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Sample records for mesophilic bacterial species

  1. Bacterial gene import and mesophilic adaptation in archaea.

    PubMed

    López-García, Purificación; Zivanovic, Yvan; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David

    2015-07-01

    It is widely believed that the archaeal ancestor was hyperthermophilic, but during archaeal evolution, several lineages - including haloarchaea and their sister methanogens, the Thaumarchaeota, and the uncultured Marine Group II and Marine Group III Euryarchaeota (MGII/III) - independently adapted to lower temperatures. Recent phylogenomic studies suggest that the ancestors of these lineages were recipients of massive horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Many of the acquired genes, which are often involved in metabolism and cell envelope biogenesis, were convergently acquired by distant mesophilic archaea. In this Opinion article, we explore the intriguing hypothesis that the import of these bacterial genes was crucial for the adaptation of archaea to mesophilic lifestyles.

  2. Bacterial gene import and mesophilic adaptation in archaea

    PubMed Central

    López-García, Purificación; Zivanovic, Yvan; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David

    2015-01-01

    It is widely believed that the archaeal ancestor was hyperthermophilic, but during archaeal evolution, several lineages — including haloarchaea and their sister methanogens, the Thaumarchaeota, and the uncultured Marine Group II and Marine Group III Euryarchaeota (MGII/III) — independently adapted to lower temperatures. Recent phylogenomic studies suggest that the ancestors of these lineages were recipients of massive horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Many of the acquired genes, which are often involved in metabolism and cell envelope biogenesis, were convergently acquired by distant mesophilic archaea. In this Opinion article, we explore the intriguing hypothesis that the import of these bacterial genes was crucial for the adaptation of archaea to mesophilic lifestyles. PMID:26075362

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Bioreactors Treating Pharmaceutical Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    LaPara, Timothy M.; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Pantea, Lisa; Alleman, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the bacterial communities supported by a seven-stage, full-scale biological wastewater treatment plant was studied. These reactors were operated at both mesophilic (28 to 32°C) and thermophilic (50 to 58°C) temperatures. Community fingerprint analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the PCR-amplified V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from the domain Bacteria revealed that these seven reactors supported three distinct microbial communities. A band-counting analysis of the PCR-DGGE results suggested that elevated reactor temperatures corresponded with reduced species richness. Cloning of nearly complete 16S rRNA genes also suggested a reduced species richness in the thermophilic reactors by comparing the number of clones with different nucleotide inserts versus the total number of clones screened. While these results imply that elevated temperature can reduce species richness, other factors also could have impacted the number of populations that were detected. Nearly complete 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that the thermophilic reactors were dominated by members from the β subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (β-proteobacteria) in addition to anaerobic phylotypes from the low-G+C gram-positive and Synergistes divisions. The mesophilic reactors, however, included at least six bacterial divisions, including Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides, Synergistes, Planctomycetes, low-G+C gram-positives, Holophaga-Acidobacterium, and Proteobacteria (α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and δ-proteobacteria subdivisions). The two PCR-based techniques detected the presence of similar bacterial populations but failed to coincide on the relative distribution of these phylotypes. This suggested that at least one of these methods is insufficiently quantitative to determine total community biodiversity—a function of both the total number of species present (richness) and their relative distribution

  4. Bacterial community structure in treated sewage sludge with mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Stiborova, Hana; Wolfram, Jan; Demnerova, Katerina; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2015-11-01

    Stabilized sewage sludge is applied to agricultural fields and farmland due to its high organic matter content. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two types of sludge stabilization, mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) and thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD), on bacterial communities in sludge, including the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Bacterial community structure and phylogenetic diversity were analyzed in four sewage sludge samples from the Czech Republic. Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes showed that investigated sludge samples harbor diverse bacterial populations with only a few taxa present across all samples. Bacterial diversity was higher in sludge samples after MAD versus TAD treatment, and communities in MAD-treated sludge shared the highest genetic similarities. In all samples, the bacterial community was dominated by reads affiliated with Proteobacteria. The sludge after TAD treatment had considerably higher number of reads of thermotolerant/thermophilic taxa, such as the phyla Deinococcus-Thermus and Thermotogae or the genus Coprothermobacter. Only one operational taxonomic unit (OTU), which clustered with Rhodanobacter, was detected in all communities at a relative abundance >1 %. All of the communities were screened for the presence of 16S rRNA gene sequences of pathogenic bacteria using a database of 122 pathogenic species and ≥98 % identity threshold. The abundance of such sequences ranged between 0.23 and 1.57 % of the total community, with lower numbers present after the TAD treatment, indicating its higher hygienization efficiency. Sequences clustering with nontuberculous mycobacteria were present in all samples. Other detected sequences of pathogenic bacteria included Streptomyces somaliensis, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Gordonia spp., Legionella anisa, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Enterobacter aerogenes, Brucella melitensis, and Staphylococcus aureus.

  5. Mathematical models and bacterial communities for ammonia toxicity in mesophilic anaerobes not acclimated to high concentrations of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyong; Cui, Fenghao; Mo, Kyung; Kim, Moonil

    In this study, we evaluated ammonia toxicity in mesophilic anaerobic digestion at various pH values and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrations. We performed anaerobic toxicity assays (ATAs) to evaluate the toxicity effects of TAN and pH on mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Modeling based on the results of the ATAs indicated that the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) decreased by 30% at a TAN concentration higher than 3.0 g/L compared to a TAN concentration of 0 g/L. In addition, the highest SMA for a given TAN level (0.5-10.0 g/L) was observed at a pH of around 7.6. The results of bacterial community analyses showed that the diversity and richness of microorganisms with increasing TAN concentration were decreased. Chloroflexi and Synergistetes were the dominant phyla at TAN concentrations less than 3.0 g/L, and Firmicutes was the dominant phylum at TAN concentrations higher than 3.0 g/L, implying that the ammonia toxicity concentration may influence the kind of dominant species. In conclusion, to start a stable mesophilic anaerobic digestion concerning ammonia toxicity, a TAN concentration less than 3.0 g/L is preferable.

  6. Dynamics of culturable mesophilic bacterial communities of three fresh herbs and their production environment.

    PubMed

    Gekenidis, M-T; Gossin, D; Schmelcher, M; Schöner, U; Remus-Emsermann, M N P; Drissner, D

    2017-10-01

    development of mesophilic bacterial communities and selected food-contaminating bacteria of fresh herbs contributes to estimating consumer exposure. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Extracellular enzyme activity in anaerobic bacterial cultures: evidence of pullulanase activity among mesophilic marine bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, C; Repeta, D J

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular enzymatic activity of a mixed culture of anaerobic marine bacteria enriched on pullulan [alpha(1,6)-linked maltotriose units] was directly assessed with a combination of gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Hydrolysis products of pullulan were separated by GPC into three fractions with molecular weights of > or = 10,000, approximately 5,000, and < or = 1,200. NMR spectra of these fractions demonstrated that pullulan was rapidly and specifically hydrolyzed at alpha(1,6) linkages by pullulanase enzymes, most likely type II pullulanase. Although isolated pullulanase enzymes have been shown to hydrolyze pullulan completely to maltotriose (S. H. Brown, H. R. Costantino, and R. M. Kelly, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1985-1991, 1990; M. Klingeberg, H. Hippe, and G. Antranikian, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 69:145-152, 1990; R. Koch, P. Zablowski, A. Spreinat, and G. Antranikian, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 71:21-26, 1990), the smallest carbohydrate detected in the bacterial cultures consisted of two maltotriose units linked through one alpha(1,6) linkage. Either the final hydrolysis step was closely linked to substrate uptake, or specialized porins similar to maltoporin might permit direct transport of large oligosaccharides into the bacterial cell. This is the first report of pullulanase activity among mesophilic marine bacteria. The combination of GPC and NMR could easily be used to assess other types of extracellular enzyme activity in bacterial cultures. PMID:8161177

  8. Coaggregation between bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Kinder, S A; Holt, S C

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial coaggregation, or interbacterial adherence, is one mechanism involved in the development of bacterial biofilms that are found on surfaces in nature. Assays used to measure coaggregation rely on the interaction of bacterial cells in suspension or attachment of one species to a second species that has been fixed to a solid substrate. Both semiquantitative and quantitative assays are described. These methods have also been used to determine the nature of the adherence and molecules involved in mediating the interaction, to characterize potential inhibitors, to isolate the bacterial adhesins and receptors, and to isolate adherence-deficient mutant strains. Each of the assay systems offers different advantages, with significant variations in sensitivity. Selection of a particular assay system should depend on the goals of the study to be performed.

  9. Inactivation of Selected Bacterial Pathogens in Dairy Cattle Manure by Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion (Balloon Type Digester)

    PubMed Central

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Mamphweli, Sampson N.; Meyer, Edson L.; Okoh, Anthony I.; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manure in biogas digesters has shown promise as a technology in reducing the microbial load to safe and recommended levels. We sought to treat dairy manure obtained from the Fort Hare Dairy Farm by investigating the survival rates of bacterial pathogens, through a total viable plate count method, before, during and after mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Different microbiological media were inoculated with different serial dilutions of manure samples that were withdrawn from the biogas digester at 3, 7 and 14 day intervals to determine the viable cells. Data obtained indicated that the pathogens of public health importance were 90%–99% reduced in the order: Campylobacter sp. (18 days) < Escherichia coli sp. (62 days) < Salmonella sp. (133 days) from a viable count of 10.1 × 103, 3.6 × 105, 7.4 × 103 to concentrations below the detection limit (DL = 102 cfu/g manure), respectively. This disparity in survival rates may be influenced by the inherent characteristics of these bacteria, available nutrients as well as the stages of the anaerobic digestion process. In addition, the highest p-value i.e., 0.957 for E. coli showed the statistical significance of its model and the strongest correlation between its reductions with days of digestion. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that the specific bacterial pathogens in manure can be considerably reduced through anaerobic digestion after 133 days. PMID:25026086

  10. Reassessment of the Enteropathogenicity of Mesophilic Aeromonas Species

    PubMed Central

    Teunis, Peter; Figueras, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Cases of Aeromonas diarrhea have been described all over the world. The genus Aeromonas includes ca. 30 species, of which 10 have been isolated in association with gastroenteritis. The dominating species that account for ca. 96% of the identified strains are Aeromonas caviae, A. veronii, A. dhakensis, and A. hydrophila. However, the role of Aeromonas as a true enteropathogen has been questioned on the basis of the lack of outbreaks, the non-fulfillment of Koch’s postulates and the low numbers of acute illnesses in the only existing human challenge study. In the present study we reassess the enteropathogenicity of Aeromonas using dose response models for microbial infection and acute illness. The analysis uses the data from the human challenge study and additional data from selected outbreak investigations where the numbers exposed and the dose were reported, allowing their inclusion as “natural experiments”. In the challenge study several cases of asymptomatic shedding were found (26.3%, 15/57), however, only 3.5% (2/57) of those challenged with Aeromonas developed acute enteric symptoms (i.e., diarrhea). The “natural experiments” showed a much higher risk of illness associated with exposure to Aeromonas, even at moderate to low doses. The median dose required for 1% illness risk, was ~1.4 × 104 times higher in the challenge study (1.24 × 104 cfu) compared to natural exposure events (0.9 cfu). The dose response assessment presented in this study shows that the combined challenge and outbreak data are consistent with high infectivity of Aeromonas, and a wide range of susceptibility to acute enteric illness. To illustrate the outcomes, we simulate the risk associated with concentrations of Aeromonas found in different water and food matrices, indicating the disease burden potentially associated with these bacteria. In conclusion this study showed that Aeromonas is highly infectious, and that human susceptibility to illness may be high, similar to

  11. Thermal adaptation analyzed by comparison of protein sequences from mesophilic and extremely thermophilic Methanococcus species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, P. J.; Badger, J. H.; Buldak, G. L.; Reich, C. I.; Woese, C. R.; Olsen, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The genome sequence of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii provides a wealth of data on proteins from a thermophile. In this paper, sequences of 115 proteins from M. jannaschii are compared with their homologs from mesophilic Methanococcus species. Although the growth temperatures of the mesophiles are about 50 degrees C below that of M. jannaschii, their genomic G+C contents are nearly identical. The properties most correlated with the proteins of the thermophile include higher residue volume, higher residue hydrophobicity, more charged amino acids (especially Glu, Arg, and Lys), and fewer uncharged polar residues (Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln). These are recurring themes, with all trends applying to 83-92% of the proteins for which complete sequences were available. Nearly all of the amino acid replacements most significantly correlated with the temperature change are the same relatively conservative changes observed in all proteins, but in the case of the mesophile/thermophile comparison there is a directional bias. We identify 26 specific pairs of amino acids with a statistically significant (P < 0.01) preferred direction of replacement.

  12. Thermal adaptation analyzed by comparison of protein sequences from mesophilic and extremely thermophilic Methanococcus species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, P. J.; Badger, J. H.; Buldak, G. L.; Reich, C. I.; Woese, C. R.; Olsen, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The genome sequence of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii provides a wealth of data on proteins from a thermophile. In this paper, sequences of 115 proteins from M. jannaschii are compared with their homologs from mesophilic Methanococcus species. Although the growth temperatures of the mesophiles are about 50 degrees C below that of M. jannaschii, their genomic G+C contents are nearly identical. The properties most correlated with the proteins of the thermophile include higher residue volume, higher residue hydrophobicity, more charged amino acids (especially Glu, Arg, and Lys), and fewer uncharged polar residues (Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln). These are recurring themes, with all trends applying to 83-92% of the proteins for which complete sequences were available. Nearly all of the amino acid replacements most significantly correlated with the temperature change are the same relatively conservative changes observed in all proteins, but in the case of the mesophile/thermophile comparison there is a directional bias. We identify 26 specific pairs of amino acids with a statistically significant (P < 0.01) preferred direction of replacement.

  13. Thermal adaptation analyzed by comparison of protein sequences from mesophilic and extremely thermophilic Methanococcus species

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Paul J.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Buldak, Gerald L.; Reich, Claudia I.; Woese, Carl R.; Olsen, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    The genome sequence of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii provides a wealth of data on proteins from a thermophile. In this paper, sequences of 115 proteins from M. jannaschii are compared with their homologs from mesophilic Methanococcus species. Although the growth temperatures of the mesophiles are about 50°C below that of M. jannaschii, their genomic G+C contents are nearly identical. The properties most correlated with the proteins of the thermophile include higher residue volume, higher residue hydrophobicity, more charged amino acids (especially Glu, Arg, and Lys), and fewer uncharged polar residues (Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln). These are recurring themes, with all trends applying to 83–92% of the proteins for which complete sequences were available. Nearly all of the amino acid replacements most significantly correlated with the temperature change are the same relatively conservative changes observed in all proteins, but in the case of the mesophile/thermophile comparison there is a directional bias. We identify 26 specific pairs of amino acids with a statistically significant (P < 0.01) preferred direction of replacement. PMID:10097079

  14. Thermal adaptation analyzed by comparison of protein sequences from mesophilic and extremely thermophilic Methanococcus species.

    PubMed

    Haney, P J; Badger, J H; Buldak, G L; Reich, C I; Woese, C R; Olsen, G J

    1999-03-30

    The genome sequence of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii provides a wealth of data on proteins from a thermophile. In this paper, sequences of 115 proteins from M. jannaschii are compared with their homologs from mesophilic Methanococcus species. Although the growth temperatures of the mesophiles are about 50 degrees C below that of M. jannaschii, their genomic G+C contents are nearly identical. The properties most correlated with the proteins of the thermophile include higher residue volume, higher residue hydrophobicity, more charged amino acids (especially Glu, Arg, and Lys), and fewer uncharged polar residues (Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln). These are recurring themes, with all trends applying to 83-92% of the proteins for which complete sequences were available. Nearly all of the amino acid replacements most significantly correlated with the temperature change are the same relatively conservative changes observed in all proteins, but in the case of the mesophile/thermophile comparison there is a directional bias. We identify 26 specific pairs of amino acids with a statistically significant (P < 0.01) preferred direction of replacement.

  15. Comparative study of energy-transducing properties of cytoplasmic membranes from mesophilic and thermophilic Bacillus species.

    PubMed Central

    De Vrij, W; Bulthuis, R A; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    The properties of enzymes involved in energy transduction from a mesophilic (Bacillus subtilis) and a thermophilic (B. stearothermophilus) bacterium were compared. Membrane preparations of the two organisms contained dehydrogenases for NADH, succinate, L-alpha-glycerophosphate, and L-lactate. Maximum NADH and cytochrome c oxidation rates were obtained at the respective growth temperatures of the two bacteria. The enzymes involved in the oxidation reactions in membranes of the thermophilic species were more thermostable than those of the mesophilic species. The apparent microviscosities of the two membrane preparations were studied at different temperatures. At the respective optimal growth temperatures, the apparent microviscosities of the membranes of the two organisms were remarkably similar. The transition from the gel to the liquid-crystalline state occurred at different temperatures in the two species. In the two species, the oxidation of physiological (NADH) and nonphysiological (N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine or phenazine methosulfate) electron donors led to generation of a proton motive force which varied strongly with temperature. At increasing temperatures, the efficiency of energy transduction declined because of increasing H+ permeability. At the growth temperature, the efficiency of energy transduction was lower in B. stearothermophilus than in the mesophilic species. Extremely high respiratory activities enabled B. stearothermophilus to maintain a high proton motive force at elevated temperatures. The pH dependence of proton motive force generation appeared to be similar in the two membrane preparations. The highest proton motive forces were generated at low external pH, mainly because of a high pH gradient. At increasing external pH, the proton motive force declined. PMID:2834342

  16. Temperature adaptation at homologous sites in proteins from nine thermophile-mesophile species pairs.

    PubMed

    McDonald, John H

    2010-07-12

    Whether particular amino acids are favored by selection at high temperatures over others has long been an open question in protein evolution. One way to approach this question is to compare homologous sites in proteins from one thermophile and a closely related mesophile; asymmetrical substitution patterns have been taken as evidence for selection favoring certain amino acids over others. However, most pairs of prokaryotic species that differ in optimum temperature also differ in genome-wide GC content, and amino acid content is known to be associated with GC content. Here, I compare homologous sites in nine thermophilic prokaryotes and their mesophilic relatives, all with complete published genome sequences. After adjusting for the effects of differing GC content with logistic regression, 139 of the 190 pairs of amino acids show significant substitutional asymmetry, evidence of widespread adaptive amino acid substitution. The patterns are fairly consistent across the nine pairs of species (after taking the effects of differing GC content into account), suggesting that much of the asymmetry results from adaptation to temperature. Some amino acids in some species pairs deviate from the overall pattern in ways indicating that adaptation to other environmental or physiological differences between the species may also play a role. The property that is best correlated with the patterns of substitutional asymmetry is transfer free energy, a measure of hydrophobicity, with more hydrophobic amino acids favored at higher temperatures. The correlation of asymmetry and hydrophobicity is fairly weak, suggesting that other properties may also be important.

  17. Bacterial Diversity and Sulfur Cycling in a Mesophilic Sulfide-Rich Spring

    PubMed Central

    Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Senko, John M.; Najar, Fares Z.; Kenton, Stephen M.; Roe, Bruce A.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Spear, John R.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2003-01-01

    representatives from cultures. Overall, this work expands the division-level diversity of the bacterial domain and highlights the complexity of microbial communities involved in sulfur cycling in mesophilic microbial mats. PMID:12957951

  18. Influence of Thermal and Bacterial Pretreatment of Microalgae on Biogas Production in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, Beti; Marinšek Logar, Romana; Panjičko, Mario; Fanedl, Lijana

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae biomass has a great potential in search for new alternative energy sources. They can be used as a substrate for the biogas production in anaerobic digestion. When using microalgae, the efficiency of this process is hampered due to the resistant cell wall. In order to accelerate the hydrolysis of cell wall and increase the efficiency of biogas production we applied two different pretreatments - biological and thermal under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. During biological pretreatment we incubated microalgae with anaerobic hydrolytic bacteria Pseudobutyrivibrio xylanivorans Mz5T. In thermal pretreatment we incubated microalgae at 90 °C. We also tested a combined thermal and biological pretreatment in which we incubated P. xylanivorans Mz5T with thermally pretreated microalgae. Thermal pretreatment in mesophilic and thermophilic process has increased methane production by 21% and 6%, respectively. Biological pretreatment of microalgae has increased methane production by 13%, but only under thermophilic conditions (pretreatment under mesophilic conditions showed no effect on methane production). Thermal-biological pretreatment increased methane production by 12% under thermophilic conditions and by 6% under mesophilic conditions.

  19. Low-temperature (9 degrees C) AMD treatment in a sulfidogenic bioreactor dominated by a mesophilic Desulfomicrobium species.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Hannele; Nevatalo, Laura M; Kaksonen, Anna H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2009-11-01

    The possibilities for the treatment of low-temperature mine waste waters have not been widely studied. The amenability of low-temperature sulfate reduction for mine waste water treatment at 9 degrees C was studied in a bench-scale fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR). Formate was used as the electron and carbon source. The first influent for the FBR was acidic, synthetic waste water containing iron, nutrients, and sulfate, followed by diluted barren bioleaching solution (DBBS). The average sulfate reduction rates were 8 mmol L(-1) day(-1) and 6 mmol L(-1) day(-1) with synthetic waste water and DBBS, respectively. The corresponding specific activities were 2.4 and 1.6 mmol SO(4)(2-) g VSS(-1) day(-1), respectively. The composition of the microbial community and the active species of the FBR was analyzed by extracting the DNA and RNA, followed by PCR-DGGE with the universal bacterial 16S rRNA gene primers and dsrB-primers specific for sulfate-reducing bacteria. The FBR microbial community was simple and stable and the dominant and active species belonged to the genus Desulfomicrobium. In summary, long-term operation of a low-temperature bioreactor resulted in enrichment of formate-utilizing, psychrotolerant mesophilic sulfate reducing bacteria. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A mesophilic Clostridium species that produces butanol from monosaccharides and hydrogen from polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Bramono, Sandhi Eko; Lam, Yuen Sean; Ong, Say Leong; He, Jianzhong

    2011-10-01

    A unique mesophilic Clostridium species strain BOH3 is obtained in this study, which is capable of fermenting monosaccharides to produce butanol and hydrolyzing polysaccharides to produce hydrogen (H(2)) and volatile fatty acids (VFAs). From 30 g/L of glucose and xylose each, batch culture BOH3 was able to produce 4.67 and 4.63 g/L of butanol. Enhancement treatments by increasing the inoculated cells improved butanol production to 7.05 and 7.41 g/L, respectively. Hydrogen production (2.47 and 1.93 mmol) was observed when cellulose and xylan (10 g/L each) were used, suggesting that strain BOH3 possesses xylanolytic and cellulolytic capabilities. These unique features reveal the strain's novelty as most wild-type solventogenic strains have not been reported to have such properties. Therefore, culture BOH3 is promising in generating butanol and hydrogen from renewable feedstock.

  1. Survival of model bacterial strains and helminth eggs in the course of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Juris, P; Tóth, F; Lauková, A; Plachý, P; Dubinský, P; Sokol, J

    1996-05-01

    The effect of methanogenesis on the survival of model bacterial strains (Escherichia coli EC 5, Staphylococcus aureus SA 11, Enterococcus faecium CCM 4231) and non-embryonated helminth eggs (Ascaris suum) was investigated in pig slurry. Two pilot-plant experiments were carried out in two anaerobic digesters (800 and 1,000 litre) in a mesophilic thermal range (35-37 degrees C). The mean hydraulic retention time of the digesters was 20 days. The methanogenesis process was monitored by determining the following chemical parameters: pH, N-NH3, total dry matter (kg/day), organic matter (kg/day) production of methane by supplied and degraded organic matter (m3/kg). The results obtained allow us to state that the anaerobic stabilization of pig slurry in the mesophilic temperature range resulted in total devitalization of model bacterial strains E. coli EC 5 and Ent. faecium CCM 4231. St. aureus SA 11 cells, exposed to the above mentioned conditions, were also reduced in their number from 10.04 to 3.27 and from 8.69 to 2.77 log cfu/ml. It is assumed that the longer retention time of excrements in the digester could also result in total devitalization of St. aureus SA 11 cells. From the microbiological point of view, the above mentioned facts indicate a sufficient hygienization effect of the anaerobic fermentation on the contaminated pig excrements. The survival of A. suum eggs was little affected by the 20-day anaerobic mesophilic digestion of pig slurry. Only 17 or 18% (F1, F2) of the non-embryonated A. suum eggs were damaged after the 20-day exposure.

  2. Temperature Sensitivity Conferred by ligA Alleles from Psychrophilic Bacteria upon Substitution in Mesophilic Bacteria and a Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Jarosław A.; Puckett, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a collection of 13 psychrophilic ligA alleles that can serve as genetic elements for engineering mesophiles to a temperature-sensitive (TS) phenotype. When these ligA alleles were substituted into Francisella novicida, they conferred a TS phenotype with restrictive temperatures between 33 and 39°C. When the F. novicida ligA hybrid strains were plated above their restrictive temperatures, eight of them generated temperature-resistant variants. For two alleles, the mutations that led to temperature resistance clustered near the 5′ end of the gene, and the mutations increased the predicted strength of the ribosome binding site at least 3-fold. Four F. novicida ligA hybrid strains generated no temperature-resistant variants at a detectable level. These results suggest that multiple mutations are needed to create temperature-resistant variants of these ligA gene products. One ligA allele was isolated from a Colwellia species that has a maximal growth temperature of 12°C, and this allele supported growth of F. novicida only as a hybrid between the psychrophilic and the F. novicida ligA genes. However, the full psychrophilic gene alone supported the growth of Salmonella enterica, imparting a restrictive temperature of 27°C. We also tested two ligA alleles from two Pseudoalteromonas strains for their ability to support the viability of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that lacked its essential gene, CDC9, encoding an ATP-dependent DNA ligase. In both cases, the psychrophilic bacterial alleles supported yeast viability and their expression generated TS phenotypes. This collection of ligA alleles should be useful in engineering bacteria, and possibly eukaryotic microbes, to predictable TS phenotypes. PMID:26773080

  3. The formation of illite from nontronite by mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Eberl, D.D.; Dong, H.; Kim, J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of illite through the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction is considered to be one of the most important mineral reactions occurring during diagenesis. In biologically catalyzed systems, however, this transformation has been suggested to be rapid and to bypass the high temperature and long time requirements. To understand the factors that promote the S-I reaction, the present study focused on the effects of pH, temperature, solution chemistry, and aging on the S-I reaction in microbially mediated systems. Fe(III)-reduction experiments were performed in both growth and non-growth media with two types of bacteria: mesophilic (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) and thermophilic (Thermus scotoductus SA-01). Reductive dissolution of NAu-2 was observed and the formation of illite in treatment with thermophilic SA-01 was indicated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A basic pH (8.4) and high temperature (65??C) were the most favorable conditions forthe formation of illite. A long incubation time was also found to enhance the formation of illite. K-nontronite (non-permanent fixation of K) was also detected and differentiated from the discrete illite in the XRD profiles. These results collectively suggested that the formation of illite associated with the biologically catalyzed smectite-to-illite reaction pathway may bypass the prolonged time and high temperature required for the S-I reaction in the absence of microbial activity.

  4. Shifts in bacterial and archaeal community structures during the batch biomethanation of Ulva biomass under mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaai; Jung, Heejung; Lee, Changsoo

    2014-10-01

    Mesophilic biomethanation of Ulva biomass was performed in a batch bioreactor, and a high organic removal of 77% was obtained on the basis of chemical oxygen demand (COD) after a month of operation. The estimated methane yield was 0.43 ± 0.02 L CH4/g COD(removed) which is close to the theoretical methane potential. Transitions of bacterial and archaeal community structures, associated with process performance data, were investigated using a combination of molecular fingerprinting and biostatistical tools. During the operation, archaeal community structure had no significant changes while bacterial community structure shifted continuously and dynamically. The reactor completely stabilized volatile fatty acids (primarily acetate and propionate) accumulated from the acidogenesis phase, with Methanosaeta- and Methanolinea-related microbes respectively being the main aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Methanolinea- and Syntrophobacter-related populations were likely the key members to form a syntrophic propionate-degrading consortium. A Methanolinea-related population was likely the dominant methane producer in the experimental reactor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. From mesophilic to thermophilic digestion: the transitions of anaerobic bacterial, archaeal, and fungal community structures in sludge and manure samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weimin; Yu, Guangwei; Louie, Tiffany; Liu, Tong; Zhu, Chengsheng; Xue, Gang; Gao, Pin

    2015-12-01

    The shift of microbial communities during a transition from mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) to thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD) was characterized in two treatments. One treatment was inoculated with sludge and the other was inoculated with manure. In this study, methane was produced both in MAD and TAD, but TAD has slightly more methane produced than MAD. A broad phylogenetic spectrum of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal taxa at thermophilic conditions was detected. Coprothermobacter, Bacillus, Haloplasma, Clostridiisalibacter, Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter, Saccharomycetales, Candida, Alternaria, Cladosporium, and Penicillium were found almost exclusively in TAD, suggesting their adaptation to thermophilic conditions and ecological roles in digesting the organic compounds. The characterization of the lesser-known fungal community revealed that fungi probably constituted an important portion of the overall community within TAD and contributed to this process by degrading complex organic compounds. The shift of the microbial communities between MAD and TAD implied that temperature drastically affected the microbial diversity in anaerobic digestion. In addition, the difference in microbial communities between sludge and manure indicated that different source of inoculum also affected the microbial diversity and community.

  6. Genomic Characterization of Dairy Associated Leuconostoc Species and Diversity of Leuconostocs in Undefined Mixed Mesophilic Starter Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Frantzen, Cyril A.; Kot, Witold; Pedersen, Thomas B.; Ardö, Ylva M.; Broadbent, Jeff R.; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H.; Dal Bello, Fabio; Østlie, Hilde M.; Kleppen, Hans P.; Vogensen, Finn K.; Holo, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Undefined mesophilic mixed (DL-type) starter cultures are composed of predominantly Lactococcus lactis subspecies and 1–10% Leuconostoc spp. The composition of the Leuconostoc population in the starter culture ultimately affects the characteristics and the quality of the final product. The scientific basis for the taxonomy of dairy relevant leuconostocs can be traced back 50 years, and no documentation on the genomic diversity of leuconostocs in starter cultures exists. We present data on the Leuconostoc population in five DL-type starter cultures commonly used by the dairy industry. The analyses were performed using traditional cultivation methods, and further augmented by next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Bacterial counts for starter cultures cultivated on two different media, MRS and MPCA, revealed large differences in the relative abundance of leuconostocs. Most of the leuconostocs in two of the starter cultures were unable to grow on MRS, emphasizing the limitations of culture-based methods and the importance of careful media selection or use of culture independent methods. Pan-genomic analysis of 59 Leuconostoc genomes enabled differentiation into twelve robust lineages. The genomic analyses show that the dairy-associated leuconostocs are highly adapted to their environment, characterized by the acquisition of genotype traits, such as the ability to metabolize citrate. In particular, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris display telltale signs of a degenerative evolution, likely resulting from a long period of growth in milk in association with lactococci. Great differences in the metabolic potential between Leuconostoc species and subspecies were revealed. Using targeted amplicon sequencing, the composition of the Leuconostoc population in the five commercial starter cultures was shown to be significantly different. Three of the cultures were dominated by Ln. mesenteroides subspecies cremoris. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides dominated in two of

  7. Genomic Characterization of Dairy Associated Leuconostoc Species and Diversity of Leuconostocs in Undefined Mixed Mesophilic Starter Cultures.

    PubMed

    Frantzen, Cyril A; Kot, Witold; Pedersen, Thomas B; Ardö, Ylva M; Broadbent, Jeff R; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H; Dal Bello, Fabio; Østlie, Hilde M; Kleppen, Hans P; Vogensen, Finn K; Holo, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Undefined mesophilic mixed (DL-type) starter cultures are composed of predominantly Lactococcus lactis subspecies and 1-10% Leuconostoc spp. The composition of the Leuconostoc population in the starter culture ultimately affects the characteristics and the quality of the final product. The scientific basis for the taxonomy of dairy relevant leuconostocs can be traced back 50 years, and no documentation on the genomic diversity of leuconostocs in starter cultures exists. We present data on the Leuconostoc population in five DL-type starter cultures commonly used by the dairy industry. The analyses were performed using traditional cultivation methods, and further augmented by next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Bacterial counts for starter cultures cultivated on two different media, MRS and MPCA, revealed large differences in the relative abundance of leuconostocs. Most of the leuconostocs in two of the starter cultures were unable to grow on MRS, emphasizing the limitations of culture-based methods and the importance of careful media selection or use of culture independent methods. Pan-genomic analysis of 59 Leuconostoc genomes enabled differentiation into twelve robust lineages. The genomic analyses show that the dairy-associated leuconostocs are highly adapted to their environment, characterized by the acquisition of genotype traits, such as the ability to metabolize citrate. In particular, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris display telltale signs of a degenerative evolution, likely resulting from a long period of growth in milk in association with lactococci. Great differences in the metabolic potential between Leuconostoc species and subspecies were revealed. Using targeted amplicon sequencing, the composition of the Leuconostoc population in the five commercial starter cultures was shown to be significantly different. Three of the cultures were dominated by Ln. mesenteroides subspecies cremoris. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides dominated in two of the

  8. Monitoring bacterial and archaeal community shifts in a mesophilic anaerobic batch reactor treating a high-strength organic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2008-09-01

    Shifts in bacterial and archaeal communities, associated with changes in chemical profiles, were investigated in an anaerobic batch reactor treating dairy-processing wastewater prepared with whey permeate powder. The dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations were monitored by quantitative real-time PCR and showed good agreement with the process data. A rapid increase in bacterial populations and a high rate of substrate fermentation were observed during the initial period. Growth and regrowth of archaeal populations occurred with biphasic production of methane, corresponding to the diauxic consumption of acetate and propionate. Bacterial community structure was examined by denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes. An Aeromonas-like organism was suggested to be mainly responsible for the rapid fermentation of carbohydrate during the initial period. Several band sequences closely related to the Clostridium species, capable of carbohydrate fermentation, lactate or ethanol fermentation, and/or homoacetogenesis, were also detected. Statistical analyses of the DGGE profiles showed that the bacterial community structure, as well as the process performance, varied with the incubation time. Our results demonstrated that the bacterial community shifted, reflecting the performance changes and, particularly, that a significant community shift corresponded to a considerable process event. This suggested that the diagnosis of an anaerobic digestion process could be possible by monitoring bacterial community shifts.

  9. Bacillus acidicola sp. nov., a novel mesophilic, acidophilic species isolated from acidic Sphagnum peat bogs in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Albert, Richard A; Archambault, Julieta; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Tindall, Brian J; Matheny, Mike

    2005-09-01

    A mesophilic, acidophilic, spore-forming bacterium, strain 105-2(T), was isolated from an acidic Sphagnum peat bog in Wisconsin, USA. Strain 105-2(T) has 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Bacillus sporothermodurans DSM 10599(T) and Bacillus oleronius DSM 9356(T) of 97.4 and 97.8%, respectively. The primary lipoquinone is MK-7 and the major fatty acids are 15:0 iso, 15:0 anteiso and 17:0 anteiso. The predominant polar lipids were found to be diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and a glycolipid. The DNA G+C content was found to be 43.2 mol%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular analyses identified strain 105-2(T) as a novel Bacillus species, for which the name Bacillus acidicola is proposed. The type strain is 105-2(T) (=DSM 14745(T)=ATCC BAA-366(T)=NRRL B-23453(T)).

  10. Effect of increased load of high-strength food wastewater in thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge on bacterial community structure.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Min; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Young Mo; Park, Jong Moon

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, anaerobic co-digestion (AcoD) has been widely used to improve reactor performance, especially methane production. In this study, we applied two different operating temperatures (thermophilic and mesophilic) and gradually increased the load of food wastewater (FWW) to investigate the bacterial communities during the AcoD of waste activated sludge (WAS) and FWW. As the load of FWW was increased, methane production rate (MPR; L CH4/L d) and methane content (%) in both Thermophilic AcoD (TAcoD) and Mesophilic AcoD (MAcoD) increased significantly; the highest MPR and methane content in TAcoD (1.423 L CH4/L d and 68.24%) and MAcoD (1.233 L CH4/L d and 65.21%) were observed when the FWW mixing ratio was 75%. However, MPR and methane yield in both reactors decreased markedly and methane production in TAcoD ceased completely when only FWW was fed into the reactor, resulting from acidification of the reactor caused by accumulation of organic acids. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed a decrease in bacterial diversity in TAcoD and a markedly different composition of bacterial communities between TAcoD and MAcoD with an increase in FWW load. For example, Bacterial members belonging to two genera Petrotoga (assigned to phylum Thermotogae) and Petrimonas (assigned to phylum Bacteroidetes) became dominant in TAcoD and MAcoD with an increase in FWW load, respectively. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) results showed higher bacterial and archaeal populations (expressed as 16S rRNA gene concentration) in TAcoD than MAcoD with an increase in FWW load and showed maximum population when the FWW mixing ratio was 75% in both reactors. Collectively, this study demonstrated the dynamics of key bacterial communities in TAcoD and MAcoD, which were highly affected by the load of FWW.

  11. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Draft genome sequence of Mesotoga strain PhosAC3, a mesophilic member of the bacterial order Thermotogales, isolated from a digestor treating phosphogypsum in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Hania, Wajdi; Fadhlaoui, Khaled; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Persillon, Cécile; Postec, Anne; Hamdi, Moktar; Dolla, Alain; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Le Mer, Jean; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Mesotoga strain PhosAc3 was the first mesophilic cultivated member of the order Thermotogales. This genus currently contain two described species, M. prima and M. infera. Strain PhosAc3, isolated from a Tunisian digestor treating phosphogypsum, is phylogenetically closely related to M. prima strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T). Strain PhosAc3 has a genome of 3.1 Mb with a G+C content of 45.2%. It contains 3,051 protein-coding genes of which 74.6% have their best reciprocal BLAST hit in the genome of the type species, strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T). For this reason we propose to assign strain PhosAc3 as a novel ecotype of the Mesotoga prima species. However, in contrast with the M. prima type strain, (i) it does not ferment sugars but uses them only in the presence of elemental sulfur as terminal electron acceptor, (ii) it produces only acetate and CO2 from sugars, whereas strain MesG1.Ag.4.2(T) produces acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate, 2-methyl-butyrate and (iii) sulfides are also end products of the elemental sulfur reduction in theses growth conditions.

  13. Eradication of bacterial species via photosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Paul S.; Maddocks, L.; King, Terence A.; Drucker, D. B.

    1999-02-01

    Photosensitization and inactivation efficacy of three bacterial species: Prevotella nigrescens, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli have been investigated. Samples of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were treated with the triphenylmethane dye malachite green isothiocyanate and exposed to light from a variety of continuous and pulsed light sauces at a wavelength of approximately 630 nm. Inactivation of the Gram-positive species Staphylococcus aureus was found to increase with radiation dose, whilst Gram-negative Escherichia coli was resistant to such treatment. Samples of the pigmented species Prevotella nigrescens were found to be inactivated by exposure to light alone. The mechanism of photosensitization and inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus with malachite green isothiocyanate is addressed. The possible roles of the excited triplet state of the photosensitizer, the involvement of molecular oxygen, and the bacterial cell wall are discussed. Photosensitization may provide a way of eliminating naturally pigmented species responsible for a variety of infections, including oral diseases such as gingivitis and periodontitis.

  14. Bacterial Responses to Reactive Chlorine Species

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael J.; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research. PMID:23768204

  15. Bacterial responses to reactive chlorine species.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the active ingredient of household bleach, is the most common disinfectant in medical, industrial, and domestic use and plays an important role in microbial killing in the innate immune system. Given the critical importance of the antimicrobial properties of chlorine to public health, it is surprising how little is known about the ways in which bacteria sense and respond to reactive chlorine species (RCS). Although the literature on bacterial responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enormous, work addressing bacterial responses to RCS has begun only recently. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies now provide new insights into how bacteria mount defenses against this important class of antimicrobial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, emphasizing the overlaps between RCS stress responses and other more well-characterized bacterial defense systems, and identify outstanding questions that represent productive avenues for future research.

  16. Characterization and comparative analysis of psychrophilic and mesophilic alpha-amylases from Euplotes species: a contribution to the understanding of enzyme thermal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Yang, Guang; Aprile, Lino; Turturo, Vincenzo; Pucciarelli, Sandra; Pucciarelli, Stefania; Miceli, Cristina

    2013-09-06

    The eukaryotic α-amylase isolated from the psychrophilic ciliated protozoon Euplotes focardii (EfAmy) was expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. Its enzymatic activity was compared to that of the homologous protein from the mesophilic congeneric species Euplotes crassus (EcAmy). The comparison of the amino acid composition and the surface residue composition of the two enzymes indicated a preference for tiny residues and the avoidance of charged, aromatic and hydrophobic residues in EfAmy. Our comparative homology modeling study reveals a lack of surface salt bridges, a decreased number of the surface charged residues, decreased hydrogen bonds and bound ions, and a reduction of aromatic-sulfur interactions, cationic-π interactions and disulfide interactions in EfAmy. In contrast, sequence alignment and homology modeling showed five unconserved prolines located on the surface loops of EcAmy. By analyzing amylolytic activity towards soluble starch as the substrate, we determined the temperature and pH dependence, thermostability and kinetic parameters of these two enzymes. We demonstrated that EfAmy shows the characteristics of a psychrophilic α-amylase, such as the highest hydrolytic activity at low temperatures and high thermolability. In contrast, the EcAmy showed mesophilic characteristics with the highest activity at moderate temperatures and a more than 2-fold increased half-life at 50°C compared to EfAmy. The kcat and KM values of EfAmy were higher than those of the mesophilic EcAmy at all tested temperatures. Furthermore, both EfAmy and EcAmy showed maximum activities at pH 9 and maintained high activities in the presence of surfactants. These results suggest the potential applications of EfAmy and EcAmy as ingredients in detergents for industrial applications.

  17. Cross- species communication in bacterial world.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sarangam; Pal, Sukla

    2017-02-20

    Biofilms are the compact association of micro organisms and the communication processes in these biofilms are always a wonder. Electrical and chemical signaling mechanism are the key to understand the bacterial communication network. Quorum sensing so far has been able to explain the coordinated motion of bacteria through its chemical signaling mechanism. Bacteria residing within biofilm communities are trivial to communicate. But the recent observation in 2017 by Humphries et al. has revealed that the ion channels enabled electrical signaling mechanism can be as powerful as to attract the distant cells i.e., this signaling mechanism are capable of holding a long range behavior. As a result long range cross species communication in the bacterial world have been possible. This substantial outcome has brought this field into a new paradigm to investigate the complex co-existence of biofilm communities and distant cells with a possible scope of application in synthetic biology. In this present article, we briefly describe this new signaling mechanism and how it gives rise to a long range communication ability in bacterial communities.

  18. Bacterial Community Diversity Harboured by Interacting Species

    PubMed Central

    Bili, Mikaël; Cortesero, Anne Marie; Mougel, Christophe; Gauthier, Jean Pierre; Ermel, Gwennola; Simon, Jean Christophe; Outreman, Yannick; Terrat, Sébastien; Mahéo, Frédérique; Poinsot, Denis

    2016-01-01

    All animals are infected by microbial partners that can be passengers or residents and influence many biological traits of their hosts. Even if important factors that structure the composition and abundance of microbial communities within and among host individuals have been recently described, such as diet, developmental stage or phylogeny, few studies have conducted cross-taxonomic comparisons, especially on host species related by trophic relationships. Here, we describe and compare the microbial communities associated with the cabbage root fly Delia radicum and its three major parasitoids: the two staphylinid beetles Aleochara bilineata and A. bipustulata and the hymenopteran parasitoid Trybliographa rapae. For each species, two populations from Western France were sampled and microbial communities were described through culture independent methods (454 pyrosequencing). Each sample harbored at least 59 to 261 different bacterial phylotypes but was strongly dominated by one or two. Microbial communities differed markedly in terms of composition and abundance, being mainly influenced by phylogenetic proximity but also geography to a minor extent. Surprisingly, despite their strong trophic interaction, parasitoids shared a very low proportion of microbial partners with their insect host. Three vertically transmitted symbionts from the genus Wolbachia, Rickettsia, and Spiroplasma were found in this study. Among them, Wolbachia and Spiroplasma were found in both the cabbage fly and at least one of its parasitoids, which could result from horizontal transfers through trophic interactions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this hypothesis may explain some but not all cases. More work is needed to understand the dynamics of symbiotic associations within trophic network and the effect of these bacterial communities on the fitness of their hosts. PMID:27258532

  19. The contribution of species richness and composition to bacterial services.

    PubMed

    Bell, Thomas; Newman, Jonathan A; Silverman, Bernard W; Turner, Sarah L; Lilley, Andrew K

    2005-08-25

    Bacterial communities provide important services. They break down pollutants, municipal waste and ingested food, and they are the primary means by which organic matter is recycled to plants and other autotrophs. However, the processes that determine the rate at which these services are supplied are only starting to be identified. Biodiversity influences the way in which ecosystems function, but the form of the relationship between bacterial biodiversity and functioning remains poorly understood. Here we describe a manipulative experiment that measured how biodiversity affects the functioning of communities containing up to 72 bacterial species constructed from a collection of naturally occurring culturable bacteria. The experimental design allowed us to manipulate large numbers of bacterial species selected at random from those that were culturable. We demonstrate that there is a decelerating relationship between community respiration and increasing bacterial diversity. We also show that both synergistic interactions among bacterial species and the composition of the bacterial community are important in determining the level of ecosystem functioning.

  20. EXPLOSIVE RADIATION OF A BACTERIAL SPECIES GROUP

    PubMed Central

    Morlon, Hélène; Kemps, Brian D.; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The current diversity of life on earth is the product of macroevolutionary processes that have shaped the dynamics of diversification. Although the tempo of diversification has been studied extensively in macroorganisms, much less is known about the rates of diversification in the exceedingly diverse and species-rich microbiota. Decreases in diversification rates over time, a signature of explosive radiations, are commonly observed in plant and animal lineages. However, the few existing analyses of microbial lineages suggest that the tempo of diversification in prokaryotes may be fundamentally different. Here, we use multilocus and genomic sequence data to test hypotheses about the rate of diversification in a well-studied pathogenic bacterial lineage, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (sl). Our analyses support the hypothesis that an explosive radiation of lineages occurred near the origin of the clade, followed by a sharp decay in diversification rates. These results suggest that explosive radiations may be a general feature of evolutionary history across the tree of life. PMID:22834754

  1. Occurrence and molecular characterization of cultivable mesophilic and thermophilic obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from paper mills.

    PubMed

    Suihko, Maija-Liisa; Partanen, Laila; Mattila-Sandholm, Tiina; Raaska, Laura

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the cultivable obligate anaerobic bacterial population in paper mill environments. A total of 177 anaerobically grown bacterial isolates were screened for aerotolerance, from which 67 obligate anaerobes were characterized by automated ribotyping and 41 were further identified by partial 16S rDNA sequencing. The mesophilic isolates indicated 11 different taxa (species) within the genus Clostridium and the thermophilic isolates four taxa within the genus Thermoanaerobacterium and one within Thermoanaerobacter (both formerly Clostridium). The most widespread mesophilic bacterium was closely related to C. magnum and occurred in three of four mills. One mill was contaminated with a novel mesophilic bacterium most closely related to C. thiosulfatireducens. The most common thermophile was T. thermosaccharolyticum, occurring in all four mills. The genetic relationships of the mill isolates to described species indicated that most of them are potential members of new species. On the basis of identical ribotypes clay could be identified to be the contamination source of thermophilic bacteria. Automated ribotyping can be a useful tool for the identification of clostridia as soon as comprehensive identification libraries are available.

  2. Deinococcus budaensis sp. nov., a mesophilic species isolated from a biofilm sample of a hydrothermal spring cave.

    PubMed

    Makk, Judit; Tóth, Erika M; Anda, Dóra; Pál, Sára; Schumann, Peter; Kovács, Attila L; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2016-12-01

    Following the exposure of a biofilm sample from a hydrothermal spring cave (Gellért Hill, Budapest, Hungary) to gamma radiation, a strain designated FeSTC15-38T was isolated and studied by polyphasic taxonomic methods. The spherical-shaped cells stained Gram-negative, and were aerobic and non-motile. The pH range for growth was pH 6.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0. The temperature range for growth was 20-37 °C, with an optimum at 28 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. The highest sequence similarities appeared with Deinococcus hopiensis KR-140T (94.1 %), Deinococcus aquaticus PB314T (93.3 %) and Deinococcus aerophilus 5516T-11T (92.7 %). The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 68.2 mol%. The predominant fatty acids (>10 %) were iso-C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c, and the cell-wall peptidoglycan type was A3β l-Orn-Gly2-3, corroborating the assignment of the strain to the genus Deinococcus. Strain FeSTC15-38T contained MK-8 as the major menaquinone and several unidentified phospholipids, glycolipids and phosphoglycolipids. Resistance to gamma radiation (D10) of strain FeSTC15-38T was <3.0 kGy. According to phenotypic and genotypic data, strain FeSTC15-38T represents a novel species for which the name Deinococcus budaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FeSTC15-38T (=NCAIM B.02630T=DSM 101791T).

  3. Full-scale mesophilic biogas plants using manure as C-source: bacterial community shifts along the process cause changes in the abundance of resistance genes and mobile genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Birgit; Ding, Guo-Chun; Kreuzig, Robert; Smalla, Kornelia

    2016-02-01

    The application of manure, typically harboring bacteria carrying resistance genes (RGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs), as co-substrate in biogas plants (BGPs) might be critical when digestates are used as fertilizers. In the present study, the relative abundance of RGs and MGEs in total community (TC-) DNA from manure, fermenters and digestate samples taken at eight full-scale BGPs co-fermenting manure were determined by real-time PCR. In addition, the bacterial community composition of all digestates as well as manure and fermenter material from one BGP (BGP3) was characterized by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons from TC-DNA. Compared to respective input manures, relative abundances determined for sul1, sul2, tet(M), tet(Q), intI1, qacEΔ1, korB and traN were significantly lower in fermenters, whereas relative abundances of tet(W) were often higher in fermenters. The bacterial communities in all digestates were dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes while Proteobacteria were low in abundance and no Enterobacteriaceae were detected. High-throughput sequencing revealed shifts in bacterial communities during treatment for BGP3. Although in comparison to manure, digestate bacteria had lower relative abundances of RGs and MGEs except for tet(W), mesophilic BGPs seem not to be effective for prevention of the spread of RGs and MGEs via digestates into arable soils. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Substrate Type and Free Ammonia Determine Bacterial Community Structure in Full-Scale Mesophilic Anaerobic Digesters Treating Cattle or Swine Manure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiabao; Rui, Junpeng; Yao, Minjie; Zhang, Shiheng; Yan, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuanpeng; Yan, Zhiying; Li, Xiangzhen

    2015-01-01

    The microbial-mediated anaerobic digestion (AD) process represents an efficient biological process for the treatment of organic waste along with biogas harvest. Currently, the key factors structuring bacterial communities and the potential core and unique bacterial populations in manure anaerobic digesters are not completely elucidated yet. In this study, we collected sludge samples from 20 full-scale anaerobic digesters treating cattle or swine manure, and investigated the variations of bacterial community compositions using high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Clustering and correlation analysis suggested that substrate type and free ammonia (FA) play key roles in determining the bacterial community structure. The COD: NH4+-N (C:N) ratio of substrate and FA were the most important available operational parameters correlating to the bacterial communities in cattle and swine manure digesters, respectively. The bacterial populations in all of the digesters were dominated by phylum Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi. Increased FA content selected Firmicutes, suggesting that they probably play more important roles under high FA content. Syntrophic metabolism by Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Synergistetes and Planctomycetes are likely inhibited when FA content is high. Despite the different manure substrates, operational conditions and geographical locations of digesters, core bacterial communities were identified. The core communities were best characterized by phylum Firmicutes, wherein Clostridium predominated overwhelmingly. Substrate-unique and abundant communities may reflect the properties of manure substrate and operational conditions. These findings extend our current understanding of the bacterial assembly in full-scale manure anaerobic digesters. PMID:26648921

  5. Bacterial acquisition in juveniles of several broadcast spawning coral species.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Koty H; Ritchie, Kim B; Schupp, Peter J; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J

    2010-05-28

    Coral animals harbor diverse microorganisms in their tissues, including archaea, bacteria, viruses, and zooxanthellae. The extent to which coral-bacterial associations are specific and the mechanisms for their maintenance across generations in the environment are unknown. The high diversity of bacteria in adult coral colonies has made it challenging to identify species-specific patterns. Localization of bacteria in gametes and larvae of corals presents an opportunity for determining when bacterial-coral associations are initiated and whether they are dynamic throughout early development. This study focuses on the early onset of bacterial associations in the mass spawning corals Montastraea annularis, M. franksi, M. faveolata, Acropora palmata, A. cervicornis, Diploria strigosa, and A. humilis. The presence of bacteria and timing of bacterial colonization was evaluated in gametes, swimming planulae, and newly settled polyps by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using general eubacterial probes and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The coral species investigated in this study do not appear to transmit bacteria via their gametes, and bacteria are not detectable in or on the corals until after settlement and metamorphosis. This study suggests that mass-spawning corals do not acquire, or are not colonized by, detectable numbers of bacteria until after larval settlement and development of the juvenile polyp. This timing lays the groundwork for developing and testing new hypotheses regarding general regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial colonization and infection of corals, and how interactions among bacteria and juvenile polyps influence the structure of bacterial assemblages in corals.

  6. Bacterial Acquisition in Juveniles of Several Broadcast Spawning Coral Species

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Koty H.; Ritchie, Kim B.; Schupp, Peter J.; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J.

    2010-01-01

    Coral animals harbor diverse microorganisms in their tissues, including archaea, bacteria, viruses, and zooxanthellae. The extent to which coral-bacterial associations are specific and the mechanisms for their maintenance across generations in the environment are unknown. The high diversity of bacteria in adult coral colonies has made it challenging to identify species-specific patterns. Localization of bacteria in gametes and larvae of corals presents an opportunity for determining when bacterial-coral associations are initiated and whether they are dynamic throughout early development. This study focuses on the early onset of bacterial associations in the mass spawning corals Montastraea annularis, M. franksi, M. faveolata, Acropora palmata, A. cervicornis, Diploria strigosa, and A. humilis. The presence of bacteria and timing of bacterial colonization was evaluated in gametes, swimming planulae, and newly settled polyps by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using general eubacterial probes and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The coral species investigated in this study do not appear to transmit bacteria via their gametes, and bacteria are not detectable in or on the corals until after settlement and metamorphosis. This study suggests that mass-spawning corals do not acquire, or are not colonized by, detectable numbers of bacteria until after larval settlement and development of the juvenile polyp. This timing lays the groundwork for developing and testing new hypotheses regarding general regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial colonization and infection of corals, and how interactions among bacteria and juvenile polyps influence the structure of bacterial assemblages in corals. PMID:20526374

  7. Prevalent bacterial species and novel phylotypes in advanced noma lesions.

    PubMed

    Paster, B J; Falkler Jr, W A; Enwonwu, C O; Idigbe, E O; Savage, K O; Levanos, V A; Tamer, M A; Ericson, R L; Lau, C N; Dewhirst, F E

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial diversity in advanced noma lesions using culture-independent molecular methods. 16S ribosomal DNA bacterial genes from DNA isolated from advanced noma lesions of four Nigerian children were PCR amplified with universally conserved primers and spirochetal selective primers and cloned into Escherichia coli. Partial 16S rRNA sequences of approximately 500 bases from 212 cloned inserts were used initially to determine species identity or closest relatives by comparison with sequences of known species or phylotypes. Nearly complete sequences of approximately 1,500 bases were obtained for most of the potentially novel species. A total of 67 bacterial species or phylotypes were detected, 25 of which have not yet been grown in vitro. Nineteen of the species or phylotypes, including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus spp., and the opportunistic pathogens Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Ochrobactrum anthropi were detected in more than one subject. Other known species that were detected included Achromobacter spp., Afipia spp., Brevundimonas diminuta, Capnocytophaga spp., Cardiobacterium sp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium spp., Gemella haemoylsans, and Neisseria spp. Phylotypes that were unique to noma infections included those in the genera Eubacterium, Flavobacterium, Kocuria, Microbacterium, and Porphyromonas and the related Streptococcus salivarius and genera Sphingomonas and TREPONEMA: Since advanced noma lesions are infections open to the environment, it was not surprising to detect species not commonly associated with the oral cavity, e.g., from soil. Several species previously implicated as putative pathogens of noma, such as spirochetes and Fusobacterium spp., were detected in at least one subject. However, due to the limited number of available noma subjects, it was not possible at this time to associate specific species with the disease.

  8. Metal-ion susceptibility of oral bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Youravong, N; Carlen, A; Teanpaisan, R; Dahlén, G

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of lead (Pb) on growth of bacterial species related to dental diseases in vitro. The effects of lead acetate on representative species of the oral flora were examined at 0.1-10 mmol l(-1) and compared with the effect of silver nitrate and ferrous sulfate. The minimal inhibitory concentration of lead acetate was between 0.15 and 5 mmol l(-1) for the bacterial strains tested. The minimal bactericidal concentration of lead acetate for most oral species was detected in the range of 5-10 mmol l(-1). Silver nitrate at a concentration of 1.25 mmol l(-1) was sufficient to exhibit antibacterial activity against almost all bacteria tested. Ferrous sulfate had the lowest effect. The study indicated a general antimicrobial effect of lead on oral bacterial species in the range of 0.15-10 mmol l(-1). The toxicity of silver nitrate was the highest, whereas that of ferrous sulfate was the lowest. Gram-positive species had a tendency to be less susceptible for metals than Gram-negatives. The study shows that it is possible that microbiological changes may occur in the dental plaque in children because of toxic exposure of environmental lead. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Attached bacterial populations shared by four species of aquatic angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Crump, Byron C; Koch, Evamaria W

    2008-10-01

    Symbiotic relationships between microbes and plants are common and well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, but little is known about such relationships in aquatic environments. We compared the phylogenetic diversities of leaf- and root-attached bacteria from four species of aquatic angiosperms using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. Plants were collected from three beds in Chesapeake Bay at sites characterized as freshwater (Vallisneria americana), brackish (Potomogeton perfoliatus and Stuckenia pectinata), and marine (Zostera marina). DGGE analyses showed that bacterial communities were very similar for replicate samples of leaves from canopy-forming plants S. pectinata and P. perfoliatus and less similar for replicate samples of leaves from meadow-forming plants Z. marina and V. americana and of roots of all species. In contrast, bacterial communities differed greatly among plant species and between leaves and roots. DNA sequencing identified 154 bacterial phylotypes, most of which were restricted to single plant species. However, 12 phylotypes were found on more than one plant species, and several of these phylotypes were abundant in clone libraries and represented the darkest bands in DGGE banding patterns. Root-attached phylotypes included relatives of sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. Leaf-attached phylotypes included relatives of polymer-degrading Bacteroidetes and phototrophic Alphaproteobacteria. Also, leaves and roots of three plant species hosted relatives of methylotrophic Betaproteobacteria belonging to the family Methylophilaceae. These results suggest that aquatic angiosperms host specialized communities of bacteria on their surfaces, including several broadly distributed and potentially mutualistic bacterial populations.

  10. Microarray identification of bacterial species in peritonsillar abscesses.

    PubMed

    Wikstén, J E; Laakso, S; Mäki, M; Mäkitie, A A; Pitkäranta, A; Blomgren, K

    2015-05-01

    Peritonsillar abscess (PTA) is the most common otorhinolaryngological infection, requiring management at the special healthcare level. The microbiological findings vary due to geographical, etiological, and methodological factors. This study aimed to identify the bacterial species of PTAs by using a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)- and microarray-based assay, and to find causative cofactors among patients with different pathogens. We determined the bacterial findings of aspirates of pus prospectively collected from 180 PTA patients. Samples were pretreated prior to nucleic acid extraction and analyzed with a PCR- and microarray-based assay or DNA sequencing. Both methods were based on the gyrB/parE topoisomerase genes. Patients answered symptom questionnaires at admission, and their medical records were reviewed later. Altogether, 160 (89 %) aspirates of pus tested positive for bacteria, and a bacterial species was identified in 149 (83 %) of the samples. A polybacterial species was detected in 20 (13 %) and anaerobic bacteria in 77 (52 %) of the 149 samples. Fusobacterium necrophorum patients were younger (p < 0 .001) and had more severe symptoms (p = 0.04) than patients with other pathogens. Gender, smoking, or preadmission antibiotics showed no correlation with any of the pathogens. Although requiring some optimization, this microarray assay seems feasible and fast for bacterial identification directly from pus samples, and confirms the diversity of PTA pathogens. Young patients with more severe symptoms may require special attention. Species-specific antibiotic treatment of PTA remains challenging due to bacterial variations; the present assay may aid in specifying PTA antibiotic treatment in the future.

  11. Panamanian frog species host unique skin bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Lisa K.; Hughey, Myra C.; Rebollar, Eria A.; Umile, Thomas P.; Loftus, Stephen C.; Burzynski, Elizabeth A.; Minbiole, Kevin P. C.; House, Leanna L.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Becker, Matthew H.; Walke, Jenifer B.; Medina, Daniel; Ibáñez, Roberto; Harris, Reid N.

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates, including amphibians, host diverse symbiotic microbes that contribute to host disease resistance. Globally, and especially in montane tropical systems, many amphibian species are threatened by a chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), that causes a lethal skin disease. Bd therefore may be a strong selective agent on the diversity and function of the microbial communities inhabiting amphibian skin. In Panamá, amphibian population declines and the spread of Bd have been tracked. In 2012, we completed a field survey in Panamá to examine frog skin microbiota in the context of Bd infection. We focused on three frog species and collected two skin swabs per frog from a total of 136 frogs across four sites that varied from west to east in the time since Bd arrival. One swab was used to assess bacterial community structure using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and to determine Bd infection status, and one was used to assess metabolite diversity, as the bacterial production of anti-fungal metabolites is an important disease resistance function. The skin microbiota of the three Panamanian frog species differed in OTU (operational taxonomic unit, ~bacterial species) community composition and metabolite profiles, although the pattern was less strong for the metabolites. Comparisons between frog skin bacterial communities from Panamá and the US suggest broad similarities at the phylum level, but key differences at lower taxonomic levels. In our field survey in Panamá, across all four sites, only 35 individuals (~26%) were Bd infected. There was no clustering of OTUs or metabolite profiles based on Bd infection status and no clear pattern of west-east changes in OTUs or metabolite profiles across the four sites. Overall, our field survey data suggest that different bacterial communities might be producing broadly similar sets of metabolites across frog hosts and sites. Community structure and function may not be as tightly coupled in these skin symbiont

  12. Interference by Neisseria gonorrhoeae growth by other bacterial species.

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, S J; Geller, R C; Perkins, G H; Rhoden, D L

    1976-01-01

    Growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from clinical specimens has been enhanced by the use of selective media that inhibit the simultaneous growth of other microorganisms. One explanation for this enhancement could be that certain other bacteria inhibit gonococcal growth. This hypothesis was examined by testing 167 bacterial isolates for in vitro gonococcal inhibition; 34.1% of the isolates failed to inhibit the gonococcus, but 12.0% produced weak inhibition and 53.9% strongly inhibited N. gonorrhoeae. The pattern of in vitro gonococcal inhibition was consistently the same for all the individual isolates within some species, but individual isolates within other bacterial species varied in their ability to inhibit the gonococcus. Consistently strong in vitro N. gonorrhoeae inhibitors were Citrobacter diversus, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas. The in vivo significance of gonococcal interference was demonstrated in the subcutaneous chamber model of N. gonorrhoeae infection. Images PMID:823175

  13. Cutaneous bacterial species from Lithobates catesbeianus can inhibit pathogenic dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Antje; Hernandez, Trang

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics are being successfully used to fight many infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms. However, new infectious diseases are continuously being identified, and some known pathogens are becoming resistant against known antibiotics. Furthermore, many antifungals are causing serious side effects in long-term treatments of patients, and many skin infections caused by dermatophytes are difficult to cure. The beneficial roles of resident cutaneous microbiota to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms have been shown for many vertebrate species. Microbial symbionts on the amphibian skin for example can be a source of powerful antimicrobial metabolites that can protect amphibians against diseases, such as chytridiomycosis, caused by a fungal pathogen. In this research, we investigated whether cutaneous bacterial species isolated from Lithobates catesbeianus (North American bullfrog), an invasive amphibian species that is resistant to chytridiomycosis, produce secondary metabolites that can be used to inhibit the growth of three species of dermatophytes (Microsporum gypseum, Epidermophyton floccosum, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes) which are known to cause topical or subdermal skin infections in humans. Strongly anti-dermatophyte bacterial species that belonged to the Bacillaceae, Streptomycetaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Aeromonadaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae were identified. This research has provided evidence of the presence of cutaneous anti-dermatophyte bacteria from L. catesbeianus which might provide a basis for health care providers to experiment with new antifungals in the future.

  14. Novel microbial populations in ambient and mesophilic biogas-producing and phenol-degrading consortia unraveled by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2014-08-01

    Methanogenesis from wastewater-borne organics and organic solid wastes (e.g., food residues) can be severely suppressed by the presence of toxic phenols. In this work, ambient (20 °C) and mesophilic (37 °C) methane-producing and phenol-degrading consortia were enriched and characterized using high-throughput sequencing (HTS). 454 Pyrosequencing indicated novel W22 (25.0 % of bacterial sequences) in the WWE1 and Sulfurovum-resembled species (32.0 %) in the family Campylobacterales were the most abundant in mesophilic and ambient reactors, respectively, which challenges previous knowledge that Syntrophorhabdus was the most predominant. Previous findings may underestimate bacterial diversity and low-abundance bacteria, but overestimate abundance of Syntrophorhabdus. Illumina HTS revealed that archaeal populations were doubled in ambient reactor and tripled in mesophilic reactor, respectively, compared to the ∼4.9 % (of the bacteria and archaea sequences) in the seed sludge. Moreover, unlike the dominance of Methanosarcina in seed sludge, acetotrophic Methanosaeta predominated both (71.4-76.5 % of archaeal sequences) ambient and mesophilic enrichments. Noteworthy, this study, for the first time, discovered the co-occurrence of green sulfur bacteria Chlorobia, sulfur-reducing Desulfovibrio, and Sulfurovum-resembling species under ambient condition, which could presumably establish mutualistic relationships to compete with syntrophic bacteria and methanogens, leading to the deterioration of methanogenic activity. Taken together, this HTS-based study unravels the high microbial diversity and complicated bacterial interactions within the biogas-producing and phenol-degrading bioreactors, and the identification of novel bacterial species and dominant methanogens involved in the phenol degradation provides novel insights into the operation of full-scale bioreactors for maximizing biogas generation.

