, the early expression of foxA4 in the BCNE (which contains precursors of the whole forebrain and most of the midbrain and hindbrain) is directly required to restrict anterior neural development. PMID:25343614

  2. Zebrafish second heart field development relies on progenitor specification in anterior lateral plate mesoderm and nkx2.5 function.

    PubMed

    Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Adams, Meghan S; Nevis, Kathleen R; Jahangiri, Leila; Obregon, Pablo; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey

    2013-03-01

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors perform essential functions during mammalian cardiogenesis. We recently identified a population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in zebrafish expressing latent TGFβ-binding protein 3 (ltbp3) that exhibits several defining characteristics of the anterior SHF in mammals. However, ltbp3 transcripts are conspicuously absent in anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), where SHF progenitors are specified in higher vertebrates. Instead, ltbp3 expression initiates at the arterial pole of the developing heart tube. Because the mechanisms of cardiac development are conserved evolutionarily, we hypothesized that zebrafish SHF specification also occurs in the ALPM. To test this hypothesis, we Cre/loxP lineage traced gata4(+) and nkx2.5(+) ALPM populations predicted to contain SHF progenitors, based on evolutionary conservation of ALPM patterning. Traced cells were identified in SHF-derived distal ventricular myocardium and in three lineages in the outflow tract (OFT). We confirmed the extent of contributions made by ALPM nkx2.5(+) cells using Kaede photoconversion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, as in higher vertebrates, zebrafish SHF progenitors are specified within the ALPM and express nkx2.5. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that Nkx2.5 plays a conserved and essential role during zebrafish SHF development. Embryos injected with an nkx2.5 morpholino exhibited SHF phenotypes caused by compromised progenitor cell proliferation. Co-injecting low doses of nkx2.5 and ltbp3 morpholinos revealed a genetic interaction between these factors. Taken together, our data highlight two conserved features of zebrafish SHF development, reveal a novel genetic relationship between nkx2.5 and ltbp3, and underscore the utility of this model organism for deciphering SHF biology.

  3. Zebrafish second heart field development relies on progenitor specification in anterior lateral plate mesoderm and nkx2.5 function

    PubMed Central

    Guner-Ataman, Burcu; Paffett-Lugassy, Noelle; Adams, Meghan S.; Nevis, Kathleen R.; Jahangiri, Leila; Obregon, Pablo; Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors perform essential functions during mammalian cardiogenesis. We recently identified a population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in zebrafish expressing latent TGFβ-binding protein 3 (ltbp3) that exhibits several defining characteristics of the anterior SHF in mammals. However, ltbp3 transcripts are conspicuously absent in anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), where SHF progenitors are specified in higher vertebrates. Instead, ltbp3 expression initiates at the arterial pole of the developing heart tube. Because the mechanisms of cardiac development are conserved evolutionarily, we hypothesized that zebrafish SHF specification also occurs in the ALPM. To test this hypothesis, we Cre/loxP lineage traced gata4+ and nkx2.5+ ALPM populations predicted to contain SHF progenitors, based on evolutionary conservation of ALPM patterning. Traced cells were identified in SHF-derived distal ventricular myocardium and in three lineages in the outflow tract (OFT). We confirmed the extent of contributions made by ALPM nkx2.5+ cells using Kaede photoconversion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, as in higher vertebrates, zebrafish SHF progenitors are specified within the ALPM and express nkx2.5. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that Nkx2.5 plays a conserved and essential role during zebrafish SHF development. Embryos injected with an nkx2.5 morpholino exhibited SHF phenotypes caused by compromised progenitor cell proliferation. Co-injecting low doses of nkx2.5 and ltbp3 morpholinos revealed a genetic interaction between these factors. Taken together, our data highlight two conserved features of zebrafish SHF development, reveal a novel genetic relationship between nkx2.5 and ltbp3, and underscore the utility of this model organism for deciphering SHF biology. PMID:23444361

  4. Time course and side-by-side analysis of mesodermal, pre-myogenic, myogenic and differentiated cell markers in the chicken model for skeletal muscle formation

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Federica; Nogueira, Júlia Meireles; Wöhrle, Svenja; Sobreira, Débora Rodrigues; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The chicken is a well-established model for amniote (including human) skeletal muscle formation because the developmental anatomy of chicken skeletal muscle matches that of mammals. The accessibility of the chicken in the egg as well as the sequencing of its genome and novel molecular techniques have raised the profile of this model. Over the years, a number of regulatory and marker genes have been identified that are suited to monitor the progress of skeletal myogenesis both in wildtype and in experimental embryos. However, in the various studies, differing markers at different stages of development have been used. Moreover, contradictory results on the hierarchy of regulatory factors are now emerging, and clearly, factors need to be able to cooperate. Thus, a reference paper describing in detail and side-by-side the time course of marker gene expression during avian myogenesis is needed. We comparatively analysed onset and expression patterns of the key markers for the chicken immature paraxial mesoderm, for muscle-competent cells, for cells committed to myogenesis and for cells entering terminal differentiation. We performed this analysis from stages when the first paraxial mesoderm is being laid down to the stage when mesoderm formation comes to a conclusion. Our data show that, although the sequence of marker gene expression is the same at the various stages of development, the timing of the expression onset is quite different. Moreover, marker gene expression in myogenic cells being deployed from the dorsomedial and ventrolateral lips of the dermomyotome is different from those being deployed from the rostrocaudal lips, suggesting different molecular programs. Furthermore, expression of Myosin Heavy Chain genes is overlapping but different along the length of a myotube. Finally, Mef2c is the most likely partner of Mrf proteins, and, in contrast to the mouse and more alike frog and zebrafish fish, chicken Mrf4 is co-expressed with MyoG as cells enter terminal

  5. The murine Nck SH2/SH3 adaptors are important for the development of mesoderm-derived embryonic structures and for regulating the cellular actin network.

    PubMed

    Bladt, Friedhelm; Aippersbach, Elke; Gelkop, Sigal; Strasser, Geraldine A; Nash, Piers; Tafuri, Anna; Gertler, Frank B; Pawson, Tony

    2003-07-01

    Mammalian Nck1 and Nck2 are closely related adaptor proteins that possess three SH3 domains, followed by an SH2 domain, and are implicated in coupling phosphotyrosine signals to polypeptides that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. However, the in vivo functions of Nck1 and Nck2 have not been defined. We have mutated the murine Nck1 and Nck2 genes and incorporated beta-galactosidase reporters into the mutant loci. In mouse embryos, the two Nck genes have broad and overlapping expression patterns. They are functionally redundant in the sense that mice deficient for either Nck1 or Nck2 are viable, whereas inactivation of both Nck1 and Nck2 results in profound defects in mesoderm-derived notochord and embryonic lethality at embryonic day 9.5. Fibroblast cell lines derived from Nck1(-/-) Nck2(-/-) embryos have defects in cell motility and in the organization of the lamellipodial actin network. These data suggest that the Nck SH2/SH3 adaptors have important functions in the development of mesodermal structures during embryogenesis, potentially linked to a role in cell movement and cytoskeletal organization.

  6. The NK-2 class homeodomain factor CEH-51 and the T-box factor TBX-35 have overlapping function in C. elegans mesoderm development.

    PubMed

    Broitman-Maduro, Gina; Owraghi, Melissa; Hung, Wendy W K; Kuntz, Steven; Sternberg, Paul W; Maduro, Morris F

    2009-08-01

    The C. elegans MS blastomere, born at the 7-cell stage of embryogenesis, generates primarily mesodermal cell types, including pharynx cells, body muscles and coelomocytes. A presumptive null mutation in the T-box factor gene tbx-35, a target of the MED-1 and MED-2 divergent GATA factors, was previously found to result in a profound decrease in the production of MS-derived tissues, although the tbx-35(-) embryonic arrest phenotype was variable. We report here that the NK-2 class homeobox gene ceh-51 is a direct target of TBX-35 and at least one other factor, and that CEH-51 and TBX-35 share functions. Embryos homozygous for a ceh-51 null mutation arrest as larvae with pharynx and muscle defects, although these tissues appear to be specified correctly. Loss of tbx-35 and ceh-51 together results in a synergistic phenotype resembling loss of med-1 and med-2. Overexpression of ceh-51 causes embryonic arrest and generation of ectopic body muscle and coelomocytes. Our data show that TBX-35 and CEH-51 have overlapping function in MS lineage development. As T-box regulators and NK-2 homeodomain factors are both important for heart development in Drosophila and vertebrates, our results suggest that these regulators function in a similar manner in C. elegans to specify a major precursor of mesoderm.

  7. Axial skeletal defects caused by mutation in the spondylocostal dysplasia/pudgy gene Dll3 are associated with disruption of the segmentation clock within the presomitic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Dunwoodie, Sally L; Clements, Melanie; Sparrow, Duncan B; Sa, Xin; Conlon, Ronald A; Beddington, Rosa S P

    2002-04-01

    A loss-of-function mutation in the mouse delta-like3 (Dll3) gene has been generated following gene targeting, and results in severe axial skeletal defects. These defects, which consist of highly disorganised vertebrae and costal defects, are similar to those associated with the Dll3-dependent pudgy mutant in mouse and with spondylocostal dysplasia (MIM 277300) in humans. This study demonstrates that Dll3(neo) and Dll3(pu) are functionally equivalent alleles with respect to the skeletal dysplasia, and we suggest that the three human DLL3 mutations associated with spondylocostal dysplasia are also functionally equivalent to the Dll3(neo) null allele. Our phenotypic analysis of Dll3(neo)/Dll3(neo) mutants shows that the developmental origins of the skeletal defects lie in delayed and irregular somite formation, which results in the perturbation of anteroposterior somite polarity. As the expression of Lfng, Hes1, Hes5 and Hey1 is disrupted in the presomitic mesoderm, we suggest that the somitic aberrations are founded in the disruption of the segmentation clock that intrinsically oscillates within presomitic mesoderm.

  8. A comparative molecular approach to mesodermal patterning in basal deuterostomes: the expression pattern of Brachyury in the enteropneust hemichordate Ptychodera flava.

    PubMed

    Peterson, K J; Cameron, R A; Tagawa, K; Satoh, N; Davidson, E H

    1999-01-01

    This work concerns the formation of mesoderm in the development of an enteropneust hemichordate, Ptychodera flava, and the expression of the Brachyury gene during this process. Brachyury expression occurs in two distinct phases. In the embryo, Brachyury is transcribed during gastrulation in the future oral and anal regions of the gut, but transcripts are no longer detected by 2 weeks of development. Brachyury expression is not detected during the 5 months of larval planktonic existence. During this time, the adult coeloms begin to develop, originating as coalescences of cells that appear to delaminate from the wall of the gut. Brachyury expression cannot be detected again until metamorphosis, when transcripts appear in the mesoderm of the adult proboscis, collar and the very posterior region of the trunk. It is also expressed in the posterior end of the gut. At no time is Brachyury expressed in the stomochord, the putative homologue of the chordate notochord. These observations illuminate the process of maximal indirect development in Ptychodera and, by comparison with patterns of Brachyury expression in the indirect development of echinoderms, their sister group, they reveal the evolutionary history of Brachyury utilization in deuterostomes.

  9. XPACE4 is a localized pro-protein convertase required for mesoderm induction and the cleavage of specific TGFbeta proteins in Xenopus development.

    PubMed

    Birsoy, Bilge; Berg, Linnea; Williams, P Huw; Smith, James C; Wylie, Christopher C; Christian, Jan L; Heasman, Janet

    2005-02-01

    XPACE4 is a member of the subtilisin/kexin family of pro-protein convertases. It cleaves many pro-proteins to release their active proteins, including members of the TGFbeta family of signaling molecules. Studies in mouse suggest it may have important roles in regulating embryonic tissue specification. Here, we examine the role of XPACE4 in Xenopus development and make three novel observations: first, XPACE4 is stored as maternal mRNA localized to the mitochondrial cloud and vegetal hemisphere of the oocyte; second, it is required for the endogenous mesoderm inducing activity of vegetal cells before gastrulation; and third, it has substrate-specific activity, cleaving Xnr1, Xnr2, Xnr3 and Vg1, but not Xnr5, Derriere or ActivinB pro-proteins. We conclude that maternal XPACE4 plays an important role in embryonic patterning by regulating the production of a subset of active mature TGFbeta proteins in specific sites.

  10. Development of a conditional Mesd (mesoderm development) allele for functional analysis of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related family in defined tissues.

    PubMed

    Taibi, Andrew V; Lighthouse, Janet K; Grady, Richard C; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Holdener, Bernadette C

    2013-01-01

    The Low-density lipoprotein receptor-Related Protein (LRP) family members are essential for diverse processes ranging from the regulation of gastrulation to the modulation of lipid homeostasis. Receptors in this family bind and internalize a diverse array of ligands in the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a consequence, LRPs regulate a wide variety of cellular functions including, but not limited to lipid metabolism, membrane composition, cell motility, and cell signaling. Not surprisingly, mutations in single human LRPs are associated with defects in cholesterol metabolism and development of atherosclerosis, abnormalities in bone density, or aberrant eye vasculature, and may be a contributing factor in development of Alzheimer's disease. Often, members of this diverse family of receptors perform overlapping roles in the same tissues, complicating the analysis of their function through conventional targeted mutagenesis. Here, we describe development of a mouse Mesd (Mesoderm Development) conditional knockout allele, and demonstrate that ubiquitous deletion of Mesd using Cre-recombinase blocks gastrulation, as observed in the traditional knockout and albino-deletion phenotypes. This conditional allele will serve as an excellent tool for future characterization of the cumulative contribution of LRP members in defined tissues.

  11. Hoxb1 regulates proliferation and differentiation of second heart field progenitors in pharyngeal mesoderm and genetically interacts with Hoxa1 during cardiac outflow tract development.

    PubMed

    Roux, Marine; Laforest, Brigitte; Capecchi, Mario; Bertrand, Nicolas; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2015-10-15

    Outflow tract (OFT) anomalies are among the most common congenital heart defects found at birth. The embryonic OFT grows by the progressive addition of cardiac progenitors, termed the second heart field (SHF), which originate from splanchnic pharyngeal mesoderm. Development of the SHF is controlled by multiple intercellular signals and transcription factors; however the relationship between different SHF regulators remains unclear. We have recently shown that Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 are expressed in a sub-population of the SHF contributing to the OFT. Here, we report that Hoxb1 deficiency results in a shorter OFT and ventricular septal defects (VSD). Mechanistically, we show that both FGF/ERK and BMP/SMAD signaling, which regulate proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells and OFT morphogenesis, are enhanced in the pharyngeal region in Hoxb1 mutants. Absence of Hoxb1 also perturbed SHF development through premature myocardial differentiation. Hence, the positioning and remodeling of the mutant OFT is disrupted. Hoxa1(-/-) embryos, in contrast, have low percentage of VSD and normal SHF development. However, compound Hoxa1(-/-); Hoxb1(+/-) embryos display OFT defects associated with premature SHF differentiation, demonstrating redundant roles of these factors during OFT development. Our findings provide new insights into the gene regulatory network controlling SHF and OFT formation.

  12. Tissue Reactivity of the 14F7 Mab Raised against N-Glycolyl GM3 Ganglioside in Tumors of Neuroectodermal, Mesodermal, and Epithelial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Rancés; Quintana, Yisel; Blanco, Damián; Cedeño, Mercedes; Rengifo, Charles E.; Frómeta, Milagros; Ríos, Martha; Rengifo, Enrique; Carr, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid forming the structure of gangliosides and/or other glycoconjugates (Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen) in human has been considered as a tumor-associated antigen. Specifically, some reports of 14F7 Mab (a highly specific Mab raised against N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside) reactivity in human tumors have been recently published. Nevertheless, tumors of epithelial origin have been mostly evaluated. The goal of the present paper was to evaluate the immunohistochemical recognition of 14F7 Mab in different human tumors of neuroectodermal, mesodermal, and epithelial origins using an immunoperoxidase staining method. Samples of fetal, normal, and reactive astrocytosis of the brain were also included in the study. In general, nontumoral tissues, as well as, low-grade brain tumors showed no or a limited immunoreaction with 14F7 Mab. Nevertheless, high-grade astrocytomas (III-IV) and neuroblastomas, as well as, sarcomas and thyroid carcinomas were mostly reactive with 14F7. No reaction was evidenced in medulloblastomas and ependymoblastomas. Our data suggest that the expression of N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside could be related to the aggressive behavior of malignant cells, without depending on the tumor origin. Our data could also support the possible use of N-glycolyl GM3 as a target for both active and passive immunotherapies of malignancies expressing this molecule. PMID:26317019

  13. Tissue Reactivity of the 14F7 Mab Raised against N-Glycolyl GM3 Ganglioside in Tumors of Neuroectodermal, Mesodermal, and Epithelial Origin.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Rancés; Quintana, Yisel; Blanco, Damián; Cedeño, Mercedes; Rengifo, Charles E; Frómeta, Milagros; Ríos, Martha; Rengifo, Enrique; Carr, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid forming the structure of gangliosides and/or other glycoconjugates (Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen) in human has been considered as a tumor-associated antigen. Specifically, some reports of 14F7 Mab (a highly specific Mab raised against N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside) reactivity in human tumors have been recently published. Nevertheless, tumors of epithelial origin have been mostly evaluated. The goal of the present paper was to evaluate the immunohistochemical recognition of 14F7 Mab in different human tumors of neuroectodermal, mesodermal, and epithelial origins using an immunoperoxidase staining method. Samples of fetal, normal, and reactive astrocytosis of the brain were also included in the study. In general, nontumoral tissues, as well as, low-grade brain tumors showed no or a limited immunoreaction with 14F7 Mab. Nevertheless, high-grade astrocytomas (III-IV) and neuroblastomas, as well as, sarcomas and thyroid carcinomas were mostly reactive with 14F7. No reaction was evidenced in medulloblastomas and ependymoblastomas. Our data suggest that the expression of N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside could be related to the aggressive behavior of malignant cells, without depending on the tumor origin. Our data could also support the possible use of N-glycolyl GM3 as a target for both active and passive immunotherapies of malignancies expressing this molecule.

  14. Identification of presomitic mesoderm (PSM)-specific Mesp1 enhancer and generation of a PSM-specific Mesp1/Mesp2-null mouse using BAC-based rescue technology.

    PubMed

    Oginuma, Masayuki; Hirata, Tatsumi; Saga, Yumiko

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) modification technology is a powerful method for the identification of enhancer sequences and genetic modifications. Using this method, we have analyzed the Mesp1 and/or Mesp2 enhancers and identified P1-PSME, a PSM-specific enhancer of Mesp1, which contains a T-box binding site similar to the previously identified P2-PSME. Hence, Mesp1 and Mesp2 use different enhancers for their PSM-specific expression. In addition, we find that these two genes also use distinct enhancers for their early mesodermal expression. Based on these results, we generated a PSM-specific Mesp1/Mesp2-null mouse by introducing a BAC clone, from which only early mesodermal Mesp1 expression is possible, into the Mesp1/Mesp2 double knockout (dKO) genetic background. This successfully rescued gastrulation defects due to the lack of the early mesoderm in the dKO mouse and we thereby obtained a PSM-specific Mesp1/Mesp2-null mouse showing a lack of segmented somites.

  15. Prdm1 functions in the mesoderm of the second heart field, where it interacts genetically with Tbx1, during outflow tract morphogenesis in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Stéphane D; Mayeuf-Louchart, Alicia; Watanabe, Yusuke; Brzezinski, Joseph A; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Congenital heart defects affect at least 0.8% of newborn children and are a major cause of lethality prior to birth. Malformations of the arterial pole are particularly frequent. The myocardium at the base of the pulmonary trunk and aorta and the arterial tree associated with these great arteries are derived from splanchnic mesoderm of the second heart field (SHF), an important source of cardiac progenitor cells. These cells are controlled by a gene regulatory network that includes Fgf8, Fgf10 and Tbx1. Prdm1 encodes a transcriptional repressor that we show is also expressed in the SHF. In mouse embryos, mutation of Prdm1 affects branchial arch development and leads to persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA), indicative of neural crest dysfunction. Using conditional mutants, we show that this is not due to a direct function of Prdm1 in neural crest cells. Mutation of Prdm1 in the SHF does not result in PTA, but leads to arterial pole defects, characterized by mis-alignment or reduction of the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and abnormalities in the arterial tree, defects that are preceded by a reduction in outflow tract size and loss of caudal pharyngeal arch arteries. These defects are associated with a reduction in proliferation of progenitor cells in the SHF. We have investigated genetic interactions with Fgf8 and Tbx1, and show that on a Tbx1 heterozygote background, conditional Prdm1 mutants have more pronounced arterial pole defects, now including PTA. Our results identify PRDM1 as a potential modifier of phenotypic severity in TBX1 haploinsufficient DiGeorge syndrome patients.

  16. Expression pattern of Brachyury and Not in the sea urchin: comparative implications for the origins of mesoderm in the basal deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, K J; Harada, Y; Cameron, R A; Davidson, E H

    1999-03-15

    This work concerns the expression of two transcription factors during the development of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: SpNot, the orthologue of the vertebrate Not gene, and SpBra, the orthologue of the vertebrate Brachyury gene. SpNot transcripts are detected by in situ hybridization in the vegetal plate at the mesenchyme-blastula stage. Later the gene is expressed in the secondary mesenchyme, but expression is no longer detectable after gastrulation. SpNot is upregulated during larval development, in the invaginating vestibule of the adult rudiment. Transcripts are also found in several larva-specific tissues, including the epaulets, blastocoelar cells, and pigment cells. SpBra also displays a discontinuous pattern of expression. Much like SpNot, this gene is expressed during embryogenesis in the embryonic vegetal plate and secondary mesenchyme founder cells, and expression is then extinguished. The gene is upregulated over a week later in the feeding larva, in the vestibule of the adult rudiment. In contrast to SpNot, SpBra is also expressed in the mesoderm of both left and right hydrocoels, and it is not expressed in any larva-specific tissues. We compare the spatial expression profile determined in this study with that of the orthologous Brachyury gene in an indirectly developing enteropneust hemichordate, a representative of the sister group to the echinoderms within the deuterostomes. These observations illuminate the genetic basis underlying the process of maximal indirect development in basal deuterostomes. Finally, Brachyury appears to be an excellent marker for the progeny of the set-aside cells of the sea urchin embryo.

  17. Tgfβ2 and 3 are coexpressed with their extracellular regulator Ltbp1 in the early limb bud and modulate mesodermal outgrowth and BMP signaling in chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor β proteins (Tgfβs) are secreted cytokines with well-defined functions in the differentiation of the musculoskeletal system of the developing limb. Here we have studied in chicken embryos, whether these cytokines are implicated in the development of the embryonic limb bud at stages preceding tissue differentiation. Results Immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3 indicates that signaling by this pathway is active in the undifferentiated mesoderm and AER. Gene expression analysis shows that transcripts of tgfβ2 and tgfβ3 but not tgfβ1 are abundant in the growing undifferentiated limb mesoderm. Transcripts of tgfβ2 are also found in the AER, which is the signaling center responsible for limb outgrowth. Furthermore, we show that Latent Tgfβ Binding protein 1 (LTBP1), which is a key extracellular modulator of Tgfβ ligand bioavailability, is coexpressed with Tgfβs in the early limb bud. Administration of exogenous Tgfβs to limb buds growing in explant cultures provides evidence of these cytokines playing a role in the regulation of mesodermal limb proliferation. In addition, analysis of gene regulation in these experiments revealed that Tgfβ signaling has no effect on the expression of master genes of musculoskeletal tissue differentiation but negatively regulates the expression of the BMP-antagonist Gremlin. Conclusion We propose the occurrence of an interplay between Tgfβ and BMP signaling functionally associated with the regulation of early limb outgrowth by modulating limb mesenchymal cell proliferation. PMID:20565961

  18. CXCR2 Inhibition in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induces Predominant Differentiation to Mesoderm and Endoderm Through Repression of mTOR, β-Catenin, and hTERT Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Hye; Kang, Ka-Won; Kim, Jihea; Hong, Soon-Chul; Park, Yong

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of our previous report verifying that chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) ligands in human placenta-derived cell conditioned medium (hPCCM) support human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) propagation without exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), this study was designed to identify the effect of CXCR2 manipulation on the fate of hPSCs and the underlying mechanism, which had not been previously determined. We observed that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs induces predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm with concomitant loss of hPSC characteristics and accompanying decreased expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), β-catenin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). These phenomena are recapitulated in hPSCs propagated in conventional culture conditions, including bFGF as well as those in hPCCM without exogenous bFGF, suggesting that the action of CXCR2 on hPSCs might not be associated with a bFGF-related mechanism. In addition, the specific CXCR2 ligand growth-related oncogene α (GROα) markedly increased the expression of ectodermal markers in differentiation-committed embryoid bodies derived from hPSCs. This finding suggests that CXCR2 inhibition in hPSCs prohibits the propagation of hPSCs and leads to predominant differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm owing to the blockage of ectodermal differentiation. Taken together, our results indicate that CXCR2 preferentially supports the maintenance of hPSC characteristics as well as facilitates ectodermal differentiation after the commitment to differentiation, and the mechanism might be associated with mTOR, β-catenin, and hTERT activities. PMID:27188501

  19. Bilateral and unilateral mesodermal corneal metaplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Klauss, V; Riedel, K

    1983-01-01

    We report on 2 infants, one with a bilateral and the other with a unilateral corneal metaplasia. The first case with bilateral corneal metaplasia showed shortening of both upper and lower lids with formation of symblephara. By ultrasonography the right eye presented with microphthalmos, aphakia, and persistent hyaloid, whereas the inner parts of the left eye appeared to be normal. The question remains to be answered whether this is an abortive cryptophthalmos leading to bilateral corneal metaplasia or a primary corneal metaplasia inhibiting the lid growth. No suggestions concerning the aetiology are made. The second case presented with a unilateral corneal metaplasia, normal eye lids, aphakia, and microphthalmos. This aberration was probably caused by an amniotic band, as it is associated with malformation of the nose on the same side. In case 2 the dermoid was excised and a lamellar corneal graft performed. The histology is reported. Images PMID:6838805

  20. Human Myocardial Pericytes: Multipotent Mesodermal Precursors Exhibiting Cardiac Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C.W.; Baily, James E.; Corselli, Mirko; Diaz, Mary; Sun, Bin; Xiang, Guosheng; Gray, Gillian A.; Huard, Johnny; Péault, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular mesenchymal precursor cells (i.e. pericytes) reside in skeletal muscle where they contribute to myofiber regeneration; however, the existence of similar microvessel-associated regenerative precursor cells in cardiac muscle has not yet been documented. We tested whether microvascular pericytes within human myocardium exhibit phenotypes and multipotency similar to their anatomically and developmentally distinct counterparts. Fetal and adult human heart pericytes (hHPs) express canonical pericyte markers in situ, including CD146, NG2, PDGFRβ, PDGFRα, αSMA, and SM-MHC, but not CD117, CD133 and desmin, nor endothelial cell (EC) markers. hHPs were prospectively purified to homogeneity from ventricular myocardium by flow cytometry, based on a combination of positive- (CD146) and negative-selection (CD34, CD45, CD56, and CD117) cell lineage markers. Purified hHPs expanded in vitro were phenotypically similar to human skeletal muscle-derived pericytes (hSkMPs). hHPs express MSC markers in situ and exhibited osteo- chondro-, and adipogenic potentials but, importantly, no ability for skeletal myogenesis, diverging from pericytes of all other origins. hHPs supported network formation with/without ECs in Matrigel cultures; hHPs further stimulated angiogenic responses under hypoxia, markedly different from hSkMPs. The cardiomyogenic potential of hHPs was examined following 5-azacytidine treatment and neonatal cardiomyocyte co-culture in vitro, and intramyocardial transplantation in vivo. Results indicated cardiomyocytic differentiation in a small fraction of hHPs. In conclusion, human myocardial pericytes share certain phenotypic and developmental similarities with their skeletal muscle homologs, yet exhibit different antigenic, myogenic, and angiogenic properties. This is the first example of an anatomical restriction in the developmental potential of pericytes as native mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:25336400

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor signaling is essential for mesoderm formation and muscle development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nesan, Dinushan; Kamkar, Maryam; Burrows, Jeffrey; Scott, Ian C; Marsden, Mungo; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2012-03-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling is thought to play a key role in embryogenesis, but its specific developmental effects remain unclear. Cortisol is the primary ligand for GR activation in teleosts, and in zebrafish (Danio rerio), the prehatch embryo content of this steroid is of maternal origin. Using early zebrafish developmental stages, we tested the hypothesis that GR signaling is critical for embryo growth and hatching. In zebrafish, maternal GR mRNA is degraded quickly, followed by zygotic synthesis of the receptor. GR protein is widely expressed throughout early development, and we were able to knockdown this protein using morpholino oligonucleotides. This led to a more than 70% reduction in mRNA abundance of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (mmp13), a glucocorticoid-responsive gene. The GR morphants displayed delayed somitogenesis, defects in somite and tail morphogenesis, reduced embryo size, and rarely survived after hatch. This correlated with altered expression of myogenic markers, including myogenin, myostatin, and muscle-specific myosin heavy chain and troponin genes. A key finding was a 70-90% reduction in the mRNA abundance of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), including bmp2a, bmp2b, and bmp4 in GR morphants. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed multiple putative glucocorticoid response elements upstream of these BMP genes. GR morphants displayed reduced expression of BMP-modulated genes, including eve1 and pax3. Zebrafish GR mRNA injection rescued the GR morphant phenotype and reversed the disrupted expression of BMP and myogenic genes. Our results for the first time indicate that GR signaling is essential for zebrafish muscle development, and we hypothesize a role for BMP morphogens in this process.

  2. Clonal multipotency of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells between mesodermal and ectodermal lineage.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Okada, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Tono, Kayoko; Masuda, Maki; Wada, Mika; Hoshi, Akio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Akira

    2007-09-01

    The differentiation potential of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) after in vitro culture and in vivo transplantation has been extensively studied. However, the clonal multipotency of MDSCs has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that single skeletal muscle-derived CD34-/CD45- (skeletal muscle-derived double negative [Sk-DN]) cells exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, vasculogenic, and neural cell lineages after in vivo single cell-derived single sphere implantation and in vitro clonal single cell culture. Muscles from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were enzymatically dissociated and sorted based on CD34 and CD45. Sk-DN cells were clone-sorted into a 96-well plate and were cultured in collagen-based medium with basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor for 14 days. Individual colony-forming units (CFUs) were then transplanted directly into severely damaged muscle together with 1 x 10(5) competitive carrier Sk-DN cells obtained from wild-type mice muscle expanded for 5 days under the same culture conditions using 35-mm culture dishes. Four weeks after transplantation, implanted GFP+ cells demonstrated differentiation into endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, skeletal muscle, and neural cell (Schwann cell) lineages. This multipotency was also confirmed by expression of mRNA markers for myogenic (MyoD, myf5), neural (Musashi-1, Nestin, neural cell adhesion molecule-1, peripheral myelin protein-22, Nucleostemin), and vascular (alpha-smooth muscle actin, smoothelin, vascular endothelial-cadherin, tyrosine kinase-endothelial) stem cells by clonal (single-cell derived) single-sphere reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Approximately 70% of clonal CFUs exhibited expression of all three cell lineages. These findings support the notion that Sk-DN cells are a useful tool for damaged muscle-related tissue reconstitution by synchronized vasculogenesis, myogenesis, and neurogenesis.

  3. Fate choice of post-natal mesoderm progenitors: skeletal versus cardiac muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Duelen, Robin; Sahakyan, Vardine; Perini, Ilaria; Palazzolo, Giacomo; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2014-02-01

    Regenerative medicine for skeletal and cardiac muscles still constitutes a fascinating and ambitious frontier. In this perspective, understanding the possibilities of intrinsic cell plasticity, present in post-natal muscles, is vital to define and improve novel therapeutic strategies for acute and chronic diseases. In addition, many somatic stem cells are now crossing the boundaries of basic/translational research to enter the first clinical trials. However, it is still an open question whether a lineage switch between skeletal and cardiac adult myogenesis is possible. Therefore, this review focuses on resident somatic stem cells of post-natal skeletal and cardiac muscles and their plastic potential toward the two lineages. Furthermore, examples of myogenic lineage switch in adult stem cells are also reported and discussed.

  4. HOX-mediated LMO2 expression in embryonic mesoderm is recapitulated in acute leukaemias

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Nieto, F J; Joshi, A; Bonadies, N; Kinston, S; Chan, W-I; Gudgin, E; Pridans, C; Landry, J-R; Kikuchi, J; Huntly, B J; Gottgens, B

    2013-01-01

    The Lim Domain Only 2 (LMO2) leukaemia oncogene encodes an LIM domain transcriptional cofactor required for early haematopoiesis. During embryogenesis, LMO2 is also expressed in developing tail and limb buds, an expression pattern we now show to be recapitulated in transgenic mice by an enhancer in LMO2 intron 4. Limb bud expression depended on a cluster of HOX binding sites, while posterior tail expression required the HOX sites and two E-boxes. Given the importance of both LMO2 and HOX genes in acute leukaemias, we further demonstrated that the regulatory hierarchy of HOX control of LMO2 is activated in leukaemia mouse models as well as in patient samples. Moreover, Lmo2 knock-down impaired the growth of leukaemic cells, and high LMO2 expression at diagnosis correlated with poor survival in cytogenetically normal AML patients. Taken together, these results establish a regulatory hierarchy of HOX control of LMO2 in normal development, which can be resurrected during leukaemia development. Redeployment of embryonic regulatory hierarchies in an aberrant context is likely to be relevant in human pathologies beyond the specific example of ectopic activation of LMO2. PMID:23708655

  5. Ultrastructure of mesoderm in embryos of Opisthopatus roseus (Onychophora, Peripatopsidae): revision of the "long germ band" hypothesis for Opisthopatus.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Georg; Bartolomaeus, Thomas; Ruhberg, Hilke

    2005-01-01

    In previous studies, an unusual pattern of development which resembles the "long germ band" development of some insects has been described in the onychophoran Opisthopatus cinctipes. This pattern has been proposed to be a characteristic of the genus Opisthopatus. To test this assumption, the ultrastructure of embryos of O. roseus, the sister species of O. cinctipes, was examined. Two kinds of paired, segmentally arranged coelomic cavities were found in the embryos studied: 1) dorsolateral coelomic cavities lined by extremely thin epithelia, and 2) ventral coelomic cavities situated within the anlagen of ventrolateral body appendages. Only the dorsolateral coelomic cavities can be considered "somites," since they occur earlier during embryogenesis. This is in contrast with the previous view that suggested a ventral position of "somites" in O. cinctipes. In addition, an anterior-to-posterior gradient occurs in the development of O. roseus. Based on our findings, we reevaluated the previous data on O. cinctipes. From this survey, no evidence in support of a "long germ band" hypothesis in Opisthopatus was found. Instead, the embryogenesis in representatives of Opisthopatus is more similar to that in other onychophorans than expected.

  6. Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in second heart field-derived mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jione; Nathan, Elisha; Xu, Shan-Mei; Tzahor, Eldad; Black, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    The cells of the second heart field (SHF) contribute to the outflow tract and right ventricle, as well as to parts of the left ventricle and atria. Isl1, a member of the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor family, is expressed early in this cardiac progenitor population and functions near the top of a transcriptional pathway essential for heart development. Isl1 is required for the survival and migration of SHF-derived cells into the early developing heart at the inflow and outflow poles. Despite this important role for Isl1 in early heart formation, the transcriptional regulation of Isl1 has remained largely undefined. Therefore, to identify transcription factors that regulate Isl1 expression in vivo, we screened the conserved noncoding sequences from the mouse Isl1 locus for enhancer activity in transgenic mouse embryos. Here, we report the identification of an enhancer from the mouse Isl1 gene that is sufficient to direct expression to the SHF and its derivatives. The Isl1 SHF enhancer contains three consensus Forkhead transcription factor binding sites that are efficiently and specifically bound by Forkhead transcription factors. Importantly, the activity of the enhancer is dependent on these three Forkhead binding sites in transgenic mouse embryos. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Isl1 is a direct transcriptional target of Forkhead transcription factors in the SHF and establish a transcriptional pathway upstream of Isl1 in the SHF. PMID:19580802

  7. Zic3 is required in the extra-cardiac perinodal region of the lateral plate mesoderm for left-right patterning and heart development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations in ZIC3 cause human X-linked heterotaxy and isolated cardiovascular malformations. A mouse model with targeted deletion of Zic3 demonstrates an early role for Zic3 in gastrulation, CNS, cardiac and left-right axial development. The observation of multiple malformations in Zic3(null) mice a...

  8. Characterisation of the role of Vrp1 in cell fusion during the development of visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Drosophila muscle cell fusion takes place both during the formation of the somatic mesoderm and the visceral mesoderm, giving rise to the skeletal muscles and the gut musculature respectively. The core process of myoblast fusion is believed to be similar for both organs. The actin cytoskeleton regulator Verprolin acts by binding to WASP, which in turn binds to the Arp2/3 complex and thus activates actin polymerization. While Verprolin has been shown to be important for somatic muscle cell fusion, the function of this protein in visceral muscle fusion has not been determined. Results Verprolin is specifically expressed in the fusion competent myoblasts of the visceral mesoderm, suggesting a role in visceral mesoderm fusion. We here describe a novel Verprolin mutant allele which displays subtle visceral mesoderm fusion defects in the form of mislocalization of the immunoglobulin superfamily molecule Duf/Kirre, which is required on the myoblast cell surface to facilitate attachment between cells that are about to fuse, indicating a function for Verprolin in visceral mesoderm fusion. We further show that Verprolin mutant cells are capable of both migrating and fusing and that the WASP-binding domain of Verprolin is required for rescue of the Verprolin mutant phenotype. Conclusions Verprolin is expressed in the visceral mesoderm and plays a role in visceral muscle fusion as shown by mislocalization of Duf/Kirre in the Verprolin mutant, however it is not absolutely required for myoblast fusion in either the visceral or the somatic mesoderm. PMID:20701765

  9. Dual embryonic origin and patterning of the pharyngeal skeleton in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Piekarski, Nadine; Hanken, James

    2015-01-01

    The impressive morphological diversification of vertebrates was achieved in part by innovation and modification of the pharyngeal skeleton. Extensive fate mapping in amniote models has revealed a primarily cranial neural crest derivation of the pharyngeal skeleton. Although comparable fate maps of amphibians produced over several decades have failed to document a neural crest derivation of ventromedial elements in these vertebrates, a recent report provides evidence of a mesodermal origin of one of these elements, basibranchial 2, in the axolotl. We used a transgenic labeling protocol and grafts of labeled cells between GFP+ and white embryos to derive a fate map that describes contributions of both cranial neural crest and mesoderm to the axolotl pharyngeal skeleton, and we conducted additional experiments that probe the mechanisms that underlie mesodermal patterning. Our fate map confirms a dual embryonic origin of the pharyngeal skeleton in urodeles, including derivation of basibranchial 2 from mesoderm closely associated with the second heart field. Additionally, heterotopic transplantation experiments reveal lineage restriction of mesodermal cells that contribute to pharyngeal cartilage. The mesoderm-derived component of the pharyngeal skeleton appears to be particularly sensitive to retinoic acid (RA): administration of exogenous RA leads to loss of the second basibranchial, but not the first. Neural crest was undoubtedly critical in the evolution of the vertebrate pharyngeal skeleton, but mesoderm may have played a central role in forming ventromedial elements, in particular. When and how many times during vertebrate phylogeny a mesodermal contribution to the pharyngeal skeleton evolved remain to be resolved.

  10. Role of the chicken homeobox-containing genes GHox-4.6 and GHox-8 in the specification of positional identities during the development of normal and polydactylous chick limb buds.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A

    1992-06-01

    During early stages of normal chick limb development, the homeobox-containing (HOX) gene GHox-4.6 is expressed throughout the posterior mesoderm of the wing bud from which most of the skeletal elements including the digits will develop, whereas GHox-8 is expressed in the anterior limb bud mesoderm which will not give rise to skeletal elements. In the present study, we have examined the expression of GHox-4.6 and GHox-8 in the wing buds of two polydactylous mutant chick embryos, diplopodia-5 and talpid2, from which supernumerary digits develop from anterior limb mesoderm, and have also examined the expression of these genes in response to polarizing zone grafts and retinoic acid-coated bead implants which induce the formation of supernumerary digits from anterior limb mesoderm. We have found that the formation of supernumerary digits from the anterior mesoderm in mutant and experimentally induced polydactylous limb buds is preceded by the ectopic expression of GHox-4.6 in the anterior mesoderm and the coincident suppression of GHox-8 expression in the anterior mesoderm. These observations suggest that the anterior mesoderm of the polydactylous limb buds is "posteriorized" and support the suggestion that GHox-8 and GHox-4.6, respectively, are involved in specifying the anterior non-skeletal and posterior digit-forming regions of the limb bud. Although the anterior mesodermal domain of GHox-8 expression is severely impaired in the mutant and experimentally induced polydactylous limb buds, this gene is expressed by the prolonged, thickened apical ectodermal ridges of the polydactylous limb buds that extend along the distal anterior as well as the distal posterior mesoderm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The RhoGEF Pebble is required for cell shape changes during cell migration triggered by the Drosophila FGF receptor Heartless.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sabine; Gryzik, Tanja; Tannebaum, Sylvia; Müller, H-Arno J

    2004-06-01

    The FGF receptor Heartless (HTL) is required for mesodermal cell migration in the Drosophila gastrula. We show that mesoderm cells undergo different phases of specific cell shape changes during mesoderm migration. During the migratory phase, the cells adhere to the basal surface of the ectoderm and exhibit extensive protrusive activity. HTL is required for the protrusive activity of the mesoderm cells. Moreover, the early phenotype of htl mutants suggests that HTL is required for the adhesion of mesoderm cells to the ectoderm. In a genetic screen we identified pebble (pbl) as a novel gene required for mesoderm migration. pbl encodes a guanyl nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RHO1 and is known as an essential regulator of cytokinesis. We show that the function of PBL in cell migration is independent of the function of PBL in cytokinesis. Although RHO1 acts as a substrate for PBL in cytokinesis, compromising RHO1 function in the mesoderm does not block cell migration. These data suggest that the function of PBL in cell migration might be mediated through a pathway distinct from RHO1. This idea is supported by allele-specific differences in the expressivity of the cytokinesis and cell migration phenotypes of different pbl mutants. We show that PBL is autonomously required in the mesoderm for cell migration. Like HTL, PBL is required for early cell shape changes during mesoderm migration. Expression of a constitutively active form of HTL is unable to rescue the early cellular defects in pbl mutants, suggesting that PBL is required for the ability of HTL to trigger these cell shape changes. These results provide evidence for a novel function of the Rho-GEF PBL in HTL-dependent mesodermal cell migration.

  12. A Twist in fate: evolutionary comparison of Twist structure and function.

    PubMed

    Castanon, Irinka; Baylies, Mary K

    2002-04-03

    The general requirement to induce mesoderm and allocate cells into different mesodermal tissues such as body muscle or heart is common in many animal embryos. Since the discovery of the twist gene, there has been great progress toward unraveling the molecular mechanisms that control mesoderm specification and differentiation. Twist was first identified in Drosophila as a gene crucial for proper gastrulation and mesoderm formation. In the fly embryo, Twist continues to play additional roles, allocating mesodermal cells into the body wall muscle fate and patterning a subset of these muscles. Twist is also required for proper differentiation of the adult musculature. Twist homologues have been identified in a great variety of organisms, which span the phylogenetic tree. These organisms include other invertebrates such as jellyfish, nematode, leech and lancelet as well as vertebrates such as frog, chick, fish, mouse and human. The Twist family shares both homology in structure across the basic helix-loop-helix domain and in expression during mesoderm and muscle development in most species. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the Twist family and consider how Twist functions during development. Moreover, we highlight experimental evidence that shows common themes that Twist employs during specification and patterning of the mesoderm among evolutionarily distant organisms. Conserved principles and the molecular mechanisms underlying them are discussed.

  13. Embryonic even skipped-Dependent Muscle and Heart Cell Fates Are Required for Normal Adult Activity, Heart Function, and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Miki; Wessells, Robert J.; Han, Zhe; Liu, Jiandong; Fitzgerald, Kerry; Yusibova, Galina L.; Zamora, Monica; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Bodmer, Rolf; Jaynes, James B.

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila pair-rule gene even skipped (eve) is required for embryonic segmentation and later in specific cell lineages in both the nervous system and the mesoderm. We previously generated eve mesoderm-specific mutants by combining an eve null mutant with a rescuing transgene that includes the entire locus, but with the mesodermal enhancer removed. This allowed us to analyze in detail the defects that result from a precisely targeted elimination of mesodermal eve expression in the context of an otherwise normal embryo. Absence of mesodermal eve causes a highly selective loss of the entire eve-expressing lineage in this germ layer, including those progeny that do not continue to express eve, suggesting that mesodermal eve precursor specification is not implemented. Despite the resulting absence of a subset of muscles and pericardial cells, mesoderm-specific eve mutants survive to fertile adulthood, providing an opportunity to examine the effects of these developmental abnormalities on adult fitness and heart function. We find that in these mutants, flying ability, myocardial performance under normal and stressed conditions, and lifespan are severely reduced. These data imply a nonautonomous role of the affected pericardial cells and body wall muscles in developing and/or maintaining cardiac performance and possibly other functions contributing to normal lifespan. Given the similarities of molecular-genetic control between Drosophila and vertebrates, these findings suggest that peri/epicardial influences may well be important for proper myocardial function. PMID:16239588

  14. Altered expression of the chicken homeobox-containing genes GHox-7 and GHox-8 in the limb buds of limbless mutant chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Krabbenhoft, K M; Upholt, W B; Fallon, J F; Kosher, R A

    1991-12-01

    It has been suggested that the reciprocal expression of the chicken homeobox-containing genes GHox-8 and GHox-7 by the apical ectodermal ridge and subjacent limb mesoderm might be involved in regulating the proximodistal outgrowth of the developing chick limb bud. In the present study the expression of GHox-7 and GHox-8 has been examined by in situ and dot blot hybridization in the developing limb buds of limbless mutant chick embryos. The limb buds of homozygous mutant limbless embryos form at the proper time in development (stage 17/18), but never develop an apical ectodermal ridge, fail to undergo normal elongation, and eventually degenerate. At stage 18, which is shortly following the formation of the limb bud, the expression of GHox-7 is considerably reduced (about 3-fold lower) in the mesoderm of limbless mutant limb buds compared to normal limb bud mesoderm. By stages 20 and 21, as the limb buds of limbless embryos cease outgrowth, GHox-7 expression in limbless mesoderm declines to very low levels, whereas GHox-7 expression increases in the mesoderm of normal limb buds which are undergoing outgrowth. In contrast to GHox-7, expression of GHox-8 in limbless mesoderm at stage 18 is quantitatively similar to its expression in normal limb bud mesoderm, and in limbless and normal mesoderm GHox-8 expression is highly localized in the anterior mesoderm of the limb bud. In normal limb buds, GHox-8 is also expressed in high amounts by the apical ectodermal ridge.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James

    2016-04-19

    Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill levators of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-levator muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes.

  16. Wnt antagonism initiates cardiogenesis in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Valerie A.; Mercola, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Heart induction in Xenopus occurs in paired regions of the dorsoanterior mesoderm in response to signals from the Spemann organizer and underlying dorsoanterior endoderm. These tissues together are sufficient to induce heart formation in noncardiogenic ventral marginal zone mesoderm. Similarly, in avians the underlying definitive endoderm induces cardiogenesis in precardiac mesoderm. Heart-inducing factors in amphibians are not known, and although certain BMPs and FGFs can mimic aspects of cardiogenesis in avians, neither can induce the full range of activities elicited by the inducing tissues. Here we report that the Wnt antagonists Dkk-1 and Crescent can induce heart formation in explants of ventral marginal zone mesoderm. Other Wnt antagonists, including the frizzled domain-containing proteins Frzb and Szl, lacked this activity. Unlike Wnt antagonism, inhibition of BMP signaling did not promote cardiogenesis. Ectopic expression of GSK3β, which inhibits β-catenin-mediated Wnt signaling, also induced cardiogenesis in ventral mesoderm. Analysis of Wnt proteins expressed during gastrulation revealed that Wnt3A and Wnt8, but not Wnt5A or Wnt11, inhibited endogenous heart induction. These results indicate that diffusion of Dkk-1 and Crescent from the organizer initiate cardiogenesis in adjacent mesoderm by establishing a zone of low Wnt3A and Wnt8 activity. PMID:11159911

  17. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  18. Gprk2 adjusts Fog signaling to organize cell movements in Drosophila gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Naoyuki; Yu, Fengwei; Hirose, Susumu

    2013-10-01

    Gastrulation of Drosophila melanogaster proceeds through sequential cell movements: ventral mesodermal (VM) cells are induced by secreted Fog protein to constrict their apical surfaces to form the ventral furrow, and subsequently lateral mesodermal (LM) cells involute toward the furrow. How these cell movements are organized remains elusive. Here, we observed that LM cells extended apical protrusions and then underwent accelerated involution movement, confirming that VM and LM cells display distinct cell morphologies and movements. In a mutant for the GPCR kinase Gprk2, apical constriction was expanded to all mesodermal cells and the involution movement was abolished. In addition, the mesodermal cells halted apical constriction prematurely in accordance with the aberrant accumulation of Myosin II. Epistasis analyses revealed that the Gprk2 mutant phenotypes were dependent on the fog gene. Overexpression of Gprk2 suppressed the effects of excess Cta, a downstream component of Fog signaling. Based on these findings, we propose that Gprk2 attenuates and tunes Fog-Cta signaling to prevent apical constriction in LM cells and to support appropriate apical constriction in VM cells. Thus, the two distinct cell movements in mesoderm invagination are not predetermined, but rather are organized by the adjustment of cell signaling.

  19. Gastrulation EMT Is Independent of P-Cadherin Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Moly, Pricila K; Cooley, James R; Zeltzer, Sebastian L; Yatskievych, Tatiana A; Antin, Parker B

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an evolutionarily conserved process during which cells lose epithelial characteristics and gain a migratory phenotype. Although downregulation of epithelial cadherins by Snail and other transcriptional repressors is generally considered a prerequisite for EMT, recent studies have challenged this view. Here we investigate the relationship between E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression and localization, Snail function and EMT during gastrulation in chicken embryos. Expression analyses show that while E-cadherin transcripts are detected in the epiblast but not in the primitive streak or mesoderm, P-cadherin mRNA and protein are present in the epiblast, primitive and mesoderm. Antibodies that specifically recognize E-cadherin are not presently available. During EMT, P-cadherin relocalizes from the lateral surfaces of epithelial epiblast cells to a circumferential distribution in emerging mesodermal cells. Cells electroporated with an E-cadherin expression construct undergo EMT and migrate into the mesoderm. An examination of Snail function showed that reduction of Slug (SNAI2) protein levels using a morpholino fails to inhibit EMT, and expression of human or chicken Snail in epiblast cells fails to induce EMT. In contrast, cells expressing the Rho inhibitor peptide C3 rapidly exit the epiblast without activating Slug or the mesoderm marker N-cadherin. Together, these experiments show that epiblast cells undergo EMT while retaining P-cadherin, and raise questions about the mechanisms of EMT regulation during avian gastrulation.

  20. BMP-SMAD signaling: From pluripotent stem cells to cardiovascular commitment.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Valeria V; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Valdimarsdottir, Gudrun

    2016-02-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can form all somatic cells of the body. They thus offer opportunities for understanding (i) the basic steps of early human development, (ii) the pathophysiology in human degenerative diseases and (iii) approaches to regenerative medicine and drug development. Methods for improving their differentiation to defined mesodermal derivatives in particular will benefit their use in all of these areas but most particularly applications that require cardiac and vascular tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate mesodermal development in humans are still poorly understood. Gene ablation studies in mice have shown that the signaling pathways activated by the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily, including the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), play crucial roles in mesoderm differentiation and patterning the early embryo. Understanding their interplay and interaction with other signaling pathways, how they activate and inhibit transcription factors and epigenetic regulators during self-renewal, maintenance and exit from pluripotency and differentiation could provide vital information for a range of applications. This includes disease modeling when the hPSCs are derived from patients or drug screens for diseases of mesodermal organs. Here, we review the role of the BMP-SMAD signaling pathway in pluripotent stem cells and during mesoderm differentiation with focus on the cells that make up the cardiovascular system.

  1. What are Head Cavities? - A History of Studies on Vertebrate Head Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Adachi, Noritaka

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the discovery of segmental epithelial coeloms, or "head cavities," in elasmobranch embryos toward the end of the 19th century, the debate over the presence of mesodermal segments in the vertebrate head became a central problem in comparative embryology. The classical segmental view assumed only one type of metamerism in the vertebrate head, in which each metamere was thought to contain one head somite and one pharyngeal arch, innervated by a set of cranial nerves serially homologous to dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The non-segmental view, on the other hand, rejected the somite-like properties of head cavities. A series of small mesodermal cysts in early Torpedo embryos, which were thought to represent true somite homologs, provided a third possible view on the nature of the vertebrate head. Recent molecular developmental data have shed new light on the vertebrate head problem, explaining that head mesoderm evolved, not by the modification of rostral somites of an amphioxus-like ancestor, but through the polarization of unspecified paraxial mesoderm into head mesoderm anteriorly and trunk somites posteriorly.

  2. MiR-24 Is Required for Hematopoietic Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Lynn; Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Lapid, Danica; Choi, Hyewon; Nguyen, Tan; Dahl, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of miRNA, miR-24, in mouse hematopoietic progenitors increases monocytic/ granulocytic differentiation and inhibits B cell development. To determine if endogenous miR-24 is required for hematopoiesis, we antagonized miR-24 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and performed in vitro differentiations. Suppression of miR-24 resulted in an inability to produce blood and hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs) from ESCs. The phenotype is not a general defect in mesoderm production since we observe production of nascent mesoderm as well as mesoderm derived cardiac muscle and endothelial cells. Results from blast colony forming cell (BL-CFC) assays demonstrate that miR-24 is not required for generation of the hemangioblast, the mesoderm progenitor that gives rise to blood and endothelial cells. However, expression of the transcription factors Runx1 and Scl is greatly reduced, suggesting an impaired ability of the hemangioblast to differentiate. Lastly, we observed that known miR-24 target, Trib3, is upregulated in the miR-24 antagonized embryoid bodies (EBs). Overexpression of Trib3 alone in ESCs was able to decrease HPC production, though not as great as seen with miR-24 knockdown. These results demonstrate an essential role for miR-24 in the hematopoietic differentiation of ESCs. Although many miRNAs have been implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis, this is the first miRNA observed to be required for the specification of mammalian blood progenitors from early mesoderm. PMID:25634354

  3. Rapid transcription fosters coordinate snail expression in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Boettiger, Alistair Nicol; Levine, Michael

    2013-01-31

    Transcription is commonly held to be a highly stochastic process, resulting in considerable heterogeneity of gene expression among the different cells in a population. Here, we employ quantitative in situ hybridization methods coupled with high-resolution imaging assays to measure the expression of snail, a developmental patterning gene necessary for coordinating the invagination of the mesoderm during gastrulation of the Drosophila embryo. Our measurements of steady-state mRNAs suggest that there is very little variation in snail expression across the different cells that make up the mesoderm and that synthesis approaches the kinetic limits of Pol II processivity. We propose that rapid transcription kinetics and negative autoregulation are responsible for the remarkable homogeneity of snail expression and the coordination of mesoderm invagination.

  4. Coco regulates dorsoventral specification of germ layers via inhibition of TGFβ signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Thomas J. D.; Vonica, Alin; Heasman, Janet; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Bell, Esther

    2013-01-01

    One of the earliest steps in embryonic development is the specification of the germ layers, the subdivision of the blastula embryo into endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. Maternally expressed members of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) family influence all three germ layers; the ligands are required to induce endoderm and mesoderm, whereas inhibitors are required for formation of the ectoderm. Here, we demonstrate a vital role for maternal Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGFβ signalling, in this process. We show that Coco is required to prevent Activin and Nodal signals in the dorsal marginal side of the embryo from invading the prospective ectoderm, thereby restricting endoderm- and mesoderm-inducing signals to the vegetal and marginal zones of the pre-gastrula Xenopus laevis embryo. PMID:24026124

  5. Coco regulates dorsoventral specification of germ layers via inhibition of TGFβ signalling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Thomas J D; Vonica, Alin; Heasman, Janet; Brivanlou, Ali H; Bell, Esther

    2013-10-01

    One of the earliest steps in embryonic development is the specification of the germ layers, the subdivision of the blastula embryo into endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. Maternally expressed members of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) family influence all three germ layers; the ligands are required to induce endoderm and mesoderm, whereas inhibitors are required for formation of the ectoderm. Here, we demonstrate a vital role for maternal Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGFβ signalling, in this process. We show that Coco is required to prevent Activin and Nodal signals in the dorsal marginal side of the embryo from invading the prospective ectoderm, thereby restricting endoderm- and mesoderm-inducing signals to the vegetal and marginal zones of the pre-gastrula Xenopus laevis embryo.

  6. Oriented cell motility and division underlie early limb bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wyngaarden, Laurie A; Vogeli, Kevin M; Ciruna, Brian G; Wells, Mathew; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Hopyan, Sevan

    2010-08-01

    The vertebrate limb bud arises from lateral plate mesoderm and its overlying ectoderm. Despite progress regarding the genetic requirements for limb development, morphogenetic mechanisms that generate early outgrowth remain relatively undefined. We show by live imaging and lineage tracing in different vertebrate models that the lateral plate contributes mesoderm to the early limb bud through directional cell movement. The direction of cell motion, longitudinal cell axes and bias in cell division planes lie largely parallel to one another along the rostrocaudal (head-tail) axis in lateral plate mesoderm. Transition of these parameters from a rostrocaudal to a mediolateral (outward from the body wall) orientation accompanies early limb bud outgrowth. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Wnt5a acts as a chemoattractant in the emerging limb bud where it contributes to the establishment of cell polarity that is likely to underlie the oriented cell behaviours.

  7. Early embryonic expression patterns of the mouse Flamingo and Prickle orthologues.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Lucy A; Du Roure, Camille; Rodriguez, Tristan A

    2007-11-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster proteins Flamingo and Prickle act in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which is required for acquisition of epithelial polarity in the wing, eye, and epidermis. In mammals, PCP signaling has been shown to regulate cell movements and polarity in a variety of tissues. Here, we show that the murine Flamingo orthologues Celsr1-3 and the Prickle orthologues Prickle1, Prickle2, and Testin have dynamic patterns of expression during pregastrulation and gastrulation stages. Celsr1 is expressed in the anterior visceral endoderm and nascent mesoderm, Celsr2 and Celsr3 mark the prospective neuroectoderm, Prickle1 is expressed in the primitive streak and mesoderm, Prickle2 in the node, and Testin in the anterior visceral endoderm, the extraembryonic ectoderm, primitive streak, and mesoderm. Analysis of a gene-trap mutation in Testin indicates that this gene is not required for embryogenesis; therefore, other Prickle homologues may compensate for its function during development.

  8. Molecular inroads into the anterior heart field.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Robert G

    2005-02-01

    In 2001, three research groups described a previously unrecognized population of progenitor cells in pharyngeal mesoderm that gives rise to myocardium at the arterial pole of the heart. In the last 4 years, the major importance of the cellular contribution of pharyngeal mesoderm to normal and pathologic heart development has become apparent. Lineage-tracing experiments have defined the extent to which pharyngeal progenitor cells colonize the heart, revealing a contribution to venous, as well as arterial, pole myocardium; in addition, major molecular inroads have been made into understanding gene regulation in pharyngeal myocardial progenitor cells, implicating forkhead, Gata, LIM homeodomain, MEF2, SMAD, and T-box transcription factors. The key role of the anterior heart field during normal heart development is underscored by the demonstration that both direct and indirect perturbation of myocardial progenitor cells in pharyngeal mesoderm result in congenital heart disease.

  9. The expression pattern of the Distal-less homeobox-containing gene Dlx-5 in the developing chick limb bud suggests its involvement in apical ectodermal ridge activity, pattern formation, and cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, D; Sumoy, L; Gannon, J; Sun, H; Brown, A M; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A

    1995-08-01

    Here we report the isolation from a chick limb bud cDNA library of a cDNA that contains the full coding sequence of chicken Dlx-5, a member of the Distal-less (Dlx) family of homeobox-containing genes that encode homeodomains highly similar to that of the Drosophila Distal-less gene, a gene that is required for limb development in the Drosophila embryo. The expression pattern of Dlx-5 in the developing chick limb bud suggests that it may be involved in several aspects of limb morphogenesis. Dlx-5 is expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) which directs the outgrowth and patterning of underlying limb mesoderm. During early limb development Dlx-5 is also expressed in the mesoderm at the anterior margin of the limb bud and in a discrete group of mesodermal cells at the mid-proximal posterior margin that corresponds to the posterior necrotic zone. These mesodermal domains of Dlx-5 expression roughly correspond to the anterior and posterior boundaries of the progress zone, the group of highly proliferating undifferentiated mesodermal cells underneath the AER that will give rise to the skeletal elements of the limb and associated structures. The AER and anterior and posterior mesodermal domains of Dlx-5 expression are regions in which the homeobox-containing gene Msx-2 is also highly expressed, suggesting that Dlx-5 and Msx-2 might be involved in regulatory networks that control AER activity and demarcate the progress zone. In addition, Dlx-5 is expressed in high amounts by the differentiating cartilaginous skeletal elements of the limb, suggesting it may be involved in regulating the onset of limb cartilage differentiation.

  10. Snail-dependent repression of the RhoGEF pebble is required for gastrulation consistency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Murray, Michael J; Southall, Tony D; Liu, Wenjie; Fraval, Hamilton; Lorensuhewa, Nirmal; Brand, Andrea H; Saint, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The Rho GTP exchange factor, Pebble (Pbl), long recognised as an essential activator of Rho during cytokinesis, also regulates mesoderm migration at gastrulation. Like other cell cycle components, pbl expression patterns broadly correlate with proliferative tissue. Surprisingly, in spite of its role in the early mesoderm, pbl is downregulated in the presumptive mesoderm before ventral furrow formation. Here, we show that this mesoderm-specific repression of pbl is dependent on the transcriptional repressor Snail (Sna). pbl repression was lost in sna mutants but was unaffected when Sna was ectopically expressed, showing that Sna is necessary, but not sufficient, for pbl repression. Using DamID, the first intron of pbl was identified as a Sna-binding region. Nine sites with the Sna-binding consensus motif CAGGT[GA] were identified in this intron. Mutating these to TAGGC[GA] abolished the ventral repression of pbl. Surprisingly, Sna-dependent repression of pbl was not essential for viability or fertility. Loss of repression did, however, increase the frequency of low-penetrance gastrulation defects. Consistent with this, expression of a pbl-GFP transgene in the presumptive mesoderm generated similar gastrulation defects. Finally, we show that a cluster of Snail-binding sites in the middle of the first intron of pbl orthologues is a conserved feature in the other 11 sequenced Drosophila species. We conclude that pbl levels are precisely regulated to ensure that there is enough protein available for its role in early mesoderm development but not so much as to inhibit the orderly progression of gastrulation.

  11. The emerging role of GATA transcription factors in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Lentjes, Marjolein H F M; Niessen, Hanneke E C; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Melotte, Veerle; van Engeland, Manon

    2016-03-08

    The GATA family of transcription factors consists of six proteins (GATA1-6) which are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. GATA1/2/3 are required for differentiation of mesoderm and ectoderm-derived tissues, including the haematopoietic and central nervous system. GATA4/5/6 are implicated in development and differentiation of endoderm- and mesoderm-derived tissues such as induction of differentiation of embryonic stem cells, cardiovascular embryogenesis and guidance of epithelial cell differentiation in the adult.

  12. Mitosis-associated repression in development

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Emilia; Lim, Bomyi; Guessous, Ghita; Falahati, Hanieh; Levine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional repression is a pervasive feature of animal development. Here, we employ live-imaging methods to visualize the Snail repressor, which establishes the boundary between the presumptive mesoderm and neurogenic ectoderm of early Drosophila embryos. Snail target enhancers were attached to an MS2 reporter gene, permitting detection of nascent transcripts in living embryos. The transgenes exhibit initially broad patterns of transcription but are refined by repression in the mesoderm following mitosis. These observations reveal a correlation between mitotic silencing and Snail repression. We propose that mitosis and other inherent discontinuities in transcription boost the activities of sequence-specific repressors, such as Snail. PMID:27401553

  13. Localisation of embryonic prealbumin in formalin-fixed human fetal and adult tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, M E; Reid, W A; McHardie, G A; Hardman, R; Smith, G D; Horne, C H; Kalashnikov, V V; Tatarinov, Y S

    1981-01-01

    The presence of embryonic prealbumin (EPA) has been confirmed in fetal fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and distal tubular epithelial cells by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. EPA has often been found also in the stromal cells of benign and malignant mesodermal tumours, but not in the epithelial cells of benign and malignant epithelial tumours. That EPA is not an exclusive product of neoplastic mesodermal cells is demonstrated by our finding of EPA in fibroblasts of granulation tissue, irradiated fibroblasts, and in distal tubular epithelial cells of miscellaneous adult kidneys. Images PMID:7021602

  14. Neuro-Immune Mechanisms in Response to Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    parents, Hank and Gail Schoneboom. They instilled in me a work ethic to be successful in any rigorous endeavor and nurtured the curiosity of the child...are the resident macrophages of the CNS, thought to arise from a common embryologic origin, the mesoderm (Cuadros and Navascues, 1998, Wozniak, 1998

  15. In Vivo T-Box Transcription Factor Profiling Reveals Joint Regulation of Embryonic Neuromesodermal Bipotency

    PubMed Central

    Gentsch, George E.; Owens, Nick D.L.; Martin, Stephen R.; Piccinelli, Paul; Faial, Tiago; Trotter, Matthew W.B.; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Smith, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The design of effective cell replacement therapies requires detailed knowledge of how embryonic stem cells form primary tissues, such as mesoderm or neurectoderm that later become skeletal muscle or nervous system. Members of the T-box transcription factor family are key in the formation of these primary tissues, but their underlying molecular activities are poorly understood. Here, we define in vivo genome-wide regulatory inputs of the T-box proteins Brachyury, Eomesodermin, and VegT, which together maintain neuromesodermal stem cells and determine their bipotential fates in frog embryos. These T-box proteins are all recruited to the same genomic recognition sites, from where they activate genes involved in stem cell maintenance and mesoderm formation while repressing neurogenic genes. Consequently, their loss causes embryos to form an oversized neural tube with no mesodermal derivatives. This collaboration between T-box family members thus ensures the continuous formation of correctly proportioned neural and mesodermal tissues in vertebrate embryos during axial elongation. PMID:24055059

  16. Extraocular muscle aplasia in Moebius syndrome.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, E I; Maumenee, I H

    1986-01-01

    A case of Moebius syndrome with bilateral aplasia of the medial and lateral recti is reported. The fibrous bands that replaced the medial recti were inserted posteriorly on the globe resulting in a restrictive large angle esotropia. Surgical intervention resulted in alignment in the primary position. The present case favors a primary mesodermal dysplasia of the extraocular musculature in Moebius syndrome.

  17. Interdigital cell death in the embryonic limb is associated with depletion of Reelin in the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Mendoza, M J; Lorda-Diez, C I; Montero, J A; García-Porrero, J A; Hurlé, J M

    2013-01-01

    Interdigital cell death is a physiological regression process responsible for sculpturing the digits in the embryonic vertebrate limb. Changes in the intensity of this degenerative process account for the different patterns of interdigital webbing among vertebrate species. Here, we show that Reelin is present in the extracellular matrix of the interdigital mesoderm of chick and mouse embryos during the developmental stages of digit formation. Reelin is a large extracellular glycoprotein which has important functions in the developing nervous system, including neuronal survival; however, the significance of Reelin in other systems has received very little attention. We show that reelin expression becomes intensely downregulated in both the chick and mouse interdigits preceding the establishment of the areas of interdigital cell death. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factors, which are cell survival signals for the interdigital mesoderm, intensely upregulated reelin expression, while BMPs, which are proapototic signals, downregulate its expression in the interdigit. Gene silencing experiments of reelin gene or its intracellular effector Dab-1 confirmed the implication of Reelin signaling as a survival factor for the limb undifferentiated mesoderm. We found that Reelin activates canonical survival pathways in the limb mesoderm involving protein kinase B and focal adhesion kinase. Our findings support that Reelin plays a role in interdigital cell death, and suggests that anoikis (apoptosis secondary to loss of cell adhesion) may be involved in this process. PMID:24030152

  18. Evolution of the head-trunk interface in tetrapod vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sefton, Elizabeth M; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S; Mohaddes, Zahra; Hanken, James

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate neck musculature spans the transition zone between head and trunk. The extent to which the cucullaris muscle is a cranial muscle allied with the gill levators of anamniotes or is instead a trunk muscle is an ongoing debate. Novel computed tomography datasets reveal broad conservation of the cucullaris in gnathostomes, including coelacanth and caecilian, two sarcopterygians previously thought to lack it. In chicken, lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to occipital somites is a recently identified embryonic source of cervical musculature. We fate-map this mesoderm in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), which retains external gills, and demonstrate its contribution to posterior gill-levator muscles and the cucullaris. Accordingly, LPM adjacent to the occipital somites should be regarded as posterior cranial mesoderm. The axial position of the head-trunk border in axolotl is congruent between LPM and somitic mesoderm, unlike in chicken and possibly other amniotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09972.001 PMID:27090084

  19. Nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation and secretion of fibroblast growth factor-2 during avian gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Riese, J; Zeller, R; Dono, R

    1995-01-01

    The expression and distribution of the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 or bFGF) proteins during early avian embryogenesis has been analysed in detail. Three FGF-2 protein isoforms of 18.5, 20.0 and 21.5 kDa are expressed during gastrulation of chicken embryos. Using whole mount immunohistochemistry, these proteins were found to be predominantly nuclear in prestreak blastodiscs during mesoderm induction. Distribution of positive cells in the epiblast was mosaic, whereas all cells of the forming hypoblast expressed the FGF-2 proteins. During primitive streak formation, the proteins started to translocate to the cytoplasm in epiblast cells but remained nuclear in the hypoblast. The FGF-2 proteins became predominantly cytoplasmic in all cells during the subsequent developmental stages. Their highest levels were detected in endodermal cells underlying Hensen's node and the newly formed notochord, the dorsal apex of all epiblast cells and, most interestingly, in the extra-cellular basal lamina separating the epiblast from newly formed mesoderm. Heparin and suramin treatment of these advanced embryos (stage 4) revealed a dose-dependent inhibition on the regression of Hensen's node and formation of mesodermal derivatives such as somites. The results are discussed with respect to current models on FGF-mediated functions during vertebrate mesoderm induction and regionalization.

  20. The Pluripotency of Neural Crest Cells and Their Role in Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Le Douarin, Nicole M; Dupin, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) is, in the Chordate phylum, an innovation of vertebrates, which exhibits several original characteristics: its component cells are pluripotent and give rise to both ectodermal and mesodermal cell types. Moreover, during the early stages of neurogenesis, the NC cells exert a paracrine stimulating effect on the development of the preotic brain.

  1. Role of erbB-2 and erbB-3 in the Activation of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Culouscou, J-M., et al. Heregulin induces tyrosine phosphorylation of HER4/p 180erbB4 . Nature 366:473-475, 1993. 9. Goldman, R., Ben Levy , R., Peles, E...of a dominant negative mutant of the FGF receptor disrupts mesoderm formation in Xenopus embryos. Cell 66:257- 270, 1991. 53. Lofts, F. J., Hurst, H

  2. Noncanonical transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling in cranial neural crest cells causes tongue muscle developmental defects.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2013-10-11

    Microglossia is a congenital birth defect in humans and adversely impacts quality of life. In vertebrates, tongue muscle derives from the cranial mesoderm, whereas tendons and connective tissues in the craniofacial region originate from cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Loss of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) type II receptor in CNC cells in mice (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre) causes microglossia due to a failure of cell-cell communication between cranial mesoderm and CNC cells during tongue development. However, it is still unclear how TGFβ signaling in CNC cells regulates the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts during tongue development. Here we show that activation of the cytoplasmic and nuclear tyrosine kinase 1 (ABL1) cascade in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice results in a failure of CNC-derived cell differentiation followed by a disruption of TGFβ-mediated induction of growth factors and reduction of myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation activities. Among the affected growth factors, the addition of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) and neutralizing antibody for follistatin (FST; an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)) could most efficiently restore cell proliferation, differentiation, and organization of muscle cells in the tongue of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice. Thus, our data indicate that CNC-derived fibroblasts regulate the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts through TGFβ-mediated regulation of FGF and BMP signaling during tongue development.

  3. [An unusual case of acute aminophylline intoxication].

    PubMed

    Manes, Massimo; Pellu, Valentina; Radin, Elisabetta; Molino, Andrea; Gabrielli, Danila; Caputo, Donatella; Paternoster, Giuseppe; Torti, Paola; Visetti, Enrico; Nebiolo, Pier Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Theophylline/aminophylline use for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has declined over time, as new and safer therapies developed. However, theophylline/aminophylline overdose can occur. Hereby it is described an unusual case of severe aminophylline intoxication due to mesodermic injections treated with CVVHDF session.

  4. Dual embryonic origin of the hyobranchial apparatus in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Davidian, Asya; Malashichev, Yegor

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the cartilaginous viscerocranium of vertebrates is considered as neural crest (NC)-derived. Morphological work carried out on amphibian embryos in the first half of the XX century suggested potentially mesodermal origin for some hyobranchial elements. Since then, the embryonic sources of the hyobranchial apparatus in amphibians has not been investigated due to lack of an appropriate long-term labelling system. We performed homotopic transplantations of neural folds along with the majority of cells of the presumptive NC, and/or fragments of the head lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) from transgenic GFP+ into white embryos. In these experiments, the NC-derived GFP+ cells contributed to all hyobranchial elements, except for basibranchial 2, whereas the grafting of GFP+ head mesoderm led to a reverse labelling result. The grafting of only the most ventral part of the head LPM resulted in marking of the basibranchial 2 and the heart myocardium, implying their origin from a common mesodermal region. This is the first evidence of contribution of LPM of the head to cranial elements in any vertebrate. If compared to fish, birds, and mammals, in which all branchial skeletal elements are NC-derived, the axolotl (probably this is true for all amphibians) demonstrates an evolutionary deviation, in which the head LPM replaces NC cells in a hyobranchial element. This implies that cells of different embryonic origin may have the same developmental program, leading to the formation of identical (homologous) elements of the skeleton.

  5. Robust mechanisms of ventral furrow invagination require the combination of cellular shape changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Vito; Muñoz, José J.; Baum, Buzz; Miodownik, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Ventral furrow formation in Drosophila is the first large-scale morphogenetic movement during the life of the embryo, and is driven by co-ordinated changes in the shape of individual epithelial cells within the cellular blastoderm. Although many of the genes involved have been identified, the details of the mechanical processes that convert local changes in gene expression into whole-scale changes in embryonic form remain to be fully understood. Biologists have identified two main cell deformation modes responsible for ventral furrow invagination: constriction of the apical ends of the cells (apical wedging) and deformation along their apical-basal axes (radial lengthening/shortening). In this work, we used a computer 2D finite element model of ventral furrow formation to investigate the ability of different combinations of three plausible elementary active cell shape changes to bring about epithelial invagination: ectodermal apical-basal shortening, mesodermal apical-basal lengthening/shortening and mesodermal apical constriction. We undertook a systems analysis of the biomechanical system, which revealed many different combinations of active forces (invagination mechanisms) were able to generate a ventral furrow. Two important general features were revealed. First that combinations of shape changes are the most robust to environmental and mutational perturbation, in particular those combining ectodermal pushing and mesodermal wedging. Second, that ectodermal pushing plays a big part in all of the robust mechanisms (mesodermal forces alone do not close the furrow), and this provides evidence that it may be an important element in the mechanics of invagination in Drosophila.

  6. Distinct modes of floor plate induction in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Patten, Iain; Kulesa, Paul; Shen, Michael M; Fraser, Scott; Placzek, Marysia

    2003-10-01

    To begin to reconcile models of floor plate formation in the vertebrate neural tube, we have performed experiments aimed at understanding the development of the early floor plate in the chick embryo. Using real-time analyses of cell behaviour, we provide evidence that the principal contributor to the early neural midline, the future anterior floor plate, exists as a separate population of floor plate precursor cells in the epiblast of the gastrula stage embryo, and does not share a lineage with axial mesoderm. Analysis of the tissue interactions associated with differentiation of these cells to a floor plate fate reveals a role for the nascent prechordal mesoderm, indicating that more than one inductive event is associated with floor plate formation along the length of the neuraxis. We show that Nr1, a chick nodal homologue, is expressed in the nascent prechordal mesoderm and we provide evidence that Nodal signalling can cooperate with Shh to induce the epiblast precursors to a floor-plate fate. These results indicate that a shared lineage with axial mesoderm cells is not a pre-requisite for floor plate differentiation and suggest parallels between the development of the floor plate in amniote and anamniote embryos.

  7. Distribution and possible function of an adrenomedullin-like peptide in the developing chick limb bud.

    PubMed

    Seghatoleslami, M Reza; Martínez, Alfredo; Cuttitta, Frank; Kosher, Robert A

    2002-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a multifunctional peptide that exhibits discrete domains of expression during mouse embryogenesis consistent with a role in regulating growth and differentiation during morphogenesis. Here we report that AM immunoreactivity is present at high levels throughout the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) of the chick limb bud as the AER is directing the outgrowth and patterning of underlying limb mesoderm. Immunostaining is particularly strong along the surfaces of the contiguous cells of the AER. AM immunoreactivity attenuates as the AER regresses and is absent from the distal apical ectoderm of stage 20 limbless mutant limb buds which fail to develop an AER. To explore the possible role of AM in AER activity, we examined the effect of exogenous AM and an AM inhibitor on the in vitro morphogenesis of limb mesoderm, cultured in the presence and absence of the AER. Although exogenous AM cannot substitute for the AER in promoting outgrowth of limb mesoderm in vitro, a specific AM antagonist, AM(22-52), impairs the outgrowth and proliferation of limb mesoderm cultured in the presence of the AER. This is consistent with the possibility that inhibition of endogenous AM activity in the AER impairs the ability of the AER to promote limb morphogenesis. Taken together, these studies suggest that an AM-like molecule may function in an autocrine fashion to regulate some aspect of AER activity.

  8. Function of BMPs in the apical ectoderm of the developing mouse limb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Omi, Minoru; Ferrari, Deborah; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Lizarraga, Gail; Chin, Hsian-Jean; Upholt, William B; Dealy, Caroline N; Kosher, Robert A

    2004-05-01

    Several bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), a critical signaling center that directs the outgrowth and patterning of limb mesoderm, but little is known about their function. To study the functions of apical ectodermal BMPs, an AER-specific promoter element from the Msx2 gene was used to target expression of the potent BMP antagonist noggin to the apical ectoderm of the limbs of transgenic mice. Msx2-noggin mutant mice have severely malformed limbs characterized by syndactyly, postaxial polydactyly, and dorsal transformations of ventral structures indicated by absence of ventral footpads and presence of supernumerary ventral nails. Mutant limb buds exhibit a dorsoventral (DV) and anteroposterior (AP) expansion in the extent of the AER. AER activity persists longer than normal and is maintained in regions of the apical ectoderm where its activity normally ceases. Mutant limbs possess a broad band of mesodermal tissue along the distal periphery that is absent from normal limbs and which fails to undergo the apoptosis that normally occurs in the subectodermal mesoderm. Taken together, our results suggest that apical ectodermal BMPs may delimit the boundaries of the AER by preventing adjacent nonridge ectodermal cells from becoming AER cells; negatively modulate AER activity and thus fine-tune the strength of AER signaling; and regulate the apoptosis of the distal subectodermal mesoderm that occurs as AER activity attenuates, an event that is essential for normal limb development. Our results also confirm that ectodermal BMP signaling regulates DV patterning.

  9. Conditional deletion of WT1 in the septum transversum mesenchyme causes congenital diaphragmatic hernia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Rita; Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Ariza, Laura; Rojas, Anabel; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a severe birth defect. Wt1-null mouse embryos develop CDH but the mechanisms regulated by WT1 are unknown. We have generated a murine model with conditional deletion of WT1 in the lateral plate mesoderm, using the G2 enhancer of the Gata4 gene as a driver. 80% of G2-Gata4Cre;Wt1fl/fl embryos developed typical Bochdalek-type CDH. We show that the posthepatic mesenchymal plate coelomic epithelium gives rise to a mesenchyme that populates the pleuroperitoneal folds isolating the pleural cavities before the migration of the somitic myoblasts. This process fails when Wt1 is deleted from this area. Mutant embryos show Raldh2 downregulation in the lateral mesoderm, but not in the intermediate mesoderm. The mutant phenotype was partially rescued by retinoic acid treatment of the pregnant females. Replacement of intermediate by lateral mesoderm recapitulates the evolutionary origin of the diaphragm in mammals. CDH might thus be viewed as an evolutionary atavism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16009.001 PMID:27642710

  10. Red light, green light: Signals that control endothelial cell proliferation during embryonic vascular development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proper regulation of endothelial cell proliferation is critical for vascular development in the embryo. VEGF-A and bFGF, which are important in the induction of mesodermal progenitors to form a capillary plexus, are also key mitogenic signals. Disruption in VEGF-A or bFGF decreases endothelial c...

  11. PAPC mediates self/non–self-distinction during Snail1-dependent tissue separation

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Olivia; Damm, Erich W.; Parent, Serge E.; Barua, Debanjan; Smith, Tamara H.L.; Wen, Jason W.H.; Lepage, Stephanie E.; Nagel, Martina; Ibrahim-Gawel, Hady; Huang, Yunyun

    2015-01-01

    Cleft-like boundaries represent a type of cell sorting boundary characterized by the presence of a physical gap between tissues. We studied the cleft-like ectoderm–mesoderm boundary in Xenopus laevis and zebrafish gastrulae. We identified the transcription factor Snail1 as being essential for tissue separation, showed that its expression in the mesoderm depends on noncanonical Wnt signaling, and demonstrated that it enables paraxial protocadherin (PAPC) to promote tissue separation through two novel functions. First, PAPC attenuates planar cell polarity signaling at the ectoderm–mesoderm boundary to lower cell adhesion and facilitate cleft formation. Second, PAPC controls formation of a distinct type of adhesive contact between mesoderm and ectoderm cells that shows properties of a cleft-like boundary at the single-cell level. It consists of short stretches of adherens junction–like contacts inserted between intermediate-sized contacts and large intercellular gaps. These roles of PAPC constitute a self/non–self-recognition mechanism that determines the site of boundary formation at the interface between PAPC-expressing and -nonexpressing cells. PMID:25778923

  12. Retinal flat cells participate in the formation of fibers by retinal neuroblasts in vitro. Time lapse video studies.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1986-03-01

    Freshly dissociated cells from embryonic chick neural retinas grow in characteristic patterns on flat cells or on chick embryo mesodermal cells. A striking difference between the two patterns is that the cells grown on flat cells are interconnected by a complex network of fibers, whereas those grown on mesodermal cells are aggregated into clusters that remain relatively isolated within the mesodermal monolayer. Analysis by time-lapse video microscopy indicates that two processes produce the fibers. (1) Fibers grow out by the extension of growth cones from cells within aggregates. (2) Neuronal cell aggregates that attach to two flat cells are pulled apart by the movement of the cells beneath them. As the aggregate is pulled apart, portions of the cells remain attached to the two halves, and their cytoplasm is drawn into thin fibers. The lack of fibers on a mesodermal substrate is due to two factors: (1) Aggregates are widely spaced on the substrate surface and do not come into contact often. (2) On those occasions when they do come into contact, the movement of the monolayer is so vigorous that emerging fibers are torn.

  13. Embryological Development: Evolutionary History, Genetic Bias, and Cellular Environment Control the Flow of Developmental Events, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arnold I.

    1981-01-01

    Emphasizes ectodermal-mesodermal interaction but focuses on the genesis of specialized structures like feathers (ectodermal) and muscles, cartilage, and bone. The sum of these interactions and other factors which govern normal development may be important in regulating the regeneration of particular structures in postembryonic individuals.…

  14. A growth-promoting influence from the mesonephros during limb outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Geduspan, J S; Solursh, M

    1992-05-01

    It has been suggested that the mesonephros has a role in normal limb development. This hypothesis was directly tested by removing the mesonephros adjacent to the presumptive limb region of stage 12-18 chick embryos using microsurgery or laser ablation. The experimental manipulation resulted in reduced limb outgrowth on the operated side. The poor limb outgrowth was correlated with either the lack of or the presence of a rudimentary mesonephros on the operated side. Furthermore, the presence of nephric tissue in limb bud organ culture enhanced growth and morphological differentiation of cartilage formed in culture. In vivo, the influence of the mesonephros resulted in significantly higher cell proliferation in the adjoining medial half of the limb mesoderm compared with the lateral half. The removal of the mesonephros adjoining the prospective limb region reduced the number of dividing cells in the medial mesoderm. The higher proliferation in the medial limb mesoderm is significant to limb outgrowth since grafting experiments showed that most of the cells that form the limb are derived from the medial mesoderm. The results suggest that the influence from the mesonephros may provide some signal for limb outgrowth.

  15. Studies on insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin in chick limb morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dealy, C N; Kosher, R A

    1995-01-01

    The apical ectodermal ridge (AER) promotes the proliferation and directed outgrowth of the subridge mesodermal cells of the developing limb bud, while suppressing their differentiation. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and its receptor are expressed by the subridge mesodermal cells of the chick limb bud growing out in response to the AER, and specific insulin receptors are present in the limb bud during its outgrowth. To study the possible roles of IGF-I and insulin in limb outgrowth, we have examined their effects on the morphogenesis of posterior and anterior portions of the distal tip of stage 25 embryonic chick wing buds subjected to organ culture in serum-free medium in the presence or absence of the AER and limb ectoderm. The distal mesoderm of control posterior explants lacking an AER or all limb ectoderm ceases expressing IGF-I mRNA, exhibits little or no proliferation, fails to undergo outgrowth, and rapidly differentiates. Exogenous IGF-I and insulin promote the outgrowth and proliferation and suppress the differentiation of distal mesodermal cells in posterior explants lacking an AER or limb ectoderm, thus mimicking at least to some extent the outgrowth promoting and anti-differentiative effects normally elicited on the subridge mesoderm by the AER. Furthermore, IGF-I and insulin-treated posterior explants exhibit high IGF-I mRNA expression, indicating that IGF-I and insulin maintain the expression of endogenous IGF-I by the subridge mesoderm. We have also found IGF-I and insulin can affect the morphology and activity of the AER. When the posterior portion of the wing bud tip is cultured with the AER intact in control medium, on day 4-5 the AER flattens, ceases expressing high amounts of the AER-characteristic homeobox-containing gene Msx2, and concomitantly an elongated cartilaginous element differentiates in the subridge mesoderm. In contrast, in the presence of exogenous IGF-I or insulin the AER of such explants does not flatten, continues

  16. Mouse FGF15 is the ortholog of human and chick FGF19, but is not uniquely required for otic induction.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracy J; Ladher, Raj; McWhirter, John; Murre, Cornelis; Schoenwolf, Gary C; Mansour, Suzanne L

    2004-05-01

    The inner ear develops from an ectodermal placode that is specified by inductive signals from the adjacent neurectoderm and underlying mesoderm. In chick, fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)-19 is expressed in mesoderm underlying the presumptive otic placode, and human FGF19 induces expression of otic markers in a tissue explant containing neural plate and surface ectoderm. We show here that mouse Fgf15 is the sequence homolog of chick and human Fgf19/FGF19. In addition, we show that FGF15, like FGF19, is sufficient to induce expression of otic markers in a chick explant assay, suggesting that these FGFs are orthologs. Mouse embryos lacking Fgf15, however, do not have otic abnormalities at E9.5-E10.5, suggesting that Fgf15 is not uniquely required for otic induction or early patterning of the otocyst. To compare FGF15 and FGF19 signaling components and assess where signals potentially redundant with FGF15 might function, we determined the expression patterns of Fgf15 and Fgf19. Unlike Fgf19, Fgf15 is not expressed in mesoderm underlying the presumptive otic placode, but is expressed in the adjacent neurectoderm. Fgfr4, which encodes the likely receptor for both FGF19 and FGF15, is expressed in the neurectoderm of both species, and is also expressed in the mesoderm only in chick. These results suggest the hypotheses that during otic induction, FGF19 signals in either an autocrine fashion to the mesoderm or a paracrine fashion to the neurectoderm, whereas FGF15 signals in an autocrine fashion to the neurectoderm. Thus, the FGFs that signal to the neurectoderm are the best potential candidates for redundancy with FGF15 during mouse otic development.

  17. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  18. Relationship between fibronectin expression during gastrulation and heart formation in the rat embryo.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Baldwin, H S

    1995-11-01

    By utilizing myosin immunostaining, we were able to identify early rat myocardium as a thin epithelial sheet and realized that its cohesive movement toward the midline leads to the straight heart tube formation. Localization study of fibronectin mRNA and protein was, therefore, carried out to investigate its tissue origin and possible roles in facilitating mesoderm migration and heart formation. Fibronectin mRNAs were first detected throughout the mesoderm during the early primitive streak stage, suggesting that the mesoderm is the source of fibronectin. By pre-head fold (pre-somite) and head fold (early somite) stages, the mesoderm became largely down-regulated for fibronectin mRNAs, while it was also at these stages when myosin-positive myocardium formed itself into the epithelium and was subsequently folding toward the midline. Thus, there appears to be little fibronectin synthesis during and directly relevant to early heart tube formation. Later, during the early straight heart tube stage (5 somite and older), endocardium became highly positive for fibronectin mRNAs, suggesting that the endocardium is the major source of fibronectin for the cardiac jelly. Based on the results, we present a map for the early mammalian heart in which the heart is a single crescentic band lying in front of the prechordal plate. We also suggest a process for heart tube formation based on the cohesive movement of the myocardial epithelium. During heart tube formation, fibronectin protein had been deposited previously by the mesoderm and was found uniformly in the ECM and not newly produced by any adjacent tissue. The data contradict the endodermal guidance of heart migration by fibronectin gradient and suggest, instead, a permissive role for the fibronectin substrate.

  19. Functional evolution of Ets in echinoderms with focus on the evolution of echinoderm larval skeletons.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Mioko; Fujitani, Haruka; Miyamoto, Norio; Komatsu, Miéko; Kiyomoto, Masato; Akasaka, Koji; Wada, Hiroshi

    2010-09-01

    Convergent evolution of echinoderm pluteus larva was examined from the standpoint of functional evolution of a transcription factor Ets1/2. In sea urchins, Ets1/2 plays a central role in the differentiation of larval skeletogenic mesenchyme cells. In addition, Ets1/2 is suggested to be involved in adult skeletogenesis. Conversely, in starfish, although no skeletogenic cells differentiate during larval development, Ets1/2 is also expressed in the larval mesoderm. Here, we confirmed that the starfish Ets1/2 is indispensable for the differentiation of the larval mesoderm. This result led us to assume that, in the common ancestors of echinoderms, Ets1/2 activates the transcription of distinct gene sets, one for the differentiation of the larval mesoderm and the other for the development of the adult skeleton. Thus, the acquisition of the larval skeleton involved target switching of Ets1/2. Specifically, in the sea urchin lineage, Ets1/2 activated a downstream target gene set for skeletogenesis during larval development in addition to a mesoderm target set. We examined whether this heterochronic activation of the skeletogenic target set was achieved by the molecular evolution of the Ets1/2 transcription factor itself. We tested whether starfish Ets1/2 induced skeletogenesis when injected into sea urchin eggs. We found that, in addition to ectopic induction of mesenchyme cells, starfish Ets1/2 can activate some parts of the skeletogenic pathway in these mesenchyme cells. Thus, we suggest that the nature of the transcription factor Ets1/2 did not change, but rather that some unidentified co-factor(s) for Ets1/2 may distinguish between targets for the larval mesoderm and for skeletogenesis. Identification of the co-factor(s) will be key to understanding the molecular evolution underlying the evolution of the pluteus larvae.

  20. [The formation of neurons in the bone marrow, the dream of alchemy in the new millenium].

    PubMed

    Khonsari, H; Catala, M

    2003-03-01

    In rodents, bone marrow contains stem cells that have the potentiality to differentiate into mesodermal and non-mesodermal cells, both in vitro and in vivo. These cells can populate a wide panel of organs such as the liver, the brain, the lungs, the heart.... They appropriately differentiate according to the environment in which they migrate and are known to assume specific functions. Even in adult animals, these cells can migrate and differentiate. Such a potentiality suggests exciting therapeutic outcomes. Brain lesions could benefit of such techniques. These experimental protocols should be precisely controlled before their use in medicine in order to solve problems that still remain such as the permeability of the hemato-encephalic barrier, the integration of differentiated grafted cells into local functional neural networks.

  1. Planar induction of anteroposterior pattern in the developing central nervous system of Xenopus laevis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doniach, T.; Phillips, C. R.; Gerhart, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    It has long been thought that anteroposterior (A-P) pattern in the vertebrate central nervous system is induced in the embryo's dorsal ectoderm exclusively by signals passing vertically from underlying, patterned dorsal mesoderm. Explants from early gastrulae of the frog Xenopus laevis were prepared in which vertical contact between dorsal ectoderm and mesoderm was prevented but planar contact was maintained. In these, four position-specific neural markers (engrailed-2, Krox-20, XlHbox 1, and XlHbox 6) were expressed in the ectoderm in the same A-P order as in the embryo. Thus, planar signals alone, following a path available in the normal embryo, can induce A-P neural pattern.

  2. A genomic approach to myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Michelson, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have developed an integrated genetic, genomic and computational approach to identify and characterize genes involved in myoblast fusion in Drosophila. We first used fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify mesodermal cells both from wild-type embryos and from twelve variant genotypes in which muscle development is perturbed in known ways. Then, we obtained gene expression profiles for the purified cells by hybridizing isolated mesodermal RNA to Affymetrix GeneChip arrays. These data were subsequently compounded into a statistical meta-analysis that predicts myoblast subtype-specific gene expression signatures that were later validated by in situ hybridization experiments. Finally, we analyzed the myogenic functions of a subset of these myoblast genes using a double-stranded RNA interference assay in living embryos expressing green fluorescent protein under control of a muscle-specific promoter. This experimental strategy led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized genes required for myoblast fusion in Drosophila. PMID:18979251

  3. Hox genes control vertebrate body elongation by collinear Wnt repression.

    PubMed

    Denans, Nicolas; Iimura, Tadahiro; Pourquié, Olivier

    2015-02-26

    In vertebrates, the total number of vertebrae is precisely defined. Vertebrae derive from embryonic somites that are continuously produced posteriorly from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) during body formation. We show that in the chicken embryo, activation of posterior Hox genes (paralogs 9-13) in the tail-bud correlates with the slowing down of axis elongation. Our data indicate that a subset of progressively more posterior Hox genes, which are collinearly activated in vertebral precursors, repress Wnt activity with increasing strength. This leads to a graded repression of the Brachyury/T transcription factor, reducing mesoderm ingression and slowing down the elongation process. Due to the continuation of somite formation, this mechanism leads to the progressive reduction of PSM size. This ultimately brings the retinoic acid (RA)-producing segmented region in close vicinity to the tail bud, potentially accounting for the termination of segmentation and axis elongation.

  4. Modulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells on leucocytes and leukemic cells: A double-edged sword?

    PubMed

    Low, Jun How; Ramdas, Premdass; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have drawn much attention amongst stem cell researchers in the past few decades. The ability of the MSC to differentiate into cells of mesodermal and non-mesodermal origins has made them an attractive approach for cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine. The MSCs have immunosuppressive activities that may have considerable therapeutic values in autoimmune diseases. However, despite the many beneficial effects reported, there is a growing body of evidence, which suggests that MSCs could be a culprit of enhanced tumour growth, metastasis and drug resistance in leukaemia, via some modulatory effects. Many controversies regarding the interactions between MSCs and leukaemia still exist. Furthermore, the role of MSCs in leukemogenesis and its progression remain largely unknown. Hence it is important to understand how the MSCs modulate leukaemia before these cells could be safely used in the treatment of leukaemia patients.

  5. Switching axial progenitors from producing trunk to tail tissues in vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Jurberg, Arnon Dias; Aires, Rita; Varela-Lasheras, Irma; Nóvoa, Ana; Mallo, Moisés

    2013-06-10

    The vertebrate body is made by progressive addition of new tissue from progenitors at the posterior embryonic end. Axial extension involves different mechanisms that produce internal organs in the trunk but not in the tail. We show that Gdf11 signaling is a major coordinator of the trunk-to-tail transition. Without Gdf11 signaling, the switch from trunk to tail is significantly delayed, and its premature activation brings the hindlimbs and cloaca next to the forelimbs, leaving extremely short trunks. Gdf11 activity includes activation of Isl1 to promote formation of the hindlimbs and cloaca-associated mesoderm as the most posterior derivatives of lateral mesoderm progenitors. Gdf11 also coordinates reallocation of bipotent neuromesodermal progenitors from the anterior primitive streak to the tail bud, in part by reducing the retinoic acid available to the progenitors. Our findings provide a perspective to understand the evolution of the vertebrate body plan.

  6. Apical domain polarization localizes actin-myosin activity to drive ratchet-like apical constriction.

    PubMed

    Mason, Frank M; Tworoger, Michael; Martin, Adam C

    2013-08-01

    Apical constriction promotes epithelia folding, which changes tissue architecture. During Drosophila gastrulation, mesoderm cells exhibit repeated contractile pulses that are stabilized such that cells apically constrict like a ratchet. The transcription factor Twist is required to stabilize cell shape. However, it is unknown how Twist spatially coordinates downstream signals to prevent cell relaxation. We find that during constriction, Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is polarized to the middle of the apical domain (medioapical cortex), separate from adherens junctions. Rok recruits or stabilizes medioapical myosin II (Myo-II), which contracts dynamic medioapical actin cables. The formin Diaphanous mediates apical actin assembly to suppress medioapical E-cadherin localization and form stable connections between the medioapical contractile network and adherens junctions. Twist is not required for apical Rok recruitment, but instead polarizes Rok medioapically. Therefore, Twist establishes radial cell polarity of Rok/Myo-II and E-cadherin and promotes medioapical actin assembly in mesoderm cells to stabilize cell shape fluctuations.

  7. Spatial Allocation and Specification of Cardiomyocytes during Zebrafish Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Hajime; Chiba, Ayano; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Takano, Haruko; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Omori, Toyonori

    2017-01-01

    Incomplete development and severe malformation of the heart result in miscarriage of embryos because of its malfunction as a pump for circulation. During cardiogenesis, development of the heart is precisely coordinated by the genetically-primed program that is revealed by the sequential expression of transcription factors. It is important to investigate how spatial allocation of the heart containing cardiomyocytes and other mesoderm-derived cells is determined. In addition, the molecular mechanism underlying cardiomyocyte differentiation still remains elusive. The location of ectoderm-, mesoderm-, and endoderm-derived organs is determined by their initial allocation and subsequent mutual cell-cell interactions or paracrine-based regulation. In the present work, we provide an overview of cardiac development controlled by the germ layers and discuss the points that should be uncovered in future for understanding cardiogenesis. PMID:28382067

  8. Shared Pluripotency Programs Suggest Derivation of Vertebrate Neural Crest from Blastula Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Delgado, Elsy; Nordin, Kara; Rao, Anjali; Geary, Lauren; LaBonne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Neural Crest cells, unique to vertebrates, are derived from the ectoderm but also generate mesodermal cell types. This broad developmental potential persists past the time when most ectoderm-derived cells have become lineage restricted. The ability of neural crest to contribute mesodermal derivatives to the bauplan has raised questions about how this apparent gain in developmental potential is achieved. Here we describe shared molecular underpinnings of potency in neural crest and blastula cells. We show that in Xenopus, key neural crest regulatory factors are also expressed in blastula animal pole cells and promote pluripotency in both cell types. We suggest that neural crest cells may have evolved as a consequence of a subset of blastula animal pole cells retaining activity of the regulatory network underlying pluripotency. PMID:25931449

  9. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb apical ectodermal ridge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Tsugane, Mizuyo H; Scranton, Victoria; Kosher, Robert A; Pierro, Louis J; Upholt, William B; Dealy, Caroline N

    2011-05-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in the limb plays a central role in coordination of limb patterning and outgrowth. Shh expression in the limb is limited to the cells of the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), located in posterior limb bud mesoderm. Shh is not expressed by limb ectoderm or apical ectodermal ridge (AER), but recent studies suggest a role for AER-Shh signaling in limb patterning. Here, we have examined the effects of activation of Shh signaling in the AER. We find that targeted expression of Shh in the AER activates constitutive Shh signaling throughout the AER and subjacent limb mesoderm, and causes a range of limb patterning defects with progressive severity from mild polydactyly, to polysyndactyly with proximal defects, to severe oligodactyly with phocomelia and partial limb ventralization. Our studies emphasize the importance of control of the timing, level and location of Shh pathway signaling for limb anterior-posterior, proximal-distal, and dorsal-ventral patterning.

  10. Dose-dependent Nodal/Smad signals pattern the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Elizabeth J

    2014-08-01

    Nodal signals in the early post-implantation stage embryo are essential to establish initial proximal-distal (P-D) polarity and generate the final anterior-posterior (A-P) body axis. Nodal signaling in the epiblast results in the phosphorylation of Smad2 in the overlying visceral endoderm necessary to induce the AVE, in part via Smad2-dependent activation of the T-box gene Eomesodermin. Slightly later following mesoderm induction a continuum of dose-dependent Nodal signaling during the process of gastrulation underlies specification of mesodermal and definitive endoderm progenitors. Dynamic Nodal expression during the critical 72 h time window immediately following implantation, accomplished by a series of feed-back and feed-forward mechanisms serves to provide key positional cues required for establishment of the body plan and controls cell fate decisions in the early mammalian embryo.

  11. Mox homeobox expression in muscle lineage of the gastropod Haliotis asinina: evidence for a conserved role in bilaterian myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hinman, V F; Degnan, B M

    2002-04-01

    Mox homeobox genes are expressed during early vertebrate somitogenesis. Here we describe the expression of Has-Mox, a Mox gene from the gastropod Haliotis asinina. Has-Moxis expressed in the trochophore larva in paraxial mesodermal bands. During larval development, Has-Mox expression remains restricted to mesodermal cells destined to form adult muscle in the foot. This restricted expression of Has-Mox in Haliotis is similar to that observed for vertebrate Mox genes, suggesting a conserved role in myogenesis in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. In contrast, Mox is not expressed in muscle lineages in the ecdysozoan representatives Caenorhabditis elegans or Drosophila; the C. elegansgenome has lost Mox altogether. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer Link server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00427-002-0223-6.

  12. Abl suppresses cell extrusion and intercalation during epithelium folding.

    PubMed

    Jodoin, Jeanne N; Martin, Adam C

    2016-09-15

    Tissue morphogenesis requires control over cell shape changes and rearrangements. In the Drosophila mesoderm, linked epithelial cells apically constrict, without cell extrusion or intercalation, to fold the epithelium into a tube that will then undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Apical constriction drives tissue folding or cell extrusion in different contexts, but the mechanisms that dictate the specific outcomes are poorly understood. Using live imaging, we found that Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase depletion causes apically constricting cells to undergo aberrant basal cell extrusion and cell intercalation. abl depletion disrupted apical-basal polarity and adherens junction organization in mesoderm cells, suggesting that extruding cells undergo premature EMT. The polarity loss was associated with abnormal basolateral contractile actomyosin and Enabled (Ena) accumulation. Depletion of the Abl effector Enabled (Ena) in abl-depleted embryos suppressed the abl phenotype, consistent with cell extrusion resulting from misregulated ena Our work provides new insight into how Abl loss and Ena misregulation promote cell extrusion and EMT.

  13. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb Apical Ectodermal Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Tsugane, Mizuyo H.; Scranton, Victoria; Kosher, Robert A.; Pierro, Louis J.; Upholt, William B.; Dealy, Caroline N.

    2012-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in the limb plays a central role in coordination of limb patterning and outgrowth. Shh expression in the limb is limited to the cells of the Zone of Polarizing Activity (ZPA), located in posterior limb bud mesoderm. Shh is not expressed by limb ectoderm or AER, but recent studies suggest a role for AER-Shh signaling in limb patterning. Here, we have examined the effects of activation of Shh signaling in the AER. We find that targeted expression of Shh in the AER activates constitutive Shh signaling throughout the AER and subjacent limb mesoderm, and causes a range of limb patterning defects with progressive severity from mild polydactyly, to polysyndactyly with proximal defects, to severe oligodactyly with phocomelia and partial limb ventralization. Our studies emphasize the importance of control of the timing, level and location of Shh pathway signaling for limb AP, PD and DV patterning. PMID:21465622

  14. The spatial and temporal expression of Ch-en, the engrailed gene in the polychaete Chaetopterus, does not support a role in body axis segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaver, E. C.; Paulson, D. A.; Irvine, S. Q.; Martindale, M. Q.