  15. The bacterial species definition in the genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Ramette, Alban; Tiedje, James M

    2006-01-01

    The bacterial species definition, despite its eminent practical significance for identification, diagnosis, quarantine and diversity surveys, remains a very difficult issue to advance. Genomics now offers novel insights into intra-species diversity and the potential for emergence of a more soundly based system. Although we share the excitement, we argue that it is premature for a universal change to the definition because current knowledge is based on too few phylogenetic groups and too few samples of natural populations. Our analysis of five important bacterial groups suggests, however, that more stringent standards for species may be justifiable when a solid understanding of gene content and ecological distinctiveness becomes available. Our analysis also reveals what is actually encompassed in a species according to the current standards, in terms of whole-genome sequence and gene-content diversity, and shows that this does not correspond to coherent clusters for the environmental Burkholderia and Shewanella genera examined. In contrast, the obligatory pathogens, which have a very restricted ecological niche, do exhibit clusters. Therefore, the idea of biologically meaningful clusters of diversity that applies to most eukaryotes may not be universally applicable in the microbial world, or if such clusters exist, they may be found at different levels of distinction. PMID:17062412

  16. Patterns of Gut Bacterial Colonization in Three Primate Species

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Erin A.; Rodrigo, Allen; Yoder, Anne D.

    2015-01-01

    Host fitness is impacted by trillions of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract that facilitate development and are inextricably tied to life history. During development, microbial colonization primes the gut metabolism and physiology, thereby setting the stage for adult nutrition and health. However, the ecological rules governing microbial succession are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the relationship between host lineage, captive diet, and life stage and gut microbiota characteristics in three primate species (infraorder, Lemuriformes). Fecal samples were collected from captive lemur mothers and their infants, from birth to weaning. Microbial DNA was extracted and the v4 region of 16S rDNA was sequenced on the Illumina platform using protocols from the Earth Microbiome Project. Here, we show that colonization proceeds along different successional trajectories in developing infants from species with differing dietary regimes and ecological profiles: frugivorous (fruit-eating) Varecia variegata, generalist Lemur catta, and folivorous (leaf-eating) Propithecus coquereli. Our analyses reveal community membership and succession patterns consistent with previous studies of human infants, suggesting that lemurs may serve as a useful model of microbial ecology in the primate gut. Each lemur species exhibits distinct species-specific bacterial diversity signatures correlating to life stages and life history traits, implying that gut microbial community assembly primes developing infants at species-specific rates for their respective adult feeding strategies. PMID:25970595

  17. Secondary structure features of ribosomal RNA species within intact ribosomal subunits and efficiency of RNA-protein interactions in thermoacidophilic (Caldariella acidophila, Bacillus acidocaldarius) and mesophilic (Escherichia coli) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, P; Mazzei, F; Londei, P; Teichner, A; de Rosa, M; Gambacorta, A

    1983-08-02

    Ribosomal subunits of Caldariella acidophila (max.growth temp., 90 degrees C) have been compared to subunits of Bacillus acidocaldarius (max. growth temp., 70 degrees C) and Escherichia coli (max. growth temp., 47 degrees C) with respect to (a) bihelical content of rRNA; (b) G . C content of bihelical domains and (c) tightness of rRNA-protein interactions. The principal results are as follows. Subunits of C. acidophilia ribosomes (Tm = 90-93 degrees C) exhibit considerable thermal tolerance over their B. acidocaldarius (Tm = 77 degrees C) and E. coli counterparts (Tm = 72 degrees C). Based on the "melting' hyperchromicities of the intact ribosomal subunits a 51-55% fraction of the nucleotides appears to participate in hydrogen-bonded base pairing regardless of ribosome source, whereas a larger fraction, 67-70%, appears to be involved in hydrogen bonding in the naked rRNA species. The G . C content of bihelical domains of both free and ribosome-bound rRNA increases with increasing thermophily; based on hyperchromicity dispersion spectra of intact subunits and free rRNA, the bihelical parts of C. acidophila rRNA are estimated to contain 63-64% G . C, compared to 58.5% G . C for B. acidocaldarius and 55% G . C for E. coli. The increment of ribosome Tm values with increasing thermophily is greater than the increase in Tm for the free rRNA, indicating that within ribosomes bihelical domains of the thermophile rRNA species are stabilized more efficiently than their mesophile counterparts by proteins or/ and other component(s). The efficiency of the rRNA-protein interactions in the mesophile and thermophile ribosomes has been probed by comparing the releases, with LiCl-urea, of the rRNA species from the corresponding ribosomal subunits stuck to a Celite column through their protein moiety; it has been established that the release of C. acidophila rRNA from the Celite-bound ribosomes occurs at salt-urea concentrations about 4-fold higher than those required to release r

  18. Extensive Identification of Bacterial Riboflavin Transporters and Their Distribution across Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Enrique; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; García-Angulo, Víctor Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin, the precursor for the cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide, is an essential metabolite in all organisms. While the functions for de novo riboflavin biosynthesis and riboflavin import may coexist in bacteria, the extent of this co-occurrence is undetermined. The RibM, RibN, RfuABCD and the energy-coupling factor-RibU bacterial riboflavin transporters have been experimentally characterized. In addition, ImpX, RfnT and RibXY are proposed as riboflavin transporters based on positional clustering with riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RBP) genes or conservation of the FMN riboswitch regulatory element. Here, we searched for the FMN riboswitch in bacterial genomes to identify genes encoding riboflavin transporters and assessed their distribution among bacteria. Two new putative riboflavin transporters were identified: RibZ in Clostridium and RibV in Mesoplasma florum. Trans-complementation of an Escherichia coli riboflavin auxotroph strain confirmed the riboflavin transport activity of RibZ from Clostridium difficile, RibXY from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, ImpX from Fusobacterium nucleatum and RfnT from Ochrobactrum anthropi. The analysis of the genomic distribution of all known bacterial riboflavin transporters revealed that most occur in species possessing the RBP and that some bacteria may even encode functional riboflavin transporters from two different families. Our results indicate that some species possess ancestral riboflavin transporters, while others possess transporters that appear to have evolved recently. Moreover, our data suggest that unidentified riboflavin transporters also exist. The present study doubles the number of experimentally characterized riboflavin transporters and suggests a specific, non-accessory role for these proteins in riboflavin-prototrophic bacteria. PMID:25938806

  19. Validation of hierarchical cluster analysis for identification of bacterial species using 42 bacterial isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Luka, Janos; Crane, Nicole J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential advantages of the use of Raman spectroscopy in the biomedical field due to its rapidity and noninvasive nature. In this study, Raman spectroscopy is applied as a method for differentiating between bacteria isolates for Gram status and Genus species. We created models for identifying 28 bacterial isolates using spectra collected with a 785 nm laser excitation Raman spectroscopic system. In order to investigate the groupings of these samples, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was implemented. In addition, cluster analyses of the isolates were performed using various data types consisting of, biochemical tests, gene sequence alignment, high resolution melt (HRM) analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility tests of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and degree of antimicrobial resistance (SIR). In order to evaluate the ability of these models to correctly classify bacterial isolates using solely Raman spectroscopic data, a set of 14 validation samples were tested using the PLSDA models and consequently the HCA models. External cluster evaluation criteria of purity and Rand index were calculated at different taxonomic levels to compare the performance of clustering using Raman spectra as well as the other datasets. Results showed that Raman spectra performed comparably, and in some cases better than, the other data types with Rand index and purity values up to 0.933 and 0.947, respectively. This study clearly demonstrates that the discrimination of bacterial species using Raman spectroscopic data and hierarchical cluster analysis is possible and has the potential to be a powerful point-of-care tool in clinical settings.

  20. Extensive Identification of Bacterial Riboflavin Transporters and Their Distribution across Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Preciado, Ana; Torres, Alfredo Gabriel; Merino, Enrique; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; García-Angulo, Víctor Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin, the precursor for the cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide, is an essential metabolite in all organisms. While the functions for de novo riboflavin biosynthesis and riboflavin import may coexist in bacteria, the extent of this co-occurrence is undetermined. The RibM, RibN, RfuABCD and the energy-coupling factor-RibU bacterial riboflavin transporters have been experimentally characterized. In addition, ImpX, RfnT and RibXY are proposed as riboflavin transporters based on positional clustering with riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RBP) genes or conservation of the FMN riboswitch regulatory element. Here, we searched for the FMN riboswitch in bacterial genomes to identify genes encoding riboflavin transporters and assessed their distribution among bacteria. Two new putative riboflavin transporters were identified: RibZ in Clostridium and RibV in Mesoplasma florum. Trans-complementation of an Escherichia coli riboflavin auxotroph strain confirmed the riboflavin transport activity of RibZ from Clostridium difficile, RibXY from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, ImpX from Fusobacterium nucleatum and RfnT from Ochrobactrum anthropi. The analysis of the genomic distribution of all known bacterial riboflavin transporters revealed that most occur in species possessing the RBP and that some bacteria may even encode functional riboflavin transporters from two different families. Our results indicate that some species possess ancestral riboflavin transporters, while others possess transporters that appear to have evolved recently. Moreover, our data suggest that unidentified riboflavin transporters also exist. The present study doubles the number of experimentally characterized riboflavin transporters and suggests a specific, non-accessory role for these proteins in riboflavin-prototrophic bacteria.

  1. Salivary mucins promote the coexistence of competing oral bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Erica Shapiro; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2017-01-24

    Mucus forms a major ecological niche for microbiota in various locations throughout the human body such as the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract and oral cavity. The primary structural components of mucus are mucin glycoproteins, which crosslink to form a complex polymer network that surrounds microbes. Although the mucin matrix could create constraints that impact inhabiting microbes, little is understood about how this key environmental factor affects interspecies interactions. In this study, we develop an experimental model using gel-forming human salivary mucins to understand the influence of mucin on the viability of two competing species of oral bacteria. We use this dual-species model to show that mucins promote the coexistence of the two competing bacteria and that mucins shift cells from the mixed-species biofilm into the planktonic form. Taken together, these findings indicate that the mucus environment could influence bacterial viability by promoting a less competitive mode of growth.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 24 January 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.200.

  2. Periodic Colony Formation by Bacterial Species Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Itoh, Hiroto; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the periodic colony growth of bacterial species Bacillus subtilis. A colony grows cyclically with the interface repeating an advance (migration phase) and a rest (consolidation phase) alternately on a surface of semi-solid agar plate under appropriate environmental conditions, resulting in a concentric ring-like colony. It was found from macroscopic observations that the characteristic quantities for the periodic growth such as the migration time, the consolidation time and the terrace spacing do not depend so much on nutrient concentration Cn, but do on agar concentration Ca. The consolidation time was a weakly increasing function of Ca, while the migration time and the terrace spacing were, respectively, weakly and strongly decreasing function of Ca. Overall, the cycle (migration-plus-consolidation) time seems to be constant, and does not depend so much on both Cn and Ca. Microscopically, bacterial cells inside the growing front of a colony keep increasing their population during both migration and consolidation phases. It was also confirmed that their secreting surfactant called surfactin does not affect their periodic growth qualitatively, i.e., mutant cells which cannot secrete surfactin produce a concentric ring-like colony. All these results suggest that the diffusion of the nutrient and the surfactin are irrelevant to their periodic growth.

  3. Bacterial Associates of Two Caribbean Coral Species Reveal Species-Specific Distribution and Geographic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Anthony G.; Chadwick, Nanette E.; Liles, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Scleractinian corals harbor microorganisms that form dynamic associations with the coral host and exhibit substantial genetic and ecological diversity. Microbial associates may provide defense against pathogens and serve as bioindicators of changing environmental conditions. Here we describe the bacterial assemblages associated with two of the most common and phylogenetically divergent reef-building corals in the Caribbean, Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides. Contrasting life history strategies and disease susceptibilities indicate potential differences in their microbiota and immune function that may in part drive changes in the composition of coral reef communities. The ribotype structure and diversity of coral-associated bacteria within the surface mucosal layer (SML) of healthy corals were assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and 454 bar-coded pyrosequencing. Corals were sampled at disparate Caribbean locations representing various levels of anthropogenic impact. We demonstrate here that M. faveolata and P. astreoides harbor distinct, host-specific bacteria but that specificity varies by species and site. P. astreoides generally hosts a bacterial assemblage of low diversity that is largely dominated by one bacterial genus, Endozoicomonas, within the order Oceanospirillales. The bacterial assemblages associated with M. faveolata are significantly more diverse and exhibit higher specificity at the family level than P. astreoides assemblages. Both corals have more bacterial diversity and higher abundances of disease-related bacteria at sites closer to the mainland than at those furthest away. The most diverse bacterial taxa and highest relative abundance of disease-associated bacteria were seen for corals near St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) (2.5 km from shore), and the least diverse taxa and lowest relative abundance were seen for corals near our most pristine site in Belize (20 km from shore). We conclude

  4. Bacterial associates of two Caribbean coral species reveal species-specific distribution and geographic variability.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Kathleen M; Moss, Anthony G; Chadwick, Nanette E; Liles, Mark R

    2012-09-01

    Scleractinian corals harbor microorganisms that form dynamic associations with the coral host and exhibit substantial genetic and ecological diversity. Microbial associates may provide defense against pathogens and serve as bioindicators of changing environmental conditions. Here we describe the bacterial assemblages associated with two of the most common and phylogenetically divergent reef-building corals in the Caribbean, Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides. Contrasting life history strategies and disease susceptibilities indicate potential differences in their microbiota and immune function that may in part drive changes in the composition of coral reef communities. The ribotype structure and diversity of coral-associated bacteria within the surface mucosal layer (SML) of healthy corals were assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and 454 bar-coded pyrosequencing. Corals were sampled at disparate Caribbean locations representing various levels of anthropogenic impact. We demonstrate here that M. faveolata and P. astreoides harbor distinct, host-specific bacteria but that specificity varies by species and site. P. astreoides generally hosts a bacterial assemblage of low diversity that is largely dominated by one bacterial genus, Endozoicomonas, within the order Oceanospirillales. The bacterial assemblages associated with M. faveolata are significantly more diverse and exhibit higher specificity at the family level than P. astreoides assemblages. Both corals have more bacterial diversity and higher abundances of disease-related bacteria at sites closer to the mainland than at those furthest away. The most diverse bacterial taxa and highest relative abundance of disease-associated bacteria were seen for corals near St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) (2.5 km from shore), and the least diverse taxa and lowest relative abundance were seen for corals near our most pristine site in Belize (20 km from shore). We conclude

  5. Whole-genome sequence comparison as a method for improving bacterial species definition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Du, Pengcheng; Zheng, Han; Yu, Weiwen; Wan, Li; Chen, Chen

    2014-01-01

    We compared pairs of 1,226 bacterial strains with whole genome sequences and calculated their average nucleotide identity (ANI) between genomes to determine whether whole genome comparison can be directly used for bacterial species definition. We found that genome comparisons of two bacterial strains from the same species (SGC) have a significantly higher ANI than those of two strains from different species (DGC), and that the ANI between the query and the reference genomes can be used to determine whether two genomes come from the same species. Bacterial species definition based on ANI with a cut-off value of 0.92 matched well (81.5%) with the current bacterial species definition. The ANI value was shown to be consistent with the standard for traditional bacterial species definition, and it could be used in bacterial taxonomy for species definition. A new bioinformatics program (ANItools) was also provided in this study for users to obtain the ANI value of any two bacterial genome pairs (http://genome.bioinfo-icdc.org/). This program can match a query strain to all bacterial genomes, and identify the highest ANI value of the strain at the species, genus and family levels respectively, providing valuable insights for species definition.

  6. Bacterial communities and species-specific associations with the mucus of Brazilian coral species

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Camila; Torres, Tatiana T.; Ottoboni, Laura M. M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the existence of species-specific associations between Brazilian coral species and bacteria. Pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rDNA was used to analyze the taxonomic composition of bacterial communities associated with the mucus of four coral species (Madracis decactis, Mussismilia hispida, Palythoa caribaeorum, and Tubastraea coccinea) in two seasons (winter and summer), which were compared with the surrounding water and sediment. The microbial communities found in samples of mucus, water, and sediment differed according to the composition and relative frequency of OTUs. The coral mucus community seemed to be more stable and resistant to seasonal variations, compared to the water and sediment communities. There was no influence of geographic location on the composition of the communities. The sediment community was extremely diverse and might act as a "seed bank" for the entire environment. Species-specific OTUs were found in P. caribaeorum, T. coccinea, and M. hispida. PMID:23567936

  7. Dynamics of bacterial microbiota during lignocellulosic waste composting: Studies upon its structure, functionality and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    López-González, J A; Suárez-Estrella, F; Vargas-García, M C; López, M J; Jurado, M M; Moreno, J

    2015-01-01

    An intensive isolation program carried out in three replicated composting piles allowed the identification of the resident and transient components of the composting microbiome. More than 4000 bacterial strains were isolated, enzymatically characterized and identified by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA gene. While microorganisms isolated under mesophilic conditions were prominent throughout the process, thermophilic stages gathered the highest total counts and spore-forming bacteria prevailed at the bio-oxidative phase of composting. Enzymatic capabilities related to the degradation of polymeric materials were exhibited by most of the isolates and as a result of these activities, more soluble compounds could be made available to the entire composting microbiota. A high proportion of isolates showed to be thermotolerant as they were detected at mesophilic and thermophilic phases. Isolated strains belonged to 187 bacterial species. Biodiversity was greater at the central stages of composting and mesophilic, thermophilic and cooling phases shared 50% of species.

  8. Bacterial communities of two parthenogenetic aphid species cocolonizing two host plants across the Hawaiian Islands.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ryan T; Bressan, Alberto; Greenwell, April M; Fierer, Noah

    2011-12-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) have been the focus of several studies with respect to their interactions with inherited symbionts, but bacterial communities of most aphid species are still poorly characterized. In this research, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities in aphids. Specifically, we examined the diversity of bacteria in two obligately parthenogenetic aphid species (the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii, and the cardamom aphid, Pentalonia caladii) cocolonizing two plant species (taro, Colocasia esculenta, and ginger, Alpinia purpurata) across four Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu). Results from this study revealed that heritable symbionts dominated the bacterial communities for both aphid species. The bacterial communities differed significantly between the two species, and A. gossypii harbored a more diverse bacterial community than P. caladii. The bacterial communities also differed across aphid populations sampled from the different islands; however, communities did not differ between aphids collected from the two host plants.

  9. Bacterial Communities of Two Parthenogenetic Aphid Species Cocolonizing Two Host Plants across the Hawaiian Islands ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan T.; Bressan, Alberto; Greenwell, April M.; Fierer, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) have been the focus of several studies with respect to their interactions with inherited symbionts, but bacterial communities of most aphid species are still poorly characterized. In this research, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities in aphids. Specifically, we examined the diversity of bacteria in two obligately parthenogenetic aphid species (the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii, and the cardamom aphid, Pentalonia caladii) cocolonizing two plant species (taro, Colocasia esculenta, and ginger, Alpinia purpurata) across four Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu). Results from this study revealed that heritable symbionts dominated the bacterial communities for both aphid species. The bacterial communities differed significantly between the two species, and A. gossypii harbored a more diverse bacterial community than P. caladii. The bacterial communities also differed across aphid populations sampled from the different islands; however, communities did not differ between aphids collected from the two host plants. PMID:21965398

  10. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  11. Identification of bacterial species by untargeted NMR spectroscopy of the exo-metabolome.

    PubMed

    Palama, T L; Canard, I; Rautureau, G J P; Mirande, C; Chatellier, S; Elena-Herrmann, B

    2016-08-07

    Identification of bacterial species is a crucial bottleneck for clinical diagnosis of infectious diseases. Quick and reliable identification is a key factor to provide suitable antibiotherapies and avoid the development of multiple-drug resistance. We propose a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics strategy for rapid discrimination and identification of several bacterial species that relies on untargeted metabolic profiling of supernatants from bacterial culture media. We show that six bacterial species (Gram negative: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis; Gram positive: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus) can be well discriminated from multivariate statistical analysis, opening new prospects for NMR applications to microbial clinical diagnosis.

  12. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups. PMID:20163710

  13. Bacterial Responses to Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal: Reactive Electrophilic Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changhan; Park, Chankyu

    2017-01-01

    Glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MG), belonging to α-oxoaldehydes, are produced by organisms from bacteria to humans by glucose oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation. Since glyoxals contain two adjacent reactive carbonyl groups, they are referred to as reactive electrophilic species (RES), and are damaging to proteins and nucleotides. Therefore, glyoxals cause various diseases in humans, such as diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, from which all living organisms need to be protected. Although the glyoxalase system has been known for some time, details on how glyoxals are sensed and detoxified in the cell have not been fully elucidated, and are only beginning to be uncovered. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on bacterial responses to glyoxal, and specifically focus on the glyoxal-associated regulators YqhC and NemR, as well as their detoxification mediated by glutathione (GSH)-dependent/independent glyoxalases and NAD(P)H-dependent reductases. Furthermore, we will address questions and future directions. PMID:28106725

  14. Column bioleaching of uranium embedded in granite porphyry by a mesophilic acidophilic consortium.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guanzhou; Li, Qian; Yu, Runlan; Sun, Zhanxue; Liu, Yajie; Chen, Miao; Yin, Huaqun; Zhang, Yage; Liang, Yili; Xu, Lingling; Sun, Limin; Liu, Xueduan

    2011-04-01

    A mesophilic acidophilic consortium was enriched from acid mine drainage samples collected from several uranium mines in China. The performance of the consortium in column bioleaching of low-grade uranium embedded in granite porphyry was investigated. The influences of several chemical parameters on uranium extraction in column reactor were also investigated. A uranium recovery of 96.82% was achieved in 97 days column leaching process including 33 days acid pre-leaching stage and 64 days bioleaching stage. It was reflected that indirect leaching mechanism took precedence over direct. Furthermore, the bacterial community structure was analyzed by using Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis. The results showed that microorganisms on the residual surface were more diverse than that in the solution. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the dominant species in the solution and Leptospirillum ferriphilum on the residual surface.

  15. Co-habiting amphibian species harbor unique skin bacterial communities in wild populations.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Bowers, Robert M; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob; Lauber, Christian L

    2012-03-01

    Although all plant and animal species harbor microbial symbionts, we know surprisingly little about the specificity of microbial communities to their hosts. Few studies have compared the microbiomes of different species of animals, and fewer still have examined animals in the wild. We sampled four pond habitats in Colorado, USA, where multiple amphibian species were present. In total, 32 amphibian individuals were sampled from three different species including northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens), western chorus frogs (Pseudacris triseriata) and tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum). We compared the diversity and composition of the bacterial communities on the skin of the collected individuals via barcoded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Dominant bacterial phyla included Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. In total, we found members of 18 bacterial phyla, comparable to the taxonomic diversity typically found on human skin. Levels of bacterial diversity varied strongly across species: L. pipiens had the highest diversity; A. tigrinum the lowest. Host species was a highly significant predictor of bacterial community similarity, and co-habitation within the same pond was not significant, highlighting that the skin-associated bacterial communities do not simply reflect those bacterial communities found in their surrounding environments. Innate species differences thus appear to regulate the structure of skin bacterial communities on amphibians. In light of recent discoveries that some bacteria on amphibian skin have antifungal activity, our finding suggests that host-specific bacteria may have a role in the species-specific resistance to fungal pathogens.

  16. Complete genome analysis of Clostridium bornimense strain M2/40(T): A new acidogenic Clostridium species isolated from a mesophilic two-phase laboratory-scale biogas reactor.

    PubMed

    Tomazetto, Geizecler; Hahnke, Sarah; Koeck, Daniela E; Wibberg, Daniel; Maus, Irena; Pühler, Alfred; Klocke, Michael; Schlüter, Andreas

    2016-08-20

    Taxonomic and functional profiling based on metagenome analyses frequently revealed that members of the class Clostridia dominate biogas reactor communities and perform different essential metabolic pathways in the biogas fermentation process. Clostridium bornimense strain M2/40(T) was recently isolated from a mesophilic two-phase lab-scale biogas reactor continuously fed with maize silage and wheat straw. The genome of the strain was completely sequenced and manually annotated to reconstruct its metabolic potential regarding carbohydrate active enzyme production and fermentation of organic compounds for consolidated biofuel production from biomass. The C. bornimense M2/40(T) genome consists of a chromosome (2,917,864bp in size) containing 2613 protein coding sequences, and a 699,161bp chromid (secondary replicon) harboring 680 coding sequences. Both replicons feature very similar GC-contents of approximately 29%. The complex genome comprises three prophage regions, two CRISPR-cas systems and a putative cellulosomal gene cluster that is located on the second replicon (chromid) of the strain. The overexpressed glycosyl hydrolases (GH) CelK (GH9) and CelA (GH48) encoded in the cellulosomal gene cluster were shown to be active on the substrates xylan and xyloglucan whereas XghA (GH74) is highly active on xyloglucan. Reconstruction of fermentation pathways from genome sequence data revealed that strain M2/40(T) encodes all enzymes for hydrogen, acetate, formate, lactate, butyrate, and ethanol production, leading to the classification of the isolate as acidogenic bacterium. Phylogenetic analyses uncovered that the closest characterized relative of C. bornimense is C. cellulovorans. Comparative analyses of the C. bornimense and C. cellulovorans genomes revealed considerable rearrangements within their chromosomes suggesting that both species evolved separately for a relatively long period of time and adapted to specific tasks within microbial consortia responsible for

  17. Greater Species Richness of Bacterial Skin Symbionts Better Suppresses the Amphibian Fungal Pathogen Batrachochytrium Dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Rejmanek, Daniel; Woodhams, Douglas C; Worth, S Joy; Kenny, Heather; McKenzie, Valerie; Lawler, Sharon P; Foley, Janet E

    2017-07-01

    The symbiotic microbes that grow in and on many organisms can play important roles in protecting their hosts from pathogen infection. While species diversity has been shown to influence community function in many other natural systems, the question of how species diversity of host-associated symbiotic microbes contributes to pathogen resistance is just beginning to be explored. Understanding diversity effects on pathogen resistance could be particularly helpful in combating the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) which has caused dramatic population declines in many amphibian species and is a major concern for amphibian conservation. Our study investigates the ability of host-associated bacteria to inhibit the proliferation of Bd when grown in experimentally assembled biofilm communities that differ in species number and composition. Six bacterial species isolated from the skin of Cascades frogs (Rana cascadae) were used to assemble bacterial biofilm communities containing 1, 2, 3, or all 6 bacterial species. Biofilm communities were grown with Bd for 7 days following inoculation. More speciose bacterial communities reduced Bd abundance more effectively. This relationship between bacterial species richness and Bd suppression appeared to be driven by dominance effects-the bacterial species that were most effective at inhibiting Bd dominated multi-species communities-and complementarity: multi-species communities inhibited Bd growth more than monocultures of constituent species. These results underscore the notion that pathogen resistance is an emergent property of microbial communities, a consideration that should be taken into account when designing probiotic treatments to reduce the impacts of infectious disease.

  18. Comparative genomics of Wolbachia and the bacterial species concept.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Kirsten Maren; Klasson, Lisa; Näslund, Kristina; Bourtzis, Kostas; Andersson, Siv G E

    2013-04-01

    The importance of host-specialization to speciation processes in obligate host-associated bacteria is well known, as is also the ability of recombination to generate cohesion in bacterial populations. However, whether divergent strains of highly recombining intracellular bacteria, such as Wolbachia, can maintain their genetic distinctness when infecting the same host is not known. We first developed a protocol for the genome sequencing of uncultivable endosymbionts. Using this method, we have sequenced the complete genomes of the Wolbachia strains wHa and wNo, which occur as natural double infections in Drosophila simulans populations on the Seychelles and in New Caledonia. Taxonomically, wHa belong to supergroup A and wNo to supergroup B. A comparative genomics study including additional strains supported the supergroup classification scheme and revealed 24 and 33 group-specific genes, putatively involved in host-adaptation processes. Recombination frequencies were high for strains of the same supergroup despite different host-preference patterns, leading to genomic cohesion. The inferred recombination fragments for strains of different supergroups were of short sizes, and the genomes of the co-infecting Wolbachia strains wHa and wNo were not more similar to each other and did not share more genes than other A- and B-group strains that infect different hosts. We conclude that Wolbachia strains of supergroup A and B represent genetically distinct clades, and that strains of different supergroups can co-exist in the same arthropod host without converging into the same species. This suggests that the supergroups are irreversibly separated and that barriers other than host-specialization are able to maintain distinct clades in recombining endosymbiont populations. Acquiring a good knowledge of the barriers to genetic exchange in Wolbachia will advance our understanding of how endosymbiont communities are constructed from vertically and horizontally transmitted genes.

  19. Comparative Genomics of Wolbachia and the Bacterial Species Concept

    PubMed Central

    Näslund, Kristina; Bourtzis, Kostas; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of host-specialization to speciation processes in obligate host-associated bacteria is well known, as is also the ability of recombination to generate cohesion in bacterial populations. However, whether divergent strains of highly recombining intracellular bacteria, such as Wolbachia, can maintain their genetic distinctness when infecting the same host is not known. We first developed a protocol for the genome sequencing of uncultivable endosymbionts. Using this method, we have sequenced the complete genomes of the Wolbachia strains wHa and wNo, which occur as natural double infections in Drosophila simulans populations on the Seychelles and in New Caledonia. Taxonomically, wHa belong to supergroup A and wNo to supergroup B. A comparative genomics study including additional strains supported the supergroup classification scheme and revealed 24 and 33 group-specific genes, putatively involved in host-adaptation processes. Recombination frequencies were high for strains of the same supergroup despite different host-preference patterns, leading to genomic cohesion. The inferred recombination fragments for strains of different supergroups were of short sizes, and the genomes of the co-infecting Wolbachia strains wHa and wNo were not more similar to each other and did not share more genes than other A- and B-group strains that infect different hosts. We conclude that Wolbachia strains of supergroup A and B represent genetically distinct clades, and that strains of different supergroups can co-exist in the same arthropod host without converging into the same species. This suggests that the supergroups are irreversibly separated and that barriers other than host-specialization are able to maintain distinct clades in recombining endosymbiont populations. Acquiring a good knowledge of the barriers to genetic exchange in Wolbachia will advance our understanding of how endosymbiont communities are constructed from vertically and horizontally transmitted genes

  20. Distinct antimicrobial peptide expression determines host species-specific bacterial associations

    PubMed Central

    Franzenburg, Sören; Walter, Jonas; Künzel, Sven; Wang, Jun; Baines, John F.; Bosch, Thomas C. G.; Fraune, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Animals are colonized by coevolved bacterial communities, which contribute to the host’s health. This commensal microbiota is often highly specific to its host-species, inferring strong selective pressures on the associated microbes. Several factors, including diet, mucus composition, and the immune system have been proposed as putative determinants of host-associated bacterial communities. Here we report that species-specific antimicrobial peptides account for different bacterial communities associated with closely related species of the cnidarian Hydra. Gene family extensions for potent antimicrobial peptides, the arminins, were detected in four Hydra species, with each species possessing a unique composition and expression profile of arminins. For functional analysis, we inoculated arminin-deficient and control polyps with bacterial consortia characteristic for different Hydra species and compared their selective preferences by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial microbiota. In contrast to control polyps, arminin-deficient polyps displayed decreased potential to select for bacterial communities resembling their native microbiota. This finding indicates that species-specific antimicrobial peptides shape species-specific bacterial associations. PMID:24003149

  1. Catecholamines and in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria: enhancement of growth varies greatly among bacterial species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of a range of bacterial species, including anaerobes. Bacteria tested included: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes fragilis, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnie, Enterobacter Sp, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The results of the current study indicated that supplementation of bacterial cultures in minimal medium with norepinephrine or epinephrine did not result in increased growth of bacteria. Positive controls involving treatment of Escherichia coli with catecholamines did result in increased growth of that bacterial species. The results of the present study extend previous observations that showed differential capability of catecholamines to enhance bacterial growth in vitro.

  2. Catecholamines and in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria: enhancement of growth varies greatly among bacterial species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of a range of bacterial species, including anaerobes. Bacteria tested included: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes fragilis, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnie, Enterobacter Sp, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The results of the current study indicated that supplementation of bacterial cultures in minimal medium with norepinephrine or epinephrine did not result in increased growth of bacteria. Positive controls involving treatment of Escherichia coli with catecholamines did result in increased growth of that bacterial species. The results of the present study extend previous observations that showed differential capability of catecholamines to enhance bacterial growth in vitro.

  3. Horizontally Acquired Genes Are Often Shared between Closely Related Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) serves as an important source of innovation for bacterial species. We used a pangenome-based approach to identify genes that were horizontally acquired by four closely related bacterial species, belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. This enabled us to examine the extent to which such closely related species tend to share horizontally acquired genes. We find that a high percent of horizontally acquired genes are shared among these closely related species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the extent of sharing of horizontally acquired genes among these four closely related species is predictive of the extent to which these genes will be found in additional bacterial species. Finally, we show that acquired genes shared by more species tend to be better optimized for expression within the genomes of their new hosts. Combined, our results demonstrate the existence of a large pool of frequently horizontally acquired genes that have distinct characteristics from horizontally acquired genes that are less frequently shared between species.

  4. Extensive Overlap of Tropical Rainforest Bacterial Endophytes between Soil, Plant Parts, and Plant Species.

    PubMed

    Haruna, Emmanuel; Zin, Noraziah M; Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Adams, Jonathan M

    2017-06-22

    The extent to which distinct bacterial endophyte communities occur between different plant organs and species is poorly known and has implications for bioprospecting efforts. Using the V3 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene, we investigated the diversity patterns of bacterial endophyte communities of three rainforest plant species, comparing leaf, stem, and root endophytes plus rhizosphere soil community. There was extensive overlap in bacterial communities between plant organs, between replicate plants of the same species, between plant species, and between plant organ and rhizosphere soil, with no consistent clustering by compartment or host plant species. The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis highlighted an extensively overlapping bacterial community structure, and the β-nearest taxon index (βNTI) analysis revealed dominance of stochastic processes in community assembly, suggesting that bacterial endophyte operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were randomly distributed among plant species and organs and rhizosphere soil. Percentage turnover of OTUs within pairs of samples was similar both for plant individuals of the same species and of different species at around 80-90%. Our results suggest that sampling extra individuals, extra plant organs, extra species, or use of rhizosphere soil, might be about equally effective for obtaining new OTUs for culture. These observations suggest that the plant endophyte community may be much more diverse, but less predictable, than would be expected from culturing efforts alone.

  5. Non-random species loss in bacterial communities reduces antifungal volatile production.

    PubMed

    Hol, W H Gera; Garbeva, Paolina; Hordijk, Cornelis; Hundscheid, P J; Gunnewiek, Paulien J A Klein; Van Agtmaal, Maaike; Kuramae, Eiko E; De Boer, Wietse

    2015-08-01

    The contribution of low-abundance microbial species to soil ecosystems is easily overlooked because there is considerable overlap between metabolic abilities (functional redundancy) of dominant and subordinate microbial species. Here we studied how loss of less abundant soil bacteria affected the production of antifungal volatiles, an important factor in the natural control of soil-borne pathogenic fungi. We provide novel empirical evidence that the loss of soil bacterial species leads to a decline in the production of volatiles that suppress root pathogens. By using dilution-to-extinction for seven different soils we created bacterial communities with a decreasing number of species and grew them under carbon-limited conditions. Communities with high bacterial species richness produced volatiles that strongly reduced the hyphal growth of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. For most soil origins loss of bacterial species resulted in loss of antifungal volatile production. Analysis of the volatiles revealed that several known antifungal compounds were only produced in the more diverse bacterial communities. Our results suggest that less abundant bacterial species play an important role in antifungal volatile production by soil bacterial communities and, consequently, in the natural suppression of soil-borne pathogens.

  6. Assessing the complex sponge microbiota: core, variable and species-specific bacterial communities in marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Susanne; Tsai, Peter; Bell, James; Fromont, Jane; Ilan, Micha; Lindquist, Niels; Perez, Thierry; Rodrigo, Allen; Schupp, Peter J; Vacelet, Jean; Webster, Nicole; Hentschel, Ute; Taylor, Michael W

    2012-03-01

    Marine sponges are well known for their associations with highly diverse, yet very specific and often highly similar microbiota. The aim of this study was to identify potential bacterial sub-populations in relation to sponge phylogeny and sampling sites and to define the core bacterial community. 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing was applied to 32 sponge species from eight locations around the world's oceans, thereby generating 2567 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at the 97% sequence similarity level) in total and up to 364 different OTUs per sponge species. The taxonomic richness detected in this study comprised 25 bacterial phyla with Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Poribacteria being most diverse in sponges. Among these phyla were nine candidate phyla, six of them found for the first time in sponges. Similarity comparison of bacterial communities revealed no correlation with host phylogeny but a tropical sub-population in that tropical sponges have more similar bacterial communities to each other than to subtropical sponges. A minimal core bacterial community consisting of very few OTUs (97%, 95% and 90%) was found. These microbes have a global distribution and are probably acquired via environmental transmission. In contrast, a large species-specific bacterial community was detected, which is represented by OTUs present in only a single sponge species. The species-specific bacterial community is probably mainly vertically transmitted. It is proposed that different sponges contain different bacterial species, however, these bacteria are still closely related to each other explaining the observed similarity of bacterial communities in sponges in this and previous studies. This global analysis represents the most comprehensive study of bacterial symbionts in sponges to date and provides novel insights into the complex structure of these unique associations.

  7. Resource-dependent attenuation of species interactions during bacterial succession.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Damian W; Scheuerl, Thomas; Culbert, Christopher T; Mombrikotb, Shorok B; Johnstone, Emma; Barraclough, Timothy G; Bell, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial communities are vital for many economically and ecologically important processes. The role of bacterial community composition in determining ecosystem functioning depends critically on interactions among bacterial taxa. Several studies have shown that, despite a predominance of negative interactions in communities, bacteria are able to display positive interactions given the appropriate evolutionary or ecological conditions. We were interested in how interspecific interactions develop over time in a naturalistic setting of low resource supply rates. We assembled aquatic bacterial communities in microcosms and assayed the productivity (respiration and growth) and substrate degradation while tracking community composition. The results demonstrated that while bacterial communities displayed strongly negative interactions during the early phase of colonisation and acclimatisation to novel biotic and abiotic factors, this antagonism declined over time towards a more neutral state. This was associated with a shift from use of labile substrates in early succession to use of recalcitrant substrates later in succession, confirming a crucial role of resource dynamics in linking interspecific interactions with ecosystem functioning.

  8. Amazonian dark Earth and plant species from the Amazon region contribute to shape rhizosphere bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Lima, Amanda; Cannavan, Fabiana Souza; Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2015-05-01

    Amazonian Dark Earths (ADE) or Terra Preta de Índio formed in the past by pre-Columbian populations are highly sustained fertile soils supported by microbial communities that differ from those extant in adjacent soils. These soils are found in the Amazon region and are considered as a model soil when compared to the surrounding and background soils. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ADE and its surrounding soil on the rhizosphere bacterial communities of two leguminous plant species that frequently occur in the Amazon region in forest sites (Mimosa debilis) and open areas (Senna alata). Bacterial community structure was evaluated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and bacterial community composition by V4 16S rRNA gene region pyrosequencing. T-RFLP analysis showed effect of soil types and plant species on rhizosphere bacterial community structure. Differential abundance of bacterial phyla, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes, revealed that soil type contributes to shape the bacterial communities. Furthermore, bacterial phyla such as Firmicutes and Nitrospira were mostly influenced by plant species. Plant roots influenced several soil chemical properties, especially when plants were grown in ADE. These results showed that differences observed in rhizosphere bacterial community structure and composition can be influenced by plant species and soil fertility due to variation in soil attributes.

  9. Effects of Host Plant Factors on the Bacterial Communities Associated with Two Whitefly Sibling Species.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Ming; Guo, Lei; Tao, Yun-Li; Zhang, You-Jun; Wan, Fang-Hao; Chu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Although discrepancy in the specific traits and ecological characteristics of Bemisia tabaci between species are partially attributed to the B. tabaci-associated bacteria, the factors that affect the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacteria are not well-understood. We used the metagenomic approach to characterize the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community because the approach is an effective tool to identify the bacteria. To investigate the effects of the host plant and a virus, tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), on the bacterial communities of B. tabaci sibling species B and Q, we analyzed the bacterial communities associated with whitefly B and Q collected from healthy cotton, healthy tomato, and TYLCV-infected tomato. The analysis used miseq-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S rDNA gene. For the bacteria associated with B. tabaci, we found that the influence of the host plant species was greater than that of the whitefly cryptic species. With further analysis of host plants infected with the TYLCV, the virus had no significant effects on the B. tabaci-associated bacterial community. The effects of different plant hosts and TYLCV-infection on the diversity of B. tabaci-associated bacterial communities were successfully analyzed in this study. To explain why B. tabaci sibling species with different host ranges differ in performance, the analysis of the bacterial community may be essential to the explanation.

  10. Identification of Bacterial Species in Kuwaiti Waters Through DNA Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.

    2017-01-01

    With an objective of identifying the bacterial diversity associated with ecosystem of various Kuwaiti Seas, bacteria were cultured and isolated from 3 water samples. Due to the difficulties for cultured and isolated fecal coliforms on the selective agar plates, bacterial isolates from marine agar plates were selected for molecular identification. 16S rRNA genes were successfully amplified from the genome of the selected isolates using Universal Eubacterial 16S rRNA primers. The resulted amplification products were subjected to automated DNA sequencing. Partial 16S rDNA sequences obtained were compared directly with sequences in the NCBI database using BLAST as well as with the sequences available with Ribosomal Database Project (RDP).

  11. Bacterial Communities of Diverse Drosophila Species: Ecological Context of a Host–Microbe Model System

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Srijak; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Kopp, Artyom

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is emerging as an important model of non-pathogenic host–microbe interactions. The genetic and experimental tractability of Drosophila has led to significant gains in our understanding of animal–microbial symbiosis. However, the full implications of these results cannot be appreciated without the knowledge of the microbial communities associated with natural Drosophila populations. In particular, it is not clear whether laboratory cultures can serve as an accurate model of host–microbe interactions that occur in the wild, or those that have occurred over evolutionary time. To fill this gap, we characterized natural bacterial communities associated with 14 species of Drosophila and related genera collected from distant geographic locations. To represent the ecological diversity of Drosophilids, examined species included fruit-, flower-, mushroom-, and cactus-feeders. In parallel, wild host populations were compared to laboratory strains, and controlled experiments were performed to assess the importance of host species and diet in shaping bacterial microbiome composition. We find that Drosophilid flies have taxonomically restricted bacterial communities, with 85% of the natural bacterial microbiome composed of only four bacterial families. The dominant bacterial taxa are widespread and found in many different host species despite the taxonomic, ecological, and geographic diversity of their hosts. Both natural surveys and laboratory experiments indicate that host diet plays a major role in shaping the Drosophila bacterial microbiome. Despite this, the internal bacterial microbiome represents only a highly reduced subset of the external bacterial communities, suggesting that the host exercises some level of control over the bacteria that inhabit its digestive tract. Finally, we show that laboratory strains provide only a limited model of natural host–microbe interactions. Bacterial taxa used in experimental studies are rare or absent in

  12. Bacterial profiling of White Plague Disease in a comparative coral species framework.

    PubMed

    Roder, Cornelia; Arif, Chatchanit; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Daniels, Camille; Shibl, Ahmed; Chavanich, Suchana; Voolstra, Christian R

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened throughout the world. A major factor contributing to their decline is outbreaks and propagation of coral diseases. Due to the complexity of coral-associated microbe communities, little is understood in terms of disease agents, hosts and vectors. It is known that compromised health in corals is correlated with shifts in bacterial assemblages colonizing coral mucus and tissue. However, general disease patterns remain, to a large extent, ambiguous as comparative studies over species, regions, or diseases are scarce. Here, we compare bacterial assemblages of samples from healthy (HH) colonies and such displaying signs of White Plague Disease (WPD) of two different coral species (Pavona duerdeni and Porites lutea) from the same reef in Koh Tao, Thailand, using 16S rRNA gene microarrays. In line with other studies, we found an increase of bacterial diversity in diseased (DD) corals, and a higher abundance of taxa from the families that include known coral pathogens (Alteromonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Vibrionaceae). In our comparative framework analysis, we found differences in microbial assemblages between coral species and coral health states. Notably, patterns of bacterial community structures from HH and DD corals were maintained over species boundaries. Moreover, microbes that differentiated the two coral species did not overlap with microbes that were indicative of HH and DD corals. This suggests that while corals harbor distinct species-specific microbial assemblages, disease-specific bacterial abundance patterns exist that are maintained over coral species boundaries.

  13. Interactions between Lactobacillus crispatus and Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)-Associated Bacterial Species in Initial Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Machado, António; Jefferson, Kimberly Kay; Cerca, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Certain anaerobic bacterial species tend to predominate the vaginal flora during bacterial vaginosis (BV), with Gardnerella vaginalis being the most common. However, the exact role of G. vaginalis in BV has not yet been determined. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that G. vaginalis is an early colonizer, paving the way for intermediate (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum) and late colonizers (e.g., Prevotella bivia). Theoretically, in order to function as an early colonizer, species would need to be able to adhere to vaginal epithelium, even in the presence of vaginal lactobacilli. Therefore, we quantified adherence of G. vaginalis and other BV-associated bacteria to an inert surface pre-coated with Lactobacillus crispatus using a new Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. We found that G. vaginalis had the greatest capacity to adhere in the presence of L. crispatus. Theoretically, an early colonizer would contribute to the adherence and/or growth of additional species, so we next quantified the effect of G. vaginalis biofilms on the adherence and growth of other BV-associated species by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) technique. Interestingly, G. vaginalis derived a growth benefit from the addition of a second species, regardless of the species. Conversely, G. vaginalis biofilms enhanced the growth of P. bivia, and to a minor extent of F. nucleatum. These results contribute to our understanding of BV biofilm formation and the progression of the disorder. PMID:23739678

  14. Association between Lactobacillus species and bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria, and bacterial vaginosis scores in pregnant Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Tamrakar, Renuka; Yamada, Takashi; Furuta, Itsuko; Cho, Kazutoshi; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Hideto; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Minakami, Hisanori

    2007-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV), the etiology of which is still uncertain, increases the risk of preterm birth. Recent PCR-based studies suggested that BV is associated with complex vaginal bacterial communities, including many newly recognized bacterial species in non-pregnant women. Methods To examine whether these bacteria are also involved in BV in pregnant Japanese women, vaginal fluid samples were taken from 132 women, classified as normal (n = 98), intermediate (n = 21), or BV (n = 13) using the Nugent gram stain criteria, and studied. DNA extracted from these samples was analyzed for bacterial sequences of any Lactobacillus, four Lactobacillus species, and four BV-related bacteria by PCR with primers for 16S ribosomal DNA including a universal Lactobacillus primer, Lactobacillus species-specific primers for L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. gasseri, and L. iners, and BV-related bacterium-specific primers for BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium. Results The prevalences of L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri were significantly higher, while those of BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium were significantly lower in the normal group than in the BV group. Unlike other Lactobacillus species, the prevalence of L. iners did not differ between the three groups and women with L. iners were significantly more likely to have BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium. Linear regression analysis revealed associations of BVAB2 and Megasphaera with Nugent score, and multivariate regression analyses suggested a close relationship between Eggerthella-like bacterium and BV. Conclusion The BV-related bacteria, including BVAB2, Megasphaera, Leptotrichia, and Eggerthella-like bacterium, are common in the vagina of pregnant Japanese women with BV. The presence of L. iners may be correlated with vaginal colonization by these BV-related bacteria. PMID:17986357

  15. Bacterial Contaminants of Poultry Meat: Sources, Species, and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rouger, Amélie; Zagorec, Monique

    2017-01-01

    With the constant increase in poultry meat consumption worldwide and the large variety of poultry meat products and consumer demand, ensuring the microbial safety of poultry carcasses and cuts is essential. In the present review, we address the bacterial contamination of poultry meat from the slaughtering steps to the use-by-date of the products. The different contamination sources are identified. The contaminants occurring in poultry meat cuts and their behavior toward sanitizing treatments or various storage conditions are discussed. A list of the main pathogenic bacteria of concern for the consumer and those responsible for spoilage and waste of poultry meat is established. PMID:28841156

  16. Bacterial Contaminants of Poultry Meat: Sources, Species, and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rouger, Amélie; Tresse, Odile; Zagorec, Monique

    2017-08-25

    With the constant increase in poultry meat consumption worldwide and the large variety of poultry meat products and consumer demand, ensuring the microbial safety of poultry carcasses and cuts is essential. In the present review, we address the bacterial contamination of poultry meat from the slaughtering steps to the use-by-date of the products. The different contamination sources are identified. The contaminants occurring in poultry meat cuts and their behavior toward sanitizing treatments or various storage conditions are discussed. A list of the main pathogenic bacteria of concern for the consumer and those responsible for spoilage and waste of poultry meat is established.

  17. Bacterial endophyte communities of three agricultural important grass species differ in their response towards management regimes

    PubMed Central

    Wemheuer, Franziska; Kaiser, Kristin; Karlovsky, Petr; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are critical for plant growth and health. However, compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophyte communities towards agricultural practices are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed the influence of fertilizer application and mowing frequency on bacterial endophytes in three agriculturally important grass species. For this purpose, we examined bacterial endophytic communities in aerial plant parts of Dactylis glomerata L., Festuca rubra L., and Lolium perenne L. by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes over two consecutive years. Although management regimes influenced endophyte communities, observed responses were grass species-specific. This might be attributed to several bacteria specifically associated with a single grass species. We further predicted functional profiles from obtained 16S rRNA data. These profiles revealed that predicted abundances of genes involved in plant growth promotion or nitrogen metabolism differed between grass species and between management regimes. Moreover, structural and functional community patterns showed no correlation to each other indicating that plant species-specific selection of endophytes is driven by functional rather than phylogenetic traits. The unique combination of 16S rRNA data and functional profiles provided a holistic picture of compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophytes in agricultural relevant grass species towards management practices. PMID:28102323

  18. Bacterial endophyte communities of three agricultural important grass species differ in their response towards management regimes.

    PubMed

    Wemheuer, Franziska; Kaiser, Kristin; Karlovsky, Petr; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Bernd

    2017-01-19

    Endophytic bacteria are critical for plant growth and health. However, compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophyte communities towards agricultural practices are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed the influence of fertilizer application and mowing frequency on bacterial endophytes in three agriculturally important grass species. For this purpose, we examined bacterial endophytic communities in aerial plant parts of Dactylis glomerata L., Festuca rubra L., and Lolium perenne L. by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes over two consecutive years. Although management regimes influenced endophyte communities, observed responses were grass species-specific. This might be attributed to several bacteria specifically associated with a single grass species. We further predicted functional profiles from obtained 16S rRNA data. These profiles revealed that predicted abundances of genes involved in plant growth promotion or nitrogen metabolism differed between grass species and between management regimes. Moreover, structural and functional community patterns showed no correlation to each other indicating that plant species-specific selection of endophytes is driven by functional rather than phylogenetic traits. The unique combination of 16S rRNA data and functional profiles provided a holistic picture of compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophytes in agricultural relevant grass species towards management practices.

  19. Bacterial endophyte communities of three agricultural important grass species differ in their response towards management regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemheuer, Franziska; Kaiser, Kristin; Karlovsky, Petr; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are critical for plant growth and health. However, compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophyte communities towards agricultural practices are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed the influence of fertilizer application and mowing frequency on bacterial endophytes in three agriculturally important grass species. For this purpose, we examined bacterial endophytic communities in aerial plant parts of Dactylis glomerata L., Festuca rubra L., and Lolium perenne L. by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes over two consecutive years. Although management regimes influenced endophyte communities, observed responses were grass species-specific. This might be attributed to several bacteria specifically associated with a single grass species. We further predicted functional profiles from obtained 16S rRNA data. These profiles revealed that predicted abundances of genes involved in plant growth promotion or nitrogen metabolism differed between grass species and between management regimes. Moreover, structural and functional community patterns showed no correlation to each other indicating that plant species-specific selection of endophytes is driven by functional rather than phylogenetic traits. The unique combination of 16S rRNA data and functional profiles provided a holistic picture of compositional and functional responses of bacterial endophytes in agricultural relevant grass species towards management practices.

  20. Modeling multispecies biofilms including new bacterial species invasion.

    PubMed

    D'Acunto, B; Frunzo, L; Klapper, I; Mattei, M R

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model for multispecies biofilm evolution based on continuum approach and mass conservation principles is presented. The model can describe biofilm growth dynamics including spatial distribution of microbial species, substrate concentrations, attachment, and detachment, and, in particular, is able to predict the biological process of colonization of new species and transport from bulk liquid to biofilm (or vice-versa). From a mathematical point of view, a significant feature is the boundary condition related to biofilm species concentrations on the biofilm free boundary. These data, either for new or for already existing species, are not required by this model, but rather can be predicted as results. Numerical solutions for representative examples are obtained by the method of characteristics. Results indicate that colonizing bacteria diffuse into biofilm and grow only where favorable environmental conditions exist for their development. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Digester performance and microbial community changes in thermophilic and mesophilic sequencing batch reactors fed with the fine sieved fraction of municipal sewage.

    PubMed

    Ghasimi, Dara S M; Tao, Yu; de Kreuk, Merle; Abbas, Ben; Zandvoort, Marcel H; van Lier, Jules B

    2015-12-15

    This study investigates the start-up and operation of bench-scale mesophilic (35 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) digesters treating the fine sieved fraction (FSF) from raw municipal sewage. FSF was sequestered from raw municipal wastewater, in the Netherlands, using a rotating belt filter equipped with a 350 micron mesh. For the given wastewater, the major component of FSF was toilet paper, which is estimated to be 10-14 kg per year per average person in the western European countries. A seven months adaptation time was allowed for the thermophilic and mesophilic digesters in order to adapt to FSF as the sole substrate with varying dry solids content of 10-25%. Different SBR cycle durations (14, 9 and 2 days) were applied for both temperature conditions to study methane production rates, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) dynamics, lag phases, as well as changes in microbial communities. The prevailing sludge in the two digesters consisted of very different bacterial and archaeal communities, with OP9 lineage and Methanothermobacter being pre-dominant in the thermophilic digester and Bacteroides and Methanosaeta dominating the mesophilic one. Eventually, decreasing the SBR cycle period, thus increasing the FSF load, resulted in improved digester performances, particularly with regard to the thermophilic digester, i.e. shortened lag phases following the batch feedings, and reduced VFA peaks. Over time, the thermophilic digester outperformed the mesophilic one with 15% increased volatile solids (VS) destruction, irrespective to lower species diversity found at high temperature.

  2. Arthrobacter Species as a Prey Cell Reservoir for Nonobligate Bacterial Predators in Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    species as a prey cell reservoir for nonobligate bacterial predators in soil. Can. J. Microbiol. 35 : 559--564, tine investigation at etc entreprise sur...8217 .Stieprom tice ~s species and Bad//uhs instead of’ A. glohifrbrmis. to provide 1 .0 mng/g soil did not nivoie from the soil did not interfecre because

  3. A new mathematical model of bacterial interactions in two-species oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Bénédicte; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Bronsard, Julie; Ginguené, Franck; Meuric, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis are bacterial inflammatory diseases, where the bacterial biofilms present on the tooth-supporting tissues switch from a healthy state towards a pathogenic state. Among bacterial species involved in the disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis has been shown to induce dysbiosis, and to induce virulence of otherwise healthy bacteria like Streptococcus gordonii. During biofilm development, primary colonizers such as S. gordonii first attach to the surface and allow the subsequent adhesion of periodontal pathogens such as P. gingivalis. Interactions between those two bacteria have been extensively studied during the adhesion step of the biofilm. The aim of the study was to understand interactions of both species during the growing phase of the biofilm, for which little knowledge is available, using a mathematical model. This two-species biofilm model was based on a substrate-dependent growth, implemented with damage parameters, and validated thanks to data obtained on experimental biofilms. Three different hypothesis of interactions were proposed and assayed using this model: independence, competition between both bacteria species, or induction of toxicity by one species for the other species. Adequacy between experimental and simulated biofilms were found with the last hypothetic mathematical model. This new mathematical model of two species bacteria biofilms, dependent on different substrates for growing, can be applied to any bacteria species, environmental conditions, or steps of biofilm development. It will be of great interest for exploring bacterial interactions in biofilm conditions. PMID:28253369

  4. A new mathematical model of bacterial interactions in two-species oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bénédicte; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Bronsard, Julie; Ginguené, Franck; Meuric, Vincent; Mahé, Fabrice; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis are bacterial inflammatory diseases, where the bacterial biofilms present on the tooth-supporting tissues switch from a healthy state towards a pathogenic state. Among bacterial species involved in the disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis has been shown to induce dysbiosis, and to induce virulence of otherwise healthy bacteria like Streptococcus gordonii. During biofilm development, primary colonizers such as S. gordonii first attach to the surface and allow the subsequent adhesion of periodontal pathogens such as P. gingivalis. Interactions between those two bacteria have been extensively studied during the adhesion step of the biofilm. The aim of the study was to understand interactions of both species during the growing phase of the biofilm, for which little knowledge is available, using a mathematical model. This two-species biofilm model was based on a substrate-dependent growth, implemented with damage parameters, and validated thanks to data obtained on experimental biofilms. Three different hypothesis of interactions were proposed and assayed using this model: independence, competition between both bacteria species, or induction of toxicity by one species for the other species. Adequacy between experimental and simulated biofilms were found with the last hypothetic mathematical model. This new mathematical model of two species bacteria biofilms, dependent on different substrates for growing, can be applied to any bacteria species, environmental conditions, or steps of biofilm development. It will be of great interest for exploring bacterial interactions in biofilm conditions.

  5. Bacterial carbon processing by generalist species in the coastal ocean.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Sun, Shulei; Edwards, Robert A; Hodson, Robert E; Moran, Mary Ann

    2008-02-07

    The assimilation and mineralization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by marine bacterioplankton is a major process in the ocean carbon cycle. However, little information exists on the specific metabolic functions of participating bacteria and on whether individual taxa specialize on particular components of the marine DOC pool. Here we use experimental metagenomics to show that coastal communities are populated by taxa capable of metabolizing a wide variety of organic carbon compounds. Genomic DNA captured from bacterial community subsets metabolizing a single model component of the DOC pool (either dimethylsulphoniopropionate or vanillate) showed substantial overlap in gene composition as well as a diversity of carbon-processing capabilities beyond the selected phenotypes. Our direct measure of niche breadth for bacterial functional assemblages indicates that, in accordance with ecological theory, heterogeneity in the composition and supply of organic carbon to coastal oceans may favour generalist bacteria. In the important interplay between microbial community structure and biogeochemical cycling, coastal heterotrophic communities may be controlled less by transient changes in the carbon reservoir that they process and more by factors such as trophic interactions and physical conditions.

  6. Comparative molecular analysis of bacterial species associated with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    De Iuliis, V; Ursi, S; Di Tommaso, L M; Caruso, M; Marino, A; D Ercole, S; Caputi, S; Sinjari, B; Festa, F; Macri, M; Martinotti, S; Vitullo, G; Toniato, E

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disorder affecting the supporting teeth structures, including gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing loss of connective tissue, reabsorption of alveolar bone and formation of periodontal pockets. The aim of this study is to find a correlation between bacterial growth and periodontal disease. Fifty-seven patients aged between 21 and 65 years, median age 46 years, were enrolled. According to gingival pocket depth, ranging from 3 to 7 mm, patients were divided into two groups: the first (30 patients, 53%) with deep pockets ³ 5 mm and the second (27 patients, 47%) less than 5 mm. The samples taken were processed for microbiological analysis by absolute quantitative real-time Taq-Man technique. Patients affected by periodontal disease were 32 (56%) and patients with gingival bleeding were 35 (61%). This data showed that the presence, the type and the bacterial load in gingival pockets were strongly correlated with gingival depth, periodontal disease and gingival bleeding. Quantitative microbiological analysis is a key point to improve patient compliance, allowing to choose the specific antibiotic treatment. avoiding antibiotic resistance and ensuring the successful outcome of therapy for periodontal disease.

  7. What's in a Name? New Bacterial Species and Changes to Taxonomic Status from 2012 through 2015

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Technological advancements in fields such as molecular genetics and the human microbiome have resulted in an unprecedented recognition of new bacterial genus/species designations by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. Knowledge of designations involving clinically significant bacterial species would benefit clinical microbiologists in the context of emerging pathogens, performance of accurate organism identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. In anticipation of subsequent taxonomic changes being compiled by the Journal of Clinical Microbiology on a biannual basis, this compendium summarizes novel species and taxonomic revisions specific to bacteria derived from human clinical specimens from the calendar years 2012 through 2015. PMID:27795334

  8. Transcriptional Responses of Treponema denticola to Other Oral Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Simanian, Emil J.; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-01-01

    The classic organization by Socransky and coworkers categorized the oral bacteria of the subgingival plaque into different complexes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are grouped into the red complex that is highly correlated with periodontal disease. Socransky's work closely associates red with orange complex species such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia but not with members of the other complexes. While the relationship between species contained by these complexes is in part supported by their ability to physically attach to each other, the physiological consequences of these interactions and associations are less clear. In this study, we employed T. denticola as a model organism to analyze contact-dependent responses to interactions with species belonging to the same complex (P. gingivalis and T. forsythia), the closely associated orange complex (using F. nucleatum and P. intermedia as representatives) and the unconnected yellow complex (using Streptococcus sanguinis and S. gordonii as representatives). RNA was extracted from T. denticola alone as well as after pairwise co-incubation for 5 hrs with representatives of the different complexes, and the respective gene expression profiles were determined using microarrays. Numerous genes related to motility, metabolism, transport, outer membrane and hypothetical proteins were differentially regulated in T. denticola in the presence of the tested partner species. Further analysis revealed a significant overlap in the affected genes and we identified a general response to the presence of other species, those specific to two of the three complexes as well as individual complexes. Most interestingly, many predicted major antigens (e.g. flagella, Msp, CTLP) were suppressed in responses that included red complex species indicating that the presence of the most closely associated species induces immune-evasive strategies. In summary, the data presented here provide

  9. Towards large-scale FAME-based bacterial species identification using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Slabbinck, Bram; De Baets, Bernard; Dawyndt, Peter; De Vos, Paul

    2009-05-01

    In the last decade, bacterial taxonomy witnessed a huge expansion. The swift pace of bacterial species (re-)definitions has a serious impact on the accuracy and completeness of first-line identification methods. Consequently, back-end identification libraries need to be synchronized with the List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in Nomenclature. In this study, we focus on bacterial fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling as a broadly used first-line identification method. From the BAME@LMG database, we have selected FAME profiles of individual strains belonging to the genera Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas. Only those profiles resulting from standard growth conditions have been retained. The corresponding data set covers 74, 44 and 95 validly published bacterial species, respectively, represented by 961, 378 and 1673 standard FAME profiles. Through the application of machine learning techniques in a supervised strategy, different computational models have been built for genus and species identification. Three techniques have been considered: artificial neural networks, random forests and support vector machines. Nearly perfect identification has been achieved at genus level. Notwithstanding the known limited discriminative power of FAME analysis for species identification, the computational models have resulted in good species identification results for the three genera. For Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, random forests have resulted in sensitivity values, respectively, 0.847, 0.901 and 0.708. The random forests models outperform those of the other machine learning techniques. Moreover, our machine learning approach also outperformed the Sherlock MIS (MIDI Inc., Newark, DE, USA). These results show that machine learning proves very useful for FAME-based bacterial species identification. Besides good bacterial identification at species level, speed and ease of taxonomic synchronization are major advantages of this computational species

  10. Species Composition of Bacterial Communities Influences Attraction of Mosquitoes to Experimental Plant Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Wesson, Dawn M.; Arellano, Consuelo; Schal, Coby

    2013-01-01

    In the container habitats of immature mosquitoes, catabolism of plant matter and other organic detritus by microbial organisms produces metabolites that mediate the oviposition behavior of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Public health agencies commonly use oviposition traps containing plant infusions for monitoring populations of these mosquito species, which are global vectors of dengue viruses. In laboratory experiments, gravid females exhibited significantly diminished responses to experimental infusions made with sterilized white oak leaves, showing that attractive odorants were produced through microbial metabolic activity. We evaluated effects of infusion concentration and fermentation time on attraction of gravid females to infusions made from senescent bamboo or white oak leaves. We used plate counts of heterotrophic bacteria, total counts of 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained bacterial cells, and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to show that changes in the relative abundance of bacteria and the species composition of bacterial communities influenced attraction of gravid A. aegypti and A. albopictus mosquitoes to infusions. DGGE profiles showed that bacterial species composition in infusions changed over time. Principal components analysis indicated that oviposition responses to plant infusions were in general most affected by bacterial diversity and abundance. Analysis of bacterial 16S rDNA sequences derived from DGGE bands revealed that Proteo-bacteria (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-, and Gamma-) were the predominant bacteria detected in both types of plant infusions. Gravid A. aegypti were significantly attracted to a mix of 14 bacterial species cultured from bamboo leaf infusion. The oviposition response of gravid mosquitoes to plant infusions is strongly influenced by abundance and diversity of bacterial species, which in turn is affected by plant species, leaf biomass, and fermentation

  11. UASB performance and microbial adaptation during a transition from mesophilic to thermophilic treatment of palm oil mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Khemkhao, Maneerat; Nuntakumjorn, Boonyarit; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Phalakornkule, Chantaraporn

    2012-07-30

    The treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) by an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) at organic loading rates (OLR) between 2.2 and 9.5 g COD l(-1) day(-1) was achieved by acclimatizing the mesophilic (37 °C) microbial seed to the thermophilic temperature (57 °C) by a series of stepwise temperature shifts. The UASB produced up to 13.2 l biogas d(-1) with methane content on an average of 76%. The COD removal efficiency ranged between 76 and 86%. Microbial diversity of granules from the UASB reactor was also investigated. The PCR-based DGGE analysis showed that the bacterial population profiles significantly changed with the temperature transition from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions. In addition, the results suggested that even though the thermophilic temperature of 57 °C was suitable for a number of hydrolytic, acidogenic and acetogenic bacteria, it may not be suitable for some Methanosaeta species acclimatized from 37 °C. Specifically, the bands associated with Methanosaeta thermophila PT and Methanosaeta harundinacea can be detected during the four consecutive operation phases of 37 °C, 42 °C, 47 °C and 52 °C, but their corresponding bands were found to fade out at 57 °C. The DGGE analysis predicted that the temperature transition can result in significant methanogenic biomass washout at 57 °C. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emerging Bacterial Infection: Identification and Clinical Significance of Kocuria Species

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Padmavali; Vaish, Ritu; Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Kale, Vinod; Kandi, Maheshwar Reddy; Bhoomagiri, Mohan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Recently there have been reports of gram-positive cocci which are morphologically similar to both Staphylococci and the Micrococci. These bacteria have been identified as Kocuria species with the help of automated identification system and other molecular methods including 16S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) evaluation. Kocuria belongs to the family Micrococcaceae which also includes Staphylococcus species and Micrococcus species. Isolation and clinical significance of these bacteria from human specimens warrant great caution as it does not necessarily confirm infection due to their ubiquitous presence, and as a normal flora of skin and mucous membranes in human and animals. Most clinical microbiology laboratories ignore such bacteria as laboratory and specimen contaminants. With increasing reports of infections associated with these bacteria, it is now important for clinical microbiologists to identify and enumerate the virulence and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of such bacteria and assist clinicians in improving the patient care and management. We review the occurrence and clinical significance of Kocuria species. PMID:27630804

  13. Bacterial genomic epidemiology, from local outbreak characterization to species-history reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gaiarsa, Stefano; De Marco, Leone; Comandatore, Francesco; Marone, Piero; Bandi, Claudio; Sassera, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriology has embraced the next-generation sequencing revolution, swiftly moving from the time of single genome sequencing to the age of genomic epidemiology. Hundreds and now even thousands of genomes are being sequenced for single bacterial species, allowing unprecedented levels of resolution and insight in the evolution and epidemic diffusion of the main bacterial pathogens. Here, we present a review of some of the most recent and groundbreaking studies in this field. PMID:26878934

  14. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization for the identification of bacterial species in archival heart valve sections of canine bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, B G; Craven, M; McDonough, S P; Nydam, D V; Scorza, V; Assarasakorn, S; Lappin, M; Simpson, K W

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial endocarditis (BE) is defined as inflammation of cardiac valve structures and/or the endocardium secondary to bacterial infection. Canine valvular BE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and ante-mortem diagnosis and post-mortem identification of causative organisms is problematic. Identification of bacteria in canine BE has traditionally relied on visualization of organisms on histological sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin (HE), Gram and modified Steiner's stains. Each of these staining techniques has limitations with respect to identification of bacterial species in cases of BE. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) has been introduced recently as a technique to identify bacteria in biological specimens. To our knowledge, FISH has not been used previously to identify bacteria in archival samples of heart valves from dogs with naturally occurring BE. We sought to determine whether FISH could detect the presence and species of bacteria in archival heart valve sections from dogs with BE, and to compare FISH to histochemical stains in the identification of bacteria. FISH detected bacteria in seven of 17 cases of canine BE and showed near perfect agreement with modified Steiner's stain for the detection of bacteria. FISH identified Streptococcus spp. and/or Staphylococcus spp. in all of these cases, but Bartonella spp. were not identified.