    2001-01-01

    We are interested in understanding whether the annelids and arthropods shared a common segmented ancestor and have approached this question by characterizing the expression pattern of the segment polarity gene engrailed (en) in a basal annelid, the polychaete Chaetopterus. We have isolated an en gene, Ch-en, from a Chaetopterus cDNA library. Genomic Southern blotting suggests that this is the only en class gene in this animal. The predicted protein sequence of the 1.2-kb cDNA clone contains all five domains characteristic of en proteins in other taxa, including the en class homeobox. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that Ch-en is expressed throughout larval life in a complex spatial and temporal pattern. The Ch-en transcript is initially detected in a small number of neurons associated with the apical organ and in the posterior portion of the prototrochophore. At later stages, Ch-en is expressed in distinct patterns in the three segmented body regions (A, B, and C) of Chaetopterus. In all segments, Ch-en is expressed in a small set of segmentally iterated cells in the CNS. In the A region, Ch-en is also expressed in a small group of mesodermal cells at the base of the chaetal sacs. In the B region, Ch-en is initially expressed broadly in the mesoderm that then resolves into one band/segment coincident with morphological segmentation. The mesodermal expression in the B region is located in the anterior region of each segment, as defined by the position of ganglia in the ventral nerve cord, and is involved in the morphogenesis of segment-specific feeding structures late in larval life. We observe banded mesodermal and ectodermal staining in an anterior-posterior sequence in the C region. We do not observe a segment polarity pattern of expression of Ch-en in the ectoderm, as is observed in arthropods. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Transmembrane protein 88: a Wnt regulatory protein that specifies cardiomyocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Palpant, Nathan J.; Pabon, Lil; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S.; Hadland, Brandon K.; Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L.; Paige, Sharon L.; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Moon, Randall T.; Murry, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic regulation of the cell fate transition from lateral plate mesoderm to the specification of cardiomyocytes requires suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but the mechanism for this is not well understood. By analyzing gene expression and chromatin dynamics during directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we identified a suppressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, transmembrane protein 88 (TMEM88), as a potential regulator of cardiovascular progenitor cell (CVP) specification. During the transition from mesoderm to the CVP, TMEM88 has a chromatin signature of genes that mediate cell fate decisions, and its expression is highly upregulated in advance of key cardiac transcription factors in vitro and in vivo. In early zebrafish embryos, tmem88a is expressed broadly in the lateral plate mesoderm, including the bilateral heart fields. Short hairpin RNA targeting of TMEM88 during hESC cardiac differentiation increases Wnt/β-catenin signaling, confirming its role as a suppressor of this pathway. TMEM88 knockdown has no effect on NKX2.5 or GATA4 expression, but 80% of genes most highly induced during CVP development have reduced expression, suggesting adoption of a new cell fate. In support of this, analysis of later stage cell differentiation showed that TMEM88 knockdown inhibits cardiomyocyte differentiation and promotes endothelial differentiation. Taken together, TMEM88 is crucial for heart development and acts downstream of GATA factors in the pre-cardiac mesoderm to specify lineage commitment of cardiomyocyte development through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:23924634

  16. The heart-forming fields: one or multiple?

    PubMed

    Moorman, Antoon F M; Christoffels, Vincent M; Anderson, Robert H; van den Hoff, Maurice J B

    2007-08-29

    The recent identification of a second mesodermal region as a source of cardiomyocytes has challenged the views on the formation of the heart. This second source of cardiomyocytes is localized centrally on the embryonic disc relative to the remainder of the classic cardiac crescent, a region also called the pharyngeal mesoderm. In this review, we discuss the concept of the primary and secondary cardiogenic fields in the context of folding of the embryo, and the subsequent temporal events involved in formation of the heart. We suggest that, during evolution, the heart developed initially only with the components required for a systemic circulation, namely a sinus venosus, a common atrium, a 'left' ventricle and an arterial cone, the latter being the myocardial outflow tract as seen in the heart of primitive fishes. These components developed in their entirety from the classic cardiac crescent. Only later in the course of evolution did the appearance of novel signalling pathways permit the central part of the cardiac crescent, and possibly the contiguous pharyngeal mesoderm, to develop into the cardiac components required for the pulmonary circulation. These latter components comprise the right ventricle, and that part of the left atrium that derives from the mediastinal myocardium, namely the dorsal atrial wall and the atrial septum. It is these elements which are now recognized as developing from the second field of pharyngeal mesoderm. We suggest that, rather than representing development from separate fields, the cardiac components required for both the systemic and pulmonary circulations are derived by patterning from a single cardiac field, albeit with temporal delay in the process of formation.

  17. ABCC5 is required for cAMP-mediated hindgut invagination in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Lauren E; Hill, Rose Z; Moy, Gary W; Gökırmak, Tufan; Hamdoun, Amro

    2015-10-15

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are evolutionarily conserved proteins that pump diverse substrates across membranes. Many are known to efflux signaling molecules and are extensively expressed during development. However, the role of transporters in moving extracellular signals that regulate embryogenesis is largely unexplored. Here, we show that a mesodermal ABCC (MRP) transporter is necessary for endodermal gut morphogenesis in sea urchin embryos. This transporter, Sp-ABCC5a (C5a), is expressed in pigment cells and their precursors, which are a subset of the non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells. C5a expression depends on Delta/Notch signaling from skeletogenic mesoderm and is downstream of Gcm in the aboral NSM gene regulatory network. Long-term imaging of development reveals that C5a knockdown embryos gastrulate, but ∼90% develop a prolapse of the hindgut by the late prism stage (∼8 h after C5a protein expression normally peaks). Since C5a orthologs efflux cyclic nucleotides, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Sp-CAPK/PKA) is expressed in pigment cells, we examined whether C5a could be involved in gastrulation through cAMP transport. Consistent with this hypothesis, membrane-permeable pCPT-cAMP rescues the prolapse phenotype in C5a knockdown embryos, and causes archenteron hyper-invagination in control embryos. In addition, the cAMP-producing enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is expressed in pigment cells, and its inhibition impairs gastrulation. Together, our data support a model in which C5a transports sAC-derived cAMP from pigment cells to control late invagination of the hindgut. Little is known about the ancestral functions of ABCC5/MRP5 transporters, and this study reveals a novel role for these proteins in mesoderm-endoderm signaling during embryogenesis.

  18. ABCC5 is required for cAMP-mediated hindgut invagination in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shipp, Lauren E.; Hill, Rose Z.; Moy, Gary W.; Gökırmak, Tufan; Hamdoun, Amro

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are evolutionarily conserved proteins that pump diverse substrates across membranes. Many are known to efflux signaling molecules and are extensively expressed during development. However, the role of transporters in moving extracellular signals that regulate embryogenesis is largely unexplored. Here, we show that a mesodermal ABCC (MRP) transporter is necessary for endodermal gut morphogenesis in sea urchin embryos. This transporter, Sp-ABCC5a (C5a), is expressed in pigment cells and their precursors, which are a subset of the non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells. C5a expression depends on Delta/Notch signaling from skeletogenic mesoderm and is downstream of Gcm in the aboral NSM gene regulatory network. Long-term imaging of development reveals that C5a knockdown embryos gastrulate, but ∼90% develop a prolapse of the hindgut by the late prism stage (∼8 h after C5a protein expression normally peaks). Since C5a orthologs efflux cyclic nucleotides, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Sp-CAPK/PKA) is expressed in pigment cells, we examined whether C5a could be involved in gastrulation through cAMP transport. Consistent with this hypothesis, membrane-permeable pCPT-cAMP rescues the prolapse phenotype in C5a knockdown embryos, and causes archenteron hyper-invagination in control embryos. In addition, the cAMP-producing enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is expressed in pigment cells, and its inhibition impairs gastrulation. Together, our data support a model in which C5a transports sAC-derived cAMP from pigment cells to control late invagination of the hindgut. Little is known about the ancestral functions of ABCC5/MRP5 transporters, and this study reveals a novel role for these proteins in mesoderm-endoderm signaling during embryogenesis. PMID:26395488

  19. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Christiana; de Oliveira Lira Ortega, Adriana; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Gonçalves-Bittar, Daniela; Bönecker, Marcelo; Ciamponi, Ana Lídia

    2011-08-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disease affecting tissues derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm. Knowledge and early diagnosis of the craniofacial alterations commonly found in patients with FDH provide oral health care professionals with effective preventive and therapeutic tools. This article aims to review the craniofacial characteristics present in FDH and the main systemic manifestations that have implications for dental management, while presenting a new case of the syndrome with novel oral findings.

  20. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  1. Ruptured profunda femoris aneurysm secondary to neurofibromatosis: vascular involvement in an unusual location.

    PubMed

    Emrecan, Bilgin; Onem, Gokhan; Susam, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by abnormal growth that involves tissues of mesodermal and neuroectodermal origin. Aneurysms are rarely seen in peripheral arteries. This report presents a case of ruptured arterial aneurysm secondary to neurofibromatosis; the lesion occurred in the profunda femoris artery, a highly unusual location. Treatment of patients with ruptured arterial aneurysm secondary to neurofibromatosis may be interventional or surgical. In this case, a surgical approach was successful.

  2. [Novel concepts in biology of diffuse endocrine system: results and future investigations].

    PubMed

    Iaglov, V V; Iaglova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse endocrine system is a largest part of endocrine system of vertebrates. Recend findings showed that DES-cells are not neuroectodermal but have ectodermal, mesodermal, and entodermal ontogeny. The article reviews novel concept of diffuse endocrine system anatomy and physiology, functional role of DES hormones and poorly investigated aspects like DES-cell morphology, hormones secretion in normal and pathologic conditions. Further research of diffuse endocrine system has a great significance for biochemistry, morphology, and clinical medicine.

  3. Injury, nerve, and wound epidermis related electrophoretic and fluorographic protein patterns in forelimbs of adult newts

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, D.J.; Tassava, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    Polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis and (/sup 35/S)methionine fluorography were used to examine proteins in regenerating newt limbs, amputated denervated limbs, unamputated denervated limbs, and separated blastema mesodermal core and wound epidermis. A total of 27 protein electrophoretic bands were obtained from amputated limbs and 24 bands from unamputated limbs. Amputation resulted in the appearance of 4 new bands and the loss of 1 band as compared to unamputated limbs. These 5 banding differences were apparent on stained gels 3 days postamputation and were maintained through 10 weeks postamputation (complete regenerate stage). Only one band in unamputated limbs was always detectable on fluorographs, whereas virtually all of the stainable bands of amputated limbs were visible on fluorographs. Amputation clearly stimulated a marked, generalized increase in the synthesis of limb proteins. The 5 amputation induced changes were equally evident in stained gels of both innervated and denervated limbs. Amputated denervated limbs possessed a full set of fluorographic bands (including the 5 differences) through 18 days postamputation. However, denervation without amputation was not sufficient to alter the stainable banding pattern. Wound epidermis and mesodermal core both displayed the 5 banding differences and had identical banding patterns with the exception of one epidermal specific band. This band was also present in whole limb skin but was absent in unamputated mesodermal limb tissue. This was the only band of unamputated limbs that was consistently detectable by fluorography. It is concluded that amputation induces nerve independent changes in protein synthesis that are common to both mesodermal core and wound epidermis. These changes may represent preparation for cellular proliferation.

  4. Signaling molecules, transcription growth factors and other regulators revealed from in-vivo and in-vitro models for the regulation of cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Meganathan, Kesavan; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Natarajan, Karthick; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2015-03-15

    Several in-vivo heart developmental models have been applied to decipher the cardiac developmental patterning encompassing early, dorsal, cardiac and visceral mesoderm as well as various transcription factors such as Gata, Hand, Tin, Dpp, Pnr. The expression of cardiac specific transcription factors, such as Gata4, Tbx5, Tbx20, Tbx2, Tbx3, Mef2c, Hey1 and Hand1 are of fundamental significance for the in-vivo cardiac development. Not only the transcription factors, but also the signaling molecules involved in cardiac development were conserved among various species. Enrichment of the bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm is essential for the initiation of myocardial differentiation and the cardiac developmental process. Moreover, the expression of a number of cardiac transcription factors and structural genes initiate cardiac differentiation in the medial mesoderm. Other signaling molecules such as TGF-beta, IGF-1/2 and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) play a significant role in cardiac repair/regeneration, ventricular heart development and specification of early cardiac mesoderm, respectively. The role of the Wnt signaling in cardiac development is still controversial discussed, as in-vitro results differ dramatically in relation to the animal models. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) were utilized as an important in-vitro model for the elucidation of the cardiac developmental processes since they can be easily manipulated by numerous signaling molecules, growth factors, small molecules and genetic manipulation. Finally, in the present review the dynamic role of the long noncoding RNA and miRNAs in the regulation of cardiac development are summarized and discussed.

  5. Sirenomelia apus: a rare deformity.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Vinayak Y; Ahmed, Minhajuddin; Colaco, Sylvia M

    2012-07-01

    Sirenomelia also known as the mermaid syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation of uncertain etiology. It is characterized by fusion of the lower limbs and commonly associated with severe urogenital and gastrointestinal malformations. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation.

  6. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Roles for Irf6 during Development of the Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Goudy, Steven; Angel, Peggi; Jacobs, Britni; Hill, Cynthia; Mainini, Veronica; Smith, Arianna L.; Kousa, Youssef A.; Caprioli, Richard; Prince, Lawrence S.; Baldwin, Scott; Schutte, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) encodes a highly conserved helix-turn-helix DNA binding protein and is a member of the interferon regulatory family of DNA transcription factors. Mutations in IRF6 lead to isolated and syndromic forms of cleft lip and palate, most notably Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) and Popliteal Ptyerigium Syndrome (PPS). Mice lacking both copies of Irf6 have severe limb, skin, palatal and esophageal abnormalities, due to significantly altered and delayed epithelial development. However, a recent report showed that MCS9.7, an enhancer near Irf6, is active in the tongue, suggesting that Irf6 may also be expressed in the tongue. Indeed, we detected Irf6 staining in the mesoderm-derived muscle during development of the tongue. Dual labeling experiments demonstrated that Irf6 was expressed only in the Myf5+ cell lineage, which originates from the segmental paraxial mesoderm and gives rise to the muscles of the tongue. Fate mapping of the segmental paraxial mesoderm cells revealed a cell-autonomous Irf6 function with reduced and poorly organized Myf5+ cell lineage in the tongue. Molecular analyses showed that the Irf6−/− embryos had aberrant cytoskeletal formation of the segmental paraxial mesoderm in the tongue. Fate mapping of the cranial neural crest cells revealed non-cell-autonomous Irf6 function with the loss of the inter-molar eminence. Loss of Irf6 function altered Bmp2, Bmp4, Shh, and Fgf10 signaling suggesting that these genes are involved in Irf6 signaling. Based on these data, Irf6 plays important cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles in muscular differentiation and cytoskeletal formation in the tongue. PMID:23451037

  7. Ophthalmologic findings in an 18-month-old boy with focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Young, Marielle P; Sawyer, Briana L; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is a rare X-linked dominant disorder with in utero lethality in males. Affected patients have been reported to have several different mutations in the PORCN gene on chromosome Xp11.23. Dysplastic mesodermal and ectodermal tissue causes clinical findings in the skin, skeleton, teeth, central nervous system, and eyes of affected patients. We describe the ophthalmologic findings in an 18-month-old boy with mosaicism of a novel mutation in PORCN.

  8. Stem cells in asexual reproduction of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelid): proliferation and migration of neoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Mutsumi; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Ozawa, Kaname; Tochinai, Shin

    2012-05-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete that reproduces mainly asexually by fragmentation (autotomy) and regeneration. As sexual reproduction can also be induced, it is a good animal model for the study of both somatic and germline stem cells. To clarify the features of stem cells in regeneration, we investigated the proliferation and lineage of stem cells in E. japonensis. Neoblasts, which have the morphological characteristics of undifferentiated cells, were found to firmly adhere to the posterior surface of septa in each trunk segment. Also, smaller neoblast-like cells, which are designated as N-cells in this study, were located dorsal to the neoblasts on the septa. By conducting 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling-experiments, we have shown that neoblasts are slow-cycling (or quiescent) in intact growing worms, but proliferate rapidly in response to fragmentation. N-cells proliferate more actively than do neoblasts in intact worms. The results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that neoblast and N-cell lineage mesodermal cells that incorporated BrdU early in regeneration migrated toward the autotomized site to form the mesodermal region of the blastema, while the epidermal and intestinal cells also contributed to the blastema locally near the autotomized site. We have also shown that neoblasts have stem cell characteristics by expressing Ej-vlg2 and by the activity of telomerase during regeneration. Telomerase activity was high in the early stage of regeneration and correlated with the proliferation activity in the neoblast lineage of mesodermal stem cells. Taken together, our results indicate that neoblasts are mesodermal stem cells involved in the regeneration of E. japonensis.

  9. Esophageal squamous papillomas with focal dermal hypoplasia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, Eric A; Heifert, Theresa A; Nylund, Cade M

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare disorder of the mesodermal and ectodermal tissues. Here we present an eight-year-old female known to have FDH who presents with poor weight gain and dysphagia. She was diagnosed with multiple esophageal papillomas and eosinophilic esophagitis. She was successfully treated with argon plasma coagulation and ingested fluticasone propionate, which has not been described previously in a child.

  10. New Advanced Technologies in Stem Cell Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    diabetes .6,7 The NF-κB pathway, long recognized as an important com- ponent of innate and adaptive immunity, has also more recently emerged as a key...negative PCs as a source of MSCs in a variety of mesodermal tissues, including fat [23]. While the adipogenic activity is mainly exhibited by the prevalent ...integrity, a phenotype often observed during pregnancy complications due to diabetes , postmaturity, or preeclampsia [78]. In addition to their

  11. Homology of the cranial vault in birds: new insights based on embryonic fate-mapping and character analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddin, Hillary C.; Piekarski, Nadine; Sefton, Elizabeth M.; Hanken, James

    2016-08-01

    Bones of the cranial vault appear to be highly conserved among tetrapod vertebrates. Moreover, bones identified with the same name are assumed to be evolutionarily homologous. However, recent developmental studies reveal a key difference in the embryonic origin of cranial vault bones between representatives of two amniote lineages, mammals and birds, thereby challenging this view. In the mouse, the frontal is derived from cranial neural crest (CNC) but the parietal is derived from mesoderm, placing the CNC-mesoderm boundary at the suture between these bones. In the chicken, this boundary is located within the frontal. This difference and related data have led several recent authors to suggest that bones of the avian cranial vault are misidentified and should be renamed. To elucidate this apparent conflict, we fate-mapped CNC and mesoderm in axolotl to reveal the contributions of these two embryonic cell populations to the cranial vault in a urodele amphibian. The CNC-mesoderm boundary in axolotl is located between the frontal and parietal bones, as in the mouse but unlike the chicken. If, however, the avian frontal is regarded instead as a fused frontal and parietal (i.e. frontoparietal) and the parietal as a postparietal, then the cranial vault of birds becomes developmentally and topologically congruent with those of urodeles and mammals. This alternative hypothesis of cranial vault homology is also phylogenetically consistent with data from the tetrapod fossil record, where frontal, parietal and postparietal bones are present in stem lineages of all extant taxa, including birds. It further implies that a postparietal may be present in most non-avian archosaurs, but fused to the parietal or supraoccipital as in many extant mammals.

  12. Origin matters: differences in embryonic tissue origin and Wnt signaling determine the osteogenic potential and healing capacity of frontal and parietal calvarial bones.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Natalina; Wan, Derrick C; Kwan, Matt D; Panetta, Nicholas J; Li, Shuli; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-07-01

    Calvarial bones arise from two embryonic tissues, namely, the neural crest and the mesoderm. In this study we have addressed the important question of whether disparate embryonic tissue origins impart variable osteogenic potential and regenerative capacity to calvarial bones, as well as what the underlying molecular mechanism(s). Thus, by performing in vitro and in vivo studies, we have investigated whether differences exist between neural crest-derived frontal and paraxial mesodermal-derived parietal bone. Of interest, our data indicate that calvarial bone osteoblasts of neural crest origin have superior potential for osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, neural crest-derived frontal bone displays a superior capacity to undergo osseous healing compared with calvarial bone of paraxial mesoderm origin. Our study identified both in vitro and in vivo enhanced endogenous canonical Wnt signaling in frontal bone compared with parietal bone. In addition, we demonstrate that constitutive activation of canonical Wnt signaling in paraxial mesodermal-derived parietal osteoblasts mimics the osteogenic potential of frontal osteoblasts, whereas knockdown of canonical Wnt signaling dramatically impairs the greater osteogenic potential of neural crest-derived frontal osteoblasts. Moreover, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) treatment induces phosphorylation of GSK-3beta and increases the nuclear levels of beta-catenin in osteoblasts, suggesting that enhanced activation of Wnt signaling might be mediated by FGF. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence that indeed embryonic tissue origin makes a difference and that active canonical Wnt signaling plays a major role in contributing to the superior intrinsic osteogenic potential and tissue regeneration observed in neural crest-derived frontal bone.

  13. Male urethral sarcoma: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Magno Almeida; dos Santos, Guilherme Campelo Lopes; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Dall’Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Sant’Anna, Alexandre Crippa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urethral tumors are rare and aggressive. They usually affect men (2:1) and occur more commonly in white (85% of cases). Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from embryonic mesoderm. It represents 1% of all cases of urinary tract malignancies and rarely primary affect the ureter. We report a case of male urethral sarcoma. To date, only two similar cases have been published in literature. PMID:26398363

  14. Retinal flat cells are a substrate that facilitates retinal neuron growth and fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1986-03-01

    When embryonic chick neural retinas are dissociated into a suspension of single cells and plated in stationary cultures, "flat cells" spread out and form a monolayer to which the neuronal cells attach. It has been shown previously that the flat cells are related to the Müller cell population of the retina. The neuronal cells form aggregates interconnected by bundles of axon-like fibers. The authors have been able to isolate relatively pure flat cells by shaking off the neuronal aggregates after 5 or 6 days of culture. In order to determine if the flat cells have a unique relationship with the neuronal cells, freshly dissociated neural retina cells were added to monolayers of flat cells and their behavior compared to that on chick embryo mesodermal cells. It has been observed by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy that the growth behavior of the retina cells on flat cells is significantly different from that on mesodermal cells. On flat cells, neuronal retina cells form flat patches in which new growing flat cells fuse with the monolayer, and neuronal cells attach as single cells or small clusters. Axon-like fibers are present several hours after plating, and by day 4 an extensive network of fibers connects single cells and clusters on the surface of the monolayer. When retina cells are plated onto mesodermal cells, the cells form aggregates which are organized along the long axis of the mesodermal cells. The flat cells provide a unique substrate for the differentiation and neurite extension of neuronal cells from embryonic chick retina.

  15. Cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles for IRF6 during development of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Goudy, Steven; Angel, Peggi; Jacobs, Britni; Hill, Cynthia; Mainini, Veronica; Smith, Arianna L; Kousa, Youssef A; Caprioli, Richard; Prince, Lawrence S; Baldwin, Scott; Schutte, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) encodes a highly conserved helix-turn-helix DNA binding protein and is a member of the interferon regulatory family of DNA transcription factors. Mutations in IRF6 lead to isolated and syndromic forms of cleft lip and palate, most notably Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) and Popliteal Ptyerigium Syndrome (PPS). Mice lacking both copies of Irf6 have severe limb, skin, palatal and esophageal abnormalities, due to significantly altered and delayed epithelial development. However, a recent report showed that MCS9.7, an enhancer near Irf6, is active in the tongue, suggesting that Irf6 may also be expressed in the tongue. Indeed, we detected Irf6 staining in the mesoderm-derived muscle during development of the tongue. Dual labeling experiments demonstrated that Irf6 was expressed only in the Myf5+ cell lineage, which originates from the segmental paraxial mesoderm and gives rise to the muscles of the tongue. Fate mapping of the segmental paraxial mesoderm cells revealed a cell-autonomous Irf6 function with reduced and poorly organized Myf5+ cell lineage in the tongue. Molecular analyses showed that the Irf6-/- embryos had aberrant cytoskeletal formation of the segmental paraxial mesoderm in the tongue. Fate mapping of the cranial neural crest cells revealed non-cell-autonomous Irf6 function with the loss of the inter-molar eminence. Loss of Irf6 function altered Bmp2, Bmp4, Shh, and Fgf10 signaling suggesting that these genes are involved in Irf6 signaling. Based on these data, Irf6 plays important cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous roles in muscular differentiation and cytoskeletal formation in the tongue.

  16. Homology of the cranial vault in birds: new insights based on embryonic fate-mapping and character analysis

    PubMed Central

    Piekarski, Nadine; Sefton, Elizabeth M.; Hanken, James

    2016-01-01

    Bones of the cranial vault appear to be highly conserved among tetrapod vertebrates. Moreover, bones identified with the same name are assumed to be evolutionarily homologous. However, recent developmental studies reveal a key difference in the embryonic origin of cranial vault bones between representatives of two amniote lineages, mammals and birds, thereby challenging this view. In the mouse, the frontal is derived from cranial neural crest (CNC) but the parietal is derived from mesoderm, placing the CNC–mesoderm boundary at the suture between these bones. In the chicken, this boundary is located within the frontal. This difference and related data have led several recent authors to suggest that bones of the avian cranial vault are misidentified and should be renamed. To elucidate this apparent conflict, we fate-mapped CNC and mesoderm in axolotl to reveal the contributions of these two embryonic cell populations to the cranial vault in a urodele amphibian. The CNC–mesoderm boundary in axolotl is located between the frontal and parietal bones, as in the mouse but unlike the chicken. If, however, the avian frontal is regarded instead as a fused frontal and parietal (i.e. frontoparietal) and the parietal as a postparietal, then the cranial vault of birds becomes developmentally and topologically congruent with those of urodeles and mammals. This alternative hypothesis of cranial vault homology is also phylogenetically consistent with data from the tetrapod fossil record, where frontal, parietal and postparietal bones are present in stem lineages of all extant taxa, including birds. It further implies that a postparietal may be present in most non-avian archosaurs, but fused to the parietal or supraoccipital as in many extant mammals. PMID:27853617

  17. A gene regulatory network controlling the embryonic specification of endoderm.

    PubMed

    Peter, Isabelle S; Davidson, Eric H

    2011-05-29

    Specification of endoderm is the prerequisite for gut formation in the embryogenesis of bilaterian organisms. Modern lineage labelling studies have shown that in the sea urchin embryo model system, descendants of the veg1 and veg2 cell lineages produce the endoderm, and that the veg2 lineage also gives rise to mesodermal cell types. It is known that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is required for endoderm specification and Delta/Notch signalling is required for mesoderm specification. Some direct cis-regulatory targets of these signals have been found and various phenomenological patterns of gene expression have been observed in the pre-gastrular endomesoderm. However, no comprehensive, causal explanation of endoderm specification has been conceived for sea urchins, nor for any other deuterostome. Here we propose a model, on the basis of the underlying genomic control system, that provides such an explanation, built at several levels of biological organization. The hardwired core of the control system consists of the cis-regulatory apparatus of endodermal regulatory genes, which determine the relationship between the inputs to which these genes are exposed and their outputs. The architecture of the network circuitry controlling the dynamic process of endoderm specification then explains, at the system level, a sequence of developmental logic operations, which generate the biological process. The control system initiates non-interacting endodermal and mesodermal gene regulatory networks in veg2-derived cells and extinguishes the endodermal gene regulatory network in mesodermal precursors. It also generates a cross-regulatory network that specifies future anterior endoderm in veg2 descendants and institutes a distinct network specifying posterior endoderm in veg1-derived cells. The network model provides an explanatory framework that relates endoderm specification to the genomic regulatory code.

  18. Single-cell analysis reveals lineage segregation in early post-implantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zeng, Yanwu; Fang, Zhuoqing; Gu, Junjie; Ge, Laixiang; Tang, Fan; Qu, Zepeng; Hu, Jing; Cui, Yaru; Zhang, Kunshan; Wang, Junbang; Li, Siguang; Sun, Yi; Jin, Ying

    2017-03-15

    The mammalian post-implantation embryo has been extensively investigated at the tissue level. However, to unravel the molecular basis for the cell-fate plasticity and determination, it is essential to study the characteristics of individual cells. Especially, the individual definitive endoderm (DE) cells have not been characterized in vivo. Here, we report gene expression patterns in single cells freshly isolated from mouse embryos on days 5.5 and 6.5. Initial transcriptome data from 124 single cells yielded signature genes for the epiblast, visceral endoderm, and extra-embryonic ectoderm and revealed a unique distribution pattern of fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) ligands and receptors. Further analysis indicated that early-stage epiblast cells do not segregate into lineages of the major germ layers. Instead, some cells began to diverge from epiblast cells, displaying molecular features of the pre-mesendoderm by expressing higher levels of mesendoderm markers and lower levels of Sox3 transcripts. Analysis of single-cell high-throughput quantitative RT-PCR data from 441 cells identified a late stage of the day 6.5 embryo in which mesoderm and DE cells emerge, with many of them coexpressing Oct4 and Gata6. Analysis of single-cell RNA-seq data from 112 cells of the late-stage day 6.5 embryos revealed differentially expressed signaling genes and networks of transcription factors that might underlie the segregation of the mesoderm and DE lineages. Moreover, we discovered a subpopulation of mesoderm cells that possess molecular features of the extraembryonic mesoderm. This study provides fundamental insight into the molecular basis for lineage segregation in post-implantation mouse embryos.

  19. The single fgf receptor gene in the beetle Tribolium castaneum codes for two isoforms that integrate FGF8- and Branchless-dependent signals.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Beer, Katharina; Iwanov, Katharina; Schmöhl, Felix; Beckmann, Paula Indigo; Schröder, Reinhard

    2015-06-15

    The precise regulation of cell-cell communication by numerous signal-transduction pathways is fundamental for many different processes during embryonic development. One important signalling pathway is the evolutionary conserved fibroblast-growth-factor (FGF)-pathway that controls processes like cell migration, axis specification and mesoderm formation in vertebrate and invertebrate animals. In the model insect Drosophila, the FGF ligand / receptor combinations of FGF8 (Pyramus and Thisbe) / Heartless (Htl) and Branchless (Bnl) / Breathless (Btl) are required for the migration of mesodermal cells and for the formation of the tracheal network respectively with both the receptors functioning independently of each other. However, only a single fgf-receptor gene (Tc-fgfr) has been identified in the genome of the beetle Tribolium. We therefore asked whether both the ligands Fgf8 and Bnl could transduce their signal through a common FGF-receptor in Tribolium. Indeed, we found that the function of the single Tc-fgfr gene is essential for mesoderm differentiation as well as for the formation of the tracheal network during early development. Ligand specific RNAi for Tc-fgf8 and Tc-bnl resulted in two distinct non-overlapping phenotypes of impaired mesoderm differentiation and abnormal formation of the tracheal network in Tc-fgf8- and Tc-bnl(RNAi) embryos respectively. We further show that the single Tc-fgfr gene encodes at least two different receptor isoforms that are generated through alternative splicing. We in addition demonstrate through exon-specific RNAi their distinct tissue-specific functions. Finally, we discuss the structure of the fgf-receptor gene from an evolutionary perspective.

  20. Description of prosthetic treatment in case of neurofibromatosis in the course of Recklinghausen disease. Case course.

    PubMed

    Ey-Chmielewska, Halina; Sobolewska, Ewa; Fraczak, Bogumiła

    2007-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis is a hereditary autosomal predominating disease occuring in one out of every 2000 or 3300 alive births. The classical form of neurofibromatosis was described by von Recklinghausen in 1882. The disease is a gene mutation, where the anomalies affect mesoderm and neuroectoderm. The paper presents the therapeutic treatment method for the case of lacking teeth restoration in a patient diagnosed with known form ofneurofibromatosis NF-1 in Recklinghausen disease.

  1. Ancestral state reconstruction by comparative analysis of a GRN kernel operating in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Erkenbrack, Eric M; Ako-Asare, Kayla; Miller, Emily; Tekelenburg, Saira; Thompson, Jeffrey R; Romano, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Diverse sampling of organisms across the five major classes in the phylum Echinodermata is beginning to reveal much about the structure and function of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) in development and evolution. Sea urchins are the most studied clade within this phylum, and recent work suggests there has been dramatic rewiring at the top of the skeletogenic GRN along the lineage leading to extant members of the euechinoid sea urchins. Such rewiring likely accounts for some of the observed developmental differences between the two major subclasses of sea urchins-cidaroids and euechinoids. To address effects of topmost rewiring on downstream GRN events, we cloned four downstream regulatory genes within the skeletogenic GRN and surveyed their spatiotemporal expression patterns in the cidaroid Eucidaris tribuloides. We performed phylogenetic analyses with homologs from other non-vertebrate deuterostomes and characterized their spatiotemporal expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WMISH). Our data suggest the erg-hex-tgif subcircuit, a putative GRN kernel, exhibits a mesoderm-specific expression pattern early in Eucidaris development that is directly downstream of the initial mesodermal GRN circuitry. Comparative analysis of the expression of this subcircuit in four echinoderm taxa allowed robust ancestral state reconstruction, supporting hypotheses that its ancestral function was to stabilize the mesodermal regulatory state and that it has been co-opted and deployed as a unit in mesodermal subdomains in distantly diverged echinoderms. Importantly, our study supports the notion that GRN kernels exhibit structural and functional modularity, locking down and stabilizing clade-specific, embryonic regulatory states.

  2. PS integrins and laminins: key regulators of cell migration during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Jose M; Domínguez-Giménez, Paloma; Estrada, Beatriz; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2011-01-01

    During embryonic development, there are numerous cases where organ or tissue formation depends upon the migration of primordial cells. In the Drosophila embryo, the visceral mesoderm (vm) acts as a substrate for the migration of several cell populations of epithelial origin, including the endoderm, the trachea and the salivary glands. These migratory processes require both integrins and laminins. The current model is that αPS1βPS (PS1) and/or αPS3βPS (PS3) integrins are required in migrating cells, whereas αPS2βPS (PS2) integrin is required in the vm, where it performs an as yet unidentified function. Here, we show that PS1 integrins are also required for the migration over the vm of cells of mesodermal origin, the caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM). These results support a model in which PS1 might have evolved to acquire the migratory function of integrins, irrespective of the origin of the tissue. This integrin function is highly specific and its specificity resides mainly in the extracellular domain. In addition, we have identified the Laminin α1,2 trimer, as the key extracellular matrix (ECM) component regulating CVM migration. Furthermore, we show that, as it is the case in vertebrates, integrins, and specifically PS2, contributes to CVM movement by participating in the correct assembly of the ECM that serves as tracks for migration.

  3. PS Integrins and Laminins: Key Regulators of Cell Migration during Drosophila Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Jose M.; Domínguez-Giménez, Paloma; Estrada, Beatriz; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2011-01-01

    During embryonic development, there are numerous cases where organ or tissue formation depends upon the migration of primordial cells. In the Drosophila embryo, the visceral mesoderm (vm) acts as a substrate for the migration of several cell populations of epithelial origin, including the endoderm, the trachea and the salivary glands. These migratory processes require both integrins and laminins. The current model is that αPS1βPS (PS1) and/or αPS3βPS (PS3) integrins are required in migrating cells, whereas αPS2βPS (PS2) integrin is required in the vm, where it performs an as yet unidentified function. Here, we show that PS1 integrins are also required for the migration over the vm of cells of mesodermal origin, the caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM). These results support a model in which PS1 might have evolved to acquire the migratory function of integrins, irrespective of the origin of the tissue. This integrin function is highly specific and its specificity resides mainly in the extracellular domain. In addition, we have identified the Laminin α1,2 trimer, as the key extracellular matrix (ECM) component regulating CVM migration. Furthermore, we show that, as it is the case in vertebrates, integrins, and specifically PS2, contributes to CVM movement by participating in the correct assembly of the ECM that serves as tracks for migration. PMID:21949686

  4. Second heart field cardiac progenitor cells in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Francou, Alexandre; Saint-Michel, Edouard; Mesbah, Karim; Théveniau-Ruissy, Magali; Rana, M Sameer; Christoffels, Vincent M; Kelly, Robert G

    2013-04-01

    At the end of the first week of mouse gestation, cardiomyocyte differentiation initiates in the cardiac crescent to give rise to the linear heart tube. The heart tube subsequently elongates by addition of cardiac progenitor cells from adjacent pharyngeal mesoderm to the growing arterial and venous poles. These progenitor cells, termed the second heart field, originate in splanchnic mesoderm medial to cells of the cardiac crescent and are patterned into anterior and posterior domains adjacent to the arterial and venous poles of the heart, respectively. Perturbation of second heart field cell deployment results in a spectrum of congenital heart anomalies including conotruncal and atrial septal defects seen in human patients. Here, we briefly review current knowledge of how the properties of second heart field cells are controlled by a network of transcriptional regulators and intercellular signaling pathways. Focus will be on 1) the regulation of cardiac progenitor cell proliferation in pharyngeal mesoderm, 2) the control of progressive progenitor cell differentiation and 3) the patterning of cardiac progenitor cells in the dorsal pericardial wall. Coordination of these three processes in the early embryo drives progressive heart tube elongation during cardiac morphogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction.

  5. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation. PMID:26694615

  6. Expression study of the hunchback ortholog in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli.

    PubMed

    Franke, Franziska Anni; Mayer, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Zinc finger transcription factors encoded by hunchback homologs play different roles in arthropods, including maternally mediated control, segmentation, and mesoderm and neural development. Knockdown experiments in spider and insect embryos have also revealed homeotic effects and gap phenotypes, the latter indicating a function of hunchback as a "gap gene". Although the expression pattern of hunchback has been analysed in representatives of all four major arthropod groups (chelicerates, myriapods, crustaceans and insects), nothing is known about its expression in one of the closest arthropod relatives, the Onychophora (velvet worms). We therefore examined the expression pattern of hunchback in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our transcriptomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed only one hunchback ortholog in this species. The putative Hunchback protein contains all nine zinc finger domains known from other protostomes. We found no indication of maternally contributed transcripts of hunchback in early embryos of E. rowelli. Its initial expression occurs in the ectodermal tissue of the antennal segment, followed by the jaw, slime papilla and trunk segments in an anterior-to-posterior progression. Later, hunchback expression is seen in the mesoderm of the developing limbs. A second "wave" of expression commences later in development in the antennal segment and continues posteriorly along each developing nerve cord. This expression is restricted to the neural tissues and does not show any segmental pattern. These findings are in line with the ancestral roles of hunchback in mesoderm and neural development, whereas we find no evidence for a putative function of hunchback as a "gap gene" in Onychophora.

  7. Origin, Specification, and Plasticity of the Great Vessels of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Nagelberg, Danielle; Wang, Jinhu; Su, Rina; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Targoff, Kimara L.; Poss, Kenneth D.; Knaut, Holger

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs) are a series of paired embryonic blood vessels that give rise to several major arteries that connect directly to the heart. During development, the PAAs emerge from nkx2.5-expressing mesodermal cells and connect the dorsal head vasculature to the outflow tract of the heart. Despite their central role in establishing the circulatory system, the embryonic origins of the PAA progenitors are only coarsely defined, and the factors that specify them and their regenerative potential are unclear. Using fate mapping and mutant analysis, we find that PAA progenitors are derived from the tcf21 and nkx2.5 double-positive head mesoderm and require these two transcription factors for their specification and survival. Unexpectedly, cell ablation shows that the tcf21+; nkx2.5+ PAA progenitors are not required for PAA formation. We find that this compensation is due to the replacement of ablated tcf21+; nkx2.5+ PAA cells by endothelial cells from the dorsal head vasculature. Together, these studies assign the embryonic origin of the great vessel progenitors to the interface between the pharyngeal and cardiac mesoderm, identify the transcription factor code required for their specification, and reveal an unexpected plasticity in the formation of the great vessels. PMID:26255850

  8. Hyaluronan Is Required for Generation of Hematopoietic Cells during Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstatter, Ingrid U.; Serobyan, Naira; Loring, Jeanne; Khaldoyanidi, Sophia K.

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an important component of the microenvironment in bone marrow, but its role in regulation of the development of hematopoietic cells is not well understood. To address the role of HA in regulation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation into the hematopoietic lineage, we screened for genes encoding components of the HA pathway. Using gene arrays, we found that HA synthases and HA receptors are expressed in both undifferentiated and differentiating hESCs. Enzymatic degradation of HA resulted in decreased numbers of hematopoietic progenitors and lower numbers of CD45+ cells generated in HA-deprived embryoid bodies (EBs). In addition, deprivation of HA resulted in the inhibition of generation of CD31+ cells, stromal fibroblast-like cells and contracting myocytes in EBs. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry revealed that HA deprivation did not influence the dynamics of OCT4 expression, but decreased the expression of BRY, an early mesoderm marker, and BMP2, a later mesoderm marker in differentiating EBs. In addition, the endoderm markers α-FP and SOX17 were decreased, whereas the expression of the ectoderm markers GFAP and FGF5 was higher in HA-deprived cultures. Our findings indicate that endogenously produced HA contributes to the network that regulates the differentiation of hESC and the generation of mesodermal lineage in general and hematopoietic cells specifically. PMID:20861924

  9. Xenopus Cdc42 regulates convergent extension movements during gastrulation through Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2002-04-15

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that regulate many essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, cell adhesion, cell-cycle progression, and transcription. We have isolated the Xenopus homolog of Rho GTPase Cdc42 and examined its potential role during gastrulation movements in early Xenopus embryos. XCdc42 is expressed in tissues undergoing extensive morphogenetic changes, such as the deep layers of involuting mesoderm and posterior neuroectoderm during gastrulation, and somitic mesoderm at neurula stages. Overexpression of either wild-type (WT) or dominant-negative (DN) XCdc42 interferes with convergent extension movements in intact embryos, activin-stimulated animal caps, and dorsal marginal zone explants. These effects occur without affecting mesodermal specification. Overexpression of WT or DN XCdc42 leads to the decrease and increase of cell adhesiveness of blastomeres, respectively, as demonstrated by the cell adhesion assay. In addition, when overexpressed, PKC-alpha, XWnt-5a, and Mfz-3 inhibit activin-induced convergent extension in animal cap explants. This inhibition can be rescued by coexpression of DN XCdc42, implying that XCdc42 acts downstream of the Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway involving PKC activation. XCdc42 also lies downstream of XWnt-5a in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent cell adhesion. Taken together, our results suggest that XCdc42 plays a role in the regulation of convergent extension movements during gastrulation through the protein kinase C-mediated Wnt/Ca2+ pathway.

  10. The cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Arg regulates gastrulation via control of actin organization.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Fletcher, Jason; Devani, Madhav; Dwivedi, Harsh; Keller, Ray; Chang, Chenbei

    2012-04-01

    Coordinated cell movements are crucial for vertebrate gastrulation and are controlled by multiple signals. Although many factors are shown to mediate non-canonical Wnt pathways to regulate cell polarity and intercalation during gastrulation, signaling molecules acting in other pathways are less investigated and the connections between various signals and cytoskeleton are not well understood. In this study, we show that the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Arg modulates gastrulation movements through control of actin remodeling. Arg is expressed in the dorsal mesoderm at the onset of gastrulation, and both gain- and loss-of-function of Arg disrupted axial development in Xenopus embryos. Arg controlled migration of anterior mesendoderm, influenced cell decision on individual versus collective migration, and modulated spreading and protrusive activities of anterior mesendodermal cells. Arg also regulated convergent extension of the trunk mesoderm by influencing cell intercalation behaviors. Arg modulated actin organization to control dynamic F-actin distribution at the cell-cell contact or in membrane protrusions. The functions of Arg required an intact tyrosine kinase domain but not the actin-binding motifs in its carboxyl terminus. Arg acted downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases to regulate phosphorylation of endogenous CrkII and paxillin, adaptor proteins involved in activation of Rho family GTPases and actin reorganization. Our data demonstrate that Arg is a crucial cytoplasmic signaling molecule that controls dynamic actin remodeling and mesodermal cell behaviors during Xenopus gastrulation.

  11. The Hydra FGFR, Kringelchen, partially replaces the Drosophila Heartless FGFR.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Anja; Hübinger, Christine; Hüsken, Katrin; Vogt, Angelika; Rebscher, Nicole; Onel, Susanne-Filiz; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Hassel, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) are highly conserved receptor tyrosine kinases, and evolved early in metazoan evolution. In order to investigate their functional conservation, we asked whether the Kringelchen FGFR in the freshwater polyp Hydra vulgaris, is able to functionally replace FGFR in fly embryos. In Drosophila, two endogenous FGFR, Breathless (Btl) and Heartless (Htl), ensure formation of the tracheal system and mesodermal cell migration as well as formation of the heart. Using UAS-kringelchen-5xmyc transgenic flies and targeted expression, we show that Kringelchen is integrated correctly into the cell membrane of mesodermal and tracheal cells in Drosophila. Nevertheless, Kringelchen expression driven in tracheal cells failed to rescue the btl (LG19) mutant. The Hydra FGFR was able to substitute for Heartless in the htl (AB42) null mutant; however, this occurred only during early mesodermal cell migration. Our data provide evidence for functional conservation of this early-diverged FGFR across these distantly related phyla, but also selectivity for the Htl FGFR in the Drosophila system.

  12. Differential requirements of BMP and Wnt signalling during gastrulation and neurulation define two steps in neural crest induction.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Ben; Araya, Claudio; Linker, Claudia; Kuriyama, Sei; Mayor, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The neural crest is induced by a combination of secreted signals. Although previous models of neural crest induction have proposed a step-wise activation of these signals, the actual spatial and temporal requirement has not been analysed. Through analysing the role of the mesoderm we show for the first time that specification of neural crest requires two temporally and chemically different steps: first, an induction at the gastrula stage dependent on signals arising from the dorsolateral mesoderm; and second, a maintenance step at the neurula stage dependent on signals from tissues adjacent to the neural crest. By performing tissue recombination experiments and using specific inhibitors of different inductive signals, we show that the first inductive step requires Wnt activation and BMP inhibition, whereas the later maintenance step requires activation of both pathways. This change in BMP necessity from BMP inhibition at gastrula to BMP activation at neurula stages is further supported by the dynamic expression of BMP4 and its antagonists, and is confirmed by direct measurements of BMP activity in the neural crest cells. The differential requirements of BMP activity allow us to propose an explanation for apparently discrepant results between chick and frog experiments. The demonstration that Wnt signals are required for neural crest induction by mesoderm solves an additional long-standing controversy. Finally, our results emphasise the importance of considering the order of exposure to signals during an inductive event.

  13. The developmental expression of foxl2 in the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Wotton, Karl R; French, Kathryn E M; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2007-08-01

    The FoxL2 genes are a subfamily of the Fox (forkhead box) gene family. FOXL2 is mutated in the disorder Blepharophimosis, Ptosis, and Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES), which is characterized by eyelid malformations, and Premature Ovarian Failure (POF). In the mouse expression is seen in the perioptic mesenchyme, developing eyelids, ovary and pituitary. We have isolated a foxl2 cDNA from the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula (also known as the lesser spotted catshark), allowing the characterisation of this gene's sequence and expression from a lineage that diverged early in the evolution of gnathostomes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis strongly grouped this sequence with the gnathostomes within the FoxL2 subfamily. We demonstrate the early expression of Scyliorhinus canicula foxl2 in the mandibular head mesoderm and later in continuous populations of mandibular arch cells and mandibular head mesenchyme cells around the developing pituitary. As development proceeds expression decreases in the mesenchyme of the head but is seen in the mesenchyme around the eye and later in the developing eyelids. Additionally expression is seen in regions of pharyngeal arch mesoderm and in ectoderm from which gill buds will form. This expression is maintained in the developing and elongating gill buds. Thus, S. canicula foxl2 is a marker for the mandibular mesoderm and gill buds and its expression is conserved in the perioptic mesenchyme, developing eyelids and pituitary.

  14. c-Rel Regulates Inscuteable Gene Expression during Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Riki; Kozuki, Satoshi; Kamakura, Sachiko; Sumimoto, Hideki; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2016-02-12

    Inscuteable (Insc) regulates cell fate decisions in several types of stem cells. Although it is recognized that the expression levels of mouse INSC govern the balance between symmetric and asymmetric stem cell division, regulation of mouse Insc gene expression remains poorly understood. Here, we showed that mouse Insc expression transiently increases at an early stage of differentiation, when mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells differentiate into bipotent mesendoderm capable of producing both endoderm and mesoderm in defined culture conditions. We identified the minimum transcriptional regulatory element (354 bases) that drives mouse Insc transcription in mES cells within a region >5 kb upstream of the mouse Insc transcription start site. We found that the transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis oncogene (c-Rel) bound to the minimum element and promoted mouse Insc expression in mES cells. In addition, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of either mouse INSC or c-Rel protein decreased mesodermal cell populations without affecting differentiation into the mesendoderm or endoderm. Furthermore, overexpression of mouse INSC rescued the mesoderm-reduced phenotype induced by knockdown of c-Rel. We propose that regulation of mouse Insc expression by c-Rel modulates cell fate decisions during mES cell differentiation.

  15. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  16. Robustness and Accuracy in Sea Urchin Developmental Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Ben-Tabou de-Leon, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    Developmental gene regulatory networks robustly control the timely activation of regulatory and differentiation genes. The structure of these networks underlies their capacity to buffer intrinsic and extrinsic noise and maintain embryonic morphology. Here I illustrate how the use of specific architectures by the sea urchin developmental regulatory networks enables the robust control of cell fate decisions. The Wnt-βcatenin signaling pathway patterns the primary embryonic axis while the BMP signaling pathway patterns the secondary embryonic axis in the sea urchin embryo and across bilateria. Interestingly, in the sea urchin in both cases, the signaling pathway that defines the axis controls directly the expression of a set of downstream regulatory genes. I propose that this direct activation of a set of regulatory genes enables a uniform regulatory response and a clear cut cell fate decision in the endoderm and in the dorsal ectoderm. The specification of the mesodermal pigment cell lineage is activated by Delta signaling that initiates a triple positive feedback loop that locks down the pigment specification state. I propose that the use of compound positive feedback circuitry provides the endodermal cells enough time to turn off mesodermal genes and ensures correct mesoderm vs. endoderm fate decision. Thus, I argue that understanding the control properties of repeatedly used regulatory architectures illuminates their role in embryogenesis and provides possible explanations to their resistance to evolutionary change.

  17. Evolution and development of the vertebrate neck

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Rolf; Knight, Robert; Johanson, Zerina

    2013-01-01

    Muscles of the vertebrate neck include the cucullaris and hypobranchials. Although a functional neck first evolved in the lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) with the separation of the pectoral/shoulder girdle from the skull, the neck muscles themselves have a much earlier origin among the vertebrates. For example, lampreys possess hypobranchial muscles, and may also possess the cucullaris. Recent research in chick has established that these two muscles groups have different origins, the hypobranchial muscles having a somitic origin but the cucullaris muscle deriving from anterior lateral plate mesoderm associated with somites 1–3. Additionally, the cucullaris utilizes genetic pathways more similar to the head than the trunk musculature. Although the latter results are from experiments in the chick, cucullaris homologues occur in a variety of more basal vertebrates such as the sharks and zebrafish. Data are urgently needed from these taxa to determine whether the cucullaris in these groups also derives from lateral plate mesoderm or from the anterior somites, and whether the former or the latter represent the basal vertebrate condition. Other lateral plate mesoderm derivatives include the appendicular skeleton (fins, limbs and supporting girdles). If the cucullaris is a definitive lateral plate-derived structure it may have evolved in conjunction with the shoulder/limb skeleton in vertebrates and thereby provided a greater degree of flexibility to the heads of predatory vertebrates. PMID:22697305

  18. Bone morphogenic protein signalling suppresses differentiation of pluripotent cells by maintaining expression of E-Cadherin.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Mattias; Nistor, Paul A; Blin, Guillaume; Pegg, Amy; Zhou, Xinzhi; Lowell, Sally

    2013-12-17

    Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signalling contributes towards maintenance of pluripotency and favours mesodermal over neural fates upon differentiation, but the mechanisms by which BMP controls differentiation are not well understood. We report that BMP regulates differentiation by blocking downregulation of Cdh1, an event that accompanies the earliest stages of neural and mesodermal differentiation. We find that loss of Cdh1 is a limiting requirement for differentiation of pluripotent cells, and that experimental suppression of Cdh1 activity rescues the BMP-imposed block to differentiation. We further show that BMP acts prior to and independently of Cdh1 to prime pluripotent cells for mesoderm differentiation, thus helping to reinforce the block to neural differentiation. We conclude that differentiation depends not only on exposure to appropriate extrinsic cues but also on morphogenetic events that control receptivity to those differentiation cues, and we explain how a key pluripotency signal, BMP, feeds into this control mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01197.001.

  19. Bone morphogenic protein signalling suppresses differentiation of pluripotent cells by maintaining expression of E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Malaguti, Mattias; Nistor, Paul A; Blin, Guillaume; Pegg, Amy; Zhou, Xinzhi; Lowell, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signalling contributes towards maintenance of pluripotency and favours mesodermal over neural fates upon differentiation, but the mechanisms by which BMP controls differentiation are not well understood. We report that BMP regulates differentiation by blocking downregulation of Cdh1, an event that accompanies the earliest stages of neural and mesodermal differentiation. We find that loss of Cdh1 is a limiting requirement for differentiation of pluripotent cells, and that experimental suppression of Cdh1 activity rescues the BMP-imposed block to differentiation. We further show that BMP acts prior to and independently of Cdh1 to prime pluripotent cells for mesoderm differentiation, thus helping to reinforce the block to neural differentiation. We conclude that differentiation depends not only on exposure to appropriate extrinsic cues but also on morphogenetic events that control receptivity to those differentiation cues, and we explain how a key pluripotency signal, BMP, feeds into this control mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01197.001 PMID:24347544

  20. The tissue-specific lncRNA Fendrr is an essential regulator of heart and body wall development in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Grote, Phillip; Wittler, Lars; Hendrix, David; Koch, Frederic; Währisch, Sandra; Beisaw, Arica; Macura, Karol; Bläss, Gaby; Kellis, Manolis; Werber, Martin; Herrmann, Bernhard G

    2013-01-28

    The histone-modifying complexes PRC2 and TrxG/MLL play pivotal roles in determining the activation state of genes controlling pluripotency, lineage commitment, and cell differentiation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can bind to either complex, and some have been shown to act as modulators of PRC2 or TrxG/MLL activity. Here we show that the lateral mesoderm-specific lncRNA Fendrr is essential for proper heart and body wall development in the mouse. Embryos lacking Fendrr displayed upregulation of several transcription factors controlling lateral plate or cardiac mesoderm differentiation, accompanied by a drastic reduction in PRC2 occupancy along with decreased H3K27 trimethylation and/or an increase in H3K4 trimethylation at their promoters. Fendrr binds to both the PRC2 and TrxG/MLL complexes, suggesting that it acts as modulator of chromatin signatures that define gene activity. Thus, we identified an lncRNA that plays an essential role in the regulatory networks controlling the fate of lateral mesoderm derivatives.

  1. Evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements at the vertebrate head-trunk interface coordinate the transport and assembly of hypopharyngeal structures.

    PubMed

    Lours-Calet, Corinne; Alvares, Lucia E; El-Hanfy, Amira S; Gandesha, Saniel; Walters, Esther H; Sobreira, Débora Rodrigues; Wotton, Karl R; Jorge, Erika C; Lawson, Jennifer A; Kelsey Lewis, A; Tada, Masazumi; Sharpe, Colin; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2014-06-15

    The vertebrate head-trunk interface (occipital region) has been heavily remodelled during evolution, and its development is still poorly understood. In extant jawed vertebrates, this region provides muscle precursors for the throat and tongue (hypopharyngeal/hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors, HMP) that take a stereotype path rostrally along the pharynx and are thought to reach their target sites via active migration. Yet, this projection pattern emerged in jawless vertebrates before the evolution of migratory muscle precursors. This suggests that a so far elusive, more basic transport mechanism must have existed and may still be traceable today. Here we show for the first time that all occipital tissues participate in well-conserved cell movements. These cell movements are spearheaded by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm that split into two streams. The rostrally directed stream projects along the floor of the pharynx and reaches as far rostrally as the floor of the mandibular arch and outflow tract of the heart. Notably, this stream leads and engulfs the later emerging HMP, neural crest cells and hypoglossal nerve. When we (i) attempted to redirect hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors towards various attractants, (ii) placed non-migratory muscle precursors into the occipital environment or (iii) molecularly or (iv) genetically rendered muscle precursors non-migratory, they still followed the trajectory set by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm. Thus, we have discovered evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements, driven by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm, that ensure cell transport and organ assembly at the head-trunk interface.

  2. Divergent and conserved roles of Dll1 signaling in development of craniofacial and trunk muscle.

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Maciej T; Rassek, Claudia; Lenhard, Diana C; Bröhl, Dominique; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2014-11-15

    Craniofacial and trunk skeletal muscles are evolutionarily distinct and derive from cranial and somitic mesoderm, respectively. Different regulatory hierarchies act upstream of myogenic regulatory factors in cranial and somitic mesoderm, but the same core regulatory network - MyoD, Myf5 and Mrf4 - executes the myogenic differentiation program. Notch signaling controls self-renewal of myogenic progenitors as well as satellite cell homing during formation of trunk muscle, but its role in craniofacial muscles has been little investigated. We show here that the pool of myogenic progenitor cells in craniofacial muscle of Dll1(LacZ/Ki) mutant mice is depleted in early fetal development, which is accompanied by a major deficit in muscle growth. At the expense of progenitor cells, supernumerary differentiating myoblasts appear transiently and these express MyoD. The progenitor pool in craniofacial muscle of Dll1(LacZ/Ki) mutants is largely rescued by an additional mutation of MyoD. We conclude from this that Notch exerts its decisive role in craniofacial myogenesis by repression of MyoD. This function is similar to the one previously observed in trunk myogenesis, and is thus conserved in cranial and trunk muscle. However, in cranial mesoderm-derived progenitors, Notch signaling is not required for Pax7 expression and impinges little on the homing of satellite cells. Thus, Dll1 functions in satellite cell homing and Pax7 expression diverge in cranial- and somite-derived muscle.

  3. The posterior neural plate in axolotl gives rise to neural tube or turns anteriorly to form somites of the tail and posterior trunk.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yuka; Kurth, Thomas; Weiche, Susanne; Reichelt, Saskia; Tazaki, Akira; Perike, Srikanth; Kappert, Verena; Epperlein, Hans-Henning

    2017-02-15

    Classical grafting experiments in the Mexican axolotl had shown that the posterior neural plate of the neurula is no specified neuroectoderm but gives rise to somites of the tail and posterior trunk. The bipotentiality of this region with neuromesodermal progenitor cell populations was revealed more recently also in zebrafish, chick, and mouse. We reinvestigated the potency of the posterior plate in axolotl using grafts from transgenic embryos, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. The posterior plate is brachyury-positive except for its more anterior parts which express sox2. Between anterior and posterior regions of the posterior plate a small domain with sox2+ and bra+ cells exists. Lineage analysis of grafted GFP-labeled posterior plate tissue revealed that posterior GFP+ cells move from dorsal to ventral, form the posterior wall, turn anterior bilaterally, and join the gastrulated paraxial presomitic mesoderm. More anterior sox2+/GFP+ cells, however, are integrated into the developing spinal cord. Tail notochord is formed from axial mesoderm involuted already during gastrulation. Thus the posterior neural plate is a postgastrula source of paraxial mesoderm, which performs an anterior turn, a novel morphogenetic movement. More anterior plate cells, in contrast, do not turn anteriorly but become specified to form tail spinal cord.

  4. Docking protein SNT1 is a critical mediator of fibroblast growth factor signaling during Xenopus embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Keiko; Kyun Park, Eui; Mood, Kathleen; Daar, Ira O

    2002-03-01

    The docking protein SNT1/FRS2 (fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2) is implicated in the transmission of extracellular signals from several growth factor receptors to the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascade, but its biological function during development is not well characterized. Here, we show that the Xenopus homolog of mammalian SNT1/FRS-2 (XSNT1) plays a critical role in the appropriate formation of mesoderm-derived tissue during embryogenesis. XSNT1 has an expression pattern that is quite similar to the fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) during Xenopus development. Ectopic expression of XSNT1 markedly enhanced the embryonic defects induced by an activated FGF receptor, and increased the MAP kinase activity as well as the expression of a mesodermal marker in response to FGF receptor signaling. A loss-of-function study using antisense XSNT1 morpholino oligonucleotides (XSNT-AS) shows severe malformation of trunk and posterior structures. Moreover, XSNT-AS disrupts muscle and notochord formation, and inhibits FGFR-induced MAP kinase activation. In ectodermal explants, XSNT-AS blocks FGFR-mediated induction of mesoderm and the accompanying elongation movements. Our results indicate that XSNT1 is a critical mediator of FGF signaling and is required for early Xenopus development.

  5. Analysis of coelom development in the sea urchin Holopneustes purpurescens yielding a deuterostome body plan

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An analysis of early coelom development in the echinoid Holopneustes purpurescens yields a deuterostome body plan that explains the disparity between the pentameral plan of echinoderms and the bilateral plans of chordates and hemichordates, the three major phyla of the monophyletic deuterostomes. The analysis shows an early separation into a medial hydrocoele and lateral coelomic mesoderm with an enteric channel between them before the hydrocoele forms the pentameral plan of five primary podia. The deuterostome body plan thus has a single axial or medial coelom and a pair of lateral coeloms, all surrounding an enteric channel, the gut channel. Applied to the phyla, the medial coelom is the hydrocoele in echinoderms, the notochord in chordates and the proboscis coelom in hemichordates: the lateral coeloms are the coelomic mesoderm in echinoderms, the paraxial mesoderm in chordates and the lateral coeloms in hemichordates. The plan fits frog and chick development and the echinoderm fossil record, and predicts genes involved in coelomogenesis as the source of deuterostome macroevolution. PMID:26892238

  6. Embryogenesis of the Uropygial Glands in the Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis (Rothschild, 1893): Procellariiformes).

    PubMed

    Rehorek, S J; Wu, J L; Smith, T D; Beeching, S C

    2017-04-07

    An avian uropygial gland is located on the mid-dorsum of the tail, and is the only external gland found in birds. Most studies have focused on the function, gross anatomy and chemical nature of this gland, with little research on its ontogeny. The purpose of this study was to examine the development of this gland in a series of Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) embryos. Specimens were examined anatomically and histologically. It was found that grooves preceded glandular development by many stages. The embryogenesis of the uropygial gland was divided into 6 phases: preinception, groove inception, mesodermal separation, migrating mesodermal cells, oval shaped "depressions", constriction and finally glandular inception. No other gland is known to develop similarly, though there may be parallels with femoral gland development. In comparison to other bird species, the length of the development period in the Albatross, as well as other compounding factors, make it difficult to determine the significance of these observations. The development of a mesodermal band, soon to be a connective tissue capsule, is more complex than originally described in ducks. Thus, the unique nature of this gland is established, but the significance of the observations required further studies into uropygial gland development. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Role of crescent in convergent extension movements by modulating Wnt signaling in early Xenopus embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mikihito; Itoh, Mari; Hikasa, Hiroki; Taira, Sumiko; Taira, Masanori

    2005-12-01

    The Xenopus gene crescent encodes a member of the secreted Frizzled-related protein (sFRP) family and is expressed in the head organizer region. However, the target and function of Crescent in early development are not well understood. Here, we describe a role of Crescent in the regulation of convergent extension movements (CEMs) during gastrulation and neurulation. We show that overexpression of Crescent in whole embryos or animal caps inhibits CEMs without affecting tissue specification. Consistent with this, Crescent efficiently forms complexes with Xwnt11 and Xwnt5a, in contrast to another sFRP, Frzb1. As expected, the inhibitory effect of Crescent or Xwnt11 on CEMs is cancelled when both proteins are coexpressed in the neuroectoderm. Interestingly, when coexpressed in the dorsal mesoderm, the activity of Xwnt11 is rather enhanced by Crescent. Supporting this finding, the inhibition of CEMs by Crescent in mesodermalized but not neuralized animal caps is reversed by the dominant-negative form of Cdc42, a putative mediator of Wnt/Ca2+ pathway. Antisense morpholino oligos for Crescent impair neural plate closure and elicit microcephalic embryos with a shortened trunk without affecting early tissue specification. These data suggest a potential role for Crescent in head formation by regulating a non-canonical Wnt pathway positively in the adjacent posterior mesoderm and negatively in the overlying anterior neuroectoderm.

  8. Secondary neurulation: Fate-mapping and gene manipulation of the neural tube in tail bud.

    PubMed

    Shimokita, Eisuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2011-04-01

    The body tail is a characteristic trait of vertebrates, which endows the animals with a variety of locomotive functions. During embryogenesis, the tail develops from the tail bud, where neural and mesodermal tissues make a major contribution. The neural tube in the tail bud develops by the process known as secondary neurulation (SN), where mesenchymal cells undergo epithelialization and tubulogenesis. These processes contrast with the well known primary neurulation, which is achieved by invagination of an epithelial cell sheet. In this study we have identified the origin of SN-undergoing cells, which is located caudo-medially to Hensen's node of early chicken embryo. This region is distinctly fate-mapped from tail-forming mesoderm. The identification of the presumptive SN region has allowed us to target this region with exogenous genes using in ovo electroporation techniques. The SN-transgenesis has further enabled an exploration of molecular mechanisms underlying mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition during SN, where activity levels of Cdc42 and Rac1 are critical. This is the first demonstration of molecular and cellular analyses of SN, which can be performed at a high resolution separately from tail-forming mesoderm.

  9. Development, triploblastism, physics of wetting and the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    The Cambrian explosion is characterized by the sudden outburst of organized animal plans, which occurred circa 530 M years ago. Around that time, many forms of animal life appeared, including several which have since disappeared. There is no general consensus about "why" this happened, and why it had any form of suddenness. However, all organized animal plans share a common feature: they are triploblastic, i.e., composed of 3 layers of tissue, endoderm, ectoderm and mesoderm. I show here that, within simple hypotheses, the formation of the mesoderm has intrinsically a physical exponential dynamics, leading rapidly to triploblastism, and eventually, to animal formation. A novel physico-mathematical framework including epithelium-mesenchyme transition, visco-elastic constitutive equations, and conservation laws, is presented which allows one to describe gastrulation as a self-wetting phenomenon of a soft solid onto itself. This phenomenon couples differentiation and migration during gastrulation, and leads in a closed form to an exponential scaling law for the formation of the mesoderm. Therefore, the Cambrian explosion might have started, actually, by a true viscoelastic "explosion": the exponential run-away of mesenchymal cells.

  10. Multiple Cranial Organ Defects after Conditionally Knocking Out Fgf10 in the Neural Crest

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, Tathyane H. N.; Lourenco, Silvia V.; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2016-01-01

    Fgf10 is necessary for the development of a number of organs that fail to develop or are reduced in size in the null mutant. Here we have knocked out Fgf10 specifically in the neural crest driven by Wnt1cre. The Wnt1creFgf10fl/fl mouse phenocopies many of the null mutant defects, including cleft palate, loss of salivary glands, and ocular glands, highlighting the neural crest origin of the Fgf10 expressing mesenchyme surrounding these organs. In contrast tissues such as the limbs and lungs, where Fgf10 is expressed by the surrounding mesoderm, were unaffected, as was the pituitary gland where Fgf10 is expressed by the neuroepithelium. The circumvallate papilla of the tongue formed but was hypoplastic in the conditional and Fgf10 null embryos, suggesting that other sources of FGF can compensate in development of this structure. The tracheal cartilage rings showed normal patterning in the conditional knockout, indicating that the source of Fgf10 for this tissue is mesodermal, which was confirmed using Wnt1cre-dtTom to lineage trace the boundary of the neural crest in this region. The thyroid, thymus, and parathyroid glands surrounding the trachea were present but hypoplastic in the conditional mutant, indicating that a neighboring source of mesodermal Fgf10 might be able to partially compensate for loss of neural crest derived Fgf10. PMID:27826253

  11. Essential roles of the winged helix transcription factor MFH-1 in aortic arch patterning and skeletogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iida, K; Koseki, H; Kakinuma, H; Kato, N; Mizutani-Koseki, Y; Ohuchi, H; Yoshioka, H; Noji, S; Kawamura, K; Kataoka, Y; Ueno, F; Taniguchi, M; Yoshida, N; Sugiyama, T; Miura, N

    1997-11-01

    Mesenchyme Fork Head-1 (MFH-1) is a forkhead (also called winged helix) transcription factor defined by a common 100-amino acid DNA-binding domain. MFH-1 is expressed in non-notochordal mesoderm in the prospective trunk region and in cephalic neural-crest and cephalic mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells in the prechordal region of early embryos. Subsequently, strong expression is localized in developing cartilaginous tissues, kidney and dorsal aortas. To investigate the developmental roles of MFH-1 during embryogenesis, mice lacking the MFH-1 locus were generated by targeted mutagenesis. MFH-1-deficient mice died embryonically and perinatally, and exhibited interrupted aortic arch and skeletal defects in the neurocranium and the vertebral column. Interruption of the aortic arch seen in the mutant mice was the same as in human congenital anomalies. These results suggest that MFH-1 has indispensable roles during the extensive remodeling of the aortic arch in neural-crest-derived cells and in skeletogenesis in cells derived from the neural crest and the mesoderm.

  12. Differential localization of Mox-1 and Mox-2 proteins indicates distinct roles during development.

    PubMed

    Candia, A F; Wright, C V

    1996-12-01

    Transcript localizations for Mox genes have implicated this homeobox gene subfamily in the early steps of mesoderm formation. We have extended these studies by determining the protein expression profile of Mox-1 and Mox-2 during mouse development. The time of onset of Mox protein expression has been accurately obtained to provide clues as to their roles during gastrulation. Expression of Mox-1 protein is first detected in the newly formed mesoderm of primitive streak stage mouse embryos (7.5 days post-coitum, d.p.c.). In contrast, Mox-2 protein is first detected at 9.0 d.p.c. in thr already formed somites. Additionally, immunostaining reveals new and distinct areas of Mox expression in the branchial arches and limbs that were not reported in our previous mRNA localization analysis. Mouse Mox-2 antibodies cross-react specifically in similar embryonic tissues in chick indicating the conservation of function of Mox genes in vertebrates. These expression data suggest that the Mox genes function transiently in the formation of mesodermal and mesenchymal derivatives, after their initial specification, but before their overt differentiation. Furthermore, while there appears to be some overlap in protein expression between Mox-1 and Mox-2 during somitogenesis, unique areas of expression indicate several distinct roles for the Mox genes during development.

  13. Evolutionary origins of the vertebrate heart: Specification of the cardiac lineage in Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Brad; Levine, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Here we exploit the extensive cell lineage information and streamlined genome of the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, to investigate heart development in a basal chordate. Several cardiac genes were analyzed, including the sole Ciona ortholog of the Drosophila tinman gene, and tissue-specific enhancers were isolated for some of the genes. Conserved sequence motifs within these enhancers facilitated the isolation of a heart enhancer for the Ciona Hand-like gene. Altogether, these studies provide a regulatory framework for the differentiation of the cardiac mesoderm, beginning at the 110-cell stage, and extending through the fusion of cardiac progenitors during tail elongation. The cardiac lineage shares a common origin with the germ line, and zygotic transcription is first detected in the heart progenitors only after its separation from the germ line at the 64-cell stage. We propose that germ-line determinants influence the specification of the cardiac mesoderm, both by inhibiting inductive signals required for the development of noncardiac mesoderm lineages, and by providing a localized source of Wnt-5 and other signals required for heart development. We discuss the possibility that the germ line also influences the specification of the vertebrate heart. PMID:14500781

  14. TGF-β mediated Msx2 expression controls occipital somites-derived caudal region of skull development

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Ryoichi; Urata, Mark; Han, Jun; Zehnaly, Armen; Bringas, Pablo; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Chai, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial development involves cranial neural crest (CNC) and mesoderm-derived cells. TGF-β signaling plays a critical role in instructing CNC cells to form the craniofacial skeleton. However, it is not known how TGF-β signaling regulates the fate of mesoderm-derived cells during craniofacial development. In this study, we show that occipital somites contribute to the caudal region of mammalian skull development. Conditional inactivation of Tgfbr2 in mesoderm-derived cells results in defects of the supraoccipital bone with meningoencephalocele and discontinuity of the neural arch of the C1 vertebra. At the cellular level, loss of TGF-β signaling causes decreased chondrocyte proliferation and premature differentiation of cartilage to bone. Expression of Msx2, a critical factor in the formation of the dorsoventral axis, is diminished in the Tgfbr2 mutant. Significantly, overexpression of Msx2 in Myf5-Cre;Tgfbr2flox/flox mice partially rescues supraoccipital bone development. These results suggest that the TGF-β/Msx2 signaling cascade is critical for development of the caudal region of the skull. PMID:17727833

  15. The migration of myogenic cells from the somites at the wing level in avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M; Drake, C; Meier, S

    1987-06-01

    This study is concerned with establishing a morphological basis for the initiation of migration of putative myogenic cells from the somites into the presumptive wing bud in avian embryos. At the 22 somite stage (stage 14) vasculogenesis is a prevalent activity. By use of a quail specific monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial cells, vascular cells are recognized in the lateral plate, on the intermediate mesoderm, and on somite surfaces. Cells that are found between the lateral plate mesoderm and somites are shown to be vascular endothelial cells. The lateral body folds progressively bring the lateral plate mesoderm close to the lateral margin of the somites and vascular elements disappear from surface view. It is not until the 24 somite stage (stage 15) that some cells in the ventral lateral margin of somites at the wing level can be seen in scanning electron micrographs to extend basal cell processes toward adjacent vascular tubes. These results provide a morphological basis for the early migratory behavior of myogenic cells and demonstrate their close proximity to the prepatterned vascular network.

  16. The role of gsc and BMP-4 in dorsal-ventral patterning of the marginal zone in Xenopus: a loss-of-function study using antisense RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Steinbeisser, H; Fainsod, A; Niehrs, C; Sasai, Y; De Robertis, E M

    1995-01-01

    The dorsal-specific homeobox gene goosecoid (gsc) and the bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene (BMP-4) are expressed in complementary regions of the Xenopus gastrula. Injection of gsc mRNA dorsalizes ventral mesodermal tissue and can induce axis formation in normal and UV-ventralized embryos. On the other hand, BMP-4 mRNA injection, which has a strong ventralizing effect on whole embryos, has been implicated in ventralization by UV, and can rescue tail structures in embryos dorsalized by LiCl. The above-mentioned putative roles for BMP-4 and gsc are based on gain-of-function experiments. In order to determine the in vivo role of these two genes in the patterning of the Xenopus mesoderm during gastrulation, partial loss-of-function experiments were performed using antisense RNA injections. Using marker genes that are expressed early in gastrulation, we show that antisense gsc RNA has a ventralizing effect on embryos, whereas antisense BMP-4 RNA dorsalizes mesodermal tissue. These loss-of-function studies also show a requirement for gsc and BMP-4 in the dorsalization induced by LiCl and in the ventralization generated by UV irradiation, respectively. Thus, both gain- and loss-of-function results for gsc and BMP-4 support the view that these two genes are necessary components of the dorsal and ventral patterning pathways in Xenopus embryos. Images PMID:7489713

  17. Stepwise renal lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells tracing in vivo development

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Masaki; Yanagawa, Naomi; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Yuri, Shunsuke; Hauser, Peter V.; Jo, Oak D.; Yanagawa, Norimoto

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced renal lineages from mESCs by following the in vivo developmental cues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced nephrogenic intermediate mesoderm by stepwise addition of factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced two types of renal progenitor cells by reciprocal conditioned media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose the potential role of CD24 for the enrichment of renal lineage cells. -- Abstract: The in vitro derivation of renal lineage progenitor cells is essential for renal cell therapy and regeneration. Despite extensive studies in the past, a protocol for renal lineage induction from embryonic stem cells remains unestablished. In this study, we aimed to induce renal lineages from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) by following in vivo developmental stages, i.e., the induction of mesoderm (Stage I), intermediate mesoderm (Stage II) and renal lineages (Stage III). For stage I induction, in accordance with known signaling pathways involved in mesoderm development in vivo, i.e., Nodal, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and Wnt, we found that the sequential addition of three factors, i.e., Activin-A (A), a surrogate for Nodal signaling, during days 0-2, A plus BMP-4 (4) during days 2-4, and A4 plus lithium (L), a surrogate for Wnt signaling, during days 4-6, was most effective to induce the mesodermal marker, Brachyury. For stage II induction, the addition of retinoic acid (R) in the continuous presence of A4L during days 6-8 was most effective to induce nephrogenic intermediate mesodermal markers, such as Pax2 and Lim1. Under this condition, more than 30% of cells were stained positive for Pax2, and there was a concomitant decrease in the expression of non-mesodermal markers. For stage III induction, in resemblance to the reciprocal induction between ureteric bud (UB) and metanephric mesenchyme (MM) during kidney development, we found that the exposure to conditioned media derived from UB and MM cells was

  18. Anterior visceral endoderm SMAD4 signaling specifies anterior embryonic patterning and head induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiling; Li, Yi-Ping; Fu, Xin-Yuan; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2010-09-27

    SMAD4 serves as a common mediator for signaling of TGF-β superfamily. Previous studies illustrated that SMAD4-null mice die at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) due to failure of mesoderm induction and extraembryonic defects; however, functions of SMAD4 in each germ layer remain elusive. To investigate this, we disrupted SMAD4 in the visceral endoderm and epiblast, respectively, using a Cre-loxP mediated approach. We showed that mutant embryos lack of SMAD4 in the visceral endoderm (Smad4(Co/Co);TTR-Cre) died at E7.5-E9.5 without head-fold and anterior embryonic structures. We demonstrated that TGF-β regulates expression of several genes, such as Hex1, Cer1, and Lim1, in the anterior visceral endoderm (AVE), and the failure of anterior embryonic development in Smad4(Co/Co);TTR-Cre embryos is accompanied by diminished expression of these genes. Consistent with this finding, SMAD4-deficient embryoid bodies showed impaired responsiveness to TGF-β-induced gene expression and morphological changes. On the other hand, embryos carrying Cre-loxP mediated disruption of SMAD4 in the epiblasts exhibited relatively normal mesoderm and head-fold induction although they all displayed profound patterning defects in the later stages of gastrulation. Cumulatively, our data indicate that SMAD4 signaling in the epiblasts is dispensable for mesoderm induction although it remains critical for head patterning, which is significantly different from SMAD4 signaling in the AVE, where it specifies anterior embryonic patterning and head induction.

  19. The Drosophila melanogaster T-box genes midline and H15 are conserved regulators of heart development.

    PubMed

    Miskolczi-McCallum, Cindy M; Scavetta, Rick J; Svendsen, Pia C; Soanes, Kelly H; Brook, William J

    2005-02-15

    The Drosophila melanogaster genes midline and H15 encode predicted T-box transcription factors homologous to vertebrate Tbx20 genes. All identified vertebrate Tbx20 genes are expressed in the embryonic heart and we find that both midline and H15 are expressed in the cardioblasts of the dorsal vessel, the insect organ equivalent to the vertebrate heart. The midline mRNA is first detected in dorsal mesoderm at embryonic stage 12 in the two progenitors per hemisegment that will divide to give rise to all six cardioblasts. Expression of H15 mRNA in the dorsal mesoderm is detected first in four to six cells per hemisegment at stage 13. The expression of midline and H15 in the dorsal vessel is dependent on Wingless signaling and the transcription factors tinman and pannier. We find that the selection of two midline-expressing cells from a pool of competent progenitors is dependent on Notch signaling. Embryos deleted for both midline and H15 have defects in the alignment of the cardioblasts and associated pericardial cells. Embryos null for midline have weaker and less penetrant phenotypes while embryos deficient for H15 have morphologically normal hearts, suggesting that the two genes are partially redundant in heart development. Despite the dorsal vessel defects, embryos mutant for both midline and H15 have normal numbers of cardioblasts, suggesting that cardiac cell fate specification is not disrupted. However, ectopic expression of midline in the dorsal mesoderm can lead to dramatic increases in the expression of cardiac markers, suggesting that midline and H15 participate in cardiac fate specification and may normally act redundantly with other cardiogenic factors. Conservation of Tbx20 expression and function in cardiac development lends further support for a common ancestral origin of the insect dorsal vessel and the vertebrate heart.

  20. Model systems for studying trophoblast differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Roberts, R Michael

    2012-09-01

    This review focuses on a now well-established model for generating cells of the trophoblast (TB) lineage by treating human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) with the growth factor BMP4. We first discuss the opposing roles of FGF2 and BMP4 in directing TB formation and the need to exclude the former from the growth medium to minimize the co-induction of mesoderm and endoderm. Under these conditions, there is up-regulation of several transcription factors implicated in TB lineage emergence within 3 h of BMP4 exposure and, over a period of days and especially under a high O(2) gas atmosphere, gradual appearance of cell types carrying markers for more differentiated TB cell types, including extravillous TB and syncytioTB. We describe the potential value of including low molecular weight pharmaceutical agents that block activin A (INHBA) and FGF2 signaling to support BMP4-directed differentiation. We contend that the weight of available evidence supports the contention that BMP4 converts human ESC and iPSC of the so-called epiblast type unidirectionally to TB. We also consider the argument that BMP4 treatment of human ESC in the absence of exogenous FGF2 leads only to the emergence of mesoderm derivatives to be seriously flawed. Instead, we propose that, when signaling networks supporting pluripotency ESC or iPSC become unsustainable and when specification towards extra-embryonic mesoderm and endoderm are rendered inoperative, TB emerges as a major default state to pluripotency.

  1. Thinking clockwise.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Raquel P; Pascoal, Susana; Palmeirim, Isabel

    2005-09-01

    Throughout the Animal Kingdom, the time of embryonic development is maintained and strictly controlled. Each step of the process is successful only when it occurs at the right time and place. This raises the question: how is time controlled during embryonic development? Time control is particularly crucial during embryo segmentation processes, where the number of generated segments, as well as the time of formation of each segment, is extraordinarily constant and specific for each species. Somitogenesis is the process through which the vertebrate presomitic mesoderm is segmented along its anterior-posterior axis into round-shaped masses of epithelial cells, named somites. In the chick embryo, a new pair of somites is formed every 90 min. The discovery that this clock-like precision is dictated by the somitogenesis molecular clock constituted a landmark in the Developmental Biology field. Several genes exhibit cyclic gene expression in the embryo presomitic mesoderm from which the somites arise, presenting a 90 min oscillation period, the time required to form a pair of somites. The combined levels of dynamic gene expression throughout the presomitic mesoderm enable cells to acquire positional information, thus giving them a notion of time. Anterior-posterior patterning of the vertebrate nervous system also involves partition into discrete territories. This is particularly evident in the hindbrain where overt segmentation occurs. Nevertheless, little is known about the segmentation genes and mechanisms that may be involved. This paper intends to describe the molecular clock associated with vertebrate somitogenesis, suggesting that it may be operating in many other patterning processes.

  2. SP8 regulates signaling centers during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Kasberg, Abigail D; Brunskill, Eric W; Steven Potter, S

    2013-09-15

    Much of the bone, cartilage and smooth muscle of the vertebrate face is derived from neural crest (NC) cells. During craniofacial development, the anterior neural ridge (ANR) and olfactory pit (OP) signaling centers are responsible for driving the outgrowth, survival, and differentiation of NC populated facial prominences, primarily via FGF. While much is known about the functional importance of signaling centers, relatively little is understood of how these signaling centers are made and maintained. In this report we describe a dramatic craniofacial malformation in mice mutant for the zinc finger transcription factor gene Sp8. At E14.5 they show facial prominences that are reduced in size and underdeveloped, giving an almost faceless phenotype. At later times they show severe midline defects, excencephaly, hyperterlorism, cleft palate, and a striking loss of many NC and paraxial mesoderm derived cranial bones. Sp8 expression was primarily restricted to the ANR and OP regions during craniofacial development. Analysis of an extensive series of conditional Sp8 mutants confirmed the critical role of Sp8 in signaling centers, and not directly in the NC and paraxial mesoderm cells. The NC cells of the Sp8 mutants showed increased levels of apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation, thereby explaining the reduced sizes of the facial prominences. Perturbed gene expression in the Sp8 mutants was examined by laser capture microdissection coupled with microarrays, as well as in situ hybridization and immunostaining. The most dramatic differences included striking reductions in Fgf8 and Fgf17 expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers. We were also able to achieve genetic and pharmaceutical partial rescue of the Sp8 mutant phenotype by reducing Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. These results show that Sp8 primarily functions to promote Fgf expression in the ANR and OP signaling centers that drive the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of the NC and paraxial

  3. Distinct and cooperative roles of mammalian Vg1 homologs GDF1 and GDF3 during early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Olov; Bertolino, Philippe; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2007-11-15

    Vg1, a member of the TGF-beta superfamily of ligands, has been implicated in the induction of mesoderm, formation of primitive streak, and left-right patterning in Xenopus and chick embryos. In mice, GDF1 and GDF3 - two TGF-beta superfamily ligands that share high sequence identity with Vg1 - have been shown to independently mimic distinct aspects of Vg1's functions. However, the extent to which the developmental processes controlled by GDF1 and GDF3 and the underlying signaling mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved remains unclear. Here we show that phylogenetic and genomic analyses indicate that Gdf1 is the true Vg1 ortholog in mammals. In addition, and similar to GDF1, we find that GDF3 signaling can be mediated by the type I receptor ALK4, type II receptors ActRIIA and ActRIIB, and the co-receptor Cripto to activate Smad-dependent reporter genes. When expressed in heterologous cells, the native forms of either GDF1 or GDF3 were incapable of inducing downstream signaling. This could be circumvented by using chimeric constructs carrying heterologous prodomains, or by co-expression with the Furin pro-protein convertase, indicating poor processing of the native GDF1 and GDF3 precursors. Unexpectedly, co-expression with Nodal - another TGF-beta superfamily ligand involved in mesoderm formation - could also expose the activities of native GDF1 and GDF3, suggesting a potentially novel mode of cooperation between these ligands. Functional complementarity between GDF1 and GDF3 during embryonic development was investigated by analyzing genetic interactions between their corresponding genes. This analysis showed that Gdf1(-/-);Gdf3(-/-) compound mutants are more severely affected than either Gdf1(-/-) or Gdf3(-/-) single mutants, with defects in the formation of anterior visceral endoderm and mesoderm that recapitulate Vg1 loss of function, suggesting that GDF1 and GDF3 together represent the functional mammalian homologs of Vg1.

  4. Gene length may contribute to graded transcriptional responses in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Peter; Mizutani, Claudia M.; Kosman, David; MacKay, Danielle L.; Belu, Mirela; Hermann, Anita; McGinnis, William; Bier, Ethan; Hwa, Terence

    2011-01-01

    An important question in developmental biology is how relatively shallow gradients of morphogens can reliably establish a series of distinct transcriptional readouts. Current models emphasize interactions between transcription factors binding in distinct modes to cis-acting sequences of target genes. Another recent idea is that the cis-acting interactions may amplify preexisting biases or prepatterns to establish robust transcriptional responses. In this study, we examine the possible contribution of one such source of prepattern, namely gene length. We developed quantitative imaging tools to measure gene expression levels for several loci at a time on a single-cell basis and applied these quantitative imaging tools to dissect the establishment of a gene expression border separating the mesoderm and neuroectoderm in the early Drosophila embryo. We first characterized the formation of a transient ventral-to-dorsal gradient of the Snail (Sna) repressor and then examined the relationship between this gradient and repression of neural target genes in the mesoderm. We found that neural genes are repressed in a nested pattern within a zone of the mesoderm abutting the neuroectoderm, where Sna levels are graded. While several factors may contribute to the transient graded response to the Sna gradient, our analysis suggests that gene length may play an important, albeit transient, role in establishing these distinct transcriptional responses. One prediction of the gene-length-dependent transcriptional patterning model is that the co-regulated genes knirps (a short gene) and knirps-related (a long gene) should be transiently expressed in domains of differing widths, which we confirmed experimentally. These findings suggest that gene length may contribute to establishing graded responses to morphogen gradients by providing transient prepatterns that are subsequently amplified and stabilized by traditional cis-regulatory interactions. PMID:21920356

  5. Evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements at the vertebrate head–trunk interface coordinate the transport and assembly of hypopharyngeal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lours-Calet, Corinne; Alvares, Lucia E.; El-Hanfy, Amira S.; Gandesha, Saniel; Walters, Esther H.; Sobreira, Débora Rodrigues; Wotton, Karl R.; Jorge, Erika C.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Kelsey Lewis, A.; Tada, Masazumi; Sharpe, Colin; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate head–trunk interface (occipital region) has been heavily remodelled during evolution, and its development is still poorly understood. In extant jawed vertebrates, this region provides muscle precursors for the throat and tongue (hypopharyngeal/hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors, HMP) that take a stereotype path rostrally along the pharynx and are thought to reach their target sites via active migration. Yet, this projection pattern emerged in jawless vertebrates before the evolution of migratory muscle precursors. This suggests that a so far elusive, more basic transport mechanism must have existed and may still be traceable today. Here we show for the first time that all occipital tissues participate in well-conserved cell movements. These cell movements are spearheaded by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm that split into two streams. The rostrally directed stream projects along the floor of the pharynx and reaches as far rostrally as the floor of the mandibular arch and outflow tract of the heart. Notably, this stream leads and engulfs the later emerging HMP, neural crest cells and hypoglossal nerve. When we (i) attempted to redirect hypobranchial/hypoglossal muscle precursors towards various attractants, (ii) placed non-migratory muscle precursors into the occipital environment or (iii) molecularly or (iv) genetically rendered muscle precursors non-migratory, they still followed the trajectory set by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm. Thus, we have discovered evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements, driven by the occipital lateral mesoderm and ectoderm, that ensure cell transport and organ assembly at the head–trunk interface. PMID:24662046

  6. Modifiers of muscle and heart cell fate specification identified by gain-of-function screen in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Yannick; Jagla, Teresa; Da Ponte, Jean-Philippe; Dastugue, Bernard; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2003-09-01

    The homeobox genes ladybird in Drosophila and their vertebrate counterparts Lbx1 genes display restricted expression patterns in a subset of muscle precursors and are both implicated in diversification of muscle cell fates. In order to gain new insights into mechanisms controlling conserved aspects of cell fate specification, we have performed a gain-of-function (GOF) screen for modifiers of the mesodermal expression of ladybird genes using a collection of EP element carrying Drosophila lines. Amongst the identified genes, several have been previously implicated in cell fate specification processes, thus validating the strategy of our screen. Observed GOF phenotypes have led us to identification of an important number of candidate genes, whose myogenic and/or cardiogenic functions remain to be investigated. Amongst them, the EP insertions close to rhomboid, yan and rac2 suggest new roles for these genes in diversification of muscle and/or heart cell lineages. The analysis of loss and GOF of rhomboid and yan reveals their new roles in specification of ladybird-expressing precursors of adult muscles (LaPs) and ladybird/tinman-positive pericardial cells. Observed phenotypes strongly suggest that rhomboid and yan act at the level of progenitor and founder cells and contribute to the diversification of mesodermal fates. Our analysis of rac2 phenotypes clearly demonstrates that the altered mesodermal level of Rho-GTPase Rac2 can influence specification of a number of cardiac and muscular cell types including those expressing ladybird. Finding that in rac2 mutants ladybird and even skipped-positive muscle founders are overproduced, indicate a new early function for this gene during segregation of muscle progenitors and/or specification of founder cells. Intriguingly, rhomboid, yan and rac2 act as conserved components of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) signalling pathways, suggesting that RTK signalling constitutes a part of a conserved regulatory network governing

  7. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition blocks skeletogenesis and echinochrome production in Paracentrotus lividus and Heliocidaris tuberculata embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Zito, Francesca; Koop, Demian; Byrne, Maria; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of widely distributed metalloenzymes, involved in diverse physiological processes. These enzymes catalyse the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate. At least 19 genes encoding for CAs have been identified in the sea urchin genome, with one of these localized to the skeletogenic mesoderm (primary mesenchyme cells, PMCs). We investigated the effects of a specific inhibitor of CA, acetazolamide (AZ), on development of two sea urchin species with contrasting investment in skeleton production, Paracentrotus lividus and Heliocidaris tuberculata, to determine the role of CA on PMC differentiation, skeletogenesis and on non-skeletogenic mesodermal (NSM) cells. Embryos were cultured in the presence of AZ from the blastula stage prior to skeleton formation and development to the larval stage was monitored. At the dose of 8 mmol/L AZ, 98% and 90% of P. lividus and H. tuberculata embryos lacked skeleton, respectively. Nevertheless, an almost normal PMC differentiation was indicated by the expression of msp130, a PMC-specific marker. Strikingly, the AZ-treated embryos also lacked the echinochrome pigment produced by the pigment cells, a subpopulation of NSM cells with immune activities within the larva. Conversely, all ectoderm and endoderm derivatives and other subpopulations of mesoderm developed normally. The inhibitory effects of AZ were completely reversed after removal of the inhibitor from the medium. Our data, together with new information concerning the involvement of CA on skeleton formation, provide evidence for the first time of a possible role of the CAs in larval immune pigment cells.

  8. NFAT5 regulates the canonical Wnt pathway and is required for cardiomyogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Atsuo; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Ogata, Takehiro; Imoto-Tsubakimoto, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NFAT5 protein expression is downregulated during cardiomyogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NFAT5 function suppresses canonical Wnt signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NFAT5 function attenuates mesodermal induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NFAT5 function is required for cardiomyogenesis. -- Abstract: While nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5), a transcription factor implicated in osmotic stress response, is suggested to be involved in other processes such as migration and proliferation, its role in cardiomyogenesis is largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of NFAT5 in cardiac differentiation of P19CL6 cells, and observed that it was abundantly expressed in undifferentiated P19CL6 cells, and its protein expression was significantly downregulated by enhanced proteasomal degradation during DMSO-induced cardiomyogenesis. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of NFAT5 markedly attenuated cardiomyogenesis, which was associated with the inhibition of mesodermal differentiation. TOPflash reporter assay revealed that the transcriptional activity of canonical Wnt signaling was activated prior to mesodermal differentiation, and this activation was markedly attenuated by NFAT5 inhibition. Pharmacological activation of canonical Wnt signaling by [2 Prime Z, 3 Prime E]-6-bromoindirubin-3 Prime -oxime (BIO) restored Brachyury expression in NFAT5DN-expressing cells. Inhibition of NFAT5 markedly attenuated Wnt3 and Wnt3a induction. Expression of Dkk1 and Cerberus1, which are secreted Wnt antagonists, was also inhibited by NFAT5 inhibition. Thus, endogenous NFAT5 regulates the coordinated expression of Wnt ligands and antagonists, which are essential for cardiomyogenesis through the canonical Wnt pathway. These results demonstrated a novel role of NFAT5 in cardiac differentiation of stem cells.

  9. Analysis of lamprey clustered Fox genes: insight into Fox gene evolution and expression in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Wotton, Karl R; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2011-12-01

    In the human genome, members of the FoxC, FoxF, FoxL1, and FoxQ1 gene families are found in two paralagous clusters. One cluster contains the genes FOXQ1, FOXF2, FOXC1 and the second consists of FOXF1, FOXC2, and FOXL1. In jawed vertebrates these genes are known to be expressed in different pharyngeal tissues and all, except FoxQ1, are involved in patterning the early embryonic mesoderm. We have previously traced the evolution of this cluster in the bony vertebrates, and the gene content is identical in the dogfish, a member of the most basally branching lineage of the jawed vertebrates. Here we extend these analyses to jawless vertebrates. Using genomic searches and molecular approaches we have identified homologues of these genes from lampreys. We identify two FoxC genes, two FoxF genes, two FoxQ1 genes and single FoxL1 gene. We examine the embryonic expression of one predominantly mesodermally expressed gene family, FoxC, and the endodermally expressed member of the cluster, FoxQ1. We identified FoxQ1 transcripts in the pharyngeal endoderm, while the two FoxC genes are differentially expressed in the pharyngeal mesenchyme and ectoderm. Furthermore we identify conserved expression of lamprey FoxC genes in the paraxial and intermediate mesoderms. We interpret our results through a chordate-wide comparison of expression patterns and discuss gene content in the context of theories on the evolution of the vertebrate genome.

  10. Immunogold-labeled S-phase neoblasts, total neoblast number, their distribution, and evidence for arrested neoblasts in Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Rhabditophora).

    PubMed

    Bode, A; Salvenmoser, W; Nimeth, K; Mahlknecht, M; Adamski, Z; Rieger, R M; Peter, R; Ladurner, P

    2006-09-01

    Neoblasts in Platyhelminthes are the only cells to proliferate and differentiate into all cell types. In Macrostomum lignano, the incorporation of 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in neoblasts confirmed the distribution of S-phase cells in two lateral bands. BrdU labeling for light and for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) identified three populations of proliferating cells: somatic neoblasts located between the epidermis and gastrodermis (mesodermal neoblasts), neoblasts located within the gastrodermis (gastrodermal neoblasts), and gonadal S-phase cells. In adults, three stages of mesodermal neoblasts (2, 2-3, and 3) defined by their ultrastructure were found. Stage 1 neoblasts where only seen in hatchlings. These stages either were phases within the S-phase of one neoblast pool or were subsequent stages of differentiating neoblasts, each with its own cell cycle. Regular TEM and immunogold labeling provided the basis for calculating the total number of neoblasts and the ratio of labeled to non-labeled neoblasts. Somatic neoblasts represented 6.5% of the total number of cells. Of these, 27% were labeled in S-phase. Of this fraction, 33% were in stage 2, 46% in stage 2-3, and 21% in stage 3. Immunogold labeling substantiated results concerning the differentiation of neoblasts into somatic cells. Non-labeled stage 2 neoblasts were present, even after a 2-week BrdU exposure. Double labeling of mitoses and FMRF-amide revealed a close spatial relationship of mesodermal neoblasts with the nervous system. Immunogold-labeled sections showed that nearly 70% of S-phase cells were in direct contact or within 5 microm from nerve cords.

  11. Cell lineage, axis formation, and the origin of germ layers in the amphipod crustacean Orchestia cavimana.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Carsten; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2002-10-01

    Embryos of the amphipod crustacean Orchestia cavimana are examined during cleavage, gastrulation, and segmentation by using in vivo labelling. Single blastomeres of the 8- and 16-cell stages were labelled with DiI to trace cell lineages. Early cleavage follows a distinct pattern and the a/p and d/v body axes are already determined at the 4- and 8-cell stages, respectively. In these stages, the germinal rudiment and the naupliar mesoderm can be traced back to a single blastomere each. In addition, the ectoderm and the postnaupliar mesoderm are separated into right and left components. At the16-cell stage, naupliar ectoderm is divided from the postnaupliar ectoderm, and extraembryonic lineages are separated from postnaupliar mesoderm and endoderm. From our investigation, it is evident that the cleavage pattern and cell lineage of Orchestia cavimana are not of the spiral type. Furthermore, the results of the labelling show many differences to cleavage patterns and cell lineages in other crustaceans, in particular, other Malacostraca. The cleavage and cell lineage patterns of the amphipod Orchestia are certainly derived within Malacostraca, whose ancestral cleavage mode was most likely of the superficial type. On the other hand, Orchestia exhibits a stereotyped cell division pattern during formation and differentiation of the germ band that is typical for malacostracans. Hence, a derived (apomorphic) early cleavage pattern is the ontogenetic basis for an evolutionarily older cell division pattern of advanced developmental stages. O. cavimana offers the possibility to trace the lineages and the fates of cells from early developmental stages up to the formation of segmental structures, including neurogenesis at a level of resolution that is not matched by any other arthropod system.

  12. Latent TGFβ binding protein 3 identifies a second heart field in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Cashman, Timothy J.; Nevis, Kathleen R.; Obregon, Pablo; Carney, Sara A.; Liu, Yan; Gu, Aihua; Mosimann, Christian; Sondalle, Samuel; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren; Burns, Caroline E.; Burns, C. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    The four-chambered mammalian heart develops from two fields of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) distinguished by their spatiotemporal patterns of differentiation and contributions to the definitive heart [1–3]. The first heart field differentiates earlier in lateral plate mesoderm, generates the linear heart tube and ultimately gives rise to the left ventricle. The second heart field (SHF) differentiates later in pharyngeal mesoderm, elongates the heart tube, and gives rise to the outflow tract (OFT) and much of the right ventricle. Because hearts in lower vertebrates contain a rudimentary OFT but not a right ventricle [4], the existence and function of SHF-like cells in these species has remained a topic of speculation [4–10]. Here we provide direct evidence from Cre/Lox-mediated lineage tracing and loss of function studies in zebrafish, a lower vertebrate with a single ventricle, that latent-TGFβ binding protein 3 (ltbp3) transcripts mark a field of CPCs with defining characteristics of the anterior SHF in mammals. Specifically, ltbp3+ cells differentiate in pharyngeal mesoderm after formation of the heart tube, elongate the heart tube at the outflow pole, and give rise to three cardiovascular lineages in the OFT and myocardium in the distal ventricle. In addition to expressing Ltbp3, a protein that regulates the bioavailability of TGFβ ligands [11], zebrafish SHF cells co-express nkx2.5, an evolutionarily conserved marker of CPCs in both fields [4]. Embryos devoid of ltbp3 lack the same cardiac structures derived from ltbp3+ cells due to compromised progenitor proliferation. Additionally, small-molecule inhibition of TGFβ signaling phenocopies the ltbp3-morphant phenotype whereas expression of a constitutively active TGFβ type I receptor rescues it. Taken together, our findings uncover a requirement for ltbp3-TGFβ signaling during zebrafish SHF development, a process that serves to enlarge the single ventricular chamber in this species. PMID:21623370

  13. Human adipose tissue possesses a unique population of pluripotent stem cells with nontumorigenic and low telomerase activities: potential implications in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Fumitaka; Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Bagheri, Mozhdeh; Heneidi, Saleh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Aiba, Setsuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a small population of pluripotent stem cells, termed adipose multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (adipose-Muse) cells, exist in adult human adipose tissue and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adipose-MSCs). They can be identified as cells positive for both MSC markers (CD105 and CD90) and human pluripotent stem cell marker SSEA-3. They intrinsically retain lineage plasticity and the ability to self-renew. They spontaneously generate cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell and successfully differentiate into targeted cells by cytokine induction. Cells other than adipose-Muse cells exist in adipose-MSCs, however, do not exhibit these properties and are unable to cross the boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal lineages even under cytokine inductions. Importantly, adipose-Muse cells demonstrate low telomerase activity and transplants do not promote teratogenesis in vivo. When compared with bone marrow (BM)- and dermal-Muse cells, adipose-Muse cells have the tendency to exhibit higher expression in mesodermal lineage markers, while BM- and dermal-Muse cells were generally higher in those of ectodermal and endodermal lineages. Adipose-Muse cells distinguish themselves as both easily obtainable and versatile in their capacity for differentiation, while low telomerase activity and lack of teratoma formation make these cells a practical cell source for potential stem cell therapies. Further, they will promote the effectiveness of currently performed adipose-MSC transplantation, particularly for ectodermal and endodermal tissues where transplanted cells need to differentiate across the lineage from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal in order to replenish lost cells for tissue repair.

  14. Clarifying tetrapod embryogenesis by a dorso-ventral analysis of the tissue flows during early stages of chicken development.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    The formation of an animal body remains largely a mystery. It is still not clear whether anything like an organization plan or an "archetype" as coined by Darwin himself, actually exists, or whether animals are organized by a succession of stop-and-go genetic, non-linear, instructions with no global pattern. Nevertheless, it was recognized long ago that the early stages of amniote development consist of large scale rotatory movements over a discoidal blastula (Wetzel, 1924). Such rotatory movements reshuffle a mass inside a finite volume, and thus may have to bear physical conservation laws which contribute to establish the plan of animals in a global fashion. In this article I use dual dorso-ventral imaging of the chicken blastula, to show experimentally that the global movement of early vertebrate embryogenesis is organized with a very simple topology, around and away of a series of hyperbolic points in the vector flow of movement. At the first hyperbolic point, a layer of tissue (the mesoderm) ingresses and moves as a viscous sheet radially. It is found that the sheet flows away with a scaling law for the radius R(t)∼exp(t/τ). Also, the movement of this mesoderm changes the flow on the other layer (the ectoderm) by the principle of action and reaction. By mesoderm wetting the ectoderm, the first hyperbolic point migrates from the anal region, to the umbilical region. The final location of the hyperbolic point defines eventually the central part of the body (the umbilical region). Thus, the formation of the vertebrate body is fixed, as a global movement, by the dynamics of singular points in the visco-elastic flow, governed by mechanical forces within the tissue.