  15. Gene Loss Dominates As a Source of Genetic Variation within Clonal Pathogenic Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-07-10

    Some of the most dangerous pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Yersinia pestis evolve clonally. This means that little or no recombination occurs between strains belonging to these species. Paradoxically, although different members of these species show extreme sequence similarity of orthologous genes, some show considerable intraspecies phenotypic variation, the source of which remains elusive. To examine the possible sources of phenotypic variation within clonal pathogenic bacterial species, we carried out an extensive genomic and pan-genomic analysis of the sources of genetic variation available to a large collection of clonal and nonclonal pathogenic bacterial species. We show that while nonclonal species diversify through a combination of changes to gene sequences, gene loss and gene gain, gene loss completely dominates as a source of genetic variation within clonal species. Indeed, gene loss is so prevalent within clonal species as to lead to levels of gene content variation comparable to those found in some nonclonal species that are much more diverged in their gene sequences and that acquire a substantial number of genes horizontally. Gene loss therefore needs to be taken into account as a potential dominant source of phenotypic variation within clonal bacterial species.

  16. [Purification and characterization of thermostable amylases from two bacterial species].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongcun; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Niu, Dandan; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2008-02-01

    Two thermophilic bacterial isolates, strain 173 and strain 174, with raw starch-digesting activities were selected from thermophilic bacteria growing in hot spring of Tengchong County, Yunnan Province, China. By amplification, sequencing and alignment analysis of 16S ribosomal DNAs, they were identified as members of genus Geobacillus. In shaker flask culture Geobacillus sp. 173 produced 14.5 U/mL amylase and for Geobacillus sp. 174 with 12.9 U/mL. Both amylases were purified by starch absorption-desorption and chromatograph. The amylases from strain 173 and strain 174 purified to about 50 and 29 folds were respectively achieved with an overall yield of 34% and 41%. The maximum gelatinized-starch-digesting activity of the purified amylases were at 70 degrees C and pH 5.0 - 5.5. The high raw-starch-digesting activity of these enzymes were observed at 50 degrees C - 60 degrees C (from strain 173) and 40 degrees C - 60 degrees C (from strain 174). Both enzymes were not sensitive to ions including mental ions (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Zn2+) and others (EDTA, Citrate), but were slightly inhibited by ions such as Co2+, Cu2+ for amylase from strain 173 and Cu2+ for amylase from strain 174. Both enzyme had specificity of starch substrates.

  17. Prevalence of hydrogen peroxide-producing Lactobacillus species in normal women and women with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbach, D A; Davick, P R; Williams, B L; Klebanoff, S J; Young-Smith, K; Critchlow, C M; Holmes, K K

    1989-01-01

    A predominance of Lactobacillus species in the vaginal flora is considered normal. In women with bacterial vaginosis, the prevalence and concentrations of intravaginal Gardnerella vaginalis and anaerobes are increased, whereas the prevalence of intravaginal Lactobacillus species is decreased. Because some lactobacilli are known to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which can be toxic to organisms that produce little or no H2O2-scavenging enzymes (e.g., catalase), we postulated that an absence of H2O2-producing Lactobacillus species could allow an overgrowth of catalase-negative organisms, such as those found among women with bacterial vaginosis. In this study, H2O2-producing facultative Lactobacillus species were found in the vaginas of 27 (96%) of 28 normal women and 4 (6%) of 67 women with bacterial vaginosis (P less than 0.001). Anaerobic Lactobacillus species (which do not produce hydrogen peroxide) were isolated from 24 (36%) of 67 women with bacterial vaginosis and 1 (4%) of 28 normal women (P less than 0.001). The production of H2O2 by Lactobacillus species may represent a nonspecific antimicrobial defense mechanism of the normal vaginal ecosystem. PMID:2915019

  18. A highly precise and portable genome engineering method allows comparison of mutational effects across bacterial species

    PubMed Central

    Nyerges, Ákos; Csörgő, Bálint; Nagy, István; Bálint, Balázs; Bihari, Péter; Lázár, Viktória; Apjok, Gábor; Umenhoffer, Kinga; Bogos, Balázs; Pósfai, György; Pál, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Currently available tools for multiplex bacterial genome engineering are optimized for a few laboratory model strains, demand extensive prior modification of the host strain, and lead to the accumulation of numerous off-target modifications. Building on prior development of multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), our work addresses these problems in a single framework. Using a dominant-negative mutant protein of the methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) system, we achieved a transient suppression of DNA repair in Escherichia coli, which is necessary for efficient oligonucleotide integration. By integrating all necessary components into a broad-host vector, we developed a new workflow we term pORTMAGE. It allows efficient modification of multiple loci, without any observable off-target mutagenesis and prior modification of the host genome. Because of the conserved nature of the bacterial MMR system, pORTMAGE simultaneously allows genome editing and mutant library generation in other biotechnologically and clinically relevant bacterial species. Finally, we applied pORTMAGE to study a set of antibiotic resistance-conferring mutations in Salmonella enterica and E. coli. Despite over 100 million y of divergence between the two species, mutational effects remained generally conserved. In sum, a single transformation of a pORTMAGE plasmid allows bacterial species of interest to become an efficient host for genome engineering. These advances pave the way toward biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Finally, pORTMAGE allows systematic comparison of mutational effects and epistasis across a wide range of bacterial species. PMID:26884157

  19. Application of methods for identifying broiler chicken gut bacterial species linked with increased energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Torok, Valeria A; Ophel-Keller, Kathy; Loo, Maylene; Hughes, Robert J

    2008-02-01

    A high-throughput microbial profiling tool based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was developed to monitor the poultry gut microbiota in response to dietary manipulations. Gut microbial communities from the duodena, jejuna, ilea, and ceca of 48 birds fed either a barley control diet or barley diet supplemented with exogenous enzymes for degrading nonstarch polysaccharide were characterized by using multivariate statistical methods. Analysis of samples showed that gut microbial communities varied significantly among gut sections, except between the duodenum and jejunum. Significant diet-associated differences in gut microbial communities were detected within the ileum and cecum only. The dissimilarity in bacterial community composition between diets was 73 and 66% within the ileum and cecum, respectively. Operational taxonomic units, representing bacterial species or taxonomically related groups, contributing to diet-associated differences were identified. Several bacterial species contributed to differences between diet-related gut microbial community composition, with no individual bacterial species contributing more than 1 to 5% of the total. Using canonical analysis of principal coordinates biplots, we correlated differences in gut microbial community composition within the ileum and cecum to improved performance, as measured by apparent metabolizable energy. This is the first report that directly links differences in the composition of the gut microbial community with improved performance, which implies that the presence of specific beneficial and/or absence of specific detrimental bacterial species may contribute to the improved performance in these birds.

  20. Effect of species, breed, and age on bacterial load in bovine and bubaline semen

    PubMed Central

    Sannat, Chandrahas; Nair, Ajit; Sahu, S. B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. A.; Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Shende, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of species, breed and age on bacterial load in fresh and frozen semen of Cattle and Buffalo bull. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 56 cow and 10 buffalo bulls stationed at Central Semen Station Anjora, Durg (Chhattisgarh). Impact of breeds on bacterial load in semen was assessed using six breeds of cattle viz. Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi, Tharparkar, Jersey and Holstein Friesian (HF) cross. Cow bulls were categorized into four different groups based on their age (<4 years, 4-5 years, 5-6 years and > 6 years) to study variation among age groups. Bacterial load was measured in fresh and frozen semen samples from these bulls using the standard plate count (SPC) method and count was expressed as colony forming unit (CFU) per ml of semen. Results: Higher bacterial load was reported in fresh (2.36 × 104 ± 1943 CFU/ml) and frozen (1.00 × 10 ± 90 CFU/ml) semen of cow bulls as compared to buffalo bulls (1.95 × 104 ± 2882 and 7.75 × 102 ± 160 CFU/ml in fresh and frozen semen, respectively). Jersey bull showed significantly higher bacterial count (p < 0.05) both in fresh (4.07 × 104 ± 13927 CFU/ml) and frozen (1.92 × 103 ± 178 CFU/ml) semen followed by HF cross, Sahiwal, Gir, Red Sindhi and Tharparkar bull. Bulls aged < 4 years and more than 6 years yielded increased bacterial load in their semen. Although a minor variation was reported between species and among age groups, no significant differences were measured. Conclusion: Bacterial load in semen did not differ significantly between species and age groups; however significant variation was reported among different breeds. Bulls of Jersey breed showed significantly higher bacterial load in semen as compared to the crossbred and indigenous bull. PMID:27047115

  1. Increased Biomass Production by Mesophilic Food-Associated Bacteria through Lowering the Growth Temperature from 30°C to 10°C.

    PubMed

    Seel, Waldemar; Derichs, Julia; Lipski, André

    2016-07-01

    Five isolates from chilled food and refrigerator inner surfaces and closely related reference strains of the species Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, Bacillus cereus, Pedobacter nutrimenti, and Pedobacter panaciterrae were tested for the effect of growth temperature (30°C and 10°C) on biomass formation. Growth was monitored via optical density, and biomass formation was measured at the early stationary phase based on the following parameters in complex and defined media: viable cell count, total cell count, cell dry weight, whole-cell protein content, and cell morphology. According to the lack of growth at 1°C, all strains were assigned to the thermal class of mesophiles. Glucose and ammonium consumption related to cell yield were analyzed in defined media. Except for the protein content, temperature had a significant (t test, P < 0.05) effect on all biomass formation parameters for each strain. The results show a significant difference between the isolates and the related reference strains. Isolates achieved an increase in biomass production between 20% and 110% at the 10°C temperature, which is 15 to 25°C lower than their maximum growth rate temperatures. In contrast, reference strains showed a maximum increase of only about 25%, and some reference strains showed no increase or a decrease of approximately 25%. As expected, growth rates for all strains were higher at 30°C than at 10°C, while biomass production for isolates was higher at 10°C than at 30°C. In contrast, the reference strains showed similar growth yields at the two temperatures. This also demonstrates for mesophilic bacterial strains more efficient nutrient assimilation during growth at low temperatures. Until now, this characteristic was attributed only to psychrophilic microorganisms. For several psychrophilic species, increased biomass formation was described at temperatures lower than optimum growth temperatures, which are defined by the highest growth

  2. Increased Biomass Production by Mesophilic Food-Associated Bacteria through Lowering the Growth Temperature from 30°C to 10°C

    PubMed Central

    Seel, Waldemar; Derichs, Julia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Five isolates from chilled food and refrigerator inner surfaces and closely related reference strains of the species Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, Bacillus cereus, Pedobacter nutrimenti, and Pedobacter panaciterrae were tested for the effect of growth temperature (30°C and 10°C) on biomass formation. Growth was monitored via optical density, and biomass formation was measured at the early stationary phase based on the following parameters in complex and defined media: viable cell count, total cell count, cell dry weight, whole-cell protein content, and cell morphology. According to the lack of growth at 1°C, all strains were assigned to the thermal class of mesophiles. Glucose and ammonium consumption related to cell yield were analyzed in defined media. Except for the protein content, temperature had a significant (t test, P < 0.05) effect on all biomass formation parameters for each strain. The results show a significant difference between the isolates and the related reference strains. Isolates achieved an increase in biomass production between 20% and 110% at the 10°C temperature, which is 15 to 25°C lower than their maximum growth rate temperatures. In contrast, reference strains showed a maximum increase of only about 25%, and some reference strains showed no increase or a decrease of approximately 25%. As expected, growth rates for all strains were higher at 30°C than at 10°C, while biomass production for isolates was higher at 10°C than at 30°C. In contrast, the reference strains showed similar growth yields at the two temperatures. This also demonstrates for mesophilic bacterial strains more efficient nutrient assimilation during growth at low temperatures. Until now, this characteristic was attributed only to psychrophilic microorganisms. IMPORTANCE For several psychrophilic species, increased biomass formation was described at temperatures lower than optimum growth temperatures, which are defined by

  3. Identification of different bacterial species in biofilms using confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is used to discriminate between different species of bacteria grown in biofilms. Tests are performed using two bacterial species, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans, which are major components of oral plaque and of particular interest due to their association with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Dehydrated biofilms of these species are studied as a simplified model of dental plaque. A prediction model based on principal component analysis and logistic regression is calibrated using pure biofilms of each species and validated on pure biofilms grown months later, achieving 96% accuracy in prospective classification. When biofilms of the two species are partially mixed together, Raman-based identifications are achieved within ~2 μm of the boundaries between species with 97% accuracy. This combination of spatial resolution and predication accuracy should be suitable for forming images of species distributions within intact two-species biofilms.

  4. Bacterial persistence induced by salicylate via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiebin; El Meouche, Imane; Dunlop, Mary J.

    2017-01-01

    Persisters are phenotypic variants of regular cells that exist in a dormant state with low metabolic activity, allowing them to exhibit high tolerance to antibiotics. Despite increasing recognition of their role in chronic and recalcitrant infections, the mechanisms that induce persister formation are not fully understood. In this study, we find that salicylate can induce persister formation in Escherichia coli via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Salicylate-induced ROS cause a decrease in the membrane potential, reduce metabolism and lead to an increase in persistence. These effects can be recovered by culturing cells in the presence of a ROS quencher or in an anaerobic environment. Our findings reveal that salicylate-induced oxidative stress can lead to persistence, suggesting that ROS, and their subsequent impact on membrane potential and metabolism, may play a broad role in persister formation. PMID:28281556

  5. Bacterial community in sclerotia of Cenococcum species and soil in sub-alpine forest, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonoyama, Y.; Narisawa, K.; Ohta, H.; Watanabe, M.

    2009-04-01

    Species of Cenococcum, ectomycorrhizal fungi, may be particularly abundant in cold- or nutrient-stressed habitats. The fungus is easily recognized by its jet-black hyphae, and distinct compact masses of fungal mycelium called sclerotia. They are hard, black, comparatively smooth and mostly spherical. Sclerotia are formed in rhizosphere and can provide sufficient inoculums for several years. The purpose of this study is to investigate bacterial community inside sclerotia, with an interest on contribution of sclerotia to microbial diversity in rhizosphere. To investigate bacterial community inside of the fungal sclerotia by 16S rDNA gene clone library, several hundred of sclerotia (ca. 1g) were collected from sub-alpine forest soil in central Japan. Furthermore, three sclerotium grains were applied to investigate internal bacteria community by culture method. The isolated bacterial strains were then proceeded to determine their 16S rDNA partial sequences. The predominant group determined by clone library analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA genes with DNA from the sclerotia was Acidobacteria in both sclerotia and soil. Bacterial community of sclerotia showed higher diversity compared to soil. On the contrary, bacterial flora isolated from single sclerotium differed each other. Additionally, the bacterial community was composed by limited species of related genus.

  6. Differing prevalence and diversity of bacterial species in fetal membranes from very preterm and term labor.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hannah E; Harris, Kathryn A; Azizia, Malika; Bank, Lindsay; Carpenter, Bernadette; Hartley, John C; Klein, Nigel; Peebles, Donald

    2009-12-08

    Intrauterine infection may play a role in preterm delivery due to spontaneous preterm labor (PTL) and preterm prolonged rupture of membranes (PPROM). Because bacteria previously associated with preterm delivery are often difficult to culture, a molecular biology approach was used to identify bacterial DNA in placenta and fetal membranes. We used broad-range 16S rDNA PCR and species-specific, real-time assays to amplify bacterial DNA from fetal membranes and placenta. 74 women were recruited to the following groups: PPROM <32 weeks (n = 26; 11 caesarean); PTL with intact membranes <32 weeks (n = 19; all vaginal birth); indicated preterm delivery <32 weeks (n = 8; all caesarean); term (n = 21; 11 caesarean). 50% (5/10) of term vaginal deliveries were positive for bacterial DNA. However, little spread was observed through tissues and species diversity was restricted. Minimal bacteria were detected in term elective section or indicated preterm deliveries. Bacterial prevalence was significantly increased in samples from PTL with intact membranes [89% (17/19) versus 50% (5/10) in term vaginal delivery p = 0.03] and PPROM (CS) [55% (6/11) versus 0% (0/11) in term elective CS, p = 0.01]. In addition, bacterial spread and diversity was greater in the preterm groups with 68% (13/19) PTL group having 3 or more positive samples and over 60% (12/19) showing two or more bacterial species (versus 20% (2/10) in term vaginal deliveries). Blood monocytes from women with PTL with intact membranes and PPROM who were 16S bacterial positive showed greater level of immune paresis (p = 0.03). A positive PCR result was associated with histological chorioamnionitis in preterm deliveries. Bacteria are found in both preterm and term fetal membranes. A greater spread and diversity of bacterial species were found in tissues of women who had very preterm births. It is unclear to what extent the greater bacterial prevalence observed in all vaginal delivery groups reflects bacterial contamination

  7. The Use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Distinguishing Between Bacterial Pathogen Species and Strains

    PubMed Central

    Multari, Rosalie A.; Cremers, David A.; Dupre, Joanne M.; Gustafson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used in a blind study to successfully differentiate bacterial pathogens, both species and strain. The pathogens used for the study were chosen and prepared by one set of researchers. The LIBS data were collected and analyzed by another set of researchers. The latter researchers had no knowledge of the sample identities other than that (1) the first five of fifteen samples were unique (not replicates) and (2) the remaining ten samples consisted of two replicates of each of the first five samples. Using only chemometric analysis of the LIBS data, the ten replicate bacterial samples were successfully matched to each of the first five samples. The results of this blind study show it is possible to differentiate the bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli, three clonal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, and one unrelated MRSA strain using LIBS. This is an important finding because it demonstrates that LIBS can be used to determine bacterial pathogen species within a defined sample set and can be used to differentiate between clonal relationships among strains of a single multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacterial species. Such a capability is important for the development of LIBS instruments for use in medical, water, and food safety applications. PMID:20615288

  8. Assessing variation in bacterial composition between the rhizospheres of two mangrove tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Newton C. M.; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; Pires, Ana C. C.; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Angela; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda C. S.; Smalla, Kornelia

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to determine to what extent roots from the common mangrove tree species Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa are able to impose a selective force on the composition of sediment bacterial communities in mangrove intertidal sediments using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4 hyper-variable region). The novel results showed that root systems of A. schaueriana and L. racemosa are associated with increased bacterial dominance, lower richness and compositional shifts of sediment bacterial communities. The proportion of OTUs (operational taxonomc units) belonging to the orders Rhizobiales and Vibrionales were enriched in rhizosphere samples from both plant species and sulphur-reducing bacteria (SRB) belonging to the order Desulfobacterales and Desulfuromonadales were enriched in the rhizosphere of A. schaueriana. In addition, Clostridium and Vibrio populations were more abundant in different mangrove rhizospheres. A. schaueriana and L. racemosa roots appear to be able to impose a selective force on the composition of mangrove sediment bacterial communities and this phenomenon appears to be plant species specific. Our findings provide new insights into the potential ecological roles of bacterial guilds in plant-microbe interactions and may aid rhizoengineering approaches for replanting impacted mangrove areas.

  9. Improved Discrimination of Bacterial Spore Species With Ft-Ir Spectroscopy by Pretreatment With Autoclaving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    species of bacterial endospores: Bacillus cereus, Bacillus globigii, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium perfringens . Discrimination...Bacillus cereus is known to cause food poisoning. Some potentially pathogenic microorganisms, specifically from the genera Bacillus and Clostridium ...Bacillus and Clostridium species indicate that the two mid-infrared spectral regions, the amide I band (1500-1700 cm-1) and C-H regions (2700-3500

  10. Bacterial Communities in the Rhizospheres of Three Mangrove Tree Species from Beilun Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Xiong, Xiaofei; Xu, Zhanzhou; Lu, Chuqian; Cheng, Hao; Lyu, Xiangli; Zhang, Jinghuai; He, Wei; Deng, Wei; Lyu, Yihua; Lou, Quansheng; Hong, Yiguo; Fang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial communities played important roles in the high productivity mangrove ecosystem. In this study, we investigated the vertical distributions of rhizosphere bacteria from three mangrove species (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Kandelia candel and Aegiceras corniculatum) in Beilun Estuary, China using high throughput DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis showed that bacterial communities from mangrove rhizosphere sediments were dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria), followed by Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes and Acidobacteria. However, the ANOVA analysis on Shannon and Chao1 indices indicated that bacterial communities among sediments of the three mangrove species varied more strongly than the sampling depths. In addition, the PCA result demonstrated that the bacterial communities could be separated into three groups according to the mangrove species. Moreover, the dominated orders Rhodospirillales, GCA004 and envOPS12 were significantly different among sediments of the three mangrove species. The results of this study provided valuable information about the distribution feature of rhizosphere bacteria from Chinese mangrove plants and shed insights into biogeochemical transformations driven by bacteria in rhizosphere sediments.

  11. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Two Bornean Nepenthes Species with Differences in Nitrogen Acquisition Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sickel, Wiebke; Grafe, T Ulmar; Meuche, Ivonne; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Keller, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes have been studied for over a century, but surprisingly little is known about associations with microorganisms. The two species Nepenthes rafflesiana and Nepenthes hemsleyana differ in their pitcher-mediated nutrient sources, sequestering nitrogen from arthropod prey and arthropods as well as bat faeces, respectively. We expected bacterial communities living in the pitchers to resemble this diet difference. Samples were taken from different parts of the pitchers (leaf, peristome, inside, outside, digestive fluid) of both species. Bacterial communities were determined using culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacterial richness and community structure were similar in leaves, peristomes, inside and outside walls of both plant species. Regarding digestive fluids, bacterial richness was higher in N. hemsleyana than in N. rafflesiana. Additionally, digestive fluid communities were highly variable in structure, with strain-specific differences in community composition between replicates. Acidophilic taxa were mostly of low abundance, except the genus Acidocella, which strikingly reached extremely high levels in two N. rafflesiana fluids. In N. hemsleyana fluid, some taxa classified as vertebrate gut symbionts as well as saprophytes were enriched compared to N. rafflesiana, with saprophytes constituting potential competitors for nutrients. The high variation in community structure might be caused by a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were present in both study species, which might provide essential nutrients to the plant at times of low prey capture and/or rare encounters with bats.

  12. Bacterial Communities in the Rhizospheres of Three Mangrove Tree Species from Beilun Estuary, China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Xiong, Xiaofei; Xu, Zhanzhou; Lu, Chuqian; Cheng, Hao; Lyu, Xiangli; Zhang, Jinghuai; He, Wei; Deng, Wei; Lyu, Yihua; Lou, Quansheng; Hong, Yiguo; Fang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial communities played important roles in the high productivity mangrove ecosystem. In this study, we investigated the vertical distributions of rhizosphere bacteria from three mangrove species (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Kandelia candel and Aegiceras corniculatum) in Beilun Estuary, China using high throughput DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis showed that bacterial communities from mangrove rhizosphere sediments were dominated by Proteobacteria (mostly Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria), followed by Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes and Acidobacteria. However, the ANOVA analysis on Shannon and Chao1 indices indicated that bacterial communities among sediments of the three mangrove species varied more strongly than the sampling depths. In addition, the PCA result demonstrated that the bacterial communities could be separated into three groups according to the mangrove species. Moreover, the dominated orders Rhodospirillales, GCA004 and envOPS12 were significantly different among sediments of the three mangrove species. The results of this study provided valuable information about the distribution feature of rhizosphere bacteria from Chinese mangrove plants and shed insights into biogeochemical transformations driven by bacteria in rhizosphere sediments. PMID:27695084

  13. Speedy speciation in a bacterial microcosm: new species can arise as frequently as adaptations within a species

    PubMed Central

    Koeppel, Alexander F; Wertheim, Joel O; Barone, Laura; Gentile, Nicole; Krizanc, Danny; Cohan, Frederick M

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologists are challenged to explain the origins of enormous numbers of bacterial species worldwide. Contributing to this extreme diversity may be a simpler process of speciation in bacteria than in animals and plants, requiring neither sexual nor geographical isolation between nascent species. Here, we propose and test a novel hypothesis for the extreme diversity of bacterial species—that splitting of one population into multiple ecologically distinct populations (cladogenesis) may be as frequent as adaptive improvements within a single population's lineage (anagenesis). We employed a set of experimental microcosms to address the relative rates of adaptive cladogenesis and anagenesis among the descendants of a Bacillus subtilis clone, in the absence of competing species. Analysis of the evolutionary trajectories of genetic markers indicated that in at least 7 of 10 replicate microcosm communities, the original population founded one or more new, ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes) before a single anagenetic event occurred within the original population. We were able to support this inference by identifying putative ecotypes formed in these communities through differences in genetic marker association, colony morphology and microhabitat association; we then confirmed the ecological distinctness of these putative ecotypes in competition experiments. Adaptive mutations leading to new ecotypes appeared to be about as common as those improving fitness within an existing ecotype. These results suggest near parity of anagenesis and cladogenesis rates in natural populations that are depauperate of bacterial diversity. PMID:23364353

  14. Species sorting and neutral processes are both important during the initial assembly of bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Langenheder, Silke; Székely, Anna J

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown that species sorting, that is, the selection by local environmental conditions is important for the composition and assembly of bacterial communities. On the other hand, there are other studies that could show that bacterial communities are neutrally assembled. In this study, we implemented a microcosm experiment with the aim to determine, at the same time, the importance of species sorting and neutral processes for bacterial community assembly during the colonisation of new, that is, sterile, habitats, by atmospheric bacteria. For this we used outdoor microcosms, which contained sterile medium from three different rock pools representing different environmental conditions, which were seeded by rainwater bacteria. We found some evidence for neutral assembly processes, as almost every 4th taxon growing in the microcosms was also detectable in the rainwater sample irrespective of the medium. Most of these taxa belonged to widespread families with opportunistic growth strategies, such as the Pseudomonadaceae and Comamonadaceae, indicating that neutrally assembled taxa may primarily be generalists. On the other hand, we also found evidence for species sorting, as one out of three media selected a differently composed bacterial community. Species sorting effects were relatively weak and established themselves via differences in relative abundance of generalists among the different media, as well as media-specific occurrences of a few specific taxa. In summary, our results suggest that neutral and species sorting processes interact during the assembly of bacterial communities and that their importance may differ depending on how many generalists and specialists are present in a community. PMID:21270841

  15. Causality evaluation of bacterial species isolated from patients with community-acquired lower leg cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Chaniotakis, I; Gartzonika, C G; Gaitanis, G; Levidiotou-Stefanou, S; Bassukas, I D

    2016-09-01

    Lower leg cellulitis is a diffuse inflammation of the cutaneous connective tissue following invasion of microorganisms and with potential to recur. The causative agent is not routinely identified in clinical practice, and the empirical therapy initiated primarily targets the 'conventional' disease pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. To evaluate at case level, the role of bacterial species isolated from lesional skin in the pathogenesis of community-acquired lower leg cellulitis. Two sampling methods (superficial swab and biopsy) were applied to isolate bacterial species from 40 patients hospitalized for first (N = 24 cases) and recurrent (N = 16 patients) lower leg cellulitis episodes. Subsequently, a clinical-laboratory heuristic algorithm was employed to interpret causality associations of isolated species with disease episodes at case level. In 37/40 cases (92.5%), at least one bacterial species was identified with either sampling method. The number of different species/specimen isolated from superficial swabs compared to punch biopsies was significantly more (P < 0.001). A causative agent was identified in 16 cases (40%); it was a 'conventional' pathogen in seven patients and strains belonging to one of six 'non-conventional' pathogens in nine cases. There was no concordance in the spectrum of isolated pathogens with the two sampling methods (kappa-index = 0.028). Another four species may have participated in five patients as co-pathogens in mixed infections. There was also no difference in microbiological disease features between patients with first and recurrent cellulitis episodes. The application of a clinical-laboratory causality algorithm coupled with pooled culture results of more than one sampling methods in patients with lower leg cellulitis is anticipated to permit the identification of responsible bacterial species at case level and offer incentive for therapeutic intervention studies. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology

  16. Plants of the fynbos biome harbour host species-specific bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Miyambo, Tsakani; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Cowan, Don A; Valverde, Angel

    2016-08-01

    The fynbos biome in South Africa is globally recognised as a plant biodiversity hotspot. However, very little is known about the bacterial communities associated with fynbos plants, despite interactions between primary producers and bacteria having an impact on the physiology of both partners and shaping ecosystem diversity. This study reports on the structure, phylogenetic composition and potential roles of the endophytic bacterial communities located in the stems of three fynbos plants (Erepsia anceps, Phaenocoma prolifera and Leucadendron laureolum). Using Illumina MiSeq 16S rRNA sequencing we found that different subpopulations of Deinococcus-Thermus, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the endophytic bacterial communities. Alphaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria were prevalent in P. prolifera, whereas Deinococcus-Thermus dominated in L. laureolum, revealing species-specific host-bacteria associations. Although a high degree of variability in the endophytic bacterial communities within hosts was observed, we also detected a core microbiome across the stems of the three plant species, which accounted for 72% of the sequences. Altogether, it seems that both deterministic and stochastic processes shaped microbial communities. Endophytic bacterial communities harboured putative plant growth-promoting bacteria, thus having the potential to influence host health and growth.

  17. The in situ bacterial production of fluorescent organic matter; an investigation at a species level.

    PubMed

    Fox, B G; Thorn, R M S; Anesio, A M; Reynolds, D M

    2017-08-18

    Aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an essential role in biogeochemical cycling and transport of organic matter throughout the hydrological continuum. To characterise microbially-derived organic matter (OM) from common environmental microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was employed. This work shows that bacterial organisms can produce fluorescent organic matter (FOM) in situ and, furthermore, that the production of FOM differs at a bacterial species level. This production can be attributed to structural biological compounds, specific functional proteins (e.g. pyoverdine production by P. aeruginosa), and/or metabolic by-products. Bacterial growth curve data demonstrates that the production of FOM is fundamentally related to microbial metabolism. For example, the majority of Peak T fluorescence (> 75%) is shown to be intracellular in origin, as a result of the building of proteins for growth and metabolism. This underpins the use of Peak T as a measure of microbial activity, as opposed to bacterial enumeration as has been previously suggested. This study shows that different bacterial species produce a range of FOM that has historically been attributed to high molecular weight allochthonous material or the degradation of terrestrial FOM. We provide definitive evidence that, in fact, it can be produced by microbes within a model system (autochthonous), providing new insights into the possible origin of allochthonous and autochthonous organic material present in aquatic systems. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Bacterial Clearance by Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, Juliana K; das Gupta, Kaustav; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Iyer, Abishek; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2015-12-28

    Broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are used clinically as anticancer agents, and more isoform-selective HDACi have been sought to modulate other conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Mouse studies suggest that HDACi downregulate immune responses and may compromise host defense. However, their effects on human macrophage antimicrobial responses are largely unknown. Here, we show that overnight pretreatment of human macrophages with HDACi prior to challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or Escherichia coli results in significantly reduced intramacrophage bacterial loads, which likely reflect the fact that this treatment regime impairs phagocytosis. In contrast, cotreatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial challenge did not impair phagocytosis; instead, HDACi cotreatment actually promoted clearance of intracellular S. Typhimurium and E. coli. Mechanistically, treatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial infection enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation by these cells. The capacity of HDACi to promote the clearance of intracellular bacteria from human macrophages was abrogated when cells were pretreated with MitoTracker Red CMXRos, which perturbs mitochondrial function. The HDAC6-selective inhibitor tubastatin A promoted bacterial clearance from human macrophages, whereas the class I HDAC inhibitor MS-275, which inhibits HDAC1 to -3, had no effect on intracellular bacterial loads. These data are consistent with HDAC6 and/or related HDACs constraining mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production from human macrophages during bacterial challenge. Our findings suggest that, whereas long-term HDACi treatment regimes may potentially compromise host defense, selective HDAC inhibitors may have applications in treating acute bacterial infections.

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Promote Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Bacterial Clearance by Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ariffin, Juliana K.; das Gupta, Kaustav; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Iyer, Abishek; Reid, Robert C.; Fairlie, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Broad-spectrum histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are used clinically as anticancer agents, and more isoform-selective HDACi have been sought to modulate other conditions, including chronic inflammatory diseases. Mouse studies suggest that HDACi downregulate immune responses and may compromise host defense. However, their effects on human macrophage antimicrobial responses are largely unknown. Here, we show that overnight pretreatment of human macrophages with HDACi prior to challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or Escherichia coli results in significantly reduced intramacrophage bacterial loads, which likely reflect the fact that this treatment regime impairs phagocytosis. In contrast, cotreatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial challenge did not impair phagocytosis; instead, HDACi cotreatment actually promoted clearance of intracellular S. Typhimurium and E. coli. Mechanistically, treatment of human macrophages with HDACi at the time of bacterial infection enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation by these cells. The capacity of HDACi to promote the clearance of intracellular bacteria from human macrophages was abrogated when cells were pretreated with MitoTracker Red CMXRos, which perturbs mitochondrial function. The HDAC6-selective inhibitor tubastatin A promoted bacterial clearance from human macrophages, whereas the class I HDAC inhibitor MS-275, which inhibits HDAC1 to -3, had no effect on intracellular bacterial loads. These data are consistent with HDAC6 and/or related HDACs constraining mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production from human macrophages during bacterial challenge. Our findings suggest that, whereas long-term HDACi treatment regimes may potentially compromise host defense, selective HDAC inhibitors may have applications in treating acute bacterial infections. PMID:26711769

  20. Bacterial species associated with sound and Botrytis-infected grapes from a Greek vineyard.

    PubMed

    Nisiotou, Aspasia A; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Iliopoulos, Vassilios; Cocolin, Luca; Nychas, George-John E

    2011-02-28

    Grape bacterial microbiota plays central roles in the quality of grapes and wine, yet its diversity remains poorly described. In the present study, bacterial species associated with sound and Botrytis-infected grapes of two cultivars originating from the same vineyard were assessed. Isolates were identified by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and sequence analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene. Comparable counts were recorded between Botrytis-infected and sound grape samples. In all cases, the majority of isolates belonged to different species of Enterobacteriaceae. The dominant species in the vineyard was Klebsiella oxytoca that was found in different combinations with Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter spp., Erwinia sp., Pantoea dispersa, Tatumella ptyseos or other species. In fermenting musts, those populations declined while other species evolved, like Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterobacter ludwigii. Populations in botrytised samples persisted longer during spontaneous fermentations. Present study suggests that bacterial diversity on grapes may be wider than previously described. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A robust universal method for extraction of genomic DNA from bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Atashpaz, Sina; Khani, Sajjad; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Barar, Jaleh; Vahed, Sepideh Zununi; Azarbaijani, Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2010-01-01

    The intactness of DNA is the keystone of genome-based clinical investigations, where rapid molecular detection of life-threatening bacteria is largely dependent on the isolation of high-quality DNA. Various protocols have been so far developed for genomic DNA isolation from bacteria, most of which have been claimed to be reproducible with relatively good yields of high-quality DNA. Nonetheless, they are not fully applicable to various types of bacteria, their processing cost is relatively high, and some toxic reagents are used. The routine protocols for DNA extraction appear to be sensitive to species diversity, and may fail to produce high-quality DNA from different species. Such protocols remain time-consuming and tedious, thus to resolve some of these impediments, we report development of a very simple, rapid, and high-throughput protocol for extracting of high-quality DNA from different bacterial species. Based upon our protocol, interfering phenolic compounds were removed from extraction using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and RNA contamination was precipitated using LiCI. The UV spectrophotometric and gel electrophoresis analysis resulted in high A260/A280 ratio (>1.8) with high intactness of DNA. Subsequent evaluations were performed using some quality-dependent techniques (e.g., RAPD marker and restriction digestions). The isolated DNA from 9 different bacterial species confirmed the accuracy of this protocol which requires no enzymatic processing and accordingly its low-cost making it an appropriate method f r large-scale DNA isolation fromvarious bacterial species.

  2. Surface-motility induction, attraction and hitchhiking between bacterial species promote dispersal on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hagai, Efrat; Dvora, Reut; Havkin-Blank, Tal; Zelinger, Einat; Porat, Ziv; Schulz, Stefan; Helman, Yael

    2014-05-01

    The ability to move on solid surfaces provides ecological advantages for bacteria, yet many bacterial species lack this trait. We found that Xanthomonas spp. overcome this limitation by making use of proficient motile bacteria in their vicinity. Using X. perforans and Paenibacillus vortex as models, we show that X. perforans induces surface motility, attracts proficient motile bacteria and 'rides' them for dispersal. In addition, X. perforans was able to restore surface motility of strains that lost this mode of motility under multiple growth cycles in the lab. The described interaction occurred both on agar plates and tomato leaves and was observed between several xanthomonads and motile bacterial species. Thus, suggesting that this motility induction and hitchhiking strategy might be widespread and ecologically important. This study provides an example as to how bacteria can rely on the abilities of their neighboring species for their own benefit, signifying the importance of a communal organization for fitness.

  3. Massive Infection of Seabird Ticks with Bacterial Species Related to Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Muriel; Lebarbenchon, Camille; Jaeger, Audrey; Le Rouzic, Céline; Bastien, Matthieu; Lagadec, Erwan; McCoy, Karen D.; Pascalis, Hervé; Le Corre, Matthieu; Dellagi, Koussay; Tortosa, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Seabird ticks are known reservoirs of bacterial pathogens of medical importance; however, ticks parasitizing tropical seabirds have received less attention than their counterparts from temperate and subpolar regions. Recently, Rickettsia africae was described to infect seabird ticks of the western Indian Ocean and New Caledonia, constituting the only available data on bacterial pathogens associated with tropical seabird tick species. Here, we combined a pyrosequencing-based approach with a classical molecular analysis targeting bacteria of potential medical importance in order to describe the bacterial community in two tropical seabird ticks, Amblyomma loculosum and Carios (Ornithodoros) capensis. We also investigated the patterns of prevalence and host specificity within the biogeographical context of the western Indian Ocean islands. The bacterial community of the two tick species was characterized by a strong dominance of Coxiella and Rickettsia. Our data support a strict Coxiella-host tick specificity, a pattern resembling the one found for Rickettsia spp. in the same two seabird tick species. Both the high prevalence and stringent host tick specificity suggest that these bacteria may be tick symbionts with probable vertical transmission. Detailed studies of the pathogenicity of these bacteria will now be required to determine whether horizontal transmission can occur and to clarify their status as potential human pathogens. More generally, our results show that the combination of next generation sequencing with targeted detection/genotyping approaches proves to be efficient in poorly investigated fields where research can be considered to be starting from scratch. PMID:24657860

  4. Identification of household bacterial community and analysis of species shared with human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2013-11-01

    Microbial populations in indoor environments, where we live and eat, are important for public health. Various bacterial species reside in the kitchen, and refrigerators, the major means of food storage within kitchens, can be a direct source of food borne illness. Therefore, the monitoring of microbiota in the refrigerator is important for food safety. We investigated and compared bacterial communities that reside in the vegetable compartment of the refrigerator and on the seat of the toilet, which is recognized as highly colonized by microorganisms, in ten houses using high-throughput sequencing. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were predominant in refrigerator and toilet samples. However, Proteobacteria was more abundant in the refrigerator, and Firmicutes was more abundant in the toilet. These household bacterial communities were compared with those of human skin and gut to identify potential sources of household bacteria. Bacterial communities from refrigerators and toilets shared more species in common with human skin than gut. Opportunistic pathogens, including Propionibacterium acnes, Bacteroides vulgatus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, were identified as species shared with human skin and gut microbiota. This approach can provide a general background of the household microbiota and a potential method of source-tracking for public health purposes.

  5. Impact of lime, nitrogen and plant species on bacterial community structure in grassland microcosms.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nabla; Brodie, Eoin; Connolly, John; Clipson, Nicholas

    2004-10-01

    A microcosm-based approach was used to study impacts of plant and chemical factors on the bacterial community structure of an upland acidic grassland soil. Seven perennial plant species typical of both natural, unimproved (Nardus stricta, Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina and F. rubra) and fertilized, improved (Holcus lanatus, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens) grasslands were either left unamended or treated with lime, nitrogen, or lime plus nitrogen in a 75-day glasshouse experiment. Lime and nitrogen amendment were shown to have a greater effect on microbial activity, biomass and bacterial ribotype number than plant species. Liming increased soil pH, microbial activity and biomass, while decreasing ribotype number. Nitrogen addition decreased soil pH, microbial activity and ribotype number. Addition of lime plus nitrogen had intermediate effects, which appeared to be driven more by lime than nitrogen. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that lime and nitrogen addition altered soil bacterial community structure, while plant species had little effect. These results were further confirmed by multivariate redundancy analysis, and suggest that soil lime and nitrogen status are more important controllers of bacterial community structure than plant rhizosphere effects.

  6. Studies on interaction of colloidal silver nanoparticles (SNPs) with five different bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Khan, S Sudheer; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N

    2011-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are being increasingly used in many consumer products like textile fabrics, cosmetics, washing machines, food and drug products owing to its excellent antimicrobial properties. Here we have studied the adsorption and toxicity of SNPs on bacterial species such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus barbaricus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The influence of zeta potential on the adsorption of SNPs on bacterial cell surface was investigated at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH and with varying salt (NaCl) concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 M). The survival rate of bacterial species decreased with increase in adsorption of SNPs. Maximum adsorption and toxicity was observed at pH 5, and NaCl concentration of <0.5 M. A very less adsorption was observed at pH 9 and NaCl concentration >0.5 M, there by resulting in less toxicity. The zeta potential study suggests that, the adsorption of SNPs on the cell surface was related to electrostatic force of attraction. The equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption process were also studied. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms fitted well to the Langmuir model. The kinetics of adsorption fitted best to pseudo-first-order. These findings form a basis for interpreting the interaction of nanoparticles with environmental bacterial species.

  7. Cuticles of European and American lobsters harbor diverse bacterial species and differ in disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Miranda M A; Davies, Charlotte E; Kim, Anita; Tlusty, Michael; Wootton, Emma C; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Rowley, Andrew F

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of lobster shells have a significant impact on fishing industries but the risk of disease transmission between different lobster species has yet to be properly investigated. This study compared bacterial biofilm communities from American (Homarus americanus) and European lobsters (H. gammarus), to assess both healthy cuticle and diseased cuticle during lesion formation. Culture-independent molecular techniques revealed diversity in the bacterial communities of cuticle biofilms both within and between the two lobster species, and identified three bacterial genera associated with shell lesions plus two putative beneficial bacterial species (detected exclusively in healthy cuticle or healing damaged cuticle). In an experimental aquarium shared between American and European lobsters, heterospecific transmission of potentially pathogenic bacteria appeared to be very limited; however, the claws of European lobsters were more likely to develop lesions when reared in the presence of American lobsters. Aquarium biofilms were also examined but revealed no candidate pathogens for environmental transmission. Aquimarina sp. ‘homaria’ (a potential pathogen associated with a severe epizootic form of shell disease) was detected at a much higher prevalence among American than European lobsters, but its presence correlated more with exacerbation of existing lesions rather than with lesion initiation. PMID:24817518

  8. Diazotrophic potential among bacterial communities associated with wild and cultivated Agave species.

    PubMed

    Desgarennes, Damaris; Garrido, Etzel; Torres-Gomez, Miryam J; Peña-Cabriales, Juan J; Partida-Martinez, Laila P

    2014-12-01

    Agaves are major biotic resources in arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Despite their ecological, economical and cultural relevance, many aspects of the microbial communities associated with agaves are still unknown. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities associated with two Agave species by 16S rRNA- Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting and sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of biotic and abiotic factors in the structure of the bacterial communities. In parallel, we isolated and characterized diazotrophic bacteria associated with agaves, as Agave soils are characterized by their low nitrogen content. Our results demonstrate that in Agave, the structure of prokaryotic assemblages was mostly influenced by the community group, where the soil, episphere, and endosphere were clearly distinct. Proteobacteria (γ and α), Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria were the dominant phyla. Bacterial communities in the episphere of agaves were mainly influenced by the host species, whereas in the endosphere were affected by the season. Fifteen bacterial taxa were common and abundant in the endosphere of both Agave species during the dry season. Notably, some of the confirmed diazotrophic strains belonged to this group, suggesting a possible beneficial role in planta.

  9. Heavy metals species affect fungal-bacterial synergism during the bioremediation of fluoranthene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Kui; Ding, Ning; Peterson, Eric Charles; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    The co-occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with heavy metals (HMs) is very common in contaminated soils, but the influence of HMs on fungal-bacterial synergism during PAH bioremediation has not been investigated. The bioremediation of fluoranthene-contaminated sand using co-cultures of Acremonium sp. P0997 and Bacillus subtilis showed increases of 109.4 and 9.8 % in degradation compared to pure bacterial and fungal cultures, respectively, removing 64.1 ± 1.4 % fluoanthene in total. The presence of Cu(2+) reduced fluoranthene removal to 53.7 ± 1.7 %, while inhibiting bacterial growth, and reducing translocation of bacteria on fungal hyphae by 49.5 %, in terms of the bacterial translocation ratio. Cu(2+) reduced bacterial diffusion by 46.8 and 31.9 %, as reflected by D (a bulk random motility diffusional coefficient) and D eff (the effective one-dimensional diffusion coefficient) compared to the control without HM supplementation, respectively. However, Mn(2+) resulted in a 78.2 ± 1.9 % fluoranthene degradation, representing an increase of 21.9 %, while enhancing bacterial growth and bacterial translocation on fungal hyphae, showing a 12.0 % increase in translocation ratio, with no observable impact on D and D eff. Hence, the presence of HMs has been shown to affect fungal-bacterial synergism in PAH degradation, and this effect differs with HM species.

  10. Distribution of periodontopathic bacterial species in Japanese children with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Shuhei; Yamana, Aki; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Okawa, Rena; Fujita, Kazuyo; Kojima, Ayuchi; Nemoto, Hirotoshi; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto, Michiyo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent developments in molecular biological techniques have enabled rapid detection of periodontopathic bacterial species in clinical specimens. Accumulated evidence suggests that detection of specific bacterial species enables identification of subjects at high risk for the onset of periodontitis. We investigated the distribution of 10 selected periodontopathic bacterial species in dental plaque specimens obtained from children with disabilities who were attending daycare centers. Methods A total of 187 children (136 boys, 51 girls) aged 1-6 years old and diagnosed with such disabilities as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and autism, participated in the study. Subgingival dental plaque specimens were collected from the buccal side of the maxillary left second primary molar after a clinical examination. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the specimens and PCR analyses were carried out to detect 10 selected periodontopathic species using specific primers for each. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to analyze the correlations among clinical parameters and the detected species. Results The most frequently detected species was Capnocytophaga sputigena (28.3%), followed by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (20.9%) and Campylobacter rectus (18.2%). Eikenella corrodens, Capnocytophaga ochracea, and Prevotella nigrescence were detected in approximately 10% of the specimens, whereas Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia were rarely found, and Porphyromonas gingivalis was not detected in any of the subjects. The total numbers of detected species were positively correlated with the age of the subjects. There were 10 subjects with positive reactions for T. denticola and/or T. forsythia, in whom the total number of bacterial species was significantly higher as compared to the other subjects. Furthermore, subjects possessing C. rectus showed significantly greater values for periodontal pocket depth, gingival index

  11. Intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases: from bacterial community structure and functions to species of pathophysiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Desmarchelier, Charles; Haller, Dirk; Gérard, Philippe; Rohn, Sascha; Lepage, Patricia; Daniel, Hannelore

    2014-07-01

    The trillions of bacterial cells that colonize the mammalian digestive tract influence both host physiology and the fate of dietary compounds. Gnotobionts and fecal transplantation have been instrumental in revealing the causal role of intestinal bacteria in energy homeostasis and metabolic dysfunctions such as type-2 diabetes. However, the exact contribution of gut bacterial metabolism to host energy balance is still unclear and knowledge about underlying molecular mechanisms is scant. We have previously characterized cecal bacterial community functions and host responses in diet-induced obese mice using omics approaches. Based on these studies, we here discuss issues on the relevance of mouse models, give evidence that the metabolism of cholesterol-derived compounds by gut bacteria is of particular importance in the context of metabolic disorders and that dominant species of the family Coriobacteriaceae are good models to study these functions.

  12. Atomic-scale simulations of reactive oxygen plasma species interacting with bacterial cell walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, M.; Neyts, E. C.; Khalilov, U.; Snoeckx, R.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Bogaerts, A.

    2012-09-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in the use of low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical applications. Currently, however, there is very little fundamental knowledge regarding the relevant interaction mechanisms of plasma species with living cells. In this paper, we investigate the interaction of important plasma species, such as O3, O2 and O atoms, with bacterial peptidoglycan (or murein) by means of reactive molecular dynamics simulations. Specifically, we use the peptidoglycan structure to model the gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus murein. Peptidoglycan is the outer protective barrier in bacteria and can therefore interact directly with plasma species. Our results demonstrate that among the species mentioned above, O3 molecules and especially O atoms can break important bonds of the peptidoglycan structure (i.e. C-O, C-N and C-C bonds), which subsequently leads to the destruction of the bacterial cell wall. This study is important for gaining a fundamental insight into the chemical damaging mechanisms of the bacterial peptidoglycan structure on the atomic scale.

  13. Coral-Associated Bacterial Diversity Is Conserved across Two Deep-Sea Anthothela Species

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, Stephanie N.; Kellogg, Christina A.; France, Scott C.; Clostio, Rachel W.; Brooke, Sandra D.; Ross, Steve W.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-water corals, similar to tropical corals, contain diverse and complex microbial assemblages. These bacteria provide essential biological functions within coral holobionts, facilitating increased nutrient utilization and production of antimicrobial compounds. To date, few cold-water octocoral species have been analyzed to explore the diversity and abundance of their microbial associates. For this study, 23 samples of the family Anthothelidae were collected from Norfolk (n = 12) and Baltimore Canyons (n = 11) from the western Atlantic in August 2012 and May 2013. Genetic testing found that these samples comprised two Anthothela species (Anthothela grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) and Alcyonium grandiflorum. DNA was extracted and sequenced with primers targeting the V4–V5 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene using 454 pyrosequencing with GS FLX Titanium chemistry. Results demonstrated that the coral host was the primary driver of bacterial community composition. Al. grandiflorum, dominated by Alteromonadales and Pirellulales had much higher species richness, and a distinct bacterial community compared to Anthothela samples. Anthothela species (A. grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) had very similar bacterial communities, dominated by Oceanospirillales and Spirochaetes. Additional analysis of core-conserved bacteria at 90% sample coverage revealed genus level conservation across Anthothela samples. This core included unclassified Oceanospirillales, Kiloniellales, Campylobacterales, and genus Spirochaeta. Members of this core were previously recognized for their functional capabilities in nitrogen cycling and suggest the possibility of a nearly complete nitrogen cycle within Anthothela species. Overall, many of the bacterial associates identified in this study have the potential to contribute to the acquisition and cycling of nutrients within the coral holobiont. PMID:27092120

  14. Impact of grassland management regimes on bacterial endophyte diversity differs with grass species.

    PubMed

    Wemheuer, F; Wemheuer, B; Kretzschmar, D; Pfeiffer, B; Herzog, S; Daniel, R; Vidal, S

    2016-04-01

    Most plant species are colonized by endophytic bacteria. Despite their importance for plant health and growth, the response of these bacteria to grassland management regimes is still not understood. Hence, we investigated the bacterial community structure in three agricultural important grass species Dactylis glomerata L., Festuca rubra L. and Lolium perenne L. with regard to fertilizer application and different mowing frequencies. For this purpose, above-ground plant material was collected from the Grassland Management Experiment (GrassMan) in Germany in September 2010 and 2011. DNA was extracted from surface-sterilized plant tissue and subjected to 16S rRNA gene PCRs. Endophytic community structures were assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analysis of obtained PCR products. DGGE fingerprints revealed that fertilizer application significantly altered the endophytic communities in L. perenne and F. rubra but not in D. glomerata. Although no direct effect of mowing was observed, mowing frequencies in combination with fertilizer application had a significant impact on endophyte bacterial community structures. However, this effect was not observed for all three grass species in both years. Therefore, our results showed that management regimes changed the bacterial endophyte communities, but this effect was plant-specific and varied over time. Endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant health and growth. However, studies addressing the influence of grassland management regimes on these bacteria in above-ground plant parts are still missing. In this study, we present first evidence that fertilizer application significantly impacted bacterial community structures in three agricultural important grass species, whereas mowing had only a minor effect. Moreover, this effect was plant-specific and thus not visible for all grass species in each year. Consequently, this study sheds new light into the complex interaction of microbes and

  15. Coral-Associated Bacterial Diversity Is Conserved across Two Deep-Sea Anthothela Species.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Stephanie N; Kellogg, Christina A; France, Scott C; Clostio, Rachel W; Brooke, Sandra D; Ross, Steve W

    2016-01-01

    Cold-water corals, similar to tropical corals, contain diverse and complex microbial assemblages. These bacteria provide essential biological functions within coral holobionts, facilitating increased nutrient utilization and production of antimicrobial compounds. To date, few cold-water octocoral species have been analyzed to explore the diversity and abundance of their microbial associates. For this study, 23 samples of the family Anthothelidae were collected from Norfolk (n = 12) and Baltimore Canyons (n = 11) from the western Atlantic in August 2012 and May 2013. Genetic testing found that these samples comprised two Anthothela species (Anthothela grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) and Alcyonium grandiflorum. DNA was extracted and sequenced with primers targeting the V4-V5 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene using 454 pyrosequencing with GS FLX Titanium chemistry. Results demonstrated that the coral host was the primary driver of bacterial community composition. Al. grandiflorum, dominated by Alteromonadales and Pirellulales had much higher species richness, and a distinct bacterial community compared to Anthothela samples. Anthothela species (A. grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) had very similar bacterial communities, dominated by Oceanospirillales and Spirochaetes. Additional analysis of core-conserved bacteria at 90% sample coverage revealed genus level conservation across Anthothela samples. This core included unclassified Oceanospirillales, Kiloniellales, Campylobacterales, and genus Spirochaeta. Members of this core were previously recognized for their functional capabilities in nitrogen cycling and suggest the possibility of a nearly complete nitrogen cycle within Anthothela species. Overall, many of the bacterial associates identified in this study have the potential to contribute to the acquisition and cycling of nutrients within the coral holobiont.

  16. Coral-associated bacterial diversity is conserved across two deep-sea Anthothela species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawler, Stephanie N.; Kellogg, Christina A.; France, Scott C; Clostio, Rachel W; Brooke, Sandra D.; Ross, Steve W.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-water corals, similar to tropical corals, contain diverse and complex microbial assemblages. These bacteria provide essential biological functions within coral holobionts, facilitating increased nutrient utilization and production of antimicrobial compounds. To date, few cold-water octocoral species have been analyzed to explore the diversity and abundance of their microbial associates. For this study, 23 samples of the family Anthothelidae were collected from Norfolk (n = 12) and Baltimore Canyons (n = 11) from the western Atlantic in August 2012 and May 2013. Genetic testing found that these samples comprised two Anthothela species (Anthothela grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) and Alcyonium grandiflorum. DNA was extracted and sequenced with primers targeting the V4-V5 variable region of the 16S rRNA gene using 454 pyrosequencing with GS FLX Titanium chemistry. Results demonstrated that the coral host was the primary driver of bacterial community composition. Al. grandiflorum, dominated by Alteromonadales and Pirellulales had much higher species richness, and a distinct bacterial community compared to Anthothela samples. Anthothela species (A. grandiflora and Anthothela sp.) had very similar bacterial communities, dominated by Oceanospirillales and Spirochaetes. Additional analysis of core-conserved bacteria at 90% sample coverage revealed genus level conservation across Anthothela samples. This core included unclassified Oceanospirillales, Kiloniellales, Campylobacterales, and genus Spirochaeta. Members of this core were previously recognized for their functional capabilities in nitrogen cycling and suggest the possibility of a nearly complete nitrogen cycle within Anthothela species. Overall, many of the bacterial associates identified in this study have the potential to contribute to the acquisition and cycling of nutrients within the coral holobiont.

  17. Different management practices are associated with mesophilic and thermophilic spore levels in bulk tank raw milk.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Kent, D J; Boor, K J; Martin, N H; Wiedmann, M

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial endospores (also referred to as spores) present in raw milk are capable of surviving pasteurization and other adverse conditions encountered during dairy powder production. Therefore, requiring low spore levels in raw ingredients (e.g., raw milk) may be necessary for producing dairy powders with low spore counts. To identify potential associations between management practices and spore levels in raw milk, we sampled bulk tank raw milk from 33 farms throughout New York State every other month for 1yr. Following spore pasteurization (80°C for 12min), samples were incubated at 3 different temperatures to enumerate psychrotolerant (6°C for 10 d), mesophilic (32°C for 48h), and thermophilic (55°C for 48h) spores. An additional enrichment procedure was used to detect spores present at low levels (<10 spores/mL). Overall, psychrotolerant, mesophilic, and thermophilic spores were detected (at levels ≥10 spores/mL) in 1, 74, and 58% of bulk tank raw milk samples, respectively. Although thermophilic spore levels could not be quantified (due to bacterial swarming), mesophilic spore levels ranged from below detection (<10 spores/mL) to 680 spores/mL. Data collected through surveys were used to identify management practices associated with either mesophilic or thermophilic spore levels. We found that different management practices are associated with mesophilic and thermophilic spore levels. Low mesophilic spore levels in bulk tank raw milk samples were associated with (1) large herd size, (2) use of sawdust or sand bedding, and (3) not fore stripping during the premilking routine. Management practices that were associated with lower odds of having a thermophilic spore level ≥10 spores/mL are (1) large herd size, (2) spray-based application of the postmilking disinfectant, (3) dry massaging the udder during the premilking routine, and (4) the use of straw bedding. Collectively, these results suggest that different management practices may influence mesophilic

  18. Bacterial communities associated with the pitcher fluids of three Nepenthes (Nepenthaceae) pitcher plant species growing in the wild.

    PubMed

    Chou, Lee Yiung; Clarke, Charles M; Dykes, Gary A

    2014-10-01

    Nepenthes pitcher plants produce modified jug-shaped leaves to attract, trap and digest insect prey. We used 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing to compare bacterial communities in pitcher fluids of each of three species, namely Nepenthes ampullaria, Nepenthes gracilis and Nepenthes mirabilis, growing in the wild. In contrast to previous greenhouse-based studies, we found that both opened and unopened pitchers harbored bacterial DNA. Pitchers of N. mirabilis had higher bacterial diversity as compared to other Nepenthes species. The composition of the bacterial communities could be different between pitcher types for N. mirabilis (ANOSIM: R = 0.340, p < 0.05). Other Nepenthes species had similar bacterial composition between pitcher types. SIMPER showed that more than 50 % of the bacterial taxa identified from the open pitchers of N. mirabilis were not found in other groups. Our study suggests that bacteria in N. mirabilis are divided into native and nonnative groups.

  19. The Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase from the Mesophilic Bacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus Is a Highly Active Thermozyme

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Andreas; Botelho, Hugo M.; Kindinger, Florian; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2012-01-01

    A biochemical, biophysical, and phylogenetic study of the sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR) from the mesophilic gammaproteobacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus (HnSOR) was performed in order to determine the structural and biochemical properties of the enzyme. SOR proteins from 14 predominantly chemolithoautotrophic bacterial and archaeal species are currently available in public databases. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that they form a coherent protein family. The HnSOR purified from Escherichia coli after heterologous gene expression had a temperature range of activity of 10 to 99°C with an optimum at 80°C (42 U/mg protein). Sulfite, thiosulfate, and hydrogen sulfide were formed at various stoichiometries in a range between pH 5.4 and 11 (optimum pH 8.4). Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering showed that the HnSOR adopts secondary and quaternary structures similar to those of the 24-subunit enzyme from the hyperthermophile Acidianus ambivalens (AaSOR). The melting point of the HnSOR was ≈20°C lower than that of the AaSOR, when analyzed with CD-monitored thermal unfolding. Homology modeling showed that the secondary structure elements of single subunits are conserved. Subtle changes in the pores of the outer shell and increased flexibility might contribute to activity at low temperature. We concluded that the thermostability was the result of a rigid protein core together with the stabilizing effect of the 24-subunit hollow sphere. PMID:22139503

  20. Different pioneer plant species select specific rhizosphere bacterial communities in a high mountain environment.

    PubMed

    Ciccazzo, Sonia; Esposito, Alfonso; Rolli, Eleonora; Zerbe, Stefan; Daffonchio, Daniele; Brusetti, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The rhizobacterial communities of 29 pioneer plants belonging to 12 species were investigated in an alpine ecosystem to assess if plants from different species could select for specific rhizobacterial communities. Rhizospheres and unvegetated soils were collected from a floristic pioneer stage plot at 2,400 m a.s.l. in the forefield of Weisskugel Glacier (Matsch Valley, South Tyrol, Italy), after 160 years of glacier retreat. To allow for a culture-independent perspective, total environmental DNA was extracted from both rhizosphere and bare soil samples and analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). ARISA fingerprinting showed that rhizobacterial genetic structure was extremely different from bare soil bacterial communities while rhizobacterial communities clustered strictly together according to the plant species. Sequencing of DGGE bands showed that rhizobacterial communities were mainly composed of Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria whereas bare soil was colonized by Acidobacteria and Clostridia. UniFrac significance calculated on DGGE results confirmed the rhizosphere effect exerted by the 12 species and showed different bacterial communities (P < 0.05) associated with all the plant species. These results pointed out that specific rhizobacterial communities were selected by pioneer plants of different species in a high mountain ecosystem characterized by oligotrophic and harsh environmental conditions, during an early primary succession.

  1. [Continuous bio-hydrogen production by mesophilic and thermophilic cultures].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-E; Cui, Long-Tao; Xing, Wei; Yang, Yang

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic biological hydrogen productions were achieved successfully in two lab-scale anaerobic hydrogen production reactors under mesophilic (37 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) conditions, respectively. The mesophilic reactor, a CSTR, was operated over 4 months by seeding with river sediments and feeding with glucose solution, in which the highest hydrogen production rate was 8.6 L/(L x d) and the substrate hydrogen production molar ratio (H2/glucose) was 1.98. After seeded with anaerobic methanogenic granules, a UASB reactor was thermophilically operated by feeding with sucrose solution and during its steady operation period, the hydrogen production rate was 6.8 L/(L x d) and the substrate hydrogen production molar ratio (H2/sucrose) was 3.6. Within the produced gas, the H2 percentages were about 43% and others were CO2, no methane could be detected. Thermophilic hydrogen-producing granules were successfully cultivated in the UASB reactor, which were grey-white in color, the diameters were about 0.8 - 1.2 mm, and typical settling velocities were about 30 - 40 m/h. Through SEM a great number of bacilli could be found on the surface of the granules which made the surface rough. Total DNA of these two hydrogen production sludges were extracted and purified, and the PCR and DGGE process were conducted, the results indicate that most of the eubacteria in two sludges are the same, but the dominant species are obviously different with each other.

  2. Plant-associated bacterial populations on native and invasive plant species: comparisons between 2 freshwater environments.

    PubMed

    Olapade, Ola A; Pung, Kayleigh

    2012-06-01

    Plant-microbial interactions have been well studied because of the ecological importance of such relationships in aquatic systems. However, general knowledge regarding the composition of these biofilm communities is still evolving, partly as a result of several confounding factors that are attributable to plant host properties and to hydrodynamic conditions in aquatic environments. In this study, the occurrences of various bacterial phylogenetic taxa on 2 native plants, i.e., mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum L.) and cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum Bartram), and on an invasive species, i.e., garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb.) Cavara & Grande), were quantitatively examined using nucleic acid staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The plants were incubated in triplicates for about a week within the Kalamazoo River and Pierce Cedar Creek as well as in microcosms. The bacterial groups targeted for enumeration are known to globally occur in relatively high abundance and are also ubiquitously distributed in freshwater environments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of the bacterioplankton assemblages revealed that the majority of bacterial cells that hybridized with the different probes were similar between the 2 sites. In contrast, the plant-associated populations while similar on the 3 plants incubated in Kalamazoo River, their representations were highest on the 2 native plants relative to the invasive species in Pierce Cedar Creek. Overall, our results further suggested that epiphytic bacterial assemblages are probably under the influences of and probably subsequently respond to multiple variables and conditions in aquatic milieus.