  15. Lineage tracing of neuromesodermal progenitors reveals novel Wnt-dependent roles in trunk progenitor cell maintenance and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Garriock, Robert J; Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B; Kennedy, Mark W; Canizales, Lauren C; Lewandoski, Mark; Yamaguchi, Terry P

    2015-05-01

    In the development of the vertebrate body plan, Wnt3a is thought to promote the formation of paraxial mesodermal progenitors (PMPs) of the trunk region while suppressing neural specification. Recent lineage-tracing experiments have demonstrated that these trunk neural progenitors and PMPs derive from a common multipotent progenitor called the neuromesodermal progenitor (NMP). NMPs are known to reside in the anterior primitive streak (PS) region; however, the extent to which NMPs populate the PS and contribute to the vertebrate body plan, and the precise role that Wnt3a plays in regulating NMP self-renewal and differentiation are unclear. To address this, we used cell-specific markers (Sox2 and T) and tamoxifen-induced Cre recombinase-based lineage tracing to locate putative NMPs in vivo. We provide functional evidence for NMP location primarily in the epithelial PS, and to a lesser degree in the ingressed PS. Lineage-tracing studies in Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway mutants provide genetic evidence that trunk progenitors normally fated to enter the mesodermal germ layer can be redirected towards the neural lineage. These data, combined with previous PS lineage-tracing studies, support a model that epithelial anterior PS cells are Sox2(+)T(+) multipotent NMPs and form the bulk of neural progenitors and PMPs of the posterior trunk region. Finally, we find that Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling directs trunk progenitors towards PMP fates; however, our data also suggest that Wnt3a positively supports a progenitor state for both mesodermal and neural progenitors.

  16. miRNA-1 and miRNA-133a are involved in early commitment of pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate antagonistic roles in the regulation of cardiac differentiation.

    PubMed

    Izarra, Alberto; Moscoso, Isabel; Cañón, Susana; Carreiro, Candelas; Fondevila, Dolors; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Blanca, Vanessa; Valiente, Iñigo; Díez-Juan, Antonio; Bernad, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    miRNA-1 (miR-1) and miRNA-133a (miR-133a) are muscle-specific miRNAs that play an important role in heart development and physiopathology. Although both miRNAs have been broadly studied during cardiogenesis, the mechanisms by which miR-1 and miR-133a could influence linage commitment in pluripotent stem cells remain poorly characterized. In this study we analysed the regulation of miR-1 and miR-133a expression during pluripotent stem cell differentiation [P19.CL6 cells; embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)] and investigated their role in DMSO and embryoid body (EB)-mediated mesodermal and cardiac differentiation by gain- and loss-of-function studies, as well as in vivo, by the induction of teratomas. Gene expression analysis revealed that miR-1 and miR-133a are upregulated during cardiac differentiation of P19.CL6 cells, and also during ESC and iPSC EB differentiation. Forced overexpression of both miRNAs promoted mesodermal commitment and a concomitant decrease in the expression of neural differentiation markers. Moreover, overexpression of miR-1 enhanced the cardiac differentiation of P19.CL6, while miR-133a reduced it with respect to control cells. Teratoma formation experiments with P19.CL6 cells confirmed the influence of miR-1 and miR-133a during in vivo differentiation. Finally, inhibition of both miRNAs during P19.CL6 cardiac differentiation had opposite results to their overexpression. In conclusion, gene regulation involving miR-1 and miR-133a controls the mesodermal and cardiac fate of pluripotent stem cells. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Downregulation of H19 improves the differentiation potential of mouse parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ragina, Neli P; Schlosser, Karianne; Knott, Jason G; Senagore, Patricia K; Swiatek, Pamela J; Chang, Eun Ah; Fakhouri, Walid D; Schutte, Brian C; Kiupel, Matti; Cibelli, Jose B

    2012-05-01

    Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (P-ESCs) offer an alternative source of pluripotent cells, which hold great promise for autologous transplantation and regenerative medicine. P-ESCs have been successfully derived from blastocysts of several mammalian species. However, compared with biparental embryonic stem cells (B-ESCs), P-ESCs are limited in their ability to fully differentiate into all 3 germ layers. For example, it has been observed that there is a differentiation bias toward ectoderm derivatives at the expense of endoderm and mesoderm derivatives-muscle in particular-in chimeric embryos, teratomas, and embryoid bodies. In the present study we found that H19 expression was highly upregulated in P-ESCs with more than 6-fold overexpression compared with B-ESCs. Thus, we hypothesized that manipulation of the H19 gene in P-ESCs would alleviate their limitations and allow them to function like B-ESCs. To test this hypothesis we employed a small hairpin RNA approach to reduce the amount of H19 transcripts in mouse P-ESCs. We found that downregulation of H19 led to an increase of mesoderm-derived muscle and endoderm in P-ESCs teratomas similar to that observed in B-ESCs teratomas. This phenomenon coincided with upregulation of mesoderm-specific genes such as Myf5, Myf6, and MyoD. Moreover, H19 downregulated P-ESCs differentiated into a higher percentage of beating cardiomyocytes compared with control P-ESCs. Collectively, these results suggest that P-ESCs are amenable to molecular modifications that bring them functionally closer to true ESCs.

  18. Downregulation of H19 Improves the Differentiation Potential of Mouse Parthenogenetic Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ragina, Neli P.; Schlosser, Karianne; Knott, Jason G.; Senagore, Patricia K.; Swiatek, Pamela J.; Chang, Eun Ah; Fakhouri, Walid D.; Schutte, Brian C.; Kiupel, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (P-ESCs) offer an alternative source of pluripotent cells, which hold great promise for autologous transplantation and regenerative medicine. P-ESCs have been successfully derived from blastocysts of several mammalian species. However, compared with biparental embryonic stem cells (B-ESCs), P-ESCs are limited in their ability to fully differentiate into all 3 germ layers. For example, it has been observed that there is a differentiation bias toward ectoderm derivatives at the expense of endoderm and mesoderm derivatives—muscle in particular—in chimeric embryos, teratomas, and embryoid bodies. In the present study we found that H19 expression was highly upregulated in P-ESCs with more than 6-fold overexpression compared with B-ESCs. Thus, we hypothesized that manipulation of the H19 gene in P-ESCs would alleviate their limitations and allow them to function like B-ESCs. To test this hypothesis we employed a small hairpin RNA approach to reduce the amount of H19 transcripts in mouse P-ESCs. We found that downregulation of H19 led to an increase of mesoderm-derived muscle and endoderm in P-ESCs teratomas similar to that observed in B-ESCs teratomas. This phenomenon coincided with upregulation of mesoderm-specific genes such as Myf5, Myf6, and MyoD. Moreover, H19 downregulated P-ESCs differentiated into a higher percentage of beating cardiomyocytes compared with control P-ESCs. Collectively, these results suggest that P-ESCs are amenable to molecular modifications that bring them functionally closer to true ESCs. PMID:21793658

  19. Maternal Inheritance of Twist and Analysis of MAPK Activation in Embryos of the Polychaete Annelid Platynereis dumerilii

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Schaub, Christoph; Domsch, Katrin; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Wolfstetter, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the specification of the 4d (mesentoblast) lineage in Platynereis dumerilii. We employ RT-PCR and in situ hybridization against the Platynereis dumerilii twist homolog (Pdu-twist) to reveal mesodermal specification within this lineage. We show that Pdu-twist mRNA is already maternally distributed. After fertilization, ooplasmatic segregation leads to relocation of Pdu-twist transcripts into the somatoblast (2d) lineage and 4d, indicating that the maternal component of Pdu-twist might be an important prerequisite for further mesoderm specification but does not represent a defining characteristic of the mesentoblast. However, after the primordial germ cells have separated from the 4d lineage, zygotic transcription of Pdu-twist is exclusively observed in the myogenic progenitors, suggesting that mesodermal specification occurs after the 4d stage. Previous studies on spiral cleaving embryos revealed a spatio-temporal correlation between the 4d lineage and the activity of an embryonic organizer that is capable to induce the developmental fates of certain micromeres. This has raised the question if specification of the 4d lineage could be connected to the organizer activity. Therefore, we aimed to reveal the existence of such a proposed conserved organizer in Platynereis employing antibody staining against dpERK. In contrast to former observations in other spiralian embryos, activation of MAPK signaling during 2d and 4d formation cannot be detected which questions the existence of a conserved connection between organizer function and specification of the 4d lineage. However, our experiments unveil robust MAPK activation in the prospective nephroblasts as well as in the macromeres and some micromeres at the blastopore in gastrulating embryos. Inhibition of MAPK activation leads to larvae with a shortened body axis, defects in trunk muscle spreading and improper nervous system condensation, indicating a

  20. Inference of the Xenopus tropicalis embryonic regulatory network and spatial gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During embryogenesis, signaling molecules produced by one cell population direct gene regulatory changes in neighboring cells and influence their developmental fates and spatial organization. One of the earliest events in the development of the vertebrate embryo is the establishment of three germ layers, consisting of the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Attempts to measure gene expression in vivo in different germ layers and cell types are typically complicated by the heterogeneity of cell types within biological samples (i.e., embryos), as the responses of individual cell types are intermingled into an aggregate observation of heterogeneous cell types. Here, we propose a novel method to elucidate gene regulatory circuits from these aggregate measurements in embryos of the frog Xenopus tropicalis using gene network inference algorithms and then test the ability of the inferred networks to predict spatial gene expression patterns. Results We use two inference models with different underlying assumptions that incorporate existing network information, an ODE model for steady-state data and a Markov model for time series data, and contrast the performance of the two models. We apply our method to both control and knockdown embryos at multiple time points to reconstruct the core mesoderm and endoderm regulatory circuits. Those inferred networks are then used in combination with known dorsal-ventral spatial expression patterns of a subset of genes to predict spatial expression patterns for other genes. Both models are able to predict spatial expression patterns for some of the core mesoderm and endoderm genes, but interestingly of different gene subsets, suggesting that neither model is sufficient to recapitulate all of the spatial patterns, yet they are complementary for the patterns that they do capture. Conclusion The presented methodology of gene network inference combined with spatial pattern prediction provides an additional layer of validation to

  1. A genomic regulatory network for development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; Rast, Jonathan P.; Oliveri, Paola; Ransick, Andrew; Calestani, Cristina; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa; Minokawa, Takuya; Amore, Gabriele; Hinman, Veronica; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Otim, Ochan; Brown, C. Titus; Livi, Carolina B.; Lee, Pei Yun; Revilla, Roger; Rust, Alistair G.; Pan, Zheng jun; Schilstra, Maria J.; Clarke, Peter J C.; Arnone, Maria I.; Rowen, Lee; Cameron, R. Andrew; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy; Bolouri, Hamid

    2002-01-01

    Development of the body plan is controlled by large networks of regulatory genes. A gene regulatory network that controls the specification of endoderm and mesoderm in the sea urchin embryo is summarized here. The network was derived from large-scale perturbation analyses, in combination with computational methodologies, genomic data, cis-regulatory analysis, and molecular embryology. The network contains over 40 genes at present, and each node can be directly verified at the DNA sequence level by cis-regulatory analysis. Its architecture reveals specific and general aspects of development, such as how given cells generate their ordained fates in the embryo and why the process moves inexorably forward in developmental time.

  2. A molecular basis for retinoic acid-induced axial truncation.

    PubMed

    Iulianella, A; Beckett, B; Petkovich, M; Lohnes, D

    1999-01-01

    Dietary deprivation and gene disruption studies clearly demonstrate that biologically active retinoids, such as retinoic acid (RA), are essential for numerous developmental programs. Similar ontogenic processes are also affected by retinoic acid excess, suggesting that the effects of retinoid administration reflect normal retinoid-dependent events. In the mouse, exogenous retinoic acid can induce both anterior (anencephaly, exencephaly) and posterior (spina bifida) neural tube defects depending on the developmental stage of treatment. Retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARgamma) mediates these effects on the caudal neural tube at 8.5 days postcoitum, as RARgamma-/- mice are completely resistant to spina bifida induced by retinoic acid at this stage. We therefore used this null mouse as a model to examine the molecular nature of retinoid-induced caudal neural tube defects by using a panel of informative markers and comparing their expression between retinoic acid-treated wild-type and RARgamma-/- embryos. Our findings indicate that treatment of wild-type embryos led to a rapid and significant decrease in the caudal expression of all mesodermal markers examined (e.g., brachyury, wnt-3a, cdx-4), whereas somite, neuroepithelial, notochord, floorplate, and hindgut markers were unaffected. RARgamma-/- mutants exhibited normal expression patterns for all markers examined, consistent with the notion that mesodermal defects underlie the etiology of retinoid-induced spina bifida. We also found that posterior somitic, but not caudal presomitic, embryonic tissues contained detectable bioactive retinoids, an observation which correlated with the ability of caudal explants to rapidly clear exogenous RA. Interestingly, transcripts encoding mP450RAI, a cytochrome P450, the product of which is believed to catabolize retinoic acid, were abundant in the retinoid-poor region of the caudal embryo. mP450RAI was rapidly induced by retinoic acid treatment in vivo, consistent with previous

  3. A molecular view of onychophoran segmentation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf

    2017-02-14

    This paper summarizes our current knowledge on the expression and assumed function of Drosophila and (other) arthropod segmentation gene orthologs in Onychophora, a closely related outgroup to Arthropoda. This includes orthologs of the so-called Drosophila segmentation gene cascade including the Hox genes, as well as other genetic factors and pathways involved in non-drosophilid arthropods. Open questions about and around the topic are addressed, such as the definition of segments in onychophorans, the unclear regulation of conserved expression patterns downstream of non-conserved factors, and the potential role of mesodermal patterning in onychophoran segmentation.

  4. Placental mesenchymal dysplasia associated with hepatic and pulmonary hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Tortoledo, Maria; Galindo, A; Ibarrola, C

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a 31-week stillborn female infant with placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) in association with hepatic mesenchymal hamartoma (HMH) and pulmonary hamartoma. Placental mesenchymal dysplasia was initially misdiagnosed as a partial mole. However, histologically, no trophoblastic proliferation or inclusions were observed. Differential diagnosis of the hepatic mass with similar tumors is discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of lung hamartoma reported in a fetus and the first case related to PMD and HMH. A common anomalous development of the mesoderm, a reparative post-injury process and a genetic mechanism, have been proposed to explain their pathogenesis.

  5. A review of the role of ultrasound biomicroscopy in glaucoma associated with rare diseases of the anterior segment

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, Giuseppe; Abdolrahimzadeh, Barmak; Calafiore, Silvia; Anselmi, Gianmario; Mannino, Cristina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique, which allows high-resolution evaluation of the anatomical features of the anterior segment of the eye regardless of optical media transparency. This technique provides diagnostically significant information in vivo for the cornea, anterior chamber, chamber angle, iris, posterior chamber, zonules, ciliary body, and lens, and is of great value in assessment of the mechanisms of glaucoma onset. The purpose of this paper is to review the use of ultrasound biomicroscopy in the diagnosis and management of rare diseases of the anterior segment such as mesodermal dysgenesis of the neural crest, iridocorneal endothelial syndrome, phakomatoses, and metabolic disorders. PMID:27536058

  6. Competent steps in determination of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R

    1999-06-01

    Competence is an active state that defines the way in which cells respond to an inductive signal. A challenge of developmental biology is to explain not just the nature of the signalling molecules that promote cell specification or differentiation, but also how cells acquire competence to respond to these signals and what that reflects in molecular terms. A recent paper by Carmena et al. has revealed how several signalling mechanisms are used sequentially and in specific combinations to specify two mesodermal lineages in Drosophila.

  7. Early steps in vertebrate cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mohun, T; Sparrow, D

    1997-10-01

    Heart formation provides an excellent model for studying the molecular basis of cell determination in vertebrate embryos. By combining molecular assays with the experimental approaches of classic embryology, a model for the cell signalling events that initiate cardiogenesis is emerging. Studies of chick, amphibian, and fish embryos demonstrate the inductive role of dorso-anterior endoderm in specifying the cardiac fate of adjacent mesoderm. A consequence of this signalling is the onset of cardiomyogenesis and several transcription factors--Nkx2-5-related, HAND, GATA and MEF-2 families--contribute to these events.

  8. Evolutionary crossroads in developmental biology: Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Technau, Ulrich; Steele, Robert E

    2011-04-01

    There is growing interest in the use of cnidarians (corals, sea anemones, jellyfish and hydroids) to investigate the evolution of key aspects of animal development, such as the formation of the third germ layer (mesoderm), the nervous system and the generation of bilaterality. The recent sequencing of the Nematostella and Hydra genomes, and the establishment of methods for manipulating gene expression, have inspired new research efforts using cnidarians. Here, we present the main features of cnidarian models and their advantages for research, and summarize key recent findings using these models that have informed our understanding of the evolution of the developmental processes underlying metazoan body plan formation.

  9. Cloning and expression of Xenopus Prickle, an orthologue of a Drosophila planar cell polarity gene.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, John B; Goto, Toshiyasu; Keller, Ray; Harland, Richard M

    2002-08-01

    We have cloned Xenopus orthologues of the Drosophila planar cell polarity (PCP) gene Prickle. Xenopus Prickle (XPk) is expressed in tissues at the dorsal midline during gastrulation and early neurulation. XPk is later expressed in a segmental pattern in the presomitic mesoderm and then in recently formed somites. XPk is also expressed in the tailbud, pronephric duct, retina, and the otic vesicle. The complex expression pattern of XPk suggests that PCP signaling is used in a diverse array of developmental processes in vertebrate embryos.

  10. Derivation of the mammalian skull vault

    PubMed Central

    MORRISS-KAY, GILLIAN M.

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the evolutionary history of the mammalian skull vault as a basis for understanding its complex structure. Current information on the developmental tissue origins of the skull vault bones (mesoderm and neural crest) is assessed for mammals and other tetrapods. This information is discussed in the context of evolutionary changes in the proportions of the skull vault bones at the sarcopterygian-tetrapod transition. The dual tissue origin of the skull vault is considered in relation to the molecular mechanisms underlying osteogenic cell proliferation and differentiation in the sutural growth centres and in the proportionate contributions of different sutures to skull growth. PMID:11523816

  11. Myogenesis in the sea urchin embryo: the molecular fingerprint of the myoblast precursors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sea urchin larvae the circumesophageal fibers form a prominent muscle system of mesodermal origin. Although the morphology and later development of this muscle system has been well-described, little is known about the molecular signature of these cells or their precise origin in the early embryo. As an invertebrate deuterostome that is more closely related to the vertebrates than other commonly used model systems in myogenesis, the sea urchin fills an important phylogenetic gap and provides a unique perspective on the evolution of muscle cell development. Results Here, we present a comprehensive description of the development of the sea urchin larval circumesophageal muscle lineage beginning with its mesodermal origin using high-resolution localization of the expression of several myogenic transcriptional regulators and differentiation genes. A few myoblasts are bilaterally distributed at the oral vegetal side of the tip of the archenteron and first appear at the late gastrula stage. The expression of the differentiation genes Myosin Heavy Chain, Tropomyosin I and II, as well as the regulatory genes MyoD2, FoxF, FoxC, FoxL1, Myocardin, Twist, and Tbx6 uniquely identify these cells. Interestingly, evolutionarily conserved myogenic factors such as Mef2, MyoR and Six1/2 are not expressed in sea urchin myoblasts but are found in other mesodermal domains of the tip of the archenteron. The regulatory states of these domains were characterized in detail. Moreover, using a combinatorial analysis of gene expression we followed the development of the FoxF/FoxC positive cells from the onset of expression to the end of gastrulation. Our data allowed us to build a complete map of the Non-Skeletogenic Mesoderm at the very early gastrula stage, in which specific molecular signatures identify the precursors of different cell types. Among them, a small group of cells within the FoxY domain, which also express FoxC and SoxE, have been identified as plausible myoblast

  12. Fanconi anemia with concurrent thumb polydactyly and dorsal dimelia: a case report with discussion of embryology.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is known to be associated with radial ray deficiency (thumb and radius hypoplasia), and its embryological basis remains to be poorly understood. We describe a rare case of Fanconi anemia with concurrent thumb polydactyly and dorsal dimelia. The embryological basis of limb abnormalities in Fanconi anemia patients is thought to be based on the complex interactions between the apical ectodermal ridge (where Fanconi anemia genes are expressed) and both the mesoderm (where Spalt-like 4 (SALL4) and Sonic hedgehog (SHH) are located and which are responsible for radial ray deficiency, thumb polydactyly, and triphalangism) and the dorsoventral axis (an error in that axis leads to dorsal dimelia).

  13. Stem Cell Research

    SciTech Connect

    Verfaillie, Catherine

    2009-01-23

    We have identified a population of primitive cells in normal human post-natal bone marrow that can, at the single cell level, differentiate in many ways and also proliferate extensively. These cells can differentiate in vitro into most mesodermal cell types (for example, bone cells, and others), as well as cells into cells of the nervous system. The finding that stem cells exist in post-natal tissues with previously unknown proliferation and differentiation potential opens up the possibility of using them to treat a host of degenerative, traumatic or congenital diseases.

  14. Implantation and the placenta: Key pieces of the development puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, J.C.; Werb, Z.; Fisher, S.J.

    1994-12-02

    The mammalian embryo cannot develop without the placenta. Its specialized cells (trophoblast, endoderm, and extraembryonic mesoderm) form early in development. They attach the embryo to the uterus (implantation) and form vascular connections necessary for nutrient transport. In addition, the placenta redirects maternal endocrine, immune, and metabolic functions to the embryo`s advantage. These complex activities are sensitive to disruption, as shown by the high incidence of early embryonic mortality and pregnancy diseases in humans, as well as the numerous peri-implantation lethal mutations in mice. Integration of molecular and developmental approaches has recently produced insights into the molecules that control these processes.

  15. Trachea: anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Brand-Saberi, Beate E M; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2014-02-01

    The windpipe (trachea) is a tube of 12 cm length connecting the larynx to the principal bronchi that lead to the lungs. The main functions of the trachea comprise air flow into the lungs, mucociliary clearance, and humidification and warming of air. Mucociliary clearance is achieved by kinocilia and goblet cells in the mucosa, and by tracheal glands. The trachea develops from the endodermal lining of the foregut in interaction with the visceral mesoderm. During adult life, different types of stem cells reside in the mucosal epithelium and glandular ducts. Recently, cholinergic chemosensory cells have been described in the trachea.

  16. Slug is a novel downstream target of MyoD. Temporal profiling in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Po; Iezzi, Simona; Carver, Ethan; Dressman, Devin; Gridley, Thomas; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Hoffman, Eric P

    2002-08-16

    Temporal expression profiling was utilized to define transcriptional regulatory pathways in vivo in a mouse muscle regeneration model. Potential downstream targets of MyoD were identified by temporal expression, promoter data base mining, and gel shift assays; Slug and calpain 6 were identified as novel MyoD targets. Slug, a member of the snail/slug family of zinc finger transcriptional repressors critical for mesoderm/ectoderm development, was further shown to be a downstream target by using promoter/reporter constructs and demonstration of defective muscle regeneration in Slug null mice.

  17. Gene transfer to pre-hematopoietic and committed hematopoietic precursors in the early mouse Yolk Sac: a comparative study between in situ electroporation and retroviral transduction

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, Sébastien JD; Alves-Leiva, Celmar; Lécluse, Yann; Martin, Patrick; Albagli, Olivier; Godin, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic development in vertebrate embryos results from the sequential contribution of two pools of precursors independently generated. While intra-embryonic precursors harbour the features of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), precursors formed earlier in the yolk sac (YS) display limited differentiation and self-renewal potentials. The mechanisms leading to the generation of the precursors in both sites are still largely unknown, as are the molecular basis underlying their different potential. A possible approach to assess the role of candidate genes is to transfer or modulate their expression/activity in both sites. We thus designed and compared transduction protocols to target either native extra-embryonic precursors, or hematopoietic precursors. Results One transduction protocol involves transient modification of gene expression through in situ electroporation of the prospective blood islands, which allows the evolution of transfected mesodermal cells in their "normal" environment, upon organ culture. Following in situ electroporation of a GFP reporter construct into the YS cavity of embryos at post-streak (mesodermal/pre-hematopoietic precursors) or early somite (hematopoietic precursors) stages, high GFP expression levels as well as a good preservation of cell viability is observed in YS explants. Moreover, the erythro-myeloid progeny typical of the YS arises from GFP+ mesodermal cells or hematopoietic precursors, even if the number of targeted precursors is low. The second approach, based on retroviral transduction allows a very efficient transduction of large precursor numbers, but may only be used to target 8 dpc YS hematopoietic precursors. Again, transduced cells generate a progeny quantitatively and qualitatively similar to that of control YS. Conclusion We thus provide two protocols whose combination may allow a thorough study of both early and late events of hematopoietic development in the murine YS. In situ electroporation constitutes

  18. Cross-sectional Imaging Features of Primary Retroperitoneal Tumors and Their Subsequent Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Turker; Harman, Mustafa; Guneyli, Serkan; Gemici, Kazim; Efe, Duran; Guler, Ibrahim; Yildiz, Melda

    2015-01-01

    Basically malignant tumors in the retroperitoneal region arise from a heterogeneous group of tissues: mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell, and lymphoid. Although rare, benign tumors and cystic masses can be also encountered in retroperitoneal space. Developments in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have contributed to both diagnosis and staging of the retroperitoneal tumors. High spatial resolution and superiority in calcification make CT indispensable; on the other hand, MRI has a better soft-tissue contrast resolution which is essential for the assessment of vascular invasion and tissue characterization. The aim of this article is to review the CT and MRI features of retroperitoneal tumors and their subsequent management. PMID:25973288

  19. Laser Resection of Fibroepithelial Polyps with Digital Ureteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Demetrius H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibroepithelial polyps (FEPs) are rare benign upper urinary-tract neoplasms originating from mesodermal components of the ureteral wall covered in normal urothelial epithelium. Historically, these lesions have been treated with endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open means depending on the size, number, and morphology of the polyps. Digital ureteroscopy (DURS) offers many advantages over fiber-optic endoscopy, including superior resolution and potential ergonomic benefits, given the absence of external cameras and light cords. We describe a case involving multiple proximal ureteral FEPs treated with flexible DURS and the holmium (Ho) laser, in which the digital ureteroscope offered exceptional visualization of the FEP stalks allowing for straightforward resection and endoscopic removal. PMID:27579383

  20. Ectoderm from various regions of the developing chick limb bud differentially regulates the expression of the chicken homeobox-containing genes GHox-7 and GHox-8 by limb mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Upholt, W B; Kosher, R A

    1993-03-01

    The apical ectodermal ridge expresses high amounts of the homeobox gene GHox-8 when placed upon dissociated limb mesenchymal cells in culture and induces high expression of GHox-7, but only low expression of GHox-8, in the underlying mesenchymal cells. Ectoderm from the proximal anterior border of the limb induces high expression of both GHox-7 and GHox-8, while ectoderm from the proximal posterior border does not induce expression of either gene. Thus, ectoderm in various regions of the limb bud has distinct regulatory activities and may be involved in controlling the regionally specific expression of GHox-7 and GHox-8 in the mesoderm.

  1. Distinct genetic programs guide Drosophila circular and longitudinal visceral myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The visceral musculature of Drosophila larvae comprises circular visceral muscles tightly interwoven with longitudinal visceral muscles. During myogenesis, the circular muscles arise by one-to-one fusion of a circular visceral founder cell (FC) with a visceral fusion-competent myoblast (FCM) from the trunk visceral mesoderm, and longitudinal muscles arise from FCs of the caudal visceral mesoderm. Longitudinal FCs migrate anteriorly under guidance of fibroblast growth factors during embryogenesis; it is proposed that they fuse with FCMs from the trunk visceral mesoderm to give rise to syncytia containing up to six nuclei. Results Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunochemical analyses, we investigated whether these fusion events during migration use the same molecular repertoire and cellular components as fusion-restricted myogenic adhesive structure (FuRMAS), the adhesive signaling center that mediates myoblast fusion in the somatic mesoderm. Longitudinal muscles were formed by the fusion of one FC with Sns-positive FCMs, and defects in FCM specification led to defects in longitudinal muscle formation. At the fusion sites, Duf/Kirre and the adaptor protein Rols7 accumulated in longitudinal FCs, and Blow and F-actin accumulated in FCMs. The accumulation of these four proteins at the fusion sites argues for FuRMAS-like adhesion and signaling centers. Longitudinal fusion was disturbed in rols and blow single, and scar wip double mutants. Mutants of wasp or its interaction partner wip had no defects in longitudinal fusion. Conclusions Our results indicated that all embryonic fusion events depend on the same cell-adhesion molecules, but that the need for Rols7 and regulators of F-actin distinctly differs. Rols7 was required for longitudinal visceral and somatic myoblast fusion but not for circular visceral fusion. Importantly, longitudinal fusion depended on Kette and SCAR/Wave but was independent of WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation. Thus, the

  2. Teratomas produced from human pluripotent stem cells xenografted into immunodeficient mice - a histopathology atlas

    PubMed Central

    Damjanov, Ivan; Andrews, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    This atlas illustrates the microscopic features of tumors produced from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) xenografted into immunosuppressed mice, according to the generally accepted protocols for performing this teratoma assay of stem cell pluripotency. Microphotographs depict various hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissues derived from all three embryonic germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm). The appearance of persistent hPSC in teratomas is also described with special emphasis on the morphogenesis of embryoid bodies and yolk sac components surrounding them. The use of immunohistochemistry for analyzing hPSC-derived teratomas is also illustrated. PMID:28000905

  3. At new heights - endodermal lineages in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Ober, Elke A; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-06-01

    The endoderm gives rise to diverse tissues and organs that are essential for the homeostasis and metabolism of the organism: the thymus, thyroid, lungs, liver and pancreas, and the functionally diverse domains of the digestive tract. Classically, the endoderm, the 'innermost germ layer', was in the shadow of the ectoderm and mesoderm. However, at a recent Keystone meeting it took center stage, revealing astonishing progress in dissecting the mechanisms underlying the development and malfunction of the endodermal organs. In vitro cultures of stem and progenitor cells have become widespread, with remarkable success in differentiating three-dimensional organoids, which - in a new turn for the field - can be used as disease models.

  4. Creating cellular diversity through transcription factor competition

    PubMed Central

    Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    The development of blood cells has long served as a model system to study the generation of diverse mature cells from multipotent progenitors. The article by Org et al (2015) reveals how transcription factor competition on primed DNA templates may contribute to embryonic blood cell specification during the early stages of mesoderm development. The study not only provides new insights into the functionality of the key haematopoietic transcription factor Scl/Tal1, but also provides a potentially widely applicable framework for transcription factor-mediated cell fate specification. PMID:25680687

  5. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  6. Aphallia, lung agenesis and multiple defects of blastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gérard-Blanluet, Marion; Lambert, Véronique; Khung-Savatovsky, Suonavy; Perrin-Sabourin, Laurence; Passemard, Sandrine; Baumann, Clarisse; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Verloes, Alain

    2011-01-01

    We report the association of aphallia, with imperforate anus, bilateral renal dysplasia and complete right lung agenesis in a fetus born of non-consanguineous parents. No maternal diabetes was present. The multiple mesodermal anomalies present in this male fetus, with a severe form of Uro-Rectal-Septum Malformation Sequence associated with unilateral lung agenesis, and rib segmentation anomaly is consistent with an extended defect of blastogenesis, with apparent common timing of the malformations around the 5th to 7th weeks of gestation.

  7. Immature teratoma of the tectum mesencephali with histopathological detection of rudimentary eye anlage in a 3-year-old boy: Report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Dubinski, Daniel; Mittelbronn, Michel; Marquardt, Gerhard; Tews, Dominique S; Noack, Anika; Behmanesh, Bedjan; Seifert, Volker; Freiman, Thomas M

    2016-12-01

    Intracranial teratoma is a rare neoplasm derived from omnipotent germinal cells that can contain mesoderm, endoderm and/or ectoderm layer tissue. Histologically teratomas are characterized by abnormal structures like teeth or bone that can be further subdivided into mature and immature according to the presence of incompletely differentiated tissue. Characteristic intracranial teratomas are space-occupying lesions in the pineal region and often present with hydrocephalic symptoms due to aqueduct stenosis. A 3-year-old boy presented with a peracute hemiparesis, fatigue and speech deficit. MRI diagnostics showed a cystic, partially solid, inhomogeneous contrast-enhancing formation at the top of the tectum mesencephali with consecutive aqueduct compression. The patient underwent a sub-occipital craniotomy via a supracerebellar approach and complete resection was achieved. The histopathological examination mainly showed mature tissue of ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal origin. However, small areas of undifferentiated neuroectodermal tissue within an optic vesicle formation were detected, leading to the diagnosis of an immature teratoma. In due course, the patient was discharged in good health without neurological deficits. To our knowledge, optic vesicle-containing intracranial germ cell tumors are extremely rare. Here we report a unique case with immature neuroectodermal tissue within an optic vesicle formation in an otherwise mature teratoma.

  8. Microfluidic-based patterning of embryonic stem cells for in vitro development studies.

    PubMed

    Suri, Shalu; Singh, Ankur; Nguyen, Anh H; Bratt-Leal, Andres M; McDevitt, Todd C; Lu, Hang

    2013-12-07

    In vitro recapitulation of mammalian embryogenesis and examination of the emerging behaviours of embryonic structures require both the means to engineer complexity and accurately assess phenotypes of multicellular aggregates. Current approaches to study multicellular populations in 3D configurations are limited by the inability to create complex (i.e. spatially heterogeneous) environments in a reproducible manner with high fidelity thus impeding the ability to engineer microenvironments and combinations of cells with similar complexity to that found during morphogenic processes such as development, remodelling and wound healing. Here, we develop a multicellular embryoid body (EB) fusion technique as a higher-throughput in vitro tool, compared to a manual assembly, to generate developmentally relevant embryonic patterns. We describe the physical principles of the EB fusion microfluidic device design; we demonstrate that >60 conjoined EBs can be generated overnight and emulate a development process analogous to mouse gastrulation during early embryogenesis. Using temporal delivery of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) to embryoid bodies, we recapitulate embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) during mouse embryo development with induced mesoderm differentiation in murine embryonic stem cells leading to expression of Brachyury-T-green fluorescent protein (T-GFP), an indicator of primitive streak development and mesoderm differentiation during gastrulation. The proposed microfluidic approach could be used to manipulate hundreds or more of individual embryonic cell aggregates in a rapid fashion, thereby allowing controlled differentiation patterns in fused multicellular assemblies to generate complex yet spatially controlled microenvironments.

  9. Single-Cell Expression Profiling Reveals a Dynamic State of Cardiac Precursor Cells in the Early Mouse Embryo.

    PubMed

    Kokkinopoulos, Ioannis; Ishida, Hidekazu; Saba, Rie; Ruchaya, Prashant; Cabrera, Claudia; Struebig, Monika; Barnes, Michael; Terry, Anna; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shintani, Yasunori; Coppen, Steven; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Ameen, Torath; Mein, Charles; Hamada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken; Yashiro, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    In the early vertebrate embryo, cardiac progenitor/precursor cells (CPs) give rise to cardiac structures. Better understanding their biological character is critical to understand the heart development and to apply CPs for the clinical arena. However, our knowledge remains incomplete. With the use of single-cell expression profiling, we have now revealed rapid and dynamic changes in gene expression profiles of the embryonic CPs during the early phase after their segregation from the cardiac mesoderm. Progressively, the nascent mesodermal gene Mesp1 terminated, and Nkx2-5+/Tbx5+ population rapidly replaced the Tbx5low+ population as the expression of the cardiac genes Tbx5 and Nkx2-5 increased. At the Early Headfold stage, Tbx5-expressing CPs gradually showed a unique molecular signature with signs of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lineage-tracing revealed a developmentally distinct characteristic of this population. They underwent progressive differentiation only towards the cardiomyocyte lineage corresponding to the first heart field rather than being maintained as a progenitor pool. More importantly, Tbx5 likely plays an important role in a transcriptional network to regulate the distinct character of the FHF via a positive feedback loop to activate the robust expression of Tbx5 in CPs. These data expands our knowledge on the behavior of CPs during the early phase of cardiac development, subsequently providing a platform for further study.

  10. Human mesenchymal stem cells express neuronal markers after osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Foudah, Dana; Redondo, Juliana; Caldara, Cristina; Carini, Fabrizio; Tredici, Giovanni; Miloso, Mariarosaria

    2013-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that are able to differentiate into mesodermal lineages (osteogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic), but also towards non-mesodermal derivatives (e.g. neural cells). Recent in vitro studies revealed that, in the absence of any kind of differentiation stimuli, undifferentiated MSCs express neural differentiation markers, but the literature data do not all concur. Considering their promising therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases, it is very important to expand our knowledge about this particular biological property of MSCs. In this study, we confirmed the spontaneous expression of neural markers (neuronal, glial and progenitor markers) by undifferentiated human MSCs (hMSCs) and in particular, we demonstrated that the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and NeuN are expressed by a very high percentage of hMSCs, regardless of the number of culture passages and the culture conditions. Moreover, the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and NeuN are still expressed by hMSCs after in vitro osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. On the other hand, chondrogenically differentiated hMSCs are negative for these markers. Our findings suggest that the expression of neuronal markers could be common to a wide range of cellular types and not exclusive for neuronal lineages. Therefore, the expression of neuronal markers alone is not sufficient to demonstrate the differentiation of MSCs towards the neuronal phenotype. Functional properties analysis is also required.

  11. Complete occipitalization of the atlas with bilateral external auditory canal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dolenšek, Janez; Cvetko, Erika; Snoj, Žiga; Meznaric, Marija

    2017-02-18

    Fusion of the atlas with the occipital bone is a rare congenital dysplasia known as occipitalization of the atlas, occipitocervical synostosis, assimilation of the atlas, or atlanto-occipital fusion. It is a component of the paraxial mesodermal maldevelopment and commonly associated with other dysplasias of the craniovertebral junction. External auditory canal atresia or external aural atresia is a rare congenital absence of the external auditory canal. It occurs as the consequence of the maldevelopment of the first pharyngeal cleft due to defects of cranial neural crest cells migration and/or differentiation. It is commonly associated with the dysplasias of the structures derived from the first and second pharyngeal arches including microtia. We present the coexistence of the occipitalization of the atlas and congenital aural atresia, an uncommon combination of the paraxial mesodermal maldevelopment, and defects of cranial neural crest cells. The association is most probably syndromic as minimal diagnostic criteria for the oculoariculovertebral spectrum are fulfilled. From the clinical point of view, it is important to be aware that patients with microtia must obtain also appropriate diagnostic imaging studies of the craniovetebral junction due to eventual concomitant occipitalization of the atlas and frequently associated C1-C2 instability.

  12. Oscillatory control of Delta-like1 in cell interactions regulates dynamic gene expression and tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Hiromi; Isomura, Akihiro; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kori, Hiroshi; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates tissue morphogenesis through cell–cell interactions. The Notch effectors Hes1 and Hes7 are expressed in an oscillatory manner and regulate developmental processes such as neurogenesis and somitogenesis, respectively. Expression of the mRNA for the mouse Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) is also oscillatory. However, the dynamics of Dll1 protein expression are controversial, and their functional significance is unknown. Here, we developed a live-imaging system and found that Dll1 protein expression oscillated in neural progenitors and presomitic mesoderm cells. Notably, when Dll1 expression was accelerated or delayed by shortening or elongating the Dll1 gene, Dll1 oscillations became severely dampened or quenched at intermediate levels, as modeled mathematically. Under this condition, Hes1 and Hes7 oscillations were also dampened. In the presomitic mesoderm, steady Dll1 expression led to severe fusion of somites and their derivatives, such as vertebrae and ribs. In the developing brain, steady Dll1 expression inhibited proliferation of neural progenitors and accelerated neurogenesis, whereas optogenetic induction of Dll1 oscillation efficiently maintained neural progenitors. These results indicate that the appropriate timing of Dll1 expression is critical for the oscillatory networks and suggest the functional significance of oscillatory cell–cell interactions in tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26728556

  13. Amphioxus FGF signaling predicts the acquisition of vertebrate morphological traits

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Stephanie; Camasses, Alain; Somorjai, Ildiko; Belgacem, Mohamed R.; Chabrol, Olivier; Escande, Marie-Line; Pontarotti, Pierre; Escriva, Hector

    2011-01-01

    FGF signaling is one of the few cell–cell signaling pathways conserved among all metazoans. The diversity of FGF gene content among different phyla suggests that evolution of FGF signaling may have participated in generating the current variety of animal forms. Vertebrates possess the greatest number of FGF genes, the functional evolution of which may have been implicated in the acquisition of vertebrate-specific morphological traits. In this study, we have investigated the roles of the FGF signal during embryogenesis of the cephalochordate amphioxus, the best proxy for the chordate ancestor. We first isolate the full FGF gene complement and determine the evolutionary relationships between amphioxus and vertebrate FGFs via phylogenetic and synteny conservation analysis. Using pharmacological treatments, we inhibit the FGF signaling pathway in amphioxus embryos in different time windows. Our results show that the requirement for FGF signaling during gastrulation is a conserved character among chordates, whereas this signal is not necessary for neural induction in amphioxus, in contrast to what is known in vertebrates. We also show that FGF signal, acting through the MAPK pathway, is necessary for the formation of the most anterior somites in amphioxus, whereas more posterior somite formation is not FGF-dependent. This result leads us to propose that modification of the FGF signal function in the anterior paraxial mesoderm in an amphioxus-like vertebrate ancestor might have contributed to the loss of segmentation in the preotic paraxial mesoderm of the vertebrate head. PMID:21571634

  14. Variability and constraint in the mammalian vertebral column.

    PubMed

    Asher, R J; Lin, K H; Kardjilov, N; Hautier, L

    2011-05-01

    Patterns of vertebral variation across mammals have seldom been quantified, making it difficult to test hypotheses of covariation within the axial skeleton and mechanisms behind the high level of vertebral conservatism among mammals. We examined variation in vertebral counts within 42 species of mammals, representing monotremes, marsupials and major clades of placentals. These data show that xenarthrans and afrotherians have, on average, a high proportion of individuals with meristic deviations from species' median series counts. Monotremes, xenarthrans, afrotherians and primates show relatively high variation in thoracolumbar vertebral count. Among the clades sampled in our dataset, rodents are the least variable, with several species not showing any deviations from median vertebral counts, or vertebral anomalies such as asymmetric ribs or transitional vertebrae. Most mammals show significant correlations between sacral position and length of the rib cage; only a few show a correlation between sacral position and number of sternebrae. The former result is consistent with the hypothesis that adult axial skeletal structures patterned by distinct mesodermal tissues are modular and covary; the latter is not. Variable levels of correlation among these structures may indicate that the boundaries of prim/abaxial mesodermal precursors of the axial skeleton are not uniform across species. We do not find evidence for a higher frequency of vertebral anomalies in our sample of embryos or neonates than in post-natal individuals of any species, contrary to the hypothesis that stabilizing selection plays a major role in vertebral patterning.

  15. Optochemical dissection of T-box gene-dependent medial floor plate development.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; Walker, Whitney J; McQuade, Lindsey E; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2015-06-19

    In addition to their cell-autonomous roles in mesoderm development, the zebrafish T-box transcription factors no tail a (ntla) and spadetail (spt/tbx16) are required for medial floor plate (MFP) formation. Posterior MFP cells are completely absent in zebrafish embryos lacking both Ntla and Spt function, and genetic mosaic analyses have shown that the two T-box genes promote MFP development in a non-cell-autonomous manner. On the basis of these observations, it has been proposed that Ntla/Spt-dependent mesoderm-derived signals are required for the induction of posterior but not anterior MFP cells. To investigate the mechanisms by which Ntla and Spt regulate MFP development, we have used photoactivatable caged morpholinos (cMOs) to silence these T-box genes with spatiotemporal control. We find that posterior MFP formation requires Ntla or Spt activity during early gastrulation, specifically in lateral margin-derived cells that converge toward the midline during epiboly and somitogenesis. Nodal signaling-dependent MFP specification is maintained in the absence of Ntla and Spt function; however, midline cells in ntla;spt morphants exhibit aberrant morphogenetic movements, resulting in their anterior mislocalization. Our findings indicate that Ntla and Spt do not differentially regulate MFP induction along the anterior-posterior axis; rather, the T-box genes act redundantly within margin-derived cells to promote the posterior extension of MFP progenitors.

  16. The involvement of engrailed and wingless during segmentation in the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis (Peripatopsidae: Onychophora) (Reid 1996).

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Tait, Noel N; Budd, Graham E; Akam, Michael

    2009-05-01

    As the putative sister group to the arthropods, onychophorans can provide insight into ancestral developmental mechanisms in the panarthropod clade. Here, we examine the expression during segmentation of orthologues of wingless (Wnt1) and engrailed, two genes that play a key role in defining segment boundaries in Drosophila and that appear to play a role in segmentation in many other arthropods. Both are expressed in segmentally reiterated stripes in all forming segments except the first (brain) segment, which only shows an engrailed stripe. Engrailed is expressed before segments are morphologically visible and is expressed in both mesoderm and ectoderm. Segmental wingless expression is not detectable until after mesodermal somites are clearly distinct. Early engrailed expression lies in and extends to both sides of the furrow that first demarcates segments in the ectoderm, but is largely restricted to the posterior part of somites. Wingless expression lies immediately anterior to engrailed expression, as it does in many arthropods, but there is no precise cellular boundary between the two expression domains analogous to the overt parasegment boundary seen in Drosophila. Engrailed stripes extend along the posterior part of each limb bud, including the antenna, while wingless is restricted to the distal tip of the limbs and the neurectoderm basal to the limbs.

  17. Expression of the decapentaplegic ortholog in embryos of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli.

    PubMed

    Treffkorn, Sandra; Mayer, Georg

    2013-12-01

    The gene decapentaplegic (dpp) and its homologs are essential for establishing the dorsoventral body axis in arthropods and vertebrates. However, the expression of dpp is not uniform among different arthropod groups. While this gene is expressed along the dorsal body region in insects, its expression occurs in a mesenchymal group of cells called cumulus in the early spider embryo. A cumulus-like structure has also been reported from centipedes, suggesting that it might be either an ancestral feature of arthropods or a derived feature (=synapomorphy) uniting the chelicerates and myriapods. To decide between these two alternatives, we analysed the expression patterns of a dpp ortholog in a representative of one of the closest arthropod relatives, the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our data revealed unique expression patterns in the early mesoderm anlagen of the antennal segment and in the dorsal and ventral extra-embryonic tissue, suggesting a divergent role of dpp in these tissues in Onychophora. In contrast, the expression of dpp in the dorsal limb portions resembles that in arthropods, except that it occurs in the mesoderm rather than in the ectoderm of the onychophoran limbs. A careful inspection of embryos of E. rowelli revealed no cumulus-like accumulation of dpp expressing cells at any developmental stage, suggesting that this feature is either a derived feature of chelicerates or a synapomorphy uniting the chelicerates and myriapods.

  18. Status of RNAs, localized in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in the frogs Rana pipiens and Eleutherodactylus coqui.

    PubMed

    Nath, Kimberly; Boorech, Jamie L; Beckham, Yvonne M; Burns, Mary M; Elinson, Richard P

    2005-01-15

    Early development in the frog model, Xenopus laevis, is governed by RNAs, localized to the vegetal cortex of the oocyte. These RNAs include Xdazl RNA, which is involved in primordial germ cell formation, and VegT RNA, which specifies the mesoderm and endoderm. In order to determine whether orthologues of these RNAs are localized and have similar functions in other frogs, we cloned RpDazl and RpVegT from Rana pipiens, a frog that is phylogenetically distant from X. laevis. RNAs from both genes are localized to the vegetal cortex of the R. pipiens oocyte, indicating that the vegetal localization is likely the basal state. The animal location of EcVegT RNA in Eleutherodactylus coqui that we found previously (Beckham et al., 2003) is then a derived state, probably due to the great increase in egg size required for direct development of this species. To answer the question of function, we injected RpVegT or EcVegT RNAs into X. laevis embryos, and assayed animal caps for gene expression. Both of these RNAs induced the expression of endodermal, mesodermal, and organizer genes, showing that the function of RpVegT and EcVegT as meso-endodermal determinants is conserved in frogs. The RNA localizations and the function of VegT orthologues in germ layer specification may be synapomorphies for anuran amphibians.

  19. Epimorphic regeneration approach to tissue replacement in adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vineet; Johnson, Scott A; Reing, Janet; Zhang, Li; Tottey, Stephen; Wang, Gang; Hirschi, Karen K; Braunhut, Susan; Gudas, Lorraine J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-02-23

    Urodeles and fetal mammals are capable of impressive epimorphic regeneration in a variety of tissues, whereas the typical default response to injury in adult mammals consists of inflammation and scar tissue formation. One component of epimorphic regeneration is the recruitment of resident progenitor and stem cells to a site of injury. Bioactive molecules resulting from degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor and stem cells in vitro in adult mammals. The ability to recruit multipotential cells to the site of injury by in vivo administration of chemotactic ECM degradation products in a mammalian model of digit amputation was investigated in the present study. Adult, 6- to 8-week-old C57/BL6 mice were subjected to midsecond phalanx amputation of the third digit of the right hind foot and either treated with chemotactic ECM degradation products or left untreated. At 14 days after amputation, mice treated with ECM degradation products showed an accumulation of heterogeneous cells that expressed markers of multipotency, including Sox2, Sca1, and Rex1 (Zfp42). Cells isolated from the site of amputation were capable of differentiation along neuroectodermal and mesodermal lineages, whereas cells isolated from control mice were capable of differentiation along only mesodermal lineages. The present findings demonstrate the recruitment of endogenous stem cells to a site of injury, and/or their generation/proliferation therein, in response to ECM degradation products.

  20. 14-3-3ε Is Required for Germ Cell Migration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tsigkari, K. Kirki; Acevedo, Summer F.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Although 14-3-3 proteins participate in multiple biological processes, isoform-specific specialized functions, as well as functional redundancy are emerging with tissue and developmental stage-specificity. Accordingly, the two 14-3-3ε proteins in Drosophila exhibit functional specificity and redundancy. Homozygotes for loss of function alleles of D14-3-3ε contain significantly fewer germ line cells (pole cells) in their gonads, a phenotype not shared by mutants in the other 14-3-3 gene leo. We show that although D14-3-3ε is enriched within pole cells it is required in mesodermal somatic gonad precursor cells which guide pole cells in their migration through the mesoderm and coalesce with them to form the embryonic gonad. Loss of D14-3-3ε results in defective pole cell migration, reduced pole cell number. We present evidence that D14-3-3ε loss results in reduction or loss of the transcription factor Zfh-1, one of the main regulatory molecules of the pole cell migration, from the somatic gonad precursor cells. PMID:22666326

  1. Local activation of protein kinase A inhibits morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Byung-Ho; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2003-05-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has various biological roles in many organisms. However, little is known about its role in the developmental processes of vertebrates. In this study, we describe the functional analysis of PKA during gastrulation movements in Xenopus laevis. Overexpression of constitutively active PKA (cPKA) in the dorsal equatorial region of the embryo affects morphogenetic movement during gastrulation. We also show that intrinsic differences of PKA activities along the dorsoventral axis are set up and the level of PKA activity on the dorsal region is lower than that on the ventral region from late blastula to gastrula stages. In addition, PKA activation in animal explants inhibits activin-induced elongation. In cPKA-injected embryos, there were no changes in the expressions of markers involved in mesoderm specification, although the correct expression domains of these genes were altered. The effects of PKA activation can be restored by coexpression of PKI, a pseudosubstrate of PKA. We further analyzed the effects of PKA activation on the behavior of migratory gastrulating cells in vitro. Expression of cPKA in head mesoderm cells causes less polarized and/or randomized migration as demonstrated by a directional cell migration assay. Finally, we show that RhoA GTPase lies downstream of PKA, affecting activin-induced convergent extension movements. Taken together, these results suggest that overexpressed PKA can modulate a pathway responsible for morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

  2. Regional repression of a Drosophila POU box gene in the endoderm involves inductive interactions between germ layers.

    PubMed

    Affolter, M; Walldorf, U; Kloter, U; Schier, A F; Gehring, W J

    1993-04-01

    An induction process occurring between the mesodermal and the endodermal germ layers has recently been described in the regulation of the Drosophila homeotic gene labial (lab). We report here that proper spatial regulation of the Drosophila POU box gene pdm-1 products also involves interaction between these two germ layers. pdm-1 transcripts are initially present in both the anterior and the posterior endodermal midgut primordia. Upon fusion of the two primordia, transcripts disappear from two regions in the endoderm, a central domain and an anterior domain. The anterior repression domain of pdm-1 is independent of the expression of known homeotic genes and genes encoding secreted signalling molecules in the visceral mesoderm, both for its positioning and its repression. Repression in the central domain requires both the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Both of these genes are also required for lab induction. However, the analysis of pdm-1 expression in various mutant backgrounds indicates that the regulation of lab and pdm-1 across germ layers is controlled by different genetic cascades. Our study indicates that dpp is not the signal that dictates central pdm-1 repression across germ layers and suggests that in the same midgut region, different signalling pathways result in the differential activation or repression of potential transcription factors.

  3. Genomic Regions Required for Morphogenesis of the Drosophila Embryonic Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, D.; Scott, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila midgut is an excellent system for studying the cell migration, cell-cell communication, and morphogenetic events that occur in organ formation. Genes representative of regulatory gene families common to all animals, including homeotic, TGFβ, and Wnt genes, play roles in midgut development. To find additional regulators of midgut morphogenesis, we screened a set of genomic deficiencies for midgut phenotypes. Fifteen genomic intervals necessary for proper midgut morphogenesis were identified; three contain genes already known to act in the midgut. Three other genomic regions are required for formation of the endoderm or visceral mesoderm components of the midgut. Nine regions are required for proper formation of the midgut constrictions. The E75 ecdysone-induced gene, which encodes a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is the relevant gene in one region and is essential for proper formation of midgut constrictions. E75 acts downstream of the previously known constriction regulators or in parallel. Temporal hormonal control may therefore work in conjunction with spatial regulation by the homeotic genes in midgut development. Another genomic region is required to activate transcription of the homeotic genes Antp and Scr specifically in visceral mesoderm. The genomic regions identified by this screen provide a map to novel midgut development regulators. PMID:8582615

  4. Distribution of the Sex combs reduced Gene Products in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, James W.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of RNA and protein encoded by the homeotic Sex combs reduced (Scr) gene were examined during Drosophila development. The gene products are present in the epidermis of both the labial and first thoracic segments as would be predicted from prior genetic studies. However, the pattern in the central nervous system (CNS) and mesoderm is further restricted; the major expression located in the labial neuromere of the CNS and the mesoderm of the first thoracic segment. The spatial restriction within the CNS is correlated with and may be due to a differential timing of expression in the labial and first thoracic ectoderm. The labial ectoderm accumulates the Scr RNA prior to segregation of the neuroblasts while expression in the first thoracic ectoderm occurs after neuroblast segregation. The protein is also observed in the subesophageal ganglia of both larvae and adults, as well as in the labial and first thoracic imaginal discs. Surprisingly, the protein is also present to a lesser extent in second and third thoracic leg discs. PMID:3117618

  5. Abl suppresses cell extrusion and intercalation during epithelium folding

    PubMed Central

    Jodoin, Jeanne N.; Martin, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires control over cell shape changes and rearrangements. In the Drosophila mesoderm, linked epithelial cells apically constrict, without cell extrusion or intercalation, to fold the epithelium into a tube that will then undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Apical constriction drives tissue folding or cell extrusion in different contexts, but the mechanisms that dictate the specific outcomes are poorly understood. Using live imaging, we found that Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase depletion causes apically constricting cells to undergo aberrant basal cell extrusion and cell intercalation. abl depletion disrupted apical–basal polarity and adherens junction organization in mesoderm cells, suggesting that extruding cells undergo premature EMT. The polarity loss was associated with abnormal basolateral contractile actomyosin and Enabled (Ena) accumulation. Depletion of the Abl effector Enabled (Ena) in abl-depleted embryos suppressed the abl phenotype, consistent with cell extrusion resulting from misregulated ena. Our work provides new insight into how Abl loss and Ena misregulation promote cell extrusion and EMT. PMID:27440923

  6. Concise review: Adipose-derived stem cells as a novel tool for future regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroshi; Tobita, Morikuni; Uysal, A Cagri

    2012-05-01

    The potential use of stem cell-based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues and organs offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in the genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are, theoretically, highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seem to be an ideal population of stem cells for practical regenerative medicine, because they are not subjected to the same restrictions. In particular, large number of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be easily harvested from adipose tissue. Furthermore, recent basic research and preclinical studies have revealed that the use of ASCs in regenerative medicine is not limited to mesodermal tissue but extends to both ectodermal and endodermal tissues and organs, although ASCs originate from mesodermal lineages. Based on this background knowledge, the primary purpose of this concise review is to summarize and describe the underlying biology of ASCs and their proliferation and differentiation capacities, together with current preclinical and clinical data from a variety of medical fields regarding the use of ASCs in regenerative medicine. In addition, future directions for ASCs in terms of cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine are discussed.

  7. A conserved role for Snail as a potentiator of active transcription

    PubMed Central

    Rembold, Martina; Ciglar, Lucia; Yáñez-Cuna, J. Omar; Zinzen, Robert P.; Girardot, Charles; Jain, Ankit; Welte, Michael A.; Stark, Alexander; Leptin, Maria; Furlong, Eileen E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factors of the Snail family are key regulators of epithelial–mesenchymal transitions, cell morphogenesis, and tumor metastasis. Since its discovery in Drosophila ∼25 years ago, Snail has been extensively studied for its role as a transcriptional repressor. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Snail can positively modulate transcriptional activation. By combining information on in vivo occupancy with expression profiling of hand-selected, staged snail mutant embryos, we identified 106 genes that are potentially directly regulated by Snail during mesoderm development. In addition to the expected Snail-repressed genes, almost 50% of Snail targets showed an unanticipated activation. The majority of “Snail-activated” genes have enhancer elements cobound by Twist and are expressed in the mesoderm at the stages of Snail occupancy. Snail can potentiate Twist-mediated enhancer activation in vitro and is essential for enhancer activity in vivo. Using a machine learning approach, we show that differentially enriched motifs are sufficient to predict Snail's regulatory response. In silico mutagenesis revealed a likely causative motif, which we demonstrate is essential for enhancer activation. Taken together, these data indicate that Snail can potentiate enhancer activation by collaborating with different activators, providing a new mechanism by which Snail regulates development. PMID:24402316

  8. Forces driving cell sorting in the amphibian embryo.

    PubMed

    Winklbauer, Rudolf; Parent, Serge E

    2017-04-01

    Adhesion differences are the main driver of cell sorting and related processes such as boundary formation or tissue positioning. In the early amphibian embryo, graded variations in cadherin density and localized expression of adhesion-modulating factors are associated with regional differences in adhesive properties including overall adhesion strength. The role of these differences in embryonic boundary formation has not been studied extensively, but available evidence suggests that adhesion strength differentials are not essential. On the other hand, the inside-out positioning of the germ layers is correlated with adhesion strength, although the biological significance of this effect is unclear. By contrast, the positioning of dorsal mesoderm tissues along the anterior-posterior body axis is essential for axis elongation, but the underlying sorting mechanism is not correlated with adhesion strength, and may rely on specific cell adhesion. Formation of the ectoderm-mesoderm boundary is the best understood sorting related process in the frog embryo. It relies on contact-induced cell repulsion at the tissue interface, driven by Eph-ephrin signaling and paraxial protocadherin-dependent self/non-self recognition.

  9. Sirenomelia Phenotype in Bmp7;Shh Compound Mutants: A Novel Experimental Model for Studies of Caudal Body Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Allepuz, Carlos; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Ros, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Sirenomelia is a severe congenital malformation of the lower body characterized by the fusion of the legs into a single lower limb. This striking external phenotype consistently associates severe visceral abnormalities, most commonly of the kidneys, intestine, and genitalia that generally make the condition lethal. Although the causes of sirenomelia remain unknown, clinical studies have yielded two major hypotheses: i) a primary defect in the generation of caudal mesoderm, ii) a primary vascular defect that leaves the caudal part of the embryo hypoperfused. Interestingly, Sirenomelia has been shown to have a genetic basis in mice, and although it has been considered a sporadic condition in humans, recently some possible familial cases have been reported. Here, we report that the removal of one or both functional alleles of Shh from the Bmp7-null background leads to a sirenomelia phenotype that faithfully replicates the constellation of external and internal malformations, typical of the human condition. These mutants represent an invaluable model in which we have analyzed the pathogenesis of sirenomelia. We show that the signaling defect predominantly impacts the morphogenesis of the hindgut and the development of the caudal end of the dorsal aortas. The deficient formation of ventral midline structures, including the interlimb mesoderm caudal to the umbilicus, leads to the approximation and merging of the hindlimb fields. Our study provides new insights for the understanding of the mechanisms resulting in caudal body malformations, including sirenomelia. PMID:23028704

  10. Expression and Functional Study of Extracellular BMP Antagonists during the Morphogenesis of the Digits and Their Associated Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I.; Montero, Juan A.; Rodriguez-Leon, Joaquin; Garcia-Porrero, Juan A.; Hurle, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain insight into the role of BMP signaling in the diversification of the embryonic limb mesodermal progenitors destined to form cartilage, joints, and tendons. Given the importance of extracellular BMP modulators in in vivo systems, we performed a systematic search of those expressed in the developing autopod during the formation of the digits. Here, we monitored the expression of extracellular BMP modulators including: Noggin, Chordin, Chordin-like 1, Chordin-like 2, Twisted gastrulation, Dan, BMPER, Sost, Sostdc1, Follistatin, Follistatin-like 1, Follistatin-like 5 and Tolloid. These factors show differential expression domains in cartilage, joints and tendons. Furthermore, they are induced in specific temporal patterns during the formation of an ectopic extra digit, preceding the appearance of changes that are identifiable by conventional histology. The analysis of gene regulation, cell proliferation and cell death that are induced by these factors in high density cultures of digit progenitors provides evidence of functional specialization in the control of mesodermal differentiation but not in cell proliferation or apoptosis. We further show that the expression of these factors is differentially controlled by the distinct signaling pathways acting in the developing limb at the stages covered by this study. In addition, our results provide evidence suggesting that TWISTED GASTRULATION cooperates with CHORDINS, BMPER, and NOGGIN in the establishment of tendons or cartilage in a fashion that is dependent on the presence or absence of TOLLOID. PMID:23573253

  11. Zebrafish hoxd4a Acts Upstream of meis1.1 to Direct Vasculogenesis, Angiogenesis and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Amali, Aseervatham Anusha; Sie, Lawrence; Winkler, Christoph; Featherstone, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking the 4th-group paralog Hoxd4 display malformations of the anterior vertebral column, but are viable and fertile. Here, we report that zebrafish embryos having decreased function of the orthologous hoxd4a gene manifest striking perturbations in vasculogenesis, angiogenesis and primitive and definitive hematopoiesis. These defects are preceded by reduced expression of the hemangioblast markers scl1, lmo2 and fli1 within the posterior lateral plate mesoderm (PLM) at 13 hours post fertilization (hpf). Epistasis analysis revealed that hoxd4a acts upstream of meis1.1 but downstream of cdx4 as early as the shield stage in ventral-most mesoderm fated to give rise to hemangioblasts, leading us to propose that loss of hoxd4a function disrupts hemangioblast specification. These findings place hoxd4a high in a genetic hierarchy directing hemangioblast formation downstream of cdx1/cdx4 and upstream of meis1.1. An additional consequence of impaired hoxd4a and meis1.1 expression is the deregulation of multiple Hox genes implicated in vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis which may further contribute to the defects described here. Our results add to evidence implicating key roles for Hox genes in their initial phase of expression early in gastrulation. PMID:23554940

  12. Structure and expression of three Emx genes in the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Derobert, Y; Plouhinec, J L; Sauka-Spengler, T; Le Mentec, C; Baratte, B; Jaillard, D; Mazan, S

    2002-07-15

    We report the characterization of three Emx genes in a chondrichthyan, the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula. Comparisons of these genes with their osteichthyan counterparts indicate that the gnathostome Emx genes belong to three distinct orthology classes, each containing one of the dogfish genes and either the tetrapod Emx1 genes (Emx1 class), the osteichthyan Emx2 genes (Emx2 class) or the zebrafish Emx1 gene (Emx3 class). While the three classes could be retrieved from the pufferfish genome data, no indication of an Emx3-related gene in tetrapods could be found in the databases, suggesting that this class may have been lost in this taxon. Expression pattern comparisons of the three dogfish Emx genes and their osteichthyan counterparts indicate that not only telencephalic, but also diencephalic Emx expression territories are highly conserved among gnathostomes. In particular, all gnathostomes share an early, dynamic phase of Emx expression, spanning presumptive dorsal diencephalic territories, which involves Emx3 in the dogfish, but another orthology class, Emx2, in tetrapods. In addition, the dogfish Emx2 gene shows a highly specific expression domain in the cephalic paraxial mesoderm from the end of gastrulation and throughout neurulation, which suggests a role in the segmentation of the cephalic mesoderm.

  13. Characterization of Brachyury genes in the dogfish S. canicula and the lamprey L. fluviatilis. Insights into gastrulation in a chondrichthyan.

    PubMed

    Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Baratte, Blandine; Lepage, Mario; Mazan, Sylvie

    2003-11-15

    In order to gain insights into the evolution of gastrulation mechanisms among vertebrates, we have characterized a Brachyury-related gene in a lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis, and in a chondrichthyan, Scyliorhinus canicula. These two genes, respectively termed LfT and ScT, share with their osteichthyan counterparts prominent expression sites in the developing notochord, the tailbud, but also a transient expression in the prechordal plate, which is likely to be ancestral among vertebrates. In addition, the lamprey LfT gene is transcribed in the endoderm of the pharyngeal arches and the epiphysis, two expression sites that have not been reported thus far in gnathostomes, and, as in the chick, in the differentiating nephrotomes. Since Brachyury expression in nascent mesoderm and endoderm is highly conserved among vertebrates as well as cephalochordates, we have used this marker to identify these cell populations during gastrulation in the dogfish. The results suggest that these cells are initially present over the whole margin of the blastoderm and are displaced during gastrulation to its posterior part, which may correspond to the site of mesoderm and endoderm internalization. These data provide the first molecular characterization of gastrulation in a chondrichthyan. They indicate that gastrulation in the dogfish and in some amniotes shares striking similarities despite the phylogenetic distance between these species. This supports the hypothesis that the extensively divergent morphologies of gastrulae among vertebrates largely result from adaptations to the presence of yolk.

  14. Initiation of zebrafish hematopoiesis by the TATA-box-binding protein-related factor, Trf3

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Daniel O.; Raha, Tamal; Lawson, Nathan D.; Green, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    TATA-box-binding protein (TBP)-related factor 3, TRF3 (also called TBP2), is a vertebrate-specific member of the TBP family that has a conserved C-terminal region and DNA binding domain virtually identical to that of TBP1. TRF3 is highly expressed during embryonic development, and studies in zebrafish and Xenopus have shown that TRF3 is required for normal embryogenesis2,3. Here we show that Trf3-depleted zebrafish embryos exhibit multiple developmental defects and, in particular, fail to undergo hematopoiesis. Expression profiling for Trf3-dependent genes identified mespa, which encodes a transcription factor whose murine orthologue is required for mesoderm specification4, and chromatin immunoprecipitation verified that Trf3 binds to the mespa promoter. Depletion of Mespa resulted in developmental and hematopoietic defects strikingly similar to those induced by Trf3 depletion. Injection of mespa mRNA restored normal development to a Trf3-depleted embryo, indicating mespa is the single Trf3 target gene required for zebrafish embryogenesis. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Trf3 or Mespa also failed to express cdx4, a caudal-related gene required for hematopoiesis. Mespa binds to the cdx4 promoter, and epistasis analysis revealed an ordered trf3-mespa-cdx4 pathway. Thus, in zebrafish commitment of mesoderm to the hematopoietic lineage occurs through a transcription factor pathway initiated by a TBP-related factor. PMID:18046332

  15. A stem-deuterostome origin of the vertebrate pharyngeal transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, J. Andrew; Fritzenwanker, Jens H.; Lowe, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Hemichordate worms possess ciliated gills on their trunk, and the homology of these structures with the pharyngeal gill slits of chordates has long been a topic of debate in the fields of evolutionary biology and comparative anatomy. Here, we show conservation of transcription factor expression between the developing pharyngeal gill pores of the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii and the pharyngeal gill slit precursors (i.e. pharyngeal endodermal outpockets) of vertebrates. Transcription factors that are expressed in the pharyngeal endoderm, ectoderm and mesenchyme of vertebrates are expressed exclusively in the pharyngeal endoderm of S. kowalevskii. The pharyngeal arches and tongue bars of S. kowalevskii lack Tbx1-expressing mesoderm, and are supported solely by an acellular collagenous endoskeleton and by compartments of the trunk coelom. Our findings suggest that hemichordate and vertebrate gills are homologous as simple endodermal outpockets from the foregut, and that much vertebrate pharyngeal complexity arose coincident with the incorporation of cranial paraxial mesoderm and neural crest-derived mesenchyme within pharyngeal arches along the chordate and vertebrate stems, respectively. PMID:21676974

  16. Constitutively active Notch1 converts cranial neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme to perivascular cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sophie R.; Perera, Surangi N.; Baker, Clare V. H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perivascular/mural cells originate from either the mesoderm or the cranial neural crest. Regardless of their origin, Notch signalling is necessary for their formation. Furthermore, in both chicken and mouse, constitutive Notch1 activation (via expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain) is sufficient in vivo to convert trunk mesoderm-derived somite cells to perivascular cells, at the expense of skeletal muscle. In experiments originally designed to investigate the effect of premature Notch1 activation on the development of neural crest-derived olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OECs), we used in ovo electroporation to insert a tetracycline-inducible NotchΔE construct (encoding a constitutively active mutant of mouse Notch1) into the genome of chicken cranial neural crest cell precursors, and activated NotchΔE expression by doxycycline injection at embryonic day 4. NotchΔE-targeted cells formed perivascular cells within the frontonasal mesenchyme, and expressed a perivascular marker on the olfactory nerve. Hence, constitutively activating Notch1 is sufficient in vivo to drive not only somite cells, but also neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme and perhaps developing OECs, to a perivascular cell fate. These results also highlight the plasticity of neural crest-derived mesenchyme and glia. PMID:28183698

  17. Endoglin integrates BMP and Wnt signalling to induce haematopoiesis through JDP2

    PubMed Central

    Baik, June; Magli, Alessandro; Tahara, Naoyuki; Swanson, Scott A.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Borges, Luciene; Stewart, Ron; Garry, Daniel J.; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Thomson, James A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of haematopoietic and cardiac patterning remain poorly understood. Here we show that the BMP and Wnt signalling pathways are integrated in an endoglin (Eng)-dependent manner in cardiac and haematopoietic lineage specification. Eng is expressed in early mesoderm and marks both haematopoietic and cardiac progenitors. In the absence of Eng, yolk sacs inappropriately express the cardiac marker, Nkx2.5. Conversely, high levels of Eng in vitro and in vivo increase haematopoiesis and inhibit cardiogenesis. Levels of Eng determine the activation of both BMP and Wnt pathways, which are integrated downstream of Eng by phosphorylation of Smad1 by Gsk3. By interrogating Eng-dependent Wnt-mediated transcriptional changes, we identify Jdp2 as a key Eng-dependent Wnt target, sufficient to establish haematopoietic fate in early mesoderm when BMP and Wnt crosstalk is disturbed. These studies provide mechanistic insight into the integration of BMP and Wnt signalling in the establishment of haematopoietic and cardiac progenitors during embryogenesis. PMID:27713415

  18. Hyperglycemia impairs left–right axis formation and thereby disturbs heart morphogenesis in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hachisuga, Masahiro; Oki, Shinya; Kitajima, Keiko; Ikuta, Satomi; Sumi, Tomoyuki; Kato, Kiyoko; Wake, Norio; Meno, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects with heterotaxia are associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying such diabetes-related heart defects, we examined the effects of high-glucose concentrations on formation of the left–right axis in mouse embryos. Expression of Pitx2, which plays a key role in left–right asymmetric morphogenesis and cardiac development, was lost in the left lateral plate mesoderm of embryos of diabetic dams. Embryos exposed to high-glucose concentrations in culture also failed to express Nodal and Pitx2 in the left lateral plate mesoderm. The distribution of phosphorylated Smad2 revealed that Nodal activity in the node was attenuated, accounting for the failure of left–right axis formation. Consistent with this notion, Notch signal-dependent expression of Nodal-related genes in the node was also down-regulated in association with a reduced level of Notch signaling, suggesting that high-glucose concentrations impede Notch signaling and thereby hinder establishment of the left–right axis required for heart morphogenesis. PMID:26351675

  19. Analysis of the Fam181 gene family during mouse development reveals distinct strain-specific expression patterns, suggesting a role in nervous system development and function.

    PubMed

    Marks, Matthias; Pennimpede, Tracie; Lange, Lisette; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Wittler, Lars

    2016-01-10

    During somitogenesis differential gene expression can be observed for so-called cyclic genes, which display expression changes with a periodicity of 120min in the mouse. In screens to identify novel cyclic genes in murine embryos, Fam181b was predicted to be an oscillating gene in the presomitic mesoderm (psm). This gene, and its closely related paralog Fam181a, belong to the thus far uncharacterized Fam181 gene family. Here we describe the expression of Fam181b and Fam181a during murine embryonic development. In addition, we confirm oscillation of Fam181b in the psm in-phase with targets of, and regulated by, Notch signaling. Fam181b expression in the psm, as well as in the lateral plate mesoderm, was found to be affected by genetic background. We show that Fam181a and b exhibit partially overlapping mRNA expression patterns, and encode for proteins containing highly-conserved motifs, which predominantly localize to the nucleus. A Fam181b loss-of-function model was generated and found to result in no obvious phenotype.

  20. Existence of reserve quiescent stem cells in adults, from amphibians to humans.

    PubMed

    Young, H E

    2004-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the phenomenon of tissue restoration in amphibians and higher order animals. These theories include dedifferentiation of damaged tissues, transdifferentiation of lineage-committed stem cells, and activation of quiescent stem cells. Young and colleagues demonstrated that connective tissues throughout the body contain multiple populations of quiescent lineage-committed progenitor stem cells and lineage-uncommitted pluripotent stem cells. Subsequent cloning and cell sorting studies identified quiescent lineage-uncommitted pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells, capable of forming any mesodermal cell type, and pluripotent epiblastic-like stem cells, capable of forming any somatic cell type. Based on their studies, they propose at least 11 categories of quiescent reserve stem cells resident within postnatal animals, including humans. These categories are pluripotent epiblastic-like stem cells, pluripotent ectodermal stem cells, pluripotent epidermal stem cells, pluripotent neuronal stem cells, pluripotent neural crest stem cells, pluripotent mesenchymal (mesodermal) stem cells, pluripotent endodermal stem cells, multipotent progenitor stem cells, tripotent progenitor stem cells, bipotent progenitor stem cells, and unipotent progenitor stem cells. Thus, activation of quiescent reserve stem cells, i.e., lineage-committed progenitor stem cells and lineage-uncommitted pluripotent stem cells, resident within the connective tissues could provide for the continual maintenance and repair of the postnatal organism after birth.

  1. Skin-derived stem cells as a source of primordial germ cell- and oocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Wei; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Dyce, Paul W; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a unique organ that contains a variety of stem cells for the maintenance of skin homeostasis and the repair of skin tissues following injury and disease. Skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) constitute a heterogeneous population of stem cells generated in vitro from dermis, which can be cultured as spherical aggregates of cells in suspension culture. Under certain in vitro or in vivo conditions, SDSCs show multipotency and can generate a variety of neural, mesodermal, and endodermal cell types such as neurons, glia, fibroblasts, adipocytes, muscle cells, chondroblasts, osteoblats, and islet β-cell-like cells. SDSCs are likely derived from multipotent stem cells located in the hair follicles that are, in turn, derived from embryonic migratory neural crest or mesoderm cells. During the past decade, a wave of reports have shown that germ cells can be generated from various types of stem cells. It has been shown that SDSCs are able to produce primordial germ cell-like cells in vitro, and even oocyte-like cells (OLCs). Whether these germ cell-like cells (GCLCs) can give rise to viable progeny remains, however, unknown. In this review, we will discuss the origin and characteristics of SDSCs from which the GCLC are derived, the possible mechanisms of this differentiation process, and finally the prospective biomedical applications of the SDSC-derived GCLCs. PMID:27831564

  2. Early molecular events during retinoic acid induced differentiation of neuromesodermal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Colas, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bipotent neuromesodermal progenitors (NMPs) residing in the caudal epiblast drive coordinated body axis extension by generating both posterior neuroectoderm and presomitic mesoderm. Retinoic acid (RA) is required for body axis extension, however the early molecular response to RA signaling is poorly defined, as is its relationship to NMP biology. As endogenous RA is first seen near the time when NMPs appear, we used WNT/FGF agonists to differentiate embryonic stem cells to NMPs which were then treated with a short 2-h pulse of 25 nM RA or 1 µM RA followed by RNA-seq transcriptome analysis. Differential expression analysis of this dataset indicated that treatment with 25 nM RA, but not 1 µM RA, provided physiologically relevant findings. The 25 nM RA dataset yielded a cohort of previously known caudal RA target genes including Fgf8 (repressed) and Sox2 (activated), plus novel early RA signaling targets with nearby conserved RA response elements. Importantly, validation of top-ranked genes in vivo using RA-deficient Raldh2−/− embryos identified novel examples of RA activation (Nkx1-2, Zfp503, Zfp703, Gbx2, Fgf15, Nt5e) or RA repression (Id1) of genes expressed in the NMP niche or progeny. These findings provide evidence for early instructive and permissive roles of RA in controlling differentiation of NMPs to neural and mesodermal lineages. PMID:27793834

  3. Logics and properties of a genetic regulatory program that drives embryonic muscle development in an echinoderm

    PubMed Central

    Andrikou, Carmen; Pai, Chih-Yu; Su, Yi-Hsien; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary origin of muscle is a central question when discussing mesoderm evolution. Developmental mechanisms underlying somatic muscle development have mostly been studied in vertebrates and fly where multiple signals and hierarchic genetic regulatory cascades selectively specify myoblasts from a pool of naive mesodermal progenitors. However, due to the increased organismic complexity and distant phylogenetic position of the two systems, a general mechanistic understanding of myogenesis is still lacking. In this study, we propose a gene regulatory network (GRN) model that promotes myogenesis in the sea urchin embryo, an early branching deuterostome. A fibroblast growth factor signaling and four Forkhead transcription factors consist the central part of our model and appear to orchestrate the myogenic process. The topological properties of the network reveal dense gene interwiring and a multilevel transcriptional regulation of conserved and novel myogenic genes. Finally, the comparison of the myogenic network architecture among different animal groups highlights the evolutionary plasticity of developmental GRNs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07343.001 PMID:26218224

  4. Contribution of hedgehog signaling to the establishment of left-right asymmetry in the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob F; Miranda, Esther L; McClay, David R

    2016-03-15

    Most bilaterians exhibit a left-right asymmetric distribution of their internal organs. The sea urchin larva is notable in this regard since most adult structures are generated from left sided embryonic structures. The gene regulatory network governing this larval asymmetry is still a work in progress but involves several conserved signaling pathways including Nodal, and BMP. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of Hedgehog signaling and it's contribution to left-right asymmetry. We report that Hh signaling plays a conserved role to regulate late asymmetric expression of Nodal and that this regulation occurs after Nodal breaks left-right symmetry in the mesoderm. Thus, while Hh functions to maintain late Nodal expression, the molecular asymmetry of the future coelomic pouches is locked in. Furthermore we report that cilia play a role only insofar as to transduce Hh signaling and do not have an independent effect on the asymmetry of the mesoderm. From this, we are able to construct a more complete regulatory network governing the establishment of left-right asymmetry in the sea urchin.

  5. Characterization and embryonic expression of four amphioxus Frizzled genes with important functions during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guanghui; Li, Guang; Chen, Xiaoying; Wang, Yiquan

    2013-12-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays crucial roles in the embryonic patterning of all metazoans. Recent studies on Wnt genes in amphioxus have shed important insights into the evolution of the vertebrate Wnt gene family and their functions. Nevertheless, the potential roles of Wnt family receptors encoded by Frizzled (Fz) genes in amphioxus embryonic development remain to be investigated. In the present study, we identified four amphioxus Fz genes-AmphiFz1/2/7, AmphiFz4, AmphiFz5/8, and AmphiFz9/10-and analyzed their expression patterns during amphioxus embryogenesis. We found that these four Fz genes were maternally expressed and might be involved in early animal-vegetal axis establishment. The AmphiFz1/2/7 transcripts were detected in the central dorsal neural plate, mesoderm, the Hatschek's pit, and rim of the mouth, whereas those of AmphiFz4 were detected in the mesoderm, pharyngeal endoderm, and entire gut region. AmphiFz5/8 was exclusively expressed in the anterior-most region, whereas AmphiFz9/10 was expressed in the neural plate, somites, and tail bud. The dynamic and diverse expression patterns of amphioxus Fz genes suggest that these genes are not only associated with early embryonic axis establishment but also are involved in the development of several organs in amphioxus.

  6. Nkx2.5 marks angioblasts that contribute to hemogenic endothelium of the endocardium and dorsal aorta.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Lyad; Singh, Reena; Nathan, Elisha; Patrick, Ralph; Yifa, Oren; Yahalom-Ronen, Yfat; Arraf, Alaa A; Schultheiss, Thomas M; Suo, Shengbao; Han, Jing-Dong Jackie; Peng, Guangdun; Jing, Naihe; Wang, Yuliang; Palpant, Nathan; Tam, Patrick Pl; Harvey, Richard P; Tzahor, Eldad

    2017-03-08

    Novel regenerative therapies may stem from deeper understanding of the mechanisms governing cardiovascular lineage diversification. Using enhancer mapping and live imaging in avian embryos, and genetic lineage tracing in mice, we investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of cardiovascular progenitor populations. We show that expression of the cardiac transcription factor Nkx2.5 marks a mesodermal population outside of the cardiac crescent in the extraembryonic and lateral plate mesoderm, with characteristics of hemogenic angioblasts. Extra-cardiac Nkx2.5 lineage progenitors migrate into the embryo and contribute to clusters of CD41(+)/CD45(+) and RUNX1(+) cells in the endocardium, the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the dorsal aorta and liver. We also demonstrated that ectopic expression of Nkx2.5 in chick embryos activates the hemoangiogenic gene expression program. Taken together, we identified a hemogenic angioblast cell lineage characterized by transient Nkx2.5 expression that contributes to hemogenic endothelium and endocardium, suggesting a novel role for Nkx2.5 in hemoangiogenic lineage specification and diversification.

  7. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  8. Lineage analysis of micromere 4d, a super-phylotypic cell for Lophotrochozoa, in the leech Helobdella and the sludgeworm Tubifex

    PubMed Central

    Gline, Stephanie E.; Nakamoto, Ayaki; Cho, Sung-Jin; Chi, Candace; Weisblat, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The super-phylum Lophotrochozoa contains the plurality of extant animal phyla and exhibits a corresponding diversity of adult body plans. Moreover, in contrast to Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia, most lophotrochozoans exhibit a conserved pattern of stereotyped early divisions called spiral cleavage. In particular, bilateral mesoderm in most lophotrochozoan species arises from the progeny of micromere 4d, which is assumed to be homologous with a similar cell in the embryo of the ancestral lophotrochozoan, more than 650 million years ago. Thus, distinguishing the conserved and diversified features of cell fates in the 4d lineage among modern spiralians is required to understand how lophotrochozoan diversity has evolved by changes in developmental processes. Here we analyze cell fates for the early progeny of the bilateral daughters (M teloblasts) of micromere 4d in the leech Helobdella sp. Austin, a clitellate annelid. We show that the first six progeny of the M teloblasts (em1–em6) contribute five different sets of progeny to non-segmental mesoderm, mainly in the head and in the lining of the digestive tract. The latter feature, associated with cells em1 and em2 in Helobdella, is seen with the M teloblast lineage in a second clitellate species, the sludgeworm Tubifex tubifex and, on the basis of previously published work, in the initial progeny of the M teloblast homologs in molluscan species, suggesting that it may be an ancestral feature of lophotrochozoan development. PMID:21295566

  9. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N.; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo. To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs. PMID:26952986

  10. Enhanced hemangioblast generation and improved vascular repair and regeneration from embryonic stem cells by defined transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Bhang, Suk Ho; Arentson, Elizabeth; Sawada, Atsushi; Kim, Chan Kyu; Kang, Inyoung; Yu, Jinsheng; Sakurai, Nagisa; Kim, Suk Hyung; Yoo, Judy Ji Woon; Kim, Paul; Pahng, Seong Ho; Xia, Younan; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    The fetal liver kinase 1 (FLK-1)(+) hemangioblast can generate hematopoietic, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). ER71/ETV2, GATA2, and SCL form a core transcriptional network in hemangioblast development. Transient coexpression of these three factors during mesoderm formation stage in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) robustly enhanced hemangioblast generation by activating bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and FLK-1 signaling while inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, WNT signaling, and cardiac output. Moreover, etsrp, gata2, and scl inhibition converted hematopoietic field of the zebrafish anterior lateral plate mesoderm to cardiac. FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts generated by transient coexpression of the three factors (ER71-GATA2-SCL [EGS]-induced FLK-1(+)) effectively produced hematopoietic, endothelial, and SMCs in culture and in vivo. Importantly, EGS-induced FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts, when codelivered with mesenchymal stem cells as spheroids, were protected from apoptosis and generated functional endothelial cells and SMCs in ischemic mouse hindlimbs, resulting in improved blood perfusion and limb salvage. ESC-derived, EGS-induced FLK-1(+) hemangioblasts could provide an attractive cell source for future hematopoietic and vascular repair and regeneration.

  11. Two Forkhead transcription factors regulate cardiac progenitor specification by controlling the expression of receptors of the fibroblast growth factor and Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Bhattacharyya, Pritha; Jeffries, Neal; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiogenesis involves the coordinated regulation of multiple biological processes by a finite set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we show that the Forkhead TFs Checkpoint suppressor homologue (CHES-1-like) and Jumeau (Jumu), which govern cardiac progenitor cell divisions by regulating Polo kinase activity, play an additional, mutually redundant role in specifying the cardiac mesoderm (CM) as eliminating the functions of both Forkhead genes in the same Drosophila embryo results in defective hearts with missing hemisegments. This process is mediated by the Forkhead TFs regulating the fibroblast growth factor receptor Heartless (Htl) and the Wnt receptor Frizzled (Fz): CHES-1-like and jumu exhibit synergistic genetic interactions with htl and fz in CM specification, thereby implying that they function through the same genetic pathways, and transcriptionally activate the expression of both receptor-encoding genes. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of either htl or fz in the mesoderm partially rescues the defective CM specification phenotype in embryos lacking both Forkhead genes. Together, these data emphasize the functional redundancy that leads to robustness in the cardiac progenitor specification process, and illustrate the pleiotropic functions of Forkhead TFs in different aspects of cardiogenesis. PMID:26657774

  12. Discrete Levels of Twist Activity Are Required to Direct Distinct Cell Functions during Gastrulation and Somatic Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Dobi, Krista C.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Twist (Twi), a conserved basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional regulator, directs the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and regulates changes in cell fate, cell polarity, cell division and cell migration in organisms from flies to humans. Analogous to its role in EMT, Twist has been implicated in metastasis in numerous cancer types, including breast, pancreatic and prostate. In the Drosophila embryo, Twist is essential for discrete events in gastrulation and mesodermal patterning. In this study, we derive a twi allelic series by examining the various cellular events required for gastrulation in Drosophila. By genetically manipulating the levels of Twi activity during gastrulation, we find that coordination of cell division is the most sensitive cellular event, whereas changes in cell shape are the least sensitive. Strikingly, we show that by increasing levels of Snail expression in a severe twi hypomorphic allelic background, but not a twi null background, we can reconstitute gastrulation and produce viable adult flies. Our results demonstrate that the level of Twi activity determines whether the cellular events of ventral furrow formation, EMT, cell division and mesodermal migration occur. PMID:24915423

  13. 'Immobile' (im), a recessive lethal mutation of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Droin, A; Beauchemin, M L

    1975-10-01

    'Immobile' (im) is a recessive lethal mutation discovered in the F3 of a Xenopus (Xenopus laevis laevis) originating from a mesodermal nucleus of a neurula transplanted into an enucleated egg. The im embryos do not contract after mechanical stimulation nor do they present any spontaneous contraction from the neurula stage onwards. Development proceeds normally during the first days after which deformation of the lower jaw and tail are observed. The im tadpoles die when normal controls are at the feeding stage. Nevous and muscular tissues are histologically normal in the mutant tadpoles; at advanced stages, however, an irregularity in the path of the myofibrils is observed which is especially conspicuous in the electron microscope. Cholinesterases and ATPase are present in the mutant muscles. Parabiosis and chimerae experiments have shown that parabionts and grafts behave according to their own genotype. Cultures of presumptive axial systems with or without ectoderm lead to the conclusion that, first of all, the abnormality is situated in the mesodermal cells and secondly that the first muscular contractions in normal Xenopus laevis are of myogenic origin. The banding pattern of the myofibrils is normal as was shown by obtaining contractions of glycerol extracted in myoblasts with ATP. It seems therefore that in this mutation, the abnormality is situated in the membraneous system of the muscular cell, sarcoplasmic reticulum and/or tubular system as is probably the case in the mdg mutation of the mouse.

  14. Twenty-four cases of the EEC syndrome: clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed Central

    Buss, P W; Hughes, H E; Clarke, A

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four cases of EEC syndrome were identified as part of a nationwide study. Ectodermal dysplasia, by study definition, was present in all cases and hair and teeth were universally affected. Nail dysplasia was present in 19 subjects (79%) and the skin was affected in 21 (87%). The presence of hypohidrosis was not noted as a predominant feature in the syndrome and its occurrence appeared to depend on the presence of all other features. Distal limb defects from simple syndactyly to tetramelic cleft hand and foot were identified, including preaxial anomalies. Orofacial clefting was identified in 14 cases (58%) and lacrimal duct anomaly in 21 (87%). Significant clinical problems encountered were chiefly cosmetic or ophthalmological, but conductive deafness and genitourinary problems in some cases required surgical intervention. Altered self-image was also noted in some cases. Multidisciplinary management is necessary with the early involvement of the clinical geneticist. Developmentally, the EEC syndrome and related disorders represent disorders of ectodermal/mesodermal interaction. Candidate regions include 7q21.3, the "ectrodactyly" locus; other candidates include developmental genes implicated in the ectodermal/mesodermal interactive process. Images PMID:8544192

  15. Essential Role of Chromatin Remodeling Protein Bptf in Early Mouse Embryos and Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Joseph; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Sharova, Lioudmila V.; Xiao, Hua; Southon, Eileen; Matta, Jennifer; Tessarollo, Lino; Zhang, Ying E.; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Kuehn, Michael R.; Yamaguchi, Terry P.; Wu, Carl

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the biological functions of the chromatin remodeling protein Bptf (Bromodomain PHD-finger Transcription Factor), the largest subunit of NURF (Nucleosome Remodeling Factor) in a mammal. Bptf mutants manifest growth defects at the post-implantation stage and are reabsorbed by E8.5. Histological analyses of lineage markers show that Bptf−/− embryos implant but fail to establish a functional distal visceral endoderm. Microarray analysis at early stages of differentiation has identified Bptf-dependent gene targets including homeobox transcriptions factors and genes essential for the development of ectoderm, mesoderm, and both definitive and visceral endoderm. Differentiation of Bptf−/− embryonic stem cell lines into embryoid bodies revealed its requirement for development of mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm tissue lineages, and uncovered many genes whose activation or repression are Bptf-dependent. We also provide functional and physical links between the Bptf-containing NURF complex and the Smad transcription factors. These results suggest that Bptf may co-regulate some gene targets of this pathway, which is essential for establishment of the visceral endoderm. We conclude that Bptf likely regulates genes and signaling pathways essential for the development of key tissues of the early mouse embryo. PMID:18974875

  16. Multicellular Mathematical Modelling of Mesendoderm Formation in Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Brown, L E; Middleton, A M; King, J R; Loose, M

    2016-03-01

    The earliest cell fate decisions in a developing embryo are those associated with establishing the germ layers. The specification of the mesoderm and endoderm is of particular interest as the mesoderm is induced from the endoderm, potentially from an underlying bipotential group of cells, the mesendoderm. Mesendoderm formation has been well studied in an amphibian model frog, Xenopus laevis, and its formation is driven by a gene regulatory network (GRN) induced by maternal factors deposited in the egg. We have recently demonstrated that the axolotl, a urodele amphibian, utilises a different topology in its GRN to specify the mesendoderm. In this paper, we develop spatially structured mathematical models of the GRNs governing mesendoderm formation in a line of cells. We explore several versions of the model of mesendoderm formation in both Xenopus and the axolotl, incorporating the key differences between these two systems. Model simulations are able to reproduce known experimental data, such as Nodal expression domains in Xenopus, and also make predictions about how the positional information derived from maternal factors may be interpreted to drive cell fate decisions. We find that whilst cell-cell signalling plays a minor role in Xenopus, it is crucial for correct patterning domains in axolotl.

  17. Highly conserved functions of the Brachyury gene on morphogenetic movements: insight from the early-diverging phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsuko; Martindale, Mark Q; Fukui, Akimasa; Tochinai, Shin

    2010-03-01

    Brachyury, a member of the T-box transcription family identified in a diverse array of metazoans, was initially recognized for its function in mesoderm formation and notochord differentiation in vertebrates; however, its ancestral role has been suggested to be in control of morphogenetic movements. Here, we show that morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of Brachyury (MlBra) in embryos of a ctenophore, one of the most ancient groups of animals, prevents the invagination of MlBra expressing stomodeal cells and is rescued with corresponding RNA injections. Injection of RNA encoding a dominant-interfering construct of MlBra causes identical phenotypes to that of RNA encoding a dominant-interfering form of Xenopus Brachyury (Xbra) in Xenopus embryos. Both injected embryos down-regulate Xbra downstream genes, Xbra itself and Xwnt11 but not axial mesodermal markers, resulting in failure to complete gastrulation due to loss of convergent extension movements. Moreover, animal cap assay reveals that MlBra induces Xwnt11 like Xbra. Overall results using Xenopus embryos show that these two genes are functionally interchangeable. These functional experiments demonstrate for the first time in a basal metazoan that the primitive role of Brachyury is to regulate morphogenetic movements, rather than to specify endomesodermal fates, and the role is conserved between non-bilaterian metazoans and vertebrates.

  18. Surprisingly complex T-box gene complement in diploblastic metazoans.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsuko; Pang, Kevin; Martindale, Mark Q; Tochinai, Shin

    2007-01-01

    Ctenophores and cnidarians are two metazoan groups that evolved at least 600 Ma, predating the Cambrian explosion. Although both groups are commonly categorized as diploblastic animals without derivatives of the mesodermal germ layer, ctenophores possess definitive contractile "muscle" cells. T-box family transcription factors are an evolutionarily ancient gene family, arising in the common ancestor of metazoans, and have been divided into eight groups in five distinct subfamilies, many of which are involved in the specification of mesodermal as well as ectodermally and endodermally derived structures. Here, we report the cloning and expression of five T-box genes from a ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that ctenophores possess members of at least three of the five T-box subfamilies, and expression studies suggested distinct roles of each T-box genes during gastrulation and early organogenesis. Moreover, genome searches of the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis (anthozoan cnidarian), showed at least 13 T-box genes in Nematostella, which are divided into at least six distinct groups in the same three subfamilies found in ctenophores. Our results from two diploblastic animals indicate that the common ancestor of eumetazoans had a complex set of T-box genes and that two distinct subfamilies might have appeared during triploblastic evolution.

  19. Hox6 genes modulate in vitro differentiation of mESCs to insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Brian M; Marty-Santos, Leilani; Newman, Micaleah; Lukacs, Derek T; Spence, Jason R; Wellik, Deneen M

    2016-10-01

    The differentiation of glucose-responsive, insulin-producing cells from ESCs in vitro is promising as a cellular therapy for the treatment of diabetes, a devastating and common disease. Pancreatic β-cells are derived from the endoderm in vivo and therefore most current protocols attempt to generate a pure population of first endoderm, then pancreas epithelium, and finally insulin-producing cells. Despite this, differentiation protocols result in mixed populations of cells that are often poorly defined, but also contain mesoderm. Using an in vitro mESC-to-β cell differentiation protocol, we show that expression of region-specific Hox genes is induced. We also show that the loss of function of the Hox6 paralogous group, genes expressed only in the mesenchyme of the pancreas (not epithelium), affect the differentiation of insulin-producing cells in vitro. This work is consistent with the important role for these mesoderm-specific factors in vivo and highlights contribution of supporting mesenchymal cells in in vitro differentiation.

  20. Heart fields: spatial polarity and temporal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Issa, Radwan

    2014-02-01

    In chick and mouse, heart fields undergo dynamic morphological spatiotemporal changes during heart tube formation. Here, the dynamic change in spatial polarity of such fields is discussed and a new perspective on the heart fields is proposed. The heart progenitor cells delaminate through the primitive streak and migrate in a semicircular trajectory craniolaterally forming the bilateral heart fields as part of the splanchnic mesoderm. They switch their polarity from anteroposterior to mediolateral. The anterior intestinal portal posterior descent inverts the newly formed heart field mediolateral polarity into lateromedial by 125° bending. The heart fields revert back to their original anteroposterior polarity and fuse at the midline forming a semi heart tube by completing their half circle movement. Several names and roles were assigned to different portions of the heart fields: posterior versus anterior, first versus second, and primary versus secondary heart field. The posterior and anterior heart fields define basically physical fields that form the inflow-outflow axis of the heart tube. The first and second heart fields are, in contrast, temporal fields of differentiating cardiomyocytes expressing myosin light chain 2a and undifferentiated and proliferating precardiac mesoderm expressing Isl1 gene, respectively. The two markers present a complementary pattern and are expressed transiently in all myocardial lineages. Thus, Isl1 is not restricted to a portion of the heart field or one of the two heart lineages as has been often assumed.

  1. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Abu-Issa, Radwan

    2015-01-24

    Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell-cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  2. The Development of the Calvarial Bones and Sutures and the Pathophysiology of Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Jingjing; Ting, Man-Chun; Maxson, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    The skull vault is a complex, exquisitely patterned structure that plays a variety of key roles in vertebrate life, ranging from the acquisition of food to the support of the sense organs for hearing, smell, sight, and taste. During its development, it must meet the dual challenges of protecting the brain and accommodating its growth. The bones and sutures of the skull vault are derived from cranial neural crest and head mesoderm. The frontal and parietal bones develop from osteogenic rudiments in the supraorbital ridge. The coronal suture develops from a group of Shh-responsive cells in the head mesoderm that are collocated, with the osteogenic precursors, in the supraorbital ridge. The osteogenic rudiments and the prospective coronal suture expand apically by cell migration. A number of congenital disorders affect the skull vault. Prominent among these is craniosynostosis, the fusion of the bones at the sutures. Analysis of the pathophysiology underling craniosynostosis has identified a variety of cellular mechanisms, mediated by a range of signaling pathways and effector transcription factors. These cellular mechanisms include loss of boundary integrity, altered sutural cell specification in embryos, and loss of a suture stem cell population in adults. Future work making use of genome-wide transcriptomic approaches will address the deep structure of regulatory interactions and cellular processes that unify these seemingly diverse mechanisms.

  3. Differentiation defect in neural crest-derived smooth muscle cells in patients with aortopathy associated with bicuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Lunchang; Yang, Jiong; Qiu, Ping; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Shao, Lina; Milewicz, Dianna; Chen, Y Eugene; Yang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) are at a higher risk of developing thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) than patients with trileaflet aortic valves (TAV). The aneurysms associated with BAV most commonly involve the ascending aorta and spare the descending aorta. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the ascending and descending aorta arise from neural crest (NC) and paraxial mesoderm (PM), respectively. We hypothesized defective differentiation of the neural crest stem cells (NCSCs)-derived SMCs but not paraxial mesoderm cells (PMCs)-derived SMCs contributes to the aortopathy associated with BAV. When induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from BAV/TAA patients were differentiated into NCSC-derived SMCs, these cells demonstrated significantly decreased expression of marker of SMC differentiation (MYH11) and impaired contraction compared to normal control. In contrast, the PMC-derived SMCs were similar to control cells in these aspects. The NCSC-SMCs from the BAV/TAA also showed decreased TGF-β signaling based on phosphorylation of SMAD2, and increased mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTOR pathway using rapamycin rescued the aberrant differentiation. Our data demonstrates that decreased differentiation and contraction of patient's NCSC-derived SMCs may contribute to that aortopathy associated with BAV.

  4. Aorta-derived mesoangioblasts differentiate into the oligodendrocytes by inhibition of the Rho kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kamath, Anant; Frye, Janie; Iwamoto, Gary A; Chun, Ju Lan; Berry, Suzanne E

    2012-05-01

    Mesoangioblasts are vessel-derived stem cells that differentiate into mesodermal derivatives. We have isolated postnatal aorta-derived mesoangioblasts (ADMs) that differentiate into smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle, and adipocytes, and regenerate damaged skeletal muscle in a murine model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We report that the marker profile of ADM is similar to that of mesoangioblasts isolated from embryonic dorsal aorta, postnatal bone marrow, and heart, but distinct from mesoangioblasts derived from skeletal muscle. We also demonstrate that ADM differentiate into myelinating glial cells. ADM localize to peripheral nerve bundles in regenerating muscles and exhibit morphology and marker expression of mature Schwann cells, and myelinate axons. In vitro, ADM spontaneously express markers of oligodendrocyte progenitors, including the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan NG2, nestin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor α, the A2B5 antigen, thyroid hormone nuclear receptor α, and O4. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) initiated process extension by ADM, and when combined with insulin-like growth factor 1, PDGF, and thyroid hormone, enhanced ADM expression of oligodendrocyte precursor markers and maturation into the oligodendrocyte lineage. ADM injected into the right lateral ventricle of the brain migrate to the corpus callosum, and cerebellar white matter, where they express components of myelin. Because ADM differentiate or mature into cell types of both mesodermal and ectodermal origin, they may be useful for treatment of a variety of degenerative diseases, or repair and regeneration of multiple cell types in severely damaged tissue.

  5. p38 and a p38-interacting protein are critical for downregulation of E-cadherin during mouse gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Zohn, Irene E; Li, Yingqiu; Skolnik, Edward Y; Anderson, Kathryn V; Han, Jiahuai; Niswander, Lee

    2006-06-02

    During vertebrate gastrulation, an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is necessary for migration of mesoderm from the primitive streak. We demonstrate that p38 MAP kinase and a p38-interacting protein (p38IP) are critically required for downregulation of E-cadherin during gastrulation. In an ENU-mutagenesis screen we identified the droopy eye (drey) mutation, which affects splicing of p38IP. p38IP(drey) mutant embryos display incompletely penetrant defects in neural tube closure, eye development, and gastrulation. A stronger allele (p38IP(RRK)) exhibits gastrulation defects in which mesoderm migration is defective due to deficiency in E-cadherin protein downregulation in the primitive streak. We show that p38IP binds directly to p38 and is required for p38 activation in vivo. Moreover, both p38 and p38IP are required for E-cadherin downregulation during gastrulation. Finally, p38 regulates E-cadherin protein expression downstream from NCK-interacting kinase (NIK) and independently of the regulation of transcription by Fibroblast Growth Factor (Fgf) signaling and Snail.

  6. SAMS, a syndrome of short stature, auditory-canal atresia, mandibular hypoplasia, and skeletal abnormalities is a unique neurocristopathy caused by mutations in Goosecoid.

    PubMed

    Parry, David A; Logan, Clare V; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Calder, Alistair; Khan, Shabana; Bonthron, David T; Clowes, Virginia; Sheridan, Eamonn; Ghali, Neeti; Chudley, Albert E; Dobbie, Angus; Stumpel, Constance T R M; Johnson, Colin A

    2013-12-05

    Short stature, auditory canal atresia, mandibular hypoplasia, and skeletal abnormalities (SAMS) has been reported previously to be a rare, autosomal-recessive developmental disorder with other, unique rhizomelic skeletal anomalies. These include bilateral humeral hypoplasia, humeroscapular synostosis, pelvic abnormalities, and proximal defects of the femora. To identify the genetic basis of SAMS, we used molecular karyotyping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) to study small, unrelated families. Filtering of variants from the WES data included segregation analysis followed by comparison of in-house exomes. We identified a homozygous 306 kb microdeletion and homozygous predicted null mutations of GSC, encoding Goosecoid homeobox protein, a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor. This confirms that SAMS is a human malformation syndrome resulting from GSC mutations. Previously, Goosecoid has been shown to be a determinant at the Xenopus gastrula organizer region and a segment-polarity determinant in Drosophila. In the present report, we present data on Goosecoid protein localization in staged mouse embryos. These data and the SAMS clinical phenotype both suggest that Goosecoid is a downstream effector of the regulatory networks that define neural-crest cell-fate specification and subsequent mesoderm cell lineages in mammals, particularly during shoulder and hip formation. Our findings confirm that Goosecoid has an essential role in human craniofacial and joint development and suggest that Goosecoid is an essential regulator of mesodermal patterning in mammals and that it has specific functions in neural crest cell derivatives.