  3. Bacterial-biota dynamics of eight bryophyte species from different ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Koua, Faisal Hammad Mekky; Kimbara, Kazuhide; Tani, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of bryophyte-associated microorganisms in various ecological aspects including their crucial roles in the soil-enrichment of organic mass and N2 fixation, nonetheless, little is known about the microbial diversity of the bryophyte phyllospheres (epi-/endophytes). To get insights into bacterial community structures and their dynamics on the bryophyte habitats in different ecosystems and their potential biological roles, we utilized the 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE and subsequent phylogenetic analyses to investigate the bacterial community of eight bryophyte species collected from three distinct ecosystems from western Japan. Forty-two bacterial species belonging to γ-proteobacteria and Firmicutes with 71.4% and 28.6%, respectively, were identified among 90 DGGE gel band population. These DGGE-bands were assigned to 13 different genera with obvious predomination the genus Clostridium with 21.4% from the total bacterial community. These analyses provide new insights into bryophyte-associated bacteria and their relations to the ecosystems. PMID:25737654

  4. Assessing the viability of bacterial species in drinking water by combined cellular and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Kahlisch, Leila; Henne, Karsten; Gröbe, Lothar; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-02-01

    The question which bacterial species are present in water and if they are viable is essential for drinking water safety but also of general relevance in aquatic ecology. To approach this question we combined propidium iodide/SYTO9 staining ("live/dead staining" indicating membrane integrity), fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and community fingerprinting for the analysis of a set of tap water samples. Live/dead staining revealed that about half of the bacteria in the tap water had intact membranes. Molecular analysis using 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprints and sequencing of drinking water bacteria before and after FACS sorting revealed: (1) the DNA- and RNA-based overall community structure differed substantially, (2) the community retrieved from RNA and DNA reflected different bacterial species, classified as 53 phylotypes (with only two common phylotypes), (3) the percentage of phylotypes with intact membranes or damaged cells were comparable for RNA- and DNA-based analyses, and (4) the retrieved species were primarily of aquatic origin. The pronounced difference between phylotypes obtained from DNA extracts (dominated by Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria) and from RNA extracts (dominated by Alpha-, Beta-, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria) demonstrate the relevance of concomitant RNA and DNA analyses for drinking water studies. Unexpected was that a comparable fraction (about 21%) of phylotypes with membrane-injured cells was observed for DNA- and RNA-based analyses, contradicting the current understanding that RNA-based analyses represent the actively growing fraction of the bacterial community. Overall, we think that this combined approach provides an interesting tool for a concomitant phylogenetic and viability analysis of bacterial species of drinking water.

  5. Colonization of the upper genital tract by vaginal bacterial species in non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    MITCHELL, Caroline M.; HAICK, Anoria; NKWOPARA, Evangelyn; GARCIA, Rochelle; RENDI, Mara; AGNEW, Kathy; FREDRICKS, David N.; ESCHENBACH, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate upper genital tract (UGT) presence of vaginal bacterial species using sensitive molecular methods capable of detecting fastidious bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria. Study Design Vaginal swabs were collected prior to hysterectomy. The excised uterus was sterilely opened and swabs collected from endometrium and upper endocervix. DNA was tested in 11 quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for 12 bacterial species: Lactobacillus iners, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Megasphaera spp., Prevotella spp., Leptotrichia/Sneathia, BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3 and a broad-range16S rRNA gene assay. Endometrial fluid was tested with Luminex and ELISA for cytokines and defensins, and tissue for gene expression of defensins and cathelicidin. Results We enrolled 58 women: mean age 43 + 7 years, mostly white (n = 46; 79%) and BV-negative (n = 43; 74%). By species-specific qPCR, 55 (95%) had UGT colonization with at least one species (n = 52), or were positive by 16S PCR (n = 3). The most common species were L. iners (45% UGT, 61% vagina), Prevotella spp. (33% UGT, 76% vagina) and L. crispatus (33% UGT, 56% vagina). Median quantities of bacteria in the UGT were lower than vaginal levels by 2–4 log10 rRNA gene copies/swab. There were no differences in endometrial inflammatory markers between women with no bacteria, Lactobacillus only or any BV-associated species in the UGT. Conclusion Our data suggest that the endometrial cavity is not sterile in most women undergoing hysterectomy, and that the presence of low levels of bacteria in the uterus is not associated with significant inflammation. PMID:25524398

  6. The importance of species sorting differs between habitat generalists and specialists in bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Székely, Anna J; Langenheder, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the spatial turnover of bacterial communities, that is, beta-diversity, is determined by a combination of different assembly mechanisms, such as species sorting, that is, environmental filtering, and dispersal-related mechanisms. However, it is currently unclear to what extent the importance of the different mechanisms depends on community traits. Here, we implemented a study using a rock pool metacommunity to test whether habitat specialization of bacterial taxa and groups or their phylogenetic identity influenced by which mechanisms communities were assembled. In general, our results show that species sorting was the most important assembly mechanism. However, we found that a larger fraction of the variation in bacterial community composition between pools could be explained by environmental factors in case of habitat generalists, that is, taxa that were widespread and abundant in the metacommunity, compared with habitat specialists, that is, taxa that had a more restricted distribution range and tended to be rare. Differences in assembly mechanisms were observed between different major phyla and classes. However, also here, a larger fraction of the variation in community composition among pools could be explained for taxonomic groups that contained on average more habitat generalists. In summary, our results show that species sorting is stronger for the most common taxa, indicating that beta-diversity along environmental gradients can be adequately described without considering rare taxa.

  7. Loline alkaloid production by fungal endophytes of Fescue species select for particular epiphytic bacterial microflora

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Elizabeth; Lindow, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The leaves of fescue grasses are protected from herbivores by the production of loline alkaloids by the mutualist fungal endophytes Neotyphodium sp. or Epichloë sp. Most bacteria that reside on the leaf surface of such grasses can consume these defensive chemicals. Loline-consuming bacteria are rare on the leaves of other plant species. Several bacterial species including Burkholderia ambifaria recovered from tall fescue could use N-formyl loline as a sole carbon and nitrogen source in culture and achieved population sizes that were about eightfold higher when inoculated onto plants harboring loline-producing fungal endophytes than on plants lacking such endophytes or which were colonized by fungal variants incapable of loline production. In contrast, mutants of B. ambifaria and other bacterial species incapable of loline catabolism achieved similarly low population sizes on tall fescue colonized by loline-producing Neotyphodium sp. and on plants lacking this endophytic fungus. Lolines that are released onto the surface of plants benefiting from a fungal mutualism thus appear to be a major resource that can be exploited by epiphytic bacteria, thereby driving the establishment of a characteristic bacterial community on such plants. PMID:24108329

  8. [Finding of the bacterial species Edwardsiella tarda in the aquarium fish Betta splendens].

    PubMed

    Vladík, P; Prouza, A; Vítovec, J

    1983-01-01

    A case of the mass occurrence of a disease in the aquarium fish species Betta splendens is described; morphologically the disease was characterized by the finding of large dermal changes located mainly in the dorsal part and by miliary granulomata in liver, spleen and kidneys. The granulomata consisted of epitheloid light cells with centrally located necrosis. Gram-negative bacteria with morphological and biochemical characteristics corresponding to the bacterial species Edwardsiella tarda were isolated from the kidneys, liver and from the dermal lesion. The characteristics of the strains isolated by us were compared with the reference Edwardsiella strain (Bth 1/64) obtained from the Czechoslovak collection of type cultures, Prague.

  9. Effects of viruses on bacterial functions under contrasting nutritional conditions for four species of bacteria isolated from Hong Kong waters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Xu, Jie; Harrison, Paul J; He, Lei; Yin, Kedong

    2015-09-25

    Free living viruses are ubiquitous in marine waters and concentrations are usually several times higher than the bacterial abundance. These viruses are capable of lysing host bacteria and therefore, play an important role in the microbial loop in oligotrophic waters. However, few studies have been conducted to compare the role of viruses in regulating bacterial abundance and heterotrophic activities between natural oligotrophic waters and anthropogenic influenced eutrophic waters. In this study, we examined viral effects on bacterial functions of four single bacterial species incubated with natural viral assemblages in seawater samples from eutrophic and oligotrophic waters. The viral-lysis of bacteria was significantly higher in eutrophic than oligotrophic waters. This suggests that viruses were capable of controlling bacterial abundance, respiration and production in the eutrophic waters. Cellular bacterial respiration and production was higher with viruses than without viruses, which was more evident in the oligotrophic waters. These results indicate that viruses can slow down bacterial consumption of oxygen and reduce bacteria-induced eutrophication effects in anthropogenic eutrophic waters, but switch to the role of sustaining the bacterial population when nutrients are limiting. There were bacterial species differences in resisting viral attack, which can influence the dominance and biodiversity of bacterial species in coastal waters.

  10. Effects of viruses on bacterial functions under contrasting nutritional conditions for four species of bacteria isolated from Hong Kong waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Xu, Jie; Harrison, Paul J.; He, Lei; Yin, Kedong

    2015-09-01

    Free living viruses are ubiquitous in marine waters and concentrations are usually several times higher than the bacterial abundance. These viruses are capable of lysing host bacteria and therefore, play an important role in the microbial loop in oligotrophic waters. However, few studies have been conducted to compare the role of viruses in regulating bacterial abundance and heterotrophic activities between natural oligotrophic waters and anthropogenic influenced eutrophic waters. In this study, we examined viral effects on bacterial functions of four single bacterial species incubated with natural viral assemblages in seawater samples from eutrophic and oligotrophic waters. The viral-lysis of bacteria was significantly higher in eutrophic than oligotrophic waters. This suggests that viruses were capable of controlling bacterial abundance, respiration and production in the eutrophic waters. Cellular bacterial respiration and production was higher with viruses than without viruses, which was more evident in the oligotrophic waters. These results indicate that viruses can slow down bacterial consumption of oxygen and reduce bacteria-induced eutrophication effects in anthropogenic eutrophic waters, but switch to the role of sustaining the bacterial population when nutrients are limiting. There were bacterial species differences in resisting viral attack, which can influence the dominance and biodiversity of bacterial species in coastal waters.

  11. Effects of viruses on bacterial functions under contrasting nutritional conditions for four species of bacteria isolated from Hong Kong waters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Xu, Jie; Harrison, Paul J.; He, Lei; Yin, Kedong

    2015-01-01

    Free living viruses are ubiquitous in marine waters and concentrations are usually several times higher than the bacterial abundance. These viruses are capable of lysing host bacteria and therefore, play an important role in the microbial loop in oligotrophic waters. However, few studies have been conducted to compare the role of viruses in regulating bacterial abundance and heterotrophic activities between natural oligotrophic waters and anthropogenic influenced eutrophic waters. In this study, we examined viral effects on bacterial functions of four single bacterial species incubated with natural viral assemblages in seawater samples from eutrophic and oligotrophic waters. The viral-lysis of bacteria was significantly higher in eutrophic than oligotrophic waters. This suggests that viruses were capable of controlling bacterial abundance, respiration and production in the eutrophic waters. Cellular bacterial respiration and production was higher with viruses than without viruses, which was more evident in the oligotrophic waters. These results indicate that viruses can slow down bacterial consumption of oxygen and reduce bacteria-induced eutrophication effects in anthropogenic eutrophic waters, but switch to the role of sustaining the bacterial population when nutrients are limiting. There were bacterial species differences in resisting viral attack, which can influence the dominance and biodiversity of bacterial species in coastal waters. PMID:26404394

  12. Genome-Wide Survey of Mutual Homologous Recombination in a Highly Sexual Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Kawai, Mikihiko; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Noriko; Handa, Naofumi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2012-01-01

    The nature of a species remains a fundamental and controversial question. The era of genome/metagenome sequencing has intensified the debate in prokaryotes because of extensive horizontal gene transfer. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide survey of outcrossing homologous recombination in the highly sexual bacterial species Helicobacter pylori. We conducted multiple genome alignment and analyzed the entire data set of one-to-one orthologous genes for its global strains. We detected mosaic structures due to repeated recombination events and discordant phylogenies throughout the genomes of this species. Most of these genes including the “core” set of genes and horizontally transferred genes showed at least one recombination event. Taking into account the relationship between the nucleotide diversity and the minimum number of recombination events per nucleotide, we evaluated the recombination rate in every gene. The rate appears constant across the genome, but genes with a particularly high or low recombination rate were detected. Interestingly, genes with high recombination included those for DNA transformation and for basic cellular functions, such as biosynthesis and metabolism. Several highly divergent genes with a high recombination rate included those for host interaction, such as outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide synthesis. These results provide a global picture of genome-wide distribution of outcrossing homologous recombination in a bacterial species for the first time, to our knowledge, and illustrate how a species can be shaped by mutual homologous recombination. PMID:22534164

  13. Molecular assessment of bacterial vaginosis by Lactobacillus abundance and species diversity.

    PubMed

    Dols, Joke A M; Molenaar, Douwe; van der Helm, Jannie J; Caspers, Martien P M; de Kat Angelino-Bart, Alie; Schuren, Frank H J; Speksnijder, Adrianus G C L; Westerhoff, Hans V; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Boon, Mathilde E; Reid, Gregor; de Vries, Henry J C; Kort, Remco

    2016-04-23

    To date, women are most often diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using microscopy based Nugent scoring or Amsel criteria. However, the accuracy is less than optimal. The aim of the present study was to confirm the identity of known BV-associated composition profiles and evaluate indicators for BV using three molecular methods. Evaluation of indicators for BV was carried out by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V5-V7 region, a tailor-made 16S rRNA oligonucleotide-based microarray, and a PCR-based profiling technique termed IS-profiling, which is based on fragment variability of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. An inventory of vaginal bacterial species was obtained from 40 females attending a Dutch sexually transmitted infection outpatient clinic, of which 20 diagnosed with BV (Nugent score 7-10), and 20 BV negative (Nugent score 0-3). Analysis of the bacterial communities by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed two clusters in the BV negative women, dominated by either Lactobacillus iners or Lactobacillus crispatus and three distinct clusters in the BV positive women. In the former, there was a virtually complete, negative correlation between L. crispatus and L. iners. BV positive subjects showed cluster profiles that were relatively high in bacterial species diversity and dominated by anaerobic species, including Gardnerella vaginalis, and those belonging to the Families of Lachnospiraceae and Leptotrichiaceae. Accordingly, the Gini-Simpson index of species diversity, and the relative abundance Lactobacillus species appeared consistent indicators for BV. Under the conditions used, only the 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing method was suitable to assess species diversity, while all three molecular composition profiling methods were able to indicate Lactobacillus abundance in the vaginal microbiota. An affordable and simple molecular test showing a depletion of the genus Lactobacillus in combination with an increased species diversity of vaginal

  14. Occurrence and antibiotic resistance of mesophilic Aeromonas in three riverine freshwaters of Marrakech, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Imziln, B

    2001-12-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of pollution and sewage on the occurrence and antibiotic resistance of mesophilic aeromonads in riverine freshwaters of Marrakech, samples were collected from three rivers (Oukaimeden, Ourika, and Tensift) upstream and downstream from the principal bordering villages. During a 2-year study, indicators of pollution increased dramatically in the downstream waters. Bacterial indicators (faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci) correlated with mesophilic aeromonads only in heavily polluted waters. In low and moderately polluted sources, densities of mesophilic aeromonads were independent of water quality indicators and did not correlate statistically with faecal indicators. Average counts of Aeromonas in low and heavily polluted waters were 2.5 x 10(3) and 2.1 x 10(6) colony forming units per 100 ml, respectively. The biochemical identification of 841 isolates indicated a predominance of A. caviae in heavily and moderately polluted water and sediment. A. hydrophila was dominant only in low polluted waters and when the temperature was below 12 degrees C. High densities of A. sobria were found in low, moderately polluted, or cleaned waters and when the water temperature was above 18 degrees C. All selected isolates (total = 841) were tested for antibiotic susceptibility against 21 antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance frequencies recorded were: ampicillin and amoxicillin, 100%; novobiocin, 96%; cefalotin, 81%; colistin, 72%; sulfamethoxazole, 40%; cefamandole, 37%; polymyxin B, 23%; trimethoprim, 17%; erythromycin, 15%; streptomycin, 8%; amoxicillin-clavulanate, 5%. Resistance to cefotaxime, kanamycin, gentamycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, nalidixic acid, rifampicin, or trimethoprim-sulfameth-oxazole was found to be <5%. Antibiotic resistance rates did vary according to the source of a strain"s isolation, and high numbers of antibiotic resistant strains were recorded in polluted samples. Since no correlation between

  15. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine Effects on Multi-species Oral Biofilm Formation and Bacterial Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Karin; Nikrad, Julia; Reilly, Cavan; Li, Yuping; Jones, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Future therapies for the treatment of dental decay have to consider the importance of preserving bacterial ecology while reducing biofilm adherence to teeth. A multi-species plaque derived (MSPD) biofilm model was used to assess how concentrations of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (0, 0.1%, 1%, 10%) affected the growth of complex oral biofilms. Biofilms were grown (n=96) for 24 hours on hydroxyapatite disks in BMM media with 0.5% sucrose. Bacterial viability and biomass formation was examined on each disk using a microtiter plate reader. In addition, fluorescence microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to qualitatively examine the effect of NAC on bacterial biofilm aggregation, extracellular components, and bacterial morphology. The total biomass was significantly decreased after exposure of both 1% (from 0.48, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.44, 0.57) to 0.35, with confidence interval (0.31, 0.38)) and 10% NAC (0.14 with confidence interval (0.11, 0.17)). 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing analysis indicated that 1% NAC reduced biofilm adherence while preserving biofilm ecology. PMID:26518358

  16. Bacterial community structure in freshwater springs infested with the invasive plant species Hydrilla verticillata.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Bradley, N; Li, N; Williams, H N

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic composition and physiological profiles of bacterial communities in freshwater springs were evaluated during the blooming and non-blooming stages of the invasive plant species, Hydrilla verticillata. Community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs) and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons were used to study potential Hydrilla mediated shifts in the physiological potential and phylogenetic composition of the bacterial community in infested systems. The results of CLPP revealed that the microbes in the Hydrilla invaded sites utilized less substrates during blooming periods than during nonblooming periods of the plant. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed some relationships between the relative abundances of bacterial taxa and the Biolog substrate utilization pattern. The relative abundance of the identified taxa showed some striking differences based on the blooming status of Hydrilla and to a lesser extent on site variation. The relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, and Verrucomicrobia was generally higher during Hydrilla blooms, while Deltaproteobacteria was generally higher during non-blooming stages of Hydrilla. The detected genera also varied based on the blooming stages of the plant. Based on the findings, it appears that Hydrilla alters the phylogenetic composition and structure of the bacterial community during the blooming stage.

  17. Bacterial community structure in freshwater springs infested with the invasive plant species Hydrilla verticillata

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Bradley, N.; Li, N.

    2015-01-01

    The phylogenetic composition and physiological profiles of bacterial communities in freshwater springs were evaluated during the blooming and non-blooming stages of the invasive plant species, Hydrilla verticillata. Community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs) and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons were used to study potential Hydrilla mediated shifts in the physiological potential and phylogenetic composition of the bacterial community in infested systems. The results of CLPP revealed that the microbes in the Hydrilla invaded sites utilized less substrates during blooming periods than during nonblooming periods of the plant. Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed some relationships between the relative abundances of bacterial taxa and the Biolog substrate utilization pattern. The relative abundance of the identified taxa showed some striking differences based on the blooming status of Hydrilla and to a lesser extent on site variation. The relative abundance of Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes, and Verrucomicrobia was generally higher during Hydrilla blooms, while Deltaproteobacteria was generally higher during non-blooming stages of Hydrilla. The detected genera also varied based on the blooming stages of the plant. Based on the findings, it appears that Hydrilla alters the phylogenetic composition and structure of the bacterial community during the blooming stage. PMID:26207069

  18. A New Species of Pristionchus (Rhabditida: Diplogastridae) and Its Bacterial Symbiont from Yixing, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengpeng; Dai, Chensheng; Bao, Haoran; Chen, Long; Gao, Di; Wang, Guoxiang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Hui; Yedid, Gabriel; Zhang, Keyun

    2015-01-01

    A new nematode species, Pristionchus entomophilus n. sp., was collected during a soil sample survey in Yixing of Jiangsu province, eastern China. P. entomophilus n. sp. is distinguished by its unique characteristics. This new species is mainly hermaphroditic, with males seldom found. The new nematode has a similar body length but has much narrower body width compared with P. pacificus. Its body is covered with longitudinal ridges: 12 ridges on head, 13 or 14 ridges in the middle, 11 and 7 ridges in front and rear of the anus, respectively. The eurystomatous form mouth includes a triangular dorsal tooth, a large claw-like right subventral tooth, and a row of five ventral denticles placed opposite the dorsal tooth. Only eight pairs of genital papillae and a pair of phasmids are present in the tail of the male as the sixth pair of papillae having seemingly been degenerated and lost. Molecular phylogenetic trees based on 18S rDNA confirmed that the new species belongs to the genus Pristionchus and is most closely related to P. pacificus. Moreover, the new species was found to be occasionally associated with the entomopathogenic bacterial strain 09FLYB1 of Serratia nematodophila and be able to stably transfer the bacterial strain for several generations. PMID:26527840

  19. Cold temperature decreases bacterial species richness in nitrogen-removing bioreactors treating inorganic mine waters.

    PubMed

    Karkman, A; Mattila, K; Tamminen, M; Virta, M

    2011-12-01

    Explosives used in mining, such as ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), can cause eutrophication of the surrounding environment by leakage of ammonium and nitrate from undetonated material that is not properly treated. Cold temperatures in mines affect nitrogen removal from water when such nutrients are treated with bioreactors in situ. In this study we identified bacteria in the bioreactors and studied the effect of temperature on the bacterial community. The bioreactors consisted of sequential nitrification and denitrification units running at either 5 or 10°C. One nitrification bioreactor running at 5°C was fed with salt spiked water. From the nitrification bioreactors, sequences from both ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were identified, but the species were distinct at different temperatures. The main nitrifiers in the lower temperature were closely related to the genera Nitrosospira and Candidatus Nitrotoga. 16S rRNA gene sequences closely related to halotolerant Nitrosomonas eutropha were found only from the salt spiked nitrification bioreactor. At 10°C the genera Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the abundant nitrifiers. The results showed that bacterial species richness estimates were low, <150 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), in all bioreactor clone libraries, when sequences were assigned to operational taxonomic units at an evolutionary distance of 0.03. The only exception was the nitrification bioreactor running at 10°C where species richness was higher, >300 OTUs. Species richness was lower in bioreactors running at 5°C compared to those operating at 10°C.

  20. Isolation and characterization of novel phorate-degrading bacterial species from agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Jariyal, Monu; Gupta, V K; Mandal, Kousik; Jindal, Vikas; Banta, Geetika; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-02-01

    Based upon 16S rDNA sequence homology, 15 phorate-degrading bacteria isolated from sugarcane field soils by selective enrichment were identified to be different species of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Brevibacterium, and Staphylococcus. Relative phorate degradation in a mineral salt medium containing phorate (50 μg ml(-1)) as sole carbon source established that all the bacterial species could actively degrade more than 97 % phorate during 21 days. Three of these species viz. Bacillus aerophilus strain IMBL 4.1, Brevibacterium frigoritolerans strain IMBL 2.1, and Pseudomonas fulva strain IMBL 5.1 were found to be most active phorate metabolizers, degrading more than 96 % phorate during 2 days and 100 % phorate during 13 days. Qualitative analysis of phorate residues by gas liquid chromatography revealed complete metabolization of phorate without detectable accumulation of any known phorate metabolites. Phorate degradation by these bacterial species did not follow the first-order kinetics except the P. fulva strain IMBL 5.1 with half-life period (t1/2) ranging between 0.40 and 5.47 days.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Shigella flexneri G3, Capable of Effective Cellulosic Saccharification under Mesophilic Conditions ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aijie; Gao, Lingfang; Ren, Nanqi; Xu, Jifei; Liu, Chong; Cao, Guangli; Yu, Hao; Liu, Wenzong; Hemme, Christopher L.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    A novel Shigella strain (Shigella flexneri G3) showing high cellulolytic activity under mesophilic, anaerobic conditions was isolated and characterized. The bacterium is Gram negative, short rod shaped, and nonmotile and displays effective production of glucose, cellobiose, and other oligosaccharides from cellulose (Avicel PH-101) under optimal conditions (40°C and pH 6.5). Approximately 75% of the cellulose was hydrolyzed in modified ATCC 1191 medium containing 0.3% cellulose, and the oligosaccharide production yield and specific production rate reached 375 mg g Avicel−1 and 6.25 mg g Avicel−1 h−1, respectively, after a 60-hour incubation. To our knowledge, this represents the highest oligosaccharide yield and specific rate from cellulose for mesophilic bacterial monocultures reported so far. The results demonstrate that S. flexneri G3 is capable of rapid conversion of cellulose to oligosaccharides, with potential biofuel applications under mesophilic conditions. PMID:21097577

  2. Bacterial colonization and extinction on marine aggregates: stochastic model of species presence and abundance

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andrew M; Lyons, M Maille; Dobbs, Fred C; Drake, John M

    2013-01-01

    Organic aggregates provide a favorable habitat for aquatic microbes, are efficiently filtered by shellfish, and may play a major role in the dynamics of aquatic pathogens. Quantifying this role requires understanding how pathogen abundance in the water and aggregate size interact to determine the presence and abundance of pathogen cells on individual aggregates. We build upon current understanding of the dynamics of bacteria and bacterial grazers on aggregates to develop a model for the dynamics of a bacterial pathogen species. The model accounts for the importance of stochasticity and the balance between colonization and extinction. Simulation results suggest that while colonization increases linearly with background density and aggregate size, extinction rates are expected to be nonlinear on small aggregates in a low background density of the pathogen. Under these conditions, we predict lower probabilities of pathogen presence and reduced abundance on aggregates compared with predictions based solely on colonization. These results suggest that the importance of aggregates to the dynamics of aquatic bacterial pathogens may be dependent on the interaction between aggregate size and background pathogen density, and that these interactions are strongly influenced by ecological interactions and pathogen traits. The model provides testable predictions and can be a useful tool for exploring how species-specific differences in pathogen traits may alter the effect of aggregates on disease transmission. PMID:24340173

  3. Aerobic cloacal and pharyngeal bacterial flora in six species of free-living birds.

    PubMed

    Stenkat, J; Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E; Schmitz Ornés, A; Eilers, A; Schmidt, V

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the culturable aerobic pharyngeal and cloacal bacterial flora of free-living birds, to determine the physiological bacterial microbiota, to identify possible interactions between feeding behaviour and the composition of the pharyngeal and cloacal microflora and to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs of 167 free-living birds, including water rails (Rallus aquaticus), spotted crakes (Porzana porzana), mute swans (Cygnus olor), barn swallows (Hirundo rustica), reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) and black cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) from Germany, were cultured to determine the prevalence of aerobic bacteria. Statistical analysis of bacterial findings and feeding behaviour was performed. A widespread soil and water bacteria were isolated, which are expected to be present in the habitat and food. However, some potentially avian- and human-pathogenic bacteria, such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, were also recovered. Free-living birds of the examined species harbour several environmental bacteria, which could be facultative pathogenic. Prevalence of bacteria in healthy free-living birds of the species included in this survey is influenced by environmental and alimentary factors. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Intra- and inter-species interactions within biofilms of important foodborne bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Heir, Even; Desvaux, Mickaël; Hébraud, Michel; Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John; Kačániová, Miroslava; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Ölmez, Hülya; Simões, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A community-based sessile life style is the normal mode of growth and survival for many bacterial species. Under such conditions, cell-to-cell interactions are inevitable and ultimately lead to the establishment of dense, complex and highly structured biofilm populations encapsulated in a self-produced extracellular matrix and capable of coordinated and collective behavior. Remarkably, in food processing environments, a variety of different bacteria may attach to surfaces, survive, grow, and form biofilms. Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus are important bacterial pathogens commonly implicated in outbreaks of foodborne diseases, while all are known to be able to create biofilms on both abiotic and biotic surfaces. Particularly challenging is the attempt to understand the complexity of inter-bacterial interactions that can be encountered in such unwanted consortia, such as competitive and cooperative ones, together with their impact on the final outcome of these communities (e.g., maturation, physiology, antimicrobial resistance, virulence, dispersal). In this review, up-to-date data on both the intra- and inter-species interactions encountered in biofilms of these pathogens are presented. A better understanding of these interactions, both at molecular and biophysical levels, could lead to novel intervention strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilm formation in food processing environments and thus improve food safety. PMID:26347727

  5. Korean indigenous bacterial species with valid names belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyung Sook; Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Ji Hee; Kang, Joo Won; Kim, Dae In; Lee, Ji Hee; Seong, Chi Nam

    2016-12-01

    , Gyeonggi, Jeonnam, Daejeon, and Chungnam. A large number of novel actinobacterial species continue to be discovered since the Korean government is encouraging the search for new bacterial species and researchers are endeavoring to find out novel strains from extreme or untapped environments.

  6. What Makes a Bacterial Species Pathogenic?:Comparative Genomic Analysis of the Genus Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fouts, Derrick E.; Matthias, Michael A.; Adhikarla, Haritha; Adler, Ben; Amorim-Santos, Luciane; Berg, Douglas E.; Bulach, Dieter; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Chang, Yung-Fu; Galloway, Renee L.; Haake, David A.; Haft, Daniel H.; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Ko, Albert I.; Levett, Paul N.; Matsunaga, James; Mechaly, Ariel E.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Nascimento, Ana L. T.; Nelson, Karen E.; Palsson, Bernhard; Peacock, Sharon J.; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Thaipandungpanit, Janjira; Wunder, Elsio A.; Yang, X. Frank; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira, is a globally widespread, neglected and emerging zoonotic disease. While whole genome analysis of individual pathogenic, intermediately pathogenic and saprophytic Leptospira species has been reported, comprehensive cross-species genomic comparison of all known species of infectious and non-infectious Leptospira, with the goal of identifying genes related to pathogenesis and mammalian host adaptation, remains a key gap in the field. Infectious Leptospira, comprised of pathogenic and intermediately pathogenic Leptospira, evolutionarily diverged from non-infectious, saprophytic Leptospira, as demonstrated by the following computational biology analyses: 1) the definitive taxonomy and evolutionary relatedness among all known Leptospira species; 2) genomically-predicted metabolic reconstructions that indicate novel adaptation of infectious Leptospira to mammals, including sialic acid biosynthesis, pathogen-specific porphyrin metabolism and the first-time demonstration of cobalamin (B12) autotrophy as a bacterial virulence factor; 3) CRISPR/Cas systems demonstrated only to be present in pathogenic Leptospira, suggesting a potential mechanism for this clade’s refractoriness to gene targeting; 4) finding Leptospira pathogen-specific specialized protein secretion systems; 5) novel virulence-related genes/gene families such as the Virulence Modifying (VM) (PF07598 paralogs) proteins and pathogen-specific adhesins; 6) discovery of novel, pathogen-specific protein modification and secretion mechanisms including unique lipoprotein signal peptide motifs, Sec-independent twin arginine protein secretion motifs, and the absence of certain canonical signal recognition particle proteins from all Leptospira; and 7) and demonstration of infectious Leptospira-specific signal-responsive gene expression, motility and chemotaxis systems. By identifying large scale changes in infectious (pathogenic and intermediately pathogenic

  7. Evolution of the bacterial species Lactobacillus delbrueckii: a partial genomic study with reflections on prokaryotic species concept.

    PubMed

    Germond, Jacques-Edouard; Lapierre, Luciane; Delley, Michèle; Mollet, Beat; Felis, Giovanna E; Dellaglio, Franco

    2003-01-01

    The species Lactobacillus delbrueckii consists at present of three subspecies, delbrueckii, lactis and bulgaricus, showing a high level of DNA-DNA hybridization similarity but presenting markedly different traits related to distinct ecological adaptation. The internal genetic heterogeneity of the bacterial species L. delbrueckii was analyzed. Phenotypic and several genetic traits were investigated for 61 strains belonging to this species. These included 16S rDNA sequence mutations, expression of beta-galactosidase and of the cell wall-anchored protease, the characterization of the lactose operon locus and of the sequence of lacR gene, galactose metabolism, and the distribution of insertion sequences. The high genetic heterogeneity of taxa was confirmed by every trait investigated: the lac operon was completely deleted in the subsp. delbrueckii, different mutation events in the repressor gene of the operon led to a constitutive expression of lacZ in the subsp. bulgaricus. Structural differences in the same genetic locus were probably due to the presence of different IS elements in the flanking regions. The different expression of the cell wall-anchored protease, constitutive in the subsp. bulgaricus, inducible in the subsp. lactis, and absent in the subsp. delbrueckii was also a consequence of mutations at the gene level. The galT gene for galactose metabolism was found only in the subsp. lactis, while no specific amplification product was detected in the other two subspecies. All these data, together with the absence of a specific IS element, ISL6, from the major number of strains belonging to the subsp. bulgaricus, confirmed a deep internal heterogeneity among the three subspecies. Moreover, this evidence and the directional mutations found in the 16S rDNA sequences suggested that, of the three subspecies, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis is the taxon closer to the ancestor. Limitations of the current prokaryotic species definition were also discussed, based on

  8. Influence of hyaluronic acid on bacterial and fungal species, including clinically relevant opportunistic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ardizzoni, Andrea; Neglia, Rachele G; Baschieri, Maria C; Cermelli, Claudio; Caratozzolo, Manuela; Righi, Elena; Palmieri, Beniamino; Blasi, Elisabetta

    2011-10-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has several clinical applications (aesthetic surgery, dermatology, orthopaedics and ophtalmology). Following recent evidence, suggesting antimicrobial and antiviral properties for HA, we investigated its effects on 15 ATCC strains, representative of clinically relevant bacterial and fungal species. The in vitro system employed allowed to assess optical density of broth cultures as a measure of microbial load in a time-dependent manner. The results showed that different microbial species and, sometimes, different strains belonging to the same species, are differently affected by HA. In particular, staphylococci, enterococci, Streptococcus mutans, two Escherichia coli strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida glabrata and C. parapsilosis displayed a HA dose-dependent growth inhibition; no HA effects were detected in E. coli ATCC 13768 and C. albicans; S. sanguinis was favoured by the highest HA dose. Therefore, the influence of HA on bacteria and fungi warrants further studies aimed at better establishing its relevance in clinical applications.

  9. Reverse Transcriptase-PCR Analysis of Bacterial rRNA for Detection and Characterization of Bacterial Species in Arthritis Synovial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Cox, Charles J.; Hurle, Michael; Wong, Anthony; Wilkie, Scott; Zanders, Edward D.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Crowe, J. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is widely believed to be preceded by exposure to some environmental trigger such as bacterial infectious agents. The influence of bacteria on RA disease onset or pathology has to date been controversial, due to inconsistencies between groups in the report of bacterial species isolated from RA disease tissue. Using a modified technique of reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification, we have detected bacterial rRNA in the synovial tissue of late-stage RA and non-RA arthritis controls. This may be suggestive of the presence of live bacteria. Sequencing of cloned complementary rDNA (crDNA) products revealed a number of bacterial sequences in joint tissue from each patient, and from these analyses a comprehensive profile of the organisms present was compiled. This revealed a number of different organisms in each patient, some of which are common to both RA and non-RA controls and are probably opportunistic colonizers of previously diseased tissue and others which are unique species. These latter organisms may be candidates for a specific role in disease pathology and require further investigation to exclude them as causative agents in the complex bacterial millieu. In addition, many of the detected bacterial species have not been identified previously from synovial tissue or fluid from arthritis patients. These may not be easily cultivable, since they were not revealed in previous studies using conventional in vitro bacterial culture methods. In situ hybridization analyses have revealed the joint-associated bacterial rRNA to be both intra- and extracellular. The role of viable bacteria or their nucleic acids as triggers in disease onset or pathology in either RA or non-RA arthritis controls is unclear and requires further investigation. PMID:10992514

  10. Life history correlates of fecal bacterial species richness in a wild population of the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus.

    PubMed

    Benskin, Clare McW H; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger W; Mainwaring, Mark C; Wilson, Kenneth; Hartley, Ian R

    2015-02-01

    Very little is known about the normal gastrointestinal flora of wild birds, or how it might affect or reflect the host's life-history traits. The aim of this study was to survey the species richness of bacteria in the feces of a wild population of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and to explore the relationships between bacterial species richness and various life-history traits, such as age, sex, and reproductive success. Using PCR-TGGE, 55 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified in blue tit feces. DNA sequencing revealed that the 16S rRNA gene was amplified from a diverse range of bacteria, including those that shared closest homology with Bacillus licheniformis, Campylobacter lari, Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp. For adults, there was a significant negative relationship between bacterial species richness and the likelihood of being detected alive the following breeding season; bacterial richness was consistent across years but declined through the breeding season; and breeding pairs had significantly more similar bacterial richness than expected by chance alone. Reduced adult survival was correlated with the presence of an OTU most closely resembling C. lari; enhanced adult survival was associated with an OTU most similar to Arthrobacter spp. For nestlings, there was no significant change in bacterial species richness between the first and second week after hatching, and nestlings sharing the same nest had significantly more similar bacterial richness. Collectively, these results provide compelling evidence that bacterial species richness was associated with several aspects of the life history of their hosts.

  11. Microbial community dynamics in mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of mixed waste.

    PubMed

    Supaphol, Savaporn; Jenkins, Sasha N; Intomo, Pichamon; Waite, Ian S; O'Donnell, Anthony G

    2011-03-01

    This paper identifies key components of the microbial community involved in the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion (AD) of mixed waste at Rayong Biogas Plant, Thailand. The AD process is separated into three stages: front end treatment (FET); feed holding tank and the main anaerobic digester. The study examines how the microbial community structure was affected by the different stages and found that seeding the waste at the beginning of the process (FET) resulted in community stability. Also, co-digestion of mixed waste supported different bacterial and methanogenic pathways. Typically, acetoclastic methanogenesis was the major pathway catalysed by Methanosaeta but hydrogenotrophs were also supported. Finally, the three-stage AD process means that hydrolysis and acidogenesis is initiated prior to entering the main digester which helps improve the bioconversion efficiency. This paper demonstrates that both resource availability (different waste streams) and environmental factors are key drivers of microbial community dynamics in mesophilic, anaerobic co-digestion.

  12. A comparison of microbial characteristics between the thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters exposed to elevated food waste loadings.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaohui; Wang, Cheng; Sun, Faqian; Zhu, Weijing; Wu, Weixiang

    2014-01-01

    Thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digestion reactors (TR and MR) using food waste as substrate were compared with emphasis on microbial responses to increasing organic loading rate (OLR). At OLR ranging from 1.0 to 2.5 g VS L(-1) d(-1), MR exhibited more stable performance compared to TR in terms of methane yield. Amplicons pyrosequencing results revealed the distinct microbial dynamics in the two reactors. Primarily, MR had greater richness and evenness of bacteria species. With OLR elevated, larger shifts of bacterial phylogeny were observed in MR; Methanosaeta dominated in archaeal community in MR while Methanothermobacter and Methanoculleus were favored in TR. The high functional redundancy in bacterial community integrated with acetoclastic methanogenesis in MR resulted in its better performance; whereas delicate interactions between hydrogen-producer and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in TR were much more prone to disruption. These results are conductive to understanding the microbial mechanisms of low methane yield during food waste anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine effects on multi-species oral biofilm formation and bacterial ecology.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, K; Nikrad, J; Reilly, C; Li, Y; Jones, R S

    2016-01-01

    Future therapies for the treatment of dental decay have to consider the importance of preserving bacterial ecology while reducing biofilm adherence to teeth. A multi-species plaque-derived (MSPD) biofilm model was used to assess how concentrations of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) (0, 0·1, 1, 10%) affected the growth of complex oral biofilms. Biofilms were grown (n = 96) for 24 h on hydroxyapatite discs in BMM media with 0·5% sucrose. Bacterial viability and biomass formation was examined on each disc using a microtitre plate reader. In addition, fluorescence microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to qualitatively examine the effect of NAC on bacterial biofilm aggregation, extracellular components and bacterial morphology. The total biomass was significantly decreased after exposure of both 1% (from 0·48, with a 95% confidence interval of (0·44, 0·57) to 0·35, with confidence interval (0·31, 0·38)) and 10% NAC (0·14 with confidence interval (0·11, 0·17)). 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing analysis indicated that 1% NAC reduced biofilm adherence while preserving biofilm ecology. As a compound with a wide safety margin, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) has the potential to be used as a long term anti-plaque bacteriostatic agent for managing chronic dental decay without substantially altering biofilm's bacterial ecology. The potential anti-caries benefit of NAC is directly related to reducing the biofilm coverage which reduces the degree of acid generation and the amount of time that the surface is exposed to a lower pH. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Isolation of a lead tolerant novel bacterial species, Achromobacter sp. TL-3: assessment of bioflocculant activity.

    PubMed

    Batta, Neha; Subudhi, Sanjukta; Lal, Banwari; Devi, Arundhuti

    2013-11-01

    Lead is one of the four heavy metals that has a profound damaging effects on human health. In the recent past there has been an increasing global concern for development of sustainable bioremediation technologies for detoxification of lead contaminant. Present investigation highlights for lead biosorption by a newly isolated novel bacterial species; Achromobacter sp. TL-3 strain, isolated from activated sludge samples contaminated with heavy metals (collected from oil refinery, Assam, North-East India). For isolation of lead tolerant bacteria, sludge samples were enriched into Luria Broth medium supplemented separately with a range of lead nitrate; 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250 and 1500 ppm respectively. The bacterial consortium that could tolerate 1500 ppm of lead nitrate was selected further for purification of lead tolerant bacterial isolates. Purified lead tolerant bacterial isolates were then eventually inoculated into production medium supplemented with ethanol and glycerol as carbon and energy source to investigate for bioflocculant production. Bioflocculant production was estimated by monitoring the potential of lead tolerant bacterial isolate to flocculate Kaolin clay in presence of 1% CaCl2. Compared to other isolates, TL-3 isolate demonstrated for maximum bioflocculant activity of 95% and thus was identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. TL3 isolate revealed maximum homology (98%) with Achromobacter sp. and thus designated as Achromobacter sp. TL-3. Bioflocculant activity of TL-3 isolate was correlated with the change in pH and growth. Achromobacter sp. TL-3 has significant potential for lead biosorption and can be effectively employed for detoxification of lead contaminated waste effluents/waste waters.

  15. Host and Environmental Specificity in Bacterial Communities Associated to Two Highly Invasive Marine Species (Genus Asparagopsis)

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Tânia; Serrão, Ester A.; Engelen, Aschwin H.

    2016-01-01

    As habitats change due to global and local pressures, population resilience, and adaptive processes depend not only on their gene pools but also on their associated bacteria communities. The hologenome can play a determinant role in adaptive evolution of higher organisms that rely on their bacterial associates for vital processes. In this study, we focus on the associated bacteria of the two most invasive seaweeds in southwest Iberia (coastal mainland) and nearby offshore Atlantic islands, Asparagopsis taxiformis and Asparagopsis armata. Bacterial communities were characterized using 16S rRNA barcoding through 454 next generation sequencing and exploratory shotgun metagenomics to provide functional insights and a backbone for future functional studies. The bacterial community composition was clearly different between the two species A. taxiformis and A. armata and between continental and island habitats. The latter was mainly due to higher abundances of Acidimicrobiales, Sphingomonadales, Xanthomonadales, Myxococcales, and Alteromonadales on the continent. Metabolic assignments for these groups contained a higher number of reads in functions related to oxidative stress and resistance to toxic compounds, more precisely heavy metals. These results are in agreement with their usual association with hydrocarbon degradation and heavy-metals detoxification. In contrast, A. taxiformis from islands contained more bacteria related to oligotrophic environments which might putatively play a role in mineralization of dissolved organic matter. The higher number of functional assignments found in the metagenomes of A. taxiformis collected from Cape Verde Islands suggest a higher contribution of bacteria to compensate nutrient limitation in oligotrophic environments. Our results show that Asparagopsis-associated bacterial communities have host-specificity and are modulated by environmental conditions. Whether this environmental effect reflects the host's selective requirements or

  16. Host and Environmental Specificity in Bacterial Communities Associated to Two Highly Invasive Marine Species (Genus Asparagopsis).

    PubMed

    Aires, Tânia; Serrão, Ester A; Engelen, Aschwin H

    2016-01-01

    As habitats change due to global and local pressures, population resilience, and adaptive processes depend not only on their gene pools but also on their associated bacteria communities. The hologenome can play a determinant role in adaptive evolution of higher organisms that rely on their bacterial associates for vital processes. In this study, we focus on the associated bacteria of the two most invasive seaweeds in southwest Iberia (coastal mainland) and nearby offshore Atlantic islands, Asparagopsis taxiformis and Asparagopsis armata. Bacterial communities were characterized using 16S rRNA barcoding through 454 next generation sequencing and exploratory shotgun metagenomics to provide functional insights and a backbone for future functional studies. The bacterial community composition was clearly different between the two species A. taxiformis and A. armata and between continental and island habitats. The latter was mainly due to higher abundances of Acidimicrobiales, Sphingomonadales, Xanthomonadales, Myxococcales, and Alteromonadales on the continent. Metabolic assignments for these groups contained a higher number of reads in functions related to oxidative stress and resistance to toxic compounds, more precisely heavy metals. These results are in agreement with their usual association with hydrocarbon degradation and heavy-metals detoxification. In contrast, A. taxiformis from islands contained more bacteria related to oligotrophic environments which might putatively play a role in mineralization of dissolved organic matter. The higher number of functional assignments found in the metagenomes of A. taxiformis collected from Cape Verde Islands suggest a higher contribution of bacteria to compensate nutrient limitation in oligotrophic environments. Our results show that Asparagopsis-associated bacterial communities have host-specificity and are modulated by environmental conditions. Whether this environmental effect reflects the host's selective requirements or

  17. Mineral Types and Tree Species Determine the Functional and Taxonomic Structures of Forest Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Y.; Nicolitch, O.; Turpault, M.-P.

    2016-01-01

    how soil mineralogy influences the diversity, structure, and function of soil bacterial communities in relation to the soil conditions is crucial to better understanding the relative role of the soil bacterial communities in nutrient cycling and plant nutrition in nutrient-poor environments. The present study determined in detail the diversity and structure of bacterial communities associated with different mineral types incubated for 2.5 years in the soil under different tree species using cultivation-dependent and -independent analyses. Our data showed an enrichment of specific bacterial taxa on the minerals, specifically on the most weathered minerals, suggesting that they play key roles in mineral weathering and nutrient cycling in nutrient-poor forest ecosystems. PMID:28003192

  18. Mineral Types and Tree Species Determine the Functional and Taxonomic Structures of Forest Soil Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Colin, Y; Nicolitch, O; Turpault, M-P; Uroz, S

    2017-03-01

    mineralogy influences the diversity, structure, and function of soil bacterial communities in relation to the soil conditions is crucial to better understanding the relative role of the soil bacterial communities in nutrient cycling and plant nutrition in nutrient-poor environments. The present study determined in detail the diversity and structure of bacterial communities associated with different mineral types incubated for 2.5 years in the soil under different tree species using cultivation-dependent and -independent analyses. Our data showed an enrichment of specific bacterial taxa on the minerals, specifically on the most weathered minerals, suggesting that they play key roles in mineral weathering and nutrient cycling in nutrient-poor forest ecosystems.

  19. Bacillus anthracis pXO1 Plasmid Sequence Conservation among Closely Related Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Pannucci, James; Okinaka, Richard T.; Sabin, Robert; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2002-01-01

    The complete sequencing and annotation of the 181.7-kb Bacillus anthracis virulence plasmid pXO1 predicted 143 genes but could only assign putative functions to 45. Hybridization assays, PCR amplification, and DNA sequencing were used to determine whether pXO1 open reading frame (ORF) sequences were present in other bacilli and more distantly related bacterial genera. Eighteen Bacillus species isolates and four other bacterial species were tested for the presence of 106 pXO1 ORFs. Three ORFs were conserved in most of the bacteria tested. Many of the pXO1 ORFs were detected in closely related Bacillus species, and some were detected only in B. anthracis isolates. Three isolates, Bacillus cereus D-17, B. cereus 43881, and Bacillus thuringiensis 33679, contained sequences that were similar to more than one-half of the pXO1 ORF sequences examined. The majority of the DNA fragments that were amplified by PCR from these organisms had DNA sequences between 80 and 98% similar to that of pXO1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed large potential plasmids present in both B. cereus 43881 (341 kb) and B. thuringiensis ATCC 33679 (327 kb) that hybridized with a DNA probe composed of six pXO1 ORFs. PMID:11741853

  20. Bacterial growth rates are influenced by cellular characteristics of individual species when immersed in electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tessaro, Lucas W E; Murugan, Nirosha J; Persinger, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) have negative effects on the rate of growth of bacteria. In the present study, two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative species were exposed to six magnetic field conditions in broth cultures. Three variations of the 'Thomas' pulsed frequency-modulated pattern; a strong-static "puck" magnet upwards of 5000G in intensity; a pair of these magnets rotating opposite one another at ∼30rpm; and finally a strong dynamic magnetic field generator termed the 'Resonator' with an average intensity of 250μT were used. Growth rate was discerned by optical density (OD) measurements every hour at 600nm. ELF-EMF conditions significantly affected the rates of growth of the bacterial cultures, while the two static magnetic field conditions were not statistically significant. Most interestingly, the 'Resonator' dynamic magnetic field increased the rates of growth of three species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli), while slowing the growth of one (Serratia marcescens). We suggest that these effects are due to individual biophysical characteristics of the bacterial species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. A general method for rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility and species in bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mezger, Anja; Gullberg, Erik; Göransson, Jenny; Zorzet, Anna; Herthnek, David; Tano, Eva; Nilsson, Mats; Andersson, Dan I

    2015-02-01

    To ensure correct antibiotic treatment and reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics, there is an urgent need for new rapid methods for species identification and determination of antibiotic susceptibility in infectious pathogenic bacteria. We have developed a general method for the rapid identification of the bacterial species causing an infection and the determination of their antibiotic susceptibility profiles. An initial short cultivation step in the absence and presence of different antibiotics was combined with sensitive species-specific padlock probe detection of the bacterial target DNA to allow a determination of growth (i.e., resistance) and no growth (i.e., susceptibility). A proof-of-concept was established for urinary tract infections in which we applied the method to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Escherichia coli for two drugs with 100% accuracy in 3.5 h. The short assay time from sample to readout enables fast appropriate treatment with effective drugs and minimizes the need to prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics due to unknown resistance profiles of the treated infection.

  2. Lines of evidence for horizontal gene transfer of a phenazine producing operon into multiple bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2009-02-01

    Phenazines are secondary metabolites with broad-spectrum antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and eukaryotes. In pseudomonad species, a conserved seven-gene phenazine operon (phzABCDEFG) is required for the conversion of chorismic acid to the broad-spectrum antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylate. Previous analyses of genes involved in phenazine production from nonpseudomonad species uncovered a high degree of sequence similarity to pseudomonad homologues. The analyses undertaken in this study wished to eluciadate the evolutionary history of genes involved in the production of phenazines. Furthermore, I wanted to determine if the phenazine operon has been transferred through horizontal gene transfer. Analyses of GC content, codon usage patterns, frequency of 3:1 dinucleotides, sequence similarities, and phylogenetic reconstructions were undertaken to map the evolutionary history of phenazine genes from multiple bacterial species. Patchy phyletic distribution, high sequence similarities, and phylogenetic evidence infer that pseudomonad, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Pantoea agglomerans, Burkholderia cepacia, Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Brevibacterium linens, and Mycobacterium abscessus species all contain a phenazine operon which has most likely been transferred among these species through horizontal gene transfer. The acquisition of an antibiotic-associated operon is significant, as it may increase the relative fitness of the recipient species.

  3. Isolation and identification of bacterial endophytes from pharmaceutical agarwood-producing Aquilaria species

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash J.; Preveena, Jagadesan; Kandasamy, Kodi I.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Resins and gums are used in traditional medicine and do have potential applications in pharmacy and medicine. Agarwood is the fragrant resinous wood, which is an important commodity from Aquilaria species and has been used as a sedative, analgesic, and digestive in traditional medicine. Endophytic bacteria are potentially important in producing pharmaceutical compounds found in the plants. Hence, it was important to understand which types of endophytic bacteria are associated with pharmaceutical agarwood-producing Aquilaria species. Objective: This study was undertaken to isolate and identify endophytic bacteria associated with agarwood-producing seven (7) Aquilaria species from Malaysia. Materials and Methods: Botanical samples of seven Aquilaria species were collected, and endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized-tissue samples. The 16S rRNA gene fragments were amplified using PCR method, and endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity based method. Results: Culturable, 77 EBIs were analyzed, and results of 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis suggest that 18 different types of endophytic bacteria are associated with (seven) Aquilaria species. From 77 EBIs, majority (36.4%) of the isolates were of Bacillus pumilus. Conclusion: These findings indicate that agarwood-producing Aquilaria species are harboring 18 different types of culturable endophytic bacteria. PMID:23798890

  4. Comparing mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of chicken manure: Microbial community dynamics and process resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Qigui; Takemura, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kengo; Li, Yu-You

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Microbial community dynamics and process functional resilience were investigated. • The threshold of TAN in mesophilic reactor was higher than the thermophilic reactor. • The recoverable archaeal community dynamic sustained the process resilience. • Methanosarcina was more sensitive than Methanoculleus on ammonia inhibition. • TAN and FA effects the dynamic of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria obviously. - Abstract: While methane fermentation is considered as the most successful bioenergy treatment for chicken manure, the relationship between operational performance and the dynamic transition of archaeal and bacterial communities remains poorly understood. Two continuous stirred-tank reactors were investigated under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions feeding with 10%TS. The tolerance of thermophilic reactor on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was found to be 8000 mg/L with free ammonia (FA) 2000 mg/L compared to 16,000 mg/L (FA1500 mg/L) of mesophilic reactor. Biomethane production was 0.29 L/gV S{sub in} in the steady stage and decreased following TAN increase. After serious inhibition, the mesophilic reactor was recovered successfully by dilution and washing stratagem compared to the unrecoverable of thermophilic reactor. The relationship between the microbial community structure, the bioreactor performance and inhibitors such as TAN, FA, and volatile fatty acid was evaluated by canonical correspondence analysis. The performance of methanogenic activity and substrate removal efficiency were changed significantly correlating with the community evenness and phylogenetic structure. The resilient archaeal community was found even after serious inhibition in both reactors. Obvious dynamics of bacterial communities were observed in acidogenic and hydrolytic functional bacteria following TAN variation in the different stages.

  5. Species differences in unlocking B-side electron transfer in bacterial reaction centers

    DOE PAGES

    Dylla, Nicholas P.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Wyllie, Ryan M.; ...

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) reveals symmetry-related electron transfer (ET) pathways, but only one path is used in native RCs. Analogous mutations have been made in two Rhodobacter (R.) species. A glutamic acid at position 133 in the M subunit increases transmembrane charge separation via the naturally inactive (B-side) path through impacts on primary ET in mutant R. sphaeroidesRCs. Prior work showed that the analogous substitution in the R. capsulatusRC also increases B-side activity, but mainly affects secondary ET. Finally, the overall yields of transmembrane ET are similar, but enabled in fundamentally different ways.

  6. Surface-Selective Preferential Production of Reactive Oxygen Species on Piezoelectric Ceramics for Bacterial Killing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Shuangying; Zhu, Ye; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xiaolan; He, Tianrui; Chen, Junqi; Mao, Chuanbin; Ning, Chengyun

    2016-09-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to kill bacterial cells, and thus the selective generation of ROS from material surfaces is an emerging direction in antibacterial material discovery. We found the polarization of piezoelectric ceramic causes the two sides of the disk to become positively and negatively charged, which translate into cathode and anode surfaces in an aqueous solution. Because of the microelectrolysis of water, ROS are preferentially formed on the cathode surface. Consequently, the bacteria are selectively killed on the cathode surface. However, the cell experiment suggested that the level of ROS is safe for normal mammalian cells.

  7. A genomic perspective on a new bacterial genus and species from the Alcaligenaceae family, Basilea psittacipulmonis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A novel Gram-negative, non-haemolytic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium was discovered in the lungs of a dead parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus) that was kept in captivity in a petshop in Basel, Switzerland. The organism is described with a chemotaxonomic profile and the nearly complete genome sequence obtained through the assembly of short sequence reads. Results Genome sequence analysis and characterization of respiratory quinones, fatty acids, polar lipids, and biochemical phenotype is presented here. Comparison of gene sequences revealed that the most similar species is Pelistega europaea, with BLAST identities of only 93% to the 16S rDNA gene, 76% identity to the rpoB gene, and a similar GC content (~43%) as the organism isolated from the parakeet, DSM 24701 (40%). The closest full genome sequences are those of Bordetella spp. and Taylorella spp. High-throughput sequencing reads from the Illumina-Solexa platform were assembled with the Edena de novo assembler to form 195 contigs comprising the ~2 Mb genome. Genome annotation with RAST, construction of phylogenetic trees with the 16S rDNA (rrs) gene sequence and the rpoB gene, and phylogenetic placement using other highly conserved marker genes with ML Tree all suggest that the bacterial species belongs to the Alcaligenaceae family. Analysis of samples from cages with healthy parakeets suggested that the newly discovered bacterial species is not widespread in parakeet living quarters. Conclusions Classification of this organism in the current taxonomy system requires the formation of a new genus and species. We designate the new genus Basilea and the new species psittacipulmonis. The type strain of Basilea psittacipulmonis is DSM 24701 (= CIP 110308 T, 16S rDNA gene sequence Genbank accession number JX412111 and GI 406042063). PMID:24581117

  8. Bacterial species isolated from cats with lower urinary tract infection and their susceptibilities to cefovecin.

    PubMed

    Dokuzeylül, Banu; Kahraman, Beren Başaran; Bayrakal, Alper; Siğirci, Belgi Diren; Çelik, Baran; Ikiz, Serkan; Kayar, Abdullah; Or, M Erman

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the bacterial species recovered from 61 cats with lower urinary tract infection (LUTI), and their susceptibility to cefovecin in vitro. The clinical signs and final clinical diagnosis for cats with confirmed LUTI were also reported. After physical examination of the cats, urine samples including ≥5-6 leucocytes in microscopic evaluation were cultured using bacteriological techniques. The isolates were identified by conventional microbiological methods and tested for in vitro susceptibility using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Bacterial growth was observed in 16 of 61 urine samples. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that 13 of 16 (81%) isolates were susceptible to cefovecin. The most frequently isolated bacterium from cats with signs of lower urinary tract infection, was Escherichia coli. Cefovecin was found to be effective in cats with LUTI. Because cefovecin is a new antimicrobial agent in veterinary medicine, there are only few studies about urine culture of cats with LUTI. It is the first study on in vitro activity of cefovecin against bacterial isolates from cats with lower urinary infections in Istanbul, Turkey.

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects against bacterial infection by promoting macrophage survival and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akihiro; Abe, Hiromi; Tsuruta, Sanae; Chiba, Sayuri; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Sekiya, Takashi; Morita, Rimpei; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is crucial for various immune responses. The relationship between AhR and infection with the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is poorly understood. Here, we show that in response to LM infection, AhR is required for bacterial clearance by promoting macrophage survival and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. AhR-deficient mice were more susceptible to listeriosis, and AhR deficiency enhances bacterial growth in vivo and in vitro. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines were increased in AhR-deficient macrophages infected with LM despite enhanced susceptibility to LM infection in AhR-deficient mice. Subsequent studies demonstrate that AhR protects against macrophage cell death induced by LM infection through the induction of the antiapoptotic factor, the apoptosis inhibitor of macrophages, which promotes macrophage survival in the setting of LM infection. Furthermore, AhR promotes ROS production for bacterial clearance. Our results demonstrate that AhR is essential to the resistance against LM infection as it promotes macrophage survival and ROS production. This suggests that the activation of AhR by its ligands may be an effective strategy against listeriosis.

  10. Photoinactivation of Eight Health-Relevant Bacterial Species: Determining the Importance of the Exogenous Indirect Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Maraccini, Peter A; Wenk, Jannis; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-05-17

    It is presently unknown to what extent the endogenous direct, endogenous indirect, and exogenous indirect mechanisms contribute to bacterial photoinactivation in natural surface waters. In this study, we investigated the importance of the exogenous indirect mechanism by conducting photoinactivation experiments with eight health-relevant bacterial species (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli K12, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus bovis). We used three synthetic photosensitizers (methylene blue, rose bengal, and nitrite) and two model natural photosensitizers (Suwannee River natural organic matter and dissolved organic matter isolated from a wastewater treatment wetland) that generated singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical. B. thetaiotaomicron had larger first order rate constants than all other organisms under all conditions tested. The presence of the synthetic photosensitizers generally enhanced photoinactivation of Gram-positive facultative anaerobes (Ent. faecalis, Staph. aureus, and Strep. bovis). Among Gram-negative bacteria, only methylene blue with E. coli K12 and rose bengal with C. jejuni showed an enhancing effect. The presence of model natural photosensitizers either reduced or did not affect photoinactivation rate constants. Our findings highlight the importance of the cellular membrane and photosensitizer properties in modulating the contribution of the exogenous indirect mechanism to the overall bacterial photoinactivation.

  11. Bacterial species and their associations with acute and chronic mastitis in suckler ewes.

    PubMed

    Smith, E M; Willis, Z N; Blakeley, M; Lovatt, F; Purdy, K J; Green, L E

    2015-10-01

    Acute mastitis in suckler ewes is often detected because of systemic signs such as anorexia or lameness, whereas chronic mastitis, characterized by intramammary abscesses with no systemic disease, is typically detected when ewes are inspected before mating. The aims of the current study were to identify the species and strains of culturable bacteria associated with acutely diseased, chronically diseased, and unaffected mammary glands to investigate whether species and strains vary by state. To investigate acute mastitis, 28 milk samples were obtained from both glands of 14 ewes with acute mastitis in one gland only. To investigate chronic mastitis, 16 ovine udders were obtained from 2 abattoirs; milk was aspirated from the 32 glands where possible, and the udders were sectioned to expose intramammary abscesses, which were swab sampled. All milk and swab samples were cultured aerobically. In total, 37 bacterial species were identified, 4 from acute mastitis, 26 from chronic mastitis, and 8 from apparently healthy glands. In chronic mastitis, the overall coincidence index of overlap of species detected in intramammary abscesses and milk was 0.60, reducing to 0.36 within individual glands, indicating a high degree of species overlap in milk and abscesses overall, but less overlap within specific glands. Staphylococcus aureus was detected frequently in all sample types; it was isolated from 10/14 glands with acute mastitis. In 5 ewes, closely related strains were present in both affected and unaffected glands. In chronic mastitis, closely related Staphylococcus aureus strains were detected in milk and abscesses from the same gland.

  12. Structural variation and inhibitor binding in polypeptide deformylase from four different bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathrine J; Petit, Chantal M; Aubart, Kelly; Smyth, Martin; McManus, Edward; Jones, Jo; Fosberry, Andrew; Lewis, Ceri; Lonetto, Michael; Christensen, Siegfried B

    2003-02-01

    Polypeptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the deformylation of polypeptide chains in bacteria. It is essential for bacterial cell viability and is a potential antibacterial drug target. Here, we report the crystal structures of polypeptide deformylase from four different species of bacteria: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, and Escherichia coli. Comparison of these four structures reveals significant overall differences between the two Gram-negative species (E. coli and H. influenzae) and the two Gram-positive species (S. pneumoniae and S. aureus). Despite these differences and low overall sequence identity, the S1' pocket of PDF is well conserved among the four enzymes studied. We also describe the binding of nonpeptidic inhibitor molecules SB-485345, SB-543668, and SB-505684 to both S. pneumoniae and E. coli PDF. Comparison of these structures shows similar binding interactions with both Gram-negative and Gram-positive species. Understanding the similarities and subtle differences in active site structure between species will help to design broad-spectrum polypeptide deformylase inhibitor molecules.

  13. Decoupling Environment-Dependent and Independent Genetic Robustness across Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Elhanan; Gophna, Uri; Sharan, Roded; Ruppin, Eytan

    2010-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of genetic robustness are still under debate: it may arise as a consequence of requirements imposed by varying environmental conditions, due to intrinsic factors such as metabolic requirements, or directly due to an adaptive selection in favor of genes that allow a species to endure genetic perturbations. Stratifying the individual effects of each origin requires one to study the pertaining evolutionary forces across many species under diverse conditions. Here we conduct the first large-scale computational study charting the level of robustness of metabolic networks of hundreds of bacterial species across many simulated growth environments. We provide evidence that variations among species in their level of robustness reflect ecological adaptations. We decouple metabolic robustness into two components and quantify the extents of each: the first, environmental-dependent, is responsible for at least 20% of the non-essential reactions and its extent is associated with the species' lifestyle (specialized/generalist); the second, environmental-independent, is associated (correlation = ∼0.6) with the intrinsic metabolic capacities of a species—higher robustness is observed in fast growers or in organisms with an extensive production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we identify reactions that are uniquely susceptible to perturbations in human pathogens, potentially serving as novel drug-targets. PMID:20195496

  14. Metabolic modeling of a chronic wound biofilm consortium predicts spatial partitioning of bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Phalak, Poonam; Chen, Jin; Carlson, Ross P; Henson, Michael A

    2016-09-07

    Chronic wounds are often colonized by consortia comprised of different bacterial species growing as biofilms on a complex mixture of wound exudate. Bacteria growing in biofilms exhibit phenotypes distinct from planktonic growth, often rendering the application of antibacterial compounds ineffective. Computational modeling represents a complementary tool to experimentation for generating fundamental knowledge and developing more effective treatment strategies for chronic wound biofilm consortia. We developed spatiotemporal models to investigate the multispecies metabolism of a biofilm consortium comprised of two common chronic wound isolates: the aerobe Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the facultative anaerobe Staphylococcus aureus. By combining genome-scale metabolic reconstructions with partial differential equations for metabolite diffusion, the models were able to provide both temporal and spatial predictions with genome-scale resolution. The models were used to analyze the metabolic differences between single species and two species biofilms and to demonstrate the tendency of the two bacteria to spatially partition in the multispecies biofilm as observed experimentally. Nutrient gradients imposed by supplying glucose at the bottom and oxygen at the top of the biofilm induced spatial partitioning of the two species, with S. aureus most concentrated in the anaerobic region and P. aeruginosa present only in the aerobic region. The two species system was predicted to support a maximum biofilm thickness much greater than P. aeruginosa alone but slightly less than S. aureus alone, suggesting an antagonistic metabolic effect of P. aeruginosa on S. aureus. When each species was allowed to enhance its growth through consumption of secreted metabolic byproducts assuming identical uptake kinetics, the competitiveness of P. aeruginosa was further reduced due primarily to the more efficient lactate metabolism of S. aureus. Lysis of S. aureus by a small molecule inhibitor secreted

  15. Bacterial species involved in the conversion of dietary flavonoids in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Braune, Annett; Blaut, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the conversion of dietary flavonoids and thereby affects their health-promoting effects in the human host. The identification of the bacteria involved in intestinal flavonoid conversion has gained increasing interest. This review summarizes available information on the so far identified human intestinal flavonoid-converting bacterial species and strains as well as their enzymes catalyzing the underlying reactions. The majority of described species involved in flavonoid transformation are capable of carrying out the O-deglycosylation of flavonoids. Other bacteria cleave the less common flavonoid-C-glucosides and/or further degrade the aglycones of flavonols, flavanonols, flavones, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, isoflavones and monomeric flavan-3-ols. To increase the currently limited knowledge in this field, identification of flavonoid-converting bacteria should be continued using culture-dependent screening or isolation procedures and molecular approaches based on sequence information of the involved enzymes. PMID:26963713

  16. Psychrophilic and Mesophilic Fungi in Frozen Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Harold H.; Gunderson, Millard F.