  7. Clonal analysis identifies hemogenic endothelium as the source of the blood-endothelial common lineage in the mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    Padrón-Barthe, Laura; Temiño, Susana; Villa del Campo, Cristina; Carramolino, Laura; Isern, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The first blood and endothelial cells of amniote embryos appear in close association in the blood islands of the yolk sac (YS). This association and in vitro lineage analyses have suggested a common origin from mesodermal precursors called hemangioblasts, specified in the primitive streak during gastrulation. Fate mapping and chimera studies, however, failed to provide strong evidence for a common origin in the early mouse YS. Additional in vitro studies suggest instead that mesodermal precursors first generate hemogenic endothelium, which then generate blood cells in a linear sequence. We conducted an in vivo clonal analysis to determine the potential of individual cells in the mouse epiblast, primitive streak, and early YS. We found that early YS blood and endothelial lineages mostly derive from independent epiblast populations, specified before gastrulation. Additionally, a subpopulation of the YS endothelium has hemogenic activity and displays characteristics similar to those found later in the embryonic hemogenic endothelium. Our results show that the earliest blood and endothelial cell populations in the mouse embryo are specified independently, and that hemogenic endothelium first appears in the YS and produces blood precursors with markers related to definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:25139355

  8. Coelomic epithelium-derived cells in visceral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Laura; Carmona, Rita; Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón

    2016-03-01

    Coelomic cavities of vertebrates are lined by a mesothelium which develops from the lateral plate mesoderm. During development, the coelomic epithelium is a highly active cell layer, which locally is able to supply mesenchymal cells that contribute to the mesodermal elements of many organs and provide signals which are necessary for their development. The relevance of this process of mesenchymal cell supply to the developing organs is becoming clearer because genetic lineage tracing techniques have been developed in recent years. Body wall, heart, liver, lungs, gonads, and gastrointestinal tract are populated by cells derived from the coelomic epithelium which contribute to their connective and vascular tissues, and sometimes to specialized cell types such as the stellate cells of the liver, the Cajal interstitial cells of the gut or the Sertoli cells of the testicle. In this review we collect information about the contribution of coelomic epithelium derived cells to visceral development, their developmental fates and signaling functions. The common features displayed by all these processes suggest that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the embryonic coelomic epithelium is an underestimated but key event of vertebrate development, and probably it is shared by all the coelomate metazoans.

  9. A role for BMP-induced homeobox gene MIXL1 in acute myelogenous leukemia and identification of type I BMP receptor as a potential target for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Aaron; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong; Wei, Ciamaio; Guindani, Michele; Lu, Yue; Liang, Shoudan; St. John, Lisa S.; Molldrem, Jeff; Nagarajan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Mesoderm Inducer in Xenopus Like1 (MIXL1), a paired-type homeobox transcription factor induced by TGF-β family of ligands is required for early embryonic specification of mesoderm and endoderm. Retrovirally transduced Mixl1 is reported to induce acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with a high penetrance. But the mechanistic underpinnings of MIXL1 mediated leukemogenesis are unknown. Here, we establish the protooncogene c-REL to be a transcriptional target of MIXL1 by genome wide chromatin immune precipitation. Accordingly, expression of c-REL and its downstream targets BCL2L1 and BCL2A2 are elevated in MIXL1 expressing cells. Notably, MIXL1 regulates c-REL through a zinc finger binding motif, potentially by a MIXL1–Zinc finger protein transcriptional complex. Furthermore, MIXL1 expression is detected in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) AML samples in a pattern mutually exclusive from that of HOXA9, CDX2 and HLX suggesting the existence of a core, yet distinct HOX transcriptional program. Finally, we demonstrate MIXL1 to be induced by BMP4 and not TGF-β in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Consequently, MIXL1 expressing AML cells are preferentially sensitive to the BMPR1 kinase inhibitor LDN-193189. These findings support the existence of a novel MIXL1-c REL mediated survival axis in AML that can be targeted by BMPR1 inhibitors. (MIXL1- human gene, Mixl1- mouse ortholog, MIXL1- protein) PMID:25544748

  10. Stem cell system in asexual and sexual reproduction of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelida).

    PubMed

    Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Tochinai, Shin

    2010-01-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete species that proliferates asexually via fragmentation and regeneration. As sexual reproduction can also be induced, it is a good model system for the study of both regenerative and germline stem cells. It has been shown by histological study that putative mesodermal stem cells called neoblasts, and dedifferentiated epidermal and endodermal cells are involved in blastema formation. Recently, we isolated three region-specific marker genes expressed in the digestive tract and showed by in situ hybridization that morphallactic as well as epimorphic regulation of the body patterning occurs during regeneration. We also cloned two vasa-related genes and analyzed their expression during development and in mature worms that undergo sexual reproduction. The results arising form these studies suggest that the origin and development of germline stem cells and neoblasts may be independent. Furthermore, we carried out functional analysis using RNA interference (RNAi) and showed that a novel gene termed grimp is required for mesodermal cell proliferation at the initial stages of regeneration. These findings indicate that the stem cell system in E. japonensis is regulated by both internal and external environmental factors.

  11. Epigenetic reprogramming of human embryonic stem cells into skeletal muscle cells and generation of contractile myospheres.

    PubMed

    Albini, Sonia; Coutinho, Paula; Malecova, Barbora; Giordani, Lorenzo; Savchenko, Alex; Forcales, Sonia Vanina; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2013-03-28

    Direct generation of a homogeneous population of skeletal myoblasts from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and formation of three-dimensional contractile structures for disease modeling in vitro are current challenges in regenerative medicine. Previous studies reported on the generation of myoblasts from ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EB), but not from undifferentiated ESCs, indicating the requirement for mesodermal transition to promote skeletal myogenesis. Here, we show that selective absence of the SWI/SNF component BAF60C (encoded by SMARCD3) confers on hESCs resistance to MyoD-mediated activation of skeletal myogenesis. Forced expression of BAF60C enables MyoD to directly activate skeletal myogenesis in hESCs by instructing MyoD positioning and allowing chromatin remodeling at target genes. BAF60C/MyoD-expressing hESCs are epigenetically committed myogenic progenitors, which bypass the mesodermal requirement and, when cultured as floating clusters, give rise to contractile three-dimensional myospheres composed of skeletal myotubes. These results identify BAF60C as a key epigenetic determinant of hESC commitment to the myogenic lineage and establish the molecular basis for the generation of hESC-derived myospheres exploitable for "disease in a dish" models of muscular physiology and dysfunction.

  12. Embryogenesis of bladder exstrophy: A new hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bharati; Chaudhari, Navin

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To postulate a hypothesis to explain the embryogenesis of exstrophy bladder based on our clinical observations. Materials and Methods: In 27 cases of exstrophy, we measured the distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease to the root of the penis (clitoris) (B) and the distance between the penis (clitoris) and the scrotum (labia majora) (C). These were compared with age, height and XP distance (distance between xiphisternum and symphysis pubis) matched control group of normal children. The distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease and the penis (clitoris) (A) was measured in control group. Results: The observation was A = B + C. This implies that in exstrophy bladder, the position of the penis (clitoris) has moved cephalad from the lower border of A to the junction of B and C. Conclusion: Based on the observations, we postulate that abnormal origin of genital tubercle may be the cause of exstrophy bladder. The abnormal origin of primordia of the genital tubercle in more cephalad direction than normal causes wedge effect, which will interfere with the medial migration of the mesoderm as well as the midline approximation of mesodermal structures in the lower abdominal wall, thereby resulting in the exstrophy of bladder. PMID:20011468

  13. Delayed transition to new cell fates during cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xianrui; Lyons, Deirdre C; Socolar, Joshua E S; McClay, David R

    2014-07-15

    In many embryos specification toward one cell fate can be diverted to a different cell fate through a reprogramming process. Understanding how that process works will reveal insights into the developmental regulatory logic that emerged from evolution. In the sea urchin embryo, cells at gastrulation were found to reprogram and replace missing cell types after surgical dissections of the embryo. Non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells reprogrammed to replace missing skeletogenic mesoderm cells and animal caps reprogrammed to replace all endomesoderm. In both cases evidence of reprogramming onset was first observed at the early gastrula stage, even if the cells to be replaced were removed earlier in development. Once started however, the reprogramming occurred with compressed gene expression dynamics. The NSM did not require early contact with the skeletogenic cells to reprogram, but the animal cap cells gained the ability to reprogram early in gastrulation only after extended contact with the vegetal halves prior to that time. If the entire vegetal half was removed at early gastrula, the animal caps reprogrammed and replaced the vegetal half endomesoderm. If the animal caps carried morpholinos to either hox11/13b or foxA (endomesoderm specification genes), the isolated animal caps failed to reprogram. Together these data reveal that the emergence of a reprogramming capability occurs at early gastrulation in the sea urchin embryo and requires activation of early specification components of the target tissues.

  14. A caudal proliferating growth center contributes to both poles of the forming heart tube.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Gert; Abu-Issa, Radwan; de Boer, Bouke A; Hutson, Mary R; de Boer, Piet A J; Soufan, Alexandre T; Ruijter, Jan M; Kirby, Margaret L; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2009-01-30

    Recent studies have shown that the primary heart tube continues to grow by addition of cells from the coelomic wall. This growth occurs concomitantly with embryonic folding and formation of the coelomic cavity, making early heart formation morphologically complex. A scarcity of data on localized growth parameters further hampers the understanding of cardiac growth. Therefore, we investigated local proliferation during early heart formation. Firstly, we determined the cell cycle length of primary myocardium of the early heart tube to be 5.5 days, showing that this myocardium is nonproliferating and implying that initial heart formation occurs solely by addition of cells. In line with this, we show that the heart tube rapidly lengthens at its inflow by differentiation of recently divided precursor cells. To track the origin of these cells, we made quantitative 3D reconstructions of proliferation in the forming heart tube and the mesoderm of its flanking coelomic walls. These reconstructions show a single, albeit bilateral, center of rapid proliferation in the caudomedial pericardial back wall. This center expresses Islet1. Cell tracing showed that cells from this caudal growth center, besides feeding into the venous pole of the heart, also move cranially via the dorsal pericardial mesoderm and differentiate into myocardium at the arterial pole. Inhibition of caudal proliferation impairs the formation of both the atria and the right ventricle. These data show how a proliferating growth center in the caudal coelomic wall elongates the heart tube at both its venous and arterial pole, providing a morphological mechanism for early heart formation.

  15. Heterogeneity in the Segmental Development of the Aortic Tree: Impact on Management of Genetically Triggered Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Hisham M.F.

    2014-01-01

    An extensive search of the medical literature examining the development of the thoracic aortic tree reveals that the thoracic aorta does not develop as one unit or in one stage: the oldest part of the thoracic aorta is the descending aorta with the aortic arch being the second oldest, developing under influence from the neural crest cell. Following in chronological order are the proximal ascending aorta and aortic root, which develop from a conotruncal origin. Different areas of the thoracic aorta develop under the influence of different gene sets. These parts develop from different cell lineages: the aortic root (the conotruncus), developing from the mesoderm; the ascending aorta and aortic arch, developing from the neural crest cells; and the descending aorta from the mesoderm. Findings illustrate that the thoracic aorta is not a single entity, in developmental terms. It develops from three or four distinct areas, at different stages of embryonic life, and under different sets of genes and signaling pathways. Genetically triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms are not a monolithic group but rather share a multi-genetic origin. Identification of therapeutic targets should be based on the predilection of certain genes to cause aneurysmal disease in specific aortic segments. PMID:26798739

  16. Extensive characterization of feline intra-abdominal adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Ryang; Lee, Jienny; Byeon, Jeong Su; Gu, Na-Yeon; Lee, Jiyun; Cho, In-Soo; Cha, Sang-Ho

    2016-07-25

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from various tissues and well characterized for therapeutic application to clinical diseases. However, in contrast to MSCs from other animal species, the characteristics of feline MSCs have not been well documented. In this study, we attempted to conduct extensive characterization of feline adipose tissue-derived MSCs (fAD-MSCs). fAD-MSCs were individually isolated from the intra-abdominal adipose tissues of six felines. The expression levels of cell surface markers and pluripotent markers were evaluated. Next, the proliferation capacity was analyzed by cumulative population doubling level (CPDL) and doubling time (DT) calculation assays. Differentiation potentials into mesodermal cell lineages of fAD-MSCs were further analyzed by specific staining and molecular markers. All of fAD-MSCs positively expressed cell surface markers such as CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105, CD166, and MHC-I, while CD14, CD34, CD45, and CD73 were negatively expressed. The CPDL of the fAD-MSCs was maintained until passage 5 to 6 (P5 to P6) and DT increased after P5 to P6. Also, stem cell specific pluripotent markers (Oct3/4, Nanog, and SSEA-4) were detected. Importantly, all of the fAD-MSCs demonstrated mesodermal differentiation capacity. These results suggest that well characterized fAD-MSCs could be beneficial, when considering these cells for researches of feline diseases.

  17. Id expression in amphioxus and lamprey highlights the role of gene cooption during neural crest evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulemans, Daniel; McCauley, David; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Neural crest cells are unique to vertebrates and generate many of the adult structures that differentiate them from their closest invertebrate relatives, the cephalochordates. Id genes are robust markers of neural crest cells at all stages of development. We compared Id gene expression in amphioxus and lamprey to ask if cephalochordates deploy Id genes at the neural plate border and dorsal neural tube in a manner similar to vertebrates. Furthermore, we examined whether Id expression in these cells is a basal vertebrate trait or a derived feature of gnathostomes. We found that while expression of Id genes in the mesoderm and endoderm is conserved between amphioxus and vertebrates, expression in the lateral neural plate border and dorsal neural tube is a vertebrate novelty. Furthermore, expression of lamprey Id implies that recruitment of Id genes to these cells occurred very early in the vertebrate lineage. Based on expression in amphioxus we postulate that Id cooption conferred sensory cell progenitor-like properties upon the lateral neurectoderm, and pharyngeal mesoderm-like properties upon cranial neural crest. Amphioxus Id expression is also consistent with homology between the anterior neurectoderm of amphioxus and the presumptive placodal ectoderm of vertebrates. These observations support the idea that neural crest evolution was driven in large part by cooption of multipurpose transcriptional regulators from other tissues and cell types.

  18. An amphioxus winged helix/forkhead gene, AmphiFoxD: insights into vertebrate neural crest evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jr-Kai; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.

    2002-01-01

    During amphioxus development, the neural plate is bordered by cells expressing many genes with homologs involved in vertebrate neural crest induction. However, these amphioxus cells evidently lack additional genetic programs for the cell delaminations, migrations, and differentiations characterizing definitive vertebrate neural crest. We characterize an amphioxus winged helix/forkhead gene (AmphiFoxD) closely related to vertebrate FoxD genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the AmphiFoxD is basal to vertebrate FoxD1, FoxD2, FoxD3, FoxD4, and FoxD5. One of these vertebrate genes (FoxD3) consistently marks neural crest during development. Early in amphioxus development, AmphiFoxD is expressed medially in the anterior neural plate as well as in axial (notochordal) and paraxial mesoderm; later, the gene is expressed in the somites, notochord, cerebral vesicle (diencephalon), and hindgut endoderm. However, there is never any expression in cells bordering the neural plate. We speculate that an AmphiFoxD homolog in the common ancestor of amphioxus and vertebrates was involved in histogenic processes in the mesoderm (evagination and delamination of the somites and notochord); then, in the early vertebrates, descendant paralogs of this gene began functioning in the presumptive neural crest bordering the neural plate to help make possible the delaminations and cell migrations that characterize definitive vertebrate neural crest. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. One-dimensional self-assembly of mouse embryonic stem cells using an array of hydrogel microstrands.

    PubMed

    Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Padgen, Michael R; Gracias, Alison R; Bergkvist, Magnus; Xie, Yubing

    2011-07-01

    The ability of embryonic stem (ES) cells to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into multiple cell lineages holds promise for advances in modeling disease progression, screening drugs and treating diseases. To realize these potentials, it is imperative to study self-assembly in an embryonic microenvironment, as this may increase our understanding of ES cell maintenance and differentiation. In this study, we synthesized an array of one-dimensional alginate gel microstrands and aqueous microstrands through an SU-8 filter device by means of capillary action. Furthermore, we investigated self-assembly behaviors and differentiation potentials of mouse ES cells cultured in microstrands of varying diameters. We found that microstrands with an aqueous interior facilitated high density cell culture and formed compact microtissue structures, while microstrands with gelled interiors promote smaller cell aggregate structures. In particular, we noticed that ES cells collected from one-dimensional aqueous microstrands favored the differentiation towards cell lineages of endoderm and mesoderm, whereas those from gelled microstrands preferred to differentiate into ectoderm and mesoderm lineages. In addition to providing a "liquid-like" tubular microenvironment to understand one-dimensional self-assembly process of ES cells, this alginate hydrogel microstrand system also offers an alternative way to manipulate the stem cell fate-decision using bioengineered microenvironments.

  20. Hand2 Function in Second Heart Field Progenitors is Essential for Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchihashi, Takatoshi; Maeda, Jun; Shin, Chong; Ivey, Kathryn N.; Black, Brian; Olson, Eric N.; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Srivastava, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Cardiogenesis involves the contributions of multiple progenitor pools, including mesoderm-derived cardiac progenitors known as the first and second heart fields. Disruption of genetic pathways regulating individual subsets of cardiac progenitors likely underlies many forms of human cardiac malformations. Hand2 is a member of the basic helix loop helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors and is expressed in numerous cell lineages that contribute to the developing heart. However, the early embryonic lethality of Hand2-null mice has precluded lineage-specific study of its function in myocardial progenitors. Here, we generated and used a floxed allele of Hand2 to ablate its expression in specific cardiac cell populations at defined developmental points. We found that Hand2 expression within the mesoderm-derived second heart field progenitors was required for their survival and deletion in this domain recapitulated the complete Hand2-null phenotype. Loss of Hand2 at later stages of development and in restricted domains of the second heart field revealed a spectrum of cardiac anomalies resembling forms of human congenital heart disease. Molecular analyses of Hand2 mutant cells revealed several genes by which Hand2 may influence expansion of the cardiac progenitors. These findings demonstrate that Hand2 is essential for survival of second heart field progenitors and that the graded loss of Hand2 function in this cardiac progenitor pool can cause a spectrum of congenital heart malformation. PMID:21185281

  1. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1. PMID:24996922

  2. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Milgrom-Hoffman, Michal; Michailovici, Inbal; Ferrara, Napoleone; Zelzer, Elazar; Tzahor, Eldad

    2014-07-04

    Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio-craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1) in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio-craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1) along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio-craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  3. A gene expression atlas of early craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, Andrew S; Distasio, Andrew; Dexheimer, Phillip; Plassard, Andrew; Aronow, Bruce J; Potter, S Steven

    2014-07-15

    We present a gene expression atlas of early mouse craniofacial development. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate cells from the principal critical microregions, whose development, differentiation and signaling interactions are responsible for the construction of the mammalian face. At E8.5, as migrating neural crest cells begin to exit the neural fold/epidermal ectoderm boundary, we examined the cranial mesenchyme, composed of mixed neural crest and paraxial mesoderm cells, as well as cells from adjacent neuroepithelium. At E9.5 cells from the cranial mesenchyme, overlying olfactory placode/epidermal ectoderm, and underlying neuroepithelium, as well as the emerging mandibular and maxillary arches were sampled. At E10.5, as the facial prominences form, cells from the medial and lateral prominences, the olfactory pit, multiple discrete regions of underlying neuroepithelium, the mandibular and maxillary arches, including both their mesenchymal and ectodermal components, as well as Rathke's pouch, were similarly sampled and profiled using both microarray and RNA-seq technologies. Further, we performed single cell studies to better define the gene expression states of the early E8.5 pioneer neural crest cells and paraxial mesoderm. Taken together, and analyzable by a variety of biological network approaches, these data provide a complementing and cross validating resource capable of fueling discovery of novel compartment specific markers and signatures whose combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and growth factors/receptors are responsible for providing the master genetic blueprint for craniofacial development.

  4. lunatic fringe is an essential mediator of somite segmentation and patterning.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Y A; Lun, Y; Aulehla, A; Gan, L; Johnson, R L

    1998-07-23

    The gene lunatic fringe encodes a secreted factor with significant sequence similarity to the Drosophila gene fringe. fringe has been proposed to function as a boundary-specific signalling molecule in the wing imaginal disc, where it is required to localize signalling activity by the protein Notch to the presumptive wing margin. By targeted disruption in mouse embryos, we show here that lunatic fringe is likewise required for boundary formation. lunatic fringe mutants fail to form boundaries between individual somites, the initial segmental unit of the vertebrate trunk. In addition, the normal alternating rostral-caudal pattern of the somitic mesoderm is disrupted, suggesting that intersomitic boundary formation and rostral-caudal patterning of somites are mechanistically linked by a process that requires lunatic fringe activity. As a result, the derivatives of the somitic mesoderm, especially the axial skeleton, are severely disorganized in lunatic fringe mutants. Taken together, our results demonstrate an essential function for a vertebrate fringe homologue and suggest a model in which lunatic fringe modulates Notch signalling in the segmental plate to regulate somitogenesis and rostral-caudal patterning of somites simultaneously.

  5. Nodal signaling and the evolution of deuterostome gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Chea, Helen K; Wright, Christopher V; Swalla, Billie J

    2005-10-01

    Chordates, including vertebrates, evolved within a group of animals called the deuterostomes. All holoblastic deuterostomes gastrulate at the vegetal pole and the blastopore becomes the anus, while a mouth is formed at the anterior or to the oral side. Nodal is a member of the TGF-beta superfamily of signaling molecules that are important in signaling between cells during many embryonic processes in vertebrate embryos. Nodal has also been found in other invertebrate deuterostomes, such as ascidians and sea urchins, but, so far, is missing in protostomes. Nodal has been shown to be particularly important in determining left-right asymmetries in vertebrate embryos, but less information is available for its developmental role in the invertebrate deuterostomes. We review gastrulation in the deuterostomes, then examine nodal expression early during mesoderm formation and later during the establishment of asymmetries in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Nodal is expressed asymmetrically on the left side in chordates and on the presumptive oral side of the embryo in echinoid echinoderms. The expression of nodal is in different germ layers in embryos of different phyla. Expression is in the ectoderm in most of the invertebrate deuterostomes, and in the mesoderm in vertebrates. We summarize the work that has been published to date, especially nodal expression in the invertebrate deuterostomes, and suggest future experiments to better understand the evolution of nodal signaling and deuterostome gastrulation.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K.; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P.; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:28000662

  7. Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a are expressed in the developing chick limb bud in a manner suggesting roles in pattern formation along the proximodistal and dorsoventral axes.

    PubMed

    Dealy, C N; Roth, A; Ferrari, D; Brown, A M; Kosher, R A

    1993-10-01

    The Wnt gene family encodes a group of secreted signalling molecules that have been implicated in the regulation of cell fate and pattern formation during embryogenesis. We have examined the patterns of expression of two members of the chicken Wnt family, Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a, during development of the chick limb bud. Wnt-5a is expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge which directs outgrowth of limb mesoderm. Wnt-5a also exhibits three quantitatively distinct domains of expression along the proximodistal (PD) axis of the limb mesoderm that may correspond to the regions which will give rise to the three distinct PD segments of the limb, the autopod, zeugopod, and stylopod. In contrast, Wnt-7a expression in the limb bud is specifically limited to the dorsal ectoderm. These observations suggest possible roles for Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a in pattern formation along the PD and dorsoventral axes of the developing chick limb bud. In addition, Wnt-5a and Wnt-7a exhibit spatially discrete domains of expression in several other regions of the chick embryo consistent with developmental roles for these genes in a variety of other tissues.

  8. Conditional inactivation of Has2 reveals a crucial role for hyaluronan in skeletal growth, patterning, chondrocyte maturation and joint formation in the developing limb.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazu; Li, Yingcui; Jakuba, Caroline; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Sayo, Tetsuya; Okuno, Misako; Dealy, Caroline N; Toole, Bryan P; Takeda, Junji; Yamaguchi, Yu; Kosher, Robert A

    2009-08-01

    The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) is a structural component of extracellular matrices and also interacts with cell surface receptors to directly influence cell behavior. To explore functions of HA in limb skeletal development, we conditionally inactivated the gene for HA synthase 2, Has2, in limb bud mesoderm using mice that harbor a floxed allele of Has2 and mice carrying a limb mesoderm-specific Prx1-Cre transgene. The skeletal elements of Has2-deficient limbs are severely shortened, indicating that HA is essential for normal longitudinal growth of all limb skeletal elements. Proximal phalanges are duplicated in Has2 mutant limbs indicating an involvement of HA in patterning specific portions of the digits. The growth plates of Has2-deficient skeletal elements are severely abnormal and disorganized, with a decrease in the deposition of aggrecan in the matrix and a disruption in normal columnar cellular relationships. Furthermore, there is a striking reduction in the number of hypertrophic chondrocytes and in the expression domains of markers of hypertrophic differentiation in the mutant growth plates, indicating that HA is necessary for the normal progression of chondrocyte maturation. In addition, secondary ossification centers do not form in the central regions of Has2 mutant growth plates owing to a failure of hypertrophic differentiation. In addition to skeletal defects, the formation of synovial joint cavities is defective in Has2-deficient limbs. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HA has a crucial role in skeletal growth, patterning, chondrocyte maturation and synovial joint formation in the developing limb.

  9. The gastrocoel roof plate in embryos of different frogs.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Ponce, Natalia; Santillana-Ortiz, Juan-Diego; del Pino, Eugenia M

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of the gastrocoel roof plate and the presence of cilia in this structure were examined in embryos of four species of frogs. Embryos of Ceratophrys stolzmanni (Ceratophryidae) and Engystomops randi (Leiuperidae) develop rapidly, provide comparison for the analysis of gastrocoel roof plate development in the slow-developing embryos of Epipedobates machalilla (Dendrobatidae) and Gastrotheca riobambae (Hemiphractidae). Embryos of the analyzed frogs develop from eggs of different sizes, and display different reproductive and developmental strategies. In particular, dorsal convergence and extension and archenteron elongation begin during gastrulation in embryos of rapidly developing frogs, as in Xenopus laevis. In contrast, cells that involute during gastrulation are stored in the large circumblastoporal collar that develops around the closed blastopore in embryos of slow-developing frogs. Dorsal convergence and extension only start after blastopore closure in slow-developing frog embryos. However, in the neurulae, a gastrocoel roof plate develops, despite the accumulation of superficial mesodermal cells in the circumblastoporal collar. Embryos of all four species develop a ciliated gastrocoel roof plate at the beginning of neurulation. Accordingly, fluid-flow across the gastrocoel roof plate is likely the mechanism of left-right asymmetry patterning in these frogs, as in X. laevis and other vertebrates. A ciliated gastrocoel roof plate, with a likely origin as superficial mesoderm, is conserved in frogs belonging to four different families and with different modes of gastrulation.

  10. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool in Cell-Based Therapies.

    PubMed

    Bajek, Anna; Gurtowska, Natalia; Olkowska, Joanna; Kazmierski, Lukasz; Maj, Malgorzata; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Recent development in stem cell isolation methods and expansion under laboratory conditions create an opportunity to use those aforementioned cells in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Particular attention is drawn towards mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) being multipotent progenitors exhibiting several unique characteristics, including high proliferation potential, self-renewal abilities and multilineage differentiation into cells of mesodermal and non-mesodermal origin. High abundance of MSCs found in adipose tissue makes it a very attractive source of adult stem cells for further use in regenerative medicine applications. Despite immunomodulating properties of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and a secretion of a wide variety of paracrine factors that facilitate tissue regeneration, effectiveness of stem cell therapy was not supported by the results of clinical trials. Lack of a single, universal stem cell marker, patient-to-patient variability, heterogeneity of ASC population combined with multiple widely different protocols of cell isolation and expansion hinder the ability to precisely identify and analyze biological properties of stem cells. The above issues contribute to conflicting data reported in literature. We will review the comprehensive information concerning characteristic features of ASCs. We will also review the regenerative potential and clinical application based on various clinical trials.

  11. The serpin PN1 is a feedback regulator of FGF signaling in germ layer and primary axis formation.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Helena; Iliev, Dobromir; Grahn, Tan Hooi Min; Gouignard, Nadège; Maccarana, Marco; Griesbach, Julia; Herzmann, Svende; Sagha, Mohsen; Climent, Maria; Pera, Edgar M

    2015-03-15

    Germ layer formation and primary axis development rely on Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). In Xenopus, the secreted serine protease HtrA1 induces mesoderm and posterior trunk/tail structures by facilitating the spread of FGF signals. Here, we show that the serpin Protease nexin-1 (PN1) is transcriptionally activated by FGF signals, suppresses mesoderm and promotes head development in mRNA-injected embryos. An antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against PN1 has the opposite effect and inhibits ectodermal fate. However, ectoderm and anterior head structures can be restored in PN1-depleted embryos when HtrA1 and FGF receptor activities are diminished, indicating that FGF signals negatively regulate their formation. We show that PN1 binds to and inhibits HtrA1, prevents degradation of the proteoglycan Syndecan 4 and restricts paracrine FGF/Erk signaling. Our data suggest that PN1 is a negative-feedback regulator of FGF signaling and has important roles in ectoderm and head development.

  12. Role of the thrombopoietin (TPO)/Mpl system: c-Mpl-like molecule/TPO signaling enhances early hematopoiesis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kakeda, Minoru; Kyuno, Jun-ichi; Kato, Takashi; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Asashima, Makoto

    2002-02-01

    Multiple organs are induced in the primitive embryonic ectoderm excised from blastula stage Xenopus laevis embryos, under the strict control of mesoderm inducing factors. This in vitro system is useful for exploring the mechanisms of development. In this study, the function of thrombopoietin (TPO)/c-Mpl signaling in the development of hematopoietic cells was investigated. An optimal hematopoietic cell induction system was established to evaluate the influence of growth factors on hematopoiesis. It was found that exogenous TPO enhanced hematopoiesis in explants induced by activin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 and increased the number of both erythrocytes and leukocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of anti-c-Mpl antibody completely inhibited the expansion of hematopoietic cells stimulated by TPO, and the antibody specifically recognized blood-like cells. These results demonstrate that TPO acts on hematopoietic progenitors induced in explants and the c-Mpl-like molecule in Xenopus mediates the cellular function of TPO. We also found that forced expression of TPO in embryos promoted hematopoiesis in the ventral blood island and the dorsal-- lateral plate mesoderm. These results suggest that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are regulated by TPO/c-Mpl signaling from when they appear in their ontogeny. They also suggest that TPO/c-Mpl signaling play a crucial role in the formation of hematopoietic cells in Xenopus.

  13. Tcf7l1 prepares epiblast cells in the gastrulating mouse embryo for lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jackson A.; Wu, Chun-I; Merrill, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    The core gene regulatory network (GRN) in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) integrates activities of the pro-self-renewal factors Oct4 (Pou5f1), Sox2 and Nanog with that of an inhibitor of self-renewal, Tcf7l1 (Tcf3). The inhibitor function of Tcf7l1 causes dependence on extracellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, making its embryonic role within the ESC GRN unclear. By analyzing intact mouse embryos, we demonstrate that the function of Tcf7l1 is necessary for specification of cell lineages to occur concomitantly with the elaboration of a three-dimensional body plan during gastrulation. In Tcf7l1-/- embryos, specification of mesoderm is delayed, effectively uncoupling it from the induction of the primitive streak. Tcf7l1 repressor activity is necessary for a rapid switch in the response of pluripotent cells to Wnt/β-catenin stimulation, from one of self-renewal to a mesoderm specification response. These results identify Tcf7l1 as a unique factor that is necessary in pluripotent cells to prepare them for lineage specification. We suggest that the role of Tcf7l1 in mammals is to inhibit the GRN to ensure the coordination of lineage specification with the dynamic cellular events occurring during gastrulation. PMID:23487311

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells and their subpopulation, pluripotent muse cells, in basic research and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have gained a great deal of attention for regenerative medicine because they can be obtained from easy accessible mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, and have trophic and immunosuppressive effects to protect tissues. The most outstanding property of MSCs is their potential for differentiation into cells of all three germ layers. MSCs belong to the mesodermal lineage, but they are known to cross boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal and endodermal lineages, and differentiate into a variety of cell types both in vitro and in vivo. Such behavior is exceptional for tissue stem cells. As observed with hematopoietic and neural stem cells, tissue stem cells usually generate cells that belong to the tissue in which they reside, and do not show triploblastic differentiation. However, the scientific basis for the broad multipotent differentiation of MSCs still remains an enigma. This review summarizes the properties of MSCs from representative mesenchymal tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, to demonstrate their similarities and differences. Finally, we introduce a novel type of pluripotent stem cell, multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, a small subpopulation of MSCs, which can explain the broad spectrum of differentiation ability in MSCs.

  15. MyoD stimulates delta-1 transcription and triggers notch signaling in the Xenopus gastrula.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberger, T; Steinbach, O C; Authaler, A; Kopan, R; Rupp, R A

    1999-01-01

    The Notch signaling cascade is involved in many developmental decisions, a paradigm of which has been the selection between epidermal and neural cell fates in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Notch has also been implicated as a regulator of myogenesis, although its precise function there has remained controversial. Here we show that the muscle-determining factor MyoD is a direct, positive regulator of the Notch ligand Delta-1 in prospective myoblasts of the pre-involuted mesoderm in Xenopus gastrulae. Injection of a dominant MyoD repressor variant ablates mesodermal Delta-1 expression in vivo. Furthermore, MyoD-dependent Delta-1 induction is sufficient to activate transcription from promoters of E(spl)-related genes in a Notch-dependent manner. These results indicate that a hallmark of neural cell fate determination, i.e. the feedback loop between differentiation promoting basic helix-loop-helix proteins and the Notch regulatory circuitry, is conserved in myogenesis, supporting a direct involvement of Notch in muscle determination. PMID:10202155

  16. Cre-mediated excision of Fgf8 in the Tbx1 expression domain reveals a critical role for Fgf8 in cardiovascular development in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher B; Wenning, Jennifer M; Lu, Min Min; Epstein, Douglas J; Meyers, Erik N; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2004-03-01

    Tbx1 has been implicated as a candidate gene responsible for defective pharyngeal arch remodeling in DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial syndrome. Tbx1(+/-) mice mimic aspects of the DiGeorge phenotype with variable penetrance, and null mice display severe pharyngeal hypoplasia. Here, we identify enhancer elements in the Tbx1 gene that are conserved through evolution and mediate tissue-specific expression. We describe the generation of transgenic mice that utilize these enhancer elements to direct Cre recombinase expression in endogenous Tbx1 expression domains. We use these Tbx1-Cre mice to fate map Tbx1-expressing precursors and identify broad regions of mesoderm, including early cardiac mesoderm, which are derived from Tbx1-expressing cells. We test the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) functions downstream of Tbx1 by performing tissue-specific inactivation of Fgf8 using Tbx1-Cre mice. Resulting newborn mice display DiGeorge-like congenital cardiovascular defects that involve the outflow tract of the heart. Vascular smooth muscle differentiation in the great vessels is disrupted. This data is consistent with a model in which Tbx1 induces Fgf8 expression in the pharyngeal endoderm, which is subsequently required for normal cardiovascular morphogenesis and smooth muscle differentiation in the aorta and pulmonary artery.

  17. Renal development: a complex process dependent on inductive interaction.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Kiran K; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2014-01-01

    Renal development begins in-utero and continues throughout childhood. Almost one-third of all developmental anomalies include structural or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract. There are three main phases of in-utero renal development: Pronephros, Mesonephros and Metanephros. Within three weeks of gestation, paired pronephri appear. A series of tubules called nephrotomes fuse with the pronephric duct. The pronephros elongates and induces the nearby mesoderm, forming the mesonephric (Woffian) duct. The metanephros is the precursor of the mature kidney that originates from the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesoderm (blastema) by 5 weeks of gestation. The interaction between these two components is a reciprocal process, resulting in the formation of a mature kidney. The ureteric bud forms the major and minor calyces, and the collecting tubules while the metanephrogenic blastema develops into the renal tubules and glomeruli. In humans, all of the nephrons are formed by 32 to 36 weeks of gestation. Simultaneously, the lower urinary tract develops from the vesico urethral canal, ureteric bud and mesonephric duct. In utero, ureters deliver urine from the kidney to the bladder, thereby creating amniotic fluid. Transcription factors, extracellular matrix glycoproteins, signaling molecules and receptors are the key players in normal renal development. Many medications (e.g., aminoglycosides, cyclooxygenase inhibitors, substances that affect the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system) also impact renal development by altering the expression of growth factors, matrix regulators or receptors. Thus, tight regulation and coordinated processes are crucial for normal renal development.

  18. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  19. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-10-08

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure.

  20. Hydronephrosis in the Wnt5a-ablated kidney is caused by an abnormal ureter-bladder connection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kangsun; Perantoni, Alan O

    The Wnt5a null mouse is a complex developmental model which, among its several posterior-localized axis defects, exhibits multiple kidney phenotypes, including duplex kidney and loss of the medullary zone. We previously reported that ablation of Wnt5a in nascent mesoderm causes duplex kidney formation as a result of aberrant development of the nephric duct and abnormal extension of intermediate mesoderm. However, these mice also display a loss of the medullary region late in gestation. We have now genetically isolated duplex kidney formation from the medullary defect by specifically targeting the progenitors for both the ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme. The conditional mutants fail to form a normal renal medulla but no longer exhibit duplex kidney formation. Approximately 1/3 of the mutants develop hydronephrosis in the kidneys either uni- or bilaterally when using Dll1Cre. The abnormal kidney phenotype becomes prominent at E16.5, which approximates the time when urine production begins in the mouse embryonic kidney, and is associated with a dramatic increase in apoptosis only in mutant kidneys with hydronephrosis. Methylene blue dye injection and histologic examination reveal that aberrant cell death likely results from urine toxicity due to an abnormal ureter-bladder connection. This study shows that Wnt5a is not required for development of the renal medulla and that loss of the renal medullary region in the Wnt5a-deleted kidney is caused by an abnormal ureter-bladder connection.

  1. Erythropoiesis in the yolk sac of the bat Tadarida brasiliensis cynocephala.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R J; Cabral-Anderson, L J

    1976-12-01

    The process of erythropoiesis and vasculogenesis in the yolk sac of the bat (Tadarida brasiliensis cynocephala) has been studied through the use of both light and electron microscopy. Stem cells arise from the leading edge of the migrating splanchnic mesoderm and transform into primitive erythroblasts. Differentiation involves either contact or association with the endodermal cells, since all erythropoietic activity occurs on the endodermal side of the expanding vascular bed, and many of the cells are in close apposition to the lateral or basal plasma membranes of the endodermal cells. Endodermal cells also phagocytize developing primitive erythroblasts during the later stage of the process when erythropoiesis is subsiding in the yolk sac. Cells destined to become the endothelium of the expanding vascular bed also arise from the leading edge of the migrating splanchnic mesoderm. Their process of differentiation involves the development of cytoplasmic extensions that may surround a group of differentiating erythroblasts, enclosing them in the newly formed lumen of the blood vessel. The cytoplasmic extensions make contact and develop junctional complexes with similar processes from other cells to complete the lumen of the lengthening vascular bed. Cells of the granulocyte series or megakaryocytes are not observed in the yolk sac of the bat as has been described in certain other species.

  2. Cooperative interaction of Etv2 and Gata2 regulates the development of endothelial and hematopoietic lineages

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaozhong; Richard, Jai; Zirbes, Katie M.; Gong, Wuming; Lin, Gufa; Kyba, Michael; Thomson, Jamie A.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory mechanisms that govern lineage specification of the mesodermal progenitors to become endothelial and hematopoietic cells remain an area of intense interest. Both Ets and Gata factors have been shown to have important roles in the transcriptional regulation in endothelial and hematopoietic cells. We previously reported Etv2 as an essential regulator of vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis. In the present study, we demonstrate that Gata2 is co-expressed and interacts with Etv2 in the endothelial and hematopoietic cells in the early stages of embryogenesis. Our studies reveal that Etv2 interacts with Gata2 in vitro and in vivo. The protein-protein interaction between Etv2 and Gata2 is mediated by the Ets and Gata domains. Using the embryoid body differentiation system, we demonstrate that co-expression of Gata2 augments the activity of Etv2 in promoting endothelial and hematopoietic lineage differentiation. We also identify Spi1 as a common downstream target gene of Etv2 and Gata2. We provide evidence that Etv2 and Gata2 bind to the Spi1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. In summary, we propose that Gata2 functions as a cofactor of Etv2 in the transcriptional regulation of mesodermal progenitors during embryogenesis. PMID:24583263

  3. The single amphioxus Mox gene: insights into the functional evolution of Mox genes, somites, and the asymmetry of amphioxus somitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Minguillón, Carolina; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2002-06-15

    Mox genes are members of the "extended" Hox-cluster group of Antennapedia-like homeobox genes. Homologues have been cloned from both invertebrate and vertebrate species, and are expressed in mesodermal tissues. In vertebrates, Mox1 and Mox2 are distinctly expressed during the formation of somites and differentiation of their derivatives. Somites are a distinguishing feature uniquely shared by cephalochordates and vertebrates. Here, we report the cloning and expression of the single amphioxus Mox gene. AmphiMox is expressed in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) during early amphioxus somitogenesis and in nascent somites from the tail bud during the late phase. Once a somite is completely formed, AmphiMox is rapidly downregulated. We discuss the presence and extent of the PSM in both phases of amphioxus somitogenesis. We also propose a scenario for the functional evolution of Mox genes within chordates, in which Mox was co-opted for somite formation before the cephalochordate-vertebrate split. Novel expression sites found in vertebrates after somite formation postdated Mox duplication in the vertebrate stem lineage, and may be linked to the increase in complexity of vertebrate somites and their derivatives, e.g., the vertebrae. Furthermore, AmphiMox expression adds new data into a long-standing debate on the extent of the asymmetry of amphioxus somitogenesis.

  4. Interepithelial signaling with nephric duct is required for the formation of overlying coelomic epithelial cell sheet.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Takashi; Saito, Daisuke; Atsuta, Yuji; Uchiyama, Chihiro; Ueda, Shinya; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2014-05-06

    In most organs of the body, epithelial tissues are supported by their own basement membrane and underlying stroma, the latter being regarded as a complex of amorphous cells, extracellular matrices, and soluble factors. We demonstrate here that an epithelial tube can serve as a component of stroma that supports the formation of epithelial cell sheet derived from a different origin. During development of the mesonephros in chicken embryos, the intermediate mesoderm (IMM), which contains the Wolffian duct (WD) and its associated tubules, is overlain by a sheet of epithelial cells derived from lateral plate (coelomic) mesoderm. We describe that in normal embryos, epitheliogenesis of IMM tubes and the adjacent coelomic cell sheet proceed in a coordinated manner. When the WD was surgically ablated, the overlying coelomic epithelium exhibited aberrant morphology accompanied by a punctated basement membrane. Furthermore, the WD-ablated coelomic epithelium became susceptible to latent external stress; electroporation of Rac1 resulted in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) within the coelomic epithelium. The distorted coelomic epithelium was rescued by implanting fibronectin-producing cells in place of the WD, suggesting that fibronectin provided by WD has an important role acting interepithelially. This notion was corroborated further by directly visualizing a translocation of EGFP-tagged fibronectin from fibronectin-producing to -receiving epithelia in vivo. Our findings provide a novel insight into interepithelial signaling that also might occur in adult tissues to protect against EMT and suggest a possible new target for anticancer therapeutic strategy.

  5. Autonomy of tendon development in the embryonic chick wing.

    PubMed

    Kieny, M; Chevallier, A

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this study performed in the embryonic chick wing is to test the ability of the tendons to form and develop in the absence of the muscle bellies. The experiments were performed on 2-day chick embryos by destroying a portion of the somitic mesoderm by local X-irradiation. The irradiated part included the wing somite level 15-20 and extended three somites (or presumptive somites) in front and two to six presumptive somites in the rear of the wing somite levels. The wings of the operated side were examined histologically 3-8 days after the X-irradiation. The radio-destruction of the somitic mesoderm totally inhibited or severely impaired the development of the forearm muscles. But, despite the absence of the flexor and extensor muscles the differentiation of the distal manus tendons could be observed. This differentiation occurred at the same time and in the same positions as in controls. However, these tendons were transient structures. They disappeared within three days after their individuation. Two mechanisms that progressed in proximo-distal direction were involved in their resorption: cellular dislocation and cell death. We conclude that tendons start to develop autonomously from the muscle bulks, but for their maintenance and further development they require connexion to a muscle belly.

  6. Expression of Spgatae, the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ortholog of vertebrate GATA4/5/6 factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei Yun; Davidson, Eric H

    2004-12-01

    Spgatae is the sea urchin ortholog of the vertebrate gata4/5/6 genes, as confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. The accumulation of Spgatae transcripts during embryonic development and the spatial pattern of expression are reported here. Expression was first detected in the 15 h blastula. The number of Spgatae RNA molecules increases steadily during blastula stages, with expression peaking during gastrulation. After gastrulation is complete, the level of expression decreases until the end of embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that Spgatae transcripts were first detected in a ring of prospective mesoderm cells in the vegetal plate. Spgatae expression then expands to include the entire vegetal plate at the mesenchyme blastula stage. During gastrulation Spgatae is expressed at the blastopore, and at prism stage strongly in the hindgut and midgut but not foregut, and also in mesoderm cells at the tip of the archenteron. Towards the end of embryogenesis, expression in the hindgut decreases. The terminal pattern of expression is in midgut plus coelomic pouches.

  7. Spatial expression of Hox cluster genes in the ontogeny of a sea urchin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenas-Mena, C.; Cameron, A. R.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Hox cluster of the sea urchin Strongylocentrous purpuratus contains ten genes in a 500 kb span of the genome. Only two of these genes are expressed during embryogenesis, while all of eight genes tested are expressed during development of the adult body plan in the larval stage. We report the spatial expression during larval development of the five 'posterior' genes of the cluster: SpHox7, SpHox8, SpHox9/10, SpHox11/13a and SpHox11/13b. The five genes exhibit a dynamic, largely mesodermal program of expression. Only SpHox7 displays extensive expression within the pentameral rudiment itself. A spatially sequential and colinear arrangement of expression domains is found in the somatocoels, the paired posterior mesodermal structures that will become the adult perivisceral coeloms. No such sequential expression pattern is observed in endodermal, epidermal or neural tissues of either the larva or the presumptive juvenile sea urchin. The spatial expression patterns of the Hox genes illuminate the evolutionary process by which the pentameral echinoderm body plan emerged from a bilateral ancestor.

  8. Axial patterning in snakes and caecilians: evidence for an alternative interpretation of the Hox code.

    PubMed

    Woltering, Joost M; Vonk, Freek J; Müller, Hendrik; Bardine, Nabila; Tuduce, Ioana L; de Bakker, Merijn A G; Knöchel, Walter; Sirbu, I Ovidiu; Durston, Antony J; Richardson, Michael K

    2009-08-01

    It is generally assumed that the characteristic deregionalized body plan of species with a snake-like morphology evolved through a corresponding homogenization of Hox gene expression domains along the primary axis. Here, we examine the expression of Hox genes in snake embryos and show that a collinear pattern of Hox expression is retained within the paraxial mesoderm of the trunk. Genes expressed at the anterior and most posterior, regionalized, parts of the skeleton correspond to the expected anatomical boundaries. Unexpectedly however, also the dorsal (thoracic), homogenous rib-bearing region of trunk, is regionalized by unconventional gradual anterior limits of Hox expression that are not obviously reflected in the skeletal anatomy. In the lateral plate mesoderm we also detect regionalized Hox expression yet the forelimb marker Tbx5 is not restricted to a rudimentary forelimb domain but is expressed throughout the entire flank region. Analysis of several Hox genes in a caecilian amphibian, which convergently evolved a deregionalized body plan, reveals a similar global collinear pattern of Hox expression. The differential expression of posterior, vertebra-modifying or even rib-suppressing Hox genes within the dorsal region is inconsistent with the homogeneity in vertebral identity. Our results suggest that the evolution of a deregionalized, snake-like body involved not only alterations in Hox gene cis-regulation but also a different downstream interpretation of the Hox code.

  9. Expression of a MyoD family member prefigures muscle pattern in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Michelson, A M; Abmayr, S M; Bate, M; Arias, A M; Maniatis, T

    1990-12-01

    We have isolated a Drosophila gene that is expressed in a temporal and spatial pattern during embryogenesis, strongly suggesting an important role for this gene in the early development of muscle. This gene, which we have named nautilus (nau), encodes basic and helix-loop-helix domains that display striking sequence similarity to those of the vertebrate myogenic regulatory gene family. nau transcripts are initially localized to segmentally repeated clusters of mesodermal cells, a pattern that is reminiscent of the expression of the achaete-scute genes in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system. These early nau-positive cells are detected just prior to the first morphological evidence of muscle cell fusion and occupy similar positions as the later-appearing muscle precursors. Subsequently, nau transcripts are present in at least a subset of growing muscle precursors and mature muscle fibers that exhibit distinct segmental differences. These observations establish nau as the earliest known marker of myogenesis in Drosophila and indicate that this gene may be a key determinant of pattern formation in the embryonic mesoderm.

  10. Progressively restricted expression of a new homeobox-containing gene during Xenopus laevis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Su, M W; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1991-04-01

    We have isolated cDNAs encoding a novel Xenopus homeodomain-containing protein homologous to the mouse Hox-7.1 and the Drosophila muscle segment homebox (msh). Northern blot and RNAase protection experiments established that transcripts of the frog gene, termed Xhox-7.1, first appear at about the beginning of gastrulation. After a rapid increase, mRNA levels plateau between the neurula and middle-tailbud stages, and decrease steadily thereafter. In situ hybridization localized the Xhox-7.1 message to the dorsal mesodermal mantle of gastrula stage embryos. Comparison of the hybridization patterns of progressively more anterior cross-section of tailbud stage embryos localized the signal to the dorsal neural tube and neural crest, to specific regions of the lateral plate mesoderm, and to the cardiogenic region. By the tadpole stage, the Xhox-7.1 message appears only at specific sites in the central nervous system, such as in the dorsal hindbrain. Thus, during embryonic development levels of Xhox-7.1 expression decrease as the transcript becomes more progressively localized. Finally, evidence is presented of a distinct msh-like transcript (provisionally termed Xhox-7.1') which begins to accumulate at early-gastrula stage, as well.

  11. Cellular contribution of the different regions of the somatopleure to the developing limb.

    PubMed

    Geduspan, J S; Solursh, M

    1992-11-01

    Regionalization of the presumptive limb region was examined before and at the onset of limb development by means of a variety of transplantation experiments between quail and chick embryos in ovo. The results demonstrate a two-step process, the first of which is the designation of the region of the somatopleure that would become part of the limb, followed by specification of dorsal and ventral regions of the limb. The medial half of the somatic mesoderm is the region which gives rise to the limb with only a smaller cellular contribution from the lateral half of the somatic mesoderm. The cellular contribution of the medial region of the somatopleure appeared to determine the type of limb formed (i.e., wing or leg). The second process relates to changes in the ability of the somatic ectoderm to undergo extensive lateral displacement with development. Starting at stage 14, the medial and lateral somatic ectoderms maintain their position after transplantation, in contrast to earlier stage limb or flank ectoderms which undergo extensive lateral displacement with development. The positional determination of the dorsal and ventral properties of the medial and lateral ectoderms of the prospective limb region and their distal displacement during limb outgrowth may be important morphogenetic events in limb development.

  12. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of limb ectoderm on in vitro chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M; Reiter, R S

    1988-11-01

    Previous studies have indicated possible dual effects of the limb ectoderm in cartilage differentiation. On one hand, explants from early (stage 15) wing buds are dependent on contact with the limb ectoderm for cartilage differentiation (Gumpel-Pinot, J. Embryol. Exp. Morph. 59:157-173, 1980). On the other hand, limb ectoderm from stage 23/24 wing buds inhibits cartilage differentiation by cultured limb mesenchyme cells even without direct contact (Solursh et al., Dev. Biol. 86:471-482, 1981). In the present study, ectoderms from both stage 15/16 and stage 23/24 wings are cultured under the same conditions, and ectoderms from each source are shown to have two effects. Each stimulates chondrogenesis in stage 15 wing bud mesenchyme, and each inhibits chondrogenesis in older wing mesenchyme. The results suggest that the limb ectoderm has at least dual effects on cartilage differentiation, depending on the stage of the mesenchyme. One effect involves an early mesenchymal dependence on the ectoderm. This effect requires contact between the ectoderm and mesoderm (Gumpel-Pinot, J. Embryol. Exp. Morphol. 59:157-173, 1980) but also can be observed at a distance from the ectoderm. Later, the ectoderm can act without direct contact between the ectoderm and mesoderm to inhibit chondrogenesis over some distance.