    1963-01-01

    The mold flora of certain frozen pastries and chicken pies was investigated. Molds were determined qualitatively or quantitatively, or both, by preparing pour plates of the blended product and incubating the plates at various temperatures. The mesophilic fungal flora developed on plates incubated at 10 and 20 C, whereas psychrophilic fungi were obtained on plates incubated at 0 and 5 C. About 2,000 cultures of fungi, representing about 100 different species, were isolated from various products. Four different brands of blueberry, two brands of cherry pastries, two brands of apple, and one brand of raspberry pastries were examined. In addition, two brands of chicken pies were studied. Blueberry pastries had a much higher total fungal population than the other products, although different brands of blueberry pastries varied considerably. Blueberry pastries had from 347 to 1,586 psychrophilic fungi per g. Cherry pastries had about 70 to 110 psychrophiles per g, and apple pastries had 19 to 92 psychrophiles per g. Chicken pies contained very few psychrophilic fungi, about 15 per g. Aureobasidium pullulans was recovered most frequently. About 90% of the psychrophilic fungi found in blueberry products was A. pullulans. Depending upon the brand of cherry pastry, either Phoma spp. or A. pullulans was the most common fungus present. Apple pastries also displayed brand variation, but were unique in having many mesophilic aspergilli. This genus was generally absent from other products. The Penicillium content of apple pastries was also rather high; 50% of the psychrophilic flora was represented by this genus. The psychrophilic fungal flora of chicken pies was composed primarily of penicillia (50%) and Chrysosporium pannorum (46%). PMID:13927344

  17. Novel rumen bacterial diversity in two geographically separated sub-species of reindeer.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Monica A; Praesteng, Kirsti E; Cann, Isaac K O; Mathiesen, Svein D; Mackie, Roderick I

    2007-10-01

    Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus) live under austere nutritional conditions on the high-arctic archipelago of Svalbard, while semi-domesticated Norwegian reindeer (R. tarandus tarandus) migrate between lush coastal summer pastures and inland winter pastures with lichens on mainland Norway. Svalbard reindeer are known to have high rumen concentrations of cellulolytic bacteria, ranging from 15% of the viable population in summer to 35% in winter, compared to only 2.5% in Norwegian reindeer. Their rumen bacterial diversity was investigated through comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences ( approximately 1.5 kb in length) generated from clone libraries (n = 121) and bacterial isolates (n = 51). LIBSHUFF comparisons of the composition of the two 16S rRNA libraries from Norwegian reindeer showed a significant effect of artificial feeding compared to natural pasture, but failed to yield significant differences between libraries from Norwegian reindeer and Svalbard reindeer. The combined sequences from reindeer were not significantly different from those reported in wild Thompson's gazelle in Kenya but did differ from those reported in domestic cattle in Japan. A total of 90 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified by employing a criterion of 97% similarity, while the Chao1 index estimated the reindeer bacterial rumen population richness at 698 OTUs. The majority of the clone library sequences (92.5%) represented novel strains with <97% identity to any known sequence in the public database, most of them affiliated with the bacterial phylum Firmicutes (low G+C Gram-positives) related to the order Clostridiales (76.7%), while Gram-negative bacteria in the Bacteriodales (Prevotella-Bacteroides group) contributed to 22.5%. Also, six of the isolates were putatively novel strains, possibly representing new species in the Clostridium subphylum (cluster XIVa), Actinomyces and Butyrivibrio.

  18. Individual growth detection of bacterial species in an in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Tabenski, L; Maisch, T; Santarelli, F; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G

    2014-11-01

    Most in vitro studies on the antibacterial effects of antiseptics have used planktonic bacteria in monocultures. However, this study design does not reflect the in vivo situation in oral cavities harboring different bacterial species that live in symbiotic relationships in biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a simple in vitro polymicrobial model consisting of only three bacterial strains of different phases of oral biofilm formation to simulate in vivo oral conditions. Therefore, we studied the biofilm formation of Actinomyces naeslundii (An), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) on 96-well tissue culture plates under static anaerobic conditions using artificial saliva according to the method established by Pratten et al. that was supplemented with 1 g l(-1) sucrose. Growth was separately determined for each bacterial strain after incubation periods of up to 72 h by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and live/dead staining. Presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was visualized by Concanavalin A staining. Increasing incubation times of up to 72 h showed adhesion and propagation of the bacterial strains with artificial saliva formulation. An and Ef had significantly higher growth rates than Fn. Live/dead staining showed a median of 49.9 % (range 46.0-53.0 %) of living bacteria after 72 h of incubation, and 3D fluorescence microscopy showed a three-dimensional structure containing EPS. An in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model was established to better simulate oral conditions and had the advantage of providing the well-controlled experimental conditions of in vitro testing.

  19. Impact of Cropping Systems, Soil Inoculum, and Plant Species Identity on Soil Bacterial Community Structure.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Suzanne L; Johnson, Stephen P; Miller, Zach J; Lehnhoff, Erik A; Olivo, Sarah; Yeoman, Carl J; Menalled, Fabian D

    2017-02-01

    Farming practices affect the soil microbial community, which in turn impacts crop growth and crop-weed interactions. This study assessed the modification of soil bacterial community structure by organic or conventional cropping systems, weed species identity [Amaranthus retroflexus L. (redroot pigweed) or Avena fatua L. (wild oat)], and living or sterilized inoculum. Soil from eight paired USDA-certified organic and conventional farms in north-central Montana was used as living or autoclave-sterilized inoculant into steam-pasteurized potting soil, planted with Am. retroflexus or Av. fatua and grown for two consecutive 8-week periods to condition soil nutrients and biota. Subsequently, the V3-V4 regions of the microbial 16S rRNA gene were sequenced by Illumina MiSeq. Treatments clustered significantly, with living or sterilized inoculum being the strongest delineating factor, followed by organic or conventional cropping system, then individual farm. Living inoculum-treated soil had greater species richness and was more diverse than sterile inoculum-treated soil (observed OTUs, Chao, inverse Simpson, Shannon, P < 0.001) and had more discriminant taxa delineating groups (linear discriminant analysis). Living inoculum soil contained more Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria, while the sterile inoculum soil had more Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia. Organically farmed inoculum-treated soil had greater species richness, more diversity (observed OTUs, Chao, Shannon, P < 0.05), and more discriminant taxa than conventionally farmed inoculum-treated soil. Cyanobacteria were higher in pots growing Am. retroflexus, regardless of inoculum type, for three of the four organic farms. Results highlight the potential of cropping systems and species identity to modify soil bacterial communities, subsequently modifying plant growth and crop-weed competition.

  20. Changes of resistome, mobilome and potential hosts of antibiotic resistance genes during the transformation of anaerobic digestion from mesophilic to thermophilic.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Min

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to reveal how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their horizontal and vertical transfer-related items (mobilome and bacterial hosts) respond to the transformation of anaerobic digestion (AD) from mesophilic to thermophilic using one-step temperature increase. The resistomes and mobilomes of mesophilic and thermophilic sludge were investigated using metagenome sequencing, and the changes in 24 representative ARGs belonging to three categories, class 1 integron and bacterial genera during the transition period were further followed using quantitative PCR and 454-pyrosequencing. After the temperature increase, resistome abundance in the digested sludge decreased from 125.97 ppm (day 0, mesophilic) to 50.65 ppm (day 57, thermophilic) with the reduction of most ARG types except for the aminoglycoside resistance genes. Thermophilic sludge also had a smaller mobilome, including plasmids, insertion sequences and integrons, than that of mesophilic sludge, suggesting the lower horizontal transfer potential of ARGs under thermophilic conditions. On the other hand, the total abundance of 18 bacterial genera, which were suggested as the possible hosts for 13 ARGs through network analysis, decreased from 23.27% in mesophilic sludge to 11.92% in thermophilic sludge, indicating fewer hosts for the vertical expansion of ARGs after the increase in temperature. These results indicate that the better reduction of resistome abundance by thermophilic AD might be associated with the decrease of both the horizontal and vertical transferability of ARGs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recombination produces coherent bacterial species clusters in both core and accessory genomes

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Gutmann, Michael U.; Corander, Jukka; Hanage, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Population samples show bacterial genomes can be divided into a core of ubiquitous genes and accessory genes that are present in a fraction of isolates. The ecological significance of this variation in gene content remains unclear. However, microbiologists agree that a bacterial species should be ‘genomically coherent’, even though there is no consensus on how this should be determined. Results: We use a parsimonious model combining diversification in both the core and accessory genome, including mutation, homologous recombination (HR) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) introducing new loci, to produce a population of interacting clusters of strains with varying genome content. New loci introduced by HGT may then be transferred on by HR. The model fits well to a systematic population sample of 616 pneumococcal genomes, capturing the major features of the population structure with parameter values that agree well with empirical estimates. Conclusions: The model does not include explicit selection on individual genes, suggesting that crude comparisons of gene content may be a poor predictor of ecological function. We identify a clearly divergent subpopulation of pneumococci that are inconsistent with the model and may be considered genomically incoherent with the rest of the population. These strains have a distinct disease tropism and may be rationally defined as a separate species. We also find deviations from the model that may be explained by recent population bottlenecks or spatial structure.

  2. Both species sorting and neutral processes drive assembly of bacterial communities in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jack E; Buckley, Hannah L; Etienne, Rampal S; Lear, Gavin

    2013-11-01

    A focus of ecology is to determine drivers of community assembly. Here, we investigate effects of immigration and species sorting (environmental selection) on structuring aquatic bacterial communities in both colonised and previously uncolonised environments. We used nonsterilised and presterilised water from three chemically distinct ponds to establish microcosms, which were opened for 12, 24, 48, 96 or 167 h and then closed again to allow airborne bacterial immigration and subsequent succession. Community similarity, richness, evenness and the parameters of a neutral model were investigated after 167 h. Immigration appeared to govern the assembly of communities in the presterilised water as there were no significant differences in evenness among microcosm communities containing water from each pond. Statistical estimation of neutral model parameters confirmed these findings, because the estimated immigration rate changed significantly with time of exposure to immigration. Species sorting also occurred because significant differences in community similarity (for presterilised and nonsterilised communities) and evenness (only for nonsterilised communities) were detected among microcosms containing different pond water; the magnitude of these differences was greater for communities in nonsterilised microcosms. Our study provides evidence for both processes being important during the colonisation of aquatic environments and presents a novel way to apply the neutral model. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative and bioinformatics analyses of pathogenic bacterial secretomes identified by mass spectrometry in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao Thi; Chon, Tae-Soo; Kim, Jaehan; Seo, Young-Su; Heo, Muyoung

    2017-07-01

    Secreted proteins (secretomes) play crucial roles during bacterial pathogenesis in both plant and human hosts. The identification and characterization of secretomes in the two plant pathogens Burkholderia glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, which cause diseases in rice such as seedling blight, panicle blight, and grain rot, are important steps to not only understand the disease-causing mechanisms but also find remedies for the diseases. Here, we identified two datasets of secretomes in B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, which consist of 118 and 111 proteins, respectively, using mass spectrometry approach and literature curation. Next, we characterized the functional properties, potential secretion pathways and sequence information properties of secretomes of two plant pathogens in a comparative analysis by various computational approaches. The ratio of potential non-classically secreted proteins (NCSPs) to classically secreted proteins (CSPs) in B. glumae BGR1 was greater than that in B. gladioli BSR3. For CSPs, the putative hydrophobic regions (PHRs) which are essential for secretion process of CSPs were screened in detail at their N-terminal sequences using hidden Markov model (HMM)-based method. Total 31 pairs of homologous proteins in two bacterial secretomes were indicated based on the global alignment (identity ≥ 70%). Our results may facilitate the understanding of the species-specific features of secretomes in two plant pathogenic Burkholderia species.

  4. Species-specific structural and functional diversity of bacterial communities in lichen symbioses.

    PubMed

    Grube, Martin; Cardinale, Massimiliano; de Castro, João Vieira; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2009-09-01

    Lichens are generally considered as mutualisms between fungi and green algae or cyanobacteria. These partnerships allow light-exposed and long-living joint structures. The unique organization of lichens provides still unexplored environments for microbial communities. To study lichen-associated bacterial communities, we analyze samples, by a polyphasic approach, from three lichen species (Cladonia arbuscula, Lecanora polytropa and Umbilicaria cylindrica) from alpine environments. Our results indicate that bacteria can form highly structured, biofilm-like assemblages on fungal surfaces and reach considerable abundances of up to 10(8) cells per gram fresh weight. Fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals the predominance of Alphaproteobacteria. Microbial fingerprints performed by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis using universal and group-specific primers show distinct patterns for each lichen species. Characterization of cultivable strains and presence of functional genes in the total fraction suggest the involvement of associated bacteria in nutrient cycling. Ubiquitous nifH genes, which encode the nitrogenase reductase, show a high diversity and are assigned to Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes, for example, Paenibacillus. Cultivable strains mainly belonging to the genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium and Paenibacillus show lytic (chitinolytic, glucanolytic, and proteolytic) activities, hormone production (indole-3-acetic acid) as well as phosphate mobilization and antagonistic activity toward other microorganisms. The traditional concept of lichens has to be expanded to consider multiple bacterial partners.

  5. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, T O; Aliyu, M; Isiaka, I; Haliru, F Z; Ibitoye, O B; Uwazie, J N; Muritala, H F; Bello, S A; Yusuf, I I; Mohammed, A O

    2016-10-25

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality was investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were investigated using 96-well microtitre plate. MIC and MBC of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus are 600 and 700; 600 and 800; 600 and 800 μg/mL respectively. The optical densities and colony forming units of (+)-catechin-treated bacteria decreased. (+)-Catechin (4× MIC) significantly increased the superoxide anion content of E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus compared to DMSO. Superoxide dismutase and catalase in (+)-catechin treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus increased significantly. Conversely, level of reduced glutathione in (+)-catechin-treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus decreased significantly while glutathione disulfide increased significantly. Furthermore, malondialdehyde and fragmented DNA increased significantly following exposure to (+)-catechin. From the above findings, (+)-catechin enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical) in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, possibly by autoxidation, Fenton chemistry and inhibiting electron transport chain resulting into lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation and consequentially bacterial cell death.

  6. Bacterial Species and Biochemical Characteristic Investigations of Nostoc flagelliforme Concentrates during its Storage.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lifang; Lv, Hexin; Zhen, Jing; Jiang, Shengping; Jia, Shiru; Shen, Shigang; Gao, Lu; Dai, Yujie

    2016-04-28

    Preservation of fresh algae plays an important role in algae seed subculture and aquaculture. The determination and examination of the changes of cell viability, composition, and bacterial species during storage would help to take suitable preservation methods to prolong the preservation time of fresh algae. Nostoc flagelliforme is a kind of edible cyanobacterium with important herbal and dietary values. This article investigated the changes of bacterial species and biochemical characteristics of fresh N. flagelliforme concentrate during natural storage. It was found that the viability of cells decreased along with the storage time. Fourteen bacteria strains in the algae concentrate were identified by PCR-DGGE and were grouped into four phyla, including Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Among them, Enterococcus viikkiensis may be a concern in the preservation. Eleven volatile organic compounds were identified from N. flagelliforme cells, in which geosmin could be treated as an indicator of the freshness of N. flagelliforme. The occurrence of indole compound may be an indicator of the degradation of cells.

  7. Profiling of antibiotic resistance of bacterial species recovered from routine clinical isolates in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ten Hove, Robert-Jan; Tesfaye, Melaku; Ten Hove, Witold Frederik; Nigussie, Mesfin

    2017-06-26

    With the alarming rise in antibiotic resistance in African countries, the need for a surveillance system in the region has become pressing. The rapid expansion of data networks makes it possible to set up healthcare applications that can be both cost-efficient and effective. Large data sets are available for assessment of current antibiotic resistance among Ethiopian patients. Based on the data-presentation, a practical approach is proposed on how diagnostic laboratories can participate remedial action against antibiotic resistance in Ethiopia. In Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), raw data comprising bacterial species name, specimen type and antibiograms covering the period January 2014 to May 2015 was accessed from the laboratory information management system. Using R code, the data was read and fitted into data-frames and analyzed to assess antibiotic resistance in the Ethiopian patient population. Susceptibility to an antibiotic was tested with 14.983 cultures of 54 different bacterial species or subgroups, isolated from 16 types of specimen. Half of the cultures (n = 6444) showed resistance to an antibiotic. Resistance against penicillin was highest with, on average, 91.1% of 79 bacterial cultures showing resistance. Very high resistance rates were also observed for ampicillin, whereas resistance was lowest with cefoxitin. Extraction and analysis of raw-data from the laboratory database is relatively simple and can provide valuable insight into the relationships between type of sample and drug-resistance in countries where such data is still scarce. With the largest number of antibiotic resistance tests described for Ethiopia, a tool is proposed for consistent data collection with specified core variables. Trends in antibiotic resistance can be revealed and treatment failures avoided when used as an easy accessible reference application for healthcare providers.

  8. Bacterial Species- and Strain-Dependent Induction of Tissue Factor in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Veltrop, M. H. A. M.; Beekhuizen, H.; Thompson, J.

    1999-01-01

    A cardinal process in bacterial endocarditis (BE) is the activation of the clotting system and the formation of a fibrin clot on the inner surface of the heart, the so-called endocardial vegetation. The processes that lead to the activation of the clotting system on endothelial surfaces upon exposure to bacteria are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated in an in vitro model whether infection of human endothelial cells (EC) with bacteria that are relevant to BE, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, leads to induction of tissue factor (TF)-dependent procoagulant activity (TFA) and whether this process is influenced by host factors, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), that are produced in response to the bacteremia in vivo. The results show that S. aureus binds to and is internalized by EC, resulting in expression of TF mRNA and TF surface protein as well as generation of TFA within 4 to 8 h after infection. No TFA was found when EC were exposed to UV-irradiated S. aureus or bacterial cell wall fragments. S. sanguis and S. epidermidis, although also binding to EC, did not induce endothelial TFA. This indicates a species and strain dependency. EC also expressed TFA after exposure to IL-1. The enhanced TFA of EC after exposure to S. aureus was not prevented by IL-1 receptor antagonist, arguing against an auto- or paracrine contribution of endogenous IL-1. When IL-1 was applied together with bacteria, this had a synergistic effect on the induction of EC TFA. This was found in particular with S. aureus but also, although to a lesser degree, with S. sanguis and S. epidermidis. This influence of IL-1 on the species- and strain-dependent induction of EC TFA suggests that bacterial factors as well as host factors orchestrate the induction of coagulation in an early stage in the pathogenesis of endovascular disease, such as BE. PMID:10531276

  9. Novel Perspectives on the Characterization of Species-Dependent Optical Signatures of Bacterial Colonies by Digital Holography.

    PubMed

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Krauze, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    The use of light diffraction for the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial colonies was a significant breakthrough with widespread implications for the food industry and clinical practice. We previously confirmed that optical sensors for bacterial colony light diffraction can be used for bacterial identification. This paper is focused on the novel perspectives of this method based on digital in-line holography (DIH), which is able to reconstruct the amplitude and phase properties of examined objects, as well as the amplitude and phase patterns of the optical field scattered/diffracted by the bacterial colony in any chosen observation plane behind the object from single digital hologram. Analysis of the amplitude and phase patterns inside a colony revealed its unique optical properties, which are associated with the internal structure and geometry of the bacterial colony. Moreover, on a computational level, it is possible to select the desired scattered/diffracted pattern within the entire observation volume that exhibits the largest amount of unique, differentiating bacterial features. These properties distinguish this method from the already proposed sensing techniques based on light diffraction/scattering of bacterial colonies. The reconstructed diffraction patterns have a similar spatial distribution as the recorded Fresnel patterns, previously applied for bacterial identification with over 98% accuracy, but they are characterized by both intensity and phase distributions. Our results using digital holography provide new optical discriminators of bacterial species revealed in one single step in form of new optical signatures of bacterial colonies: digital holograms, reconstructed amplitude and phase patterns, as well as diffraction patterns from all observation space, which exhibit species-dependent features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial colony analysis via digital holography and our study represents an innovative approach

  10. Novel Perspectives on the Characterization of Species-Dependent Optical Signatures of Bacterial Colonies by Digital Holography

    PubMed Central

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Krauze, Wojciech; Podbielska, Halina

    2016-01-01

    The use of light diffraction for the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial colonies was a significant breakthrough with widespread implications for the food industry and clinical practice. We previously confirmed that optical sensors for bacterial colony light diffraction can be used for bacterial identification. This paper is focused on the novel perspectives of this method based on digital in-line holography (DIH), which is able to reconstruct the amplitude and phase properties of examined objects, as well as the amplitude and phase patterns of the optical field scattered/diffracted by the bacterial colony in any chosen observation plane behind the object from single digital hologram. Analysis of the amplitude and phase patterns inside a colony revealed its unique optical properties, which are associated with the internal structure and geometry of the bacterial colony. Moreover, on a computational level, it is possible to select the desired scattered/diffracted pattern within the entire observation volume that exhibits the largest amount of unique, differentiating bacterial features. These properties distinguish this method from the already proposed sensing techniques based on light diffraction/scattering of bacterial colonies. The reconstructed diffraction patterns have a similar spatial distribution as the recorded Fresnel patterns, previously applied for bacterial identification with over 98% accuracy, but they are characterized by both intensity and phase distributions. Our results using digital holography provide new optical discriminators of bacterial species revealed in one single step in form of new optical signatures of bacterial colonies: digital holograms, reconstructed amplitude and phase patterns, as well as diffraction patterns from all observation space, which exhibit species-dependent features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial colony analysis via digital holography and our study represents an innovative approach

  11. Waste Workers’ Exposure to Airborne Fungal and Bacterial Species in the Truck Cab and During Waste Collection

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Alwan, Taif; Ørberg, Anders; Uhrbrand, Katrine; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2016-01-01

    A large number of people work with garbage collection, and exposure to microorganisms is considered an occupational health problem. However, knowledge on microbial exposure at species level is limited. The aim of the study was to achieve knowledge on waste collectors’ exposure to airborne inhalable fungal and bacterial species during waste collection with focus on the transport of airborne microorganisms into the truck cab. Airborne microorganisms were collected with samplers mounted in the truck cab, on the workers’ clothes, and outdoors. Fungal and bacterial species were quantified and identified. The study showed that the workers were exposed to between 112 and 4.8×104 bacteria m−3 air and 326 and 4.6×104 fungi m−3 air. The personal exposures to bacteria and fungi were significantly higher than the concentrations measured in the truck cabs and in the outdoor references. On average, the fungal and bacterial concentrations in truck cabs were 111 and 7.7 times higher than outdoor reference measurements. In total, 23 fungal and 38 bacterial species were found and identified. Most fungal species belonged to the genus Penicillium and in total 11 Penicillium species were found. Identical fungal species were often found both in a personal sample and in the same person’s truck cab, but concentrations were on average 27 times higher in personal samples. Concentrations of fungal and bacterial species found only in the personal samples were lower than concentrations of species also found in truck cabs. Skin-related bacteria constituted a large fraction of bacterial isolates found in personal and truck cab samples. In total, six Staphylococcus species were found. In outdoor samples, no skin-related bacteria were found. On average, concentrations of bacterial species found both in the truck cab and personal samples were 77 times higher in personal samples than in truck cab samples. In conclusion, high concentrations of fungi were found in truck cabs, but the

  12. Dancing for Food in the Deep Sea: Bacterial Farming by a New Species of Yeti Crab

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Andrew R.; Jones, William J.; Schnabel, Kareen

    2011-01-01

    Vent and seep animals harness chemosynthetic energy to thrive far from the sun's energy. While symbiont-derived energy fuels many taxa, vent crustaceans have remained an enigma; these shrimps, crabs, and barnacles possess a phylogenetically distinct group of chemosynthetic bacterial epibionts, yet the role of these bacteria has remained unclear. We test whether a new species of Yeti crab, which we describe as Kiwa puravida n. sp, farms the epibiotic bacteria that it grows on its chelipeds (claws), chelipeds that the crab waves in fluid escaping from a deep-sea methane seep. Lipid and isotope analyses provide evidence that epibiotic bacteria are the crab's main food source and K. puravida n. sp. has highly-modified setae (hairs) on its 3rd maxilliped (a mouth appendage) which it uses to harvest these bacteria. The ε- and γ- proteobacteria that this methane-seep species farms are closely related to hydrothermal-vent decapod epibionts. We hypothesize that this species waves its arm in reducing fluid to increase the productivity of its epibionts by removing boundary layers which may otherwise limit carbon fixation. The discovery of this new species, only the second within a family described in 2005, stresses how much remains undiscovered on our continental margins. PMID:22140426

  13. Dancing for food in the deep sea: bacterial farming by a new species of Yeti crab.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Andrew R; Jones, William J; Schnabel, Kareen

    2011-01-01

    Vent and seep animals harness chemosynthetic energy to thrive far from the sun's energy. While symbiont-derived energy fuels many taxa, vent crustaceans have remained an enigma; these shrimps, crabs, and barnacles possess a phylogenetically distinct group of chemosynthetic bacterial epibionts, yet the role of these bacteria has remained unclear. We test whether a new species of Yeti crab, which we describe as Kiwa puravida n. sp, farms the epibiotic bacteria that it grows on its chelipeds (claws), chelipeds that the crab waves in fluid escaping from a deep-sea methane seep. Lipid and isotope analyses provide evidence that epibiotic bacteria are the crab's main food source and K. puravida n. sp. has highly-modified setae (hairs) on its 3(rd) maxilliped (a mouth appendage) which it uses to harvest these bacteria. The ε- and γ- proteobacteria that this methane-seep species farms are closely related to hydrothermal-vent decapod epibionts. We hypothesize that this species waves its arm in reducing fluid to increase the productivity of its epibionts by removing boundary layers which may otherwise limit carbon fixation. The discovery of this new species, only the second within a family described in 2005, stresses how much remains undiscovered on our continental margins.

  14. Cheating fosters species co-existence in well-mixed bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Leinweber, Anne; Fredrik Inglis, R; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2017-05-01

    Explaining the enormous biodiversity observed in bacterial communities is challenging because ecological theory predicts that competition between species occupying the same niche should lead to the exclusion of less competitive community members. Competitive exclusion should be particularly strong when species compete for a single limiting resource or live in unstructured habitats that offer no refuge for weaker competitors. Here, we describe the 'cheating effect', a form of intra-specific competition that can counterbalance between-species competition, thereby fostering biodiversity in unstructured habitats. Using experimental communities consisting of the strong competitor Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and its weaker counterpart Burkholderia cenocepacia (BC), we show that co-existence is impossible when the two species compete for a single limiting resource, iron. However, when introducing a PA cheating mutant, which specifically exploits the iron-scavenging siderophores produced by the PA wild type, we found that biodiversity was preserved under well-mixed conditions where PA cheats could outcompete the PA wild type. Cheating fosters biodiversity in our system because it creates strong intra-specific competition, which equalizes fitness differences between PA and BC. Our study identifies cheating - typically considered a destructive element - as a constructive force in shaping biodiversity.

  15. Bacterial community composition associated with freshwater algae: species specificity vs. dependency on environmental conditions and source community.

    PubMed

    Eigemann, Falk; Hilt, Sabine; Salka, Ivette; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-03-01

    We studied bacterial associations with the green alga Desmodesmus armatus and the diatom Stephanodiscus minutulus under changing environmental conditions and bacterial source communities, to evaluate whether bacteria-algae associations are species-specific or more generalized and determined by external factors. Axenic and xenic algae were incubated in situ with and without allelopathically active macrophytes, and in the laboratory with sterile and nonsterile lake water and an allelochemical, tannic acid (TA). Bacterial community composition (BCC) of algae-associated bacteria was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), nonmetric multidimensional scaling, cluster analyses, and sequencing of DGGE bands. BCC of xenic algal cultures of both species were not significantly affected by changes in their environment or bacterial source community, except in the case of TA additions. Species-specific interactions therefore appear to overrule the effects of environmental conditions and source communities. The BCC of xenic and axenic D. armatus cultures subjected to in situ bacterial colonization, however, had lower similarities (ca. 55%), indicating that bacterial precolonization is a strong factor for bacteria-algae associations irrespective of environmental conditions and source community. Our findings emphasize the ecological importance of species-specific bacteria-algae associations with important repercussions for other processes, such as the remineralization of nutrients, and organic matter dynamics.

  16. Spatial organization of dual-species bacterial aggregates on leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monier, J-M; Lindow, S E

    2005-09-01

    The spatial organization of cells within bacterial aggregates on leaf surfaces was determined for pair-wise mixtures of three different bacterial species commonly found on leaves, Pseudomonas syringae, Pantoea agglomerans, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Cells were coinoculated onto bean plants and allowed to grow under moist conditions, and the resulting aggregates were examined in situ by epifluorescence microscopy. Each bacterial strain could be localized because it expressed either the green or the cyan fluorescent protein constitutively, and the viability of individual cells was assessed by propidium iodide staining. Each pair of bacterial strains that was coinoculated onto leaves formed mixed aggregates. The degree of segregation of cells in mixed aggregates differed between the different coinoculated pairs of strains and was higher in mixtures of P. fluorescens A506 and P. agglomerans 299R and mixtures of P. syringae B728a and P. agglomerans 299R than in mixtures of two isogenic strains of P. agglomerans 299R. The fractions of the total cell population that were dead in mixed and monospecific aggregates of a gfp-marked strain of P. agglomerans 299R and a cfp-marked strain of P. agglomerans 299R, or of P. fluorescens A506 and P. agglomerans 299R, were similar. However, the proportion of dead cells in mixed aggregates of P. syringae B728a and P. agglomerans 299R was significantly higher (13.2% +/- 8.2%) than that in monospecific aggregates of these two strains (1.6% +/- 0.7%), and it increased over time. While dead cells in such mixed aggregates were preferentially found at the interface between clusters of cells of these strains, cells of these two strains located at the interface did not exhibit equal probabilities of mortality. After 9 days of incubation, about 77% of the P. agglomerans 299R cells located at the interface were dead, while only about 24% of the P. syringae B728a cells were dead. The relevance of our results to understanding bacterial

  17. Epidemiology of urinary tract infections, bacterial species and resistances in primary care in France.

    PubMed

    Malmartel, A; Ghasarossian, C

    2016-03-01

    General practitioners often have to manage urinary tract infections (UTI) with probabilistic treatments, although bacterial resistances are increasing. Therefore, the French Society of Infectious Diseases published new guidelines in 2014. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial epidemiology of UTI in the general population in primary care and analyse risk factors for Escherichia coli resistance to antibiotics. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 ambulatory laboratories. Patients over 18 years of age coming for urinalysis were included. Risk factors for UTI were collected using a questionnaire and the laboratory records. Bacteria meeting criteria for UTI were analysed. A positive urinalysis was found in 1119 patients, corresponding to 1125 bacterial isolates. The bacterial species were: E. coli (73 %), Enterococcus spp. (7 %), Klebsiella spp. (6 %), Proteus spp. (4 %), Staphylococcus spp. (3 %) and Pseudomonas spp. (2 %). Regardless of the bacteria, the most common resistance was that to co-trimoxazole: 27 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] = [0.24; 0.30]), followed by ofloxacin resistance: 16 % [0.14; 0.18]. Escherichia coli resistances to co-trimoxazole, ofloxacin, cefixime, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin were, respectively, 25.5 % [0.23; 0.28], 17 % [0.14; 0.20], 5.6 % [0.04; 0.07], 2.2 % [0.01; 0.03] and 1.2 % [0.005; 0.02]. Independent risk factors for E. coli resistance to ofloxacin were age over 85 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.08; [1.61; 5.87]) and a history of UTI in the last 6 months (OR = 2.34; [1.54; 3.52]). Our findings support the guidelines recommending fluoroquinolone sparing. The scarcity of E. coli resistance to fosfomycin justifies its use as a first-line treatment in acute cystitis. These results should be reassessed in a few years to identify changes in the bacterial epidemiology of UTI.

  18. In situ identification of bacterial species in marine microfouling films by using an immunofluorescence technique.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Huber, P S; Meyer, A E; Slots, J; Fornalik, M S; Baier, R E

    1984-01-01

    An immunofluorescence technique was developed for the in situ identification of specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. Microorganisms adherent to glass plates after 30 days of immersion in a synthetic seawater system were cultured and classified by biochemical tests, flagellar arrangement, and the API 20E system. All isolates were gram-negative aerobic or facultative motile rods, predominantly Pseudomonas spp. Rabbit antisera to the five dominant organisms including Achromobacter spp., Comamonas terrigena, P. putrefaciens, a yellow-pigmented Pseudomonas sp., and Vibrio alginolyticus were prepared. These antisera were shown to be species specific in indirect immunofluorescence assays against a battery of 26 marine isolates from 14 bacterial species, with the exception of antisera to the Pseudomonas spp, which cross-reacted with each other but not with test bacteria of other genera. These immunofluorescent reagents enabled the in situ identification of all five bacterial species in microfouling films. Low-surface-energy test plates had smaller numbers of adherent bacteria in microfouling films than medium-surface-energy test plates, suggesting that the degree of microfouling may be influenced by the surface energy. In addition, the reagents could identify up to 39% of the attached bacteria in microfouling films spontaneously formed on steel plates in flow cells deployed in different areas of the Atlantic Ocean. The microbial composition of the ocean-formed films varied with the geographical area of their formation. The present results indicate that immunofluorescence techniques may provide a rapid and reliable means to identify, in situ, specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. PMID:6393875

  19. Exploring the bacterial microbiota associated with native South American species of Aphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Arneodo, J D; Ortego, J

    2014-06-01

    Aphids harbor a variety of bacterial endosymbionts, including the obligate symbiont Buchnera aphidicola and diverse facultative symbionts. The former supplies its host with essential amino acids. The latter are not indispensable for insect survival, but often improve their host's fitness. To date, the study of such associations was restricted to aphids of Holarctic origin. The bacterial microbiota of seven Aphis species from Argentina was investigated. The presence of B. aphidicola was assessed by specific PCR. Additional symbionts were identified through PCR with eubacterial universal primers, cloning, and sequencing of nearly complete 16S rRNA gene, intergenic spacer region, and partial 23S rRNA gene and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Infection with B. aphidicola was confirmed in every species analyzed. The facultative symbiont Serratia symbiotica was detected in Aphis malalhuina Mier Durante, Nieto Nafría & Ortego, 2003, Aphis senecionicoides Blanchard, 1944, and Aphis schinifoliae Blanchard, 1939, while Hamiltonella defensa was identified in Aphis mendocina Mier Durante, Ortego & Nieto Nafría, 2006. Arsenophonus sp. was found infecting Aphis melosae Mier Durante & Ortego, 1999, and a new, undescribed Aphis sp. In Aphis danielae Remaudière, 1994, no facultative symbionts could be recorded. When analyzing the highly conserved 16S rRNA gene, the phylogenetic tree grouped the S. symbiotica, H. defensa, and Arsenophonus isolates into three well-defined clusters showing little variability among clones corresponding to the same aphid host species. This article reports for the first time the endosymbionts associated with aphids native to South America. Despite their geographic origin, the qualitative composition of their microbiota revealed no evident differences from that described for aphids in the Northern Hemisphere.

  20. Spatial and Species Variations in Bacterial Communities Associated with Corals from the Red Sea as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, On On; Yang, Jiangke; Bougouffa, Salim; Wang, Yong; Batang, Zenon; Tian, Renmao; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz

    2012-01-01

    Microbial associations with corals are common and are most likely symbiotic, although their diversity and relationships with environmental factors and host species remain unclear. In this study, we adopted a 16S rRNA gene tag-pyrosequencing technique to investigate the bacterial communities associated with three stony Scleractinea and two soft Octocorallia corals from three locations in the Red Sea. Our results revealed highly diverse bacterial communities in the Red Sea corals, with more than 600 ribotypes detected and up to 1,000 species estimated from a single coral species. Altogether, 21 bacterial phyla were recovered from the corals, of which Gammaproteobacteria was the most dominant group, and Chloroflexi, Chlamydiae, and the candidate phylum WS3 were reported in corals for the first time. The associated bacterial communities varied greatly with location, where environmental conditions differed significantly. Corals from disturbed areas appeared to share more similar bacterial communities, but larger variations in community structures were observed between different coral species from pristine waters. Ordination methods identified salinity and depth as the most influential parameters affecting the abundance of Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas, Serratia, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, and Achromobacter in the corals. On the other hand, bacteria such as Chloracidobacterium and Endozoicomonas were more sensitive to the coral species, suggesting that the host species type may be influential in the associated bacterial community, as well. The combined influences of the coral host and environmental factors on the associated microbial communities are discussed. This study represents the first comparative study using tag-pyrosequencing technology to investigate the bacterial communities in Red Sea corals. PMID:22865078

  1. Relationship between the Presence of Bartonella Species and Bacterial Loads in Cats and Cat Fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) under Natural Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit

    2015-01-01

    Cats are considered the main reservoir of three zoonotic Bartonella species: Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae, and Bartonella koehlerae. Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) have been experimentally demonstrated to be a competent vector of B. henselae and have been proposed as the potential vector of the two other Bartonella species. Previous studies have reported a lack of association between the Bartonella species infection status (infected or uninfected) and/or bacteremia levels of cats and the infection status of the fleas they host. Nevertheless, to date, no study has compared the quantitative distributions of these bacteria in both cats and their fleas under natural conditions. Thus, the present study explored these relationships by identifying and quantifying the different Bartonella species in both cats and their fleas. Therefore, EDTA-blood samples and fleas collected from stray cats were screened for Bartonella bacteria. Bacterial loads were quantified by high-resolution melt real-time quantitative PCR assays. The results indicated a moderate correlation between the Bartonella bacterial loads in the cats and their fleas when both were infected with the same Bartonella species. Moreover, a positive effect of the host infection status on the Bartonella bacterial loads of the fleas was observed. Conversely, the cat bacterial loads were not affected by the infection status of their fleas. Our results suggest that the Bartonella bacterial loads of fleas are positively affected by the presence of the bacteria in their feline host, probably by multiple acquisitions/accumulation and/or multiplication events. PMID:26070666

  2. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, T.; Giffard, P.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S.; Auerbach, R.; Hornstra, H.; Tuanyok, A.; Price, E.P.; Glass, M.B.; Leadem, B.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, J. S.; Allan, G.J.; Foster, J.T.; Wagner, D.M.; Okinaka, R.T.; Sim, S.H.; Pearson, O.; Wu, Z.; Chang, J.; Kaul, R.; Hoffmaster, A.R.; Brettin, T.S.; Robison, R.A.; Mayo, M.; Gee, J.E.; Tan, P.; Currie, B.J.; Keim, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results: Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia. Conclusion: We describe an

  3. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia. Conclusion We describe an

  4. Diversity and variability of methanogens during the shift from mesophilic to thermohilic conditions while biogas production.

    PubMed

    Ziembińska-Buczyńska, A; Banach, A; Bacza, T; Pieczykolan, M

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is the most popular path of organic waste disposal. It is often used in wastewater treatment plants for excessive sludge removal. Methanogenic fermentation had usually been performed under mesophilic conditions, but in the past few years the thermophilic processes have become more popular due to economics and sludge sanitation. Methanogens, the group of microorganisms responsible for methane production, are thought to be sensitive to temperature change and it has already been proven that the communities performing methanogenesis under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions differ. But in most cases the research performed on methanogen diversity and changeability was undertaken in two separate anaerobic chambers for meso- and thermophilic conditions. It is also known that there is a group of microorganisms performing AD which are insensitive to temperature. Also the linkage between digester performance and its microbial content and community changeability is still not fully understood. That is why in this experiment we analyzed the bacterial community performing methanogenesis in a pilot scale anaerobic chamber during the shift from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions to point at the group of temperature tolerant microorganisms and their performance. The research was performed with PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). It occurred that the community biodiversity decreased together with a temperature increase. The changes were coherent for both the total bacteria community and methanogens. These bacterial shifts were also convergent with biogas production-it decreased in the beginning of the thermophilic phase with the bacterial biodiversity decrease and increased when the community seemed to be restored. DGGE results suggest that among a wide variety of microorganisms involved in AD there is a GC-rich group relatively insensitive towards temperature change, able to adapt quickly to shifts in

  5. Inter-phylum HGT has shaped the metabolism of many mesophilic and anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Caro-Quintero, Alejandro; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2015-03-17

    Genome sequencing has revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major evolutionary process in bacteria. Although it is generally assumed that closely related organisms engage in genetic exchange more frequently than distantly related ones, the frequency of HGT among distantly related organisms and the effect of ecological relatedness on the frequency has not been rigorously assessed. Here, we devised a novel bioinformatic pipeline, which minimized the effect of over-representation of specific taxa in the available databases and other limitations of homology-based approaches by analyzing genomes in standardized triplets, to quantify gene exchange between bacterial genomes representing different phyla. Our analysis revealed the existence of networks of genetic exchange between organisms with overlapping ecological niches, with mesophilic anaerobic organisms showing the highest frequency of exchange and engaging in HGT twice as frequently as their aerobic counterparts. Examination of individual cases suggested that inter-phylum HGT is more pronounced than previously thought, affecting up to ∼ 16% of the total genes and ∼ 35% of the metabolic genes in some genomes (conservative estimation). In contrast, ribosomal and other universal protein-coding genes were subjected to HGT at least 150 times less frequently than genes encoding the most promiscuous metabolic functions (for example, various dehydrogenases and ABC transport systems), suggesting that the species tree based on the former genes may be reliable. These results indicated that the metabolic diversity of microbial communities within most habitats has been largely assembled from preexisting genetic diversity through HGT and that HGT accounts for the functional redundancy among phyla.

  6. Pathogenic Leptospira species express surface-exposed proteins belonging to the bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Barocchi, Michele A.; Croda, Julio; Young, Tracy A.; Sanchez, Yolanda; Siqueira, Isadora; Bolin, Carole A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Riley, Lee W.; Haake, David A.; Ko, Albert I.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, such as the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin and Escherichia coli intimin, are surface-expressed proteins that mediate host mammalian cell invasion or attachment. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a new family of Big domain proteins, referred to as Lig (leptospiral Ig-like) proteins, in pathogenic Leptospira. Screening of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri expression libraries with sera from leptospirosis patients identified 13 lambda phage clones that encode tandem repeats of the 90 amino acid Big domain. Two lig genes, designated ligA and ligB, and one pseudo-gene, ligC, were identified. The ligA and ligB genes encode amino-terminal lipoprotein signal peptides followed by 10 or 11 Big domain repeats and, in the case of ligB, a unique carboxy-terminal non-repeat domain. The organization of ligC is similar to that of ligB but contains mutations that disrupt the reading frame. The lig sequences are present in pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species. LigA and LigB are expressed by a variety of virulent leptospiral strains. Loss of Lig protein and RNA transcript expression is correlated with the observed loss of virulence during culture attenuation of pathogenic strains. High-pressure freeze substitution followed by immunocytochemical electron microscopy confirmed that the Lig proteins were localized to the bacterial surface. Immunoblot studies with patient sera found that the Lig proteins are a major antigen recognized during the acute host infection. These observations demonstrate that the Lig proteins are a newly identified surface protein of pathogenic Leptospira, which by analogy to other bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily virulence factors, may play a role in host cell attachment and invasion during leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:12890019

  7. Clostridium cellulolyticum: model organism of mesophilic cellulolytic clostridia.

    PubMed

    Desvaux, Mickaël

    2005-09-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum ATCC 35319 is a non-ruminal mesophilic cellulolytic bacterium originally isolated from decayed grass. As with most truly cellulolytic clostridia, C. cellulolyticum possesses an extracellular multi-enzymatic complex, the cellulosome. The catalytic components of the cellulosome release soluble cello-oligosaccharides from cellulose providing the primary carbon substrates to support bacterial growth. As most cellulolytic bacteria, C. cellulolyticum was initially characterised by limited carbon consumption and subsequent limited growth in comparison to other saccharolytic clostridia. The first metabolic studies performed in batch cultures suggested nutrient(s) limitation and/or by-product(s) inhibition as the reasons for this limited growth. In most recent investigations using chemostat cultures, metabolic flux analysis suggests a self-intoxication of bacterial metabolism resulting from an inefficiently regulated carbon flow. The investigation of C. cellulolyticum physiology with cellobiose, as a model of soluble cellodextrin, and with pure cellulose, as a carbon source more closely related to lignocellulosic compounds, strengthen the idea of a bacterium particularly well adapted, and even restricted, to a cellulolytic lifestyle. The metabolic flux analysis from continuous cultures revealed that (i) in comparison to cellobiose, the cellulose hydrolysis by the cellulosome introduces an extra regulation of entering carbon flow resulting in globally lower metabolic fluxes on cellulose than on cellobiose, (ii) the glucose 1-phosphate/glucose 6-phosphate branch point controls the carbon flow directed towards glycolysis and dissipates carbon excess towards the formation of cellodextrins, glycogen and exopolysaccharides, (iii) the pyruvate/acetyl-CoA metabolic node is essential to the regulation of electronic and energetic fluxes. This in-depth analysis of C. cellulolyticum metabolism has permitted the first attempt to engineer metabolically a

  8. Do quaternary ammonium monomers induce drug resistance in cariogenic, endodontic and periodontal bacterial species?

    PubMed

    Wang, Suping; Wang, Haohao; Ren, Biao; Li, Hao; Weir, Michael D; Zhou, Xuedong; Oates, Thomas W; Cheng, Lei; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-10-01

    Antibacterial monomers were developed to combat oral biofilm acids and caries; however, little is known on whether quaternary ammonium monomers (QAMs) would induce drug resistance in oral bacteria. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of new antimicrobial monomers dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) and dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) on the induction of drug resistance in eight species of cariogenic, endodontic and periodontal bacteria for the first time. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), and Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) were tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was assessed using chlorhexidine (CHX) as control. Minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC), bacterial growth and membrane permeability properties were also investigated. CHX induced drug resistance in four species. DMAHDM did not induce any resistance. DMADDM induced drug resistance in only one benign species S. gordonii. The DMADDM-resistant and CHX-resistant S. gordonii had the same MIC and MBC values as S. gordonii parental strain against DMAHDM (p>0.1), hence DMAHDM effectively inhibited the resistant strains. The resistant strains had slower growth metabolism than parental strain. DMAHDM induced no drug resistance, and DMADDM had much less drug resistance than the commonly-used CHX in the eight common oral species. With its potent antimicrobial functions shown previously, the new DMAHDM is promising for applications in restorative, preventive, periodontal and endodontic treatments to combat cariogenic and pathological bacteria with no drug resistance in all tested species. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas communis Strain Nm2, a Mesophilic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Mediterranean Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Jessica A.; Kits, K. Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas communis strain Nm2, a mesophilic betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizer isolated from Mediterranean soils in Corfu, Greece, is reported here. This is the first genome to describe a cluster 8 Nitrosomonas species and represents an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium commonly found in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:26769932

  10. Goniothalamus Species: A Source of Drugs for the Treatment of Cancers and Bacterial Infections?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Irrespective of the presence of cytotoxic acetogenins and styryl-lactones in the genus Goniothalamus, only 22 species in the genus Goniothalamus, out of 160 species (13.7%) have so far been investigated. In an effort to promote further research on the genus Goniothalamus which could represent a source of drugs for the treatment of cancers and bacterial infections, this work offers a broad analysis of current knowledge on Goniothalamus species. Therefore, it includes (i) taxonomy (ii) botanical description (iii) traditional medicinal uses and (iv) phytochemical and pharmacological studies. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of actions of acetogenins and styryl-lactones, with some emphasis on the possible involvement of protein kinase, Bax and TRAIL receptors in the cytotoxic effects of styryl-lactones. We also report (v) the growth inhibition of several nosocomial bacteria by Goniothalamus. scortechinii. The crude methanol extract of G. scortechinii showed a good and broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:17965760

  11. PATRIC: the Comprehensive Bacterial Bioinformatics Resource with a Focus on Human Pathogenic Species ▿ ‡ #

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Wattam, Alice R.; Cammer, Stephen A.; Gabbard, Joseph L.; Shukla, Maulik P.; Dalay, Oral; Driscoll, Timothy; Hix, Deborah; Mane, Shrinivasrao P.; Mao, Chunhong; Nordberg, Eric K.; Scott, Mark; Schulman, Julie R.; Snyder, Eric E.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Wang, Chunxia; Warren, Andrew; Williams, Kelly P.; Xue, Tian; Seung Yoo, Hyun; Zhang, Chengdong; Zhang, Yan; Will, Rebecca; Kenyon, Ronald W.; Sobral, Bruno W.

    2011-01-01

    Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC) is a genomics-centric relational database and bioinformatics resource designed to assist scientists in infectious-disease research. Specifically, PATRIC provides scientists with (i) a comprehensive bacterial genomics database, (ii) a plethora of associated data relevant to genomic analysis, and (iii) an extensive suite of computational tools and platforms for bioinformatics analysis. While the primary aim of PATRIC is to advance the knowledge underlying the biology of human pathogens, all publicly available genome-scale data for bacteria are compiled and continually updated, thereby enabling comparative analyses to reveal the basis for differences between infectious free-living and commensal species. Herein we summarize the major features available at PATRIC, dividing the resources into two major categories: (i) organisms, genomes, and comparative genomics and (ii) recurrent integration of community-derived associated data. Additionally, we present two experimental designs typical of bacterial genomics research and report on the execution of both projects using only PATRIC data and tools. These applications encompass a broad range of the data and analysis tools available, illustrating practical uses of PATRIC for the biologist. Finally, a summary of PATRIC's outreach activities, collaborative endeavors, and future research directions is provided. PMID:21896772

  12. Chromosome painting in silico in a bacterial species reveals fine population structure.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2013-06-01

    Identifying population structure forms an important basis for genetic and evolutionary studies. Most current methods to identify population structure have limitations in analyzing haplotypes and recombination across the genome. Recently, a method of chromosome painting in silico has been developed to overcome these shortcomings and has been applied to multiple human genome sequences. This method detects the genome-wide transfer of DNA sequence chunks through homologous recombination. Here, we apply it to the frequently recombining bacterial species Helicobacter pylori that has infected Homo sapiens since their birth in Africa and shows wide phylogeographic divergence. Multiple complete genome sequences were analyzed including sequences from Okinawa, Japan, that we recently sequenced. The newer method revealed a finer population structure than revealed by a previous method that examines only MLST housekeeping genes or a phylogenetic network analysis of the core genome. Novel subgroups were found in Europe, Amerind, and East Asia groups. Examination of genetic flux showed some singleton strains to be hybrids of subgroups and revealed evident signs of population admixture in Africa, Europe, and parts of Asia. We expect this approach to further our understanding of intraspecific bacterial evolution by revealing population structure at a finer scale.

  13. Detection of bacterial pathogens including potential new species in human head lice from Mali

    PubMed Central

    Amanzougaghene, Nadia; Fenollar, Florence; Sangaré, Abdoul Karim; Sissoko, Mahamadou S.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Raoult, Didier

    2017-01-01

    In poor African countries, where no medical and biological facilities are available, the identification of potential emerging pathogens of concern at an early stage is challenging. Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, have a short life, feed only on human blood and do not transmit pathogens to their progeny. They are, therefore, a perfect tool for the xenodiagnosis of current or recent human infection. This study assessed the occurrence of bacterial pathogens from head lice collected in two rural villages from Mali, where a high frequency of head lice infestation had previously been reported, using molecular methods. Results show that all 600 head lice, collected from 117 individuals, belonged to clade E, specific to West Africa. Bartonella quintana, the causative agent of trench fever, was identified in three of the 600 (0.5%) head lice studied. Our study also shows, for the first time, the presence of the DNA of two pathogenic bacteria, namely Coxiella burnetii (5.1%) and Rickettsia aeschlimannii (0.6%), detected in human head lice, as well as the DNA of potential new species from the Anaplasma and Ehrlichia genera of unknown pathogenicity. The finding of several Malian head lice infected with B. quintana, C. burnetii, R. aeschlimannii, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia is alarming and highlights the need for active survey programs to define the public health consequences of the detection of these emerging bacterial pathogens in human head lice. PMID:28931077

  14. Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Based on Secreted, Species-Specific, Bacterial Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shih-Jung; Tapley, Asa; Adamson, John; Little, Tessa; Urbanowski, Michael; Cohen, Keira; Pym, Alexander; Almeida, Deepak; Dorasamy, Afton; Layre, Emilie; Young, David C.; Singh, Ravesh; Patel, Vinod B.; Wallengren, Kristina; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Moody, D. Branch; Bishai, William

    2015-01-01

    Improved biomarkers are needed for tuberculosis. To develop tests based on products secreted by tubercle bacilli that are strictly associated with viability, we evaluated 3 bacterial-derived, species-specific, small molecules as biomarkers: 2 mycobactin siderophores and tuberculosinyladenosine. Using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrated the presence of 1 or both mycobactins and/or tuberculosinyladenosine in serum and whole lung tissues from infected mice and sputum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or lymph nodes from infected patients but not uninfected controls. Detection of the target molecules distinguished host infection status in 100% of mice with both serum and lung as the target sample. In human subjects, we evaluated detection of the bacterial small molecules (BSMs) in multiple body compartments in 3 patient cohorts corresponding to different forms of tuberculosis. We detected at least 1 of the 3 molecules in 90%, 71%, and 40% of tuberculosis patients' sputum, CSF, and lymph node samples, respectively. In paucibacillary forms of human tuberculosis, which are difficult to diagnose even with culture, detection of 1 or more BSM was rapid and compared favorably to polymerase chain reaction–based detection. Secreted BSMs, detectable in serum, warrant further investigation as a means for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with tuberculosis. PMID:26014799

  15. Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Based on Secreted, Species-Specific, Bacterial Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shih-Jung; Tapley, Asa; Adamson, John; Little, Tessa; Urbanowski, Michael; Cohen, Keira; Pym, Alexander; Almeida, Deepak; Dorasamy, Afton; Layre, Emilie; Young, David C; Singh, Ravesh; Patel, Vinod B; Wallengren, Kristina; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Moody, D Branch; Bishai, William

    2015-12-01

    Improved biomarkers are needed for tuberculosis. To develop tests based on products secreted by tubercle bacilli that are strictly associated with viability, we evaluated 3 bacterial-derived, species-specific, small molecules as biomarkers: 2 mycobactin siderophores and tuberculosinyladenosine. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrated the presence of 1 or both mycobactins and/or tuberculosinyladenosine in serum and whole lung tissues from infected mice and sputum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or lymph nodes from infected patients but not uninfected controls. Detection of the target molecules distinguished host infection status in 100% of mice with both serum and lung as the target sample. In human subjects, we evaluated detection of the bacterial small molecules (BSMs) in multiple body compartments in 3 patient cohorts corresponding to different forms of tuberculosis. We detected at least 1 of the 3 molecules in 90%, 71%, and 40% of tuberculosis patients' sputum, CSF, and lymph node samples, respectively. In paucibacillary forms of human tuberculosis, which are difficult to diagnose even with culture, detection of 1 or more BSM was rapid and compared favorably to polymerase chain reaction-based detection. Secreted BSMs, detectable in serum, warrant further investigation as a means for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with tuberculosis.

  16. Life history correlates of fecal bacterial species richness in a wild population of the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Benskin, Clare McW H; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger W; Mainwaring, Mark C; Wilson, Kenneth; Hartley, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the normal gastrointestinal flora of wild birds, or how it might affect or reflect the host's life-history traits. The aim of this study was to survey the species richness of bacteria in the feces of a wild population of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus and to explore the relationships between bacterial species richness and various life-history traits, such as age, sex, and reproductive success. Using PCR-TGGE, 55 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified in blue tit feces. DNA sequencing revealed that the 16S rRNA gene was amplified from a diverse range of bacteria, including those that shared closest homology with Bacillus licheniformis, Campylobacter lari, Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp. For adults, there was a significant negative relationship between bacterial species richness and the likelihood of being detected alive the following breeding season; bacterial richness was consistent across years but declined through the breeding season; and breeding pairs had significantly more similar bacterial richness than expected by chance alone. Reduced adult survival was correlated with the presence of an OTU most closely resembling C. lari; enhanced adult survival was associated with an OTU most similar to Arthrobacter spp. For nestlings, there was no significant change in bacterial species richness between the first and second week after hatching, and nestlings sharing the same nest had significantly more similar bacterial richness. Collectively, these results provide compelling evidence that bacterial species richness was associated with several aspects of the life history of their hosts. PMID:25750710

  17. Comparative study on the selective chalcopyrite bioleaching of a molybdenite concentrate with mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romano, P; Blázquez, M L; Alguacil, F J; Muñoz, J A; Ballester, A; González, F

    2001-03-01

    This study evaluates different bioleaching treatments of a molybdenite concentrate using mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial cultures. Further studies on the chemical leaching and the electrochemical behavior of the MoS(2) concentrate were carried out. Bioleaching tests showed a progressive removal of chalcopyrite from the molybdenite concentrate with an increase in temperature. Chemical leaching tests support the idea of an indirect attack of the concentrate. Electrochemical tests indicate that chalcopyrite dissolution is favored when molybdenite is present. Therefore, this type of bioleaching treatment could be applied to purify molybdenite flotation concentrates by selectively dissolving chalcopyrite.

  18. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  19. Quorum sensing by 2-alkyl-4-quinolones in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Diggle, Stephen P

    2008-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces the cell-to-cell signal molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (The Pseudomonas quinolone signal; PQS), which is integrated within a complicated quorum sensing signaling system. PQS belongs to the family of 2-alkyl-4-quinolones (AQs), which have been previously described for their antimicrobial activities. PQS is synthesized via the pqsABCDE operon which is responsible for generating multiple AQs including 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), the immediate PQS precursor. In addition, PQS signaling plays an important role in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis because it regulates the production of diverse virulence factors including elastase, pyocyanin and LecA lectin in addition to affecting biofilm formation. Here, we summarize the most recent findings on the biosynthesis and regulation of PQS and other AQs including the discovery of AQs in other bacterial species.

  20. Surviving Chytridiomycosis: Differential Anti-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Activity in Bacterial Isolates from Three Lowland Species of Atelopus

    PubMed Central

    Flechas, Sandra V.; Sarmiento, Carolina; Cárdenas, Martha E.; Medina, Edgar M.; Restrepo, Silvia; Amézquita, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    In the Neotropics, almost every species of the stream-dwelling harlequin toads (genus Atelopus) have experienced catastrophic declines. The persistence of lowland species of Atelopus could be explained by the lower growth rate of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) at temperatures above 25°C. We tested the complementary hypothesis that the toads' skin bacterial microbiota acts as a protective barrier against the pathogen, perhaps delaying or impeding the symptomatic phase of chytridiomycosis. We isolated 148 cultivable bacterial strains from three lowland Atelopus species and quantified the anti-Bd activity through antagonism assays. Twenty-six percent (38 strains representing 12 species) of the bacteria inhibited Bd growth and just two of them were shared among the toad species sampled in different localities. Interestingly, the strongest anti-Bd activity was measured in bacteria isolated from A. elegans, the only species that tested positive for the pathogen. The cutaneous bacterial microbiota is thus likely a fitness-enhancing trait that may (adaptation) or not (exaptation) have appeared because of natural selection mediated by chytridiomycosis. Our findings reveal bacterial strains for development of local probiotic treatments against chytridiomycosis and also shed light on the mechanisms behind the frog-bacteria-pathogen interaction. PMID:22970314

  1. Pathogenic Bacterial Species Associated with Endodontic Infection Evade Innate Immune Control by Disabling Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aritsune; Jin, Jun-O; Johnston, Christopher D.; Yamazaki, Hajime; Houri-Haddad, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic infections, in which oral bacteria access the tooth pulp chamber, are common and do not resolve once established. To investigate the effects of these infections on the innate immune response, we established a mouse subcutaneous chamber model, where a mixture of four oral pathogens commonly associated with these infections (endodontic pathogens [EP]), i.e., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus intermedius, Parvimonas micra, and Prevotella intermedia, was inoculated into subcutaneously implanted titanium chambers. Cells that infiltrated the chamber after these infections were primarily neutrophils; however, these neutrophils were unable to control the infection. Infection with a nonpathogenic oral bacterial species, Streptococcus mitis, resulted in well-controlled infection, with bacterial numbers reduced by 4 to 5 log units after 7 days. Propidium iodide (PI) staining of the chamber neutrophils identified three distinct populations: neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were intermediate in PI staining, while cells in chambers from mice infected with S. mitis were PI positive (apoptotic) or negative (live). Strikingly, neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were severely impaired in their ability to phagocytose and to generate reactive oxygen species in vitro after removal from the chamber compared to cells from S. mitis-infected chambers. The mechanism of neutrophil impairment was necrotic cell death as determined by morphological analyses. P. intermedia alone could induce a similar neutrophil phenotype. We conclude that the endodontic pathogens, particularly P. intermedia, can efficiently disable and kill infiltrating neutrophils, allowing these infections to become established. These results can help explain the persistence of endodontic infections and demonstrate a new virulence mechanism associated with P. intermedia. PMID:25024367

  2. Pathogenic bacterial species associated with endodontic infection evade innate immune control by disabling neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Aritsune; Jin, Jun-O; Johnston, Christopher D; Yamazaki, Hajime; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Rittling, Susan R

    2014-10-01

    Endodontic infections, in which oral bacteria access the tooth pulp chamber, are common and do not resolve once established. To investigate the effects of these infections on the innate immune response, we established a mouse subcutaneous chamber model, where a mixture of four oral pathogens commonly associated with these infections (endodontic pathogens [EP]), i.e., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus intermedius, Parvimonas micra, and Prevotella intermedia, was inoculated into subcutaneously implanted titanium chambers. Cells that infiltrated the chamber after these infections were primarily neutrophils; however, these neutrophils were unable to control the infection. Infection with a nonpathogenic oral bacterial species, Streptococcus mitis, resulted in well-controlled infection, with bacterial numbers reduced by 4 to 5 log units after 7 days. Propidium iodide (PI) staining of the chamber neutrophils identified three distinct populations: neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were intermediate in PI staining, while cells in chambers from mice infected with S. mitis were PI positive (apoptotic) or negative (live). Strikingly, neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were severely impaired in their ability to phagocytose and to generate reactive oxygen species in vitro after removal from the chamber compared to cells from S. mitis-infected chambers. The mechanism of neutrophil impairment was necrotic cell death as determined by morphological analyses. P. intermedia alone could induce a similar neutrophil phenotype. We conclude that the endodontic pathogens, particularly P. intermedia, can efficiently disable and kill infiltrating neutrophils, allowing these infections to become established. These results can help explain the persistence of endodontic infections and demonstrate a new virulence mechanism associated with P. intermedia.

  3. Southern leaf blight disease severity is correlated with decreased maize leaf epiphytic bacterial species richness and the phyllosphere bacterial diversity decline is enhanced by nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Manching, Heather C; Balint-Kurti, Peter J; Stapleton, Ann E

    2014-01-01

    Plant leaves are inhabited by a diverse group of microorganisms that are important contributors to optimal growth. Biotic and abiotic effects on plant growth are usually studied in controlled settings examining response to variation in single factors and in field settings with large numbers of variables. Multi-factor experiments with combinations of stresses bridge this gap, increasing our understanding of the genotype-environment-phenotype functional map for the host plant and the affiliated epiphytic community. The maize inbred B73 was exposed to single and combination abiotic and the biotic stress treatments: low nitrogen fertilizer and high levels of infection with southern leaf blight (causal agent Cochliobolus heterostrophus). Microbial epiphyte samples were collected at the vegetative early-season phase and species composition was determined using 16S ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Plant traits and level of southern leaf blight disease were measured late-season. Bacterial diversity was different among stress treatment groups (P < 0.001). Lower species richness-alpha diversity-was correlated with increased severity of southern leaf blight disease when disease pressure was high. Nitrogen fertilization intensified the decline in bacterial alpha diversity. While no single bacterial ribotype was consistently associated with disease severity, small sets of ribotypes were good predictors of disease levels. Difference in leaf bacterial-epiphyte diversity early in the season were correlated with plant disease severity, supporting further tests of microbial epiphyte-disease correlations for use in predicting disease progression.

  4. Southern leaf blight disease severity is correlated with decreased maize leaf epiphytic bacterial species richness and the phyllosphere bacterial diversity decline is enhanced by nitrogen fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Manching, Heather C.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Stapleton, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Plant leaves are inhabited by a diverse group of microorganisms that are important contributors to optimal growth. Biotic and abiotic effects on plant growth are usually studied in controlled settings examining response to variation in single factors and in field settings with large numbers of variables. Multi-factor experiments with combinations of stresses bridge this gap, increasing our understanding of the genotype-environment-phenotype functional map for the host plant and the affiliated epiphytic community. The maize inbred B73 was exposed to single and combination abiotic and the biotic stress treatments: low nitrogen fertilizer and high levels of infection with southern leaf blight (causal agent Cochliobolus heterostrophus). Microbial epiphyte samples were collected at the vegetative early-season phase and species composition was determined using 16S ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Plant traits and level of southern leaf blight disease were measured late-season. Bacterial diversity was different among stress treatment groups (P < 0.001). Lower species richness—alpha diversity—was correlated with increased severity of southern leaf blight disease when disease pressure was high. Nitrogen fertilization intensified the decline in bacterial alpha diversity. While no single bacterial ribotype was consistently associated with disease severity, small sets of ribotypes were good predictors of disease levels. Difference in leaf bacterial-epiphyte diversity early in the season were correlated with plant disease severity, supporting further tests of microbial epiphyte-disease correlations for use in predicting disease progression. PMID:25177328

  5. Microbiological and molecular identification of bacterial species isolated from nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa of fuel workers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    AlWakeel, Suaad S

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the bacterial species colonizing the nasal and oropharyngeal mucosa of fuel workers in Central Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on a microbiological and molecular level. Throat and nasal swab samples were obtained from 29 fuel station attendants in the period of time extending from March to May 2014 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Microbiological identification techniques were utilized to identify the bacterial species isolated. Antibiotic sensitivity was assessed for each of the bacterial isolates. Molecular identification techniques based on PCR analysis of specific genomic sequences was conducted and was the basis on which phylogeny representation was done for 10 randomly selected samples of the isolates. Blood was drawn and a complete blood count was conducted to note the hematological indices for each of the study participants. Nineteen bacterial species were isolated from both the nasal cavity and the oropharynx including Streptococcus thoraltensis, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Staphylococcus hominis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and several others. We found 100% sensitivity of the isolates to ciprofloxacin, cefuroxime and gentamicin. Whereas cefotaxime and azithromycin posted sensitivities of 85.7% and 91.4%, respectively. Low sensitivities (<60% sensitivity) to the antibiotics ampicillin, erythromycin, clarithromycin and norfloxacin were observed. Ninety-seven percent similarity to the microbial bank species was noted when the isolates were compared to it. Most hematological indices recorded were within the normal range. In conclusion, exposure to toxic fumes and compounds within fuel products may be a contributing factor to bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract in fuel workers.

  6. Comparing the tolerance limits of selected bacterial and protozoan species to nickel in wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Kamika, I; Momba, M N B

    2011-12-01

    Heavy-metal resistant microorganisms play a significant role in the treatment of industrial wastewater. The detoxifying ability of these resistant microorganisms can be manipulated for bioremediation of heavy metals in wastewater systems. This study aimed at comparing the tolerance limit of selected wastewater protozoan species (Aspidisca sp., Trachelophyllum sp. and Peranema sp.) against Ni(2+) with that of selected bacterial species (Bacillus licheniformis-ATCC12759, Brevibacillus laterosporus-ATCC64 and Pseudomonas putida-ATCC31483) commonly found in wastewater systems. The isolates were exposed to various concentrations of Ni(2+) in mixed liquor and their tolerance to Ni(2+) assessed at different temperatures (25°C, 30°C, 35°C and 40°C) and pHs (4, 6, 7, 8 and 10). The physicochemical parameters such as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and dissolved oxygen (DO) of the media and the growth rates of the isolates were measured using standard methods. In terms of their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC), the results revealed that the isolates could tolerate Ni(2+) at concentrations ranging between 32 and 52ppm for protozoa and between 52 and 84ppm for bacteria. B. licheniformis-ATCC12759 was the most tolerant bacterial species (MIC: 84ppm-Ni(2+)) while Peranema sp. was the most tolerant protozoan species (MIC: 52ppm-Ni(2+)). At 10 and/or 20ppm-Ni(2+) the growth of B. licheniformis-ATCC12759 (6.30 days(-1) for 10 and 5.73 days(-1) for 20ppm-Ni(2+)), P. putida-ATCC31483 (6.02 days(-1) for 10 and 5.31 days(-1) for 20ppm-Ni(2+)) and Peranema sp. (2.15 days(-1) for 10ppm-Ni(2+)) was stimulated after one day of incubation. Statistical evidence showed significant differences (p=0.0065) between the MIC of the six isolates and positive correlations between COD and the growth rates of isolates (r=0.8999/0.8810 for bacteria/protozoa). The tolerance limit of all isolates was significantly dependent on the pH and the temperature. The study suggests that these isolates can

  7. Microbial origin of fluorescent dissolved organic matter: bacterial species fluorescence signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Bethany; Thorn, Robin; Turner, Dann; Anesio, Alexandre; Reynolds, Darren

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in aquatic systems, undertaking an essential role in global biogeochemical cycling (Hudson et al. 2007). Recent research has seen the increasing use of fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring naturally occurring fluorescent DOM (FDOM), with advances in the technology and in the analysis of data leading to an improved understanding of the interactions between the ecosystem and FDOM (Hudson et al. 2008, Carstea 2010). This work has defined the origins of FDOM as autochthonous, produced in situ, often termed 'microbially derived', and allochthonous, transported into the system from external source, often termed 'terrestrially sourced' (Coble et al. 2014). Previously at EGU we have presented research that has explored microbial processing and production of Peak T, an autochthonous FDOM peak. Within this work we have identified the autochthonous production of a range of FDOM peaks, including Peak T as well as larger molecular weight compounds solely associated with allochthonous derivation. From this we have begun to understand more about the important role that the underpinning microbial community plays in the transformation, utilisation and production of FDOM. To further this research and enhance the knowledge surrounding microbially derived FDOM our recent research has focussed on the analysis of the FDOM signature of different bacterial species; Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To do this, we have developed a non-fluorescent media to culture individual bacteria species. By undertaking bacterial growth curves, alongside fluorescence spectroscopy, we have been able to determine FDOM development with population growth, highlighting which FDOM peaks are associated with cell multiplication and which as a metabolic by-product from other processes. We have also analysed the intracellular and extracellular fluorescence signature of each species to understand how the microbial community structure

  8. Host species shapes the co-occurrence patterns rather than diversity of stomach bacterial communities in pikas.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Li, Tongtong; Tu, Bo; Kou, Yongping; Li, Xiangzhen

    2017-07-01

    The mammalian stomach acts as an important barrier against ingested pathogens into the entire gastrointestinal tract, thereby playing a key role in host health. However, little is known regarding to the stomach microbial compositions in wild mammals and the factors that may influence the community compositions. Using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we characterized the stomach bacterial community compositions, diversity, and interactions in two common pika (Ochotona sp.) species in China, including Plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae) and Daurian pikas (Ochotona daurica) living in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and the Inner Mongolia Grassland, respectively. The bacterial communities can be divided into two distinct phylogenetic clusters. The most dominant bacteria in cluster I were unclassified bacteria. Cluster II was more diverse, predominantly consisting of Bacteroidetes, followed by unclassified bacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Three dominant genera (Prevotella, Oscillospira, and Ruminococcus) in pika stomachs were significantly enriched in cluster II. In addition, seasons, host species, and sampling sites as well as body weight and sex had no significant impacts on the composition and diversity of pika stomach communities. Interestingly, Plateau pikas harbored a more complex bacterial network than Daurian pikas, and these two pika species showed different co-occurrence patterns. These results suggested that the pika stomach harbors a diverse but relatively stable and unique bacterial community, which is independent on host (host species, body weight, and sex) and measured environmental factors (sampling sites and seasons). Interestingly, host species shapes the microbial interactions rather than diversity of stomach bacterial communities in pikas, reflecting specific niche adaptation of stomach bacterial communities through species interactions.

  9. Both Leaf Properties and Microbe-Microbe Interactions Influence Within-Species Variation in Bacterial Population Diversity and Structure in the Lettuce (Lactuca Species) Phyllosphere▿

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Paul J.; Hand, Paul; Pink, David; Whipps, John M.; Bending, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Morphological and chemical differences between plant genera influence phyllosphere microbial populations, but the factors driving within-species variation in phyllosphere populations are poorly understood. Twenty-six lettuce accessions were used to investigate factors controlling within-species variation in phyllosphere bacterial populations. Morphological and physiochemical characteristics of the plants were compared, and bacterial community structure and diversity were investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Plant morphology and levels of soluble carbohydrates, calcium, and phenolic compounds (which have long been associated with plant responses to biotic stress) were found to significantly influence bacterial community structure. Clone libraries from three representative accessions were found to be significantly different in terms of both sequence differences and the bacterial genera represented. All three libraries were dominated by Pseudomonas species and the Enterobacteriaceae family. Significant differences in the relative proportions of genera in the Enterobacteriaceae were detected between lettuce accessions. Two such genera (Erwinia and Enterobacter) showed significant variation between the accessions and revealed microbe-microbe interactions. We conclude that both leaf surface properties and microbial interactions are important in determining the structure and diversity of the phyllosphere bacterial community. PMID:20952648

  10. Both leaf properties and microbe-microbe interactions influence within-species variation in bacterial population diversity and structure in the lettuce (Lactuca Species) phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul J; Hand, Paul; Pink, David; Whipps, John M; Bending, Gary D

    2010-12-01

    Morphological and chemical differences between plant genera influence phyllosphere microbial populations, but the factors driving within-species variation in phyllosphere populations are poorly understood. Twenty-six lettuce accessions were used to investigate factors controlling within-species variation in phyllosphere bacterial populations. Morphological and physiochemical characteristics of the plants were compared, and bacterial community structure and diversity were investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Plant morphology and levels of soluble carbohydrates, calcium, and phenolic compounds (which have long been associated with plant responses to biotic stress) were found to significantly influence bacterial community structure. Clone libraries from three representative accessions were found to be significantly different in terms of both sequence differences and the bacterial genera represented. All three libraries were dominated by Pseudomonas species and the Enterobacteriaceae family. Significant differences in the relative proportions of genera in the Enterobacteriaceae were detected between lettuce accessions. Two such genera (Erwinia and Enterobacter) showed significant variation between the accessions and revealed microbe-microbe interactions. We conclude that both leaf surface properties and microbial interactions are important in determining the structure and diversity of the phyllosphere bacterial community.

  11. The Influence of Time and Plant Species on the Composition of the Decomposing Bacterial Community in a Stream Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wymore, Adam S; Liu, Cindy M; Hungate, Bruce A; Schwartz, Egbert; Price, Lance B; Whitham, Thomas G; Marks, Jane C

    2016-05-01

    Foliar chemistry influences leaf decomposition, but little is known about how litter chemistry affects the assemblage of bacterial communities during decomposition. Here we examined relationships between initial litter chemistry and the composition of the bacterial community in a stream ecosystem. We incubated replicated genotypes of Populus fremontii and P. angustifolia leaf litter that differ in percent tannin and lignin, then followed changes in bacterial community composition during 28 days of decomposition using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. Using a nested experimental design, the majority of variation in bacterial community composition was explained by time (i.e., harvest day) (R(2) = 0.50). Plant species, nested within harvest date, explained a significant but smaller proportion of the variation (R(2) = 0.03). Significant differences in community composition between leaf species were apparent at day 14, but no significant differences existed among genotypes. Foliar chemistry correlated significantly with community composition at day 14 (r = 0.46) indicating that leaf litter with more similar phytochemistry harbor bacterial communities that are alike. Bacteroidetes and β-proteobacteria dominated the bacterial assemblage on decomposing leaves, and Verrucomicrobia and α- and δ-proteobacteria became more abundant over time. After 14 days, bacterial diversity diverged significantly between leaf litter types with fast-decomposing P. fremontii hosting greater richness than slowly decomposing P. angustifolia; however, differences were no longer present after 28 days in the stream. Leaf litter tannin, lignin, and lignin: N ratios all correlated negatively with diversity. This work shows that the bacterial community on decomposing leaves in streams changes rapidly over time, influenced by leaf species via differences in genotype-level foliar chemistry.

  12. Reactor performance and microbial community dynamics during solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover at mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Wang, Zhongjiang; Stiverson, Jill A; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2013-05-01

    Reactor performance and microbial community dynamics were investigated during solid state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) of corn stover at mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Thermophilic SS-AD led to faster and greater reductions of cellulose and hemicelluloses during the first 12 days compared to mesophilic SS-AD. However, accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was 5-fold higher at thermophilic than mesophilic temperatures, resulting in a large pH drop during days 6-12 in the thermophilic reactors. Culture-based enumeration revealed 10-50 times greater populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic microbes during thermophilic SS-AD than mesophilic SS-AD. DGGE analysis of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes showed dynamic shifts, especially during the thermophilic SS-AD, of bacterial and archaeal communities over the 38 days of SS-AD as a result of acclimation of the initial seed microbial consortia to the lignocellulosic feedstock. The findings of this study can guide future studies to improve efficiency and stability of SS-AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Host species and developmental stage, but not host social structure, affects bacterial community structure in socially polymorphic bees.

    PubMed

    McFrederick, Quinn S; Wcislo, William T; Hout, Michael C; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2014-05-01

    Social transmission and host developmental stage are thought to profoundly affect the structure of bacterial communities associated with honey bees and bumble bees, but these ideas have not been explored in other bee species. The halictid bees Megalopta centralis and M. genalis exhibit intrapopulation social polymorphism, which we exploit to test whether bacterial communities differ by host social structure, developmental stage, or host species. We collected social and solitary Megalopta nests and sampled bees and nest contents from all stages of host development. To survey these bacterial communities, we used 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing. We found no effect of social structure, but found differences by host species and developmental stage. Wolbachia prevalence differed between the two host species. Bacterial communities associated with different developmental stages appeared to be driven by environmentally acquired bacteria. A Lactobacillus kunkeei clade bacterium that is consistently associated with other bee species was dominant in pollen provisions and larval samples, but less abundant in mature larvae and pupae. Foraging adults appeared to often reacquire L. kunkeei clade bacteria, likely while foraging at flowers. Environmental transmission appears to be more important than social transmission for Megalopta bees at the cusp between social and solitary behavior.

  14. Co-operative inhibitory effects of hydrogen peroxide and iodine against bacterial and yeast species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide and iodine are powerful antimicrobials widely used as antiseptics and disinfectants. Their antimicrobial properties are known to be enhanced by combining them with other compounds. We studied co-operative inhibitory activities (synergism, additive effects and modes of growth inhibition) of hydrogen peroxide and iodine used concurrently against 3 bacterial and 16 yeast species. Results Synergistic or additive inhibitory effects were shown for hydrogen peroxide and iodine mixtures against all 19 species used in the study. Both biocides were mostly cidal individually and in mixtures against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Both compounds manifested static inhibitory effects individually, but their mixtures were synergistically cidal for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherihia coli. Cells of S. cerevisiae treated with hydrogen peroxide and iodine-hydrogen peroxide mixture produced increased numbers of respiratory deficient mutants indicating genotoxic effects. Conclusion Iodine and hydrogen peroxide used concurrently interact synergistically or additively against a range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. The study provides an insight as to how these traditional antimicrobials could be used more effectively for disinfection and antisepsis. In addition, a simple approach is proposed for scoring genotoxicity of different biocides by using the budding yeast system. PMID:23856115

  15. Co-operative inhibitory effects of hydrogen peroxide and iodine against bacterial and yeast species.

    PubMed

    Zubko, Elena I; Zubko, Mikhajlo K

    2013-07-15

    Hydrogen peroxide and iodine are powerful antimicrobials widely used as antiseptics and disinfectants. Their antimicrobial properties are known to be enhanced by combining them with other compounds. We studied co-operative inhibitory activities (synergism, additive effects and modes of growth inhibition) of hydrogen peroxide and iodine used concurrently against 3 bacterial and 16 yeast species. Synergistic or additive inhibitory effects were shown for hydrogen peroxide and iodine mixtures against all 19 species used in the study. Both biocides were mostly cidal individually and in mixtures against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Both compounds manifested static inhibitory effects individually, but their mixtures were synergistically cidal for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherihia coli. Cells of S. cerevisiae treated with hydrogen peroxide and iodine-hydrogen peroxide mixture produced increased numbers of respiratory deficient mutants indicating genotoxic effects. Iodine and hydrogen peroxide used concurrently interact synergistically or additively against a range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. The study provides an insight as to how these traditional antimicrobials could be used more effectively for disinfection and antisepsis. In addition, a simple approach is proposed for scoring genotoxicity of different biocides by using the budding yeast system.

  16. Influences of Plant Species, Season and Location on Leaf Endophytic Bacterial Communities of Non-Cultivated Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Tao; Melcher, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are known to be associated endophytically with plants. Research on endophytic bacteria has identified their importance in food safety, agricultural production and phytoremediation. However, the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities and the forces that shape their compositions in non-cultivated plants are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we explored the diversity, community structure, and dynamics of endophytic bacteria in different plant species in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve of northern Oklahoma, USA. High throughput sequencing of amplified segments of bacterial rDNA from 81 samples collected at four sampling times from five plant species at four locations identified 335 distinct OTUs at 97% sequence similarity, representing 16 phyla. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in the communities, followed by the phyla Bacteriodetes and Actinobacteria. Bacteria from four classes of Proteobacteria were detected with Alphaproteobacteria as the dominant class. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that host plant species and collecting date had significant influences on the compositions of the leaf endophytic bacterial communities. The proportion of Alphaproteobacteria was much higher in the communities from Asclepias viridis than from other plant species and differed from month to month. The most dominant bacterial groups identified in LDA Effect Size analysis showed host-specific patterns, indicating mutual selection between host plants and endophytic bacteria and that leaf endophytic bacterial compositions were dynamic, varying with the host plant’s growing season in three distinct patterns. In summary, next generation sequencing has revealed variations in the taxonomic compositions of leaf endophytic bacterial communities dependent primarily on the nature of the plant host species. PMID:26974817

  17. Susceptibility of different bacterial species isolated from food animals to copper sulphate, zinc chloride and antimicrobial substances used for disinfection.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, Frank M; Hasman, Henrik

    2004-05-20

    A total of 569 different bacterial isolates (156 Salmonella, 202 E. coli, 43 S. aureus, 38 S. hyicus, 52 E. faecalis, 78 E. faecium) were tested for susceptibility to copper sulphate, benzalkonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine using MIC determinations. A total of 442 isolates were also tested for susceptibility to formaldehyde and 177 isolates for susceptibility to zinc chloride. Enterococcal isolates formed a bimodal distribution of MICs to copper sulphate, whereas the other bacterial species formed one large population. Otherwise the isolates formed one large population of susceptibilities to the different antimicrobial agents. Large variations were observed in the susceptibility of the different bacterial species to the different compounds. Staphylococci were in general very susceptible to all antimicrobial compounds tested. The Salmonella isolates were in general less susceptible to copper sulphate, benzalkonium chloride and chlorhexidine followed by E. coli and the Gram-positive species. The opposite was the case for zinc chloride. All isolates were very susceptible to H(2)O(2) with MICs ranging from 0.002 to 0.016%, and to formaldehyde with MICs at 0.003 and 0.006%. This study showed that Danish bacterial isolates from livestock so far have not or have only to a limited degree developed resistance to antimicrobial compounds commonly used for disinfection. Acquired copper resistance was only found in enterococci. There were large differences in the intrinsic susceptibility of the different bacterial species to these compounds, and Salmonella especially seems intrinsically less susceptible than the other bacterial species, which might have human health implications.

  18. Influences of Plant Species, Season and Location on Leaf Endophytic Bacterial Communities of Non-Cultivated Plants.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Melcher, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are known to be associated endophytically with plants. Research on endophytic bacteria has identified their importance in food safety, agricultural production and phytoremediation. However, the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities and the forces that shape their compositions in non-cultivated plants are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we explored the diversity, community structure, and dynamics of endophytic bacteria in different plant species in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve of northern Oklahoma, USA. High throughput sequencing of amplified segments of bacterial rDNA from 81 samples collected at four sampling times from five plant species at four locations identified 335 distinct OTUs at 97% sequence similarity, representing 16 phyla. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in the communities, followed by the phyla Bacteriodetes and Actinobacteria. Bacteria from four classes of Proteobacteria were detected with Alphaproteobacteria as the dominant class. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that host plant species and collecting date had significant influences on the compositions of the leaf endophytic bacterial communities. The proportion of Alphaproteobacteria was much higher in the communities from Asclepias viridis than from other plant species and differed from month to month. The most dominant bacterial groups identified in LDA Effect Size analysis showed host-specific patterns, indicating mutual selection between host plants and endophytic bacteria and that leaf endophytic bacterial compositions were dynamic, varying with the host plant's growing season in three distinct patterns. In summary, next generation sequencing has revealed variations in the taxonomic compositions of leaf endophytic bacterial communities dependent primarily on the nature of the plant host species.

  19. Comparison of archaeal and bacterial communities in two sponge species and seawater from an Indonesian coral reef environment.

    PubMed

    Polónia, Ana Rita Moura; Cleary, Daniel Francis Richard; Freitas, Rossana; Coelho, Francisco José Riso da Costa; de Voogd, Nicole Joy; Gomes, Newton Carlos Marcial

    2016-10-01

    Most existing coral reef studies have focused on a single biotope and a single domain (Archaea or Bacteria). Few coral reef studies have explored the archaeal and bacterial community simultaneously. In this study, we compare the diversity and composition of archaeal and bacterial communities in seawater and two closely related sponge species (Stylissa carteri and Stylissa massa) in the Berau reef system, Indonesia. A 16S rRNA gene barcoded pyrosequencing approach was used to test to what extent seawater, S. carteri and S. massa host compositionally distinct communities of Archaea and Bacteria. Proteobacteria dominated the bacterial communities of all three studied biotopes whereas Euryarchaeota was the most abundant archaeal phylum in seawater and Crenarchaeota the most abundant archaeal phylum in both Stylissa species. Biotopes explained 56% and 53% of the variation in archaeal and bacterial composition respectively and there was significant congruence between the composition of archaeal and bacterial communities. These results suggest that the processes that drive bacterial composition within the studied biotopes may be fundamentally similar to those that drive archaeal composition.

  20. Effects of diet type, developmental stage, and gut compartment in the gut bacterial communities of two Cerambycidae species (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Shin Ae; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Seong-Hyun; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    The gut bacterial community of wood-feeding beetles has been examined for its role on plant digestion and biocontrol method development. Monochamus alternatus and Psacothea hilaris, both belonging to the subfamily Lamiinae, are woodfeeding beetles found in eastern Asia and Europe and generally considered as destructive pests for pine and mulberry trees, respectively. However, limited reports exist on the gut bacterial communities in these species. Here, we characterized gut bacterial community compositions in larva and imago of each insect species reared with host tree logs and artificial diets as food sources. High-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed 225 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on a 97% sequences similarity cutoff from 138,279 sequence reads, the majority of which were derived from Proteobacteria (48.2%), Firmicutes (45.5%), and Actinobacteria (5.2%). The OTU network analysis revealed 7 modules with densely connected OTUs in specific gut samples, in which the distributions of Lactococcus-, Kluyvera-, Serratia-, and Enterococcus-related OTUs were distinct between diet types or developmental stages of the host insects. The gut bacterial communities were separated on a detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) plot and by c-means fuzzy clustering analysis, according to diet type. The results from this study suggest that diet was the main determinant for gut bacterial community composition in the two beetles.

  1. Feasibility of physical map construction from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome libraries of polyploid plant species.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Cheng; Ma, Yaqin; You, Frank M; Anderson, Olin D; Kopecký, David; Simková, Hana; Safár, Jan; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Gill, Bikram; McGuire, Patrick E; Dvorak, Jan

    2010-02-19

    The presence of closely related genomes in polyploid species makes the assembly of total genomic sequence from shotgun sequence reads produced by the current sequencing platforms exceedingly difficult, if not impossible. Genomes of polyploid species could be sequenced following the ordered-clone sequencing approach employing contigs of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and BAC-based physical maps. Although BAC contigs can currently be constructed for virtually any diploid organism with the SNaPshot high-information-content-fingerprinting (HICF) technology, it is currently unknown if this is also true for polyploid species. It is possible that BAC clones from orthologous regions of homoeologous chromosomes would share numerous restriction fragments and be therefore included into common contigs. Because of this and other concerns, physical mapping utilizing the SNaPshot HICF of BAC libraries of polyploid species has not been pursued and the possibility of doing so has not been assessed. The sole exception has been in common wheat, an allohexaploid in which it is possible to construct single-chromosome or single-chromosome-arm BAC libraries from DNA of flow-sorted chromosomes and bypass the obstacles created by polyploidy. The potential of the SNaPshot HICF technology for physical mapping of polyploid plants utilizing global BAC libraries was evaluated by assembling contigs of fingerprinted clones in an in silico merged BAC library composed of single-chromosome libraries of two wheat homoeologous chromosome arms, 3AS and 3DS, and complete chromosome 3B. Because the chromosome arm origin of each clone was known, it was possible to estimate the fidelity of contig assembly. On average 97.78% or more clones, depending on the library, were from a single chromosome arm. A large portion of the remaining clones was shown to be library contamination from other chromosomes, a feature that is unavoidable during the construction of single-chromosome BAC libraries. The

  2. Diversity of the dominant bacterial species on sliced cooked pork products at expiration date in the Belgian retail.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, Wim; Pothakos, Vasileios; De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frédéric

    2017-08-01

    Pork-based cooked products, such as cooked hams, are economically valuable foods that are vulnerable to bacterial spoilage, even when applying cooling and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Besides a common presence of Brochothrix thermosphacta, their microbiota are usually dominated by lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Yet, the exact LAB species diversity can differ considerably among products. In this study, 42 sliced cooked pork samples were acquired from three different Belgian supermarkets to map their bacterial heterogeneity. The community compositions of the dominant bacterial species were established by analysing a total of 702 isolates from selective agar media by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting followed by gene sequencing. Most of the isolates belonged to the genera Carnobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Leuconostoc, with Leuconostoc carnosum and Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gelidum being the most dominant members. The diversity of the dominant bacterial species varied when comparing samples from different production facilities and, in some cases, even within the same product types. Although LAB consistently dominated the microbiota of sliced cooked pork products in the Belgian market, results indicated that bacterial diversity needs to be addressed on the level of product composition and batch variation. Dedicated studies will be needed to substantiate potential links between such variability and microbial composition. For instance, the fact that higher levels of lactobacilli were associated with the presence of potassium lactate (E326) may be suggestive of selective pressure but needs to be validated, as this finding referred to a single product only. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diversity and Localization of Bacterial Endosymbionts from Whitefly Species Collected in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Marubayashi, Julio Massaharu; Kliot, Adi; Yuki, Valdir Atsushi; Rezende, Jorge Alberto Marques; Krause-Sakate, Renate; Pavan, Marcelo Agenor; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are sap-sucking insect pests, and some cause serious damage in agricultural crops by direct feeding and by transmitting plant viruses. Whiteflies maintain close associations with bacterial endosymbionts that can significantly influence their biology. All whitefly species harbor a primary endosymbiont, and a diverse array of secondary endosymbionts. In this study, we surveyed 34 whitefly populations collected from the states of Sao Paulo, Bahia, Minas Gerais and Parana in Brazil, for species identification and for infection with secondary endosymbionts. Sequencing the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene revealed the existence of five whitefly species: The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci B biotype (recently termed Middle East-Asia Minor 1 or MEAM1), the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum, B. tabaci A biotype (recently termed New World 2 or NW2) collected only from Euphorbia, the Acacia whitefly Tetraleurodes acaciae and Bemisia tuberculata both were detected only on cassava. Sequencing rRNA genes showed that Hamiltonella and Rickettsia were highly prevalent in all MEAM1 populations, while Cardinium was close to fixation in only three populations. Surprisingly, some MEAM1 individuals and one NW2 population were infected with Fritschea. Arsenopnohus was the only endosymbiont detected in T. vaporariorum. In T. acaciae and B. tuberculata populations collected from cassava, Wolbachia was fixed in B. tuberculata and was highly prevalent in T. acaciae. Interestingly, while B. tuberculata was additionally infected with Arsenophonus, T. acaciae was infected with Cardinium and Fritschea. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on representative individuals showed that Hamiltonella, Arsenopnohus and Fritschea were localized inside the bacteriome, Cardinium and Wolbachia exhibited dual localization patterns inside and outside the bacteriome, and Rickettsia showed strict localization outside the bacteriome. This study is

  4. Diversity and localization of bacterial endosymbionts from whitefly species collected in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marubayashi, Julio Massaharu; Kliot, Adi; Yuki, Valdir Atsushi; Rezende, Jorge Alberto Marques; Krause-Sakate, Renate; Pavan, Marcelo Agenor; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are sap-sucking insect pests, and some cause serious damage in agricultural crops by direct feeding and by transmitting plant viruses. Whiteflies maintain close associations with bacterial endosymbionts that can significantly influence their biology. All whitefly species harbor a primary endosymbiont, and a diverse array of secondary endosymbionts. In this study, we surveyed 34 whitefly populations collected from the states of Sao Paulo, Bahia, Minas Gerais and Parana in Brazil, for species identification and for infection with secondary endosymbionts. Sequencing the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene revealed the existence of five whitefly species: The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci B biotype (recently termed Middle East-Asia Minor 1 or MEAM1), the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum, B. tabaci A biotype (recently termed New World 2 or NW2) collected only from Euphorbia, the Acacia whitefly Tetraleurodes acaciae and Bemisia tuberculata both were detected only on cassava. Sequencing rRNA genes showed that Hamiltonella and Rickettsia were highly prevalent in all MEAM1 populations, while Cardinium was close to fixation in only three populations. Surprisingly, some MEAM1 individuals and one NW2 population were infected with Fritschea. Arsenopnohus was the only endosymbiont detected in T. vaporariorum. In T. acaciae and B. tuberculata populations collected from cassava, Wolbachia was fixed in B. tuberculata and was highly prevalent in T. acaciae. Interestingly, while B. tuberculata was additionally infected with Arsenophonus, T. acaciae was infected with Cardinium and Fritschea. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on representative individuals showed that Hamiltonella, Arsenopnohus and Fritschea were localized inside the bacteriome, Cardinium and Wolbachia exhibited dual localization patterns inside and outside the bacteriome, and Rickettsia showed strict localization outside the bacteriome. This study is

  5. Performance of mesophilic biohydrogen-producing cultures at thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Medhavi; Gomez-Flores, Maritza; Nasr, Noha; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Hesham El Naggar, M; Nakhla, George

    2015-09-01

    In this study, batch tests were conducted to investigate the performance of mesophilic anaerobic digester sludge (ADS) at thermophilic conditions and estimate kinetic parameters for co-substrate fermentation. Starch and cellulose were used as mono-substrate and in combination as co-substrates (1:1 mass ratio) to conduct a comparative assessment between mesophilic (37 °C) and thermophilic (60 °C) biohydrogen production. Unacclimatized mesophilic ADS responded well to the temperature change. The highest hydrogen yield of 1.13 mol H2/mol hexose was observed in starch-only batches at thermophilic conditions. The thermophilic cellulose-only yield (0.42 mol H2/mol hexose) was three times the mesophilic yield (0.13 mol H2/mol hexose). Interestingly, co-fermentation of starch-cellulose at mesophilic conditions enhanced the hydrogen yield by 26% with respect to estimated mono-substrate yields, while under thermophilic conditions no enhancement in the overall yield was observed. Interestingly, the estimated overall Monod kinetic parameters showed higher rates at mesophilic than thermophilic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Host species and environmental effects on bacterial communities associated with Drosophila in the laboratory and in the natural environment.

    PubMed

    Staubach, Fabian; Baines, John F; Künzel, Sven; Bik, Elisabeth M; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila is a classic model organism to study adaptation as well as the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypes. Although associated bacterial communities might be important for many aspects of Drosophila biology, knowledge about their diversity, composition, and factors shaping them is limited. We used 454-based sequencing of a variable region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene to characterize the bacterial communities associated with wild and laboratory Drosophila isolates. In order to specifically investigate effects of food source and host species on bacterial communities, we analyzed samples from wild Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans collected from a variety of natural substrates, as well as from adults and larvae of nine laboratory-reared Drosophila species. We find no evidence for host species effects in lab-reared flies; instead, lab of origin and stochastic effects, which could influence studies of Drosophila phenotypes, are pronounced. In contrast, the natural Drosophila-associated microbiota appears to be predominantly shaped by food substrate with an additional but smaller effect of host species identity. We identify a core member of this natural microbiota that belongs to the genus Gluconobacter and is common to all wild-caught flies in this study, but absent from the laboratory. This makes it a strong candidate for being part of what could be a natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans core microbiome. Furthermore, we were able to identify candidate pathogens in natural fly isolates.

  7. Bacterial diversity of bacteriomes and organs of reproductive, digestive and excretory systems in two cicada species (Hemiptera: Cicadidae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhou; Wang, Dandan; He, Hong; Wei, Cong

    2017-01-01

    Cicadas form intimate symbioses with bacteria to obtain nutrients that are scarce in the xylem fluid they feed on. The obligate symbionts in cicadas are purportedly confined to specialized bacteriomes, but knowledge of bacterial communities associated with cicadas is limited. Bacterial communities in the bacteriomes and organs of reproductive, digestive and excretory systems of two cicada species (Platypleura kaempferi and Meimuna mongolica) were investigated using different methods, and the bacterial diversity and distribution patterns of dominant bacteria in different tissues were compared. Within each species, the bacterial communities of testes are significantly different from those of bacteriomes and ovaries. The dominant endosymbiont Candidatus Sulcia muelleri is found not only in the bacteriomes and reproductive organs, but also in the "filter chamber + conical segment" of both species. The transmission mode of this endosymbiont in the alimentary canal and its effect on physiological processes merits further study. A novel bacterium of Rhizobiales, showing ~80% similarity to Candidatus Hodgkinia cicadicola, is dominant in the bacteriomes and ovaries of P. kaempferi. Given that the genome of H. cicadicola exhibits rapid sequence evolution, it is possible that this novel bacterium is a related endosymbiont with beneficial trophic functions similar to that of H. cicadicola in some other cicadas. Failure to detect H. cicadicola in M. mongolica suggests that it has been subsequently replaced by another bacterium, a yeast or gut microbiota which compensates for the loss of H. cicadicola. The distribution of this novel Rhizobiales species in other cicadas and its identification require further investigation to help establish the definition of the bacterial genus Candidatus Hodgkinia and to provide more information on sequence divergence of related endosymbionts of cicadas. Our results highlight the complex bacterial communities of cicadas, and are informative for

  8. Bacterial diversity of bacteriomes and organs of reproductive, digestive and excretory systems in two cicada species (Hemiptera: Cicadidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhou; Wang, Dandan; He, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Cicadas form intimate symbioses with bacteria to obtain nutrients that are scarce in the xylem fluid they feed on. The obligate symbionts in cicadas are purportedly confined to specialized bacteriomes, but knowledge of bacterial communities associated with cicadas is limited. Bacterial communities in the bacteriomes and organs of reproductive, digestive and excretory systems of two cicada species (Platypleura kaempferi and Meimuna mongolica) were investigated using different methods, and the bacterial diversity and distribution patterns of dominant bacteria in different tissues were compared. Within each species, the bacterial communities of testes are significantly different from those of bacteriomes and ovaries. The dominant endosymbiont Candidatus Sulcia muelleri is found not only in the bacteriomes and reproductive organs, but also in the “filter chamber + conical segment” of both species. The transmission mode of this endosymbiont in the alimentary canal and its effect on physiological processes merits further study. A novel bacterium of Rhizobiales, showing ~80% similarity to Candidatus Hodgkinia cicadicola, is dominant in the bacteriomes and ovaries of P. kaempferi. Given that the genome of H. cicadicola exhibits rapid sequence evolution, it is possible that this novel bacterium is a related endosymbiont with beneficial trophic functions similar to that of H. cicadicola in some other cicadas. Failure to detect H. cicadicola in M. mongolica suggests that it has been subsequently replaced by another bacterium, a yeast or gut microbiota which compensates for the loss of H. cicadicola. The distribution of this novel Rhizobiales species in other cicadas and its identification require further investigation to help establish the definition of the bacterial genus Candidatus Hodgkinia and to provide more information on sequence divergence of related endosymbionts of cicadas. Our results highlight the complex bacterial communities of cicadas, and are informative

  9. Diversity and localization of bacterial symbionts in three whitefly species (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) from the east coast of the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Skaljac, M; Zanić, K; Hrnčić, S; Radonjić, S; Perović, T; Ghanim, M

    2013-02-01

    Several whitefly species (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) are cosmopolitan phloem-feeders that cause serious damage in numerous agricultural crops. All whitefly species harbor a primary bacterial symbiont and a diverse array of secondary symbionts which may influence several aspects of the insect's biology. We surveyed infections by secondary symbionts in Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) and Siphoninus phillyreae (Haliday) from areas in the east cost of the Adriatic Sea. Both the Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED) B. tabaci genetic groups were detected in Montenegro, whereas only the MED was confirmed in Croatia. Trialeurodes vaporariorum and S. phillyreae were found in all areas surveyed. MEAM1 and MED exhibited similarity to previously reported infections, while populations of T. vaporariorum from Montenegro harbored Rickettsia, Wolbachia and Cardinium in addition to previously reported Hamiltonella and Arsenopnohus. Siphoninus phillyreae harbored Hamiltonella, Wolbachia, Cardinium and Arsenophonus, with the latter appearing in two alleles. Multiple infections of all symbionts were common in the three insect species tested, with some reaching near fixation. Florescent in situ hybridization showed new localization patterns for Hamiltonella in S. phillyreae, and the morphology of the bacteriosome differed from that observed in other whitefly species. Our results show new infections with bacterial symbionts in the whitefly species studied. Infections with the same symbionts in reproductively isolated whitefly species confirm complex relationships between whiteflies and bacterial symbionts, and suggest possible horizontal transfer of some of these bacteria.

  10. Clostridium phytofermentans sp. nov., a cellulolytic mesophile from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Warnick, Thomas A; Methé, Barbara A; Leschine, Susan B

    2002-07-01

    An obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, strain ISDgT, was isolated from forest soil. Cells of this isolate stained Gram-negative, despite possessing a Gram-positive cell-wall ultrastructure, and were motile, straight rods that formed spherical terminal spores that swelled the sporangium. Cellulose, pectin, polygalacturonic acid, starch, xylan, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, gentiobiose, glucose, lactose, maltose, mannose, ribose and xylose supported growth. The major end products of fermentation were ethanol, acetate, CO2 and H2; formate and lactate were minor products. The optimum temperature for growth was 35-37 degrees C. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequence comparisons showed that strain ISDgT was related to a group of anaerobes that included Clostridium herbivorans, Clostridium polysaccharolyticum and Clostridium populeti. The G+C content of this strain was 35.9 mol%. On the basis of numerous genotypic and phenotypic differences between strain ISDgT and its close relatives, strain ISDgT is proposed as a novel species in the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium phytofermentans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ISDgT (= ATCC 700394T).

  11. Predicting genetic and ecological characteristics of bacterial species by comparing the trajectories of dN/dS and dI/dS in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2014-02-01

    Indel (insertion/deletion) causes gene disruption and is considered to be deleterious like non-synonymous mutation during the evolution of bacterial genomes. The trajectory of dN/dS (the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous mutation) has been found to decrease exponentially over time, but the trajectory of dI/dS (the ratio of indel to synonymous mutation) has not been thoroughly explored yet. Here we compared the patterns of dN/dS and dI/dS for several bacterial species. The majority of them showed a much steeper dI/dS trajectory than the dN/dS trajectory, suggesting that indel was more deleterious than non-synonymous mutation and therefore was more difficult to fix in genomes. However, the naturally competent bacteria, or those with a much lower genetic barrier for DNA exchange, presented a reverse relationship between dI/dS and dN/dS, indicative of an exceptional ability to tolerate horizontal genetic transfer. The result suggests that plotting of dN/dS and dI/dS trajectories can help to predict the genetic and ecological characteristics of bacterial species.

  12. Partial bioaugmentation to remove 3-chloroaniline slows bacterial species turnover rate in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Falk, Michael W; Seshan, Hari; Dosoretz, Carlos; Wuertz, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Bioaugmentation is a potentially powerful tool to direct community structure and metabolic capacities in bioreactors. Yet the outcome of bioaugmentation studies is usually unpredictable and effects on microbial community dynamics are poorly understood. We asked the question whether bioaugmentation could prevent a diversity shift induced by a model toxin, 3-chloroaniline (3-CA), regardless of whether 3-CA was degraded. Four replicate membrane bioreactors (MBRs) operating in parallel were amended with Pseudomonas putida UWC3 (pWDL7::rfp), a strain that carries the upper pathway genes necessary for partial degradation of 3-CA on its plasmid. Two MBRs served as controls and two MBRs were exposed to 3-CA for 71 days. Despite the selective pressure imposed by 3-CA, there was little or no 3-CA removal and neither the 16S rRNA gene of the augmented strain UWC3 nor the plasmid pWDL7::rfp proliferated in any of the reactors. Yet both host strain and plasmid were maintained at reduced levels (~10(4) host strain cells ml(-1)) in all reactors compared to the initial inoculum (~10(7) cells ml(-1); 1% of active cells). Additionally, the microbial community dynamics were evaluated for each MBR via terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis (n = 15 per reactor) that targeted a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Analysis comprised of a suite of multivariate statistics coupled with a theoretical microbial ecological approach, 'Island Biogeography', using a bacterial species time relationship (STR), within each MBR. Control MBRs had a wider range in w values than the treatment MBRs, which is attributed to the lack of a toxin selecting for biota that can withstand its toxic nature. Bioaugmentation alone strongly slowed the bacterial species turnover rate (as revealed by very low w scaling components), compared to non-bioaugmented reactors from a previous study, but did not protect the microbial community from a diversity shift caused by the toxin. Nonmetric

  13. A comparative study on the alternating mesophilic and thermophilic two-stage anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jey-R Sabado; Lee, Jehoon; Jahng, Deokjin

    2014-06-01

    An alternating mesophilic and thermophilic two stage anaerobic digestion (AD) process was conducted. The temperature of the acidogenic (A) and methanogenic (M) reactors was controlled as follows: System 1 (S1) mesophilic A-mesophilic M; (S2) mesophilic A-thermophilic M; and (S3) thermophilic A-mesophilic M. Initially, the AD reactor was acclimatized and inoculated with digester sludge. Food waste was added with the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) concentrations of 41.4-47.0 g/L and volatile fatty acids of 2.0-3.2 g/L. Based on the results, the highest total chemical oxygen demand removal (86.6%) was recorded in S2 while S3 exhibited the highest SCOD removal (96.6%). Comparing S1 with S2, total solids removal increased by 0.5%; S3 on the other hand decreased by 0.1 % as compared to S1. However, volatile solids (VS) removal in S1, S2, and S3 was 78.5%, 81.7%, and 79.2%, respectively. S2 also exhibited the highest CH4 content, yield, and production rate of 70.7%, 0.44 L CH4/g VSadded, and 1.23 L CH4/(L·day), respectively. Bacterial community structure revealed that the richness, diversity, evenness, and dominance of S2 were high except for the archaeal community. The terminal restriction fragments dendrogram also revealed that the microbial community of the acidogenic and methanogenic reactors in S2 was distinct. Therefore, S2 was the best among the systems for the operation of two-stage AD of food waste in terms of CH4 production, nutrient removal, and microbial community structure.

  14. Tree phyllosphere bacterial communities: exploring the magnitude of intra- and inter-individual variation among host species.

    PubMed

    Laforest-Lapointe, Isabelle; Messier, Christian; Kembel, Steven W

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and composition of the microbial community of tree leaves (the phyllosphere) varies among trees and host species and along spatial, temporal, and environmental gradients. Phyllosphere community variation within the canopy of an individual tree exists but the importance of this variation relative to among-tree and among-species variation is poorly understood. Sampling techniques employed for phyllosphere studies include picking leaves from one canopy location to mixing randomly selected leaves from throughout the canopy. In this context, our goal was to characterize the relative importance of intra-individual variation in phyllosphere communities across multiple species, and compare this variation to inter-individual and interspecific variation of phyllosphere epiphytic bacterial communities in a natural temperate forest in Quebec, Canada. We targeted five dominant temperate forest tree species including angiosperms and gymnosperms: Acer saccharum, Acer rubrum, Betula papyrifera, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca. For one randomly selected tree of each species, we sampled microbial communities at six distinct canopy locations: bottom-canopy (1-2 m height), the four cardinal points of mid-canopy (2-4 m height), and the top-canopy (4-6 m height). We also collected bottom-canopy leaves from five additional trees from each species. Based on an analysis of bacterial community structure measured via Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S gene, we demonstrate that 65% of the intra-individual variation in leaf bacterial community structure could be attributed to the effect of inter-individual and inter-specific differences while the effect of canopy location was not significant. In comparison, host species identity explains 47% of inter-individual and inter-specific variation in leaf bacterial community structure followed by individual identity (32%) and canopy location (6%). Our results suggest that individual samples from consistent positions within the tree

  15. Tree phyllosphere bacterial communities: exploring the magnitude of intra- and inter-individual variation among host species

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Christian; Kembel, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The diversity and composition of the microbial community of tree leaves (the phyllosphere) varies among trees and host species and along spatial, temporal, and environmental gradients. Phyllosphere community variation within the canopy of an individual tree exists but the importance of this variation relative to among-tree and among-species variation is poorly understood. Sampling techniques employed for phyllosphere studies include picking leaves from one canopy location to mixing randomly selected leaves from throughout the canopy. In this context, our goal was to characterize the relative importance of intra-individual variation in phyllosphere communities across multiple species, and compare this variation to inter-individual and interspecific variation of phyllosphere epiphytic bacterial communities in a natural temperate forest in Quebec, Canada. Methods We targeted five dominant temperate forest tree species including angiosperms and gymnosperms: Acer saccharum, Acer rubrum, Betula papyrifera, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca. For one randomly selected tree of each species, we sampled microbial communities at six distinct canopy locations: bottom-canopy (1–2 m height), the four cardinal points of mid-canopy (2–4 m height), and the top-canopy (4–6 m height). We also collected bottom-canopy leaves from five additional trees from each species. Results Based on an analysis of bacterial community structure measured via Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S gene, we demonstrate that 65% of the intra-individual variation in leaf bacterial community structure could be attributed to the effect of inter-individual and inter-specific differences while the effect of canopy location was not significant. In comparison, host species identity explains 47% of inter-individual and inter-specific variation in leaf bacterial community structure followed by individual identity (32%) and canopy location (6%). Discussion Our results suggest that individual

  16. Bacterial Profiling Reveals Novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma Species in Australian Human-Biting Ticks.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Alexander W; Doggett, Stephen; Ratchford, Andrew; Oskam, Charlotte L; Paparini, Andrea; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, a conclusive aetiology of Lyme disease-like illness in human patients remains elusive, despite growing numbers of people presenting with symptoms attributed to tick bites. In the present study, we surveyed the microbial communities harboured by human-biting ticks from across Australia to identify bacteria that may contribute to this syndrome. Universal PCR primers were used to amplify the V1-2 hyper-variable region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in DNA samples from individual Ixodes holocyclus (n = 279), Amblyomma triguttatum (n = 167), Haemaphysalis bancrofti (n = 7), and H. longicornis (n = 7) ticks. The 16S amplicons were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform and analysed in USEARCH, QIIME, and BLAST to assign genus and species-level taxonomies. Nested PCR and Sanger sequencing were used to confirm the NGS data and further analyse novel findings. All 460 ticks were negative for Borrelia spp. by both NGS and nested PCR analysis. Two novel "Candidatus Neoehrlichia" spp. were identified in 12.9% of I. holocyclus ticks. A novel Anaplasma sp. was identified in 1.8% of A. triguttatum ticks, and a novel Ehrlichia sp. was identified in both A. triguttatum (1.2%) ticks and a single I. holocyclus (0.6%) tick. Further phylogenetic analysis of novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Anaplasma and Ehrlichia based on 1,265 bp 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that these are new species. Determining whether these newly discovered organisms cause disease in humans and animals, like closely related bacteria do abroad, is of public health importance and requires further investigation.

  17. Clostridium algifaecis sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterial species from decomposing algal scum.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Fan; Zheng, Hui; Wu, Qing-Long; Yang, Hong; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Two anaerobic bacterial strains, MB9-7(T) and MB9-9, were isolated from decomposing algal scum and were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 are closely related to each other (99.7% similarity) and they are also closely related to Clostridium tyrobutyricum (96.5%). The two strains were Gram-stain positive and rod-shaped. Growth occurred at 20-45 °C, at pH 4.0-8.0 and at NaCl concentrations of up to 2% (w/v). Acid was produced from glucose, xylose and mannose. Products of fermentation in PYG medium were mainly butyrate, acetate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C(14:0) and C(16:0). The cellular polar lipids comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, two glycolipids, one phospholipid, one aminophospholipid and two aminolipids. The DNA G+C contents of strain MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 were 27.9 and 28.7 mol%, respectively. These results support the assignment of the new isolates to the genus Clostridium and also distinguish them from other species of the genus Clostridium. Hence, it is proposed that strains MB9-7(T) and MB9-9 represent a novel species of the genus Clostridium, with the suggested name Clostridium algifaecis sp. nov. The type strain is MB9-7(T) ( =CGMCC 1.5188(T) =DSM 28783(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  18. Measurements of carbon utilization by single bacterial species in sterile soil: insights into Rhizobium spp.

    PubMed

    Wigley, K; Wakelin, S A; Moot, D J; Hammond, S; Ridgway, H J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a tool to investigate the influence of soil factors on carbon utilization activity of single micro-organisms. The assay for Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii in γ-irradiated soil, using the MicroResp(™) system, was optimized for sterility, incubation time, and moisture level. The optimized method was validated with experiments that assessed (i) differences in C utilization of different rhizobia strains and (ii) how this was affected by soil type. Carbon utilization differed among strains of the same species (and symbiovar), but some strains were more responsive to the soil environment than others. This novel modification of the MicroResp(™) has enabled the scope of carbon-utilization patterns of single strains of bacteria, such as Rh. leguminosarum bv. trifolii, to be studied in soil. The system is a new tool with applications in microbial ecology adaptable to the study of many culturable bacterial and fungal soil-borne taxa. It will allow measurement of a micro-organism's ability to utilize common C sources released in rhizosphere exudates to be measured in a physical soil background. This knowledge may improve selection efficiency and deployment of commercial microbial inoculants. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Cooperative role for tetraspanins in adhesin-mediated attachment of bacterial species to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Green, Luke R; Monk, Peter N; Partridge, Lynda J; Morris, Paul; Gorringe, Andrew R; Read, Robert C

    2011-06-01

    The tetraspanins are a superfamily of transmembrane proteins with diverse functions and can form extended microdomains within the plasma membrane in conjunction with partner proteins, which probably includes receptors for bacterial adhesins. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningococcal disease, attaches to host nasopharyngeal epithelial cells via type IV pili and opacity (Opa) proteins. We examined the role of tetraspanin function in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to epithelial cells. Tetraspanins CD9, CD63, and CD151 were expressed by HEC-1-B and DETROIT 562 cells. Coincubation of cells with antibodies against all three tetraspanin molecules used individually or in combination, with recombinant tetraspanin extracellular domains (EC2), or with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) significantly reduced adherence of Neisseria meningitidis. In contrast, recombinant CD81, a different tetraspanin, had no effect on meningococcal adherence. Antitetraspanin antibodies reduced the adherence to epithelial cells of Neisseria meningitidis strain derivatives expressing Opa and pili significantly more than isogenic strains lacking these determinants. Adherence to epithelial cells of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria lactamica, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae was also reduced by pretreatment of cells with tetraspanin antibodies and recombinant proteins. These data suggest that tetraspanins are required for optimal function of epithelial adhesion platforms containing specific receptors for Neisseria meningitidis and potentially for multiple species of bacteria.

  20. Investigation of six selected bacterial species in endo-periodontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Didilescu, A C; Rusu, D; Anghel, A; Nica, L; Iliescu, A; Greabu, M; Bancescu, G; Stratul, S I

    2012-03-01

    To investigate and determine possible associations of six tested bacteria belonging to 'orange' and 'green' complexes, in endo-periodontal lesions: Parvimonas micra, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium nodatum, Eikenella corrodens and Capnocytophaga sputigena. Forty-six patients presenting with different types of endo-periodontal lesions were investigated. Clinical examinations, periapical radiographs and microbiological sampling from the canal system (endo) and periodontal pockets (perio) were performed. Qualitative and semiquantitative evaluation of bacteria was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA-DNA hybridization (micro-IDent plus; Hain Lifescience, Germany). Extremely high bacterial loads in endodontic samples were recorded for P. micra, F. nucleatum and C. sputigena, while periodontal samples were often colonized by the same species, plus C. rectus. Significant association was recorded between F. nucleatum-endo and P. micra-endo (P = 0.03, Fisher's exact test). There was marginal evidence of associations between: (i) C. sputigena-endo and C. sputigena-perio (P = 0.06, Fisher's exact test); (ii) P. micra-endo and P. micra-perio (P = 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Sensitivity to percussion was associated with an increased chance of cases with P. micra-endo (P = 0.03, Pearson chi-square test). The findings suggest that F. nucleatum, P. micra and C. sputigena may play a role in the pathogenesis of endo-periodontal lesions. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  1. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    PubMed Central

    Alasil, Saad Musbah; Omar, Rahmat; Yusof, Mohd Yasim

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237), phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512), and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260). The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups (P > 0.05). Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24790603

  2. Prevalence of selected bacterial named species and uncultivated phylotypes in endodontic abscesses from two geographic locations.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Baumgartner, J Craig; Xia, Tian; Siqueira, José F

    2006-12-01

    Evidence is mounting that the prevalence of some putative endodontic pathogens can significantly vary according to the geographic location in which samples were taken. This study aimed to provide additional knowledge on this subject by comparing the frequencies of 10 selected candidate endodontic pathogens in samples of acute apical abscesses obtained from two distinct geographic locations; Portland, OR, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. DNA was extracted from aspirates and used as template in nested PCR assays using 16S rRNA gene taxon-specific oligonucleotide primers. Of the target species/phylotypes, Treponema denticola (73% of the cases), Porphyromonas endodontalis (70%), and Tannerella forsythia (57%) were the most prevalent taxa found in Brazilian samples. Dialister invisus (70% of the cases), P. endodontalis (63%) and Dialister pneumosintes (55%) were the most frequent taxa in the Portland, OR samples. Data analysis revealed that T. denticola and T. forsythia were significantly more detected in Brazilian samples than in the Portland, OR samples. Although D. invisus, Filifactor alocis, and Synergistes oral clone W090 were detected in many more samples from the Portland, OR patients, differences were not found to be statistically significant. These findings confirmed that some bacterial taxa can markedly differ in the frequencies they occur in samples from different locations. It remains to be clarified whether this observation translates into relevant therapeutic implications.

  3. Ecological drift and local exposures drive enteric bacterial community differences within species of Galápagos iguanas.

    PubMed

    Lankau, Emily W; Hong, Pei-Ying; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-04-01

    Diet strongly influences the intestinal microbial communities through species sorting. Alternatively, these communicates may differ because of chance variation in local microbial exposures or species losses among allopatric host populations (i.e. ecological drift). We investigated how these forces shape enteric communities of Galápagos marine and land iguanas. Geographically proximate populations shared more similar communities within a host ecotype, suggesting a role for ecological drift during host colonization of the islands. Additionally, evidence of taxa sharing between proximate heterospecific host populations suggests that contemporary local exposures also influence the gut community assembly. While selective forces such as host-bacterial interactions or dietary differences are dominant drivers of intestinal community differences among hosts, historical and contemporary processes of ecological drift may lead to differences in bacterial composition within a host species. Whether such differences in community structure translate into geographic variation in benefits derived from these intimate microbial communities remains to be explored.

  4. Influence of fluoride on the bacterial composition of a dual-species biofilm composed of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus oralis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Eun; Cai, Jian-Na; Cho, Sung-Dae; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2016-10-01

    Despite the widespread use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries, few studies have demonstrated the effects of fluoride on the bacterial composition of dental biofilms. This study investigated whether fluoride affects the proportion of Streptococcus mutans and S. oralis in mono- and dual-species biofilm models, via microbiological, biochemical, and confocal fluorescence microscope studies. Fluoride did not affect the bacterial count and bio-volume of S. mutans and S. oralis in mono-species biofilms, except for the 24-h-old S. mutans biofilms. However, fluoride reduced the proportion and bio-volume of S. mutans but did not decrease those of S. oralis during both S. oralis and S. mutans dual-species biofilm formation, which may be related to the decrease in extracellular polysaccharide formation by fluoride. These results suggest that fluoride may prevent the shift in the microbial proportion to cariogenic bacteria in dental biofilms, subsequently inhibiting the cariogenic bacteria dominant biofilm formation.

  5. Composition of the Cutaneous Bacterial Community in Japanese Amphibians: Effects of Captivity, Host Species, and Body Region.

    PubMed

    Sabino-Pinto, Joana; Bletz, Molly Catherine; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Shimizu, Norio; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Vences, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    The cutaneous microbiota plays a significant role in the biology of their vertebrate hosts, and its composition is known to be influenced both by host and environment, with captive conditions often altering alpha diversity. Here, we compare the cutaneous bacterial communities of 61 amphibians (both wild and captive) from Hiroshima, Japan, using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of a segment of the 16S rRNA gene. The majority of these samples came from a captive breeding facility at Hiroshima University where specimens from six species are maintained under highly standardized conditions for several generations. This allowed to identify host effects on the bacterial communities under near identical environmental conditions in captivity. We found the structure of the cutaneous bacterial community significantly differing between wild and captive individuals of newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster, with a higher alpha diversity found in the wild individuals. Community structure also showed distinct patterns when comparing different species of amphibians kept under highly similar conditions, revealing an intrinsic host effect. Bacterial communities of dorsal vs. ventral skin surfaces did not significantly differ in most species, but a trend of higher alpha diversity on the ventral surface was found in Oriental fire-bellied toads, Bombina orientalis. This study confirms the cutaneous microbiota of amphibians as a highly dynamic system influenced by a complex interplay of numerous factors.

  6. A RAPD based study revealing a previously unreported wide range of mesophilic and thermophilic spore formers associated with milk powders in China.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Faizan A; Li, Yun; Liu, TongJie; Flint, Steve; Zhang, Guohua; He, GuoQing

    2016-01-18

    Aerobic spore forming bacteria are potential milk powder contaminants and are viewed as indicators of poor quality. A total of 738 bacteria, including both mesophilic and thermophilic, isolated from twenty-five powdered milk samples representative of three types of milk powders in China were analyzed based on the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) protocol to provide insight into species diversity. Bacillus licheniformis was found to be the most prevalent bacterium with greatest diversity (~43% of the total isolates) followed by Geobacillus stearothermophilus (~21% of the total isolates). Anoxybacillus flavithermus represented only 8.5% of the total profiles. Interestingly, actinomycetes represented a major group of the isolates with the predominance of Laceyella sacchari followed by Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, altogether comprising of 7.3% of the total isolates. Out of the nineteen separate bacterial species (except five unidentified groups) recovered and identified from milk powders, twelve proved to belong to novel or previously unreported species in milk powders. Assessment and characterization of the harmful effects caused by this particular micro-flora on the quality and safety of milk powders will be worth doing in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria from meat and their spoilage potential in vitro and in beef.

    PubMed

    Ercolini, Danilo; Russo, Federica; Nasi, Antonella; Ferranti, Pasquale; Villani, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Mesophilic and psychrotrophic populations from refrigerated meat were identified in this study, and the spoilage potential of microbial isolates in packaged beef was evaluated by analyzing the release of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Fifty mesophilic and twenty-nine psychrotrophic isolates were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, and representative strains were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum and C. divergens were the species most frequently found in both mesophilic and psychrotrophic populations. Acinetobacter baumannii, Buttiauxella spp. and Serratia spp. were identified among the mesophilic isolates, while Pseudomonas spp. were commonly identified among the psychrotrophs. The isolates were further characterized for their growth at different temperatures and their proteolytic activity in vitro on meat proteins extracts at 7 degrees C. Selected proteolytic strains of Serratia proteamaculans, Pseudomonas fragi, and C. maltaromaticum were used to examine their spoilage potential in situ. Single strains of these species and mixtures of these strains were used to contaminate beef chops that were packed and stored at 7 degrees C. At time intervals up to 1 month, viable counts were determined, and VOC were identified by GC/MS. Generally, the VOC concentrations went to increase during the storage of the contaminated meats, and the profiles of the analyzed meat changed dramatically depending on the contaminating microbial species. About 100 volatiles were identified in the different contaminated samples. Among the detected volatiles, some specific molecules were identified only when the meat was contaminated by a specific microbial species. Compounds such as 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, 2-buten-1-ol, 2-hexyl-1-octanol, 2-nonanone, and 2-ethylhexanal were detectable only for C. maltaromaticum, which also produced the highest number of aldehydes, lactones, and sulfur compounds. The

  8. Evaluation of Three Bacterial Identification Systems for Species Identification of Bacteria Isolated from Bovine Mastitis and Bulk Tank Milk Samples.

    PubMed

    Savage, Emily; Chothe, Shubhada; Lintner, Valerie; Pierre, Traci; Matthews, Tammy; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Miller, Dawn; Tewari, Deepanker; Jayarao, Bhushan

    2017-03-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate Sensititre(®) Automated Reading and Incubation System 2x System (ARIS), API(®) (API), and Bruker MALDI-TOF MS (MALDI) bacterial species identification systems using 132 diverse bacterial isolates from bovine milk samples and bulk tank milk received at the Penn State Animal Diagnostic Laboratory. The results were compared with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, which served as the reference method for species identification. The ARIS, API, and MALDI identified 0%, 40%, and 33.4% of species classified as Gram-positive rod isolates belonging to genera Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, and Corynebacterium, respectively. It was observed that 76.5%, 93.9%, and 96.9% of catalase-negative, Gram-positive cocci (n = 33; Aerococcus, Enterococcus, Lactococcus, Streptococcus) were correctly identified to the species level by ARIS, API, and MALDI, respectively, while 33.4%, 84.5%, and 97.7% of catalase-positive, Gram-positive cocci (n = 45; Kocuria, Staphylococcus) were correctly identified to their species by ARIS, API, and MALDI, respectively. A total of 48 isolates (Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pasteurella, Providencia, Pseduomonas, Serratia) of Gram-negative bacteria were examined, of which 85.4%, 93.7%, and 95.8% of the isolates were correctly identified to the species level by ARIS, API, and MALDI, respectively. In our laboratory, the MALDI had the least costs associated with consumables and reagents compared to ARIS, API, and 16S rRNA identification methods. Identification of bacterial species was accomplished in <2 h using MALDI and 24 h for ARIS, API, and 16S rRNA identification systems.

  9. Growth promotion of Lactuca sativa in response to volatile organic compounds emitted from diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Fincheira, Paola; Venthur, Herbert; Mutis, Ana; Parada, Maribel; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    Agrochemicals are currently used in horticulture to increase crop production. Nevertheless, their indiscriminate use is a relevant issue for environmental and legal aspects. Alternative tools for reducing fertilizers and synthetic phytohormones are being investigated, such as the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as growth inducers. Some soil bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus, stimulate Arabidopsis and tobacco growth by releasing VOCs, but their effects on vegetables have not been investigated. Lactuca sativa was used as model vegetable to investigate bacterial VOCs as growth inducers. We selected 10 bacteria strains, belonging to Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Serratia genera that are able to produce 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (acetoin), a compound with proven growth promoting activity. Two-day old-seedlings of L. sativa were exposed to VOCs emitted by the selected bacteria grown in different media cultures for 7 days. The results showed that the VOCs released from the bacteria elicited an increase in the number of lateral roots, dry weight, root growth and shoot length, depending on the media used. Three Bacillus strains, BCT53, BCT9 and BCT4, were selected according to its their growth inducing capacity. The BCT9 strain elicited the greatest increases in dry weight and primary root length when L. sativa seedlings were subjected to a 10-day experiment. Finally, because acetoin only stimulated root growth, we suggest that other volatiles could be responsible for the growth promotion of L. sativa. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that bacteria volatiles can be used as growth-inducers as alternative or complementary strategies for application in horticulture species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of micronutrient deficiencies on bacterial species from the human gut microbiota

    DOE PAGES

    Hibberd, Matthew C.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Wu, Meng; ...

    2017-05-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies afflict two billion people. While the impact of these imbalances on host biology has been studied extensively, much less is known about their effects on the developing or adult gut microbiota. Therefore, we established a community of 44 cultured, sequenced human gut-derived bacterial species in gnotobiotic mice and fed the animals a defined, micronutrient-sufficient diet, followed by a derivative diet devoid of vitamin A, folate, iron or zinc, followed by return to the sufficient diet. Acute vitamin A deficiency had the largest effect on community structure and meta-transcriptome, with Bacteroides vulgatus, a prominent responder, increasing its abundance inmore » the absence of vitamin A, and manifesting transcriptional changes involving various metabolic pathways. Applying retinol selection to a library of 30,300 B. vulgatus transposon mutants revealed that disruption of acrR abrogated retinol sensitivity. Genetic complementation studies, microbial RNA-Seq, and transcription factor binding assays disclosed that AcrR functions as a repressor of an adjacent AcrAB-TolC efflux system plus other members of its regulon. Retinol efflux measurements in wild-type, acrR-mutant, and complemented acrR mutant strains, plus treatment with a pharmacologic inhibitor of the efflux system, revealed that AcrAB-TolC is a determinant of retinol and bile acid sensitivity. Acute vitamin A deficiency was associated with altered bile acid metabolism in vivo, raising the possibility that retinol, bile acid metabolites, and AcrAB-TolC interact to influence the fitness of B. vulgatus and perhaps other microbiota members. This type of preclinical model can help develop mechanistic insights about and more effective treatment strategies for micronutrient deficiencies.« less

  11. Bacterial community structure in the rhizosphere of three cactus species from semi-arid highlands in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Garrido, J Félix; Montiel-Lugo, Daniel; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Torres-Cortes, Gloria; Millán, Vicenta; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo C

    2012-05-01

    The nature reserve of Tehuacan-Cuicatlan in central Mexico is known for its diversity and endemism mainly in cactus plants. Although the xerophytic flora is reasonably documented, the bacterial communities associated with these species have been largely neglected. We assessed the diversity and composition of bacterial communities in bulk (non-rhizospheric) soil and the rhizosphere of three cactus plant species: Mammillaria carnea, Opuntia pilifera and Stenocereus stellatus, approached using cultivation and molecular techniques, considering the possible effect of dry and rainy seasons. Cultivation-dependent methods were focused on putative N(2)-fixers and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, in the two media tested the values obtained for dry season samples grouped together regardless of the sample type (rhizospheric or non-rhizospheric), these groups also included the non-rhizospheric sample for rainy season, on each medium. These CFU values were smaller and significantly different from those obtained on rhizospheric samples from rainy season. Genera composition among isolates of the rhizospheric samples was very similar for each season, the most abundant taxa being α-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Interestingly, the genus Ochrobactrum was highly represented among rhizospheric samples, when cultured in N-free medium. The structure of the bacterial communities was approached with molecular techniques targeting partial 16S rRNA sequences such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and serial analysis of ribosomal sequence tags. Under these approaches, the most represented bacterial phyla were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The first two were also highly represented when using isolation techniques.

  12. Phylogenetic Sequence Variations in Bacterial rRNA Affect Species-Specific Susceptibility to Drugs Targeting Protein Synthesis▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Akshay, Subramanian; Bertea, Mihai; Hobbie, Sven N.; Oettinghaus, Björn; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Böttger, Erik C.; Akbergenov, Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotics targeting the bacterial ribosome typically bind to highly conserved rRNA regions with only minor phylogenetic sequence variations. It is unclear whether these sequence variations affect antibiotic susceptibility or resistance development. To address this question, we have investigated the drug binding pockets of aminoglycosides and macrolides/ketolides. The binding site of aminoglycosides is located within helix 44 of the 16S rRNA (A site); macrolides/ketolides bind to domain V of the 23S rRNA (peptidyltransferase center). We have used mutagenesis of rRNA sequences in Mycobacterium smegmatis ribosomes to reconstruct the different bacterial drug binding sites and to study the effects of rRNA sequence variations on drug activity. Our results provide a rationale for differences in species-specific drug susceptibility patterns and species-specific resistance phenotypes associated with mutational alterations in the drug binding pocket. PMID:21730122

  13. The Soil Bacterial Communities of South African Fynbos Riparian Ecosystems Invaded by Australian Acacia Species

    PubMed Central

    Slabbert, Etienne; Jacobs, Shayne Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Riparian ecosystem along rivers and streams are characterised by lateral and longitudinal ecological gradients and, as a result, harbour unique biodiversity. Riparian ecosystems in the fynbos of the Western Cape, South Africa, are characterised by seasonal dynamics, with summer droughts followed by high flows during winter. The unique hydrology and geomorphology of riparian ecosystems play an important role in shaping these ecosystems. The riparian vegetation in the Western Cape has, however, largely been degraded due to the invasion of non-indigenous plants, in particular Acacia mearnsii, A. saligna and A. dealbata. This study investigated the effect of hydrology and invasion on the bacterial communities associated with fynbos riparian ecosystems. Bacterial communities were characterised with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. Chemical and physical properties of soil within sites were also determined and correlated with community data. Sectioning across the lateral zones revealed significant differences in community composition, and the specific bacterial taxa influenced. Results also showed that the bacterial community structure could be linked to Acacia invasion. The presence of invasive Acacia was correlated with specific bacterial phyla. However, high similarity between cleared and pristine sites suggests that the effect of Acacia on the soil bacterial community structure may not be permanent. This study demonstrates how soil bacterial communities are influenced by hydrological gradients associated with riparian ecosystems and the impact of Acacia invasion on these communities. PMID:24475145

  14. The soil bacterial communities of South African fynbos riparian ecosystems invaded by Australian Acacia species.

    PubMed

    Slabbert, Etienne; Jacobs, Shayne Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Riparian ecosystem along rivers and streams are characterised by lateral and longitudinal ecological gradients and, as a result, harbour unique biodiversity. Riparian ecosystems in the fynbos of the Western Cape, South Africa, are characterised by seasonal dynamics, with summer droughts followed by high flows during winter. The unique hydrology and geomorphology of riparian ecosystems play an important role in shaping these ecosystems. The riparian vegetation in the Western Cape has, however, largely been degraded due to the invasion of non-indigenous plants, in particular Acacia mearnsii, A. saligna and A. dealbata. This study investigated the effect of hydrology and invasion on the bacterial communities associated with fynbos riparian ecosystems. Bacterial communities were characterised with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. Chemical and physical properties of soil within sites were also determined and correlated with community data. Sectioning across the lateral zones revealed significant differences in community composition, and the specific bacterial taxa influenced. Results also showed that the bacterial community structure could be linked to Acacia invasion. The presence of invasive Acacia was correlated with specific bacterial phyla. However, high similarity between cleared and pristine sites suggests that the effect of Acacia on the soil bacterial community structure may not be permanent. This study demonstrates how soil bacterial communities are influenced by hydrological gradients associated with riparian ecosystems and the impact of Acacia invasion on these communities.