  13. SIRT6 safeguards human mesenchymal stem cells from oxidative stress by coactivating NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Huize; Guan, Di; Liu, Xiaomeng; Li, Jingyi; Wang, Lixia; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Junzhi; Zhang, Weizhou; Ren, Ruotong; Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Hao, Ying; Yuan, Tingting; Yuan, Guohong; Wang, Hu; Ju, Zhenyu; Mao, Zhiyong; Li, Jian; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 belongs to the mammalian homologs of Sir2 histone NAD+-dependent deacylase family. In rodents, SIRT6 deficiency leads to aging-associated degeneration of mesodermal tissues. It remains unknown whether human SIRT6 has a direct role in maintaining the homeostasis of mesodermal tissues. To this end, we generated SIRT6 knockout human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by targeted gene editing. SIRT6-deficient hMSCs exhibited accelerated functional decay, a feature distinct from typical premature cellular senescence. Rather than compromised chromosomal stability, SIRT6-null hMSCs were predominately characterized by dysregulated redox metabolism and increased sensitivity to the oxidative stress. In addition, we found SIRT6 in a protein complex with both nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and RNA polymerase II, which was required for the transactivation of NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes, including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Overexpression of HO-1 in SIRT6-null hMSCs rescued premature cellular attrition. Our study uncovers a novel function of SIRT6 in maintaining hMSC homeostasis by serving as a NRF2 coactivator, which represents a new layer of regulation of oxidative stress-associated stem cell decay. PMID:26768768

  14. Paleontological and developmental evidence resolve the homology and dual embryonic origin of a mammalian skull bone, the interparietal.

    PubMed

    Koyabu, Daisuke; Maier, Wolfgang; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2012-08-28

    The homologies of mammalian skull elements are now fairly well established, except for the controversial interparietal bone. A previous experimental study reported an intriguing mixed origin of the interparietal: the medial portion being derived from the neural crest cells, whereas the lateral portion from the mesoderm. The evolutionary history of such mixed origin remains unresolved, and contradictory reports on the presence or absence and developmental patterns of the interparietal among mammals have complicated the question of its homology. Here we provide an alternative perspective on the evolutionary identity of the interparietal, based on a comprehensive study across more than 300 extinct and extant taxa, integrating embryological and paleontological data. Although the interparietal has been regarded as being lost in various lineages, our investigation on embryos demonstrates its presence in all extant mammalian "orders." The generally accepted paradigm has regarded the interparietal as consisting of two elements that are homologized to the postparietals of basal amniotes. The tabular bones have been postulated as being lost during the rise of modern mammals. However, our results demonstrate that the interparietal consists not of two but of four elements. We propose that the tabulars of basal amniotes are conserved as the lateral interparietal elements, which quickly fuse to the medial elements at the embryonic stage, and that the postparietals are homologous to the medial elements. Hence, the dual developmental origin of the mammalian interparietal can be explained as the evolutionary consequence of the fusion between the crest-derived "postparietals" and the mesoderm-derived "tabulars."

  15. Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Therapy of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karantalis, Vasileios; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite substantial clinical advances over the past 65 years, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in America. The past 15 years has witnessed major basic and translational interest in the use of stem and/or precursor cells as a therapeutic agent for chronically injured organs. Among the cell types under investigation, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely studied and in early stage clinical studies show promise for repair and regeneration of cardiac tissues. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into mesoderm and non-mesoderm derived tissues, their immunomodulatory effects, their availability and their key role in maintaining and replenishing endogenous stem cell niches have rendered them one of the most heavily investigated and clinically tested type of stem cell. Accumulating data from preclinical and early phase clinical trials document their safety when delivered as either autologous or allogeneic forms in a range of cardiovascular diseases, but also importantly define parameters of clinical efficacy that justify further investigation in larger clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of MSCs, their interaction with endogenous molecular and cellular pathways, and their modulation of immune responses. Additionally, we discuss factors that enhance their proliferative and regenerative ability and factors that may hinder their effectiveness in the clinical setting. PMID:25858066

  16. Visualization of stochastic Ca2+ signals in the formed somites during the early segmentation period in intact, normally developing zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Leung, Christina F; Miller, Andrew L; Korzh, Vladimir; Chong, Shang-Wei; Sleptsova-Freidrich, Inna; Webb, Sarah E

    2009-09-01

    Localized Ca(2+) signals were consistently visualized in the formed somites of intact zebrafish embryos during the early segmentation period. Unlike the regular process of somitogenesis, these signals were stochastic in nature with respect to time and location. They did, however, occur predominantly at the medial and lateral boundaries within the formed somites. Embryos were treated with modulators of [Ca(2+)](i) to explore the signal generation mechanism and possible developmental function of the stochastic transients. Blocking elements in the phosphoinositol pathway eliminated the stochastic signals but had no obvious effect, stochastic or otherwise, on the formed somites. Such treatments did, however, result in the subsequently formed somites being longer in the mediolateral dimension. Targeted uncaging of buffer (diazo-2) or Ca(2+) (NP-ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid [EGTA]) in the presomitic mesoderm, resulted in a regular mediolateral lengthening and shortening, respectively, of subsequently formed somites. These data suggest a requirement for IP(3) receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release during convergence cell movements in the presomitic mesoderm, which appears to have a distinct function from that of the IP(3) receptor-mediated stochastic Ca(2+) signaling in the formed somites.

  17. How the embryo makes a limb: determination, polarity and identity.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Cheryll

    2015-10-01

    The vertebrate limb with its complex anatomy develops from a small bud of undifferentiated mesoderm cells encased in ectoderm. The bud has its own intrinsic polarity and can develop autonomously into a limb without reference to the rest of the embryo. In this review, recent advances are integrated with classical embryology, carried out mainly in chick embryos, to present an overview of how the embryo makes a limb bud. We will focus on how mesoderm cells in precise locations in the embryo become determined to form a limb and express the key transcription factors Tbx4 (leg/hindlimb) or Tbx5 (wing/forelimb). These Tbx transcription factors have equivalent functions in the control of bud formation by initiating a signalling cascade involving Wnts and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and by regulating recruitment of mesenchymal cells from the coelomic epithelium into the bud. The mesoderm that will form limb buds and the polarity of the buds is determined with respect to both antero-posterior and dorso-ventral axes of the body. The position in which a bud develops along the antero-posterior axis of the body will also determine its identity - wing/forelimb or leg/hindlimb. Hox gene activity, under the influence of retinoic acid signalling, is directly linked with the initiation of Tbx5 gene expression in the region along the antero-posterior axis of the body that will form wings/forelimbs and determines antero-posterior polarity of the buds. In contrast, Tbx4 expression in the regions that will form legs/hindlimbs is regulated by the homeoprotein Pitx1 and there is no evidence that Hox genes determine antero-posterior polarity of the buds. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling determines the region along the dorso-ventral axis of the body in which both wings/forelimbs and legs/hindlimbs develop and dorso-ventral polarity of the buds. The polarity of the buds leads to the establishment of signalling regions - the dorsal and ventral ectoderm, producing Wnts and BMPs

  18. Culture bag systems for clinical applications of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Facing the challenging treatment of neurodegenerative diseases as well as complex craniofacial injuries such as those common after cancer therapy, the field of regenerative medicine increasingly relies on stem cell transplantation strategies. Here, neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) offer many promising applications, although scale up of clinical-grade processes prior to potential transplantations is currently limiting. In this study, we aimed to establish a clinical-grade, cost-reducing cultivation system for NCSCs isolated from the adult human nose using cGMP-grade Afc-FEP bags. Methods We cultivated human neural crest-derived stem cells from inferior turbinate (ITSCs) in a cell culture bag system using Afc-FEP bags in human blood plasma-supplemented medium. Investigations of viability, proliferation and expression profile of bag-cultured ITSCs were followed by DNA-content and telomerase activity determination. Cultivated ITSCs were introduced to directed in vitro differentiation assays to assess their potential for mesodermal and ectodermal differentiation. Mesodermal differentiation was determined using an enzyme activity assay (alkaline phosphatase, ALP), respective stainings (Alizarin Red S, Von Kossa and Oil Red O), and RT-PCR, while immunocytochemistry and synaptic vesicle recycling were applied to assay neuroectodermal differentiation of ITSCs. Results When cultivated within Afc-FEP bags, ITSCs grew three-dimensionally in a human blood plasma-derived matrix, thereby showing unchanged morphology, proliferation capability, viability and expression profile in comparison to three dimensionally-cultured ITSCs growing in standard cell culture plastics. Genetic stability of bag-cultured ITSCs was further accompanied by unchanged telomerase activity. Importantly, ITSCs retained their potential to differentiate into mesodermal cell types, particularly including ALP-active, Alizarin Red S-, and Von Kossa-positive osteogenic cell types, as well as

  19. Building the Vertebrate Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-03-01

    The vertebrate body can be subdivided along the antero-posterior (AP) axis into repeated structures called segments. This periodic pattern is established during embryogenesis by the somitogenesis process. Somites are generated in a rhythmic fashion from the paraxial mesoderm and subsequently differentiate to give rise to the vertebrae and skeletal muscles of the body. Somite formation involves an oscillator-the segmentation clock-whose periodic signal is converted into the periodic array of somite boundaries. This clock drives the dynamic expression of cyclic genes in the presomitic mesoderm and requires Notch and Wnt signaling. Microarray studies of the mouse presomitic mesoderm transcriptome reveal that the segmentation clock drives the periodic expression of a large network of cyclic genes involved in cell signaling. Mutually exclusive activation of the Notch/FGF and Wnt pathways during each cycle suggests that coordinated regulation of these three pathways underlies the clock oscillator. In humans, mutations in the genes associated to the function of this oscillator such as Dll3 or Lunatic Fringe result in abnormal segmentation of the vertebral column such as those seen in congenital scoliosis. Whereas the segmentation clock is thought to set the pace of vertebrate segmentation, the translation of this pulsation into the reiterated arrangement of segment boundaries along the AP axis involves dynamic gradients of FGF and Wnt signaling. The FGF signaling gradient is established based on an unusual mechanism involving mRNA decay which provides an efficient means to couple the spatio-temporal activation of segmentation to the posterior elongation of the embryo. Another striking aspect of somite production is the strict bilateral symmetry of the process. Retinoic acid was shown to control aspects of this coordination by buffering destabilizing effects from the embryonic left-right machinery. Defects in this embryonic program controlling vertebral symmetry might lead

  20. Cleavage pattern and fate map of the mesentoblast, 4d, in the gastropod Crepidula: a hallmark of spiralian development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Animals with a spiral cleavage program, such as mollusks and annelids, make up the majority of the superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The great diversity of larval and adult body plans in this group emerges from this highly conserved developmental program. The 4d micromere is one of the most conserved aspects of spiralian development. Unlike the preceding pattern of spiral divisions, cleavages within the 4d teloblastic sublineages are bilateral, representing a critical transition towards constructing the bilaterian body plan. These cells give rise to the visceral mesoderm in virtually all spiralians examined and in many species they also contribute to the endodermal intestine. Hence, the 4d lineage is an ideal one for studying the evolution and diversification of the bipotential endomesodermal germ layer in protostomes at the level of individual cells. Little is known of how division patterns are controlled or how mesodermal and endodermal sublineages diverge in spiralians. Detailed modern fate maps for 4d exist in only a few species of clitellate annelids, specifically in glossiphoniid leeches and the sludge worm Tubifex. We investigated the 4d lineage in the gastropod Crepidula fornicata, an established model system for spiralian biology, and in a closely related direct-developing species, C. convexa. Results High-resolution cell lineage tracing techniques were used to study the 4d lineage of C. fornicata and C. convexa. We present a new nomenclature to name the progeny of 4d, and report the fate map for the sublineages up through the birth of the first five pairs of teloblast daughter cells (when 28 cells are present in the 4d sublineage), and describe each clone’s behavior during gastrulation and later stages as these undergo differentiation. We identify the precise origin of the intestine, two cells of the larval kidney complex, the larval retractor muscles and the presumptive germ cells, among others. Other tissues that arise later in the 4d lineage

  1. Increased cardiogenesis in P19-GFP teratocarcinoma cells expressing the propeptide IGF-1Ea

    SciTech Connect

    Poudel, Bhawana; Bilbao, Daniel; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Germack, Renee; Rosenthal, Nadia; Santini, Maria Paola

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study, we explored the function of IGF-1Ea propeptide in inducing cardiogenesis of stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-1Ea promoted cardiac mesodermal induction in uncommitted cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under differentiation condition, IGF-1Ea increased expression of cardiac differentiation markers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Furthermore, it promoted formation of finely organized sarcomeric structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-1Ea propeptide may be a good candidate to improve production of cardiomyocytes from pluripotent cells. -- Abstract: The mechanism implicated in differentiation of endogenous cardiac stem cells into cardiomyocytes to regenerate the heart tissue upon an insult remains elusive, limiting the therapeutical goals to exogenous cell injection and/or gene therapy. We have shown previously that cardiac specific overexpression of the insulin-like growth factor 1 propeptide IGF-1Ea induces beneficial myocardial repair after infarct. Although the mechanism is still under investigation, the possibility that this propeptide may be involved in promoting stem cell differentiation into the cardiac lineage has yet to be explored. To investigate whether IGF-1Ea promote cardiogenesis, we initially modified P19 embryonal carcinoma cells to express IGF-1Ea. Taking advantage of their cardiomyogenic nature, we analyzed whether overexpression of this propeptide affected cardiac differentiation program. The data herein presented showed for the first time that constitutively overexpressed IGF-1Ea increased cardiogenic differentiation program in both undifferentiated and DMSO-differentiated cells. In details, IGF-1Ea overexpression promoted localization of alpha-actinin in finely organized sarcomeric structure compared to control cells and upregulated the cardiac mesodermal marker NKX-2.5 and the ventricular structural protein MLC2v. Furthermore, activated IGF-1 signaling promoted cardiac

  2. Expression patterns of mRNAs for the gap junction proteins connexin43 and connexin42 suggest their involvement in chick limb morphogenesis and specification of the arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Dealy, C N; Beyer, E C; Kosher, R A

    1994-02-01

    Gap junctions which comprise a family of proteins called connexins have been implicated in the morphogenesis of the chick limb bud. We have examined the expression patterns of two members of the connexin family, connexin43 (Cx43) and connexin42 (Cx42), during the early development of the chick limb bud and embryo by in situ hybridization. Cx43 mRNA is expressed in high amounts in the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), which promotes the outgrowth of the mesodermal cells of the limb bud, and in the ectopic AER of the limb buds of polydactylous diplopodia-5 mutant embryos. In contrast, little Cx43 expression is detectable in nonridge limb ectoderm at early stages of limb development. These results suggest that Cx43 gap junctions may integrate the activity of the cells comprising the AER and compartmentalize them into a functionally distinct entity capable of directing limb outgrowth. In addition, Cx43 exhibits high expression in the posterior subridge mesoderm of the early limb bud that is growing out in response to the AER, but little expression in the anterior mesoderm. This graded distribution of Cx43 transcripts correlates with a functional gradient of gap junctional communication along the anteroposterior (AP) axis, and suggests that Cx43 gap junctions may be involved in pattern formation across the AP axis. At later stages of development, Cx43 is transiently expressed in high amounts in the precartilage condensations of the carpals and metacarpals, at a time when critical cell-cell interactions are occurring that trigger cartilage differentiation. In contrast, in the developing limb, Cx42 is expressed exclusively by the central artery. In the remainder of the chick embryo, Cx42 is expressed in high amounts by the vessels comprising the arterial vasculature, but is not expressed by the venous vasculature. Thus, Cx42 gap junctions may be involved in specification of the arterial vasculature of the limb and embryo. Cx42, but not Cx43, is expressed in the ventricle of

  3. IGF-I and insulin in the acquisition of limb-forming ability by the embryonic lateral plate.

    PubMed

    Dealy, C N; Kosher, R A

    1996-07-10

    Acquisition of limb-forming ability by discrete regions of the lateral plate of the chick embryo is dependent on a medial-lateral inductive signaling cascade moving sequentially from the area of Hensen's node to the somitic mesoderm, the intermediate mesoderm, and then to the prospective limb-forming regions of the lateral plate. IGF-I and insulin are expressed by medial tissues as they are influencing the prospective limb-forming regions of the lateral plate. Here we report that IGF-I and insulin, but not FGF-2 or FGF-4, induce the formation of limb bud-like structures in vitro from prospective limb regions before they have acquired the ability to form limbs independent of medial tissues, and also induce the formation of limb bud-like structures from the prospective flank. The limb bud-like structures induced by IGF-I and insulin possess a thickened cap of ectoderm along their distal tips that resembles the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and this thickened distal apical ectoderm expresses the AER-characteristic homeobox-containing gene Msx-2. Like in normal limb buds, a population of highly proliferating cells which express the homeobox-containing gene Msx-1 are localized in the mesoderm directly subjacent to the thickened AER-like structures induced by IGF-I and insulin. However, the limb bud-like structures induced by IGF-I and insulin do not express sonic hedgehog, which encodes a secreted signaling molecule that has been implicated in regulating the anteroposterior patterning of the developing limb bud. IGF-I- and insulin-treated prospective limb explants give rise to rudimentary limbs containing identifiable skeletal elements when grafted into the coelom or to somites of host embryos. Overall, these results suggest that IGF-I and insulin may be endogenous signals produced by medial tissues that are involved in conferring limb-forming ability to the lateral plate and may promote the initial outgrowth of limb buds and possibly induce the AER. However, other

  4. Zebrafish tenascin-W, a new member of the tenascin family.

    PubMed

    Weber, P; Montag, D; Schachner, M; Bernhardt, R R

    1998-04-01

    A cDNA clone encoding tenascin-W, a novel member of the tenascin family, was isolated from a 20- to 28-h postfertilization (hpf) zebrafish cDNA library on the basis of the conserved epidermal growth factor-like domains represented in all tenascin molecules. An open reading frame of 2796 base pairs encodes a mature protein consisting of heptad repeats, a cysteine-rich amino terminal region, 3.5 epidermal growth factor-like repeats, five fibronectin type III homologous repeats, and a domain homologous to fibrinogen. These domains are the typical modular elements of molecules of the tenascin family. Sequence comparison demonstrated that TN-W shares homologies with the members of the tenascin family but is not a species homolog of any identified tenascin. The expression pattern of tn-w was analyzed by in situ hybridization in 1-day-old embryos, in 3-day-old larvae, and in juvenile zebrafish. At 24-25 hpf, tn-w mRNA was expressed in the lateral plate mesoderm, most conspicuously in the presumptive sclerotome. Migrating cells of sclerotomal and neural crest origins also showed high levels of expression. At 3 days, expression by sclerotomal and neural crest cells continued to be observed while expression in the somitic mesoderm was decreased. In juvenile fish, tn-w was expressed weakly by cells in the myosepta and, more strongly, by presumably nonneuronal cells in the dorsal root ganglia. In these tissues and at the same developmental stages, the expression of tn-w partially overlapped with the distribution of tn-c mRNA. In addition, tn-c was expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the axial mesoderm, neither of which expressed tn-w at any of the age stages examined. The expression pattern of tn-w suggests an involvement in neural crest and sclerotome cell migration and in the formation of the skeleton. Similar and possibly overlapping functions could also be performed by tn-c, which appears to have additional functions during the development of the CNS.

  5. Core issues in craniofacial myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Robert G.

    2010-11-01

    Branchiomeric craniofacial muscles control feeding, breathing and facial expression. These muscles differ on multiple counts from all other skeletal muscles and originate in a progenitor cell population in pharyngeal mesoderm characterized by a common genetic program with an adjacent population of cardiac progenitor cells, the second heart field, that gives rise to much of the heart. The transcription factors and signaling molecules that trigger the myogenic program at sites of branchiomeric muscle formation are correspondingly distinct from those in somite-derived muscle progenitor cells. Here new insights into the regulatory hierarchies controlling branchiomeric myogenesis are discussed. Differences in embryological origin are reflected in the lineage, transcriptional program and proliferative and differentiation properties of branchiomeric muscle satellite cells. These recent findings have important implications for our understanding of the diverse myogenic strategies operative both in the embryo and adult and are of direct biomedical relevance to deciphering the mechanisms underlying the cause and progression of muscle restricted myopathies.

  6. Carbonic anhydrases in chick extra-embryonic structures: a role for CA in bicarbonate reabsorption through the chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, M Gabriella

    2004-06-01

    The villus cavity cells, a specific cell type of the chick chorioallantoic membrane, express both cytosolic carbonic anhydrase in their cytoplasm and HCO3(-)/Cl(-) anion exchangers at their basolateral membranes. By immunohistochemical analysis, we show here that villus cavity cells specifically react with antibodies directed against the membrane-associated form of carbonic anhydrase, CAIV. Staining is restricted to the apical cell membranes, characteristically invaginated toward the shell membrane, as well as to endothelia of blood vessels present in the mesodermal layer. The occurrence of a membrane-associated CA form at the apical pole of villus cavity cells, when definitively confirmed, would be fairly consistent with the role proposed for these cells in bicarbonate reabsorption from the eggshell so to prevent metabolic acidosis in the embryo during development.

  7. Active Hematopoietic Hubs in Drosophila Adults Generate Hemocytes and Contribute to Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Saikat; Singh, Arashdeep; Mandal, Sudip; Mandal, Lolitika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Blood cell development in Drosophila shares significant similarities with vertebrate. The conservation ranges from biphasic mode of hematopoiesis to signaling molecules crucial for progenitor cell formation, maintenance, and differentiation. Primitive hematopoiesis in Drosophila ensues in embryonic head mesoderm, whereas definitive hematopoiesis happens in larval hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland. This organ, with the onset of pupation, ruptures to release hemocytes into circulation. It is believed that the adult lacks a hematopoietic organ and survives on the contribution of both embryonic and larval hematopoiesis. However, our studies revealed a surge of blood cell development in the dorsal abdominal hemocyte clusters of adult fly. These active hematopoietic hubs are capable of blood cell specification and can respond to bacterial challenges. The presence of progenitors and differentiated hemocytes embedded in a functional network of Laminin A and Pericardin within this hematopoietic hub projects it as a simple version of the vertebrate bone marrow. PMID:25959225

  8. Calreticulin is a secreted BMP antagonist, expressed in Hensen's node during neural induction.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Irene; Oliveira, Nidia M M; Randall, Rebecca A; Hill, Caroline S; McCoy, John M; Stern, Claudio D

    2017-01-15

    Hensen's node is the "organizer" of the avian and mammalian early embryo. It has many functions, including neural induction and patterning of the ectoderm and mesoderm. Some of the signals responsible for these activities are known but these do not explain the full complexity of organizer activity. Here we undertake a functional screen to discover new secreted factors expressed by the node at this time of development. Using a Signal Sequence Trap in yeast, we identify several candidates. Here we focus on Calreticulin. We show that in addition to its known functions in intracellular Calcium regulation and protein folding, Calreticulin is secreted, it can bind to BMP4 and act as a BMP antagonist in vivo and in vitro. Calreticulin is not sufficient to account for all organizer functions but may contribute to the complexity of its activity.

  9. Frs2α-deficiency in cardiac progenitors disrupts a subset of FGF signals required for outflow tract morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jue; Lin, Yongshun; Zhang, Yongyou; Lan, Yongsheng; Lin, Chunhong; Moon, Anne M.; Schwartz, Robert J.; Martin, James F.; Wang, Fen

    2009-01-01

    Summary The cardiac outflow tract (OFT) is a developmentally complex structure derived from multiple lineages and is often defective in human congenital anomalies. While emerging evidence shows that the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is essential for OFT development, the downstream pathways mediating FGF-signaling in cardiac progenitors remain poorly understood. Here, we report that FRS2α, an adaptor protein that links FGF receptor kinases to multiple signaling pathways, mediates critical aspects of FGF-dependent OFT development. Ablation of Frs2α in mesodermal OFT progenitor cells that originate in the second heart field (SHF) affects their expansion into the OFT myocardium, resulting in OFT misalignment and hypoplasia. Moreover, Frs2α mutants had defective endothelial-mesenchymal-transition and neural crest cell recruitment into the OFT cushions, resulting in OFT septation defects. The results provide new insight into the signaling molecules downstream of FGF receptor tyrosine kinases in cardiac progenitors. PMID:18832393

  10. Chamber identity programs drive early functional partitioning of the heart.

    PubMed

    Mosimann, Christian; Panáková, Daniela; Werdich, Andreas A; Musso, Gabriel; Burger, Alexa; Lawson, Katy L; Carr, Logan A; Nevis, Kathleen R; Sabeh, M Khaled; Zhou, Yi; Davidson, Alan J; DiBiase, Anthony; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-08-26

    The vertebrate heart muscle (myocardium) develops from the first heart field (FHF) and expands by adding second heart field (SHF) cells. While both lineages exist already in teleosts, the primordial contributions of FHF and SHF to heart structure and function remain incompletely understood. Here we delineate the functional contribution of the FHF and SHF to the zebrafish heart using the cis-regulatory elements of the draculin (drl) gene. The drl reporters initially delineate the lateral plate mesoderm, including heart progenitors. Subsequent myocardial drl reporter expression restricts to FHF descendants. We harnessed this unique feature to uncover that loss of tbx5a and pitx2 affect relative FHF versus SHF contributions to the heart. High-resolution physiology reveals distinctive electrical properties of each heart field territory that define a functional boundary within the single zebrafish ventricle. Our data establish that the transcriptional program driving cardiac septation regulates physiologic ventricle partitioning, which successively provides mechanical advantages of sequential contraction.

  11. Active tissue-specific DNA demethylation conferred by somatic cell nuclei in stable heterokaryons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Pomerantz, Jason H.; Sen, George; Palermo, Adam T.; Blau, Helen M.

    2007-01-01

    DNA methylation is among the most stable epigenetic marks, ensuring tissue-specific gene expression in a heritable manner throughout development. Here we report that differentiated mesodermal somatic cells can confer tissue-specific changes in DNA methylation on epidermal progenitor cells after fusion in stable multinucleate heterokaryons. Myogenic factors alter regulatory regions of genes in keratinocyte cell nuclei, demethylating and activating a muscle-specific gene and methylating and silencing a keratinocyte-specific gene. Because these changes occur in the absence of DNA replication or cell division, they are mediated by an active mechanism. Thus, the capacity to transfer epigenetic changes to other nuclei is not limited to embryonic stem cells and oocytes but is also a property of highly specialized mammalian somatic cells. These results suggest the possibility of directing the reprogramming of readily available postnatal human progenitor cells toward specific tissue cell types. PMID:17360535

  12. Control of segment number in vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Céline; Ozbudak, Ertuğrul M; Wunderlich, Joshua; Baumann, Diana; Lewis, Julian; Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-07-17

    The vertebrate body axis is subdivided into repeated segments, best exemplified by the vertebrae that derive from embryonic somites. The number of somites is precisely defined for any given species but varies widely from one species to another. To determine the mechanism controlling somite number, we have compared somitogenesis in zebrafish, chicken, mouse and corn snake embryos. Here we present evidence that in all of these species a similar 'clock-and-wavefront' mechanism operates to control somitogenesis; in all of them, somitogenesis is brought to an end through a process in which the presomitic mesoderm, having first increased in size, gradually shrinks until it is exhausted, terminating somite formation. In snake embryos, however, the segmentation clock rate is much faster relative to developmental rate than in other amniotes, leading to a greatly increased number of smaller-sized somites.

  13. The problem of periodic patterns in embryos.

    PubMed

    Cooke, J

    1981-10-07

    A segmented body-plan has developed at least twice during metazoan evolution: in the lineage including annelids and arthropods, where the segment is the unit of body structure, and in the ancestors of vertebrates, where a primary segmentation of the middle, mesodermal cell layer of the embryo imposes a spatially periodic character upon derivatives of other layers. The mechanism controlling the development of these periodic patterns has the property that the number of the serially homologous structures formed within each species is largely independent of the linear dimension, or scale, at which pattern formation occurs in individual cases. In this they contrast with other patterns of dispersed, homologous structures occurring in animal epidermis and dermis. The performance of various classes of model for the control of number in vertebrates somite formation are compared, in the light of experimentally and naturally observable properties of this aspect of pattern.

  14. The structure of MESD45-184 brings light into the mechanism of LDLR family folding.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Christian; Lighthouse, Janet K; Werther, Tobias; Andersen, Olav M; Diehl, Annette; Schmieder, Peter; Du, Jianguang; Holdener, Bernadette C; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2011-03-09

    Mesoderm development (MESD) is a 224 amino acid mouse protein that acts as a molecular chaperone for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Here, we provide evidence that the region 45-184 of MESD is essential and sufficient for this function and suggest a model for its mode of action. NMR studies reveal a β-α-β-β-α-β core domain with an α-helical N-terminal extension that interacts with the β sheet in a dynamic manner. As a result, the structural ensemble contains open (active) and closed (inactive) forms, allowing for regulation of chaperone activity through substrate binding. The mutant W61R, which is lethal in Drosophila, adopts only the open state. The receptor motif recognized by MESD was identified by in vitro-binding studies. Furthermore, in vivo functional evidence for the relevance of the identified contact sites in MESD is provided.

  15. Early development of the vertebral column.

    PubMed

    Scaal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The segmental organization of the vertebrate body is most obviously visible in the vertebral column, which consists of a series of vertebral bones and interconnecting joints and ligaments. During embryogenesis, the vertebral column derives from the somites, which are the primary segments of the embryonic paraxial mesoderm. Anatomical, cellular and molecular aspects of vertebral column development have been of interest to developmental biologists for more than 150 years. This review briefly summarizes the present knowledge on early steps of vertebral column development in amniotes, starting from sclerotome formation and leading to the establishment of the anatomical bauplan of the spine composed of vertebral bodies, vertebral arches, intervertebral discs and ribs, and their specific axial identities along the body axis.

  16. Extracellular Matrix and Integrins in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Leighton, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells with great therapeutic potentials. The in vitro differentiation of ESC was designed by recapitulating embryogenesis. Significant progress has been made to improve the in vitro differentiation protocols by toning soluble maintenance factors. However, more robust methods for lineage-specific differentiation and maturation are still under development. Considering the complexity of in vivo embryogenesis environment, extracellular matrix (ECM) cues should be considered besides growth factor cues. ECM proteins bind to cells and act as ligands of integrin receptors on cell surfaces. Here, we summarize the role of the ECM and integrins in the formation of three germ layer progenies. Various ECM–integrin interactions were found, facilitating differentiation toward definitive endoderm, hepatocyte-like cells, pancreatic beta cells, early mesodermal progenitors, cardiomyocytes, neuroectoderm lineages, and epidermal cells, such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. In the future, ECM combinations for the optimal ESC differentiation environment will require substantial study. PMID:26462244

  17. Mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptors: Phenotypic consequences during eukaryotic development

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.J.; Bellus, G.A.; Jabs, E.W.

    1995-10-01

    Recently, a tremendous amount of excitement and interest has been generated by the rapid succession of discoveries in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) field. In less than a year, mutations in three FGFRs (FGFR1-FGFR3) have been associated with three skeletal dysplasias and four craniosynostotic syndromes. FGFRs are members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that bind fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). The FGF family consists of structurally related polypeptides that play a key role in numerous aspects of embryogenesis, growth, and homeostasis. FGFs have a potent growth stimulatory and/or differentiation-inducing effect on cells such as those derived from the early-embryonic mesoderm or ectoderm. In addition to mitogenesis and differentiation, FGFs also stimulate chemotaxis, cell survival, and angiogenesis. FGFs mediate cellular responses on binding to and activation of FGFRs. 45 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Schistosomus reflexus syndrome: a heritable defect in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Laughton, K W; Fisher, K R S; Halina, W G; Partlow, G D

    2005-10-01

    Schistosomus reflexus (SR) is a rare and fatal congenital disorder. Primarily observed in ruminants, its defining features include spinal inversion, exposure of the abdominal viscera because of a fissure of the ventral abdominal wall, limb ankylosis, positioning of the limbs adjacent to the skull and, lung and diaphragm hypoplasia. Variable components of SR include scoliosis, cleft sternum, exposure of thoracic viscera, and abnormalities of the digestive and urogenital systems. This report presents the findings from an anatomical analysis of a female Holstein SR calf with thoracoschisis, scoliosis and anomalies of the appendicular skeleton, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and urogenital systems. Many of these malformations have not been previously reported. The reproductive tract of this case is particularly unique, displaying Muellerian duct abnormalities. These abnormalities suggest SR occurs as early as the post-gastrulation embryo and involves the intermediate mesoderm. Preliminary analysis of associated cases suggests that SR has a genetic aetiology.

  19. Early chordate origins of the vertebrate second heart field.

    PubMed

    Stolfi, Alberto; Gainous, T Blair; Young, John J; Mori, Alessandro; Levine, Michael; Christiaen, Lionel

    2010-07-30

    The vertebrate heart is formed from diverse embryonic territories, including the first and second heart fields. The second heart field (SHF) gives rise to the right ventricle and outflow tract, yet its evolutionary origins are unclear. We found that heart progenitor cells of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis also generate precursors of the atrial siphon muscles (ASMs). These precursors express Islet and Tbx1/10, evocative of the splanchnic mesoderm that produces the lower jaw muscles and SHF of vertebrates. Evidence is presented that the transcription factor COE is a critical determinant of ASM fate. We propose that the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates possessed multipotent cardiopharyngeal muscle precursors, and that their reallocation might have contributed to the emergence of the SHF.

  20. Functional Human Beige Adipocytes from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Guénantin, Anne-Claire; Briand, Nolwenn; Capel, Emilie; Dumont, Florent; Morichon, Romain; Provost, Claire; Stillitano, Francesca; Jeziorowska, Dorota; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Hajjar, Roger J; Fève, Bruno; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Collas, Philippe; Capeau, Jacqueline; Vigouroux, Corinne

    2017-03-07

    Activation of thermogenic beige adipocytes has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic target in obesity and diabetes. Relevant human models for beige adipocyte differentiation are essential to implement such therapeutic strategies. We report a straightforward and efficient protocol to generate functional human beige adipocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Without overexpression of exogenous adipogenic genes, our method recapitulates an adipogenic developmental pathway through successive mesodermal and adipogenic progenitor stages. hiPSC-derived adipocytes are insulin-sensitive and display beige-specific markers and functional properties including upregulation of thermogenic genes, increased mitochondrial content and increased oxygen consumption upon activation with cAMP analogues. Engraftment of hiPSC-derived adipocytes in mice produces well-organized and vascularized adipose tissue, capable of β-adrenergic-responsive glucose uptake. Our model of human beige adipocyte development provides a new and scalable tool for disease modeling and therapeutic screening.

  1. Genomic imprinting in disruptive spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cristina Joana; Carvalho, Filipa; Sousa, Mário; Barros, Alberto

    2004-05-22

    The possibility of imprinting disease transmission by assisted reproductive technologies has been raised after births of children with Angelman's and Beckwith-Wiedemann's syndromes. To investigate whether imprinting defects were associated with disturbed spermatogenesis, we studied two oppositely imprinted genes in spermatozoan DNA from normozoospermic and oligozoospermic patients. In the mesodermal specific transcript gene (MEST), bisulphite genomic sequencing showed that maternal imprinting was correctly erased in all 123 patients. However, methylation of the H19 gene did not change in any of 27 normozoospermic individuals (0%, 95% CI 0-13%), compared with methylation changes in eight moderate (17%, 8-31%, p=0.026) and 15 severe (30%, 18-45%, p=0.002) oligozoospermic patients. Our data suggest an association between abnormal genomic imprinting and hypospermatogenesis, and that spermatozoa from oligozoospermic patients carry a raised risk of transmitting imprinting errors.

  2. Detecting cardiac contractile activity in the early mouse embryo using multiple modalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiann-Mun; Miranda, António M. A.; Bub, Gil; Srinivas, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the first organs to develop during mammalian embryogenesis. In the mouse, it starts to form shortly after gastrulation, and is derived primarily from embryonic mesoderm. The embryonic heart is unique in having to perform a mechanical contractile function while undergoing complex morphogenetic remodeling. Approaches to imaging the morphogenesis and contractile activity of the developing heart are important in understanding not only how this remodeling is controlled but also the origin of congenital heart defects (CHDs). Here, we describe approaches for visualizing contractile activity in the developing mouse embryo, using brightfield time lapse microscopy and confocal microscopy of calcium transients. We describe an algorithm for enhancing this image data and quantifying contractile activity from it. Finally we describe how atomic force microscopy can be used to record contractile activity prior to it being microscopically visible. PMID:25610399

  3. Abnormal B.A.E.P. in a family with Moebius syndrome: evidence for supranuclear lesion.

    PubMed

    Stabile, M; Cavaliere, M L; Scarano, G; Fels, A; Valiani, R; Ventruto, V

    1984-05-01

    A family with Moebius syndrome is presented. Neurological lesions in the affected members are various: complete VI and VII cranial nerves palsy associated with mental retardation in the proband; left convergent strabismus and mental retardation in a brother of the proband and only mental retardation in a sister of the proband. The brainstem auditory evoked potentials (B.A.E.P.), investigated in the proband and his affected sister, are abnormal. The presence of the anomaly after the 3rd wave is consistent with a disfunction of the auditory tract at a supranuclear level. The mental deficiency and the supranuclear site of the acoustic lesion are an indication for a more general involvement of C.N.S. than cranial nerve nuclei alone. Karyotype and dermatoglyphics of the three affected subjects were normal. The authors hypothesized the same disorganogenetic factor acting very early (4th-6th week of gestational age) on the metamerization process of limb buds mesoderm and brainstem gray matter.

  4. Trichobezoar in Vagina: Assessment for Child Sexual Abuse and Diagnostic Result of Forensic Science.

    PubMed

    Bağ, Özlem; Acar, Buğra Han; Öztürk, Şenol; Alşen, Sevay; Ecevit, Çiğdem

    2017-03-01

    Vaginal discharge and bleeding in children require a through and thoughtful evaluation to diagnose the underlying problem including infections, sexual abuse, and vaginal foreign bodies. We report a 6-year-old girl presenting with bloody vaginal discharge, carefully evaluated for sexual abuse, and finally diagnosed as a vaginal foreign body after vaginoscopy. A rolling hair ball was extracted from the vagina and was diagnosed as trichobezoar pathologically without any endo-ecto-mesodermal residual tissue. The hair ball was genetically detected and diagnosed to belong herself by containing no foreign structure. Child sexual abuse was ruled out by forensic interview at CAC and report of forensic science that reported genetic structure belonging to the child. Medicolegal assessment helped in final diagnosis to exclude child sexual abuse.

  5. Congenital trigeminal anaesthesia: a rare preventable cause of visual loss in children

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Anand; Hassan, Eusra; Newman, William; Kneen, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Congenital trigeminal anaesthesia (CTA) is a rare condition characterised by a congenital deficit involving all or part of the sensory component of the trigeminal nerve in children. It is a heterogeneous condition that can present in isolation or is associated with congenital abnormalities affecting the mesoderm, ectoderm and/or brainstem. The authors report a case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with reduced visual acuity, painless bilateral keratitis and painless non-healing lesions on the face, who was confirmed to have CTA on detailed neurophysiological investigations. She also had associated unilateral renal dysplasia and Duane syndrome. The authors also discuss an up-to-date review of the published cases of CTA in literature, the first of which was reported as early as 1984. PMID:22761208

  6. Cowden syndrome with Lhermitte- Duclos disease presenting as ataxia.

    PubMed

    Arun, K A; Sreejith, R; Hitha, B; Geetha, P; Sasidharan, P K

    2015-01-01

    Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is a rare genodermatosis of autosomal dominant inheritance characterized by multiple hamartomatous lesions of ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal origin. A 45-year-old man presented to us with a history of dural arteriovenous fistula and intracerebral bleed in the past with gradually progressive difficulty in walking. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed a heterogeneous lesion in the cerebellum which was diagnosed as adult Lhermitte-Duclos disease which is considered a component of Cowden syndrome. On examination we found florid skin and mucosal manifestations of Cowden syndrome. A family history of thyroid malignancy was also present. Using the Cleveland Clinic web calculator, the patient had an 82% chance of having a phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) mutation.

  7. Neuromesodermal progenitors and the making of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Henrique, Domingos; Abranches, Elsa; Verrier, Laure; Storey, Kate G.

    2016-01-01

    Neuromesodermal progenitors (NMps) contribute to both the elongating spinal cord and the adjacent paraxial mesoderm. It has been assumed that these cells arise as a result of patterning of the anterior neural plate. However, as the molecular mechanisms that specify NMps in vivo are uncovered, and as protocols for generating these bipotent cells from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells in vitro are established, the emerging data suggest that this view needs to be revised. Here, we review the characteristics, regulation, in vitro derivation and in vivo induction of NMps. We propose that these cells arise within primitive streak-associated epiblast via a mechanism that is separable from that which establishes neural fate in the anterior epiblast. We thus argue for the existence of two distinct routes for making central nervous system progenitors. PMID:26329597

  8. Is Bone a Target-Tissue for the Nervous System?

    PubMed Central

    García-Castellano, José M; Díaz-Herrera, Pilar; Morcuende, José A

    2000-01-01

    Bone cells respond in specific ways to various hormones and growth factors, but the biology of skeletal innervation and its physiologic significance in bone metabolism is poorly understood. With the introduction of immunohistochemical staining techniques and new molecular biology tools, the knowledge in this field has significantly improved. In this review, we update current understanding of the effects of neuropeptides on bone metabolism, specifically vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP). In addition, new information concerning the role of growth factors, such as neurotrophins, is also discussed. There is strong evidence to suggest that bone can be a target of the nervous system. Further investigations in this field will allow us to answer questions related to pre-natal development, bone growth, fracture healing, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis or neoplasias of mesoderm origin. PMID:10934625

  9. Opposing RA and FGF signals control proximodistal vertebrate limb development through regulation of Meis genes.

    PubMed

    Mercader, N; Leonardo, E; Piedra, M E; Martínez-A, C; Ros, M A; Torres, M

    2000-09-01

    Vertebrate limbs develop in a temporal proximodistal sequence, with proximal regions specified and generated earlier than distal ones. Whereas considerable information is available on the mechanisms promoting limb growth, those involved in determining the proximodistal identity of limb parts remain largely unknown. We show here that retinoic acid (RA) is an upstream activator of the proximal determinant genes Meis1 and Meis2. RA promotes proximalization of limb cells and endogenous RA signaling is required to maintain the proximal Meis domain in the limb. RA synthesis and signaling range, which initially span the entire lateral plate mesoderm, become restricted to proximal limb domains by the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) activity following limb initiation. We identify fibroblast growth factor (FGF) as the main molecule responsible for this AER activity and propose a model integrating the role of FGF in limb cell proliferation, with a specific function in promoting distalization through inhibition of RA production and signaling.

  10. Two gene members of the murine HOX-5 complex show regional and cell-type specific expression in developing limbs and gonads.

    PubMed Central

    Dollé, P; Duboule, D

    1989-01-01

    This study reports the expression domains of two murine HOX gene members of the HOX-5 complex (Hox-5.2, Hox-5.3). These two genes have very similar homeodomain sequences, as well as temporal and spatial specificities of expression. They are both expressed at very posterior levels in the central nervous system, in sclerotome derivatives and in a few internal organs. In addition to these expression domains which are shared with other HOX genes, transcripts from both Hox-5.2 and Hox-5.3 are present at high levels in developing limbs. After an early homogeneous expression in mesodermal limb bud cells, transcription becomes restricted to cartilage-differentiating cells. In addition, Hox-5.2 is a marker for gonadal development. The possible involvement of such genes during inductive processes or organogenesis is discussed. Images PMID:2569970

  11. Protein kinase C and regulation of the local competence of Xenopus ectoderm

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A.P.; Kramer, I.M.; Durston, A.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The limited competence of embryonic tissue to respond to an inductive signal has an essential, regulatory function in embryonic induction. The molecular basis for the competence of Xenopus ectoderm to differentiate into neural tissue was investigated. Dorsal mesoderm or 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) caused in vivo activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and neural differentiation mainly in dorsal ectoderm and to a lesser extent in ventral ectoderm. These data correlate with the observations that PKC preparations from dorsal and ventral ectoderm differ, the dorsal PKC preparation being more susceptible to activation by TPA and diolein than is the ventral PKC preparation. Monoclonal antibodies against the bovine PKC {alpha} plus {beta} or {gamma} isozymes immunostained dorsal and ventral ectoderm, respectively, which suggests different localizations of PKC isozymes. These results suggest that PKC participates in the establishment of embryonic competence.

  12. Ovarian teratoma displaying a wide variety of tissue components in a broiler chicken (Gallus Domesticus): morphological heterogeneity of pluripotential germ cell during tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ohfuji, S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous ovarian teratoma was found in a seven-week-old female Chunky broiler chicken that was slaughtered for food. On post-mortem inspection, a spherical tumor mass attaching to a juvenile ovary was found in the abdominal cavity. Histopathologically, the tumor was comprised of immature mesenchymal stroma and a variety of mature tissue elements of mesodermal and ectodermal origin. In addition, there were multiple indistinguishable tissue elements, which showed no malignant cytological features but were unidentifiable as to corresponding embryological layer of origin. These heterogeneous teratoma tissues consisted of a variety of glandular, cystic, duct-like, and tubular structures, some of which exhibited a lining by a mixture of both keratinizing/non-keratinizing stratified squamous epithelial cells and cuboidal/columnar epithelial cells. The ovarian tetatoma was considered a benign and congenital one. The highly diverse differentiation of the teratoma might have manifested a morphological aspect of intrinsic character of the pluripotential germ cells during tumorigenesis. PMID:27303655

  13. Cloning and expression of the TALE superclass homeobox Meis2 gene during zebrafish embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Biemar, F; Devos, N; Martial, J A; Driever, W; Peers, B

    2001-12-01

    Meis and Prep/Pknox (MEINOX family) proteins, together with Pbx (PBC family) proteins, belong to the TALE superfamily characterized by an atypical homeodomain containing three additional amino acids between helix 1 and helix 2. Members of the MEINOX and PBC families have been isolated in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, Xenopus, chick, mouse and human, and play crucial roles in many aspects of embryogenesis. Here, we report the isolation of meis2 in zebrafish. Expression of meis2 is first detected at the beginning of gastrulation. Later during embryogenesis, meis2 transcripts are found in distinct domains of the central nervous system with the strongest expression in the hindbrain. Expression was also detected in the isthmus, along the spinal cord and in the lateral mesoderm. As development proceeds, meis2 is also expressed in the developing retina, pharyngeal arches, and in the vicinity of the gut tube.

  14. MBNL1 and RBFOX2 cooperate to establish a splicing programme involved in pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Venables, Julian P; Lapasset, Laure; Gadea, Gilles; Fort, Philippe; Klinck, Roscoe; Irimia, Manuel; Vignal, Emmanuel; Thibault, Philippe; Prinos, Panagiotis; Chabot, Benoit; Abou Elela, Sherif; Roux, Pierre; Lemaitre, Jean-Marc; Tazi, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided huge insight into the pathways, mechanisms and transcription factors that control differentiation. Here we use high-throughput RT-PCR technology to take a snapshot of splicing changes in the full spectrum of high- and low-expressed genes during induction of fibroblasts, from several donors, into iPSCs and their subsequent redifferentiation. We uncover a programme of concerted alternative splicing changes involved in late mesoderm differentiation and controlled by key splicing regulators MBNL1 and RBFOX2. These critical splicing adjustments arise early in vertebrate evolution and remain fixed in at least 10 genes (including PLOD2, CLSTN1, ATP2A1, PALM, ITGA6, KIF13A, FMNL3, PPIP5K1, MARK2 and FNIP1), implying that vertebrates require alternative splicing to fully implement the instructions of transcriptional control networks.

  15. Prenatally evolving ectopia cordis with successful surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Sadłecki, Paweł; Krekora, Michał; Krasomski, Grzegorz; Walentowicz-Sadłecka, Małgorzata; Grabiec, Marek; Moll, Jacek; Respondek-Liberska, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is a rare malformation due to failure of maturation of the midline mesodermal components of the chest and abdomen. It can be defined as a complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It comprises 0.1% of congenital heart diseases. Common cardiac anomalies associated with EC are ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and tetralogy of Fallot. EC and additional anomalies usually lead to intrauterine death. The possibility and efficacy of surgery in a surviving neonate depends on the degree of EC, coexisting congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations. We present a case of prenatally diagnosed isolated EC diagnosed in the first half of pregnancy. After counseling, the patient decided to continue her pregnancy which ended with a newborn baby discharged from the hospital after cardiac surgery performed just after elective cesarean section.

  16. Multiple distant metastases in a case of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Tertemiz, Kemal Can; Ozgen Alpaydin, Aylin; Gurel, Duygu; Savas, Recep; Gulcu, Aytac; Akkoclu, Atila

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a malignant of mesodermal neoplasm and arises from multipotential mesothelial or subserosal cells of the pleura, pericardium and peritoneum. Case A seventy five year-old male patient was admitted with chest and lower limb pain. He was a heavy smoker and exposed to environmental asbestos in his childhood. PET-CT scans showed multiple pathological FDG uptakes in lungs and other organs. Biopsies performed from lung and anterior thigh muscles were reported as epitheloid type malignant pleural mesothelioma. Discussion We emphasize that unexpected distant metastases can be observed in MPM and occasionally primary diagnosis can be determined by the biopsy of the metastatic regions. This case also points out the role of PET-CT in the staging of malign mesothelioma by determining different metastatic sites. PMID:26029551

  17. Isolation and differentiation of Xenopus animal cap cells.

    PubMed

    Ariizumi, Takashi; Takahashi, Shuji; Chan, Te-chuan; Ito, Yuzuru; Michiue, Tatsuo; Asashima, Makoto

    2009-04-01

    Xenopus is used as a model animal for investigating the inductive events and organogenesis that occur during early vertebrate development. Given that they are easy to obtain in high numbers and are relatively large in size, Xenopus embryos are excellent specimens for performing manipulations such as microinjection and microsurgery. The animal cap, which is the area around the animal pole of the blastula, is destined to form the ectoderm during normal development. However, these cells retain pluripotentiality and upon exposure to specific inducers, the animal cap can differentiate into neural, mesodermal, and endodermal tissues. In this sense, the cells of the animal cap are equivalent to mammalian embryonic stem cells. In this unit, the isolation and differentiation of animal cap cells, the so-called animal cap assay, is described. Useful methods for analyzing the mechanism of animal cap differentiation at the molecular level are also described.

  18. Development of the Human Breast

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Asma; Lteif, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Mammalia are so named based on the presence of the mammary gland in the breast. The mammary gland is an epidermal appendage, derived from the apocrine glands. The human breast consists of the parenchyma and stroma, originating from ectodermal and mesodermal elements, respectively. Development of the human breast is distinctive for several reasons. The human breast houses the mammary gland that produces and delivers milk through development of an extensive tree-like network of branched ducts. It is also characterized by cellular plasticity, with extensive remodeling in adulthood, a factor that increases its susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Also, breast development occurs in distinct stages via complex epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, orchestrated by signaling pathways under the regulation of systemic hormones. Congenital and acquired disorders of the breast often have a basis in development, making its study essential to understanding breast pathology. PMID:24872732

  19. Notch activity induces Nodal expression and mediates the establishment of left–right asymmetry in vertebrate embryos

    PubMed Central

    Raya, Ángel; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Rodríguez-Esteban, Concepción; Büscher, Dirk; Koth, Christopher M.; Itoh, Tohru; Morita, Masanobu; Raya, R. Marina; Dubova, Ilir; Bessa, Joaquín Grego; de la Pompa, José Luis; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisúa

    2003-01-01

    Left-sided expression of Nodal in the lateral plate mesoderm is a conserved feature necessary for the establishment of normal left–right asymmetry during vertebrate embryogenesis. By using gain- and loss-of-function experiments in zebrafish and mouse, we show that the activity of the Notch pathway is necessary and sufficient for Nodal expression around the node, and for proper left–right determination. We identify Notch-responsive elements in the Nodal promoter, and unveil a direct relationship between Notch activity and Nodal expression around the node. Our findings provide evidence for a mechanism involving Notch activity that translates an initial symmetry-breaking event into asymmetric gene expression. PMID:12730123

  20. Oncogenic mutations produce similar phenotypes in Drosophila tissues of diverse origins

    PubMed Central

    Stickel, Stefanie; Su, Tin Tin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT An emerging interest in oncology is to tailor treatment to particular cancer genotypes, i.e. oncogenic mutations present in the tumor, and not the tissue of cancer incidence. Integral to such a practice is the idea that the same oncogenic mutation(s) produces similar outcomes in different tissues. To test this idea experimentally, we studied tumors driven by a combination of RasV12 and scrib1 mutations in Drosophila larvae. We found that tumors induced in tissues of neural ectodermal and mesodermal origins behaved similarly in every manner examined: cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis, cellular morphology, increased aneuploidy and response to Taxol. We conclude that oncogenic effects override tissue-specific differences, at least for the mutations, tissues, and phenotypes studied herein. PMID:24570398