  15. Combined chemical and physical transformation method with RbCl and sepiolite for the transformation of various bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Lee, Haram; Yoo, Seung Min; Yu, Myeong-Sang; Park, Hansoo; Na, Dokyun

    2017-04-01

    DNA transformation that delivers plasmid DNAs into bacterial cells is fundamental in genetic manipulation to engineer and study bacteria. Developed transformation methods to date are optimized to specific bacterial species for high efficiency. Thus, there is always a demand for simple and species-independent transformation methods. We herein describe the development of a chemico-physical transformation method that combines a rubidium chloride (RbCl)-based chemical method and sepiolite-based physical method, and report its use for the simple and efficient delivery of DNA into various bacterial species. Using this method, the best transformation efficiency for Escherichia coli DH5α was 4.3×10(6)CFU/μg of pUC19 plasmid, which is higher than or comparable to the reported transformation efficiencies to date. This method also allowed the introduction of plasmid DNAs into Bacillus subtilis (5.7×10(3)CFU/μg of pSEVA3b67Rb), Bacillus megaterium (2.5×10(3)CFU/μg of pSPAsp-hp), Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (1.0×10(2)CFU/μg of pTRKH3-ermGFP), and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (2.2×10(2)CFU/μg of pMSP3535VA). Remarkably, even when the conventional chemical and physical methods failed to generate transformed cells in Bacillus sp. and Enterococcus faecalis, E. malodoratus and E. mundtii, our combined method showed a significant transformation efficiency (2.4×10(4), 4.5×10(2), 2×10(1), and 0.5×10(1)CFU/μg of plasmid DNA). Based on our results, we anticipate that our simple and efficient transformation method should prove usefulness for introducing DNA into various bacterial species without complicated optimization of parameters affecting DNA entry into the cell.

  16. Variations in the binding pocket of an inhibitor of the bacterial division protein FtsZ across genotypes and species.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Amanda; Hsin, Jen; Liu, Tianyun; Tang, Grace; Altman, Russ B; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-03-01

    The recent increase in antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria calls for new approaches to drug-target selection and drug development. Targeting the mechanisms of action of proteins involved in bacterial cell division bypasses problems associated with increasingly ineffective variants of older antibiotics; to this end, the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ is a promising target. Recent work on its allosteric inhibitor, PC190723, revealed in vitro activity on Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ and in vivo antimicrobial activities. However, the mechanism of drug action and its effect on FtsZ in other bacterial species are unclear. Here, we examine the structural environment of the PC190723 binding pocket using PocketFEATURE, a statistical method that scores the similarity between pairs of small-molecule binding sites based on 3D structure information about the local microenvironment, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We observed that species and nucleotide-binding state have significant impacts on the structural properties of the binding site, with substantially disparate microenvironments for bacterial species not from the Staphylococcus genus. Based on PocketFEATURE analysis of MD simulations of S. aureus FtsZ bound to GTP or with mutations that are known to confer PC190723 resistance, we predict that PC190723 strongly prefers to bind Staphylococcus FtsZ in the nucleotide-bound state. Furthermore, MD simulations of an FtsZ dimer indicated that polymerization may enhance PC190723 binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a drug-binding pocket can vary significantly across species, genetic perturbations, and in different polymerization states, yielding important information for the further development of FtsZ inhibitors.

  17. Effect of Organic Matter Decomposition Level on Bacterial Species Diversity and Composition in Relationship to Pythium Damping-Off Severity

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, M. J.; Madden, L. V.; Hoitink, H. A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Rhizosphere bacteria were isolated from root tip segments of cucumber seedlings grown in a suppressive, slightly decomposed light-colored peat mix, a conducive, more decomposed dark-colored peat mix, and a suppressive dark peat mix amended with composted hardwood bark. The bacteria were identified by a gas chromatographic fatty acid methyl ester analysis. The total number of taxa recovered from a single root tip segment ranged from 9 to 18. No single taxon predominated on all root tip segments harvested from any of the mixes. The highest relative population density reached by a given taxon on any root tip segment was 45%. Hill's first and second diversity numbers, the modified Hill's ratio, and Hurlbert's rarefaction method, which were used as measures of species diversity, indicated that the organic matter decomposition level of the potting mixes did not affect bacterial species diversity. Bray-Curtis polar ordination and Dice resemblance functions, however, indicated that the organic matter decomposition level of a mix significantly influenced the composition of bacterial species in the rhizosphere. Pseudomonas spp. and other taxa capable of inducing suppression of pythium damping-off predominated in the suppressive mixes. These organisms were absent from the conducive mix, in which Arthrobacter and Bacillus spp. predominated. Although effective bacterial biocontrol agents were isolated from both the suppressive mixes and the conducive mix, the majority were isolated from the less decomposed suppressive mixes. Finally, the efficacy of strains was significantly greater in the slightly decomposed light peat mix than in the decomposed dark peat mix. Natural disease suppression within these mixes was associated with the organic matter decomposition level and the bacterial species compositions of the mixes. PMID:16349117

  18. Mesophilic Crenarchaeota: proposal for a third archaeal phylum, the Thaumarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Boussau, Bastien; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Forterre, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    The archaeal domain is currently divided into two major phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. During the past few years, diverse groups of uncultivated mesophilic archaea have been discovered and affiliated with the Crenarchaeota. It was recently recognized that these archaea have a major role in geochemical cycles. Based on the first genome sequence of a crenarchaeote, Cenarchaeum symbiosum, we show that these mesophilic archaea are different from hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota and branch deeper than was previously assumed. Our results indicate that C. symbiosum and its relatives are not Crenarchaeota, but should be considered as a third archaeal phylum, which we propose to name Thaumarchaeota (from the Greek 'thaumas', meaning wonder).

  19. Occurrence of homologs of the Escherichia coli lytB gene in gram-negative bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Potter, S; Yang, X; Boulanger, M J; Ishiguro, E E

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli LytB protein regulates the activity of guanosine 3',5'-bispyrophosphate synthetase I (RelA). A Southern blot analysis of chromosomal DNA with the E. coli lytB gene as a probe revealed the presence of lytB homologs in all of the gram-negative bacterial species examined but not in gram-positive species. The lytB homologs from Enterobacter aerogenes and Pseudomonas fluorescens complemented the E. coli lytB44 mutant allele.

  20. Diversity of a mesophilic lignocellulolytic microbial consortium which is useful for enhancement of biogas production.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Gao, Yamei; Wang, Yanjie; Liu, Quan; Sun, Zhiyuan; Fu, Borui; Wen, Xue; Cui, Zongjun; Wang, Weidong

    2012-05-01

    A mesophilic lignocellulolytic microbial consortium BYND-5, established by successive subcultivation, was applied to enhance the biogas production. The degradation efficiency of BYND-5 for rice straw was more than 49.0 ± 1.8% after 7 days of cultivation at 30°C. Various organic compounds, including acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid and glycerin were detected during biodegradation. The diversity analysis of BYND-5 was conducted by ARDRA (Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis) of the 16S rDNA clone library. Results indicated that bacterial groups represented in the clone library were the Firmicutes (5.96%), the Bacteroidetes (40.0%), Deferribacteres (8.94%), Proteobacteria (16.17%), Lentisphaerae (2.13%), Fibrobacteraceae (1.7%), and uncultured bacterium (25.1%). Additionally, the enhancement of biogas yield and methane content was directly related to the pretreatment with BYND-5. The microbial community identified herein is potential candidate consortium for the degradation of waste lignocellulose and enhancement of biogas production under the mesophilic temperature conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In situ ammonia production as a sanitation agent during anaerobic digestion at mesophilic temperature.

    PubMed

    Ottoson, J R; Schnürer, A; Vinnerås, B

    2008-03-01

    To measure the sanitizing effect of mesophilic (37 degrees C) anaerobic digestion in high ammonia concentrations produced in situ. Indicator organisms and salmonella were transferred to small-scale anaerobic batch cultures and D-values were calculated. Batch cultures were started with material from two biogas processes operating at high (46 mmol l(-1)) and low (1.6 mmol l(-1)) ammonia concentration. D-values were shortened from c. 3 days to <1 day for the bacteria. MS2 had the same D-value (1.3 days) independent of ammonia concentration whereas PhiX174 and 28B were faster inactivated in the control (1.1 and 7.9 days) than in the high ammonia (8.9 and 39 days) batch cultures. Running biogas processes at high levels of ammonia shortens the time to meet EU regulation concerning reduction of salmonella and enterococci (5 log). Unless a minimum retention time of 2 days, post-treatment digestion is needed to achieve sufficient sanitation in continuous biogas processes. Running mesophilic biogas processes at high ammonia level produces residue with a high fertilizer value. With some stipulations concerning management parameters, such processes provide a method of bacterial sanitation without preceding pasteurization of the incoming organic waste.

  2. Limitations to estimating bacterial cross-species transmission using genetic and genomic markers: inferences from simulation modeling

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Julio A; Cross, Paul C; Luikart, Gordon; Creel, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cross-species transmission (CST) of bacterial pathogens has major implications for human health, livestock, and wildlife management because it determines whether control actions in one species may have subsequent effects on other potential host species. The study of bacterial transmission has benefitted from methods measuring two types of genetic variation: variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, it is unclear whether these data can distinguish between different epidemiological scenarios. We used a simulation model with two host species and known transmission rates (within and between species) to evaluate the utility of these markers for inferring CST. We found that CST estimates are biased for a wide range of parameters when based on VNTRs and a most parsimonious reconstructed phylogeny. However, estimations of CST rates lower than 5% can be achieved with relatively low bias using as low as 250 SNPs. CST estimates are sensitive to several parameters, including the number of mutations accumulated since introduction, stochasticity, the genetic difference of strains introduced, and the sampling effort. Our results suggest that, even with whole-genome sequences, unbiased estimates of CST will be difficult when sampling is limited, mutation rates are low, or for pathogens that were recently introduced. PMID:25469159

  3. Limitations to estimating bacterial cross-species transmission using genetic and genomic markers: inferences from simulation modeling.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Julio A; Cross, Paul C; Luikart, Gordon; Creel, Scott

    2014-08-01

    Cross-species transmission (CST) of bacterial pathogens has major implications for human health, livestock, and wildlife management because it determines whether control actions in one species may have subsequent effects on other potential host species. The study of bacterial transmission has benefitted from methods measuring two types of genetic variation: variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, it is unclear whether these data can distinguish between different epidemiological scenarios. We used a simulation model with two host species and known transmission rates (within and between species) to evaluate the utility of these markers for inferring CST. We found that CST estimates are biased for a wide range of parameters when based on VNTRs and a most parsimonious reconstructed phylogeny. However, estimations of CST rates lower than 5% can be achieved with relatively low bias using as low as 250 SNPs. CST estimates are sensitive to several parameters, including the number of mutations accumulated since introduction, stochasticity, the genetic difference of strains introduced, and the sampling effort. Our results suggest that, even with whole-genome sequences, unbiased estimates of CST will be difficult when sampling is limited, mutation rates are low, or for pathogens that were recently introduced.

  4. Aspergillus fumigatus and mesophilic moulds in air in the surrounding environment downwind of non-hazardous waste landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Olivier; Robert, Samuel; Debeaupuis, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Non-hazardous waste landfilling has the potential to release biological agents into the air, notably mould spores. Some species, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, may be a cause of concern for at-risk nearby residents. However, air concentration in the surrounding environment of non-hazardous waste landfill sites is poorly documented. An extensive sampling programme was designed to investigate the relationship between culturable mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus concentrations in air and distance downwind of non-hazardous waste landfill sites. On-site and off-site repeated measurements were performed at four landfill sites during cold and warm seasons. A high-flow air-sampler device was selected so as to allow peak concentration measurement. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explain variability in the concentrations in air over time and across sites, seasons, instantaneous meteorological conditions and discharged waste tonnage. Concentrations of mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus at off-site upwind sampling locations were compared with concentrations at each of the downwind sampling locations. At the tipping face location, peak concentration reached 480,000CFUm(-3) for mesophilic moulds and 9300CFUm(-3) for A. fumigatus. Compared with upwind background levels, these concentrations were, on average, approximately 20 and 40 times higher respectively. A steep decline in the concentration of both mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus was observed between the tipping face location and the downwind property boundary (reduction by 77% and 84% respectively), followed by a low decline leading to a 90% and 94% reduction in concentration at 200m from the property boundary and beyond. With the 200m and 500m downwind sampling point values added together, the 97.5th percentile of concentration was 6013CFUm(-3) and 87CFUm(-3) for mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus, respectively. Other determining factors were the discharged waste tonnage, the season, instantaneous temperature

  5. Insecticidal potency of bacterial species Bacillus thuringiensis SV2 and Serratia nematodiphila SV6 against larvae of mosquito species Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Patil, Satish V; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Salunkhe, Rahul B

    2012-05-01

    The tremendous worldwide efforts to isolate novel mosquito larvicidal bacteria with improved efficacy present significant promise to control vector-borne diseases of public health importance. In the present study, two native bacterial isolates, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt SV2) and Serratia species (SV6) were evaluated for mosquito larvicidal potential against the early fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus with reference to B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) H 14. The native Gram-positive, spore-forming Bt SV2 isolate showed 100% mortality against early fourth instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus, in parallel to Bti H14 strain. After 24 h, Bt SV2 showed 98%, 89%, and 80.67%, and Bti H14 showed 92%, 98.33%, and 60% mortality against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus, respectively. Serratia SV6 showed highest activity against Culex quinquefasciatus (100%) followed by Anopheles stephensi (95%) and Aedes aegypti (91%) after 48 h of exposure. The Gram-negative Serratia SV6 showed delayed toxicity compared to Bti H14 and Bt SV2 against early fourth instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The relative mortality of all treatments after 12-h exposures showed the varied toxicity with respect to exposure time, bacterial treatment, and mosquito species. Genetic relatedness of the strains was confirmed on the basis of phylogenetic reconstructions based on alignment of 16S rRNA gene sequences which indicated a strong clustering of the strain SV2 with B. thuringiensis and the strain SV6 with Serratia nematodiphila. In conclusion, the native isolate B. thuringiensis SV2 showed significant toxicity while Serratia SV6 showed less and delayed toxicity against several mosquito species compared with BtiH14. They may be used as novel bacterial insecticidal agents in mosquito vector-borne disease control. To our knowledge, this is the

  6. Cautionary tale of using 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values in identification of human-associated bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Tamisier, Morgane; Benamar, Samia; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2015-06-01

    Modern bacterial taxonomy is based on a polyphasic approach that combines phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, including 16S rRNA sequence similarity. However, the 95 % (for genus) and 98.7 % (for species) sequence similarity thresholds that are currently recommended to classify bacterial isolates were defined by comparison of a limited number of bacterial species, and may not apply to many genera that contain human-associated species. For each of 158 bacterial genera containing human-associated species, we computed pairwise sequence similarities between all species that have names with standing in nomenclature and then analysed the results, considering as abnormal any similarity value lower than 95 % or greater than 98.7 %. Many of the current bacterial species with validly published names do not respect the 95 and 98.7 % thresholds, with 57.1 % of species exhibiting 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity rates ≥98.7 %, and 60.1 % of genera containing species exhibiting a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity rate <95 %. In only 17 of the 158 genera studied (10.8 %), all species respected the 95 and 98.7 % thresholds. As we need powerful and reliable taxonomical tools, and as potential new tools such as pan-genomics have not yet been fully evaluated for taxonomic purposes, we propose to use as thresholds, genus by genus, the minimum and maximum similarity values observed among species.

  7. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seung Ho; Scully, Erin D; Peiffer, Michelle; Geib, Scott M; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Felton, Gary W

    2017-01-03

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We previously showed that symbiotic gut bacteria from CPB larvae suppressed jasmonate (JA)-induced defenses in tomato. However, little is known about how changes in the bacterial community may be involved in the manipulation of induced defenses in wild and cultivated Solanum plants of CPB. Here, we examined suppression of JA-mediated defense in wild and cultivated hosts of CPB by chemical elicitors and their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we investigated associations between the gut bacterial community and suppression of plant defenses using 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Symbiotic bacteria decreased plant defenses in all Solanum hosts and there were different gut bacterial communities in CPB fed on different host plants. When larvae were reared on different hosts, defense suppression differed among host plants. These results demonstrate that host plants influence herbivore gut bacterial communities and consequently affect the herbivore's ability to manipulate JA-mediated plant defenses. Thus, the presence of symbiotic bacteria that suppress plant defenses might help CPB adapt to host plants.

  8. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seung Ho; Scully, Erin D.; Peiffer, Michelle; Geib, Scott M.; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Felton, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We previously showed that symbiotic gut bacteria from CPB larvae suppressed jasmonate (JA)-induced defenses in tomato. However, little is known about how changes in the bacterial community may be involved in the manipulation of induced defenses in wild and cultivated Solanum plants of CPB. Here, we examined suppression of JA-mediated defense in wild and cultivated hosts of CPB by chemical elicitors and their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we investigated associations between the gut bacterial community and suppression of plant defenses using 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Symbiotic bacteria decreased plant defenses in all Solanum hosts and there were different gut bacterial communities in CPB fed on different host plants. When larvae were reared on different hosts, defense suppression differed among host plants. These results demonstrate that host plants influence herbivore gut bacterial communities and consequently affect the herbivore’s ability to manipulate JA-mediated plant defenses. Thus, the presence of symbiotic bacteria that suppress plant defenses might help CPB adapt to host plants. PMID:28045052

  9. Molecular screening for Midichloria in hard and soft ticks reveals variable prevalence levels and bacterial loads in different tick species.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, Alessandra; Bazzocchi, Chiara; De Marco, Leone; Opara, Maxwell N; Sassera, Davide; Plantard, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii, symbiont of the sheep tick Ixodes ricinus, was the first described member of the family Candidatus Midichloriaceae, order Rickettsiales. Recent reports are expanding our view of this family, now including numerous bacteria of great biological and medical interest, indicating a widespread distribution with an increasing range of hosts, with ticks being strongly represented. Here we present a molecular screening of 17 tick species, detecting and quantifying bacteria of the family Midichloriaceae in seven of them, including the first report of a representative of this family in a soft tick species (Argasidae), Ornithodoros maritimus. Based on sequence identity and phylogenetic analysis we propose that all these bacterial symbionts of ticks could be members of the genus Midichloria. The performed screening highlights different prevalence levels and variable bacterial loads in different tick species including one, Ixodes aulacodi, where the bacterium is present in all examined individuals, like in I. ricinus. This result prompts us to hypothesize different roles of Midichloria bacteria in different tick species.

  10. In vitro activities of a novel nanoemulsion against Burkholderia and other multidrug-resistant cystic fibrosis-associated bacterial species.

    PubMed

    LiPuma, John J; Rathinavelu, Sivaprakash; Foster, Bridget K; Keoleian, Jordan C; Makidon, Paul E; Kalikin, Linda M; Baker, James R

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory tract infection, most often involving opportunistic bacterial species with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance, is the primary cause of death in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). Species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex are especially problematic in this patient population. We investigated a novel surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NB-401) for activity against 150 bacterial isolates recovered primarily from CF respiratory tract specimens. These specimens included 75 Burkholderia isolates and 75 isolates belonging to other CF-relevant species including Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Pandoraea, Ralstonia, Stenotrophomonas, and Acinetobacter. Nearly one-third of the isolates were multidrug resistant, and 20 (13%) were panresistant based on standard antibiotic testing. All isolates belonging to the same species were genotyped to ensure that each isolate was a distinct strain. The MIC(90) of NB-401 was 125 microg/ml. We found no decrease in activity against multidrug-resistant or panresistant strains. MBC testing showed no evidence of tolerance to NB-401. We investigated the activity of NB-401 against a subset of strains grown as a biofilm and against planktonic strains in the presence of CF sputum. Although the activity of NB-401 was decreased under both conditions, the nanoemulsion remained bactericidal for all strains tested. These results support NB-401's potential role as a novel antimicrobial agent for the treatment of infection due to CF-related opportunistic pathogens.

  11. Gardnerella vaginalis outcompetes 29 other bacterial species isolated from patients with bacterial vaginosis, using in an in vitro biofilm formation model.

    PubMed

    Alves, Patrícia; Castro, Joana; Sousa, Cármen; Cereija, Tatiana B; Cerca, Nuno

    2014-08-15

    Despite the worldwide prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV), its etiology is still unknown. Although BV has been associated with the presence of biofilm, the ability of BV-associated bacteria to form biofilms is still largely unknown. Here, we isolated 30 BV-associated species and characterized their virulence, using an in vitro biofilm formation model. Our data suggests that Gardnerella vaginalis had the highest virulence potential, as defined by higher initial adhesion and cytotoxicity of epithelial cells, as well as the greater propensity to form a biofilm. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that most of the BV-associated bacteria had a tendency to grow as biofilms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Exposure of Bacterial Biofilms to Electrical Current Leads to Cell Death Mediated in Part by Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Cassandra L; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl; Hassett, Daniel J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms may form on indwelling medical devices such as prosthetic joints, heart valves and catheters, causing challenging-to-treat infections. We have previously described the 'electricidal effect', in which bacterial biofilms are decreased following exposure to direct electrical current. Herein, we sought to determine if the decreased bacterial quantities are due to detachment of biofilms or cell death and to investigate the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play in the observed effect. Using confocal and electron microscopy and flow cytometry, we found that direct current (DC) leads to cell death and changes in the architecture of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play a role in DC-associated cell death, as there was an increase in ROS-production by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms following exposure to DC. An increase in the production of ROS response enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was observed for S. aureus, S. epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms following exposure to DC. Additionally, biofilms were protected from cell death when supplemented with antioxidants and oxidant scavengers, including catalase, mannitol and Tempol. Knocking out SOD (sodAB) in P. aeruginosa led to an enhanced DC effect. Microarray analysis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed transcriptional changes in genes related to the stress response and cell death. In conclusion, the electricidal effect results in death of bacteria in biofilms, mediated, at least in part, by production of ROS.

  13. Exposure of Bacterial Biofilms to Electrical Current Leads to Cell Death Mediated in Part by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Cassandra L.; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M.; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl; Hassett, Daniel J.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms may form on indwelling medical devices such as prosthetic joints, heart valves and catheters, causing challenging-to-treat infections. We have previously described the ‘electricidal effect’, in which bacterial biofilms are decreased following exposure to direct electrical current. Herein, we sought to determine if the decreased bacterial quantities are due to detachment of biofilms or cell death and to investigate the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play in the observed effect. Using confocal and electron microscopy and flow cytometry, we found that direct current (DC) leads to cell death and changes in the architecture of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play a role in DC-associated cell death, as there was an increase in ROS-production by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms following exposure to DC. An increase in the production of ROS response enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was observed for S. aureus, S. epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms following exposure to DC. Additionally, biofilms were protected from cell death when supplemented with antioxidants and oxidant scavengers, including catalase, mannitol and Tempol. Knocking out SOD (sodAB) in P. aeruginosa led to an enhanced DC effect. Microarray analysis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed transcriptional changes in genes related to the stress response and cell death. In conclusion, the electricidal effect results in death of bacteria in biofilms, mediated, at least in part, by production of ROS. PMID:27992529

  14. Clostridium bornimense sp. nov., isolated from a mesophilic, two-phase, laboratory-scale biogas reactor.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Sarah; Striesow, Jutta; Elvert, Marcus; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Klocke, Michael

    2014-08-01

    A novel anaerobic, mesophilic, hydrogen-producing bacterium, designated strain M2/40(T), was isolated from a mesophilic, two-phase, laboratory-scale biogas reactor fed continuously with maize silage supplemented with 5% wheat straw. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison revealed an affiliation to the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (cluster I of the clostridia), with Clostridium cellulovorans as the closest characterized species, showing 93.8% sequence similarity to the type strain. Cells of strain M2/40(T) were rods to elongated filamentous rods that showed variable Gram staining. Optimal growth occurred at 35 °C and at pH 7. Grown on glucose, the main fermentation products were H2, CO2, formate, lactate and propionate. The DNA G+C content was 29.6 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C(16 : 0), summed feature 10 (C(18 : 1)ω11c/ω9t/ω6t and/or unknown ECL 17.834) and C(18 : 1)ω11c dimethylacetal. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences, strain M2/40(T) represents a novel species within the genus Clostridium, for which we propose the name Clostridium bornimense sp. nov. The type strain is M2/40(T) ( = DSM 25664(T) = CECT 8097(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  15. Selection of key sequence-based features for prediction of essential genes in 31 diverse bacterial species

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Bao-Jin; Xu, Luo; Tang, Hong-Ling; Xu, Guo-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Genes that are indispensable for survival are essential genes. Many features have been proposed for computational prediction of essential genes. In this paper, the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method was used to screen key sequence-based features related to gene essentiality. To assess the effects, the selected features were used to predict the essential genes from 31 bacterial species based on a support vector machine classifier. For all 31 bacterial objects (21 Gram-negative objects and ten Gram-positive objects), the features in the three datasets were reduced from 57, 59, and 58, to 40, 37, and 38, respectively, without loss of prediction accuracy. Results showed that some features were redundant for gene essentiality, so could be eliminated from future analyses. The selected features contained more complex (or key) biological information for gene essentiality, and could be of use in related research projects, such as gene prediction, synthetic biology, and drug design. PMID:28358836

  16. Lactobacillus species isolated from vaginal secretions of healthy and bacterial vaginosis-intermediate Mexican women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus jensenii, L. iners, L. crispatus and L. gasseri are the most frequently occurring lactobacilli in the vagina. However, the native species vary widely according to the studied population. The present study was performed to genetically determine the identity of Lactobacillus strains present in the vaginal discharge of healthy and bacterial vaginosis (BV) intermediate Mexican women. Methods In a prospective study, 31 strains preliminarily identified as Lactobacillus species were isolated from 21 samples collected from 105 non-pregnant Mexican women. The samples were classified into groups according to the Nugent score criteria proposed for detection of BV: normal (N), intermediate (I) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). We examined the isolates using culture-based methods as well as molecular analysis of the V1–V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequence analysis was performed to reject clones. Results Clinical isolates (25/31) were classified into four groups based on sequencing and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene: L. acidophilus (14/25), L. reuteri (6/25), L. casei (4/25) and L. buchneri (1/25). The remaining six isolates were presumptively identified as Enterococcus species. Within the L. acidophilus group, L. gasseri was the most frequently isolated species, followed by L. jensenii and L. crispatus. L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. brevis were also isolated, and were placed in the L. reuteri, L. casei and L. buchneri groups, respectively. ERIC profile analysis showed intraspecific variability amongst the L. gasseri and L. fermentum species. Conclusions These findings agree with previous studies showing that L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii are consistently present in the healthy vaginal ecosystem. Additional species or phylotypes were detected in the vaginal microbiota of the non-pregnant Mexican (Hispanic-mestizo) population, and thus, these results further our understanding of

  17. Bacterial Species and Antibiotic Sensitivity in Korean Patients Diagnosed with Acute Otitis Media and Otitis Media with Effusion

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Changes over time in pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity resulting from the recent overuse and misuse of antibiotics in otitis media (OM) have complicated treatment. This study evaluated changes over 5 years in principal pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity in patients in Korea diagnosed with acute OM (AOM) and OM with effusion (OME). The study population consisted of 683 patients who visited the outpatient department of otorhinolaryngology in 7 tertiary hospitals in Korea between January 2010 and May 2015 and were diagnosed with acute AOM or OME. Aural discharge or middle ear fluid were collected from patients in the operating room or outpatient department and subjected to tests of bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity. The overall bacteria detection rate of AOM was 62.3% and OME was 40.9%. The most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacterial species was coagulase negative Staphylococcus aureus (CNS) followed by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pneumonia (SP), whereas the most frequently isolated Gram-negative bacterium was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Regardless of OM subtype, ≥ 80% of CNS and MRSA strains were resistant to penicillin (PC) and tetracycline (TC); isolated MRSA strains showed low sensitivity to other antibiotics, with 100% resistant to PC, TC, cefoxitin (CFT), and erythromycin (EM); and isolated PA showed low sensitivity to quinolone antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin (CIP) and levofloxacin (LFX), and to aminoglycosides. Bacterial species and antibiotic sensitivity did not change significantly over 5 years. The rate of detection of MRSA was higher in OME than in previous studies. As bacterial predominance and antibiotic sensitivity could change over time, continuous and periodic surveillance is necessary in guiding appropriate antibacterial therapy. PMID:28244296

  18. Bacterial Species and Antibiotic Sensitivity in Korean Patients Diagnosed with Acute Otitis Media and Otitis Media with Effusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Eun Ju; Hong, Seok Min; Bae, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ho Yun; Park, Moo Kyun; Byun, Jae Yong; Kim, Myung Gu; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2017-04-01

    Changes over time in pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity resulting from the recent overuse and misuse of antibiotics in otitis media (OM) have complicated treatment. This study evaluated changes over 5 years in principal pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity in patients in Korea diagnosed with acute OM (AOM) and OM with effusion (OME). The study population consisted of 683 patients who visited the outpatient department of otorhinolaryngology in 7 tertiary hospitals in Korea between January 2010 and May 2015 and were diagnosed with acute AOM or OME. Aural discharge or middle ear fluid were collected from patients in the operating room or outpatient department and subjected to tests of bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity. The overall bacteria detection rate of AOM was 62.3% and OME was 40.9%. The most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacterial species was coagulase negative Staphylococcus aureus (CNS) followed by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pneumonia (SP), whereas the most frequently isolated Gram-negative bacterium was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Regardless of OM subtype, ≥ 80% of CNS and MRSA strains were resistant to penicillin (PC) and tetracycline (TC); isolated MRSA strains showed low sensitivity to other antibiotics, with 100% resistant to PC, TC, cefoxitin (CFT), and erythromycin (EM); and isolated PA showed low sensitivity to quinolone antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin (CIP) and levofloxacin (LFX), and to aminoglycosides. Bacterial species and antibiotic sensitivity did not change significantly over 5 years. The rate of detection of MRSA was higher in OME than in previous studies. As bacterial predominance and antibiotic sensitivity could change over time, continuous and periodic surveillance is necessary in guiding appropriate antibacterial therapy. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  19. Plants Assemble Species Specific Bacterial Communities from Common Core Taxa in Three Arcto-Alpine Climate Zones

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Brader, Günter; Sessitsch, Angela; Mäki, Anita; van Elsas, Jan D.; Nissinen, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for the pivotal role of plant-associated bacteria to plant health and productivity has accumulated rapidly in the last years. However, key questions related to what drives plant bacteriomes remain unanswered, among which is the impact of climate zones on plant-associated microbiota. This is particularly true for wild plants in arcto-alpine biomes. Here, we hypothesized that the bacterial communities associated with pioneer plants in these regions have major roles in plant health support, and this is reflected in the formation of climate and host plant specific endophytic communities. We thus compared the bacteriomes associated with the native perennial plants Oxyria digyna and Saxifraga oppositifolia in three arcto-alpine regions (alpine, low Arctic and high Arctic) with those in the corresponding bulk soils. As expected, the bulk soil bacterial communities in the three regions were significantly different. The relative abundances of Proteobacteria decreased progressively from the alpine to the high-arctic soils, whereas those of Actinobacteria increased. The candidate division AD3 and Acidobacteria abounded in the low Arctic soils. Furthermore, plant species and geographic region were the major determinants of the structures of the endophere communities. The plants in the alpine region had higher relative abundances of Proteobacteria, while plants from the low- and high-arctic regions were dominated by Firmicutes. A highly-conserved shared set of ubiquitous bacterial taxa (core bacteriome) was found to occur in the two plant species. Burkholderiales, Actinomycetales and Rhizobiales were the main taxa in this core, and they were also the main contributors to the differences in the endosphere bacterial community structures across compartments as well as regions. We postulate that the composition of this core is driven by selection by the two plants. PMID:28174556

  20. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We prev...

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Bacterial Biofilm Inhibition via Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Statistical Determination

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼10–15 nm) has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods. PMID:25402188

  2. Reactive oxygen species mediated bacterial biofilm inhibition via zinc oxide nanoparticles and their statistical determination.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Mishra, Yogendra K; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilm is a major challenge in clinical applications. The main aim of this study is to describe the synthesis, characterization and biocidal potential of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) against bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These nanoparticles were synthesized via soft chemical solution process in a very short time and their structural properties have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements. In this work, the potential of synthesized ZnO-NPs (∼ 10-15 nm) has been assessed in-vitro inhibition of bacteria and the formation of their biofilms was observed using the tissue culture plate assays. The crystal violet staining on biofilm formation and its optical density revealed the effect on biofilm inhibition. The NPs at a concentration of 100 µg/mL significantly inhibited the growth of bacteria and biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition by ZnO-NPs was also confirmed via bio-transmission electron microscopy (Bio-TEM). The Bio-TEM analysis of ZnO-NPs treated bacteria confirmed the deformation and damage of cells. The bacterial growth in presence of NPs concluded the bactericidal ability of NPs in a concentration dependent manner. It has been speculated that the antibacterial activity of NPs as a surface coating material, could be a feasible approach for controlling the pathogens. Additionally, the obtained bacterial solution data is also in agreement with the results from statistical analytical methods.

  3. Enterobacter morus sp. nov., a novel Enterobacter species associated with bacterial wilt on mulberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A mulberry pathogenetic bacterial strain R18-2T isolated from the diseased mulberry root was analyzed by a polyphasic taxonomic study. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis combined with rpoB gene sequence analysis allocated the strain R18-2T to the genus Enterobacter. The strain was Gram nega...

  4. Genome sequencing of environmental Escherichia coli expands understanding of the ecology and speciation of the model bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengwei; Walk, Seth T; Gordon, David M; Feldgarden, Michael; Tiedje, James M; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2011-04-26

    Defining bacterial species remains a challenging problem even for the model bacterium Escherichia coli and has major practical consequences for reliable diagnosis of infectious disease agents and regulations for transport and possession of organisms of economic importance. E. coli traditionally is thought to live within the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other warm-blooded animals and not to survive for extended periods outside its host; this understanding is the basis for its widespread use as a fecal contamination indicator. Here, we report the genome sequences of nine environmentally adapted strains that are phenotypically and taxonomically indistinguishable from typical E. coli (commensal or pathogenic). We find, however, that the commensal genomes encode for more functions that are important for fitness in the human gut, do not exchange genetic material with their environmental counterparts, and hence do not evolve according to the recently proposed fragmented speciation model. These findings are consistent with a more stringent and ecologic definition for bacterial species than the current definition and provide means to start replacing traditional approaches of defining distinctive phenotypes for new species with omics-based procedures. They also have important implications for reliable diagnosis and regulation of pathogenic E. coli and for the coliform cell-counting test.

  5. A genomic approach to bacterial taxonomy: an examination and proposed reclassification of species within the genus Neisseria

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Keith A.; Earle, Sarah G.; Corton, Craig; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2012-01-01

    In common with other bacterial taxa, members of the genus Neisseria are classified using a range of phenotypic and biochemical approaches, which are not entirely satisfactory in assigning isolates to species groups. Recently, there has been increasing interest in using nucleotide sequences for bacterial typing and taxonomy, but to date, no broadly accepted alternative to conventional methods is available. Here, the taxonomic relationships of 55 representative members of the genus Neisseria have been analysed using whole-genome sequence data. As genetic material belonging to the accessory genome is widely shared among different taxa but not present in all isolates, this analysis indexed nucleotide sequence variation within sets of genes, specifically protein-coding genes that were present and directly comparable in all isolates. Variation in these genes identified seven species groups, which were robust to the choice of genes and phylogenetic clustering methods used. The groupings were largely, but not completely, congruent with current species designations, with some minor changes in nomenclature and the reassignment of a few isolates necessary. In particular, these data showed that isolates classified as Neisseria polysaccharea are polyphyletic and probably include more than one taxonomically distinct organism. The seven groups could be reliably and rapidly generated with sequence variation within the 53 ribosomal protein subunit (rps) genes, further demonstrating that ribosomal multilocus sequence typing (rMLST) is a practicable and powerful means of characterizing bacteria at all levels, from domain to strain. PMID:22422752

  6. Rathayibacter toxicus, Other Rathayibacter Species Inducing Bacterial Head Blight of Grasses, and the Potential for Livestock Poisonings.

    PubMed

    Murray, Timothy D; Schroeder, Brenda K; Schneider, William L; Luster, Douglas G; Sechler, Aaron; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Subbotin, Sergei A

    2017-07-01

    Rathayibacter toxicus, a Select Agent in the United States, is one of six recognized species in the genus Rathayibacter and the best known due to its association with annual ryegrass toxicity, which occurs only in parts of Australia. The Rathayibacter species are unusual among phytopathogenic bacteria in that they are transmitted by anguinid seed gall nematodes and produce extracellular polysaccharides in infected plants resulting in bacteriosis diseases with common names such as yellow slime and bacterial head blight. R. toxicus is distinguished from the other species by producing corynetoxins in infected plants; toxin production is associated with infection by a bacteriophage. These toxins cause grazing animals feeding on infected plants to develop convulsions and abnormal gate, which is referred to as "staggers," and often results in death of affected animals. R. toxicus is the only recognized Rathayibacter species to produce toxin, although reports of livestock deaths in the United States suggest a closely related toxigenic species may be present. A closely related but undescribed species, Rathayibacter sp. EV, originally isolated from Ehrharta villosa var. villosa in South Africa, is suspected of producing toxin. Many of the diseases caused by Rathayibacter species occur in arid areas and the extracellular polysaccharide they produce is believed to aid in their survival between crops. For example, R. "agropyri" was isolated from infected plant material after being stored for 50 years in a herbarium. Similarly, the anguinid vectors associated with these bacteria form seed galls in infected plants and are capable of surviving for very long periods of time under dry conditions. The addition of R. toxicus to the list of Select Agents has raised concern over its potential introduction and a realization that current diagnostic methods are inadequate to distinguish among Rathayibacter species. In addition, little is known about the Rathayibacter species and their

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Propionispora sp. Strain 2/2-37, a New Xylan-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from a Mesophilic Biogas Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Koeck, Daniela E.; Maus, Irena; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Zverlov, Vladimir V.; Liebl, Wolfgang; Pühler, Alfred; Schwarz, Wolfgang H.

    2016-01-01

    The novel mesophilic bacterial strain Propionispora sp. 2/2-37 was isolated from an industrial-scale biogas plant. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the isolate constitutes a new subcluster within the order Selenomonadales. The 2/2-37 draft genome sequence was established and provides the genetic basis for application of this microorganism in degradation of biomass for bio-fuel production. PMID:27340074

  8. Comparative Genomics of the Bacterial Genus Streptococcus Illuminates Evolutionary Implications of Species Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiao-Yang; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Hong-Wei; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into “species groups”. However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups. PMID:24977706

  9. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Streptococcus illuminates evolutionary implications of species groups.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Yang; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Hong-Wei; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into "species groups". However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups.

  10. Bacteroides uniformis is a putative bacterial species associated with the degradation of the isoflavone genistein in human feces.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Mathieu; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2011-06-01

    Inter-individual variation in isoflavone absorption depends on gut microbial degradation and affects the efficacy of these compounds. We hypothesized that inter-individual variation in fecal isoflavone disappearance coincided with variation in bacterial species. In vitro anaerobic fecal disappearance of isoflavones was measured from 33 participants by HPLC. Fecal microbial 16S rRNA variable region PCR products were obtained from 4 participants with the greatest and least genistein or glycitein degradation and were subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. DNA bands with a homology of 90-95% to Bacteroides uniformis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were present in greater intensities in fecal samples showing a genistein disappearance rate constant of 1.47 ± 0.14 h(-1) compared with those with a genistein disappearance rate constant of 0.15 ± 0.03 h(-1) (P < 0.05). Human fecal bacterial species with DNA sequences 90-100% homologous to Tannerella forsythensis and 4 other species were present in greater intensities in fecal samples showing a glycitein disappearance rate constant of 0.57 ± 0.30 h(-1) compared with fecal samples with a glycitein disappearance rate constant of 0.08 ± 0.03 h(-1) (P < 0.05). In high degraders, B. uniformis may be a candidate for genistein degradation and T. forsythensis for glycitein degradation, based on fecal isoflavone degradation in the presence of these species. Bacteroides acidifaciens increased isoflavone disappearance in anaerobic human fecal incubations under nutrient-rich and -depleted conditions, suggesting this species as one responsible for the generally high degradation of isoflavones by humans. These fecal microbes are candidate biomarkers for interindividual variation in isoflavone uptake and efficacy.

  11. Proteome-wide identification of lysine propionylation in thermophilic and mesophilic bacteria: Geobacillus kaustophilus, Thermus thermophilus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Rhodothermus marinus.

    PubMed

    Okanishi, Hiroki; Kim, Kwang; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed the physiological significance of post-translational lysine acylations such as acetylation in the regulation of various cellular processes. Here, we characterized lysine propionylation, a recently discovered post-translational acylation, in five representative bacteria: Geobacillus kaustophilus, Thermus thermophilus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Rhodothermus marinus. Using antibody-based propionyl peptide enrichment followed by identification with nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we showed that proteins were subject to lysine propionylation in all five bacterial species analyzed. Notably, many propionylations were identified in the Bacillus-related, thermophilic eubacterium G. kaustophilus, but fewer in the mesophilic eubacterium B. subtilis, suggesting that propionylation event abundance is independent of phylogenetic relationship. We further found propionylation sites in the thermophilic eubacterium T. thermophilus, but the thermophilic eubacterium R. marinus showed the fewest number of sites, indicating that growth temperature is not a determinant of propionylation state. In silico analyses demonstrated that lysine propionylation is related to metabolic pathways, particularly those controlled by acyl-CoA synthetases, similar to lysine acetylation. We also detected dozens of propionylation sites at positions important for protein functions across bacteria, demonstrating the regulatory mechanisms affected by lysine propionylations. Our proteome-wide analyses across bacteria thus provide insights into the general functions of lysine propionylation.

  12. Rapid identification of dairy mesophilic and thermophilic sporeforming bacteria using DNA high resolution melt analysis of variable 16S rDNA regions.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kanika; Dhakal, Rajat; Seale, R Brent; Deeth, Hilton C; Pillidge, Christopher J; Powell, Ian B; Craven, Heather; Turner, Mark S

    2013-07-15

    Due to their ubiquity in the environment and ability to survive heating processes, sporeforming bacteria are commonly found in foods. This can lead to product spoilage if spores are present in sufficient numbers and where storage conditions favour spore germination and growth. A rapid method to identify the major aerobic sporeforming groups in dairy products, including Bacillus licheniformis group, Bacillus subtilis group, Bacillus pumilus group, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus group, Geobacillus species and Anoxybacillus flavithermus was devised. This method involves real-time PCR and high resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of V3 (~70 bp) and V6 (~100 bp) variable regions in the 16S rDNA. Comparisons of HRMA curves from 194 isolates of the above listed sporeforming bacteria obtained from dairy products which were identified using partial 16S rDNA sequencing, allowed the establishment of criteria for differentiating them from each other and several non-sporeforming bacteria found in samples. A blinded validation trial on 28 bacterial isolates demonstrated complete accuracy in unambiguous identification of the 7 different aerobic sporeformers. The reliability of HRMA method was also verified using boiled extractions of crude DNA, thereby shortening the time needed for identification. The HRMA method described in this study provides a new and rapid approach to identify the dominant mesophilic and thermophilic aerobic sporeforming bacteria found in a wide variety of dairy products.

  13. Microbial diversity in innovative mesophilic/thermophilic temperature-phased anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, M C; Braguglia, C M; Gallipoli, A; Gianico, A; Rossetti, S

    2015-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the few sustainable technologies that both produce energy and treat waste streams. Driven by a complex and diverse community of microbes, AD may be affected by different factors, many of which also influence the composition and activity of the microbial community. In this study, the biodiversity of microbial populations in innovative mesophilic/thermophilic temperature-phased AD of sludge was evaluated by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The increase of digestion temperature drastically affected the microbial composition and selected specialized biomass. Hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales and the protein fermentative bacterium Coprothermobacter spp. were identified in the thermophilic anaerobic biomass. Shannon-Weaver diversity (H') and evenness (E) indices were calculated using FISH data. Species richness was lower under thermophilic conditions compared with the values estimated in mesophilic samples, and it was flanked by similar trend of the evenness indicating that thermophilic communities may be therefore more susceptible to sudden changes and less prompt to adapting to operative variations.

  14. Honey Bees Avoid Nectar Colonized by Three Bacterial Species, But Not by a Yeast Species, Isolated from the Bee Gut

    PubMed Central

    Good, Ashley P.; Gauthier, Marie-Pierre L.; Vannette, Rachel L.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The gut microflora of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, is receiving increasing attention as a potential determinant of the bees’ health and their efficacy as pollinators. Studies have focused primarily on the microbial taxa that appear numerically dominant in the bee gut, with the assumption that the dominant status suggests their potential importance to the bees’ health. However, numerically minor taxa might also influence the bees’ efficacy as pollinators, particularly if they are not only present in the gut, but also capable of growing in floral nectar and altering its chemical properties. Nonetheless, it is not well understood whether honey bees have any feeding preference for or against nectar colonized by specific microbial species. To test whether bees exhibit a preference, we conducted a series of field experiments at an apiary using synthetic nectar inoculated with specific species of bacteria or yeast that had been isolated from the bee gut, but are considered minor components of the gut microflora. These species had also been found in floral nectar. Our results indicated that honey bees avoided nectar colonized by the bacteria Asaia astilbes, Erwinia tasmaniensis, and Lactobacillus kunkeei, whereas the yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii did not affect the feeding preference of the insects. Our results also indicated that avoidance of bacteria-colonized nectar was caused not by the presence of the bacteria per se, but by the chemical changes to nectar made by the bacteria. These findings suggest that gut microbes may not only affect the bees’ health as symbionts, but that some of the microbes may possibly affect the efficacy of A. mellifera as pollinators by altering nectar chemistry and influencing their foraging behavior. PMID:24466119

  15. Honey bees avoid nectar colonized by three bacterial species, but not by a yeast species, isolated from the bee gut.

    PubMed

    Good, Ashley P; Gauthier, Marie-Pierre L; Vannette, Rachel L; Fukami, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The gut microflora of the honey bee, Apis mellifera, is receiving increasing attention as a potential determinant of the bees' health and their efficacy as pollinators. Studies have focused primarily on the microbial taxa that appear numerically dominant in the bee gut, with the assumption that the dominant status suggests their potential importance to the bees' health. However, numerically minor taxa might also influence the bees' efficacy as pollinators, particularly if they are not only present in the gut, but also capable of growing in floral nectar and altering its chemical properties. Nonetheless, it is not well understood whether honey bees have any feeding preference for or against nectar colonized by specific microbial species. To test whether bees exhibit a preference, we conducted a series of field experiments at an apiary using synthetic nectar inoculated with specific species of bacteria or yeast that had been isolated from the bee gut, but are considered minor components of the gut microflora. These species had also been found in floral nectar. Our results indicated that honey bees avoided nectar colonized by the bacteria Asaia astilbes, Erwinia tasmaniensis, and Lactobacillus kunkeei, whereas the yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii did not affect the feeding preference of the insects. Our results also indicated that avoidance of bacteria-colonized nectar was caused not by the presence of the bacteria per se, but by the chemical changes to nectar made by the bacteria. These findings suggest that gut microbes may not only affect the bees' health as symbionts, but that some of the microbes may possibly affect the efficacy of A. mellifera as pollinators by altering nectar chemistry and influencing their foraging behavior.

  16. Characteristics of aerobic granulation at mesophilic temperatures in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fenghao; Park, Seyong; Kim, Moonil

    2014-01-01

    Compact and structurally stable aerobic granules were developed in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) at mesophilic temperatures (35°C). The morphological, biological and chemical characteristics of the aerobic granulation were investigated and a theoretical granulation mechanism was proposed according to the results of the investigation. The mature aerobic granules had compact structure, small size (mean diameter of 0.24 mm), excellent settleability and diverse microbial structures, and were effective for the removal of organics and nitrification. The growth kinetics demonstrated that the biomass growth depended on coexistence and interactions between heterotrophs and autotrophs in the granules. The functions of heterotrophs and autotrophs created a compact and secure layer on the outside of the granules, protecting the inside sludge containing environmentally sensitive and slow growing microorganisms. The mechanism and the reactor performance may promise feasibility and efficiency for treating industry effluents at mesophilic temperatures using aerobic granulation.

  17. An enhanced vector-free allele exchange (VFAE) mutagenesis protocol for genome editing in a wide range of bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ahmed E; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Zhimin; Shang, Liguo; Jiang, Shijie; Deng, Zhiping; Zhan, Yuhua; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Yan, Yongliang

    2017-12-01

    Vector-free allele exchange (VFAE) is a newly developed protocol for genome editing in Pseudomonas species. Although several parameters have been determined to optimize the procedures for obtaining a stable and high-frequency mutation, numerous false-positive clones still appear on the plate, which increases the difficulty of finding the desired mutants. It has also not been established whether this protocol can be used for genome editing in other bacterial species. In the current study, the protocol was modified to dramatically decrease the occurrence of false-positive colonies using Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 as a model strain. This improvement was reached by increasing the occurrence of circular-DNA cassettes of the correct size. Furthermore, the enhanced protocol was used to construct mutants in both the gram-negative Escherichia coli BL21 and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168 strains. The protocol works well in both strains, yielding ideal results with a low percentage of false-positive colonies. In summary, the enhanced VFAE mutagenesis protocol is a potential tool for use in bacterial genome editing.

  18. Genome-wide survey of codons under diversifying selection in a highly recombining bacterial species, Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Morimoto, Shinpei; Kikutake, Chie; Komukai, Sho; Matelska, Dorota; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Selection has been a central issue in biology in eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes. Inference of selection in recombining bacterial species, compared with clonal ones, has been a challenge. It is not known how codons under diversifying selection are distributed along the chromosome or among functional categories or how frequently such codons are subject to mutual homologous recombination. Here, we explored these questions by analysing genes present in >90% among 29 genomes of Helicobacter pylori, one of the bacterial species with the highest mutation and recombination rates. By a method for recombining sequences, we identified codons under diversifying selection (dN/dS > 1), which were widely distributed and accounted for ∼0.2% of all the codons of the genome. The codons were enriched in genes of host interaction/cell surface and genome maintenance (DNA replication, recombination, repair, and restriction modification system). The encoded amino acid residues were sometimes found adjacent to critical catalytic/binding residues in protein structures. Furthermore, by estimating the intensity of homologous recombination at a single nucleotide level, we found that these codons appear to be more frequently subject to recombination. We expect that the present study provides a new approach to population genomics of selection in recombining prokaryotes. PMID:26961370

  19. A survey on species and prevalence rate of bacterial agents isolated from cockroaches in three hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zarchi, Ali Akbar Karimi; Vatani, Hadi

    2009-04-01

    The presence of cockroaches has health implications, such as nosocomial infection, as the insects move freely from areas within and around hospitals that may harbor pathogenic organisms. The goals of the present study were to determine species of bacteria isolated from cockroaches found in three Tehran hospitals, and to determine distribution of potential vectors by species and sex. The study is descriptive laboratory research. A total of 305 cockroaches from three species were trapped and identified: Periplaneta americana (65.6%), Blatella germanica (12.1%), and Blatta orientalis (22.3%). From these potential vectors, 19 species of bacteria were isolated and identified. After transportation of cockroaches to the laboratory, separation of the whole-homogenized suspension of each species was carried out. Identification of the isolated bacteria was performed according to Burgey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th Edition. The most common species of bacteria isolated from cockroaches were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus Group D, Bacillus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus vulgaris. No statistical significance was found between sex and species of cockroach carrying bacteria (p > 0.05), but significance was found for sex in Citrobacter freundii, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus non-group A&B (p < 0.05).

  20. Bacterial Species and Surgical Sites Involved in Contamination During Strabismus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bloomberg, Justin D; Wang, Grace; Suh, Donny W

    2013-01-01

    Residual bacterial colonization of the eye after strabismus surgery is common. This study aimed to identify the bacterial pathogens and contaminated sites involved during strabismus surgery. A prospective, case-control study of 44 patients aged 1-78 years who underwent strabismus surgery. Before participation, we received clinical research board approval, and informed consent was obtained from each of the patients or the parents. Five percent povidone-iodine was used to sterilize the surgical site in all cases. Intraoperative swabs were taken from conjunctival incision site, plain gut suture, scleral surgery site, Vicryl suture, and lid specula. Bacteria isolates were identified by culture growth and Gram staining. Positive and negative control samples were collected. Samples from 13 (29.5%) of 44 cases were positive for growth of bacteria. The conjunctival incision site was involved in 9 cases (20.5%), and the lid speculum in 7 cases (15.9%). All 13 colonized plates grew the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus strain. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 1 case (2.3%) and was associated with the only case of postoperative infection. The S. aureus cultures came from both the conjunctival incision site and the lid speculum. Despite a high contamination rate of 29.5%, incidence of clinically significant infection was low. Our study suggests involvement of the eyelids and conjunctiva in harboring bacteria even after the use of povidone-iodine. Regardless of the mechanism of contamination, we should continue to focus our efforts on reducing intraoperative conjunctival bacterial load. Irregular tear film can contribute to postoperative complications.

  1. Ozone killing action against bacterial and fungal species; microbiological testing of a domestic ozone generator.

    PubMed

    Dyas, A; Boughton, B J; Das, B C

    1983-10-01

    The action of ozone generated from a small domestic device was examined with a view to using it in clinical isolation units accommodating immunosuppressed patients. Over a six-hour period in an average size room the device did not generate sufficient ozone to suppress bacterial and fungal growth. A useful bactericidal action, against a variety of human pathogens was achieved with ozone concentrations between 0.3 to 0.9 ppm. Bactericidal ozone concentrations are close to the limit permitted for human exposure however and further experiments are indicated.

  2. Data on graphical representation (CGR and FCGR) of bacterial and archaeal species from two Soda Lakes.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we presented the datasets generated using Chose Game representation (CGR) and Choase Game Representation of Frequencies (FCGR) of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. The data in the form of graphical representations was yielded with the help of ENDMEMO tool. The computational representation of these data datasets is useful for studies and interpretation of microbial sequences. Based on a technique from chaotic dynamics, the method produces a picture of any gene (DNA and RNA) sequence which displays both local and global patterns. Eukaryotes and prokaryotes can be identified merely based on their generated visual representation/DNA structures.

  3. Bacterial colonization of the phyllosphere of mediterranean perennial species as influenced by leaf structural and chemical features.

    PubMed

    Yadav, R K P; Karamanoli, K; Vokou, D

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we assessed various leaf structural and chemical features as possible predictors of the size of the phyllosphere bacterial population in the Mediterranean environment. We examined eight perennial species, naturally occurring and coexisting in the same area, in Halkidiki (northern Greece). They are Arbutus unedo, Quercus coccifera, Pistacia lentiscus, and Myrtus communis (evergreen sclerophyllous species), Lavandula stoechas and Cistus incanus (drought semi-deciduous species), and Calamintha nepeta and Melissa officinalis (non-woody perennial species). M. communis, L. stoechas, C. nepeta, and M. officinalis produce essential oil in substantial quantities. We sampled summer leaves from these species and (1) estimated the size of the bacterial population of their phyllosphere, (2) estimated the concentration of different leaf constituents, and (3) studied leaf morphological and anatomical features and expressed them in a quantitative way. The aromatic plants are on average more highly colonized than the other species, whereas the non-woody perennials are more highly colonized than the woody species. The population size of epiphytic bacteria is positively correlated with glandular and non-glandular trichome densities, and with water and phosphorus contents; it is negatively correlated with total phenolics content and the thickness of the leaf, of the mesophyll, and of the abaxial epidermis. No correlation was found with the density of stomata, the nitrogen, and the soluble sugar contents. By regression tree analysis, we found that the leaf-microbe system can be effectively described by three leaf attributes with leaf water content being the primary explanatory attribute. Leaves with water content >73% are the most highly colonized. For leaves with water content <73%, the phosphorus content, with a critical value of 1.34 mg g(-1) d.w., is the next explanatory leaf attribute, followed by the thickness of the adaxial epidermis. Leaves higher in phosphorus

  4. 'Halomonas saudii' sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from marine plant Halocnemum strobilaceum.

    PubMed

    Bibi, F; Yasir, M; Alvi, S A; Azhar, E I; Al-Ghamdi, A A K; Abuzenadah, A M; Raoult, D; Angelakis, E

    2017-01-01

    We report here the main characteristics of 'Halomonas saudii' strain Saudii DR2 (CSUR P2512), a new species of the Halomonas genus that was isolated from a rhizosphere of Halocnemum strobilaceum in April 2015.

  5. Rapid identification of biothreat and other clinically relevant bacterial species by use of universal PCR coupled with high-resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samuel; Ramachandran, Padmini; Rothman, Richard; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Hardick, Andrew; Won, Helen; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Jackman, Joany; Gaydos, Charlotte

    2009-07-01

    A rapid assay for eubacterial species identification is described using high-resolution melt analysis to characterize PCR products. Unique melt profiles generated from multiple hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene for 100 clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, including category A and B biothreat agents and their surrogates, allowed highly specific species identification.

  6. Caulobacter species as a cause of postneurosurgical bacterial meningitis in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, Natalie; Walkty, Andrew; Crockett, Maryanne; Fanella, Sergio; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James A

    2012-01-01

    Caulobacter species have been rarely found to be a cause of human infection. A case of probable Caulobacter species meningitis occurring postneurosurgery in a pediatric patient is reported in the present article. Gram stain and colony morphology of the isolate were not consistent with the identification provided by commercial phenotypic identification systems. The present case illustrates the need to reconcile conflicting phenotypic test results using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. PMID:23449318

  7. Culturable bacterial communities associated to Brazilian Oscarella species (Porifera: Homoscleromorpha) and their antagonistic interactions.

    PubMed

    Laport, Marinella Silva; Bauwens, Mathieu; de Oliveira Nunes, Suzanne; Willenz, Philippe; George, Isabelle; Muricy, Guilherme

    2017-04-01

    Sponges offer an excellent model to investigate invertebrate-microorganism interactions. Furthermore, bacteria associated with marine sponges represent a rich source of bioactive metabolites. The aim of this study was to characterize the bacteria inhabiting a genus of sponges, Oscarella, and their potentiality for antimicrobial production. Bacterial isolates were recovered from different Oscarella specimens, among which 337 were phylogenetically identified. The culturable community was dominated by Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, and Vibrio was the most frequently isolated genus, followed by Shewanella. When tested for antimicrobial production, bacteria of the 12 genera isolated were capable of producing antimicrobial substances. The majority of strains were involved in antagonistic interactions and inhibitory activities were also observed against bacteria of medical importance. It was more pronounced in some isolated genera (Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Photobacterium, Shewanella and Vibrio). These findings suggest that chemical antagonism could play a significant role in shaping bacterial communities within Oscarella, a genus classified as low-microbial abundance sponge. Moreover, the identified strains may contribute to the search for new sources of antimicrobial substances, an important strategy for developing therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This study was the first to investigate the diversity and antagonistic activity of bacteria isolated from Oscarella spp. It highlights the biotechnological potential of sponge-associated bacteria.

  8. Survival of Bacterial Indicator Species and Bacteriophages after Thermal Treatment of Sludge and Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Mocé-Llivina, Laura; Muniesa, Maite; Pimenta-Vale, Hugo; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan

    2003-01-01

    The inactivation of naturally occurring bacterial indicators and bacteriophages by thermal treatment of a dewatered sludge and raw sewage was studied. The sludge was heated at 80°C, and the sewage was heated at 60°C. In both cases phages were significantly more resistant to thermal inactivation than bacterial indicators, with the exception of spores of sulfite-reducing clostridia. Somatic coliphages and phages infecting Bacteroides fragilis were significantly more resistant than F-specific RNA phages. Similar trends were observed in sludge and sewage. The effects of thermal treatment on various phages belonging to the three groups mentioned above and on various enteroviruses added to sewage were also studied. The results revealed that the variability in the resistance of phages agreed with the data obtained with the naturally occurring populations and that the phages that were studied were more resistant to heat treatment than the enteroviruses that were studied. The phages survived significantly better than Salmonella choleraesuis, and the extents of inactivation indicated that naturally occurring bacteriophages can be used to monitor the inactivation of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. PMID:12620828

  9. Shifts in bacterial communities of two caribbean reef-building coral species affected by white plague disease

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Anny; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Pizarro, Valeria; Cadavid, Luis F; Arévalo-Ferro, Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Coral reefs are deteriorating at an alarming rate mainly as a consequence of the emergence of coral diseases. The white plague disease (WPD) is the most prevalent coral disease in the southwestern Caribbean, affecting dozens of coral species. However, the identification of a single causal agent has proved problematic. This suggests more complex etiological scenarios involving alterations in the dynamic interaction between environmental factors, the coral immune system and the symbiotic microbial communities. Here we compare the microbiome of healthy and WPD-affected corals from the two reef-building species Diploria strigosa and Siderastrea siderea collected at the Tayrona National Park in the Caribbean of Colombia. Microbiomes were analyzed by combining culture-dependent methods and pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) V5-V6 hypervariable regions. A total of 20 410 classifiable 16S rDNA sequences reads were obtained including all samples. No significant differences in operational taxonomic unit diversity were found between healthy and affected tissues; however, a significant increase of Alphaproteobacteria and a concomitant decrease in the Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria was observed in WPD-affected corals of both species. Significant shifts were also observed in the orders Rhizobiales, Caulobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodobacterales, Aleteromonadales and Xanthomonadales, although they were not consistent between the two coral species. These shifts in the microbiome structure of WPD-affected corals suggest a loss of community-mediated growth control mechanisms on bacterial populations specific for each holobiont system. PMID:21955993

  10. RT-PCR–DGGE Analysis to Elucidate the Dominant Bacterial Species of Industrial Spanish-Style Green Table Olive Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Cabello, Antonio; Bautista-Gallego, Joaquín; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cocolin, Luca; Jiménez-Díaz, Rufino; Arroyo-López, Francisco N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the dominant bacterial species metabolically active through the industrial production of Spanish-style Manzanilla and Gordal olives. For this purpose, samples (brines and fruits) obtained at 0, 15, and 90 fermentation days were analyzed by a culture-independent approach to determine viable cells by reverse transcription of RNA and further PCR-DGGE analysis, detecting at least 7 different species. Vibrio vulnificus, Lactobacillus plantarum group, and Lactobacillus parafarraginis were present in samples from both cultivars; Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Halolactobacillus halophilus were detected only in Gordal samples, while Staphylococcus sp. was exclusively found at the onset of Manzanilla fermentations. Physicochemical data showed a typical fermentation profile while scanning electron microscopy confirmed the in situ biofilm formation on the olive epidermis. Different Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus species, not detected during the fermentation process, were also found in the solid marine salt used by the industry for preparation of brines. Elucidation of these non-lactic acid bacteria species role during fermentation is then an appealingly challenge, particularly regarding safety issues. PMID:27582739

  11. Comparative genomics of the mesophilic cellulosome-producing Clostridium cellulovorans and its application to biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Yutaka; Miyake, Hideo; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Doi, Roy H

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium cellulovorans is an anaerobic, mesophilic bacterium that efficiently degrades native substrates in soft biomass such as corn fibre and rice straw by producing an extracellular enzyme complex called the cellulosomes. By examining genome sequences from multiple Clostridium species, comparative genomics offers new insight into genome evolution and the way natural selection moulds functional DNA sequence evolution. Recently, we reported the whole genome sequence of C. cellulovorans. A total of 57 cellulosomal genes were found in the C. cellulovorans genome and coded for not only carbohydrate-active enzymes but also lipase, peptidase and proteinase inhibitors, in addition to two novel genes encoding scaffolding proteins CbpB and CbpC. Interestingly, the genome size of C. cellulovorans was about 1 Mbp larger than that of other cellulosome-producing clostridia: mesophilic C. cellulolyticum and thermophilic C. thermocellum. Since the C. cellulovorans genome included not only cellulosomal genes but also a large number of genes encoding non-cellulosomal enzymes, the genome expansion of C. cellulovorans included genes more related to degradation of polysaccharides, such as hemicelluloses and pectins, than to cellulose. In this review, we propose a strategy for industrial applications such as biofuel production using enhanced mesophilic cellulosome- and solvent-producing clostridia.

  12. Two-stage anaerobic and post-aerobic mesophilic digestion of sewage sludge: Analysis of process performance and hygienization potential.

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Levantesi, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion has been demonstrated to be effective for enhanced sludge stabilization, in terms of increased solid reduction and improvement of sludge dewaterability. In this study, we propose a modified version of the sequential anaerobic-aerobic digestion process by operating the aerobic step under mesophilic conditions (T=37 °C), in order to improve the aerobic degradation kinetics of soluble and particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD). Process performance has been assessed in terms of "classical parameters" such as volatile solids (VS) removal, biogas production, COD removal, nitrogen species, and polysaccharide and protein fate. The aerobic step was operated under intermittent aeration to achieve nitrogen removal. Aerobic mesophilic conditions consistently increased VS removal, providing 32% additional removal vs. 20% at 20 °C. Similar results were obtained for nitrogen removal, increasing from 64% up to 99% at the higher temperature. Improved sludge dewaterability was also observed with a capillary suction time decrease of ~50% during the mesophilic aerobic step. This finding may be attributable to the decreased protein content in the aerobic digested sludge. The post-aerobic digestion exerted a positive effect on the reduction of microbial indicators while no consistent improvement of hygienization related to the increased temperature was observed. The techno-economic analysis of the proposed digestion layout showed a net cost saving for sludge disposal estimated in the range of 28-35% in comparison to the single-phase anaerobic digestion.

  13. Effects of Antibiotics on Bacterial Species Composition and Metabolic Activities in Chemostats Containing Defined Populations of Human Gut Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Dorothy F.; Macfarlane, George T.

    2013-01-01

    The composition and metabolic activities of the human colonic microbiota are modulated by a number of external factors, including diet and antibiotic therapy. Changes in the structure and metabolism of the gut microbiota may have long-term consequences for host health. The large intestine harbors a complex microbial ecosystem comprising several hundreds of different bacterial species, which complicates investigations on intestinal physiology and ecology. To facilitate such studies, a highly simplified microbiota consisting of 14 anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic organisms (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Clostridium butyricum, C. perfringens, C. bifermentans, C. innocuum, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus acidophilus) was used in this investigation. Ampicillin [9.2 μg (ml culture)−1] was added to two chemostats operated at different dilution rates (D; 0.10 h−1 and 0.21 h−1), and metronidazole [76.9 μg (ml culture)−1] was added to a third vessel (D = 0.21 h−1). Perturbations in bacterial physiology and metabolism were sampled over a 48-h period. Lactobacillus acidophilus and C. bifermentans populations did not establish in the fermentors under the imposed growth conditions. Ampicillin resulted in substantial reductions in bacteroides and C. perfringens populations at both dilution rates. Metronidazole strongly affected bacteroides communities but had no effect on bifidobacterial communities. The bacteriostatic effect of ampicillin on bifidobacterial species was growth rate dependent. Several metabolic activities were affected by antibiotic addition, including fermentation product formation and enzyme synthesis. The growth of antibiotic-resistant bifidobacteria in the large bowel may enable them to occupy ecological niches left vacant after antibiotic administration, preventing

  14. Interspecific transfer of bacterial endosymbionts between tsetse fly species: infection establishment and effect on host fitness.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Brian L; Mouchotte, Rosa; Rio, Rita V M; Wu, Yi-Neng; Wu, Zheyang; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Aksoy, Serap

    2006-11-01

    Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) can harbor up to three distinct species of endosymbiotic bacteria that exhibit unique modes of transmission and evolutionary histories with their host. Two mutualist enterics, Wigglesworthia and Sodalis, are transmitted maternally to tsetse flies' intrauterine larvae. The third symbiont, from the genus Wolbachia, parasitizes developing oocytes. In this study, we determined that Sodalis isolates from several tsetse fly species are virtually identical based on a phylogenetic analysis of their ftsZ gene sequences. Furthermore, restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis revealed little variation in the genomes of Sodalis isolates from tsetse fly species within different subgenera (Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina morsitans morsitans). We also examined the impact on host fitness of transinfecting G. fuscipes fuscipes and G. morsitans morsitans flies with reciprocal Sodalis strains. Tsetse flies cleared of their native Sodalis symbionts were successfully repopulated with the Sodalis species isolated from a different tsetse fly species. These transinfected flies effectively transmitted the novel symbionts to their offspring and experienced no detrimental fitness effects compared to their wild-type counterparts, as measured by longevity and fecundity. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that transinfected flies maintained their Sodalis populations at densities comparable to those in flies harboring native symbionts. Our ability to transinfect tsetse flies is indicative of Sodalis ' recent evolutionary history with its tsetse fly host and demonstrates that this procedure may be used as a means of streamlining future paratransgenesis experiments.

  15. Translational control of small heat shock genes in mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria by RNA thermometers.

    PubMed

    Cimdins, Annika; Klinkert, Birgit; Aschke-Sonnenborn, Ursula; Kaiser, Friederike M; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria constitute a heterogeneous phylum of oxygen-producing, photosynthetic prokaryotes. They are susceptible to various stress conditions like heat, salt, or light stress, all inducing the cyanobacterial heat shock response (HSR). Cyanobacterial small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are known to preserve thylakoid membrane integrity under stress conditions, thereby protecting the photosynthesis machinery. In Synechocystis sp PCC 6803, synthesis of the sHsp Hsp17 is regulated by an RNA thermometer (RNAT) in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the hsp17 mRNA. RNATs are direct temperature sensors that control expression of many bacterial heat shock and virulence genes. They hinder translation at low temperatures by base pairing, thus blocking ribosome access to the mRNA.   To explore the temperature range in which RNATs act, we studied various RNAT candidates upstream of sHsp genes from mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria. The mesophilic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Nostoc sp chromosomally encode two sHsps each. Reporter gene studies suggested RNAT-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of shsp expression in both organisms. Detailed structural analysis of the two A. variabilis candidates revealed two novel RNAT types. The first, avashort, regulates translation primarily by masking of the AUG translational start codon. The second, featuring an extended initial hairpin, thus named avalong, presumably makes use of complex tertiary interaction. The 5'-UTR of the small heat shock gene hspA in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus is predicted to adopt an extended secondary structure. Structure probing revealed that the ribosome binding site was blocked at temperatures below 55 °C. The results of this study demonstrate that cyanobacteria commonly use RNATs to control expression of their small heat shock genes.

  16. Translational control of small heat shock genes in mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria by RNA thermometers

    PubMed Central

    Cimdins, Annika; Klinkert, Birgit; Aschke-Sonnenborn, Ursula; Kaiser, Friederike M; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria constitute a heterogeneous phylum of oxygen-producing, photosynthetic prokaryotes. They are susceptible to various stress conditions like heat, salt, or light stress, all inducing the cyanobacterial heat shock response (HSR). Cyanobacterial small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are known to preserve thylakoid membrane integrity under stress conditions, thereby protecting the photosynthesis machinery. In Synechocystis sp PCC 6803, synthesis of the sHsp Hsp17 is regulated by an RNA thermometer (RNAT) in the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the hsp17 mRNA. RNATs are direct temperature sensors that control expression of many bacterial heat shock and virulence genes. They hinder translation at low temperatures by base pairing, thus blocking ribosome access to the mRNA.   To explore the temperature range in which RNATs act, we studied various RNAT candidates upstream of sHsp genes from mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria. The mesophilic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Nostoc sp chromosomally encode two sHsps each. Reporter gene studies suggested RNAT-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of shsp expression in both organisms. Detailed structural analysis of the two A. variabilis candidates revealed two novel RNAT types. The first, avashort, regulates translation primarily by masking of the AUG translational start codon. The second, featuring an extended initial hairpin, thus named avalong, presumably makes use of complex tertiary interaction. The 5′-UTR of the small heat shock gene hspA in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus is predicted to adopt an extended secondary structure. Structure probing revealed that the ribosome binding site was blocked at temperatures below 55 °C. The results of this study demonstrate that cyanobacteria commonly use RNATs to control expression of their small heat shock genes. PMID:24755616

  17. Species sorting and seasonal dynamics primarily shape bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial community structure (BCS) in freshwater ecosystems varies seasonally and due to physicochemical gradients, but metacommunity structure of a major river remains understudied. Here we characterize the BCS along the Mississippi River and contributing rivers in Minnesota over three years using Illumina next-generation sequencing, to determine how changes in environmental conditions as well as inputs from surrounding land and confluences impacted community structure. Contributions of sediment to water microbial diversity were also evaluated. Long-term variation in community membership was observed, and significant shifts in relative abundances of major freshwater taxa, including α-Proteobacteria, Burkholderiales, and Actinomycetales, were observed due to temporal and spatial variations. Environmental parameters (e.g. temperature, rainfall, and nutrient concentrations) primarily contributed to differences in phyla abundances (88% of variance), with minimal influence from spatial distance alone (<1% of variance). Furthermore, an annually-recurrent BCS was observed in late summer, further suggesting that seasonal dynamics strongly influence community composition. Sediment communities differed from those in the water, but contributed up to 50% to community composition in the water column. Among water sampling sites, 34% showed significant variability in BCS of replicate samples indicating variability among riverine communities due to heterogeneity in the water column. Results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of spatial and temporal variations in riverine bacterial diversity associated with physicochemical gradients and reveal how communities in sediments, and potentially other environmental reservoirs, impact waterborne BCS. Techniques used in this study may prove useful to determine sources of microbes from sediments and soils to waterways, which will facilitate best management practices and total maximum daily load determinations

  18. High diversity of skin-associated bacterial communities of marine fishes is promoted by their high variability among body parts, individuals and species.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Marlène; Villéger, Sébastien; Bouvier, Corinne; Bettarel, Yvan; Bouvier, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    Animal-associated microbiotas form complex communities, which are suspected to play crucial functions for their host fitness. However, the biodiversity of these communities, including their differences between host species and individuals, has been scarcely studied, especially in case of skin-associated communities. In addition, the intraindividual variability (i.e. between body parts) has never been assessed to date. The objective of this study was to characterize skin bacterial communities of two teleostean fish species, namely the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), using a high-throughput DNA sequencing method. In order to focus on intrinsic factors of host-associated bacterial community variability, individuals of the two species were raised in controlled conditions. Bacterial diversity was assessed using a set of four complementary indices, describing the taxonomic and phylogenetic facets of biodiversity and their respective composition (based on presence/absence data) and structure (based on species relative abundances) components. Variability of bacterial diversity was quantified at the interspecific, interindividual and intraindividual scales. We demonstrated that fish surfaces host highly diverse bacterial communities, whose composition was very different from that of surrounding bacterioplankton. This high total biodiversity of skin-associated communities was supported by the important variability, between host species, individuals and the different body parts (dorsal, anal, pectoral and caudal fins).

  19. Exploration of methods used to describe bacterial communities in silage of maize (Zea mays) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Brusetti, Lorenzo; Borin, Sara; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Sorlini, Claudia; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    Different techniques to assess bacterial community structure and diversity were evaluated in silages prepared with four different maize cultivars, three conventional and one transgenic (cv. Tundra, event Bt-176). Plants were cultivated in the greenhouse and harvested after 30 days of growth. Silage samples were collected at successive times during fermentation and analyzed for bacterial counts and by various DNA-based fingerprinting techniques. Bacterial counts were similar between cultivars for the total culturable bacteria, sporeforming, and mesophilic and thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Further analysis of the species composition of 388 LAB strains by intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR followed by sequencing of 16S rRNA gene did not reveal differences between cultivars. In contrast, molecular fingerprinting methods targeting whole bacterial communities, such as automated ribosomal intergenic spacers analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene length heterogeneity-PCR (LH-PCR), indicated that different maize silage batches or cultivars hosted different bacterial communities. Thus, ARISA and LH-PCR fingerprinting techniques offer a fast and sensitive method to compare bacterial communities, and to detect differences in silage bacterial communities.

  20. Cloacibacillus evryensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel asaccharolytic, mesophilic, amino-acid-degrading bacterium within the phylum 'Synergistetes', isolated from an anaerobic sludge digester.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Akila; Chaussonnerie, Sébastien; Tarrade, Anne; Dauga, Catherine; Bouchez, Théodore; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Sghir, Abdelghani

    2008-09-01

    A novel anaerobic, mesophilic, amino-acid-utilizing bacterium, strain 158T, was isolated from an anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant. Cells of strain 158T were non-motile, rod-shaped (2.0-3.0 x 0.8-1.0 microm) and stained Gram-negative. Optimal growth occurred at 37 degrees C and pH 7.0 in an anaerobic basal medium containing 1 % Casamino acids. Strain 158T fermented arginine, histidine, lysine and serine and showed growth on yeast extract, brain-heart infusion (BHI) medium and tryptone, but not on carbohydrates, organic acids or alcohols. The end products of degradation were: acetate, butyrate, H2 and CO2 from arginine; acetate, propionate, butyrate, H2 and CO2 from lysine; and acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, H2 and CO2 from histidine, serine, BHI medium, Casamino acids and tryptone. The DNA G+C content was 55.8 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain 158T showed only 92.6 % sequence similarity with that of Synergistes jonesii, the only described species of the 'Synergistes' group. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (16.63 %), iso-C(15:0) 3-OH (12.41 %) and C(17:1)omega6c (9.46 %) and the polar fatty acids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylmonomethylamine; these fatty acid profiles did not resemble those of any recognized bacterial species. Due to the considerable differences in genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics between strain 158T and those of its nearest relative, it is proposed that strain 158T represents a novel species in a new genus, Cloacibacillus evryensis gen. nov., sp. nov., in the phylum 'Synergistetes'. The type strain is 158T (=DSM 19522T=JCM 14828T).

  1. Gene cloning and protein expression of γ-glutamyltranspeptidases from Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans: comparison of molecular and structural properties with mesophilic counterparts.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Immacolata; Di Salle, Anna; Merlino, Antonello; Rossi, Mosè; La Cara, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GT) is an ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of γ-glutamyl bonds in glutathione and glutamine and the transfer of the released γ-glutamyl group to amino acids or short peptides. γ-GTs from extremophiles, bacteria adapted to live in hostile environments, were selected as model systems to study the molecular underpinnings of their adaptation to extreme conditions and to find out special properties of potential biotechnological interest. Here, we report the cloning, expression and purification of two members of γ-GT family from two different extremophilic species, Thermus thermophilus (TtGT) and Deinococcus radiodurans (DrGT); the first is an aerobic eubacterium, growing at high temperatures (50-82°C), the second is a polyextremophile, as it tolerates radiations, cold, dehydration, vacuum, and acid. TtGT and DrGT were both synthesized as precursor proteins of 59-60 kDa, undergoing an intramolecular auto-cleavage to yield two subunits of 40 and 19-20 kDa, respectively. However, like the γ-GT from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, but differently from the other characterized bacterial and eukaryotic γ-GTs, the two new extremophilic enzymes displayed γ-glutamyl hydrolase, but not transpeptidase activity in the 37-50°C temperature range, pH 8.0. The comparison of sequences and structural models of these two proteins with experimental-determined structures of other known mesophilic γ-GTs suggests that the extremophilic members of this protein family have found a common strategy to adapt to different hostile environments. Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis suggests that γ-GTs displaying only γ-glutamyl hydrolase activity could represent the progenitors of the bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts.

  2. Biomass characterization of laboratory-scale thermophilic-mesophilic wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Suvilampi, J; Lehtomäki, A; Rintala, J

    2006-01-01

    Two thermophilic-mesophilic wastewater treatment processes, one as the combination of the thermophilic activated sludge process (ASP), followed by the mesophilic ASP and the other as thermophilic suspended carrier biofilm process (SCBP), followed by the mesophilic ASP, were used to study sludge characteristics and floc formation. Thermophilic bacteria in both ASP and SCBP were able to form flocs, which were <50 microm in size and had a weak structure and irregular shape. Flocs in both the mesophilic ASPs were larger in size (50-500 microm) and had more compact structures. Filamentous bacteria played an important role in both the thermophilic and mesophilic processes by forming bridges between small flocs. Both thermophilic processes showed a high density of dispersed particles, such as free bacteria. When hydraulic retention time (HRT) was decreased the biofilm was retained in the thermophilic SCBP better than the flocs in the thermophilic ASP. The mesophilic ASPs efficiently removed dispersed particles originating from the thermophilic processes.

  3. Clinical investigation of bacterial species and endotoxin in endodontic infection and evaluation of root canal content activity against macrophages by cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Frederico C; Leite, Fábio R M; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Cirelli, Joni A; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of different Gram-negative bacterial species and the levels of endotoxins found in primary endodontic infection (PEI), determining their stimulation ability against macrophages through the levels of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and evaluated their relationship with clinical and radiographic findings. Samples were taken from 21 root canals with primary endodontic infection with apical periodontitis (PEIAP). Molecular techniques were used for bacterial detection. Limulus amebocyte lysate assay was used to measure endotoxins. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA assay. All samples were positive for bacterial DNA (21/21). Prevotella nigrescens (57.2 %) was the most frequent species. Higher levels of endotoxins were found in teeth with pain on palpation and exudation (all p < 0.05). Positive correlations were found between endotoxins and the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, whereas a negative correlation was found between endotoxin and the amount of IL-10 (p < 0.05). Endotoxin levels were found to be a risk factor for exudation and increased the number of Gram-negative bacterial species for the presence of a larger area of bone destruction (all p < 0.05). A wide variety of Gram-negative bacterial species are involved in primary endodontic infection, with participation of different Treponema species. Thus, the levels of endotoxins and the number of Gram-negative bacteria species present in root canals were considered risk factors for the severity of endodontic infection. The present study revealed that Gram-negative bacterial species and endotoxins play an important role in the development of signs/symptoms and the severity of bone destruction, this knowledge is essential for the establishment of an effective therapy.

  4. Time-kill behaviour against eight bacterial species and cytotoxicity of antibacterial monomers.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D; Fouad, Ashraf F; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate: (1) the antibacterial activity of two antibacterial monomers, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) and dimethylammoniumethyl dimethacrylate (DMAEDM), against eight different species of oral pathogens for the first time; (2) the cytotoxicity of DMAEDM and DMADDM. DMAEDM and DMADDM were synthesized by reacting a tertiary amine group with an organo-halide. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against eight species of bacteria were tested. Time-kill determinations were performed to examine the bactericidal kinetics. Cytotoxicity of monomers on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was assessed using a methyl thiazolyltetrazolium assay and live/dead viability assay. DMADDM showed strong bactericidal activity against all bacteria, with MIC of 1.2-9.8μg/mL. DMAEDM had MIC of 20-80mg/mL. Time-kill determinations indicated that DMADDM and DMAEDM had rapid killing effects against eight species of bacteria, and eliminated all bacteria in 30min at the concentration of 4-fold MBC. Median lethal concentration for DMADDM and DMAEDM was between 20 and 40μg/mL, which was 20-fold higher than 1-2μg/mL for BisGMA control. DMAEDM and DMADDM were tested in time-kill assay against eight species of oral bacteria for the first time. Both were effective in bacteria-inhibition, but DMADDM had a higher potency than DMAEDM. Different killing efficacy was found against different bacteria species. DMAEDM and DMADDM had much lower cytotoxicity than BisGMA. Therefore, DMADDM and DMAEDM are promising for use in bonding agents and other restorative/preventive materials to combat a variety of oral pathogens. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Time-kill behavior against eight bacterial species and cytotoxicity of antibacterial monomers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D.; Fouad, Ashraf F.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to investigate: (1) the antibacterial activity of two antibacterial monomers, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) and dimethylammoniumethyl dimethacrylate (DMAEDM), against eight different species of oral pathogens for the first time; (2) the cytotoxicity of DMAEDM and DMADDM. Methods DMAEDM and DMADDM were synthesized by reacting a tertiary amine group with an organo-halide. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against eight species of bacteria were tested. Time-kill determinations were performed to examine the bactericidal kinetics. Cytotoxicity of monomers on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was assessed using a methyl thiazolyltetrazolium assay and live/dead viability assay. Results DMADDM showed strong bactericidal activity against all bacteria, with MIC of 1.2 to 9.8μg/mL. DMAEDM had MIC of 20 to 80mg/mL. Time-kill determinations indicated that DMADDM and DMAEDM had rapid killing effects against eight species of bacteria, and eliminated all bacteria in 30min at the concentration of 4-fold MBC. Median lethal concentration for DMADDM and DMAEDM was between 20 to 40μg/mL, which was 20-fold higher than 1 to 2μg/mL for BisGMA control. Conclusions DMAEDM and DMADDM were tested in time-kill assay against eight species of oral bacteria for the first time. Both were effective in bacteria-inhibition, but DMADDM had a higher potency than DMAEDM. Different killing efficacy was found against different bacteria species. DMAEDM and DMADDM had much lower cytotoxicity than BisGMA. Therefore, DMADDM and DMAEDM are promising for use in bonding agents and other restorative/preventive materials to combat a variety of oral pathogens. PMID:23876930

  6. Bacterial species and mycotoxin contamination associated with locust bean, melon and their fermented products in south-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adedeji, Bamidele S; Ezeokoli, Obinna T; Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Obadina, Adewale O; Somorin, Yinka M; Sulyok, Michael; Adeleke, Rasheed A; Warth, Benedikt; Nwangburuka, Cyril C; Omemu, Adebukola M; Oyewole, Olusola B; Krska, Rudolf

    2017-10-03

    The microbiological safety of spontaneously fermented foods is not always guaranteed due to the undefined fermenting microbial consortium and processing materials. In this study, two commonly consumed traditional condiments (iru and ogiri) and their respective raw seeds (locust bean and melon) purchased from markets in south-western Nigeria were assessed for bacterial diversity and mycotoxin contamination using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), respectively. Two hundred isolates obtained from the raw seeds and condiments clustered into 10 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and spanned 3 phyla, 10 genera, 14 species and 2 sub-species. Bacillus (25%) and Staphylococcus (23.5%) dominated other genera. Potentially pathogenic species such as Alcaligenes faecalis, Bacillus anthracis, Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus sciuri subsp. sciuri occurred in the samples, suggesting poor hygienic practice during production and/or handling of the condiments. A total of 48 microbial metabolites including 7 mycotoxins [3-nitropropionic acid, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), AFB2, beauvericin, citrinin, ochratoxin A and sterigmatocystin] were quantified in the food samples. Melon and ogiri had detectable aflatoxin levels whereas locust bean and iru did not; the overall mycotoxin levels in the food samples were low. There is a need to educate processors/vendors of these condiments on good hygienic and processing practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by the NOX2 Complex in Monocytes Protect Mice from Bacterial Infections1, 2, 3

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Hultqvist, Malin; Nilson, Bo; Grimm, Melissa J.; Eneljung, Tove; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Verdrengh, Margareta; Kelkka, Tiina; Gjertsson, Inger; Segal, Brahm H.; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. CGD results from defective production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes caused by mutations in genes encoding the NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex subunits. Mice with a spontaneous mutation in Ncf1, which encodes the NCF1 (p47phox) subunit of NOX2, have defective phagocyte NOX2 activity. These mice occasionally develop local spontaneous infections by Staphylococcus xylosus or by the common CGD pathogen S. aureus. Ncf1 mutant mice were more susceptible to systemic challenge with these bacteria than wild type mice. Transgenic Ncf1 mutant mice harboring wild type Ncf1 gene under the human CD68 promoter (MN+ mice) gained the expression of NCF1 and functional NOX2 activity specifically in monocyte/macrophages, although minimal NOX2 activity was detected also in some CD11b+Ly6G+ cells defined as neutrophils. MN+ mice did not develop spontaneous infection and were more resistant to administered staphylococcal infections compared to MN− mice. Most strikingly, MN+ mice survived after administered Burkholderia cepacia, an opportunistic pathogen in CGD patients, whereas MN− mice died. Thus, monocyte/macrophage expression of functional NCF1 protected against spontaneous and administered bacterial infections. PMID:22491245

  8. Cytotoxic responses to 405nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells: Involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G; Grant, M Helen

    2016-06-01

    Light at wavelength 405 nm is an effective bactericide. Previous studies showed that exposing mammalian cells to 405 nm light at 36 J/cm(2) (a bactericidal dose) had no significant effect on normal cell function, although at higher doses (54 J/cm(2)), mammalian cell death became evident. This research demonstrates that mammalian and bacterial cell toxicity induced by 405 nm light exposure is accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, as detected by generation of fluorescence from 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. As indicators of the resulting oxidative stress in mammalian cells, a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione content and a corresponding increase in the efflux of oxidised glutathione were observed from 405 nm light treated cells. The mammalian cells were significantly protected from dying at 54 J/cm(2) in the presence of catalase, which detoxifies H2O2. Bacterial cells were significantly protected by sodium pyruvate (H2O2 scavenger) and by a combination of free radical scavengers (sodium pyruvate, dimethyl thiourea (OH scavenger) and catalase) at 162 and 324 J/cm(2). Results therefore suggested that the cytotoxic mechanism of 405 nm light in mammalian cells and bacteria could be oxidative stress involving predominantly H2O2 generation, with other ROS contributing to the damage.

  9. Bacterial wilt resistance in tomato, pepper, and eggplant: genetic resources respond to diverse strains in the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, A; Daunay, M-C; Frary, A; Palloix, A; Wang, J-F; Dintinger, J; Chiroleu, F; Wicker, E; Prior, P

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial wilt, caused by strains belonging to the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, inflicts severe economic losses in many crops worldwide. Host resistance remains the most effective control strategy against this disease. However, wilt resistance is often overcome due to the considerable variation among pathogen strains. To help breeders circumvent this problem, we assembled a worldwide collection of 30 accessions of tomato, eggplant and pepper (Core-TEP), most of which are commonly used as sources of resistance to R. solanacearum or for mapping quantitative trait loci. The Core-TEP lines were challenged with a core collection of 12 pathogen strains (Core-Rs2) representing the phylogenetic diversity of R. solanacearum. We observed six interaction phenotypes, from highly susceptible to highly resistant. Intermediate phenotypes resulted from the plants' ability to tolerate latent infections (i.e., bacterial colonization of vascular elements with limited or no wilting). The Core-Rs2 strains partitioned into three pathotypes on pepper accessions, five on tomato, and six on eggplant. A "pathoprofile" concept was developed to characterize the strain clusters, which displayed six virulence patterns on the whole set of Core-TEP host accessions. Neither pathotypes nor pathoprofiles were phylotype specific. Pathoprofiles with high aggressiveness were mainly found in strains from phylotypes I, IIB, and III. One pathoprofile included a strain that overcame almost all resistance sources.

  10. Comparison of microbial communities during the anaerobic digestion of Gracilaria under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Aqil; Kim, Wonduck; Lee, Jung Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digesters (MD and TD, respectively) utilizing Gracilaria and marine sediment as the substrate and inoculum, respectively, were compared by analyzing their performances and microbial community changes. During three successive transfers, the average cumulative methane yields in the MD and TD were 222.6 ± 17.3 mL CH4/g volatile solids (VS) and 246.1 ± 11 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. The higher hydrolysis rate and acidogenesis in the TD resulted in a several fold greater accumulation of volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) followed by a larger pH drop with a prolonged recovery than in the MD. However, the operational stability between both digesters remained comparable. Pyrosequencing analyses revealed that the MD had more complex microbial diversity indices and microbial community changes than the TD. Interestingly, Methanomassiliicoccales, the seventh methanogen order was the predominant archaeal order in the MD along with bacterial orders of Clostridiales, Bacteriodales, and Synergistales. Meanwhile, Coprothermobacter and Methanobacteriales dominated the bacterial and archaeal community in the TD, respectively. Although the methane yield is comparable, both MD and TD show a different profile of pH, VFA and the microbial communities.

  11. Intra-Species Bacterial Quorum Sensing Studied at Single Cell Level in a Double Droplet Trapping System

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yunpeng; Patil, Santoshkumar N.; Bowden, Steven D.; Poulter, Simon; Pan, Jie; Salmond, George P. C.; Welch, Martin; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.; Abell, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the intra-species bacterial quorum sensing at the single cell level using a double droplet trapping system. Escherichia coli transformed to express the quorum sensing receptor protein, LasR, were encapsulated in microdroplets that were positioned adjacent to microdroplets containing the autoinducer, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)- l-homoserine lactone (OdDHL). Functional activation of the LasR protein by diffusion of the OdDHL across the droplet interface was measured by monitoring the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) from a LasR-dependent promoter. A threshold concentration of OdDHL was found to induce production of quorum-sensing associated GFP by E. coli. Additionally, we demonstrated that LasR-dependent activation of GFP expression was also initiated when the adjacent droplets contained single E. coli transformed with the OdDHL synthase gene, LasI, representing a simple quorum sensing circuit between two droplets. PMID:23698779

  12. The animal food supplement sepiolite promotes a direct horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmids between bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Yubero, Elva; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-06-01

    Animal fodder is routinely complemented with antibiotics together with other food supplements to improve growth. For instance, sepiolite is currently used as a dietary coadjuvant in animal feed, as it increases animal growth parameters and improves meat and derived final product quality. This type of food additive has so far been considered innocuous for the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that sepiolite promotes the direct horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmids between bacterial species. The conditions needed for plasmid transfer (sepiolite and friction forces) occur in the digestive tracts of farm animals, which routinely receive sepiolite as a food additive. Furthermore, this effect may be aggravated by the use of antibiotics supplied as growth promoters.

  13. Multifactorial Competition and Resistance in a Two-Species Bacterial System

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Anupama; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms exist almost exclusively in interactive multispecies communities, but genetic determinants of the fitness of interacting bacteria, and accessible adaptive pathways, remain uncharacterized. Here, using a two-species system, we studied the antagonism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Escherichia coli. Our unbiased genome-scale approach enabled us to identify multiple factors that explained the entire antagonism observed. We discovered both forms of ecological competition–sequestration of iron led to exploitative competition, while phenazine exposure engendered interference competition. We used laboratory evolution to discover adaptive evolutionary trajectories in our system. In the presence of P. aeruginosa toxins, E. coli populations showed parallel molecular evolution and adaptive convergence at the gene-level. The multiple resistance pathways discovered provide novel insights into mechanisms of toxin entry and activity. Our study reveals the molecular complexity of a simple two-species interaction, an important first-step in the application of systems biology to detailed molecular dissection of interactions within native microbiomes. PMID:26647077

  14. An empirical strategy for characterizing bacterial proteomes across species in the absence of genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Turse, Joshua E; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, James K; Lipton, Mary S; Callister, Stephen J

    2010-11-12

    Global protein identification through current proteomics methods typically depends on the availability of sequenced genomes. In spite of increasingly high throughput sequencing technologies, this information is not available for every microorganism and rarely available for entire microbial communities. Nevertheless, the protein-level homology that exists between related bacteria makes it possible to extract biological information from the proteome of an organism or microbial community by using the genomic sequences of a near neighbor organism. Here, we demonstrate a trans-organism search strategy for determining the extent to which near-neighbor genome sequences can be applied to identify proteins in unsequenced environmental isolates. In proof of concept testing, we found that within a CLUSTAL W distance of 0.089, near-neighbor genomes successfully identified a high percentage of proteins within an organism. Application of this strategy to characterize environmental bacterial isolates lacking sequenced genomes, but having 16S rDNA sequence similarity to Shewanella resulted in the identification of 300-500 proteins in each strain. The majority of identified pathways mapped to core processes, as well as to processes unique to the Shewanellae, in particular to the presence of c-type cytochromes. Examples of core functional categories include energy metabolism, protein and nucleotide synthesis and cofactor biosynthesis, allowing classification of bacteria by observation of conserved processes. Additionally, within these core functionalities, we observed proteins involved in the alternative lactate utilization pathway, recently described in Shewanella.

  15. New derivatives of salicylamides: Preparation and antimicrobial activity against various bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Pauk, Karel; Zadražilová, Iveta; Imramovský, Aleš; Vinšová, Jarmila; Pokorná, Michaela; Masaříková, Martina; Cížek, Alois; Jampílek, Josef

    2013-11-01

    Three series of salicylanilides, esters of N-phenylsalicylamides and 2-hydroxy-N-[1-(2-hydroxyphenylamino)-1-oxoalkan-2-yl]benzamides, in total thirty target compounds were synthesized and characterized. The compounds were evaluated against seven bacterial and three mycobacterial strains. The antimicrobial activities of some compounds were comparable or higher than the standards ampicillin, ciprofloxacin or isoniazid. Derivatives 3f demonstrated high biological activity against Staphylococcus aureus (⩽0.03μmol/L), Mycobacterium marinum (⩽0.40μmol/L) and Mycobacterium kansasii (1.58μmol/L), 3g shows activity against Clostridium perfringens (⩽0.03μmol/L) and Bacillus cereus (0.09μmol/L), 3h against Pasteurella multocida (⩽0.03μmol/L) and M. kansasii (⩽0.43μmol/L), 3i against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and B. cereus (⩽0.03μmol/L). The structure-activity relationships are discussed for all the compounds.

  16. An Empirical Strategy for Characterizing Bacterial Proteomes across Species in the Absence of Genomic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Turse, Joshua E.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Callister, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Global protein identification through current proteomics methods typically depends on the availability of sequenced genomes. In spite of increasingly high throughput sequencing technologies, this information is not available for every microorganism and rarely available for entire microbial communities. Nevertheless, the protein-level homology that exists between related bacteria makes it possible to extract biological information from the proteome of an organism or microbial community by using the genomic sequences of a near neighbor organism. Here, we demonstrate a trans-organism search strategy for determining the extent to which near-neighbor genome sequences can be applied to identify proteins in unsequenced environmental isolates. In proof of concept testing, we found that within a CLUSTAL W distance of 0.089, near-neighbor genomes successfully identified a high percentage of proteins within an organism. Application of this strategy to characterize environmental bacterial isolates lacking sequenced genomes, but having 16S rDNA sequence similarity to Shewanella resulted in the identification of 300–500 proteins in each strain. The majority of identified pathways mapped to core processes, as well as to processes unique to the Shewanellae, in particular to the presence of c-type cytochromes. Examples of core functional categories include energy metabolism, protein and nucleotide synthesis and cofactor biosynthesis, allowing classification of bacteria by observation of conserved processes. Additionally, within these core functionalities, we observed proteins involved in the alternative lactate utilization pathway, recently described in Shewanella. PMID:21103051

  17. Characterization of a Single Magnetotactic Bacterial Species from Devil's Bathtub, Mendon Ponds Park, Honeoye Falls, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C.; Tarduno, J. A.; Stein, A.; Sia, E.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) belong to a lineage of prokaryotic bacteria that synthesize magnetosomes, single domain magnetic particles (typically magnetite or greigite) with an average size of 50 nanometers. MTB utilize magnetosomes through magnetotaxis, the alignment and movement along magnetic field lines to navigate towards preferred environmental conditions. MTB are sensitive to different environments and are thought to exhibit varying magnetosome morphologies, compositions, sizes, and quantities in regards to the environments which they inhabit. These characteristics allow MTB and magnetofossils (preserved magnetosomes) to be used as modern/paleoenvironmental recorders and biomarkers for environmental change(s). Devil's Bathtub (Mendon Ponds Park, Honeoye Falls, NY) is a meromictic glacial kettle pond surrounded by deciduous tree cover. Here we examine one species of MTB based on prominence of this particular morphology at this locale. Magnetotaxis and morphology of this species have been observed using light microscopy. Micrographs have also been taken using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to verify cell morphology and to determine magnetosome morphology. TEM and magnetic hysteresis measurements were done to find and test the composition of magnetosomes. In this study we also focus on DNA sequencing and characterization of this MTB, as there are few MTB species which have been DNA sequenced successfully. Data from these experiments are directly applicable to this up-and-coming area of research as it will aid in the understanding and correlation of magnetosome and magnetofossils with environmental characteristics.

  18. Biodegradation of free cyanide by bacterial species isolated from cyanide-contaminated artisanal gold mining catchment area in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Razanamahandry, Lovasoa Christine; Andrianisa, Harinaivo Anderson; Karoui, Hela; Kouakou, Koffi Marcelin; Yacouba, Hamma

    2016-08-01

    Soil and water samples were collected from a watershed in Burkina Faso where illegal artisanal gold extraction using cyanidation occurs. The samples were used to evaluate cyanide contamination and the presence of cyanide degrading bacteria (CDB). Free cyanide (F-CN) was detected in all samples, with concentrations varying from 0.023 to 0.9 mg kg(-1), and 0.7-23 μg L(-1) in the soil and water samples, respectively. Potential CDB also were present in the samples. To test the effective F-CN degradation capacity of the isolated CDB species, the species were cultivated in growth media containing 40, 60 or 80 mg F-CN L(-1), with or without nutrients, at pH 9.5 and at room temperature. More than 95% of F-CN was degraded within 25 h, and F-CN degradation was associated with bacterial growth and ammonium production. However, initial concentrations of F-CN higher than 100 mg L(-1) inhibited bacterial growth and cyanide degradation. Abiotic tests showed that less than 3% of F-CN was removed by volatilization. Thus, the degradation of F-CN occurred predominately by biological mechanisms, and such mechanisms are recommended for remediation of contaminated soil and water. The bacteria consortium used in the experiment described above exist in a Sahelian climate, which is characterized by a long hot and dry season. Because the bacteria are already adapted to the local climate conditions and show the potential for cyanide biodegradation, further applicability to other contaminated areas in West Africa, where illegal gold cyanidation is widespread, should be explored.

  19. A. actinomycetemcomitans profile and red complex bacterial species of an Afro-Brazilian community: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Araujo Neris, Murilo; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Aquino, Davi Romeiro; de Miranda, Taís Browne; Costa, Fernando de Oliveira; Cortelli, José Roberto

    2015-05-01

    The primary aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the levels of red complex bacteria between Afro-Brazilian and non Afro-Brazilian cohort. The secondary aim was to compare the distribution of both Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotype b and its JP2 strains among participants who harboured this bacterial species. A total of 84 individuals were included in this study: 42 Afro-descendants (mean age 35.9 ± 13.1 years) and 42 non-Afro-descendants (mean age 36.2 ± 13.1 years) matched (1:1) by periodontal diagnosis, age and gender. All participants received clinical examinations of periodontal pocket depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque and gingival indices. Subgingival samples were taken for microbial analysis. First, genomic DNA (gDNA) was extracted and purified and the quantification of total number of bacterial cells, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola was carried out by qPCR. Then, A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were classified according to serotype b and JP2 profiles by conventional PCR. Clinically, mean PD, mean CAL and percentage of CAL ≥ 3 mm differed between groups (Student's t-test p<0.05). The levels of red complex bacteria between Afro-Brazilian and non-Afro-Brazilian populations were similar. The exception was verified to A. actinomycetemcomitans showing significantly higher levels among Afro-Brazilian descendants in comparison to non-Afro-Brazilian descendants. Afro-Brazilian descendants were clearly infected by more virulent serotype b and JP2 strains. Despite no statistically significant differences related to the red complex species, Afro-Brazilian descendants harboured higher levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Also, our findings confirm that Afro-descendant populations are preferably colonised by A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b as well as JP2 strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversity of bacterial species in the nasal cavity of sheep in the highlands of Ethiopia and first report of Histophilus somni in the country.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Biruk; Sisay Tessema, Tesfaye; Tefera, Genene

    2013-06-01

    A study was conducted to isolate bacterial species/pathogens from the nasal cavity of apparently healthy and pneumonic sheep. Nasal swabs were collected aseptically, transported in tryptose soya broth and incubated for 24 h. Then, each swab was streaked onto chocolate and blood agar for culture. Bacterial species were identified following standard bacteriological procedures. Accordingly, a total of 1,556 bacteria were isolated from 960 nasal swabs collected from three different highland areas of Ethiopia, namely Debre Berhan, Asella, and Gimba. In Debre Berhan, 140 Mannheimia haemolytica, 81 Histophilus somni, 57 Staphylococcus species, and 52 Bibersteinia trehalosi were isolated. While from Gimba M. haemolytica, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and H. somni were isolated at rates of 25.2, 15.9, 11.4, and 5.9 %, respectively, of the total 647 bacterial species. In Asella from 352 bacterial species isolated, 93 (26.4 %) were M. haemolytica, 48 (13.6 %) were Staphylococcus species, 26 (7.4 %) were B. trehalosi, and 17 (4.8 %) H. somni were recognized. Further identification and characterization using BIOLOG identification system Enterococcus avium and Sphingomonas sanguinis were identified at 100 % probability, while, H. somni and Actinobacillus lignerisii were suggested by the system. The study showed that a variety of bacterial species colonize the nasal cavity of the Ethiopian highland sheep with variable proportion between healthy and pneumonic ones. To our knowledge, this is the first report on isolation of H. somni, an important pathogen in cattle, from the respiratory tract of a ruminant species in the country.

  1. Development of a gene cloning system in a fast-growing and moderately thermophilic Streptomyces species and heterologous expression of Streptomyces antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptomyces species are a major source of antibiotics. They usually grow slowly at their optimal temperature and fermentation of industrial strains in a large scale often takes a long time, consuming more energy and materials than some other bacterial industrial strains (e.g., E. coli and Bacillus). Most thermophilic Streptomyces species grow fast, but no gene cloning systems have been developed in such strains. Results We report here the isolation of 41 fast-growing (about twice the rate of S. coelicolor), moderately thermophilic (growing at both 30°C and 50°C) Streptomyces strains, detection of one linear and three circular plasmids in them, and sequencing of a 6996-bp plasmid, pTSC1, from one of them. pTSC1-derived pCWH1 could replicate in both thermophilic and mesophilic Streptomyces strains. On the other hand, several Streptomyces replicons function in thermophilic Streptomyces species. By examining ten well-sporulating strains, we found two promising cloning hosts, 2C and 4F. A gene cloning system was established by using the two strains. The actinorhodin and anthramycin biosynthetic gene clusters from mesophilic S. coelicolor A3(2) and thermophilic S. refuineus were heterologously expressed in one of the hosts. Conclusions We have developed a gene cloning and expression system in a fast-growing and moderately thermophilic Streptomyces species. Although just a few plasmids and one antibiotic biosynthetic gene cluster from mesophilic Streptomyces were successfully expressed in thermophilic Streptomyces species, we expect that by utilizing thermophilic Streptomyces-specific promoters, more genes and especially antibiotic genes clusters of mesophilic Streptomyces should be heterologously expressed. PMID:22032628

  2. Bacterial Tethering Analysis Reveals a “Run-Reverse-Turn” Mechanism for Pseudomonas Species Motility

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chen; Wong, Chui Ching; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a program that can accurately analyze the dynamic properties of tethered bacterial cells. The program works especially well with cells that tend to give rise to unstable rotations, such as polar-flagellated bacteria. The program has two novel components. The first dynamically adjusts the center of the cell's rotational trajectories. The second applies piecewise linear approximation to the accumulated rotation curve to reduce noise and separate the motion of bacteria into phases. Thus, it can separate counterclockwise (CCW) and clockwise (CW) rotations distinctly and measure rotational speed accurately. Using this program, we analyzed the properties of tethered Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida cells for the first time. We found that the Pseudomonas flagellar motor spends equal time in both CCW and CW phases and that it rotates with the same speed in both phases. In addition, we discovered that the cell body can remain stationary for short periods of time, leading to the existence of a third phase of the flagellar motor which we call “pause.” In addition, P. aeruginosa cells adopt longer run lengths, fewer pause frequencies, and shorter pause durations as part of their chemotactic response. We propose that one purpose of the pause phase is to allow the cells to turn at a large angle, where we show that pause durations in free-swimming cells positively correlate with turn angle sizes. Taken together, our results suggest a new “run-reverse-turn” paradigm for polar-flagellated Pseudomonas motility that is different from the “run-and-tumble” paradigm established for peritrichous Escherichia coli. PMID:23728820

  3. Community-acquired bacteraemia in a rural area: predominant bacterial species and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Nimri, L F; Batchoun, R

    2004-10-01

    The invasion of the bloodstream represents one of the most important sequelae of infection. This study was conducted over an 18-month period to determine the predominant bacterial agents of a community-acquired bacteraemia seen at health centres in a rural area of Jordan, and their antibiotic susceptibilities. Blood samples were collected and cultured from 215 patients who presented with fever and presumed diagnosis of a bacteraemia. Isolates were identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility. The variables included the age and sex of the patients, aetiology, sources of the bacteraemia, risk factors, treatment and outcome. One hundred and twenty-six (58.6%) blood cultures were positive. Children less than 14 years old accounted for 34.9% of these, and 38% were from patients that were more than 50 years old. The most frequent aetiologic agents were Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Brucella melitensis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. A wide range of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents and multidrug resistance was documented in 44.4% of the isolates. The most frequent sources of the bacteraemia were urinary (15.9%), respiratory (14.3%), no source of the bacteraemia identified (primary bacteraemia) (13.5%), gastrointestinal (12.7%) and soft-tissue infection (7.9%). No identifiable risk factor for infection could be determined in 34% of the patients. The predominant pathogens identified and the relatively high prevalence of antibiotic resistance of the isolates are most probably due to the nature and lifestyle of this rural population and the use of empiric treatment. Characteristics permitting recognition of patients with such strains would aid infection control efforts in the community.

  4. Diversity and distribution of culturable lactic acid bacterial species in Indonesian Sayur Asin

    PubMed Central

    Mangunwardoyo, Wibowo; Abinawanto; Salamah, Andi; Sukara, Endang; Sulistiani; Dinoto, Achmad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play important roles in processing of Sayur Asin (spontaneously fermented mustard). Unfortunately, information about LAB in Indonesian Sayur Asin, prepared by traditional manufactures which is important as baseline data for maintenance of food quality and safety, is unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the diversity and distribution of culturable lactic acid bacteria in Sayur Asin of Indonesia. Materials and Methods: Four Sayur Asin samples (fermentation liquor and fermented mustard) were collected at harvesting times (3–7 days after fermentation) from two traditional manufactures in Tulung Agung (TA) and Kediri (KDR), East Java provinces, Indonesia. LAB strains were isolated by using MRS agar method supplemented with 1% CaCO 3 and characterized morphologically. Identification of the strains was performed basedon 16S rDNA analysis and the phylogenetic tree was drawn to understand the phylogenetic relationship of the collected strains. Results: Different profiles were detected in total count of the plates, salinity and pH of fermenting liquor of Sayur Asin in TA and KDR provinces. A total of 172 LAB isolates were successfully isolated and identified based on their 16S rDNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of 27 representative LAB strains from Sayur Asin showed that these strains belonged to 5 distinct species namely Lactobacilus farciminis (N=32), L. fermentum (N=4), L. namurensis (N=15), L. plantarum (N=118) and L. parafarraginis (N=1). Strains D5-S-2013 and B4-S-2013 showed a close phylogenetic relationship with L. composti and L. paralimentarius, respectively where as the sequence had slightly lower similarity of lower than 99%, suggesting that they may be classified into novel species and need further investigation due to exhibition of significant differences in their nucleotide sequences. Lactobacillus plantarum was found being dominant in all sayur asin samples. Conclusion: Lactobacilli were

  5. Effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, A.; Kuźmicka, M.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The research concerned the effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci, present in two cheese-making commercial inocula produced by Christian-Hansen. Water solutions of inocula were pressurized at 50-800 MPa, at room temperature, for 30-120 min. Pressurization at 50-100 MPa slightly increased or reduced the number of lactic streptococci, depending on the inoculum and pressurization time. Pressurization at 200 MPa caused a reduction in the number of streptococci by over 99.9%, whereas the pressure of 400 MPa and above almost completely inactivated streptococci. Pressurization also reduced the dynamics of microorganism growth and acidification, to the degree depending on the pressure.

  6. Effect of temperature on bacterial species diversity in thermophilic solid-waste composting.

    PubMed Central

    Strom, P F

    1985-01-01

    Continuously thermophilic composting was examined with a 4.5-liter reactor placed in an incubator maintained at representative temperatures. Feed was a mixture of dried table scraps and shredded newspaper wetted to 55% moisture. One run at 49 degrees C (run A) employed a 1:4 feed-to-compost ratio, while the other runs used a 10:1 ratio and were incubated at 50, 55, 60, or 65 degrees C. Due to self-heating, internal temperatures of the composting mass were 0 to 7 degrees C hotter than the incubator. Two full-scale composting plants (at Altoona, Pa., and Leicester, England) were also examined. Plate counts per gram (dry weight) on Trypticase soy broth (BBL Microbiology Systems) with 2% agar ranged from 0.7 X 10(9) to 5.3 X 10(9) for laboratory composting and 0.02 X 10(9) to 7.4 X 10(9) for field composting. Fifteen taxa were isolated, including 10 of genus Bacillus, which dominated all samples except that from run A. Species diversity decreased markedly in laboratory composting at 60 degrees C and above, but was similar for the three runs incubated at 49, 50, and 55 degrees C. The maximum desirable composting temperature based on species diversity is thus 60 degrees C, the same as that previously recommended based on measures of the rate of decomposition. PMID:4083885

  7. PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography for profiling of a subgroup of caries-associated bacterial species in plaque from healthy coronal surfaces and periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lingyang; Sato, Takuichi; Niwa, Kousuke; Kawase, Mitsuo; Mayanagi, Gen; Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The onset of plaque-mediated disease, including dental caries and periodontal diseases, is highly associated with compositional change of the resident microflora from the ecological perspective. As specific bacterial profiles have been linked to different disease stages, microbial compositional measurements might therefore have great value for clinical diagnosis. Previously we have reported a dry-reagent strip biosensor-PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography, which utilized molecular recognition of oligonucleotides and biotin-streptavidin, and the optical property of colored microspheres, for semiquantifying a five-membered subgroup of caries-associated bacterial species in supragingival plaque from healthy coronal surfaces of teeth. The present study aimed to evaluate this technique's ability to differentiate microflora by comparing the subset profiles. Sixteen subgingival plaque specimens were pooled from periodontal pockets and analyzed for the composition of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Scardovia wiggsiae, Actinomyces sp. and Veillonella parvula. Detection frequencies, relative abundance of each bacterial species, and the five-membered bacterial profiles were compared between supra- and subgingival groups. The supragingival plaque harbored significantly more of the tested species and higher amount of Actinomyces sp. and V. parvula. In subgingival plaque, the predominance was obscured, since several highly overlapped profiles were found at comparable frequencies. Thus, PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography using the same plaque sample enabled simultaneous profiling of multiple species at species level and facilitated discrimination between anticipated different microflora, making this technique a promising chair-side microbiota profiling method.

  8. Helicobacter species and common gut bacterial DNA in gallbladder with cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Karagin, Peren H; Stenram, Unne; Wadström, Torkel; Ljungh, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria in patients with cholecystitis. METHODS: A nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), specific to 16S rRNA of Helicobacter spp. was performed on paraffin-embedded gallbladder samples of 100 cholecystitis and 102 control cases. The samples were also analyzed for some common gut bacteria by PCR. Positive samples were sequenced for species identification. RESULTS: Helicobacter DNA was found in seven out of 100 cases of acute and chronic cholecystitis. Sequence analysis displayed Helicobacter pullorum (H. pullorum) in six cases and Helicobacter pylori in one; H. pullorum was only found in cases with metaplasia. Control samples were negative for Helicobacter spp. and some common gut bacteria. There was a significant difference (P = 0.007) between cholecystitis and control samples for Helicobacter DNA. CONCLUSION: A possible relationship was detected between Helicobacter DNA and cholecystitis. Further serological and immunohistochemical studies are needed to support these data. PMID:20939110

  9. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 1010 peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  10. Parallel Mutations Result in a Wide Range of Cooperation and Community Consequences in a Two-Species Bacterial Consortium.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Sarah M; Chubiz, Lon M; Harcombe, William R; Ytreberg, F Marty; Marx, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Multi-species microbial communities play a critical role in human health, industry, and waste remediation. Recently, the evolution of synthetic consortia in the laboratory has enabled adaptation to be addressed in the context of interacting species. Using an engineered bacterial consortium, we repeatedly evolved cooperative genotypes and examined both the predictability of evolution and the phenotypes that determine community dynamics. Eight Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains evolved methionine excretion sufficient to support growth of an Escherichia coli methionine auxotroph, from whom they required excreted growth substrates. Non-synonymous mutations in metA, encoding homoserine trans-succinylase (HTS), were detected in each evolved S. enterica methionine cooperator and were shown to be necessary for cooperative consortia growth. Molecular modeling was used to predict that most of the non-synonymous mutations slightly increase the binding affinity for HTS homodimer formation. Despite this genetic parallelism and trend of increasing protein binding stability, these metA alleles gave rise to a wide range of phenotypic diversity in terms of individual versus group benefit. The cooperators with the highest methionine excretion permitted nearly two-fold faster consortia growth and supported the highest fraction of E. coli, yet also had the slowest individual growth rates compared to less cooperative strains. Thus, although the genetic basis of adaptation was quite similar across independent origins of cooperative phenotypes, quantitative measurements of metabolite production were required to predict either the individual-level growth consequences or how these propagate to community-level behavior.

  11. Impacts of silver nanoparticles on bacterial species B. subtilis and E. coli and the major crop plant Z. mays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doody, Michael A.

    This thesis examines the impacts of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (c-AgNPs) on two species of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli), the major crop plant Zea mays, and the beneficial plant-microbe relationship between Z. mays and B. subtilis. AgNPs are an increasing component of antimicrobial consumer, industrial, and military products. This has led to widespread scientific concern for the ecological safety outside their intended use. An overview of their history, use, and toxicity was used to inform the design of experiments and resulting data. Growth inhibition and sub-lethal toxic effects were used to assess the effects of c-AgNP exposure to bacteria. Similar analytical methods were used to quantify the response of Z. mays to c-AgNP exposure. Results showed that exposure to c-AgNP significantly reduced the growth of bacterial populations and alters their growth kinetics. Z. mays experienced significant sub-lethal effects due to exposure, including reduced root length and biomass, and hyper-accumulated Ag in root tissues. Beneficial interactions between B. subtilis and Z. mays were reduced as both species suffered sub-lethal effects of exposure to c-AgNPs.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a novel violacein-like pigment producing psychrotrophic bacterial species Janthinobacterium svalbardensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Ambrožič Avguštin, Jerneja; Žgur Bertok, Darja; Kostanjšek, Rok; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2013-04-01

    A bacterial strain designated JA-1, related to Janthinobacterium lividum, was isolated from glacier ice samples from the island Spitsbergen in the Arctic. The strain was tested for phenotypic traits and the most prominent appeared to be the dark red brown to black pigmentation different from the violet pigment of Janthinobacterium, Chromobacterium and Iodobacter. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridization tests showed that strain JA-1 belongs to the genus Janthinobacterium but represents a novel lineage distinct from the two known species of this genus, J. lividum and Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum. The DNA G + C content of strain JA-1 was determined to be 62.3 mol %. The isolate is a psychrotrophic Gram negative bacterium, rod-shaped with rounded ends, containing intracellular inclusions and one polar flagellum. On the basis of the presented results strain JA-1 is proposed as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Janthinobacterium, for which the name Janthinobacterium svalbardensis sp. nov. is proposed (JA-1(T) = DSM 25734, ZIM B637).

  13. Parallel Mutations Result in a Wide Range of Cooperation and Community Consequences in a Two-Species Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Sarah M.; Chubiz, Lon M.; Harcombe, William R.; Ytreberg, F. Marty; Marx, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-species microbial communities play a critical role in human health, industry, and waste remediation. Recently, the evolution of synthetic consortia in the laboratory has enabled adaptation to be addressed in the context of interacting species. Using an engineered bacterial consortium, we repeatedly evolved cooperative genotypes and examined both the predictability of evolution and the phenotypes that determine community dynamics. Eight Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains evolved methionine excretion sufficient to support growth of an Escherichia coli methionine auxotroph, from whom they required excreted growth substrates. Non-synonymous mutations in metA, encoding homoserine trans-succinylase (HTS), were detected in each evolved S. enterica methionine cooperator and were shown to be necessary for cooperative consortia growth. Molecular modeling was used to predict that most of the non-synonymous mutations slightly increase the binding affinity for HTS homodimer formation. Despite this genetic parallelism and trend of increasing protein binding stability, these metA alleles gave rise to a wide range of phenotypic diversity in terms of individual versus group benefit. The cooperators with the highest methionine excretion permitted nearly two-fold faster consortia growth and supported the highest fraction of E. coli, yet also had the slowest individual growth rates compared to less cooperative strains. Thus, although the genetic basis of adaptation was quite similar across independent origins of cooperative phenotypes, quantitative measurements of metabolite production were required to predict either the individual-level growth consequences or how these propagate to community-level behavior. PMID:27617746

  14. Antimicrobial consumption and resistance in five Gram-negative bacterial species in a hospital from 2003 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heng-Sim; Loh, Yue-Xia; Lee, Jen-Jain; Liu, Chang-Shee; Chu, Chishih

    2015-12-01

    The misuse of antimicrobial agents increases drug resistance in bacteria. The correlation between antimicrobial agent consumption and related resistance in the Gram-negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis was analyzed during the period 2003-2011. Among these five bacteria, overall E. coli and K. pneumoniae were more commonly isolated from bloodstream than the other species. Regarding Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli and K. pneumoniae showed annual increases of resistance to the tested antimicrobial agents; conversely, P. mirabilis exhibited reduced resistance to cefuroxime, ceftriaxone and cefepime. In contrast to the relatively low antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii revealed high resistance, which was over 85% resistant rate to the tested antimicrobial agents and over 80% carbapenem resistance in 2011. E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis differed in development of antimicrobial resistance after consumption of the antimicrobial agents. K. pneumoniae developed resistance to all antimicrobial groups, whereas resistance in P. mirabilis was not related to any antimicrobial consumption. P. aeruginosa developed resistance to β-lactam antimicrobials and aminoglycosides, whereas A. baumanii developed resistance to carbapenems after their use. The development of antimicrobial resistance was related to antimicrobial agents and bacterial species. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Interaction of legionella pneumophila and helicobacter pylori with bacterial species isolated from drinking water biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is well established that Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen; by contrast, the mode of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unknown but water seems to play an important role. This work aims to study the influence of five microorganisms isolated from drinking water biofilms on the survival and integration of both of these pathogens into biofilms. Results Firstly, both pathogens were studied for auto- and co-aggregation with the species isolated from drinking water; subsequently the formation of mono and dual-species biofilms by L. pneumophila or H. pylori with the same microorganisms was investigated. Neither auto- nor co-aggregation was observed between the microorganisms tested. For biofilm studies, sessile cells were quantified in terms of total cells by SYTO 9 staining, viable L. pneumophila or H. pylori cells were quantified using 16 S rRNA-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes and cultivable cells by standard culture techniques. Acidovorax sp. and Sphingomonas sp. appeared to have an antagonistic effect on L. pneumophila cultivability but not on the viability (as assessed by rRNA content using the PNA probe), possibly leading to the formation of viable but noncultivable (VBNC) cells, whereas Mycobacterium chelonae increased the cultivability of this pathogen. The results obtained for H. pylori showed that M. chelonae and Sphingomonas sp. help this pathogen to maintain cultivability for at least 24 hours. Conclusions It appears that M. chelonae may have an important role in the survival of both pathogens in drinking water. This work also suggests that the presence of some microorganisms can decrease the cultivability of L. pneumophila but not the viability which indicates that the presence of autochthonous microorganisms can lead to misleading results when the safety of water is assessed by cultivable methods alone. PMID:21418578

  16. The pyogenic potential of the different Streptococcus anginosus group bacterial species: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kobo, O; Nikola, S; Geffen, Y; Paul, M

    2017-08-14

    Streptococcus anginosus Group (SAG) bacteria are common causes of pyogenic infections (PIs). We examined the association between SAG species and the presence of a PI through a retrospective, observational, cohort study, between the years 2009 and 2015. All adults with clinically significant SAG infections in one hospital in Israel were assessed for association between SAG species and the presence of a PI defined as an abscess, empyema, or deep/organ space surgical site infection. Risk factors for PI were assessed using multivariate backward stepwise logistic regression analysis. We identified 263 patients with significant SAG infections, 182 (69%) of which were caused by S. anginosus, 45 (17·1%) by S treptococcus constellatus and 36 (13·7%) by S treptococcus intermedius. The mean age of the patients was 56·8 ± 19·1 years. PIs were identified among 160 (60%) of the patients and were mostly non-bacteraemic (147/160, 91·8%), while most non-PI patients had bacteraemia (70/103, 68%). S. anginosus and S. constellatus were associated with a significantly lower incidence of PI than S. intermedius, OR 0·18 (95% CI 0·06-0·53) and 0·14 (0·04-0·48), respectively. Patients with PI were younger and, in general, had less co-morbidities. S. intermedius was associated with pyogenic non-bacteraemic infections, while S. anginosus and S. constellatus were associated with bacteraemia with no abscess or empyema formation. These data may indicate differences in virulence mechanisms of these SAG bacteria.

  17. Nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia in Cuban intensive care units: bacterial species and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Medell, Manuel; Hart, Marcia; Duquesne, Amílcar; Espinosa, Fidel; Valdés, Rodolfo

    2013-04-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia associated with use of mechanical ventilators is one of the greatest challenges confronted by intensivists worldwide. The literature associates several bacteria with this type of infection; most common in intensive care units are Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and some of the Enterobacteriaceae family. To identify the causal agents of nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the intensive care units of Havana's Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical-Surgical Teaching Hospital in 2011, and to characterize their antibiotic resistance. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using hospital administrative data of quantitative cultures from positive tracheal aspirates for January through December, 2011. Records were analyzed from 77 intensive care unit patients who developed nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia. Variables examined were age and sex, and pathogens identified from culture of tracheal aspirate and related antibiotic susceptibility. RESULTS Species most frequently isolated were: Acinetobacter baumannii in 53 patients (68.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 34 patients (44.2%), other species of Pseudomonas in 15 patients (19.5%), and Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli in 12 patients each (15.6%). Some patients presented more than one pathogen in concurrent or successive infections. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing found high percentages of resistance to antibiotics in all these pathogens. Least resistance was found to colistin. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia is of concern. Colistin is the drug of choice among the antibiotics reviewed, but sensitivity to other antibiotics should be assessed to search for more appropriate broad-spectrum antibiotics for treating nosocomial ventilator-associated pneumonia. Our results also

  18. Antarctic bacterial haemoglobin and its role in the protection against nitrogen reactive species.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Daniela; Giordano, Daniela; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; di Prisco, Guido; Ascenzi, Paolo; Poole, Robert K; Verde, Cinzia

    2013-09-01

    In a cold and oxygen-rich environment such as Antarctica, mechanisms for the defence against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are needed and represent important components in the evolutionary adaptations. In the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125, the presence of multiple genes encoding 2/2 haemoglobins and a flavohaemoglobin strongly suggests that these proteins fulfil important physiological roles, perhaps associated to the peculiar features of the Antarctic habitat. In this work, the putative role of Ph-2/2HbO, encoded by the PSHAa0030 gene, was investigated by in vivo and in vitro experiments in order to highlight its involvement in NO detoxification mechanisms. The PSHAa0030 gene was cloned and then over-expressed in a flavohaemoglobin-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, unable to metabolise NO, and the resulting strain was studied analysing its growth properties and oxygen uptake in the presence of NO. We here demonstrate that Ph-2/2HbO protects growth and cellular respiration of the heterologous host from the toxic effect of NO-donors. Unlike in Mycobacterium tuberculosis 2/2 HbN, the deletion of the N-terminal extension of Ph-2/2HbO does not seem to reduce the NO scavenging activity, showing that the N-terminal extension is not a requirement for efficient NO detoxification. Moreover, the ferric form of Ph-2/2HbO was shown to catalyse peroxynitrite isomerisation in vitro, confirming its potential role in the scavenging of reactive nitrogen species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  19. Interaction of Legionella pneumophila and Helicobacter pylori with bacterial species isolated from drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gião, Maria S; Azevedo, Nuno F; Wilks, Sandra A; Vieira, Maria J; Keevil, Charles W

    2011-03-18

    It is well established that Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen; by contrast, the mode of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unknown but water seems to play an important role. This work aims to study the influence of five microorganisms isolated from drinking water biofilms on the survival and integration of both of these pathogens into biofilms. Firstly, both pathogens were studied for auto- and co-aggregation with the species isolated from drinking water; subsequently the formation of mono and dual-species biofilms by L. pneumophila or H. pylori with the same microorganisms was investigated. Neither auto- nor co-aggregation was observed between the microorganisms tested. For biofilm studies, sessile cells were quantified in terms of total cells by SYTO 9 staining, viable L. pneumophila or H. pylori cells were quantified using 16 S rRNA-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes and cultivable cells by standard culture techniques. Acidovorax sp. and Sphingomonas sp. appeared to have an antagonistic effect on L. pneumophila cultivability but not on the viability (as assessed by rRNA content using the PNA probe), possibly leading to the formation of viable but noncultivable (VBNC) cells, whereas Mycobacterium chelonae increased the cultivability of this pathogen. The results obtained for H. pylori showed that M. chelonae and Sphingomonas sp. help this pathogen to maintain cultivability for at least 24 hours. It appears that M. chelonae may have an important role in the survival of both pathogens in drinking water. This work also suggests that the presence of some microorganisms can decrease the cultivability of L. pneumophila but not the viability which indicates that the presence of autochthonous microorganisms can lead to misleading results when the safety of water is assessed by cultivable methods alone.

  20. Bacterial metabolites from intra- and inter-species influencing thermotolerance: the case of Bacillus cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Govea, Mayra Alejandra; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2016-11-28

    Bacterial metabolites with communicative functions could provide protection against stress conditions to members of the same species. Yet, information remains limited about protection provided by metabolites in Bacillus cereus and inter-species. This study investigated the effect of extracellular compounds derived from heat shocked (HS) and non-HS cultures of B. cereus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the thermotolerance of non-HS vegetative and sporulating B. cereus. Cultures of B. cereus and G. stearothermophilus were subjected to HS (42 or 65 °C respectively for 30 min) or non-HS treatments. Cells and supernatants were separated, mixed in a combined array, and then exposed to 50 °C for 60 min and viable cells determined. For spores, D values (85 and 95 °C) were evaluated after 120 h. In most cases, supernatants from HS B. cereus cultures added to non-HS B. cereus cells caused their thermotolerance to increase (D 50 12.2-51.9) when compared to supernatants from non-HS cultures (D 50 7.4-21.7). While the addition of supernatants from HS and non-HS G. stearothermophilus cultures caused the thermotolerance of non-HS cells from B. cereus to decrease initially (D 50 3.7-7.1), a subsequent increase was detected in most cases (D 50 18-97.7). In most cases, supernatants from sporulating G. stearothermophilus added to sporulating cells of B. cereus caused the thermotolerance of B. cereus 4810 spores to decline, whereas that of B. cereus 14579 increased. This study clearly shows that metabolites in supernatants from either the same or different species (such as G. stearothermophilus) influence the thermotolerance of B. cereus.

  1. Identification of Circular RNAs in Kiwifruit and Their Species-Specific Response to Bacterial Canker Pathogen Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zupeng; Liu, Yifei; Li, Dawei; Li, Li; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Shuaibin; Huang, Hongwen

    2017-01-01

    Research studies have recently focused on circle RNAs (circRNAs) in relation to their regulatory functions in animals. However, the systematic identification of circRNAs in plants, especially non-model plants, is limited. In addition, raw report on the prediction of the potential role of circRNAs in plant response to pathogen invasion is currently available. We conducted the systematic identification of circRNAs from four materials originating from three species belonging to genus Actinidia under different situations using ribosomal RNA (rRNA) depleted RNA-Seq data. A total of 3,582 circRNAs were identified in Actinidia, of which 64.01, 21.44, and 14.55% were intergenic circRNAs, exonic circRNAs, and intronic circRNAs, respectively. Tissue-specific expression of circRNAs was observed in kiwifruit, and a species-specific response was detected when infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), which is the causative agent of kiwifruit bacterial canker disease. Furthermore, we found that both exonic and intronic circRNAs were significantly positively correlated to parent protein-coding genes, and intronic circRNAs are a class of highly remarkable regulators the parent genes comparing to that of exonic circRNAs. Expression and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) identified a set of circRNAs that were closely associated with plant defense response. The findings of the presents study suggest that circRNAs exhibit tissue- and species-specific expression, as well as play an important role in plant immune response. PMID:28396678

  2. Biodegradation of PAHs by two bacterial